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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00123
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 27, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00123
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text



SUSTRIAL
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ATLANTA, GA.


SAVANNAH, GA




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President, W. C. POWELL; Viee-Presideats, who with the Preident, constitute the Diretery ad Board of Manager, W. F. MACMAN, B. F. WUL-
LARD, H. L COVINGTON, H. MeEACHERN, JOHN R.YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. MeMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.


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JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA, FLA,


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.

The Consolidated is Purely a Cooperative Company. Its
SInterests are Identical with those of the Producers. The
Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.

YARDS AT JACKSONVILLE, SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA AND PENSACOLA

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.
I R


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES

.. COMPANY..













WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUMNIJir BVnERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO THE NAVAL STORES, LUMER AND MANUFACTURING wiwrrniKl


Tt,.st~uAwo~asn a E.- 4Ud~m.m ~dS~L s iism minm of No Gao Am.u A~ky iuj1fLMs
and, W= V.*=%4 W1 = 303.. 4Uc Ovum. s of n bwms C.. Gffom. Anodin Seue r Ger0aS-0~ =11% 4Uehaw. o dMNNM an& a AIMA


The Southern Industrial Parliament
has been in session in Washington this
week, several of the Southern states be-
ing represented.
Governor Robert B. Glena, of North
Carolina, was unanimously elected presid-
ing oeer and delivered the opening ad-
dress Tueday. At the outset of his re-
marks he received applause by stating
that while he had come to Washington
with his heart killed with love for the sec-
tbi in which he lived, there were no men
living that loved, honored and revered
"the great nation in which we live more
that the delegates who are here to-day
from south of Mason and Dion's lie."
He rejoined in the common prosperity ex-
tending over the United States. After
drawing a pen picture of the development
of the country, during the last hundred
years, Governor Glenn touched upon the
devastation wrought in the South by the
contest between the States and said the
people of that section had gone ahead
with a will to redeem, reclaim and build
It up. He spoke ot the enormous produc-
tio of cotton, iron, timber ad other com-
meditles in the Sodth, and declared that
it had rise to the place where it ought
to stand-"equal, if not superior, to any
other seetio i the universe in which we
live." But, he said, while the harvest of
the South was great, the laborers were
few. Laborers were needed anywhere
and everywhere, and he declared that the
South hed out to them opportunities and
if they would come there was no reason
why they could not have the same re-
turns, the same wealth and be even great-
er and grander than in any other section
of the country. But while men of brains
and energy were wanted, the South did
not want the rif-raf of the country or of
the world.
Deceptiae Praticed ea Imigiants
Governor Glenn then around his audi-
ence to a high pitch of enthusiasm when
he denounced the methods of certain im-
migra agents of Western railroads to
turn the tide of settemmat from the
South by sending aoad maps showing
the marvelous prosperity in the West, but
pirng the Southern States in lines of
lak in order to bsow that thi aegroes
have superity over the whites; that
the South is placed where very few, if
any, whites live; where men of money
can only endure, and where the white
laborer cannot endure, bemase it is the
home of the negro, and where the negro
is made an equal partner with the whites.
"That samestiom he vehemently declared,
"is false. It is the duty of every honest
man in the United States, whether he is
a Northerer, a Southerner or a Western-
er, to move this calamity from the best
and purest people this country has ever
known."
What the 8th Deea far the Negr.
In the South, theoveror said, the no-
gro is given every legal right he is entitled
to. Their children are educated, as are
the white children; they are given asy-
lums for their deaf, dumb and blind, and
are everywhere given the merciful hand,
"but," ie said, "there s one distinction,
me line we draw, and that is the line of
social equality." That, he proclaimed,
could never be. The races were separated
by the laws of eternity, because, he said,
the white man never was intended to be
put on a social equality with the negro.
He appealed to every one present to make
known the truth, thus "correct an error
and a le."
In vigorously denying the charge that
one of the potent reasons for the less
id development of the South was the
eistee of a faea of sae alism and


hate for the North, Governor Glenn bade Commerce and Ocean Transportation.
welcome to the people of the country Senator Simmons, of North arolina,
from every section, saying they would be spoke on the subject of immigration. He
given the highest chair in the guest said that as a result of the agricultural,
chamber. The day had come when the commercial and industrial activity and ex-
names of Ulysses 8. Grant and Robert E. pension in the South there was a demand
Lee would be equally applauded. for labor which could not be supplied
There were a number of addresses this from its own population, and in oonas
afternoon, including one by Willett N. quence the South was struggling with a
Hays, the Assistant Secretary of Agricul- labor famine.
ture, who gave assurances that the De- Nearly every other section of the coun-
partment of Agriculture and agricultural try, he said, had claimed and obtained a
institutions could be counted on to join share of the enormous immigration to the
any large, effective movement for better- United States from abroad during the last
ing the conditions surrounding farmers twenty-five years. The failure of the
and home-makers. Mr. Hays said in the South to get a part of the newcomers not
past eighty years the American people only accounted for the present labor
engaged in farming had dwindled from famine in that section, but in many other
5 to 35 per cent of the whole population, ways, he said, had been disadvantageous
but in the South about 57 per cent were to the United States. The kind of labor
so engaged. the South needed,.he said, was a debata-
Addreses of Day. ble question. He described the system
SDay. of wages in the South as being almost
Addresses were made by W. W. Lump- universally on the share plan, and ad-
kin, of Columbia, 8. C., M. V. Richards, vised those actually engaged in efforts to
of the Southern Railway, who discussed induce immigration to the South from
mainly immigration to the South, and other section or from foreign countries to
DI. Charles A. Cary, of the Alabama Agri- present that plan and not be misled into
cultural College, who urged steps to ex- a comparison of wage scales. If laborers
terminate tick fever among the cattle, for the present could not be gotten from
and advocated that the Southern people this country it was certain, he said, that
raise more live stock, particularly for beef with proper effort the right kind of men
purposes. could be obtained abroad.
An appeal was made by John S. Cun- Bureau of Infaemetis.
ningham, president of the Tobacco Grow- Mr. Sargent declared that thirty-two
ers' Association of North Carolina, that per cent of all the immigration to Ameri-
efforts be made for the removal of the ca came into the State of New York, the
revenue tax placed on tobacco as a war great bulk of the aliens remaining in New
measure. Under that measure, he de- York city. They do not before coming
cleared, the tobacco industry has paid into here, he said, look up the geographical
the national treasury nearly $4,000,000,- situation, simply going to where their
000, and that its operation has been the friends have preceded them. What was
cause of breaking up and destroying to- needed was to offer advantages to aliens
bacco factories in Richmond, Danville and coming to the United States, whereby
other Southern cities, they may gather some knowledge of the
T. B. Thackston, of South Carolina, country outside the great centers of pop-
was elected permanent secretary of the ulation. It would be a good thing not
parliament, only to say to the alien, "you may land,"
Wedn mday's Tofsim but also furnish him information regard-
ing the opportunities in various sections
A discussion of immigration and an ad- of the country. He urged the delegates
dress by Gustav H. Schwab, of New York, to use their influence with Congress to
on Foreign Commerce and Ocean Trans- enact a law establishing at Ellis Island a
portation were the features of Wednes- bureau of information for immigrants
day's sessions of the Southern Industrial There are thousands, he said, who would
Parliament. The immigration questikit be glad to be directed to the open country
was discussed by Senator Simmons, of where there is sunshine and plenty of
North Carolina, and Commissioner Gen- room and where it would be an advantage
eral Frank P. Sargeant, of the Immigra- to the country to have them locate. The
tion Bureau. Permanent organisation way to get immigration started was to
was effected by the election of Governor get people located.
Robert Glenn, of North Carolina, as Practical Settlement of Italians in the
president, and other officers as follows: South was the title of a paper by Bishop
Secretary-Dr. W. C. Murphy, Wash- B. F. Broderick, who advocated the dis-
ingtop. tribution of immigrants by private en-
Treasurer-T. P. Thaxton, Columbia, terprises as a solution of the problem.
S. C. Dr. Chas. R. Borilleri, of Bufa N. Y,
Vice Presidents Alabama, William talked on The Italian Immigrant as a
Richards, Huntsville; Georgia, W. 0. Me- Farmer. his remarks having special ref-
Gowin, Hoffman; Mississippi, Henry erence to the colony at Fredonia, N. Y.


