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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00125
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: June 9, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00125
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text

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IJACKSONVILLE, FLA. ATLANTA, GA.


SAVANNAH, GA.


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President, W. C. POWELL; Vice-Presidents, who with the President, constitute the Directory and Board of Managers, W. F. COACHMAN, B. F. BUL-
LARD, H. L. COVINGTON, IL A. McEACHERN, JOHN R.YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, C. DOWN-
1 ING, J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES

.. COMPANY ..


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA,FLA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.


The Consolidated


is Purely


a Cooperative


Company.


Interests are identical


with those


of the Producers.


Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere


Invited.


Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.


YARDS AT JACKSONVILLE, SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA AND PENSACOLA

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.


Its


The


JaffXSaffSSS~SES~SCSCSaESmElffSE 'SCt~c~c'i~lEifjFjF~iSCjiSiSijCj~i;~;~i
















WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO THE NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING r I NKk IS.


RECORD.


A -I Oh i- O- rdTurine Op'*aci, od A-il 7, B-03 OIed Oran th. i S Can e-o a 'L by 1Gri92 Seu-l A-indan =.chaiora Sh oSct OwIOC GOwn ADia.



S. P. SHOIIER HAS BBEN CAUGHT IN HIS OWN TRAP


Mad Fictitious prices on the Savannah Market and When
Offered the Receipts at His Own Price he Refused to
take them, or to Trade at the Prices Quoted.


HIS WELL PLANNED SCHEME
to trap the Operators' Organization at the Closed Ports

HAS U! 1"ERLY FAILED,

Hid Extensively Advertised to take Receipts at the Closed Ports at Flat Savan-
nah, and Little Dreamed that he Would Be Offered Any,
Has Been Forced to Take Water.


For once S. P. Shotter has been caught
in his own trap. He had set it for the
turpentine operators who had organized
their own distributing company, and be-
fore he even realized that they were on to
his scheme the trap had been thrown on
the schemer.
A few months ago when the old con-
tract between Shotter and the naval stores
factors was yet in existence, by which the
receipts at the closed ports were received
by him at the Savannah quotations, and
when Shotter had led himself to believe
that his position as manipulator of the
Savannah market was impregnable, it is
fresh in the memory of every operator
that Shotter-S. P. Shotter-made con-
tracts in Europe for 1905-06 spirits for
less than fifty cents; and when asked,
almost on the eve of the new naval stores
year, but while yet of the opinion that no
distributing agency could be organized
without his sanction and fis graft, as to
the prices for May-August, 1905, it is
equally well remembered that he replied
that he wanted none at a price greater
than forty-six cehts.
When the first of April was approach-
ing and the time for making a new con-
tract with the factors arrived, it is well
remembered that Shotter, and his com-
bine, submitted an ultimatum that no self-
respecting individual or firm could agree
to. The factors were faced with a solemn
responsibility. They represented, not the
interests of a few men in a close corpora-
tion, but hundreds of hard-working, earn-
est, deserving operators throughout the
length and breadth of the yellow pine belt
in the Southeast. They realized that
Shotter was convinced that he had them
in his own grasp. They knew that Shotter
was laboring under the belief that his own
position was a bulwark of dictation, un-
yielding to assault and proof against at-
tack. And yet, as only honorable men
could do. they walked out of that confer-
ence without even dignifying the "ulti-
matum" by a discussion, determined to
make the issue, and to fight for a just and
equitable cause.
Shotter was stunned. He couldn't be-
lieve that operators and factors-men from
whom he bad grown rich and arrogunt-


would dare attempt to dethrone him as
an exalted ruler of the naval stores sit-
uation.
But the opertaors were moved to action
as they were never moved before. They
realized that had the factors yielded to
Shotter's ultimatum that the entire in-
dustry would have practically been sold
to one man for a mess of pottage. They
met in convention. Hundreds of them
gathered under one roof and for one pur-
pose. Addresses were- made that would
make the welkin ring. Young men, fired
by a zealous determination for right and
justice; and old men, impelled by ripe
experience and judgment and a high sense
of duty, declared on the floor that the
operators must yield forever or take the
one step necessary to place themselves in
entire control of their own industry, and
to put an end to the "one-man-power."
The result was the Naval Stores Export
Company was organized, owned exclusive-
ly by operators and factors, and the pro-
ducer was placed in the position of control
from the still to the very paint shop of
the consumer. It was then and not until
then that Shotter realized that operators
had enough sense to think for themselves
and enough nerve to act without his con-
sent or dictation.
And then Shotter began to scheme-no
new undertaking, but along a new line.
As usual, however, he based his schemes
on "fooling" the operator. His first scheme
was to immediately profess a great love
for the operator, to proffer him (as a bAit-
ed hook) every degree oT assistance, and
in doing so circulate his agents through-
out the turpentine sections sowing seeds
of discord, and arousing uneasiness and
skepticism. This failed. He then began
to flood the country with circular letters,
some of them professing to have been writ-
ten by operators, but in reality written by
the paid agents of S. P. Shotter; others
signed by the various firms in different
cities, controlled by him, but in reality
written by the same press agents and
mailed through the Savannah postoffice;
and yet another signed by Shotter him-
self in which lie made a pitiful, almost
humiliating, appeal for the good wishes
and the sympathy of the producing pub-


lie. These literary efforts failed. The
Shotter Savannah organ, the Naval Stores
Review, was in the meantime pawing and
sweating and irritating as though its very
life depended upon serving its master, and
possibly it did. It was all without avail.
The operators continued to rally to the
strength of their own export company, and
even in that sacred territory west of the
Alabama came the news! of support and
sympathy.
At that time fifty cents was the highest
that had been offered for summer spirits
and the operators' export company, even
before the business had fully been launch-
ed, in an effort to maintain high prices,
made fifty-two cents spirits for the sum-
mer a part of the platform of their per-
manent organization and boldly offered
this price, advising operators to sell only
half of their product, in order to get pro-
portionate benefits should a better price
prevail as a result of this high and stable
minimum. The offer was the best that
had ever been made in the history of the
industry. Shotter then jumped to a new
scheme. Through his various aliases,
which have been lined up before in these
columns, he immediately flooded the coun-
try with an offer of fifty-three cents. He
knew lie would get none and he could well
afford, for design, to make the offer. The
next day he made it fifty-four. With
equal design, but with equal reliance on
his inability to buy at any price he kept
advancing his offers and his Naval Stores
Review kept up the pawing and the sweat-
ing and the fretting. It all availed noth-
ing.
And then-after all else had failed-was
conceived a scheme as diabolical as was
ever evolved in the (ourse of business and
as free from business honor as the pallid
cheek of death is free from the bloom of
health, or the smile of Innocence and Vir-
tue is free from the scowl of the libertine.
What was it? Nothing less than a scheme
to financially wreck the operators' export
organization by forcing them to take the
hulk of the American receipts at the closed
ports on a manipulated Savannah market.
How? By advancing the market at Sa-
vannah to a fictitious point where con-
sumers would positively refuse to buy, to
thus stifle the demand, and to force the
operators' organization to take the prod-
ucts at a price so much higher than the
actual selling price that it would entail
a loss of from fifteen to twenty-five thous-
and dollars a day, enough to soon wipe
out the capital stock of the operators'
company. Bold, well planned, but un-
principled! And this is the trap that
Shotter set for the operators and caught
himself instead.
The contract with the Jacksonville fac-
tors expired on the last day of May. On
that day spirits was quoted in Savannah
at 74 cents. On June 1st the market was
posted in Savannah at 79 cents, a jump
of $2.50 a barrel. Rosins jumped propor-
tionately. Shotter knew that there was


no demand for it at that price, but he set
his teeth and made the market. He had
advertised through his Jacksonville house,
the Standard Naval Stores Co., and his
Tampa branches, that he would take any
receipts offered him at flat Savannah. He
did not dream, however, that he would be
offered anything. On the contrary, the
Jacksonville factors in a body, Mr. Powell
representing the Consolidated, Mr. Harris,
the West-Flynn-Harris Co., and Mr. Barnes
the Barnes-Jessup Co., walked into the
Standard Naval Stores Co. and on that
date, June 1st, offered them their receipts,
or any part of them.
"I must consult Mr. Shotter," said the
manager, "and will wire him and have
reply by seven o'clock p. m."
"All right," said the factors.
Seven o'clock came and the manager
reported that Mr. Shotter could not be
found. Further time was asked and final-
ly the reply came from Shotter, "NO."
He made his market for design, expect-
ing to force the great bulk of the re-
ceipts on the operators' own company at
prohibitive prices and when offered the
receipts at his own figures, positively re-
fused to take them. Forced to the wall
on his own prescription, he didn't have the
nerve to take his own medicine. But this
is not all. On June 2nd the price was
again posted at 79 cents and the Jackson-
ville factors diverted their entire receipts
to the Savannah market, giving Shotter
opportunity to take the products at his
own posted price. What was the result?
HE REFUSED TO TRADE. Another ev-
idence of his duplicity and of his well
laid scheme that failed to work. When
the Florida factors diverted to Savannah,
direct and through their Export Company,
no man was more surprised than Shotter
himself. He had not figured on that. It
knocked all of his calculations into the
air, and made him realize for once that
his job of "fooling" the operators was not
an enviable one, nor an easy one.
Two weeks ago the Record saw Shotter's
scheme. At that time readers of this
paper will remember that we urged a
stable market, free from manipulation for
private gain or personal spite. We ar-
gued for prices high enough to satisfy the
operator, who is the bulwark of the in-
dustry, and prices that would keep the
market firm and active. We stated then
that to permit Shotter to manipulate the
open market for personal prejudice to a
fictitious figure where the consumers would
cease the demand, as he had openly threat-
ened to do, would be a disaster to the
entire industry, felt by every interest.
This was Shotter's scheme, and the Na-
val Stores Export Co. and the factors in
diverting their Florida receipts for the
present to the open Savannah market,
where the law of supply and demand can
legitimately regulate itself, took infinitely
the best course for the operators and the

(Continued on Page 14.)











THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


FLORIDA COMMERCE.
The commerce of Florida the past year
has far surpassed anything in the history
of the State. The total of ocean-going
commerce reaches a value of nearly $90,-
000.000.
As no record is kept of the fruit and
vegetable shipments by the custom houses,
we include them with many other articles
in the following synopsis of overland ex-
ports; as this information had to be ob-
tained from many sources, there are natu-
rally some discrepancies. and a certain
amount of estimation exercised in arriv-
ing at some of the results, but where there
has been any doubt as to correctness, the
matter has been treated with the most
careful consideration.
There were exported by rail and river
transportation, 1.978.000 packages of veg-
etables, having a value of $2.249.000: or-
anges, 1.300.000 boxes at a value of $2.600,-
000 (crop of 1903). and 35,000 boxes of
other citrus fruits worth $1C5.000; cotton
of both kinds, 58.000 bales at a value of
$2.900.000; phosphate. 187.000 tons, value
$1.496.000; lumber 95.000,000 feet, value
$950.000; tobacco. Florida-grown. 1,950,000
pounds, value $773.500; fish and oysters,
not included in previous tables to the value
of $885,000; 2.450 carloads of melons worth
$250.000; 2.200.000 quarts of strawberries
worth $450,000; peaches and pears worth
$240.000. and over 8,000,000 pineapples
worth $970.0000; over 325.000 pounds of
wool worth $55.360. or a total of overland
exports of $13,983,860. The total exports
thu. foot up $70,603,716 for the year 1903
and the total commerce for the year wa1
$99,757.263.
With a volume of commerce like this
under present conditions, the future o
Florida seems bright, and so it is. with i
physical conformation unlike any othe
section of the Union, a soil of great fer
utility. a climate embracing almost ever.
latitude of the semitropics and that yield
products common to every clime; wit]
splendid water power waiting develop
ment; great forests of magnificent timber
mineral deposits of unknown value; anc
above all, harbors spacious enough to an
deep enough to float the merchant narin
of the world. No other State is so we
situated to command the commerce des
tined to flow through the Isthmian canm
when completed. Her harbors are mor
numerous, and afford deeper water tha
those of any State bordering on the Gul
of Mexico. and it must follow as a nece!
sity to the success of future trade, tha
manufacturing industries of every kin
shall establish themselves in close pro3
imity to the material to be worked u]
and at the point of embarkation. Con
petition in freight rates demands tht
the fewest transfers possible he mad
where competition in business is keen; s
that when the canal opens up the lonj
wished-for route to the Orient, and tl
rush for trade begins, then will the si
perior inducements for the establishment
of industrial activities offered by the de<
water harbors of Florida be fully recoi
nized and appreciated and the commer
of to-day will be but a pigmy by compare
son.
Agriculture is the very backbone
commerce, and combining these produce
with those of the forests and mines v
have the most important adjunct in tl
best development of a community
State; and when we consider the va
area of the rich and prosperous county
to the north of us which will pour i
teeming millions of wealth-bearing pro
nets through the splendid harbors that I
along the coast line of the State. fro
Pensacola to Fernandina. the mind hal
at tle possibilities of the future. No o
can over-estimate the value of these'*if
of Nature. for with the expansion of o
trade and the enormous increase in t
volume of our exports during the la
few years, there has also come a marvel
Mus ilmrease in the size and carrying t
|aeity of vessels employed in ocean coi
merce. This means greater water d
placement and deeper draught, and t
depth of water must be provided if thf
insatiable monsters are to yield fair i
turns on their cost. at the same til
carrying freight at rates which commel
can afford with profit. The harbors
Florida offer just these facilities, and 1
the requirements thus demanded; a
when the canal shall have been construe


ed, and the great streams of traffic flow-
ing down from the almost limitless inte-
rior seeking an outlet to new and innum ler-
able markets in other landla wlich that
great ;waterway is to create for Anmerican
enterprise. the harbors of Florida will be
the distributing Isints for this vast coim-
merce, whether from within or wiithout.-
The Blount Real Estate Co. Booklet. pub-
lished by the Industrial elicord Publishing
Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


THE CANNON COMPANY


BARRELS

ARE THE

STANDARD

OF THE

WORLD



Use no Other


Plants conveniently located.
Home Office, QUITMAN, GA.
U. S. A.


lom0od Ion W01s I SUi11l CO.
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


GUARANTY TRUST & SAVINGS COMPANY,
N. E. Corner Bay and Ocean Sts.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
OFFICERS.
James W. Spratt, W. M. Bostwick, Capital $100,000
President. Vice-President.
Harlow Barnett, Sec'y and Treas. 4 per cent interest paid on all deposits.