Kernoghan, Jackson; North Carolina, R.
S. Reinhardt, Lincolnton; South Carolina,
E J. Watson, Columbia; Tennessee, Rob-
ert Gates, Nashville; Texas, Joseph
Schwarts, Corsicana; Virginia, C. L. Hol-
land, Danville.
Executive Committee-W. T. Brown,
Ragland, Ga.; P. J. Holliday, Washington,
Ga.; Miss J. S. McCarthy, Batesville, S.
C.; J. A. Brown, Chadbourn, N. C.; Al-
bert Akers, Nashville, Tenn; E. C. Robin-
son, Houston, Tex.; J. 8. Browning, Po-
cahontas, Va.; H. L West, District of Co-
lumbia.
Speeches Before Parliament.
In the absence of Governor Glenn, W. O.
McGowin, of Georgia, presided at Wednes-
day's session. Gustav H. Schwab, of New
York, spoke on the subject of Foreign


SHIPS AND SUPPLIES FOR THE
PANAMA CANAL.
Perhaps the most noteworthy step tak-
en by the new Panama Canal Commssiion
since its organization was the decision
reached this week to purchase materials
and ships in the markets of the world.
The policy thus determined upon was
approved by Secretary Taft, and, after
consultation, received the endorsement of
the President. The decision was brought
about by the statement of Chief Engineer
Wallace that, in addition to the ships
now running between New York and Co-
lon, and owned by the Panama Railroad
Company, two others were absolutely nec-
essary to carry the food supplies and ma-


Southern Industrial ParlHment Now In Session,


trials needed ia the wo&k of aconstrue-
tion. It was found that the. shipa r
quired could not be bought in 'he United
State at what was considered a reaso-
able price, and that while two c -tona
ships col be t i ope for $4-
00, it would caw $1,100,0 to build mh
ships here. Moreover, the urop ean
could be bought at once, where it wold
take year sad a half to construct
American ship. It wa therefore decided
to buy the & p i ~rope, or whmver
ehe tey Eo bout nMt heaply
and seur mast quickly. Ftrt mre
the commiion decided to reserve to it-
self the right to boy the ateial needed
for canal construction in the words mar-
hkts.
This decision was not reared without
reluctance, for both Secretary Taft and
the members of the ementive committee
of the commission realized that the policy
entered upon might be ade the subject
of criticism on the part of A n pro-
ducers and shipuildr. This atiipated
eriticim has not been sow ina m ig It
appearance. Few of the critics care to
express themselves pli at thi time,
but their general line of objection to the
policy adopted haa refere to i bear-
ing oa te policy of prod tia. Phaps
their general feeling my be regarded a
having received expre n in the te-
ment of Representative Grosvenor, of
Ohio, who said that the poly of
tion had been biit up i the
State on the basiu of higher priem; that
thoSe prices were higher benamn labor
was paid better wages hre, and tat i
the government were to be the complin-
ant agnast the pries tat were to b the
result of the employment of American
labor at America wages, there wou
certainly be furnished teeby a theme for
some very interesting delirati ever
the tariff. From the other ide it is pos-
sible that there may be empait that
the individual prhasr i o0bged buy
in a restricted mrke while the Uted
States government takes the liberty of
buying where it pleas
Secretary Taft, in dis ing the acti
of the executive committee, id at he
felt obliged to approve it bease every
opportunity had been afforded to OCeqgra
to give a contrary Airectia, and, i the
absence of any, be felt tt under the
terms of the anal a the emMn-- l
was bound to construct the great watr-
way at the lowest possible eot. In the
first report of the Ithmia Canal O -
mission it was pointed out that if that
body were not bound by say restriction
imposed by Congress as to whr it
should purchase machinery, material and
supplies, it would sm to be ts duty to
construct the canal as cheaply as possi-
ble, and so to buy what it needed whe
it could get it ehepest. It was sggeted
that the pursuit of this policy would be
certain to produce, every time a large
contract was awarded to a foreign manu-
facturer of dealer, an outcry on the part
of American competitors, and ft wan urgd
that if Congress approved the poliy of
favoring American manufacturers and
dealers, even if it increased the cost of
construting the carnal, it was only just
that it should declare this policy by law
and lay down a rule which the sommlmi
could easily follow. Congress did not act
upon this suggestion, so the commission
felt that there was no retriction upon its
management. The matter will doubtless
be heard from further after Cogress
meets, if not before; but some months
will elapse before an extra session is like-
ly to be called, and in the meantime the
commission may secure its ships and make
contracts for supplies to a very large
amount, leaving the reckoning with the
majority in the National.Legislatum to
come later.


/
/
/


i


1








4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Florida


Electric Co.

W 11_' BMWal Eghmn
8I aud IDall Complete Eectrie Light
N aud Pow te Tdlphone Ex-
Ammnr W Mihmm Eetri




!E CANNON COMPANY


BARRELS

ME M

STANDARD

Or TWE

WORLD


Use no Other


Pbf -ninnf ica"
Ham 0C61mc, QUITMAN, GA.
M. L A.


No 1 SO AlU i.
BUUJ)M=n AND DRAL11=8 IN.


ENGINES. BOILERS.
CoMsU, &f, % OW sao d leeI Ma-
CAIPACTY NR m HAIND
te1al, WaON&dff ad=
mmer Baltking andR, RaLd a
Pians a inmates furaied for Ponw
Plants ad niw
stem PWM5. Ul Wia Bi mf4n ad

AUOUSTA. OA.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,

from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Controller Blum's Monogram and Syl
va Rye--Agents for Junga, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM & CO.
817 and 819 West Bay Street.
JACKSONVILLE, rLA.

A" Wrn -a W5 i ar PROW
ms e be we- Sem a mabew
U he aOse be se me% wusa to-dii


Our Gain in Population.
William E. Curtis, in the Chicago Rec-
ord-Herald, states that the Director of
the Census has been making an estimate
of the population of the various States
and territories for the current year, and
brings the total for the United States,
not including Alaska or the island pos-
sessions, up to 82,518,020, an increase of
1,304,689 from 1904 and 6,214,633 since the
regular census of 1900. The following is
Mr. North's estimate:


1904.
Alabama ....... 1,954,817
Arizona........ 136,807
Arkansas .... ... 1,384,904
California..... .. 1,593,717
Colorado ...... .. 50,280
Connecticut ...... 973,284
Delaware......... 191,231
District of Columbia 298,050
Florida ........ 583,390
Georgia ....... .. 2,367,923
Idaho.......... 191,060
Illinois ...... ..5,219,630
Indiana ....... 2,640,086
Indian Territory .. 476,812
Iowa .... ..... 2,359,677
Kansas ... ...... 1,487,451
Kentucky........ 2,262,590
Louisiana.... ... 1,486,841
Maine.. ...... .. 707,818
Maryland. ...... 1,24,304
Massachusetts .. .. 3,031,90
Michigan ...... .. 2,550, 18
Minnesota ...... 1,927,838
Mississippi ...... 1,655,938
Missouri...... ..3,277,657
Montana ........ 283,493
Nebraska........ 1,067,756
Nevada .. .... 40,327
New Hampshire. .. 425,612
New Jersey ..... 2 059,165
New Mexico ...... 209,322
New York ...... 7,775,182
North Carolina .... 2,004,154
North Dakota .... 370,410
Ohio .......... 4,351,683
Oklahoma........ 526,275
Oregon.. .. ...... 451,868
Pennsylvania .. .. 6,719.715
Rhode Island..... 461,776
South Carolina .... 1,415,984
South Dakota .... 422,758
Tennessee...... ..2,121,856
Texas........... 3,373,982
Utah ......... 303.137
Vermont ........ 348,129
Virginia ........ 1,933,464
Washington .. .... 582,451
West Virginia .... 1,037,04
Wisconsin....... 2,219,326
Wyoming. ...... 104.523
Total ...... .81,213,331