Pres., W. G. Toomer. Vice-pres. & Mgr., C. O. Patterson. Treas., H. C. Hare. Sec., Froman Smith

STANDARD ELECTRIC COMPANY

16 Forsyth St. Jacksonville, Fla.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS AND SUPPLY DEALERS.


Any mill having boards to dis-
pose of write me with particu-
lars. Will contract for board out-
put, kiln-dried, air-dried or green
fRANKLIN E. TOWN, 22 Hogan Street, Jacksonville., fla.


Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.

H. E. Pritchett. Pres. P. L. SUTHERLAND. Vice-Pres. A. D. COVINGTON, Sec'y.
J. P. COUNCIL, Treas and Gen'l Mgr.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO,,
General Offices: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Factory: WANNANISH, N. C.

Manufacturers of High Grade Tools
fo MNwl Step. Omratewa.


112 WEST FORSYTH ST.


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilizer, Oil and Ice Ma-
chinery, and Supplies and Repairs.
CAPACITY FOR 300 HANDS.
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting. Pulleys, Hangers, Leather ana
Rubber Belting and Hose, Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and
Hoisting Engines.

AUOUSTA, CA.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,


e from $1.50 to $5.00
t per gallon.

y Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
n Whiskies
e Controllers Blum's Moino-ram and Syl
s van Riye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
r nati and Pabst Milwaukee f3eers.
' Prices on aiplication.
i CHAS. BLUM & CO.
S517 and 519 West Bay Street,
JACKSONLLE, LA.
- JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
.P.


Cay, Shine L McCall
FIRE INSU :..


212 Dyal-Upchurch Bldg


:'isne 1955


HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY
A. J. HEDRIICK. Manager. Formerly of Hedrick 4. Raley
Sole agency for Riverside and adjoining property on easy terms. (The choice residence portion
of the city ) Improved and unimproved property in former burnt district. Springfield, LaVilla and
other suburbs. Choice business property and Investments.
MONEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTORS.


-Turpentixe
r ~

Cups

If you expect to use the HERTY cup
Snext season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices and all informa-
tion cheerfully furnished on

* Cups, Gutters
S~ and all Tools


/
d' *


use(
AS

:Ak


You War

You Want

SYou Wani

F You Meal
SCall on or Write to


-*)*6 **********4 i>


I in the Herty system of turpentining.
Address

Chattanooga Pottery
Company,
Jacksonville, Florida.


it a Turpentine Location?

Sa Sawmill Location?
40-
t any Kind of Florida Land?
n Business?

J. H. L VINGSTON & SONS,
Ocala, Florida *
-..
-... .A++.AIS&*********&**h*O~bb*O(***


BELL PHONE NO. 592


__ __~__ __ ~____


Y_1 _I_________


j.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


THE LATEST FRENCH SUMMER MILLINERY.
Don't Fail When in Jacksonville to Pay a Visit (Whether You Buy or Not)
to the Magnificent store of
NEXT NAEXT
STATE BANK HENRY ACOBS STATE BANK
5 EAST BAY STREET.
Where are now on view all the Latest Creations of the Highest and Latest
Paris Conceptions of Millinery Art showing what are the very latest and
most correct fashions in Head Wear. Buy nowhere else your new Hat until
you have paid a visit to this Grand Exhibition.
N. B.-There are also to be seen all the Newest French Walking Skirts,
French Suits and French Waists for summer wear.


v w vv w vvrrrrrvvqqqrr ~ uvqvqqlr~*qq i~~~ir3003


NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY
FOR LETTERS PATENT.
Notice is hereby given that the under-
signed will apply to the Governor of the
State of Florida at Tallahassee, Florida,
on the 20th day of June A. D. 1905, for
letters patent incorporating Record In-
vestment Company under the following
proposed charter:
P. L. SUTHERLAND,
D. H. McMILLAN,
J. A. HOLLOMON,
ARTHUR F. PERRY.
-----
PROPOSED CHARTER OF RECORD IN-
VESTMENT COMPANY.
ARTICLE I.
The name of this corporation shall be
Record Investment Company. Its prin-
cipal office shall be in the city of Jack-
sonville, Florida, and its business shall
be conducted in other places in the State
of Florida and elsewhere through
branches, agencies and otherwise, as may
be necessary and convenient.
ARTICLE IL
The general nature of the business to
be conducted by the said corporation
shall be: to buy, own, hold, lease, let up-
on lease, mortgage, sell and convey real
property and also to improve the same
by erecting thereon buildings of any kind
or character; to buy and sell real and
personal property of every kind and de-
scription, either for itself or for others,
on' commission or otherwise, and to mort-
gage and pledge same as security for
loans; to make loans and advances to
others and to take as security therefore,
either mortgages or pledges upon real or
personal property or personal security;
to carry on and transact a general build-
ing and contracting business for itself or
others; to guarantee, subscribe for, pur-
chase, hold, sell, assign, transfer, mort-
gage, pledge or otherwise dispose of,
shares of capital stock or bonds, securi-
ties or evidences of indebtedness issued
or created by any other corporation, and
while the owner or holder of such stocks,
bonds or obligations, to exercise all the
rights, powers and privileges of owner-
ship; to patent, register and protect by
trade marks or otherwise, any means,
methods, appliances, formulae, secret pro-
cesses, machines, symbols or designa-
tions; to obtain, purchase, lease or other-
wise acquire any patent, patent rights,
formulae, secret processes, licenses or
privileges, trade marks or designations
and to operate under, sell, assign, pledge
or grant licenses in respect of, or other-
wise to turn the same to account; to ac-
quire, hold, use, mortgage, lease and
convey all such property, real or personal,
in any part of the world,, as may be nec-
essary or convenient in connection with
the said businesses; to enter into, carry
out or otherwise turn to account, con-
tracts of every kind; to have and main-
tain branches, agencies and offices, with-
in and without the State of Florida; to
lo any or all things set forth in this
charter as objects, purposes, powers,
businesses or otherwise, to the same ex-
tent and as fully as natural persons
might do, and in any part of the world;
and in general to carry on such opera-
tions and enterprises and to do all such
things in connection therewith as may
be permitted by the laws of Florida and
be neetsary and convenient in the coe.
dueItg oe the company's businesses.


ARTICLE III.
The amount of the capital stock au-
thorized shall be ten thousand dollars
($10,000.00). divided into one hundred
shares of the par value of one hundred
dollars ($100.00) each. The capital stock
nay be payable either wholly or in part in
cash, or may be issued or used either
wholly or in part, for the purchase of or
payment for property, labor or services at
a just valuation thereof, to be fixed by the
Board of Directors at a meeting to be
called for that purpose.
ARTICLE IV.
The term for which this corporation
is to exist shall be ninety-nine years.
ARTICLE V.
The businesses of said corporation
shall be managed and conducted by a
President, Vice President, Secretary,
Treasurer and a Board of Directors con-
sisting ot not less than three nor more
than thirteen members, the number to be
fixed by the by-laws of the company.
The offices of Secretary and Treasurer
may be held by the same person. The
annual meeting for the election of direc-
tors by the stockholders of the company
shall be held on the first Tuesday in June
in each year. The date of the annual
meeting may be changed by the by-laws.
Until the officers elected at the first elec-
tion shall be qualified the businesses of
the corporation shall be conducted by the
following named officers: D. H. McMil-
lan, President; P. L. Sutherland, Vice
President; J. A. Hollomon, Secretary;
Arthur F. Perry. Treasurer; and D. H.
McMillan, P. L. Sutherland, J. A. Hollo-
mon and A. F. Perry as Directors.
ARTICLE VI.
The highest amount of indebtedness or
liability to which the corporation may at
any time subject itself shall be two hun-
dred and fifty thousand dollars ($250,-
00000).
ARTICLE VII.
The names and residences of the sub-
scribing incorporators of the said cor-
poration, together with the number of
shares of its capital stock subscribed by
each are as follows:
D. II. MeMillan, residing in the City of
Jacksonville, Florida, 25 shares.
P. L. Sutherland, residing in the City
of Jacksonville, Florida, 25 shares.
J. A. Hollomon, residing in the City of
Jacksonville, Florida, 25 shares.
Arthur F. Perry, residing in the City
of Jacksonville, Florida, 25 shares.
P. L. SUTHERLAND,
D. H. McMILLAN,
J. A. HOLLOMON,
ARTHUR F. PERRY.

State of Florida,
County of Duval.
Before me, a Notary Public in and for
the State of Florida at large, personally
appeared D. H. McMillan, P. L. Suther-
land, J. A. Hollomon and Arthur F. Per-
ry, each to me well known and known
to me to be the individuals described in
and who executed the foregoing proposed
charter and severally acknowledged that
they executed the same for the purposes
there in expressed.
Witness my hand and official seal at
the City of Jacksonville, Florida, this
16th day of May, A. D., 1905.
(Notary's Seal) C. SETON FLEMING,
Notary Public State of Florida at Large.
My commission tpires Dec. 18th, A. D.,
1907.


11 &**1##rrH,_*AAAAA#_&#,_#,,td"


uuuuuullluuulIIURI~uU~uLIImm.~


J****** *** i ii n mn----------- dm


J. A. Craig (% Bro.

0 239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK.

SLeaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth- i
S ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

SAgents for Dunlap and Stetson Hate; largest stock in the City. 3




The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE & DETAIL


HARDWARE
Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints, Oils and Glass,
Stoves, Tinware, Country-Holloware.


Jacksonville. Fla.


Jpmes Stewart. B. F. Hobgood.



STEWART & COMPANY



haveforsale neof hebesttimberand turpentine propositions in the
tate,onitin of 50.000 acres rg imber in Washington County, Flor-
dathatwill utabout4,200feet ofPine nd 1,800 feet of Cypress to the acre
nd also about 60 boxes. Water transportation, and RAILROAD NOW
BUILDING. DESIRABLE TERMS. Write for particulars.




John R. Young. J.W. Motte, C.B. Parker, James McNatt, W.W. Wilder. ,
President. Vice-Pres Vice-eses. VicePres Sec.& Tureas.




John R. Young Co.,
a4
e o
C Commission





SNaval Stores Factors. Wholesale Grocers.
.4 .*iii **tui4
* SavJh nnah ( Brunswick. Ga .
0 .avam nah M BrunswicIL Ga.


t
t
t
t
!


-


111~11+~111+~11~111~l~l


*eeeggUU g gggl I II* IS*ll lgll |gl)*i) .g 3ggggggaiggg.gi|OO


THE DIAMOND. 1
Wholesale and etaill

Wines. Liquors and Cigars,
Sole Agents for the State for Li"kan's Beer. also "Wilheolm Zuelle Min-
era Water. We guarantee all Brandsput up by usfull measure ua follows:
Creme de la Creme, bottle .... $2.00 Diamond Brand, bottle ........ 1.00 a
[ Highly reconun.edbe M-dcil Pr.can. ] Heart Brand, bottle .......... ..75
Q. C. C. Brand, bottle ........ 1.50 Spade Brand, bottle ........... .00
Club Brand, bottle ........... 1.25 Premium Brand, bottle ........ .5
.50 4

MYERSON CO.,
105 & 107 West Bay St. Phone 1712.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. 0


10 WEST DAY STILEIET







6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


HOW A MAN IN THE WOODS FEELS
ABOUT IT.
-In the woods, June 7.
Editor Industrial Record:
Somebody has mailed me a copy of last
week's Naval Stores Review. The fact
.is I have received this sheet regularly
lately, although I never subscribed for it.
I suppose S. P. Shotter is sending it. One
of my neighbor operators gets it and he
says he never subscribed for it. At any
rate I have had many a laugh at some of
the absurd things that Shotter says-I
say that Shotter "says," because I un-
derstand that he is the chief "It" in the
Review office, Gamble being merely his
hired tool and henchman. In last week's
issue it appears that Shotter was taken
by surprise. The paper that came to me
had an extra sheet in it, one side of which
was blank. It was evidently printed and
inserted after the regular paper had "gone
to press"; I believe that is what you call
it when the paper is already edited and
in the hands of the printer. This sheet
showed a nervousness equal to the "St.
Vitas dance." The headline was something
like this, "Producers' Interests in Great
Danger." and so on and so on along the
same line. I clipped the following from
the article:
"The great peril to the producer and
his interests is apparent. Instead of
Coachman's Company handling the Jack-
sonville receipts at that place or at Fer-
nandina considerable of them will be forced
daily on the Savannah market, augment-
ing the receipts here and preparing the way
for almost inevitable declines in prices.
"There is undoubtedly grave danger of
the Savannah market, the market which
establishes the prices daily for all the
ports, which has been in such magnificent
shape up to this time, breaking under an
enormous pressure of receipts heretofore
going to Jacksonville."
That is what I consider rot. The ref-
erence to "Coachman's Company," I sup-
pose refers to the Naval Stores Export
Co., which is an operators' company and
in which I have stock and I think ninety
per cent of all of the operators have.
As to sending the receipts to Savannah,
which is an open market, any man with
three grains of sense ought to know that
this could not affect a legitimate market in
any way. If the market is controlled by
supply and demand, as it must be, the
supplies at the closed ports figure just as
much in making the market as the sup-
plies at the open market. If the receipts
are augmented at Savannah by diverting
shipments, they must necessarily be de-
creased in proportion at the other ports,
and there would not be a particle of differ-
ence in the visible supplies. Any fool


should know this, and it was the weakest
kind of an argument for Shotter to make.
The fact is, Shotter was taken by such
surprise he didn't know what else to say,
probably. The further fact is, as I see it
in the light of reason, Shotter made a
fictitious price on the Savannah market,
at which there was no demand in the at-
tempt to make our export company lose
thousands of dollars every day by taking
the stuff at the closed ports and when
they caught on to his trick, it just took
his breath. Isn't that about the way you
figure it, Mr. Editor? I ship to Jackson-
ville because the freight rates are to my
advantage. I find that in diverting my
stuff to Savannah the factors have met
the extra freight. It is the same to me.
Now what I want is stable prices. I don't
want any of Mr. Shotter's foolishness
about this thing, or Mr. Gamble's either
as for that matter. If we are going to
keep good times up we must see that we
have a firm, active market, with spirited
demand and lively buying. I am not
afraid of the result. We placed a mini-
mum in our export company of fifty-two
cents after Shotter had already made con-
tracts at less than fifty and I know that
we operators are able to maintain good
prices in spite of any efforts of Mr. Shot-
ter to stop the consuming demands.
Yours truly,
OPERATOR.

JOS. ROSENHEIM & SONS.
Attention is called to the advertisement
in another column of Jos. Rosenheim &
Sons, manufacturers and jobbers of shoes,
Savannah, Georgia. This is one of the
largest and best known firms in the coun-
try and have established a large trade,
based upon good goods, satisfactory treat-
ment to customers and thorough reliabil-
ity. They appeal to the commissary trade
in the Southeast and the Record takes
great pleasure in commending this firm to
its readers.
..Printing of all kinds for the naval stores
industry-Letterheads, Envelopes, Com-
missary Checks, etc. Record Publishing
Company.

Sam'l P. Holmes&Co.
Stocks, Bnds, Cotton,
Gralh and Provisions.

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD Of TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Bell Phone 853 Baldwia Block


...esmIe..uu)uIu)us uu)uuu~uumu)uu~u,, t~uutmuuessuuuusa


JOS. ROSENHEIM & SONS
MANMVACTURERS AMD JOBBERS OF


SHOES


SAVANNAH. GEORGIA
"Best Shoes Made for Commissary Trade."


1O O0gO(****l eO uI10 O hh iOO S ei to I Iule1t sol itS



NUBIAN TA In Liquid Form
This well known remedy is now put up in liquid, a well as pow-
dered form. In the liquid it is READY FOR USE.
It is a perfect medicine, and extremely palatable. Even children
like it. It costs only So cents a bottle.
It will cure Constipation, Biliousness, Indigestion, Dyspepsia and
all diseases resulting from a torpid liver or disordered kdneys.
WRITE US FOR PRICES.

Spencer Medicine Company,
Chattameega, Teamessee.


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
CAPITAL $300,000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS S44,760.91
We issue Time Certficates of Deposit, which draw Iaterest at th ae rate tree pr ct er
amnm. if held ninety days or longer. Take advutuge ef tals M let year arlfgs ears
semetWag tr yes. Particular attention paid to Out-of-Town acooants, seeding depos a
****--tf~f^f-- -t~ft-< W f


J. H. VEST,
President.


a IL FLYNN.
JOM E HARR5
w. J. mUEY.
ViseoPmeia*


FLL R3CW6)0
see mid Tim.
D. FL V11 Jfl
Ast Sey saed Tim.


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.

GENERAL O C, CGERMANIA BLDG. Savannah. Ga.
WEST BLDG. Jacslonvlle, Fla.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORES RECEIVED AT SAVANNAH, GA, JACKSON-
VILLE, FLA, AND FElRANDINA, FLA

Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay Grain and Heavy
Harnbes.

SOLE AGENTS for the Celebrated Union Turpentine Aes,
and ilson & Child Philadelphia Waoos.
MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES


SAVANNAH, GA.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


TAMPA, FLA.


Frank MP. Turpin,
Proprietor.


JACKSONVILE, FLA.
Open the Year Round. Opposite Government Building. Most Centrally and Conven-
iently Located. Thoroughly Repaired and Renovated. Newly Furnished and Equpped.
Library Connected at Popular Prices.

SNONE BETTER MADE

STA IS I Prompt Shipments.
OTTER CREEK LUMBER CO., Jacksonville, Fla
DRINK A BOTTLE OF DELICIOUS AND REFRESHING









Proved by the highest medical experts to be the most healthful drink in exiatec.
Sold by the JACKSONVILLE COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO., 6a4 West Bay Stree
B. S. HALL, Pres. T. C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KImet, See. and Treas.

MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND
TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.
ltlti t l l tiItlttl lt tlel tl lll tlill tt I I illlI ..1


J. P. WnljraUs. President.
T. A. JlarInos bZd VicPreldent.
H. L. KAvToi. Secretary.


J. A. G. CAmsom. 1st Vice-Presdent
J. F. Dusawnuav,3d Vie-Pretideat
D. G. White, Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

Hill STORE I COmU0 FICTIoS i IWREilE MERS.
Main Orrfce XVYJINNI.H, OGOROGIX.
Ranch Ofrfic.: 3 PENSACOLA, PLX. Branh Grocery House,
JNaval Sors Pro rs ar LA. t COLU U1Jrre Wh s.
Naval Stores Prodocers are invited to Correspoad With Us.


THE DUVAL


"996000099 11 O-3FF0-'-W10iWWSn


IIIIIIIILIIIIIIII 1.1III(I~Lt~tl~tltl I. 11111IIII~IIIIIII.


rr---- ----------


r.~rr









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.






























LL. ?!
" .-t ,od Cloahier of


-.1ME- Wy. e
ATLANTA.







a a pooLY-TR
1 O~91' 0$ -QA.ONGA










8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



LUDDEN & BA TESw .i:,^

s":,. The South's Largest and Most Reliable Music House. d',J


Lumber Shipments From Jacksonville,
Lumber shipments fromthe port of Jack- Forty-four vessels entered from
sonville, according to the customhouse rec- wise ports, as follows: Steam. 21;
ords, show that Mlay was the banner month nage. 49,189; men employed, 1,112.
for coastwise business, but there was a 20; tonnage, 8,61; men employed
falling off in the shipments to foreign Barges, 3; tonnage, 2.505; men emp
ports. 15. Total, 44 vessels. 60,055 tons an
Since the first of May, according to the playing 1,275 men.
records, the shipments of lumber have Forty-three vessels cleared~ for
been as follows: wise ports, of which 21 were steame
Pine, coastwise, feet .......... 15,405,165 an aggregate of 49,395 tons, and empl
Cypress, coastwise, feet ........ 2,612,143 1,121 men; twenty were sailing vi
Crossties, coastwise, feet ....... 1,548,000 having an aggregate of 8,306 tons
Pine, foreign, feet ............ 563,784 employing 149 men, and two were I
having an aggregate tonnage of 1,40
Total for month .........20,129,092 employing 10 men. Total, 43 vessel
A Steady Increase. 671 tons and 1,282 men.
The total amount of lumber shipped The total of the coastwise business
during the month of April, 1905, was 18,- carried by 87 vessels, having an agg
115,881. of which 1,394,525 feet was shipped of 119,160 tons and employing 2,557
to foreign ports and 16,721.356 feet were Four vessels entered from foreign
shipped coastwise. The total coastwise All were sailing craft, and the aggi
shipments during the month of May tonnage was 895, and 24 men wer
amounted to 19,565,308 feet. played. Four vessels cleared for f
During the month of May, last year, ports, all sailing craft. The agg
total shipments of lumber amounted to tonnage was 709, and they employ
17.244,810 feet, of which 15,780,699 feet men.
were shipped to coastwise ports and 1,-
264,111 feet were shipped to foreign ports. H ROBINSON.Pres. H. AILLARD. C
The records for the past month show
that theie has been a decided increase in W.B. OWN. Vic-Pres
the shipments of cypress lumber from this C0m m ercial BaI
port. The amount of cypress shipped dur-
ing May was 2,612.143 feet. During ;the State DeposltiT.
month of April, the shipments amounted
to 912,840 feet. and during May, 1904, the BAwACHs: Ocala, FI.. Lake City.
shipments of cypress amounted th 447,092 Jacko nville, - - fer
feet.
Naval Stores Shipments.
Another Florida product that shows a
gain is that of naval stores. The ship-h i f
ments during the past month amounted
to 29.380 barrels to coastwise ports. Dur-Joseph Zapf
ing the month of April, 1905, the ship-
ments amounted to 20,200 barrels, and WMeile DWlr is iI Bilir f
during May. 1904, the shipments of naval
stores only amounted to 14,815 barrels.
According to the customhouse records A l -
the principal shipments from the port of
Jacksonville during the month of May to
coastwise ports were as follows: S. L s a r
Pine lumber. 15,405,165 feet; pine cross- Louis L
ties, 38.700, equal to 1,548,000 feet of lum-
ber; cypress lumber, 2,612,143 feet; shin-
gles, 13,200 bundles and 285,700 in bulk;l Wholes
naval stores. 29.380 barrels; cotton, 3,500
bales; cottonseed oil, 2.250 barrels; to- LIQUORS, WINE
bacco. 250 bales; cigars, 60 cases; kaolin,
11,550 sacks; fruit and vegetables, 56,750;eral
miscellaneous products, 54,782 packages. Min l erS
The shipments to foreign ports were as
follows: Pine luilwr, 563,784 feet; shin- Write for Prices
gles, 23,000 in bulk; laths, 8,000 in bulk;
miscellaneous supplies, 350 packages. The
total value of the exports to foreign ports JACKSONVILLE, f LORII
was $12,115.10.
Freights Received.
The freights received from coastwise
ports during the month, included the fol-
lowing items: Flour, 1,86) barrels; sugar,
2,700 barrels; bacon, 2X255 barrels; oil, F lo rid a
3,800 barels; kerosene oil. 7.50 barrels;
boots and shoes. 16.500 cases; coal, 3,581 1-2
tons; cement, 5,000 barrels and 12,900
sacks: plaster. 500 tons; fertilizer. 2,500E lric
sacks and 540 tons in bulk; steel rails I0
pieces: iron pipe. 850 bundles; iron bars, Contr E* l l E*!i
148 pieces; paper, 400 rolls: oats, 3.600 Cntractnl[ Electrical Elii
sacks: corn. 10,850 sacks; potatoes, 750 Sell ad C e E ri
barrels; fence wire, 2.170 reels; sewing Sell and Install Complete Electric
machines. 650 crates; miscellaneous, 87.888 and Power Plants, Telephone
packages. changes. Wholesale Electrir
The foreign imports during the month Supplies.
of May consisted of 53 bales of tobacco, Jackonwile, Fa.
1 book. 2 empty gasolene drums and one
featherbed. The total value of foreign I MO OMI
imports was $2.587.75.
Vessels and Tonnage.
During the month of May, 87 vessels en Commission merchant
tered or cleared coastwise, and 9 vessels
entered or cleared foreign, making a total Neaval Stores & C
of 96 vessels that crossed the St. Jolns Liberal adance made against
bar and entered and cleared at the cus- meats. Cosipg etsa Ulicite
tomhouse. There were also several (Gov-
ernment vessels in port during the month, 78-80 Wal St, Rooms 813-14-
but these do not have to enter and clear. NEW YORK CITY.


coast-
ton-
Sail,
S148
loyed,
d em-
coast-
*rs, of
oying
essels.
Sand
barges
4, and
s, 58,-
s was
regate
men.
ports.
regate
e em-
oreign
regate
ed 28


ashier

Ik,

Fla
ida



CO,



ch

leer



DA.




DA


HOTEL BARTHOLDI


*reway T 234 Stret
New Yk City,


Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout. Near
all Big Stores and Places of Amusement. Cars Pass the Door for all W
Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings. Large Sample Rooms for *
Commercial Travelers. Here you find no grand and magnificent deco-
rations; no luxurious grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no *
elaborate bill of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
No employees in any wa) inattentive.
speak to you.
0 But just a cozy, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the hearts of
those who are looking for solid comfort Good, plain American cook-
ing, and affable and courteous treatment
MILTON IROBLEE. Proprietor.


CYPRESS TANKS


Are Best by Every Test
C-prem withntam the effects a bea lW mature
better than any other wod, shrine and swells Ie
than other oods, is mperous to acid hold paint
well and lasts for ages without decaying. Located
as we are, right in the great c.im forat, wesr
able to secure the beat selection of the wood ad t
very low prices. We have been blding tanks for
more than a quarter of a century and boldly anert
that no tans are better built r will Iat looi.
Send for catalog and prices.
G. M. DAVIS IS SON


"'---LA A, L CFLORIDA


j St. George Hotel

EUROPEAN PLAN.
Rooms: 75c, $1.00 and $1.50 psn
PHONE 3n7.

L MRS. GEO. W. BROCK,
PROPRIETRESS.


she Metropolis


Is the Paper you want. It is


X


0.

neers
Light
ax-





I,
i.
cotton
i5.-
5is.


$5.00 a Year $2.50 Six Months


Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.


CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
i*t*tetomes islt

published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida..