1905.
1,986,347
140,276
1,403,239
1,620,883


602.925


989,500
192,855
302,883
597,102
2,405,821
198,382
5,319,150
2,678,492
498,000
2,391,633
1,491,600
2,291,440
1,513,145
711,156
1,200,869
3,088,546
2,584,427
1,971,949
1,682,105
3,320,405
203,534
1,068,120
39,825
429,118
2,103,039
212,825
7,901,754
2,031,740
383,226
4,400,155
558,261
461,451
6,824,115
470,081
1,434,901
428,0655
2,147,166
3455,300
300,734
349,251
1,953,284
598,538
1,056,05
2,256,897
107,521
82,518,020


Mr. North has also made an estimate
of the population of the ten largest cities
in the United States for 1904 and 1905.
Following are the estimates for the cities
named:


New York
Chicago ..
Philadelphia..
St. Louis
Boston
Baltimore
Cleveland.
Buffalo .
San Francisco
Pittsburg. ..


1904.
3,809,118
1,932315
1,302,389
624,626
605,860
538,765
425,632
391,075
360,298
352,852


1905.
3,902,097
1,990,750
1,417,062
636,973
617,102
546,217
436,314
400,747
364,677
360,661


14 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The CLOTHIERS

EVERYTHING THAT IS GOOD AND
SMART IN WEARING APPAREL FOR
MEs AND BOYS.


GUARANTY TRUST & SAVINGS COMPANY,
N. Crner ay am Ocaa Sta
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


OFFICERS.
James W. Spratt, W. Btik,
President. Vice President.
Harlow Barnett, See'y and Treas.


Capital $100,000
4 per cent internet pad a n 4q.s


Pre, W. G. Toomer. Vioe-ires. & Mar.. C. O. PUttnerso. Tres., H. C. Uare, Se. Pemma mith

STANDARD ELECTRIC COMPANY
16 Fosyth St. Jackanvilk. Fla
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS AND SUPPLY DRAMERS


Any mE haviA oards. to dI-
peo of write m wkh partm-
Bars. WM cstrat for kbard a-it
pMrt. kil-dried, ar-drledor lroa
FRANKLIN E. TOWN, 22 Iogan StreLet, JaCksvil..


Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracit, Steam ad Blacksmith Coal l Cement, Britk, Patal.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla

H. E. Pritchett, Pres. P. L SUTHERLAND, Vice-Prs. A. a COVIGTONT, Hee'y.
J. P. COUNCIL, Treu ad Gel Mgr.

THE OOUNOIL TOOL 00.,
GeMal Omca: JACKBSOVILL3, ILA
Factory: WANNAISRg X. C.
.a.se. s f Ni1 rad TNooI
mopMover a ---w--a.

I12 WEST FORSYTH ST. BELL PHONE NO. 592
HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY
A. J. HEDILICK. Manager. FoErmery of Hedrick Raler
sole agency for rveltei ed adjoaiBn property a ea s (The ehetms reideMtae
of the otty.) Imoed ad lbavprod property form amm iS tlt,8piaet Spd ,IV amV
other suburb. Choe bernss property .i lavestmat.
MONEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTOILL


.. Turpentirne


Cups

If you expect to use the HRTY eap
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prnea anall infor-
tion cheerfully furnished O
Cups, Gutters
end &ll Tools
used in the Herty system of turpenthing.

Chattanooga Pottery
'.*....... *...*. -^ .m*y,
"hik"euv, Hrjd


You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Lecatienn?
You Want my Kind of Florida Land?

I F You Mean Business?
Cnl on or Wrte *t
J. H. L VINGSTON & SONS,
Ocala, Florida
4 eee*e****o*. *.**Ie ***e* *"*o$** *es$ $**sot se*e









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5

** *6*6e*tt ,4*****ea -*1 | s s11 1 ss | ****s0 1 sIms a I I a s I a a I 1p1 Im


THE LATEST FRENCH SUMMER MILLINERY.
D't Fail Whe in Jackave to Pay a Visit (Whether To Bay or Not)
to the Magndleat store of

SSTAT ANK HENRY JACOBS STATE MNK
5 EAS UT STBAY Rr .
Where are now on view all the Latest Creations of the Highest and Latest
Paris Conceptions of Millinery Art showing what are the very latest and
most correct fashions in Head Wear. Bhy nowhere else your new Hat until
you have paid a visit to this Grand Exhibition.
N. B.-Ther are also to be seen all the Newest French Walking Skirts,
French Suits and French Waists for summer wear.
N O 88 0 0 000608060880#04W


NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY
POR LETTERS PATENT.
Notice is hereby given that the under-
signed will apply to the Governor of the
State of Florida at Tallahassee, Florida,
on the 20th day of June A. D. 1905, for
letters patent incorporating Record In-
vestment Company under the following
proposed charter:
P. L. SUTHERLAND,
D. LH MeMILLAN,
J. A. HOLLOMON,
ARTHUR F. PERRY.

PROPOSED CHARTER OF RECORD IN-
VESTMENT COMPANY.
ARTICLE I.
The name of this corporation shall be
Record Investment Company. Its prin-
cipal office shall be in the city of Jack-
sonville, Florida, and its business shall
be conducted in other places in the State
of Florida and elsewhere through
branches agencies and otherwise, as may
be necesary and convenient.
ARTICLE IL
The general nature of the business to
be conducted by the -said corporation
shall be: to buy, own, hold, lease, let up-
on lease, mortgage, sell and convey real
property and also to improve the 'same
by erecting thereon buildings of any kind
or character; to buy and sell real and
personal property of every kind and 'de-
scription, either for itself or for others,
on commission or otherwise, and to mort-
gage and pledge same as security for
loans; to make loans and advances to
others and to take as security therefore,
either mortgages or pledges upon real or
personal property or personal security;
to carry on and transact a general build-
ing. and contracting business for itself or
others; to guarantee, subscribe for, pur-
chase, hold, sell, assign, transfer, mort-
gage, pledge or otherwise dispose of,
shares of capital stock or bonds, seuri-
ties or evidences of indebtedness issued
or created by any other corporation, and
while the owner or hold of such stocks,
bonds or obligations, to exercise all the
rights, powers and privileges of owner-
ship; to. patent, register and protect by
trade marks or otherwise, any means,
methods, appliances, formulae, secret pro-
cesses, machines, symbols or designa-
tions; to obtain, purchase, lease or other-
wise acquire any patent, patent rights,
formulae, secret processes, licenses or
privileges, trade marks or designations
and to operate under, sell, assign, pledge
or grant licenses in respect of, or other-
wise to turn the same to account; to ac-
quire, hold, use, mortgage, lease and
convey all such property, real or personal,
in any part of the world,, as may be nec-
essary or convenient in connection with
the said businesses; to enter into, carry
out or otherwise turn to account, con-
tracts of every kind; to have and main-
tain branches, agencies and offices, with-
in and without the State of Florida; to
to any or all things set forth in this
charter as objects, purposes, powers,
businesses or otherwise, to the same ex-
tent and as fully as natural persons
might do, and in any part of the world;
and in general to carry on such opera-
tions and enterprises and to do all such
things in connection therewith as may
be peAnitted by the laws of Florida and
be neemsary and convenient in the con-
duetig ea the company's businesses,


ARTICLE nHL
The amount of the capital stock au-
thorized shall be ten thousand dollars
($10,000.00), divided into one hundred
shares of the par value of one hundred
dollars ($100.00) each. The capital stock
nay be payable either wholly or in part in
cash, or may be issued or used either
wholly or in part, for the purchase of or
payment for property, labor or services at
a just valuation thereof, to be fixed by the
Board of Directors at a meeting to be
called for that purpose.
ARTICLE IV.
The term for which this corporation
is to exist shall be ninety-nine years.
ARTICLE V.
The businesses of said corporation
shall be managed and conducted by a
President, Vice President, Secretary,
Treasurer and a Board of Directors con-
sisting of not less than three nor more
than thirteen members, the number to be
fixed by the by-laws of the company.
The offices of Secretary and Treasurer
may be held by the same person. The
annual meeting for the election of direc-
tors by the stockholders of the company
shall be held on the first Tuesday in June
in each year. The date of the annual
meeting may be changed by the by-laws.
Until the officers elected at the first elec-
tion shall be qualified the businesses of
the corporation shall be conducted by the
following named officers: D. H. MeMil-
lan, President; P. L Sutherland, Vice
President; J. A. 'Hollomon, Secretary;
Arthur F. Perry, Treasurer; and D. H.
McMillan, P. L. Sutherland, J. A. Hollo-
mon and A. F. Perry as Directors.
ARTICLE VL
The highest amount of indebtedness or
liability to which the corporation may at
any time subject itself shall be two hun-
dred and fifty thousand dollars ($250,-
000 00).
ARTICLE VIL
The names and residences of the sub-
scribing incorporators of the said cor-
poration, together with the number of
shares of its capital stock subscribed by
each are as follows:
D. H. McMillan, residing in the City of
Jacksonville, Florida, 25 shares.
P. L Sutherland, residing in the City
of Jacksonville, Florida, 25 shares.
J. A. Hollomon, residing in the City of
Jacksonville, Florida, 25 shares.
Arthur F. Perry, residing in the City
of Jacksonville, Florida, 25 shares.
P. L. SUTHERLAND,
D. H. McMILLAN,
J. A. HOLLOMON,
ARTHUR F. PERRY.

State of Florida,
County of Duval.
Before me, a Notary Public in and for
the State of Florida at large, personally
appeared D. H. McMillan, P. L. Suther-
land, J. A. Hollomon and Arthur F. Per-
ry, each to me well known and known
to me to be the individuals described in
and who executed the foregoing proposed
charter and severally acknowledged that
they executed the same for the purposes
there in expressed.
Witness my hand and official seal at
the City of Jacksonville, Florida, this
16th day of May, A. D., 1905.
(Notary's Seal) C. SETON FLEMING,
Notary Publie State of Florida at Large.
My comuahdio expires Dec. 18th, A. D.,
1907.


THE DIAMOND.
Whrselmek nat Tn.a

Wines, Liquors and Cigars,

Sa l Adent for te atfar LauaIs Deear. alM "Wlhelmam Zwle oMt.
ere Watr. We uarateS a midit up bW usm*afl sa ., a flnUwn
Crem e d I Creme, bottle .... 6.00 Diamond Braad, battle ........ 1.0
[a i .4l- o : s"T i m, l i~.] Heart Brand bottle .......... .75


Club Brand, bottle ........... 125 Premium Brand, bott

S MYERSON CO..
105 k 107 Wowt Say St.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA,


.......... .



Phee 3.


mHNN8p990m,.ul ,ies1-


SJ. A. Craig Q. Bro.

* 239 W. By Street EVERETT BLOCI.

I Leaders in Men's and Boys Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.




The Bond & Bours Co.
WeOL ESAl a RETAIL


HARDWARE

Sash. Doors. Rlina-. Paints. Oil, and Glass.
Stoves. Tinware. Country-Holloware.


Jacksonville. Fha.


SJohn R. Yonag. J. W.Mot. C. B. Paker, Jans MeNaIt. W. W. Wder,
I President V100Pre Vl.elPre& Ve0P-re.' bee. a&Treas.



.ohn Re Young Cor.,


Commission

Merchants.





S SavyLnnh : : ::I **>** i :::::: ::: :------------l- 011> :


wiuii guilE uuuiuuuuuuuei I.+


10 WEST mAY STlET


Jam Sw art B. F. ebise. Jr.

STEWART 0a COMPANY
505 West Bids. TIDER. LADs .- IL.-

2,60 acres Virgin Timber, Liberty County, Fla. Will eat 000 feet and 80
boxes par acre. Price, 5.50.
50,000 acres Virgin Timber, Washington County, Fla. Will cut 5,000 feet per .
acre. A large amount of Cypress also. Price, $.50 per acre.
5,700 acres Virgin Timber, Liberty County, Fla. Will cut 5,000 feet and 100 4
boxes per acre. Price, $4.75 per acre.
Numerous other tracts of both Virgin and Saw Mill Timber in all parts
of the State. Orange Groves and Truck Farms, Improved and Unimproved
City Property. Loans negotiated. Correspondence solicited.


XXXXXI--X^%^^


cc~usu;-- -- -- - -----------;


0 C G Br d bttl 1 0


Ibl P--1 11,m,6 -1









6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


(Omthael.)
As we said in last week's article under
above heading the T. OA. had planted
eed whiLk m t germinate, and already
the word has its eye on the association,
though Mr. hotgrs organ had given it
out that nothing co d come of it. As
stated s ftlets habd begun investigations
L ing to a genal conolidation of the
iiies thu the ocr of the asso-
ia. The time had come when some-
thig tgible mst develop The officers
of the T. A. felt that the factors had
been the real friMds of the producers
and that in resent years many factors
had become producers, therefore the first
eort should be to emourage factorage
somerm the doing buimess to consoli-
date their interests as far as possible,
and the joi with the producers in the
rgaalatti of mone great company so
that the intest of all factors and all
prod ra aold be protected. Conditions
wre rip for su' a move. Other parties
w. redy to jo t with the prod s.
The ea was considered by a few factors,
and the result was a conference of a great
majority of factors was called during the
sumer to meet at the Continental Hotel,
Atlaste Beach. This was a satisfactory
efiOeme. It adjourned to meet at Old
Pblt Comfort, Va., two or three weeks
later. We have been told that some of
Mr. Botte's now present leading asso-
ates wer there, who did not hesitate
to relate the black record, the damnable
tricks, ete., etc, etc., of one Mr. 8. P. .
Th meeting adjourned to meet in Aa-
lanfa little later, but never did, for the
reauom eme parties interested changed
their p s.
The second week in September came,
and agai a great and enthusiastic gath-
ring of turpetine people eame together,
It being the seed annual meeting of the
T. A. The spirit of organization was
in the air. Lavin out details, the story
is, that the Consolidated Naval Stores
Company wa agreed to at this meeting.
Even factorage houses agreed to consoli-
data their inta ts n one company.
Prie tM year, under the infence of the
aeciatima had improved, and conditions
began to look better. It was the aim of
the coa iitted movement to improve
price. That was the principal and main
objet of the association. During the fall
of M9 the ompsnale interested worked
out the details and by January, 1903,
tings were ready for the general consoi-
datha, which took place, sad thus an-
other move was made for the betterment
of caitlema. Some factors refused to
go into the commolidatio and many oper-
aters had fears and doubts. They had
been told that it meant lower prices and
the swamngp of the producers, etc.
Soa the Arst great propositions that
esme beoe the new company was what
to do witL the staff at the loeed orts
The nri Naval Store and ommis-
sir OCEP who had been in business
thre yr Jadkonville, and the Mu-
tual Naval Stores company, who had
bem in h-muies two years here, had
handled their receipts at Svanvah prices
The rst mea of the new company was
to form a alliae with Patterson Down-
i ua an uand mr4ete the product
L tl mrketig agent, but they
wre afraid of Shottr and would not un-
dertake t Then it was decided to or-
ganim aa export company, but about that
time Pattem Dwnaing COmpany joins
hands with Shtter and they proposed to
work in harmey with factors in sustain-
ing prices and take Jacksonville and Fer-
aM a receipt at vsanmah prices. It
was up to the new company to enter into
such aagreeent or go into the export
buMines After careful considerationn it
was decided to contract. This done, the
ext thing to do was to carry out the
main object of the organization of the
new sompny, namely, improve prices.
Parties who did not go into the new com-
pamy were predicting all kinds of Iqw
rice and ng what they could to dis-
credit the company. Mr. Shotter was
seen and plans propeed by which a 4ie
minimum for turpentine should be main-
tained. At arst he agreed, but when it