~6dddddd6~QCs6~ddddd~t~dddb~d ~db~urrC)


5


r








TEH WKKLT jLNDu3rAAL RECORD. 9


NOTICE OF INCORPORATION.
Notice is here given that the under-
signed incorporators will apply to tile Hn.
i-. B. Broward, Governor of the State of
Florida, on June 12. A. D. 1905, for Letters
Patent, incorporati-g the American Oak
Leather Tanning company and we hereby
adopt the following Articles of Incorpora-
tion:

PROPOSED CHARTER OF THE AMERI-
CAN OAK LEATHER TANNING
COMPANY.
The undersigned incorporators hereby
associate themselves together for the pur-
pose of forming a corporation under the
laws of the State of Florida, and adopt
the following articles of incorporation:
I.
The narp of tl's corporation shall lhe
THE AM, XCAN OAK LEATHER TAN-
NING COMPANY. and its business shall
be conducted in tle State of Florida, and
in other States of the United States of
America, and in foreign countries, wher-
ever necessary or convenient. The princi-
pal office of the corporation shall be lo-
cated in the city of Jacksonville, Florida.
II.
The general nature of the business to be
transacted by said corporation shall be to
manufacture and buy and sell, both at
wholesale and retail, the hides and skins
of all animals, and to tan and manufacture
the same by any process, and sell and
market the same. loth at wholesale and
retail; and to. own, construct and operate
tanneries, factories, plants, buildings and
machinery, necessary for the same: to
buy, sell and mortgage real estate; and to
manufacture and sell the hair obtained'
from the hides and skins, and all other
by-products thereof; and to manufacture
by any process, buy and sell, tannic acid.
chemicals, oils and greases, used in and
about the manufacture of leather; and
to manufacture and sell boots and shoes.
gloves and harness, and all articles manu-
factured or made from leather; to own.
buy and sell live stock, rolling stock, and
to own and operate railways, vessels, light-
ers, horses and wagons or other means of
transportation, to transport the property
or products owned or controlled by this
corporation, but not for the purposes of
doing the business of a common carrier;
to own, buy and sell and trade in, both
at wholesale and retail, dry goods, grocer-
ies, hardware, produce, lumber and naval
stores, or other kinds of merchandise; to
mortgage, lease or convey the property of
the corporation, and to borrow money and
secure the same by notes, bonds, mort-
gages or deeds: and to purchase, receive,
hold for collateral and make advances upon
the stock, bonds, notes or other obliga-
tions of other corporations, including
corporations pursuing the same kind or
kinds of business transacted by this com-
pany; and generally to have, exercise and
enjoy, all the rights, powers and privileges
incident to corporations for profit, char-
tered, organized or existing under and by
virtue of the laws of the State of Florida.
III.
The amount of the capital stock of sait
corporation shall be Thirty Thousand Dol-
lars, to be divided into three hundred
shares of the par value of One Hundred
Dollars each. All or any part of said stock
may be payable in money, property, labor
or services, at the discretion of the Board
of Directors. The corporation shall have
a lien upon all shares of stock of any
stockholder who may become indebted to
the corporation, either for the amount un-
paid on his stock subscription, or any
other indebtedness whatsoever with the
right to sell and dispose of such stock,
br such portion thereof as may be neces-
sary to pay such indebtedness, at either
public or private sale, and upon such no-
tice or terms as the Board of Directors
may determine, and with the future right
to transfer such stock until full payment
of such indebtedness.
IV.
The term for which this corporation
shall exist, shall be ninety-nine years.
V.
The business of the corporation shall be
conducted by the following officers: A
president, a vice president, a general man-
ager, a secretary and a treasurer, and a


hoard of not less than three, nor more
than thirteen directors. The offices of
secretary :and treasurer may be held by the
'anue pl'rson. The directors shall be an-
nually elected by the stockholders at their
regular meeting, and the other officers
named above shall be elected by the Di-
rectors. The Board of Directors, by a res-
olution passed by a majority of the whole
Board. may designate not less than three
nor more than seven Directors to consti-
tute an executive committee, which com-
mnittee, to the extent and in the manner
provided by said resolution, or by the by-
laws. shall have and may exercise the
powers of the Board of Directors, in tlhe
management of the business and affair'
of this corporation. The duties and pow-
ers of the officers of this company shall
he prescribed by the by-laws of this com-
pany or by resolution of the Board of Di-
rectors. either or both, and the by-laws
,may he adopted by resolution of a major-
it v of the Directors at any regular or spe-
eial meeting, and amended in the same
manner. The annual meeting of the stock-
holders shall be held on the first Monday
in June in each year, but the date may be
changed by the Directors. The first an-
nual meeting shall be held in the city of
Jacksonville. Florida, on Monday. June
12th. 1905, at 11 o'clock a. m. at the Board
of Trade building, for the purpose of ac-
cepting th;s charter, electing officers, and
completing the organization of this cor-
poration.
VI.
Until the officers elected at the first an-
nual meeting are qualified, the business
of this corporation shall be conducted by
the following named officers. President,
C. E. Garner; Vice President, W. F. Coach-
man: General Manager, C. H. Mann: Sec-
retary and Treasurer, A. F. Perry. Direc-
tors: W. F. Coachman, C. H. Mann, C. E.
Garner, A. F. Perry, Edwin Brobston.
Raymond Cay. D. T. Gerow, D. H. MeMil-
Inn, I. A. AMcEachern, L. X. Wilkie, J. C.
Little, C. B. Rogers and W. E. Brown.
VII.
The highest amount of indebtedness to
which this corporation shall at any time
hilujeet itself shall he twice the amount of
tlie authorized capital stock.
VIII.
The names and residences of the sub-
scribers .and the amount of capital stock
subscribed by each, are as follows:
1. H. A. McEachern, Jacksonville, Fla.,
25 shares.
2. Chas. II. Mann, Jacksonville, Fla., 25
shares.
3. C. E. Garner, Jacksonville, Fla., 25
shares.
4. A. F. Perry, Jacksonville, Fla., 10
shares.
5. Edwin Brobston, Jacksonville, Fla., 5
shares.
6. laymond Cay, Jacksonville, Fla., 10
shares.
7. D. T. Gerow, Jacksonville, Fla., 10
shares.
8. 1). H. MeMillan, Jacksonville, Fla.,
25 shares.
9. W. F. Coachman, Jacksonville, Fla.,
25 shares.
10. L. N. Wilkie, Jacksonville, Fla., 25
shares.
II. J. C. Little, Jacksonville, Fla., 10
shares.
12. C. B. Rogers, Jacksonville, Fla., 10
shares.
13. W. E. Brown, Jacksonville, Fla., 21
shares.

State of Florida,
County of )hlval, ss.
I lherehlv certify. That on this 4th day of
May. 19005, in the sand State and county,
personally came before me, C. E. Garner,
\V. F. Coachman and A. F. Perry, to me
well known, and acknowledged before me
that they subscribed the foregoing articles
of ;ncoropration of the American Oak
Leatlhr Tanning companyy as incorpora-
tors of said proposed corporation, in good
faith for the purposes therein expressed.
In wit ness whereof, I have hereunto set
my hand and allied my official seal, the
dhay and year last above written.
RUSSEL E. COLCORD. (Seal),
Notary Public State of Florida at Large.
My commission expires February 15,
1909.


| VEHICLE & HARNESS CO.
Cor. Forsyth and Cedar Sts, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Dealers Inr

SCarriages and Wagons

Carriage and Wages Material, Whels, Spkes, Rims, Aile, Etc.

Turpentine and MIll Harness, Wagons. Buggies, Saddlery, Dump Carts, Delivery
* Waons, Surries and everything kept In a first-class establishment.
SLargest Dealers in Florida.




Bottled from famous Suwannee
SuwanneeSp1rlng Spring water. Cures Rheumatism,
Indigestion and Kidney Trouble.
i The most refreshing, natural, spark-
ling Ginger Ale known. Bottled and
sin g r old by the Live Oak Bottling Works,
Live Oak, Fla. For sale by Consoli-
A dated Grocery Company, Jackson-
ville, Johnson, King & Co., of Jack-
A l* sonville, and M. Ferst's Sons & Co.,
Savannah, Ga.



Slttl I I tI It4 l I I o it ll IM l Ial 4I u111 Iull Il tts1i I l
4 W. W. CARNES, Pres. W. C. THOMAS, Manager. C. T. DUDLEY, Sec. & Treas.


STampa Hardware Co.


+ Wholesale

" Hardware

+ Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies.
*4
: LARGE STOCK COUNCIL AND HOLMES HACKS AND PULLERS ON HAND.
* 4,
* TAMPA. FLORIDA.

1,81II4 1441 I II It I 4tt4IIIIt I II I llttIS ttl IIIItI#1 IIIg





DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ask a call. We can show you, at correct and money
saving prices, many papers of loose pare white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is our desire to continue being the largest
Diamond dealers In Jacksonville, and oar specialty Is fine round-
cat gems and high-grade Waltham and Elgin Watches.

IHESS & S LAERD Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry,
HESS LACE 11-13 Maim St., 339W. Iay, Jacksmille, Fla.



THE OLDEST WHISKEY HOUSE IN
GEORGIA. (Entablished In 1881.)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pure Fine Old
Rye. By the gallon $3.00; four full quarts
$3.50, express prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
$2.75; four full quarts $3.00. express prepaid.
ANVIL RYE-Pure Substantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon $2.50; four full
quarts $2.90, express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gallon $2.25;
four full quarts $2.65, express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
gallon $3.00; four full quarts $3.25, express
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon $2.50; four full
quarts $2.90, express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the market
and will save you from 25 to 50 per cent on your purchases. Send for price list and
catalogue. Mailed free upon application.

The Altmayer L Flatau Liquor Compaeny,
MACON. GA. AND BIRMINGHAM. ALA.







THE WEEKLY ImuuTrmIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
JAMES A. HOLLOMON.
Edaor and Manager.
Pasblahed Every Friday.
Swammrp-row t (Domestic).. .3.00 Per Annum
mlr ono (Fyoreign) ....S 3.50 .
"The Pine and Its Products."
All communications should be addressed
The Industriil R.ecord Company.
Jacksonville. Fla.
Branch Edtorial and Busness Offloe at
Atlanta Ga. 1 Savannah. Ga.
Entered at the Postoffice at Jacksonville,
Fla., as second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive Committee
of the Turpentine Operators' Association,
September 12, 1902, as its exclusive offi-
cial organ. Adopted in annual conven-
tion September 11 as the organ also of
the general association.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the offi-
cial organ of the Interstate Cane Grow-
ers' Association. Adopted September
11, 1903, as the only official organ of the
T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by spe-
cial resolution adopted by the Georgia
Sawmill Association.
COPY FOR ADVERTISING.
Advertising copy (changes or new ad-
vertisements) should reach us Tuesday
morning to insure insertion in the issue
of the same week.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the main offi-
ces of the Industrial Record Company
are located at the intersection of Bay
and Newnan streets, Jacksonville, Fla.,
in the very heart of the great turpentine
and yellow pine industries.
The Atlanta, Ga., office is located in the
Equitable Building, No. 723. Atlanta is
the center of the great manufacturing
trade of the entire South.
The Savannah, Ga., office is in the
Board of Trade Building. Savannah is
the leading open naval stores market in
the world.

NOTICE TO PATRONS.
All payments for advertising in the In-
dustrial Record and subscriptions thereto
must be made direct to the home office in
Jacksonville. Agents are not allowed to
make collections under any circumstances.
Bills for advertising and subscriptonsare
set out from the home office, when due,
and all remittances must be made direct
to this company.
Industrial Record Publishing Co.

SOME "DONTS" FOR SHOTTER.
Don't forget, Mr. Shotter, that the ope-
rators are men of intelligence and have
sense enough to see into your schemes.

Don't make any more threats, Mr. Shot-
ter, that you will spend a quarter of a
million dollars to wreck the operators'
export movement and then expect them to
fall a victim to your plots.

Don't attempt to run rough shod over
the producers' interests by blinding their
eyes with flattery.

Don't advertise to uo something that you
know you will not do and when put to
the test positively refuse to do. Better
not attempt to deceive men who are even
better generals than you are.

Don't run poor Gamble crazy in his ef-
forts to serve you, his master. Give him
some freedom of thought.

Don't fool with a kicking gun, Mr. Shot-
ter. The stock is more dangerous than the
muzzle.

Don't advertise that your "Big Four"
combine is dissolved, Mr. Shotter, for the


Why the Demands Have Fallen Off; Another of Shotter's Schemes Unearthed.


S. P. Shotter, it is reported, made the
threat, when the factors and operators de-
decided to break away from his dictations
and manipulations and organize their own
distributing agency, that he would force
the prices to a point where the consuming
demands would cease, and thus literally
ruin the industry in America. As the
close of his own contract approached, he
began to put his scheme into execution.
At the same time he began to create the
impression among consumers that it was
the "operators' combine" that was doing
it. What has been the result? The de-
mand has almost ceased-the very object
that he had in mind. Read the following
from the current issue of the Oil, Paint
and Drug Reporter:
"Decreasing Exports of Turpentine."
"The effect of extremely high prices on
the export demand for an article has been
illustrated by the export demand for spir-
its turpentine during" the past three
months. The official report of the exports

during the month of April, the latest for
which the official figures have been com-
piled, show a very large falling off as com-
pared with the exports during the same
month last year, the shipments having
amounted to only 374,710 gallons, as com-
pared with 18i,598 gallons during April of
last year. The country taking the largest
quantity of spirits turpentine is the United
Kingdom, which in April last year took
434,470 gallons and during March of this
year 448,851 gallons, is the only country
regularly importing spirits turpentine to
which not a gallon was exported during
the month of April. During the ten
months of the fiscal year, ending with
April, there was exported to the United
Kingdom, 5,557,450 gallons, while during
the corresponding period of last year the
exports amounted to 7,278,975 gallons. Nor
is this falling off in our exports confined
to England, the-shipments to Belgium dair-
ing April showing a decrease of 342,000
gallons, and to Germany of nearly 79,(001
gallons. The average monthly exports
during the first four months of the pres-
ent calendar year amounted to only 718,-
836 gallons, while the average for last
year was 1,368,896 gallons. These figures
of exports are ample evidence of the ef-
fects of high prices on the foreign demand
which some of the interested operators in
the South-producers, factors and export-
ers-regard as an indispensable article. It
has been amplly shown that at the high
prices of late ruling for spirits turpentine
our foreign customers will not take the
product and there is abundant evidence
that they are using substitutes, and this
will prove to the permanent damage of
our export trade in spirits turpentine. The
English trade and technical journals con-
tain an increasing number of advertise-
ments offering substitutes for American
spirits turpentine, nearly all of which are
claimed to be equal to the genuine product

purpose of deceiving the men in the woods.
You know that such statements are un-
true.