came to the point of going to proper
agreement he refused. Conferences for
many days were held with him and all
kinds of plans and devices were considered
which were reasonable and fair, but he
would not stick to anything or aid. He
thought he had the advantage and he
would use it for low prices. Failing to
do anything with Shotter to aid in keep-
ing up prices, the fact was made known
to operators. Some ten or a dozen pro-
ducers got together and decided that they
would see that turpertine did not go be-
low 45 cents. They were not desirous of
making extreme high prices, but only rea-
sonable living prices. They went on the
Savannah market, and before turpentine
reached, in is downward march under Mr.
Shotter's influence 45 cents, a bid was
put on the market and soon Shotter and
his crowd were hustling for turpentine,
and back up she went and back up she
stayed. Thus the operators saved the
day.
(To be Continued.)

THE COUNTRY.
TRADE CONDITIONS THROUGHOUT


Some Naval Stores History.


Dun's last review says::
Unseasonable weather is the chief cause
of complaint, both as to distribution of st
merchandise and agricultural develop- e
ment. At many leading cities retail trade al
in spring and summer wearing apparel is w
falling behind expectations, and there is
less than the customary re-order business q
in wholesale and jobbing departments.
Although no actual reduction in the crops
is yet assured, sufficient uncertainty has
appeared to render dealers in the farm-
ing districts somewhat cautious regard-
ing the accumulation of supplies beyond
current requirements. Otherwise the a
trade situation is satisfactoryi funda- -
mental conditions are sound, payments
reasonably prompt and failures below the
average. Manufacturing activity is fully
maintained, the percentage of idle ma-
ehinery being smaller than at any recent
date, and the textile industries make no-
table progress under the stimulus of ad-
vancing raw materials. The few strikes
now in progress cause little interruption,
and some of the July 1 wage scales have
been adjusted, but others are still under
discussion. Railway earnings thus far
available for May show an average gain
of 8.0 per cent over last year's, and for-
eign commerce at this port for the last
,week increased $3,957, 199 in value of ex-
ports, while imports declined $592,312 in
comparison with the same week in 1904.
Treasury withdrawals did not disturb the
ease of the money market, and prices of
securities recovered a small part of the
recent loss, although there was less ac-
tivity and little interest on the part of
the general public. Bank exchanges at
New York were 41.8 per cent larger than p
in the same week last year, while at oth-
er leading cities there was a gain of 16.8
per cent.
Structural shapes have taken the posi-
tion of prominence in the iron and steel
industry. Building operations that were
retarded by inclement weather are now
under way, and the tonnage of steel re-
quired will keep mills fully occupied for
some time. In addition to numerous ex-
tensive office buildings and manufacturing
plants, there are special railway terminals
that swell the volume of business to a
remarkable aggregate. Motive power and
rolling stock for the railroads cannot be
delivered as rapidly as required, and these
sections of the industry are crowded to
their utmost capacity. n several other
departments, however, there is more or -
less irregularity, and the possibility of
demands for higher wages on July 1 -
tends to generate conservatism in the ac-
ceptance of long term contracts at cur- "
rent quotations. As most consumers of -
pig iron have early requirements provid-
ed for, and furnaces are producing at the
maximum, thereis a disposition to delay
purchases of material for distant deliv-
ery in the hope of more attractive terms.
This position is strengthened by the re-
duction of Southern foundry iron to $13,
without producing any large demand.
Nevertheless, the industry as a whole is
well engaged, and the output for May -.


p]
st
T
g
t(
fr
er
al
bI
al



bl
Ii

aV
ly
ni

su
st
ti
a


q
al
hi
di
w
th
wI


promises to attain a new record.
Higher raw materials have given more
;ability to the' textile manufactures.
here is no disposition to advance cotton
goods, buyers limiting their operations
immediate needs, despite the difficulty
equently encountered in securing deliv-
ries. This attitude is still maintained,
Though conditions have changed for the
better and jobbers might be expected to
anticipate future requirements somewhat
ore freely. In the aggregate this hand-
i-mouth business reaches a considerable
volume, especially in comparison with the
nail trade earlier in the year. Export
buying is less of a feature, which is large
do to the fact that manufacturers can-
ot make prompt deliveries on these lines.
frequent withdrawals of lines of woolen
oods .indicate that agents have had a
successful season, particularly in wor-
eds, and comparatively few cancella-
ons are reported. An advance of over
cent in the average of domestic wool
notations established the highest price
vel of recent years. Upper leather has
ot shared the activity of sole as yet,
nd sales of harness leather and belting
utts are restricted. Supplementary or-
ers for spring shoes are still coming for-
ard at New England factories,,although
ley interfere with cutting on fall foot-
ear, which has just begun.
Grain markets have developed further
rength. Minneapolis reported the larg-
.t advance, May options rising 28 cents
bove the low point touched on April 27.
h'Iile a good milling demand gave some


'HE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JAOKSONVILLE. PLA.
CAPITAL $300,00 SURPLUS and UNDVIDW) PROWTS S447E091
We isse Tlmm Ortimestes of Deposit, whleh draw terest at t he rath trwer tr &mr
mes, if ked ninety days or loer, Take adra tie of (ue a"tas Mt year I eeM
methM am ,ye. Prartulr itteatim paid to Oat-ot-Tow a seoeoti. parMi = by


STAJI/ NONE BETTER MADE

TAV E L Prompt Shipments.

OTTER CREEK LUMBER CO., Jacksuville, Fla

DRINK A BOTTLE OF DELICIOUS AND RZ7REKRING











roved by the highest medical experts to be the most heathful drink ie aistenc
old by the JACKSONVILLE BOTTLING CO, 60o We*t Bay Street.

R. 8. HAL., Pres. T. C. HAL, V. P. and Mgr. L.J. KmJre, See. and Treas.


IARION HARDWARE. CO.,


HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.

I 11I 14 I1 ll 1il I l 111 1 1 1 llll t llllll t lll l ll -


J. P. WILLxim. President.
T. A. JaNmNIxs, end Vice-President.
H. L. KATO, Secretary.


J. A. G. CABsoN, 1st VicePresident
J. F. Dusrmanun, 3d Vice-Preident
D. White, Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

HiNI nMo U 10N FIc 1W m HE M .
alan Office SJV VJLa OOROOIA.
Branch Oflisem I P"OXCOLA, FLX. BMreh Gronery House,
J O jCKOrVlLLe,, fCOJLUMnUI, OA.

Naval Stores Prodacers are lavited to Correspoed With Us.
r 1 1 as1 ta 1 1 llll lllall l l lllll l ii ll llll llllll II i


support, the rise was chiefly due to the
strong speculative position of that mar-
ket, where the bulk of the contract wheat
is held by 'a few strong interests. Ex-
cessive moisture threatens the develop-
ment of "rust" in winter wheat States,
but otherwise the crop outlook is not ma-
terially changed. Rain has delayed corn
planting and this cereal was also advanced
by aggressive speculation at Chicago.
Western receipts of 873,408 bushels wheat
compare with 1,015,561 bushels last year,
and exports from all ports of the United
States were 634,672 bushels, lour in-
eluded. against 1,204,849 bushels last year
and 4,672,980 in 1903. Arrivals of 912,640
bushels corn compare with 1,471,190 bush-
els, while Atlantic coast exports of 1,-
418,65 bushels largely exceeded the 147,-
456 bushels in the same week a year ago.
Cotton was also stronger in price, specu-
lative support and conflicting crop reports
having more influence than the weak sta-
tistical position.
Official returns of foreign trade in April
show extremely satisfactory results in
comparison with the corresponding month
in preceding years. Imports were valued
at 05,636,142, an increase of $12,114,29M
over April, 1904, while exports of $129,-
358229 exceeded last year's figures by
$19,477,824, or a total gain in foreign
trade for the month of $31,592,084. As
the increase in farm staple exports was
leas than $7,000,000, it follows that most
of the gain occurred in manufactured pro-
ducts, a class of trade that is steadily
gaining.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 'I
II 1


Review of Naval Stores for a Week.


pirits for the Week at Savannah.
Price Repts Sales Exp 1904
Mon. May.22 ..68 455 646 428 53%
Tues. May 3. .69 1318 727 372 53%
Wed. May 24..71 500 836 fo5 53%
Thur. May 25. .71% 933 329 727 53%

Re i for the Week at Savannah.
Monday, May 22, Last Year.
W. W ............5.27% 3.90
W. G........... 4.95 3.60
N............. .4.85 3.35
M. ............ 4.70 3.25
K. ........... 4.00 3.20
L.... .... .. .. .. 4.45 3.00
H... ........ 3.95 2.85
G. ........... 3.75 2.75
F. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3.70 2.70
E. ............ 3.65 2.65
D. ............ 3.0 2.60
A. B. C......... 3.55 2.60
Receipts 972, sales 1,426, exports 1,249.
Tuesday May 23.-Rosin firm; sales,
1,406; receipts, 3,172; shipments, 197.
Quote: A, B, C, $3.60; D, $3.65; E,
$3.70; F, $3.75; G, $3.80; H, $4.05; I,
$4.50; K, $4.70; M, $4.80; N, $4.90; W
G, $5.10; W W, 5.40.
Wednesday, May 24.-Rosin firm; sales,
2,67; receipts, 1,241; shipments, 330.
Quote: A, B, C, $3.65; D, $3.70; E,
$3.75; F, $3.80; G, $3.85; H, $4.20; I,
$4.65; K, $4.85 M, $4.956; N, $5.05; W
G, @5.35; W W, $5.56.
Thursday, May 25.-Bosin firm; sales,
2,380; receipts, 1,992; shipments, 1,064.
Quote: A, B, C, $3.70@3.75; D, $3.75;
E, $3.80@3.84; F, $3.85@3.90; G, $3.90;
' H, $3.45; I, $4.75; K, $4.95; M, $5.10;
N, @6.25; W G, 65.50@5.55; W W, $5.75.

Jvrl-konvile a C

Still another manufacturing enterprise
is to be located on Talleyrand avenue, in
/ the northern part of Jacksonville. It is
the factory of the American Oak Leather
Tanning Company, which was recently or-
ganised and of which C. H. Mann is to be
general manager.
The company has purchased a fve-acre
tract of land adjoining Edwards' road
house, sad on it is to be erected a tan-
nery and ytablialmnent for the manu-
facture of all kinds of leather goods. The
building is to be two stories in height,
and will be 00 feet front by 150 feet in
depth. Work is expected to begin at once,
sad the building is to be completed with-
in six weeks. The machinery is to be
installed as soon as possible, and every-
thing is to be of the latest model and the
output of the' plant will be equal to that
of any factory in the country.
Captain C. E. Garner is president of
the company; W. F. Coachman is vice
president; A. F. Perry is secretary and
treasurer, and C. H. Mann is general man-
ager. The capital stock of the company
is $0,000, and it is probable that this will
be increased to $100,000 during the pres-
ent year.
From the half-way house along the riv-
er front to a short distance north of the
Ostrich Farm the banks of the St. Johns
is rapidly becoming a vast manufacturing
center.
The tract of land bought by the Naval
Stores Export Company, which was for-
merly the site of the old McGuire mill,
better known as the Bueki mill, or the
Wilson & Hunting mill, presents a busy
scene at present. A great shed has been
built from the present line of Talleyrand
avenue to the edge of the old mill build-
ings, and as soon as the old buildings are
removed the shed is to extend to the river
bank.
Other sheds for the storage of rosin are
being built on the property, and the foun-
dation for great storage tanks for turpen-
tine are being constructed. The low
places are being filled in; the brick walls
of the old slab pit are being torn down
and the debris removed.


Savannah Naval Store Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.
Receipts Thur. May 25 .... 5,400 25,335
Receipts previously ....... 933 1,921
Total ...................30,947 82,795
Export Thur. May 25 .... 727 1,064
Exports previously .......23,090 61,266
Total ...................24,417 62,330
Stock Thur. May 25 .... 6,530 20,465
Stock previously ......... 9,081 27,276

Baily & Montgomery.
New York, May 24.
Spirits Turpentine-Stock 279 barrels.
Market during the week has been very
firm in the advancing market; business
fair.
Thursday, May 18th, 67%c asked.
Friday, May 19th, 69 a. m., 00% p. m.
Saturday, May 20th, 681%e.
Monday, May 22d, 70c.
Tuesday, May 23d, 72e.
Wednesday, May 24th, 73c a. m.
Rosin-Stock 6,240 barrels.
This market has also been very firm,
receipts easily sold as soon as sampled
for desirable grades.
A. C ........................ $3.75@85
D (graded) ................ 3.95
E .......................... 4.06@ 10
F .............. ............ 4.10o@ 15
G ...................... 4.2@25
H .......................... 4.30@ 35
I ........................... 4.75@ 85
K .......................... 4.90@$5
M .......................... 5.10@20
N .......................... 5.20@ 30
W G ....................... 5.40@50
W. ..................... 5.75@$6

ity of ractris.

Lift Bridge Crosng.
The Seaboard Air Line Railway has
built a track up to the north end of Tal-
leyrand avenue, and from the south side
of the avenue the track is built down
the river bank. As the level of the track
is about three feet below the grade of
the avenue, the company is now-engaged
in building a lift bridge to cross the track.
All traffic on the avenue will cross this
bridge. When a train is to cross the ave-
nue the bridge is lifted and the avenue is
effectively blocked, so that no team can
get on the track.
This bridge is to be only a temporary
structure, for the line of Talleyrand ave-
nue is to be changed from the corner of
the Ostrich Farm to a point a few feet
south of Deer Creek bridge, which is the
northern boundary of the Naval Stores
Export Company's property.
The work of grading the new line of the
avenue is now progressing rapidly. From
the Ostrich Farm the new avenue bears a
little to the north, cutting off a narrow
strip on the northwest corner of the
Country Club grounds. It continues in a
straight line, bearing I little east of north
to a point just beyond the track of the
Atlantic Coast Line and turns sharply to
the northeast, continuing in that direc-
tion to a point a few feet south of where
the present avenue crosses Deer creek.
Under the ordinance granting the At-
lantie Coast Line Railroad Company the
right to straighten the avenue, the com-
pany is to pave the entire roadway of the'
new avenue with vitrified brick. It will
now be only a short time before the new
avenue will be completed and opened to
the public. When that is done then the
present avenue is to be closed up and
will become the property of the railroad
company.
The carrying on of the great improve-
ments in that section is giving employ-
ment to a large number of men, and as
the factories and export yards of the
Naval Stores Company and the railroad
company will employ large forces of la-
borers, that section of the city is bound
to build up rapidly. Already property is
increasing in value and desirable lots for
building homes are becoming scarce.