Don't think, Mr. Shotter, that you will
make operators believe that the Naval
Stores Review is an independent paper and
fighting your battles from principle. They
know, Mr. Shotter, that you own that
sheet, body and soul, editor and devil all
combined, and that Gamble is your paid
press agent at so much per. They have
heard, too, Mr. Shotter, how you caught
Gamble short in one of his little specula-
tions, once upon a time, and forced a
change in the ownership of his paper.

Don't get so desperate, Mr. Shotter.
that you attack the personal character of
those who are wise enough to oppose you
in your schemes. Suppose they should
turn the tables on you, Mr. Shotter. But
they will not. They are men of honor.


of the pine. As these substitutes are of-
fered at temptingly low prices, they are
having a large sale, and it is probable
that their use will be continued should
the price of the genuine spirits recede to
normal figures. The present high prices
are regarded as entirely unwarranted by
the natural conditions, being attributed to
speculative manipulation. It may, there-
fore, be the opinion of many that buyers
abroad are merely holding off and will
purchase liberally when prices recede, but
in the meantime consumers have learned
to use the substitutes, and having used
them with more or less satisfaction, will
continue to do so so long as they are pro-
curable at a tempting difference in price.
As the main dependence of those who
offer the substitutes is benzine, it is clear
they will at all times be able to offer
these at half the price of spirits turps~i-
tine. even t'lough the price go to forty
cents a gallon. It appears that those who
are responsible for the present high prices
are indifferent to the prosperity of. the
turpentine industry and count only on
present gain, as the consumption abroad
has already been greatly reduced, while
in this country various substitutes and
mixtures are being sold in steadily in-
creasing quantities. while the demand for
henzine from painters and other large
users has reached proportions which tie
producers of spirits at tile South may well
regard with apprehension."
As a test that Shotter's scheme was to
choke off the demand at a great loss to tlhe
operators, he has been offered the receipts
at Savannah and at the closed ports on
and since June 1st at his own fictitious
prices and has refused to accept them.
As the Record has said, and has preached
in every issue since Shotter's scheme be-
came apparent to it. the market must be
regulated to a legitimate basis. Prices
must be made by the just and equitable
laws of supply and demand and not by
manipulation. The most useful commod-
ity in the world is not worth the space it
occupies in a warehouse unless there is
a marketable demand for it. A falling
off in demand for American spirits and
rosins is a mucl more serious problem for
the operators than an increase in produc-
tion. The hope of the American produc-
ers is to have the market regulated on a
legitimate basis, at prices high enough to
satisfy every operator, but not prohibitive
to the consumers. Then prosperous con-
ditions will be maintained.
It is stated above that Shotter is try-
ing to create the impression among the
consumers that the new operators' move-
ment is responsible for the decrease in le-
mand. Here it is before us, clipped from
an Eastern newspaper:
"Developments in the naval stores mar-
ket have been of a most interesting na-
ture and what the future will bring forth
is rather perplexing to the trade. Prices
have undergone further sharp advances
and indications point to still higher prices.
There appears to be no check in sight as to
the upward movement of prices, and, in
many quarters, ridiculously high figures
are being predicted. The continuance cf
the unusual conditions are solely due to
the unabated forcing up of the market for
spirits by the new Jacksonville combine.
* * Trade here has been checked by
the unusual high prices for both spirits
and rosins. It remains to be seen h;aw
long the consumers of spirits can resist
the abnormally high level of values. Sub
stitutes have been and are receiving .n-
creased attention by the trade, and from
numerous quarters we hear of increased
sales of the latter, which are being offered
at attractive prices."
Let it be said here, once and for all
time, the same that is said in other places
in this paper today, the conditions here
mentioned are directly traceable to S. P.
Shotter, his hope Ieing to thus ruin the


operators in their export movement. He
will not succeed. He is up against the
men who manufacture, finance and distrib-
ute their own stuff; who have no personal
fights to make, or personal prejudices to
appease. They know the conditions. +hey
know that their products must bring a
good price and they are determined that
they shall, but they will not sit idly by
and see Mr. Shotter or anybody else so
manipulate affairs that the demands will
decrease to a point that will mean their
ruin. Market conditions must be just and
fair-in making them so the operators
have nothing to fear.

MR. McEACHERN IN VIRGINIA.
Mr. H. A. McEachern, vice-president of
the Consolidated Naval Stores Company,
is at Covington, Va., for his health. With
him is Mrs. McEachern and their youngest
child. Mr. McEachern has not been in
good health for several weeks, though he
continued at his desk even when his phy-
sician told him that he must give up work
for a time or perhaps pay the penalty in
a serious illness. His friends prevailed
upon him to take a rest and last week he
left for White Sulphur Springs, but find-
ing that the hotel there had not been open-
ed, stopped over at Covington, which is
one of the most delightful springs in the
Virginia mountains. Advices from there
are to the effect that he is gaining in
strength, and rapidly improving in every
way. This will be welcome news to his
hundreds of friends throughout the South.
There is not a more popular man in the
naval stores world to-day than H. A. Mc-
Eachern; there is not one who holds to
a greater degree the confidences of the
operators. He has always been one of
them, with his heart always in their cause,
and his efforts, his voice and his pen al-
ways employed in their interest.

THE REFLECTION OF A COWARD.
The following appeared in last week's
issue of Shotter's Naval Stores Review:
"The Review regrets to learn that Mr.
H(ot) A(ir) McEachern is indisposed and
has temporarily quit the field."
What depths of degredation some men
will stoop to! Read the paragraph again.
See the venom, the malice, the .infamy,
that is corralled in three little lines of
less than twenty words. Just a sentence
that is scratched by a poisoned pen some-
times marks the author to his dying day.
"The old arch-rebel is in his last ditch"
wrote Charles Dana, as Jefferson Davis
was breathing his last and that sentence
of nine words haunted Dana to his grave,
not alone in the South but from ocean to
ocean and from Maine to the Gulf. He
would have given a fortune in less than
twenty-four hours after he had penned
Could he have recalled and retracted.
It was too late. The average American
citizen, whatever may be his polities, his
section, his religion, his business, believes
in honor and the spirit of fairness. A
scurrilous snarl at the physical helpless-
ness of a man arouses a fire of indigna-
tion even in the breast of a stranger. H.
A. McEachern left Jacksonville a week age
a very ill man and is now recuperating in
the mountains of Virginia. He needs no
one to make reply to such a despicable
reference to him as the above. It only
indexes the character of its author. As
to honor and integrity and manhood Mc-
Eachern can give lessons to Shotter and
Gamble combined, for he knows nothing
else. He counts his friends as Shotter
might count his enemies, and he is too
much of a man to stoop to the cess-pool
of personalities. Just as cowardly to take
advantage of a fellow's illness to direct a
line of hatred in print, as to knife a victim
under the cover of darkness.


10







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11.



THE CHRISTIE GROOVER DRUG c.,

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS.


-W -n N Ae r nW r AT r AD mAwE nIME AND NMOI E.


JAN1SOMLLE, FLOENIA.


Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y

w... nm Wholesale Grocers and Distillers' Supplies.
tam. Office ade Warhome Viaduot A. 0. L. Ry. Jaoksonvllle, Flori.d


Review of Naval Stores for a Week.


Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Price Rcpts Sales Exp 1904
Mon., June 5..781/2 1.573 0 407 53
Tues.. June 6(..70-75 1,919 350 130 53
Wed., June 7..65 1,652 150 0 53
Thur., June 8..60 2,1115,229 50 53
Rosin for the Week at Savannah.


Monday, June 5.
WW ........... 5.95
W G ...... .. ...... 5.75
N ..............5.50
M ..............5.30
K .............. 5.15
1 ................ 5.10
H ... ...... 4.50
G ............ .. 4.15
F .... ........ 4.10
E .............. 4.00
D .............. 3.90
ABC ............ 3.80


Last Year.
4.55
4.10
3.85
3.65
3.40
3.20
2.95
2.85
2.80
2.75
2.70
2.70


Receipts 3,813, sales 0, exports 3,127.

Tuesday, June 6.-Rosin dull; sales 2,-
013; receipts 6,036; shipments, 6,523. Quo-
tations: A, B, C, $3.80; D, $3.90; E, $4;
F, $4.10; G, $4.15; H, $4.20; I, $4.30; K,
$4.40; M, $4.50; N, $4.60; WG, $4.70; WW,
$4.80.


W. F. COACHMAN,
Psident.


Wednesday, June 7.-Rosin firm; sales
9.601; receipts 4.061; shipments 425. Quo-
tations: A, B, C. $3.10; D, $3.20; E. $3.30;
F, $3.40; (;. $3.45: H1. $3.50; 1, $4.30 to
$4.35; M, $4.40 to $4.45; N, $4.60 to $4.65;
W(;, $4.70 to $4.75; WW, $4.80 to $4.85.
Thursday. June 8.-Rosin firm; sales
5,658; receipts 6.435; shipments 1,724.
Quote: A. B. C. $3.15; D, $3.05 to $3.25;
E. $3.10 to $3.35; F. $3.15 to $3.45; G,
$3.20 to $3.50: 11. $3.50: 1. $4.30; K, $4.40;
M, $4.50; N. $4.25 to $4.60; WG, $4.50 to
$4.70; WW, $4.80.
Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 ........... 5,400 25,335
Receipts June 8 ........ 2,111 6,435
Receipts previously ..... 37,119 91,072
Total ............... 44,630 122,842
Exports June 8 ......... 50 1.724
Exports previously ...... 32,376 83,121
Total .............. 32,426 84,845
Stock June 8 .......... 12.204 37,997
Stock previously ........ 13,200 32,100


J. P. WILLIAMS,
Vice-President.


Baily & Montgomery's Review.
New York, June 7, 1905.
Spirits Turpentine: Stock, 1,320 barrels.
Thle market for spirits during the week
has held vpery steady but with only a small
jobbing business up to yesterday; to-day
market is demoralized on account of de-
cline in the Southern markets.
Thursday, June 1st-78c. a. m.; 80c. p.
m.
Friday, June 2-81c.
Saturday, June 3-81c. a. m.; 80e. p. m.
Monday, June 5-80 1-2c. a. m.; 80c..p.
m.
Tuesday. June 6-79 1-2c. a. m.; 78c. p.
m.


Wednesdayy .hJe 7-74c. asked-no bids
Rosin-Stock, 7,340 barrels.
This market has held very steady all the
week with a fail business up till to-day.
The sensational declines in the Savannah
market make quotations difficult, and quo-
tations for H and above are entirely nomi-
nal. W\e quote:
A( $4.15. E $4.30-35. F $4.35-40, G $4.45-
50. 11 $4.75. I $5.25. K $5.40-50, M $5.60-
70. N $5.80, WG $6.05-10, WW $6.25-35.


Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Review.
New York, June 6, 1905.
The Industrial RPeord, Jacksonville, Fla.:
Spirits Turpentine After advancing
until market touched 801-2 cents, the de-


W. J. KELLY,
Vice-President and Treas.


miand suddenly ceased, an as holders of
stock were anxious sellers at these high
figures, the market is in a rather demoral-
ized condition. Stock. 1.417 barrels. We
quote lMachines 7 1-2 cents asked; no
bids on market.
Rosin-The market continues steady,
fair demand for all grades. We quote CbD,
$4.30, E $4.40, F $4.50. ( $4.55. H $4.80,
I $5.40, K $5.50, M .5.70, N $5.0), WG;
$6.15. WW $6.25.
TOLAR, HART & CO.


14 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

The CLOTHIERS


iBERYTHING THAT IS GOOD AND
SMART IN WEARING APPAREL FOR
MEN AND BOYS.


E. P. THAGARD,
Secretary.


The Naval Stores Export Company


Capital, $1,250,000.00


Branch Offices:
SAVANNAH, GA.
FERNANDINA, FLA.
PENSACOLA, FLA.
TAMPA, FLA.
NEW ORLEANS, LA
CHICAGO, ILL.
NEW YORK.


POFFIC. Jacksonville, Fla.


WILL COMMENCE BUSINESS JUNE 1, 1905

Owned and controlled by Naval Stores Producers and Factors throughout the Yellow Pine
District in South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas


The Object of this Company is to Bring Producer and Consumer into Closer Relations.