~%%m;binfirnlUuiuuuU


Florida Bank and Trust Company
Cpitam l SIM.00.0.00. Jaeauenvleo. iri.
DEPOSITARY OF STATE COVwY AMD CITY FrUBS
W. F. COACHMAN President. NW. JIINaG. Vi t.
W. A. REDDING, dfaier. ARTHrw F. P.iBY, Viae PlsnsL.'
P. FLeMING, Jr., Trust Ooeer
Receives deposit accounts of Individuals. Ar, earprmtlos s aka. Pays 4 er
cent on saving etssaedepipot boxes. EBuys a d sells Ielga lsha 1 sa
Issues letters of credit.
Aet a trustee, transfer agent, regtrar aad seal ags f ratl~s s
mnnloipalities. Executes al trusts seh as executor, tustee dr wB r appe
of court, receiver and prdian.
VUreualed&aeame. Amao s seaweed. Cascs dme Iseasd.


Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Adrerlutiments rW ble Inrted J rAidf eiAOWetM a(t M Om Ba
For ame week, esm alilM.
or two weeksL, M aal.
Por thLmr wee, m- --t al.
For four wes, Sems a Ue.
*'im words o diary lenIth make eus Ie.
HTadml cOunts am two liUe.
o i M eyet Uw headMins emm b a.dmio.
RBeittaom to aseompany the order. Mo extrra cr r I- se ra
oMtalrning tadvrtiemL Coit bte In thise o s t.14 = -.9
.normig to mecure utm la sar paper.


Tgrpeatle Meu.
Buy a Blakeles Gashli Pamping Ot-
At for your atill. No. I e t plmps $
gallon per hour at a eat of3 I em sd
requires o attmntma whila nr
Started in oae ia. J. 0mpiNIL
Oeeam Me.
Wanted.
To buy a first-damm trp late
in Florida. Will y the rim"t EriM for
the right pla s. o st we'l md
apply. G. A. Petteway, DBo ,a L y,
marion Co., FL. tf
Pobsitlo Waated.
Position as stiller; can furnish refer-
ences. Address, J. L. Hatcher, Mayo, Fla.


IMPORTS OF ROSIM INTO
From United States ....................
From France ..........................
From all other countries. ...............
Total Tons ...................
Percentage from United States .........
Reported by James Watt & Son.


I
w




j


HUP Sqffttfmd
Naval stares m a msmu help by ap-
plyin to the Cty mploy-mt BW ,
840 eat Bay Sb..t, JafhewOib, Fa.
W-tedf.
Ten turpi zippers, tn dipr,
ten men to work ra wrw mil, sp-
ters, ten man for general wrk. y.
place. Apply at eame. Tyler Im
Company, Boom 5, Balwi ig., Jeak-
soaville, Fa a
fr Sal,
Turpentine ioarti ir t est io
with fee simple timber sueles-t to at
twenty-Ave to thirty m bm. Ad-
dress, Operator, C re = eorto


UXITKD MIFTOQM
1900 1901 1M0
87,110 87,6N 79J,5
2,= 3,1M 1,6S4
424 00 318
90,079 90,54 9,17
96.71 9.3 85.04


1lW
2AU
510


9L45


I-N
IT7,
725


T0.a


FOR. SALE.

6,500 Acres Round Timber, just south of Stuart.
Fronts Indian and St. Lucy Rivers; chain Pineapple
lands. Must be sold as a whole, 3.50 per acre.

BUCKMAN, JACKSONVILL, LA



H. A. Renfroe Co.


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suit to Order at ReadyJAd Prices Mai Ordem Ghve Pm AeSsa
439 W. Bay Street JACKSONVILLE. PIA.



SOUTHERN ELECTRIC CO.
BOARD OF TRADE BUILDING. 218 MAIN ISTRET.
INSTALLATIO O W K"
WO As TCTEO .=..
BELL PHONE 1330. JAOKSONVILLU. PLA.


-








8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.




LUDDEN & BA TES,. -^ft
Wn -MUM '.


SLrM8 i tn The South's Largest and Most Reliable Music House.


New York, May 23.-The Merchants
Trust Company of this city was closed
to-day by the order of the State Super-
intendents of Banks because it had made
Toens amounting to about $1,250.000, upon
which it had not been able to realize a
sufficient sum to pay depositors and save
the capital of the company from impair-
ment. Upon the application of the State
Attorney General, Douglas Robinson, a
\brother-in-law of President Roosevelt,
was appointed one of the receivers of the
company. The other receiver is the New
York Trust Company.
The company's loans, which had no
ready market value, were about $850,000,
on securities of the Hudson Valley Rail-
way Company of Glens Falls, N. Y.,
which is a consolidation of trolley lines
in the vicinity of Albany, Troy, Saratoga
and Lake George, and nearly $100,000 to
the Rutland (Vt) Street Railway Com-
pany, and the Chittenden Development
Company of Rutland.
The trust company owes depositors
about $2,200,00, and, according to the
State Bank Examiner, has available as-
sets other than in the Hudson Railway
Company and the Rutland companies, of
nearly $1,300,000; so that it will be nec-
essary to realize $950,000 to pay deposit-
ors.
Depositors Will Be Paid
The stockholders are liable to the ex-
* tent of $500,000. With that amount the
State Bank Examiner said to-day that a
sufficient sum should certainly be realized
to pay depositors in fulL
The announcement that the trust com-
pany was closed followed a meeting of
the board of directors. There was a line
of clerks of business firms waiting to
Sdraw out deposits when the State Bank
Examiner notified them that no further
business would be transacted.. No excite-
ment ensued, and those who sought ad-
mittance later went quietly away when
they were informed that the banking of-
fice was closed.
Assistant State Bank Examiner Judson
said to-day:
"In round figures there was on deposit
in the main bank of the company about
$1,300,000, confined almost entirely to
business men. The Fifty-ninth street
branch had on deposit about $700,000.
"No other institution is involved by the
closing.
"It is certain the assets would cover all
liabilities to the extent of paying the de-
positors and stockholders in full, if the
assets can be marketed at par. Several
months will be required for the receiver
or receivers to get the affairs of the com-
pany in shape approaching a more or less
final state of preparation for settlement."
Bank Kxaminer's Statement.
State Bank Superintendent F. D. Kil-
burn gave out the following statement:
"An examination of the Merchants' Trust
Company, made something over two years
ago, disclosed the fact that its manage-
ment had loaned upon and purchased se-
curities to the amount of about $4,000,000,
which had no ready market value, besides
guaranteeing loans made in the interest
of a Richmond, Va., company to the ex-
tent of $750,000. About $2,00,000 of
these loans and investments were upon se-
curities of Richmond companies. About
$850,000 were invested in the securities
of and loaned to the Hudson Valley Rail-
way Company and nearly $400,000 to
the Rutland, Vt., Street Railway Com-
pany, the latter being a holding company
of the stock of lighting, power and rail-
way companies located in Rutland.
"I was convinced'that to put the trust
company in the hands of a receiver at
that time would necessarily result in
throwing these securities on the market,
and in an enormous loss to the Trust
Company, and it wau my judgment,
which subsequent events have confirmed,


that justified that it would be better to
try to relieve the Trust Company of these
securities. This task was at once under-
taken, and has thus far resulted in the
payment by the Richmond Companies of
$*,267,000, of the entire debt, less $150,-
000. The Trust Company has also been
relived from its said guarantee of $750,-
000.
Aidavit of Hudson Valley Co.
"In the meantime, a syndicate has been
formed by those interested in the Hudson
Valley Railway property by which it was
agreed to advance $970,000 for the pur-
pose of putting that property in better
shape. This amount was paid in by this
syndicate, of which the Trust Company
paid eleven-twentieths. Out of this,
however, there was paid to the Trust
Company $100,000 upon its indebtedness."
The officers of the trust company are as
follows:
President, Jaeob L. Phillips; vice pres-
ident, Cassius M. Wicker; secretary-
treasurer, Frederick P. Davis; assistant
secretary and assistant treasurer, Jacob
C. Coyne.
One of the directors was Dr. John P.
Munn, physician to the Gould family.
On January 1 the company's stock and
bond investment amounted to $1,471,312,
including the following:
Hudson Valley Railway syndicate par-
ticipation, $33,500; United States Cotton
Duck stocks, $100,000; $101,000 Viginia
Passenger and Power Company, first
bonds; $200,000 of the Chittenden De-
velopment Company, first bonds; and
$500,000 of the bonds of the city of New
York.
State Bank Examiner Judson said the
loans believed to be responsible for the
bank's trouble were made under the ad-
ministration of Edwing Langdon, wlhN
was president of the company until 1902,
and that Edwin Hawley and Mr. Phillips
were not responsible for them.