For Quotations and Particulars, Address,


THE NAVAL STORES EXPORT COMPANY

JaLcksonville, Fla.


c:








12 THE WEEKLY INDusatlIAL RECORD.


F. M. DOWLING COMPANY.

WHOLESALE GROCERS.
PROVISIONS, GRAIN. HAY, FLOUR. GRITS end MEAL.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 9go3-o4 AND TWO PREVIOUS YEARS
Receipts. 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
Spirits, casks ................................ 193,647 292,49 314,346
Rosins, barrels .............................. 650,938 940,507 1,071,446
Total ................................... 844,585 1,233,033 1,385,780
Exports.
Spirits, casks ............................... 188,393 296,430 314,876
Rosins, barrels .......... .................... 752,270 975,428 62,637
Foreign.
Spirits, casks ............................... 93,384 206,109 217,446
Rosins, barrels ............................... 338,171 504,173 535,042
New York.
Spirits, casks ................................ 35,658 42,765 53,763
Rosins, barrels .............................. 87,353 133,121 129,095
Sundries.
Spirits, casks ................................ 59,351 37,556 43,637
Rosins, barrels .............................. 326,746 337,734 398,539
The receipts of spirits are less than 1902-03 by 98,849 casks, and of rosins, 289,569
barrels.


Wilmington ..
Charleston ....
Savannah ....
Brunswick ....
Mobile .. ....
New Orleans ..
Carrabelle ....
Georgetown ..
Pensacola ....
Jax. & Fernandi
Tampa ......


Crops of Spirits and Rosins for Three Years.
Crop 1903-04. Crop 1902-03.
Spirits. Rosin. Spirits. Rosin.
...... 16,511 89,667 18,883 113,968
...... 2,409 3,159 3,007 11,835
......176,418 650,938 270,670 940,507 3
..... 55,002 184,527 68,947 144,106
..... 12,315 50,380 18,969 79,272
...... 36,017 133,126 33,103 108,033
..... closed closed 3,394 32,148
. 7,515 44,14 10,307 46,899
...... 42,554 205,982 38,275 192,206
na .... 187,210 653,210 91,976 375,211
...... closed closed 13,565 40,664


Crop 1901-02.
Spirits. Rosin.
16,921 109,484
3,004 13,270
13,085 1,071,440
79,069 286,125
21,080 88,572
21,038 94,336
8,177 47,497
8,458 60,515
37,786 154,350
70,060 245,000
15,424 51,779


Totals ..........535,915 2,020,925 571,096 2,184,818 593,492 2,212,413

Imports of Turpentine to United Kingdom.
From official returns; cwts turned into barrels at 320 cwts, 16,230 kilos, 100 bbls.
1900 1901 1902 1903 1904
From United States ................. 174,446 193,429 155,122 143,851 144,400
From France .................. ..... 2,283 859 1,656 4,630 2,859
From other countries ............... 840 53 904 516 11

177,569 194,341 157,682 148,997 147,270
Russian Turpentine .................. 8,521 6,861 8,711 17,595 17,765
Total barrels ....................... 186,090 201,202 166,393 166,592 165,035
Percentage of Russian .............. 4.57 3.41 5.24 10.56 10.76
Average price of American ......... 35-4 27-1 33-1 42-2 41-2
Reported by James Watt & Son, London, England.

COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVANNAH FOR FIVE YEARS.


April 1 .................
April 8 .................
April 15 ...............
April 22 ...............
April 29 ................
May 6 .................
May 13 .................
May 20 .................
May 27 .................
June 3 .................
June 10 ................
June 17 ................
June 24 ................
July 1 ................
July 8 .................
July 15 ................
July 22 ................
July 28 ................
Ang. 4 ................
Ang. 12 ...............
Ang. 19 ................
Ang. 26 ................
Sept. 2 .................
Sept. 9 .................
Sept. 16 ..............
Sept. 23 ................
Sept. 30 ................
Oct. 7 ..................
Oct. 14 .................
Oct. 21 .................
Oct. 28 .................
Nov. 4 ..................
N ov. 11 .................
Nov. 18 .................
Nov. 25 .................
Dec. 2 ..................
Dec. 9 .................
Dec. 16 ................
Dec. 23 ................
Dec. 30 ................
Jan. 6 ..................


1904-05.
ND
53
54%
54%
53%
55
54%
541/4
531
54
52%
52%
521/,
53
52%
531/,
53%/
52%
531/
54%
541/
52/.
521/2
52
52%
521/,
52%
52%
52
5214
511/,
50%-'
50
50
481/.
361/,
47%3
50%
4!)/,
50


1903-04.
ND
50
491/,
47
45
45
471/4
47%
49
45%
46
467%
471/,
47%
48
491/4
50,' 14
49/4
52
52
55@%/
54
54%

57
55
57
551/
561/2
561%
56
561/.
56
56
56
56
5(;'/4
561/
561/4
571/


1902-03.
45
42%
42%/,
43
42%@43
43
45
45
45%
471/2
485%
47%
441/4
451/4

44
431/,
43%
44%
441/4
44%
45
44%
46
46%
47%
50
51%
53%
49
52
50
51
50%
51
50%
51%
52
521/4
54


1901-02. 1900-01.
34 53%
32 53%
32% 46
31/%@32 47%
32 46%
32 47
3114 48
32% 49
32% 49
32% 46
32 44%
33% / % 43%
34% 42%
33% 43%
34% 431/
341/ 441"
33 43
32% 42
34 39%
33 39%
34 38
34 35%
33% 34
34%/ .35%
34 35%
33% 36%
34 37
34% 37
35 37%
35% 40%
35% 40%
35 40
35% 41
35 40
35 39
351/4 39
35% 38%/
35% 37%
36% 35
36% 35
37% 37
1


*iIl l4I1t t lll ll Il II 1 1 l l o)lillllllI1iIIII

| MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


SBoilermaking and Repairing

* Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING end REPAIRING.

+ Jacksonville, Fla.
{t 8llllllll I 1*1tl Il tt tl It *tl 14*t 1*11 lli ll it l *I 4

WILLIAM A. BOURS JAMES C. DARBY


WILLIAM A.BOURS & COMPANY
THE OLDEST ESTABLISHED GRAIN AND SEED HOUSE IN THE STATE.

Hay, Grain, Feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Supplies, Flour,
Grits, Meal and Fertilizers.


OUR MOTTO: Prompt Shipment. RelabMe Goods.


Cataleofe Free


206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



Cummer Liumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER


Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.

ImIIIIII1a III IIII l lm m i t I I'i~ts sSaA l I *I m aI2 I


------------------ ---------
Standard Clothing Company




SOne Price One Price :
* .


_* FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
0 17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
* Stetson and Hawes Hats. Special Attention Given to Mail Orders.
SIIUI* 34l I 41144 Illl ll**t 44II 1341 1 1IISt III 3ll ll

R. TOLAR. J. H. HART. T. H. BLACHLY. J. R. TOLAR, JR
(Established 1872.)


TOLAR, HART & 00.,
160 FRONT STREET, NEW YORK.


Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.

JOSEPH D. WEED. H. D. WEED. W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED L CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.

MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


WITH THE LUMBER MILLS OF MEX-
ICO.
City of Mexico, Mexico, May 22.-Tlhe
opening of the Tampico-Tuxpam canal,
which is nearing completion, will result
in the development of extensive timber re-
sources of the region which it penetrates.
The region is covered with a large and
heavy growth f oak timber. This timber
belt begins near the coast and runs into
the interior for some distance. The Tam-
pico Land, Timber and Development Co.,
which is composed of Los Angeles, Cal.,
men, recently purchased a tract of 12,-
000 acres of this timber land, situated ad-
jacent to the new canal. A mill will be
established and the timber utilized to
the best possible advantage. The canal
will afford a cheap and easy means of
transportation to Tampico and Tuxpam.
The company has its headquarters in Tam-
pico. This timber region is remarkable in
that it contains no jungle undergrowth.
In practically all of the other tropical reg-
ions of Mexico the work of getting out the
timber is somewhat interfered with by the
dense jungle which covers the ground un-
derneath the larger trees.
A new lumber mill has just been placed
in operation at San Pedro, state of Tabas-
co, by Amilio Ocampo & Sons. It is ope-
rated by hydraulic power. There are ex-
tensive tracts of valuable timber in that
part of Mexico, the development of which
has only just begun. A lack of railroad
transportation facilities has been the prin-
cipal cause of the little work that has
been done in utilizing the valuable timber
of southeastern Mexico, but if the present
plans for building new lines of road in the
State of Tabasco are carried out it will not
be long until the region will be opened up
to enterprising men. Amilio Ocampo &
Sons, who own the new mill at San Pedro,
have been operating along the Usamacinto
river for some time. This is a large stream
and affords an outlet to the ports on the
Gulf of Campeche.
A lumber mill is being erected upon the
Sierra Mojada plantation, situated in the
State of Vera Cruz. This plantation is
owned by V.0 Peterson, of Rock Island,
Ill., and associates. Mr. Peterson says
that enough orders are already booked
to keep the mill running for six months.
The Zictacuaro Lumber and Railroad Co.
is building an extensive system of railroad
in the State of Michoacan for the purpose
primarily, of opening up its large tracts
of valuable timber situated in that part
of Mexico. The country through which the
road will pass is very mountainous and
many difficulties are met with in selecting
a route. In order to traverse the rough
section the road is built narrow guage, it
being only three feet wide. About fifteen
miles of the road have been completed.
The company intends to ultimately ex-
tend the line to a port on the Pacific coast
of Mexico. It is a wealthy concern and
is amply able to build the road. The
system, when completed. will. it is said,
be more than 200 miles long. That part of
the system which is now under construe-
tion will run to Toluca, the capital of the
State of Mexico. It will connect the Zit-
acuaro branch of the National Railroad of
Mexico with the main line of that system.
F. M. Castlebury, an American, is ar-
ranging to establish a lumber mill in the
State of Oaxaca. He owns a large tract
of valuable timber land in that State.
C. L. Nabors, formerly of Beaumont.
Tex., but who is now interested in mining
in the State of Chihuahua. Mexico, has
been investigating the timber resources
of Mexico with the view of investing in
timber lands. He represents a syndicate of
American lumbermen who will become as-
sociated with him i nthe Mexico timber
enterprise should he find conditions favor-
able fo investment.
Senator H. B. Packer, of Pennsylvania.
who is interested in a number of lumber
mills in West Virginia, lhas been making
an investigation of the timber resources
of Mexico. He believes that the develop-

ment of the timber regions of Mexico are
seriously retarded for lack of railroad
transportation facilities.
Col. W. C. Greene. the New York cop-
per mine owner, is preparing to establish
a large tanning extract plant near the
new town of Dedrick. in the western part
of the State of (hihuahua. This tanning
extract plant will be operated for the pur-
pose of utilizing the bark of the hemlock


andl oak forests which cover a 3.000.000-
ncrc tra.-t of land situated in the heart
of t he Sierra Maidres, owned by ('Co0
(reene. . Y. Miller. a tanning extract
expert. is connected with ('ol. Greene in
the tanning extract plant. He said:
"The forest of hemlock, with some oak,
extend over the entire 3.000.000 acres of
Col. (reene. and I consider it the largest
forest of hemlock on the American con-
tinent. There are not less than 5.000.000
tons of bark on the lands. My analysis of
the hemlock and oak harks of Mexico show
that it runs more than 18 per cent. of
tanning extract, as against not more than
10 per cent. in the United States and
Canada."
The plant will have an initial capacity
of thirty barrels per day. This will be
later increased to 200 barrels per day. A
force of men are now at work peeling bark.
A large cooperate plant will he established
and operated in connection with the tan-
ning extract plant.-W. I). H. in The
Tradesman.
JOHN S. FRANZ, Agent










Prices


Diebold Safe & Lock Co.
Jacksonville. Florida,
FIRE INSURANCE-LIowet rates. I-
ren H. Green & C., 9 sad 10 Park Bld.,
Jacksonville, Fla. @m.


B. R. POWELL.
President.


CMAS. 6. hARRIS.
Vice-President and Treasurer.


MENRY ASHLEY.
Secretary


DIRECTORS:
B. R. Powell Chas. G. Harris, D. I. McMillan, P. L. Sutberland, R. V. Coviltaos.

THE

Southern Drug Manufacturing

Company
Corner of West Bay and Madison Sts.
Jacksonville, Florida.



Wholesale Drugs i Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will lb glad to quote prices on
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and can save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.





Standard Naval Stores Co.,
P JACKSONVILLE


- Pays Turpentine Producers

t full Savannah Market

* Makes no Charge for Commission, Storage or Insurance *

SThis Beats Savannah so Ship to

SStandard Naval Stores Co. JACKSONVILLE
-- ---- -- -- w----p--- i99916110690000--0111060~




The Blount Real Estate Co.,

(Incorporated. $50.000 Capital.)

FOR Turpentine Locations. Saw Mill Locations.
Large and small tracts of Round Timber, Phosphate
and Farming Lands of all description.
Write us for further information and particulars'
THE BLOUNT REAL ESTATE CO..
OCALA. FLORIDA.




Joseph D. Christie, Business Agent
Room 303 Dyal-Upchurch BuldinLg Jacksonvle, nFa.
Telephone 455.
If you want to locate in Florida and contemplate going into business, let me
help you. If you have a business to sell, list same with me.


W. J. L'ENGLE.
President.


JI. B. OAMPBEUL,
***n** *l**r*, O ULA FIA.


Metropolitan Talking Machine Co
VICTOR
Talking Machines and Records.
Write to Metropolitan Talking Machine
Co. for catalogues of New Records and
Machines. Victors only. Largest jobbing
house in the South.
Agents wanted in every town. Retail
trade served. Old records exchanged.
N. B.-Columbia, Zonophone and Vic-
tors accepted.
Metropolitan Talking
Machine Co..
323 Main St, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


J. W. WADE.
Vice-President.


E. G. HUGHES,
Sec'y and Tre


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.






14 THE WEEKLY INDlUSTFIAL RECORD.


S. P. Shotter Caught
in His Own Trap.
(Continued from Page 1.)
only wise and safe course that could have
been acted upon.
S. P. Shotter's attempt to wreck the
operators' company failed in its very in-
cipiency. He might have known it. We
have so often told him that he is mistaken
in taking the operators for fools. Just
ihat scheme he will try next remains to
he seen. Whatever it may be, it will fail.
Shotter is the most resourceful schemer on
record, but as poor a general as ever
planned a campaign.
In the meantime the market will steady
itself on a legitimate basis. Operators
may content themselves with the knowl-
edge that spirits can never be low again.
The operators are deserving of high prices
and they must get them; at the same time
the demand must not be choked off and
the market must be regulated along nat-
ural trading lines and not by manipula-
tors. Stable prices-prices that mean sat-
isfaction for to-day, and for the future as
well, is what we need and must have.
NEW FACTORAGE HOUSE.
The Jacksonville Naval Storm Company,
Organized by Strong Men.
The Jacksonville Naval Stores Company,
with a capital stock of $300,000, has just
been organized at Valdoeta, Ga., and has
opened offices in Jacksonville, which is to
be their headquarters. The organizers of
this company are among the most active
business and naval stores.men of Georgia.
The company is organized on a plan


which is mutual and which includes among
its stockholders some of the most exten-
sive operators in the State of Georgia.
There has not been a meeting of the stock-
holders for organization, but this is to
take place at Valdosta tomorrow.
In the meantime offices have been open-
ed in this city in the Blum Block, rooms
21, 22 and 23, where J. G. Cranford, an
attorney at law and a turpentine operator
for several years, is in charge. He will be
the general manager of the new company,
and his experience in the business in which
he is now engaging will be of great value
to the company. Hle is a gentleman of
good commercial and financial standing,
and will bring to the new company a con-
fidence which is sure to be of great ser-
vice.
Other stockholders are as follows:
SE. C. Ashley, president of the First Nat-
ional Bank of Valdosta, Ga.; E. Y. Fry,
J. F. Pender, J. B. Lewis, B. G. Lastinger
-all practical turpentine operators, and
who have been associated with the indus-
try for a number of years.
The effort will be made to get every
shipper who patronizes the new company
to become a stockholder, as this is on the
mutual plan which has been accepted by
the stockholders as the best means of serv-
ing the best interests of the industry.
Jacksonville was selected as the head-
quarters of the new company because
Jacksonville is the headquarters of the na-
val stores industry. The members of the
company who are connected with the gen-
eral management of the company are to
move their families to Jacksonville, and
are to be closely identified with the busi-
ness interests of the city and the State.
The company has nbt been organized to
antagonize any of the other companies al-
ready in the field. It is formed for the
purpose of doing a legitimate business and
to work for the best interests of the stock-
holders who are mostly turpentine opera-
tors. The company will not contract with
any exporter or export combination, but
supply any legitimate demand at the rul-
ing prices.


The Consolidated's seven-story building in course of construction, as it appear
to- day.


BANKERS IN SESSION.
Georgia and Florida Financiers in a Joint
Meeting.
The Georgia and Florida bankers are in
joint convention to-day at the Continental
Hotel, Atlantic Beach. Fla. There is a
large attendance of bankers from both
States and Hon. Leslie M. Shaw, Secre-
tary of the Treasury of the United States,
is the guest of honor.
The meeting to-day was opened with
prayer by Rev. W. E. Boggs, and the re-
mainder of the forenoon was devoted to
hearing the president's address and the


reports of various committees.
Address by Mr. Walter F. Coachman,
president Florida Bank and Trust Com-
pany, Jacksonville. Fla. Subject, "Naval
Stores and Timber."
Address by Mr. A. J. McGrath, assist-
ant cashier of the National Shoe and
Leather Bank, New York. Subject, "The
Northern Banker Passing on Paper Of-
fered by the Southern Banker."
On Saturday evening, after the adjourn-
ment of the Georgia Bankers' Association,
the Georgia and Florida bankers will be
the guests for the balance of the afternoon
and evening of the banks of the city of
Jacksonville.


OPERATORS


Bear in Mind That During Your


StBck
Complete
OutmIt
New and
Beoond-
hand.


Extra
Kettles
Worms,
Oaps, Arm,
Furnace
Door,
Orate Banr,
and all
other at-
taehments
to-
Tirpeotino
Stills and
fixtures.


Busy Season

YOU MEET WITH A MISHAP
YOU BREAK DOWN
YOU BURN OUT
IFYOU NEED US

Over in the Left-H and Corner Will Interest You.


McMILLAN BROS.,
Southern Copper Works.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Bavannah, "e.
Xobfie, Ala&
IayettevilQe, N. C.


I U r


1





THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


THE


COVINGTON


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Co.


Wholesale


SHOES


- -


DRY GOODS.


"'Success


For Our Customers


is Success


For Us."


ABSTRACTS
Title and Tax Abstracts, Maps, etc.,
of large tract in all parts of Florida and
South Georgia, prepared for owners and
intending purchreasers. Correspondence
solicited.
REALTY TITLE AND TRUST CO.
Law Exchange Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.
WM. D. JONES
PRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST
FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.
Mall Orders Solicited.
ORDER YOUR
Whiskies
and
S. Wires
-BY-
HENRY FREE
The Only Up-to-Date Mail
Order House In the South.
z6 and z8 Clay Street and Sor W. Bay.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

E. R. R SIE JR.
MANUFACTURER OF1

BRICK K.
WRITE FRi PRlES.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.
'PTI 390.
M. BEA. C. L. BEA.
(Formerly E. Bean & Son.)
FLORIDA PAPER COMPANY
Dealers in all kinds of
WRAPPING PAPERS, PAPER BAGS,
FOLDING BOXES, TWINES AND
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
WRAPPING PAPERS.
Robinson Building, Viaduct.
Telepboee 1927. Jackaonvinle.
Cori.nBd6ace Solicited.


THE RECORD'S JOB DEPARTMENT.
The Industrial Record, in its new home,
is prepared, as it has never been before,
to furnish quick and satisfactory service
in printing for the Turpentine and Lum-
ber businesses-books, stationery, office
supplies, commissary checks, etc., etc. If
you are not buying your printing supplies
from the Record don't fail to do so in the
future.


THOSE. G. HUTCHINSON
FELLOW AMERICAN ASSCIATMIN OF
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
Room 7, Board of Trade Bldg.
Pe 312 JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Light's
Rest aurant
503 West Say St. JACKSINVILLE. FLA


K


F


251-N - 636O Ns- N BU


Timmons Blont


W. W. TIMMONS,
President.


B. W. BLOUNT,
Vice-President


Co.


J. P. CARSON,
Secy & Tress.


Naval Stores Factors
And Dealers in Supplies of all Kinds for Turpentine
Operators.


Correspondence Solicited.


Address


TIMMONS- BLOUNT CO.


American National Bank Bdg.


TAMPA, FLORIDA.


GETTING'S

F...OR...



FURNITURE


Send for
Catalogue


ohn = Furchgott= Compan:
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Don't forget your subscription to the Record.


22-30 West Bay Street
JACKSONVILLE


y e


--- ---- --


3Cscsacs~3Escz~E~csc~xs~xsc3ac3csacsuc3t


XXX96X3SC!CX9C9KXXX3a(Xr3----- --------------







16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville :
RESOURCES THREE MILLION DOLLARS.
We invite especial attention to our Savings Department, which is operated
under GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION.
INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY.
in994# *a99gyw9*.ww wwwy


C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516- 518-5-52522 -524-526 EAST BAY STREET
Jacksonville, Fla.

GEORGIA INTER-STATE SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
Minimum Coastwise Price List for Merchantable Rules 9go4. Adopted at Tifton
Georgia, July, 12, 19go4.
I Feet Feet | Feet | Feet Feet Feet Feetl Feet Feet Feet
SIZES. 120 &U1 21-251 26-301 31-35136-40 41-45 46-501 51-551 56-60 61-65
1 x10 to 2xlO.... $12.50|$135001$14.54$16l.00|$18.001$20.50$23$23. 26.50$32.00j$40.00
2%x10 to 8x10.... 12.001 12.501 13.501 14.001 15.501 17.501 20.001 23.001 28.00( 3500
8%x10 to 10x10.... 12.501 13.001 14.00$ 15.501 16.501 18.501 21.00 24.00 29.001 37.00
1 x12 to 2x12.... 14.00 15.50 10i.50S 1 8 .00| 21.00 24 28.00 32.50 38.00 49.00
2x12 to 10x2.... 13.001 13.50 14.5 1.50 18.50 21.00 24.50 28.50 34.00 43.00
10%x12 to 12x12.... 13.550 14.00" 15.501 17.50 19.50) 22.00j 25.50 30.00 36.50) 46.00
1 x14 to 3xl4.... 16.00' 19.001 20.00 22.001 24.501 27.50 32.00 37.00 44.00 57.00
3%xl4 to 12x14.... 14.50 16t.50 18.0 20.50 22.00 24.00$ 28.00 32.50 40.00 52.00
12%x14 to 14x14.... 15.50 17.00 1001 21.00{ 23.00 26.00( 30.00 34.50 42.00 55.00
1 xl6 to 4x16.... 20.501 22.001 24.50 27.501 31.00 34.00 38.00 42.50 52.00 66.00
4%x16 to 12x16.... 19.00$ 20.00 22.00 25.50 29.001 31.00 35.00 39.50 48.00 59.00
12%x16 to 16x16.... 19.50$ 20.50 23.00 26.50f 30.00( 33.00 37.00 41.00 50.00 62.00
2 x18 to 6x18.... 24.501 25.50; 2850 31.50 35.001 39.00 43.00 49.00 62.00 79.00
6%/xl8 to 14x18.... 21.00 22.001 2(.00 29.00 33.001 37.00 41.00 45.00 57.00 69.00
14%x18 to 18x18.... 23.00! 24.00! 27.00 30.00 34.001 3800 42.00 48.00 59.00 74.00
Terms: Net Cash.
Prices are F. 0. B. Cars Savannah, Brunswick, Fernandina and Jacksonville.
NOTICE. I Dimension.
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate' Dimension sizes shall embrace all sizes
Saw Mill Association, held at Jackson- 6 inches and up in thickness by seven
ville, Fla., March 15, 1904, the following inches and up in width, including six by
Classification and Rules for Inspection of six: For example: 6x6, 6x7, 7x7, 7x8, 8x9
Yellow Pine were officially adopted, effec- and up.
tive July 1, 1904: Stepping.
Classification and Inspection of Yellow topping shall embrace one to two and
Pine Lumber. I Stepping shall embrace one to two and
Pine Lmber. a half inches in thickness by seven inches
General Rules-All lumber must be and up in width. For example: 1, 1%,
sound, well manufactured. full to size and 1/., 2 and 21/x7 and up, in width.
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and Rough Edge or Flitch.
hollow knots, worm and knot holes; Rough Edge or Flitch shall embrace all
through shakes, or round shakes that sizes one inch and up in thickness by eight
show on the surface; square edge. unless inelws and up in width, sawed on two
otherwise specified. A through shake is sides only. For example. 1, 11/2, 2, 3, 4
hereby defined to be through or connected and up thick by eight inches and up wide,
from side to side, or edge to edge, or side sawed on two sides only.
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken; INSPECTION.
less than one inch thick shall be measured Standard.
as one inch.


CLASSIFICATION.
Flooring.
Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: lx3,
4, 5 and 6; 1/%x3, 4, 5 and 6.
Boards.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses un-
der one and a half inches by seven inches
and up wide, including one and a hail
inches in thickness by seven in width
For example: %. 1, 1, 1 and 1% inches
thick by seven inches and up, wide.
Scantling.
Scantling shall embrace all szes froin
two to five inches in thickness and two i'
six inches in width. For example: 2x2
2x3, 2x4, 2x5, 2x0, 3x3, 3x4, 3x5. 3x6, 4x4
4x5, 4x6, 5x5 and 5x6.
Plank.
Plank shall embrace all sizes from on
and one-half to six inches in thickness
not including six inches 1 by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1//,, 2
21/2, 3, 31/, 4, 4/2,, 5, 51/, 5%/x7 inches
and up in width.


All lumber shall be sound, sap no ob-
jection. Wane may be allowed one-eighth
of the width of the piece measured across
face of wane, extending one-fourth of the
length on one corner or its equivalent on
two or more corners.
Merchantable.
All sizes under nine inches shall show
heart entire length c; one side or edge;
sizes nine inches and over shall show
hearth the entire length on two opposite
fili s. Wane may le allowed one-eighth of
M the width of the piece measured across
iface of wanc. and extending one-fourth of
the length of the piece on one corner or
its viuivalent on two or more corners.
Prime.
, Scaniling shall show heart on two faces
, the entire length; other sizes shall show
tw,-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
vcent of the pieces wane may be allowed
, ,ne eighth of the width of the piece meas-
s hired across face of wane and extending
, one-fourth of the length of the piece on
i one corner or its equivalent on two or
more corners.


e*.*****eeee*eeeee*6*e***e***.eefet**u***e***e....u4
Would a Turpentine Prpositin

Interest You ?

What About Saw Mill Timber?
10.00 Acres Saw Timber ...................... $2.50 to $5.00
40.000.....................
50000 .............. per Acre.
26.000 Acres Virgin Timber.....................
20.000 ................. $2.50 to $6.00
10.000 ............... per Acre.
192.000 ....................
Send for oa dufmetf.

SBROBSTON. FENDIG & CO.


216 W. Forsyth aw.


THE


- V Arll Fl-.


ARAGON


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light .plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.



SJ. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
6
*****4*&*Q*4A *4*Q*#* *&*@ A*A e**Q* eh*C*egeg&.* .


S Headquarters for
Distiller's Pumping
: Outfit.
No plant complete without one.
9 Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
South Carolina. Write us for particu-
Slars and prices. We also manufacture
f Engines, Boilers and migh
* Grade Machinery,
* as well as carry a full and complete
----stockof-
, Mill Supplies, Pipe,
* Boiler Tubes, Etc.
* Advise your wants.
SMacon, - Georgia.
0 A Leag Speclalty of iM
* KVi of Tank wrk fr Twrentim Sterag Pwrp


C. H. BARNES, Pres.


J. D. SHAW, Vice-Pres.


RALPH JESSUP, Sec.-Treas


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonville. Pensacola, Fernandina and Savannah
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.



East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Speciaty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


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v v TV -V _ _ _ v_ v_


9++~c9990~~99~~drf,9r9~r+,9r~









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory


If you want anything look
through this classified list and
write to the firm appearing
therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.

ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
ACCOUNTANTS.
T. .G Hutchinson, Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fa.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, FH.
Guaranty Trust & Savings Co., Jackson-
Fla.
Florida Bank & Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Summer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BOWLING AND BILLIARDS.
Guy's Bowling and Billiard Parlors, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Faster, Geo. R., Jr., Jacksonvifll, Fla1
Southern Fuel & Supply Co, The, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
COCA-COLA.
Jacksonville Bottling Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla
-CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
CONVEYANCING.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
COOPERAGE.
Cannon Co., The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fl.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-'WHOLESALI
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville
Fla.
Christie-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville

DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Henry Jacobs, Jacksonville, Fla.
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES.
Florida Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Electric Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
gusts, Ga.
FERTILIZERS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack
sonville, Fla.
FURNITURE.
Getting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, FlI
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla,
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fh
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksonville. Fli
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fl;
Dowling & Co., F. M.. Jacksonville, Fl
Hargraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville. Fl
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
GINGER ALE.
UIve Oak Bottling Works, Live Oak, Fl;
HATS-WHOLESALLE
Kohn, Purehgott & Cb, Jacksonville, Fl


HARDWARE.
Bond Bours Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah. Ga.
HARNESS.
Vehicle and Harness Co.. Jacksonville, Fla
HAY AND GRAIN.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fl
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jaksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS.
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, F.
Duval lotel. Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
St. George. Jacksonville, Fla.
.ilghit's Restaurant. Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fl
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Macon, Ga.
INSURANCE.
('av, Sline & McCall, Jacksonville, Fla.
Loren H. Green & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELERS
C.reenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Henry Free, Jacksonville, Fla.
Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co, Maeon, Ga.
Eureka Saloon, Jacksonville, Fla.
Joseph Zapp & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Christie-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville
Fla. ,


MAPS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS
Schofield's SonseCo., J. S., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
MILLINERY.
Henry Jacobs, Jacksonville, Fla.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Baily & Montgomery, New York, N. Y.
Barnes-Jeesup Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Tinmmons-Blount Co.. Tampa, Fla.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York, N. Y.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile. Ala.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
West-Flynn-Harris Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
Tampa Naval Stores Co., Tampa, Fla.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Campbell, J. R., Ocala, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala. Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
PAPER.
llorida Paper C(o.. Jacksonvillc, Fla.
PIANOS.
Ludlden & Bates. Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co.. J. S.. Macon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
Brobston. Fendi &t Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Blount Real Estate Co., Ocala, Fla.
('. Buckman. Jacksonville. Fla.
Christie. .. D.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons. J. H.. Ocala, Fla.
Southern States Land and Timber Co.,
Stewart & Co.. Jacksonville. Fla.
Redrfcks Real Estate Agency, Jackson-
ville. Fla.


SAFES.
Diabold Safe and Lock Co., Jacksonville.
SEEDS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville Fla.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
TALKING MACHINES.
Metropolitan Talking Machine Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cypress Tank Co, Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust. Co.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksonville, ka.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
MeMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
Davis & Son., G. M., Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.


Record Readers:

The job printing department

of this company is conducted

for the exclusive benefit of the

naval stores, lumber and man-

ufacturing trades. It is reason-

able to suppose you will get

better and more satisfactory

printing supplies-letter heads,

envelopes, commissary checks

pay-roll reports, etc., by having

us make them.


Industrial Record Co.,

JacksonviHe, Florida.


M. A. BAKER,
Inventor and
Manufacturer of the

Baker Improved

Seemless Turpen-

tine stills.
Write me for prices and outfts
F. O. B any point in Georgia, Flor-
ida. Alabama or Mississippi. All
stills sold under a guarantee.
Job work through the
.w country a specialty.
T', Larget ndOldest Copper l3runswick, %iO
Works in Ge oria.lt i lre worm d hev bottom do o
,W My specialty is large worms snd heavy bottoms that do not lesak


TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
VEHICLES.
Vehicle & Harness Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
IIess & Slager. Jacksonville, Fla.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fla.



Trade Checks
FOR THE


COMMISSARY MBUISS.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD manu-
factures more of them than all the print-
ing and oltice supply houses in the South
combined.
COMMISSARY CHECKS
Send all orders for Commissary Checks,
any color, any denomination, padded or
loose, to the

Industrial Record Go.


SCT~rSiS~JIJCi~mfflrCSSamC3C3aaaC3C ssmaroaarr laCSaCSaCSCSfSESaESaaaaaacsrs~








18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Florida Bank and Trust Company
Capital $1,000,000.00. Jacksonville. FIa.
DEPOSITARY OF STATE, COUNTY AND CITY FUNDS
W. F. COACHMAN President. W S. JENNINGS. Vice President.
W. A. REDDING, cashier. ARTHUR F. PERRY, Vice President.
F. P. FLEMING, Jr., Trust Officer
Receives deposit accounts of individuals, firms, corporations and banks. Pays 4 per
cent on saying deposits. Rents safe deposit boxes. Buys and sells foreign exchange and
issues letters of credit.
Acts as trustee, transfer agent, registrar and fiscal agent for corporations and
municipalities. Executes all trusts such as executor, trustee under will or appointment
of court, receiver and guardian.
Vnrequaed Facilities. Accounts Sollteod. Correspondence Invited.




Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTM ENT.

Advertisements WIll be Inserted In Trls Departmeat at the Followiln Rates:
For one week. 2 cents a lie.
For two weeks. 35 cents a line.
For three weeks, 50 cents a line.
For four weeks, 65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Thursday
morning to secure Insertion in Friday's paper.

Position Wanted. Help Supplied.
SFirst-class stiller or woodsman requires Naval stores men an secure help by ap
position at once. A. L. Sweat, care RB M. ing t the City Employment Bureau,
Lewis, Waycross, Ga. 840 Wet Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
For Sale.-Two Steel Tanks. Turpentine Men.
Twelve thousand acres of cut over lands. Buy a Blakle Gaoline Pumping Ot-
Will make excellent location for turpen- Bt f your ll No. 1 oti t pumpi ,-
tine plant. Will sell cheap, if taken at fllon per at a eNo t of 3eats ,0
once. Address Postmaster Johnstown,requires o attention while running
Bradford County, Fla. Started in on minute. J. P. Ompbell,
Turpentine Location. aa. .
Quarter of an inch thick. Capacity 125 For Sale.
barrels each. Splendid opportunity for a Turpentine location in West Florida,
turpentine man. Can be bought very with fee simple timber sufficient to cut
cheap. Address Standard Paper & Supply twenty-five to thirty crops boxes. Ad-
Co., Jacksonville, Fla. dress, Operator, Care Industrial Record.

IMPORTS OF ROSIN INTO UNITED KINGDOM.
1900 1901 1902 1903 1904
From United States .................... 87,116 87,298 79,015 81,542 71,816
From France .......................... 2,539 3,126 13,584 2,486 17,860
From all other countries. ................ 424 200 318 510 726
Total Tons ....................... 90,079 90,624 92,917 84,538 90,402
Percentage from United States ......... -- -
Reported by James Watt & Son. 96.71 96.33 85.04 96.45 79.44


FOR SALE.
6,500 Acres Round Timber, just south of Stuart.
Fronts Indian and St. Lucy Rivers; choice Pineapple
lands. Must be sold as a whole, $3.50 per acre.


C. BUCKMAN,


22 Hogan St..
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


**i14i *tI8SIII tIIilaII tII tei ttaeIII* iti etett* itiii I t
PRICE LIST OF

Eureka Wine and Liquor Co.
The Great Southern Mail Order House. r


EXPRESS PREPAID.

Hatchett's Private Stock .... ...........
Hatchett's That's Whiskey ..................
Hatchett's Old Rye ......................
Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy ................
N. C. Apple Brandy ......................
Eureka Malt .. ............ ............
Eureka N. C. Peach Brandy .... ........ ....
N. C. Peach Brandy .................. ....
Eureka N. C. Corn ........................
Eureka N. C. Corn, XX ....................
Eureka N. C. Corn. XXX ..................
Eureka N. C. Corn, XXXX .............. ..
Old Crow Bourbon ........................
Hermitage Rye .................. .......
Sunny Brook Rye ........................
Sunny Brook Sour Mash ....................
Echo Spring .................. ......... ..
Silk Velvet .. .......... .... .. ...... ... ..
Oak and .. ........ .. .. .. .. .. .... .. .. .. ..


P
G
$4
.4
3
4


.$
4
4
3
.3
3
.2
4
4
3
3
4
.5
3


FULL QUART MEASVUI
'er Four Six Per
llon. Quarts. Quarts. Case.
.00 84.00 46.60 s&.6
.50 4.0 6. $13.75
.20 3.20 4.80 9
.75 4.75 7.00 14.0
.25 3.25 4.5 9.7
.00 4.00 6.00 12.6
.75 4.75 7.00 14.0
.25 3.25 4.56 9.0
.25 3.25 4.85 .7
.00 3.00 4.50 9.6
.75 2.75 4.15 8.3
.50 2.50 3.75 7.6
.50 4.50 .6.75 12.
.50 4.0 6.75 13.5
.75 3.75 6.66 1U.
.75 3.75 5.65 11.1
.50 4.65 6.90 12.15
.00 5.5 7.5 15.79
.75 4.00 6.0 12.0


* GIN FROM S2.50 TO $3.50 PER. GALLON. DELIVERED
* Save twelve labels of Hatchett's Private Stock and secure a bottle free.
0 Save twelve labels of Hatchett's Old Rye and secure a bottle free.
f Save twelve labels of Hatchett's That's Whiskey and secure a bottle free.
S Save twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Corn and secure a bottle free. Save
Twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy and secure one bottle free. Save *
twelve labels of Eureka Malt and secure one bottle free. Prices of all goods 0
bought at company's store are 70c per gallon less than when delivered. No
charge for jugs, boxes or drayage. A.n of my bottles are full measure. All
standard brands of whiskies sold over my bar at 1Oc per drink. 15
We also carry In stock liquors of cheaper grades. 10
All wines quoted on application. -
* Special prices In large lots, packed any sizes desired. Leaves 5 for you
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded.
EUREKA WINE AND LIQUOR. COMPANY.
135 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
1611414S1 Ill IIl stelllll1 4l,1t,1 t lllllllllJ8ll lT


.III...S. E IB. .. ... .IE


...lll...Il..lll...lles.ain..


PEARL WIGHT. Pres. T. H. MCCARTHY, Vice-Pres. MAURICE STERN Treas.


4 SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.

IRVING H. WELCH, Manger.


SFlorida Timber, Grazing &

4
Agricultural Lands.

4 401-404 LAW EXCHANGE, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

449139tt41ttt 14t I*tiIItitI ilIII SalleliIittgg1g9lll



... NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA., U. S. A.


H, A, Renfroe Co,


TAILORS


Suits to Order at Ready-Made Prices Mail Orders Given Personal Attention


439 W. Bay Street.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SOUTHERN ELECTRIC CO.
BOARD OF TRADE BUILDING. 213 MAIN STREET.
INSTALLATION OF ELECTRIC WIRES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
ELEVATORS INSTALLED AND REPAIRED. MOTOR AND FAN
WORK A SPECIALTY. ELECTRIC FIXTURES.
BELL PHONE 1330. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


JOHN R. YOUNG.
Presided

J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A, D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.
DIRECTORS:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L. SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


H. L KAYTON,
Secretary.and Treasurer.


J. R. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.




Printing For all Purposes.
P I The Industrial Record Pub. Ce
Jacksonville, FI=.


Stetson Hats






W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, VICE-PRESIDENTS.


DIRECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain. H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., withBranches in Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the:.Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one Three-Story Building, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; one one-story building, 80x250,
Making the largest space of any Company of the kind in the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
'Brnches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola. Fla., and Savannah, Ga.


Assm Ia ag& 16AA22*6ONnaslsa a&& mas AS ffeas Resssse fessaseftal


C. B. ROGERS,. PintanaxwT.


C. HI. HIODGSON, Sxc, and Tazrs'a







GREENLEAF C CROSBY CO.
Jewelers and Importers,
41 W. BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Diamonds \ Diamonds
HAVE BEEN
S DEALERS IN DIAMONDS
We Save You AND OTHER PRECIOUS STONES We Save You
The Middleman's SINCE THE ETABISHMNT OF The Middleman 's
Profit IMPORTERS POR MORE THTN Profit.
TWENTY YEARS-
SATISFACTION
ASSURED.

DIAMONDS \ DIAMONDS

Write Us--Mail Orders R.eceive Prompt Attention.




Half Tones=Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc.
I ISmPIITIT 1 IMiDE OF mISIUIlm, RETm0CH II lFBELISHII PIIHIPIS II PilCTRES.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED

A Florida Enterprise. Try It.