BIG FLORIDA LAND DEAL.

Chicago and St. Louis Capitalists Buy
193goo Acres.
Brunswick, Ga., May. 24.-A deal in-
volving $1,000,000 and 193,000 acres of
land in Liberty and Franklin counties,
Florida, was closed to-day. The pur-
chasers are a syndicate of Chicago and
St. Louis capitalists. The closing of this
deal, which has been on for the past sev-
eral weeks, a majority of those interested
having been in Brunswiek, means the
building of a railroad to Apalachicola,
Fla., from St. Joseph, a distance of forty
miles. The road will then extend north-
ward one hundred miles to Quincy, and
it is understood that it will then head for
Atlanta. The purchase also means the
settlement and building of a city at St.
Joseph. The purchasers have recently
visited the tract and inspected it thor-
oughly. A visit was also made to Apa-
lachicola. Nothing was given out official-
ly until to-day, when a meeting of Albert
Fendig, of Brobston, Fendig & Co., (i. W.
Hayne, of Chicago, R. H. Hemphill, of
St. Louis, attorney of the syndicate, and
others interested was held at which all
papers were signed and the necessary
bonus was put up. The land sold was
owned by a syndicate of Georgia and
Florida business men.


Cay, Shine & McCall
FIRE INSURANCE.


s zs Dyal-Updarch B@,


mEM


1955


Wr~le for Emfthpq~
~~ res w


A Big Failure in New York


*Q"*****^""---** p** **-**e*-**

HOTEL BARTHOLDI ** YiM" :gy .
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout. Near *
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Commercial Trvelers. Here you and no grand and magnificent deco- 0
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elaborate bill of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
No employees tn any wa la inatentiv.
speak to you.
But just a cosy, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the heartaof
those who are looking for solid comfort. Good, plain American cook-
ing, and &Sable and courteous treatment.
MILTON ILOBLEE. Proprietor.



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meC mao a an I. f ar 3 anr m int ea er.
daily newspaper m Florida ..


































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ooFull Telegraphic and Stockd
PHONE 317.

MRS. D GEO W. BtOCK








AheA etropolis.olls


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
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$5.00 a Year $25 Six Months


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CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.

JACKSONVILLE, fLORIDA.

Metropohs.










aB3 WBU=KINAMY INDUBThBL UNWIND.


TIMn ON THE FOREST RSFgRVES
TO -R 8OLD.
Information come, from Washington
that the mature timber on the National
forest reserves is to be offered for sale.
This announcement is in line with the
declared purpose of the Department of
Agriculture to develop the National for-
est reserves by use. The restriction for-
merly laid upon the export of timber from
the States in which the forest reserves
were located has been removed, and the
law now planes no limitation on the ship-
ment of timber grown on any forest re-
serves except those in the State of Idaho
and the Black Hills reserve in South Da-
kota. The effect of this change is the
law, and the declared policy'of the De-
partment of Agriculture, is that the tim-
ber on the reserves may now be cut and
disposed of to the highest bidder. On
many of the reserves there are great
quantities of mature timber, and on some
of them the facilities for getting it out
at a reasonable cost are excellent. The
Forest Service, which has charge of the
administration of the reserves, is anxi-
ous to begin the cutting of this mature
timber a n a possible, and it is pre-
pared to consider offers from lumbermen
who wish to undertake such operations.
It is perhaps well to cad attention to
the fact that this announcement does not
mean that the forest reserves are going
to be devastated under authority of the
Government. On the contrary, the dis-
tinct and definite purpose of the Forest
Service is to improve the reserves by
tiliing the material that is now fit for
lumber. In doing so, it will also pro-
vide for the reproduction of the forest
and the restocking of those areas upon
which forest conditions are defective.
Work of tis kind has been successfully
carried on for some years in the Black
Hills Forest Reserv, and has been begun
with the greatest promise of success on
the lands of the Chippewa Indians, in
Northern Minnesota, from which it is
propbaed to create another National re-
serve.
The public li general, and lumbermen
in particular, will be interested to know
that in this last ease the restrictions
imposed by the Forester have in no way
hampered the lumbering operations.
Timber sold at public sale, with full
knowledge of these restrictions, brought
higher prices than were ever obtained
for white and Norway pine in the same
region, and the slash has been burned
and got out of the way at a cost of about
12 cent per thousand feet board meas-
ure.
The supervisor of each forest reserve
is authorized to receive applications for
the right to cut timber; intending pur-
chasers should communicate with him,
not with the Department at Washington.

EMPLOYMENT ON NATIONAL FOREST
RESERVES.
The Bureau of Forestry has published
a circular giving information regarding
employment on the National forest re-
serves. Thi circular explains how ap-
pointments to the Forest Service on the
reserves are made, states the salaries of
its members, and indicates the knowl-
edge and experience required of rangers
and supervisors, and the duties each must
perform. The future organization will in-
elude Forest Supervisors at $1,800 to
2,500 a year, Deputy Forest Supervisors
at $1,500 to $1,700, Forest Rangers at
$1,00 to $1,400, Deputy Forest Rangers
at $1000 to $1,100, and Assistant Forest
Rangers at 800 to 900.
The law requires that every applicant
for a position in the Forest Service pass
a Civil Service examination. Legal resi-
dence in the State or .Territory in which
employment is desired is generally neces-
sary, since only where examinations fail
to secure thoroughly satisfactory men are
avancies filled by the examination of
applicants from other States. Appoint-
ments of Supervisors are made, so far as
practicable,- by promotion of competent
rangers or forest assistants.
To be eligible as Forest Ranger the
applicant must be physically sound, ae-
customed to outdoor work, and know
how to take care of himself and his horse
in regions remote from settlement and
supplies. He must know something of


surveying, estimating and scaling timber,
lumbering, and the livestock business.
Some of the reserves require a specialist
in one or more of these lines of work.
The applicant must be thoroughly famil-
iar with the region in which he seeks
employment. The entire time of Rangers
is to be given to the service. Rangers,
under the direction of the Forest Super-
visor, patrol to prevent fire and trespass;
estimate, survey and mark timber, and
supervise its cutting; issue mining per-
mits, build cabins and trails, enforce
grazing restrictions, investigate claims,
and make arrests for violation of reserve
laws.
Forest Supervisors must have all the
qualifications of Rangers, combined with
superior business and administrative
ability. They deal with the public in all
matters connected with the sale of timber,
the central of grazing, the issuing of per-
mits and the application of all regulations
for the use and occupancy of forest re-
serves. Knowledge of technical forestry
is desirable, but not essential.
Work upon the forest reserves offers
good and increasing opportunity for men
of the right sort. Requests for informa-
tion about the times and places when and
where examinations will be held should
be addressed to the Civil Service Commis-
sion, Washington, D. C.

MR. DALEY HEARD FROM.
Mr. Daley, who is a naval stores in-
spector employed by 8. P. Shotter & Co.,
informs the Record that he inspected the
car of rosins shipped by Carmichael &
Bathea to The Tampa Naval Stores Co.
and that the rosins had not been previ-
ously inspected by the Shotter Company
at the still.
WILL BUILD NEW RAILROAD.
Norfolk, Va., May 23.- The Norfolk
"and Carolina Coast Railroad Company,
with a capital of $5,000,000, is being
formed by a syndicate headed by Ru-
dolph Kleydolete & Co. of New York.
The company will take over a half a mil-
lion of timber land in Eastern Carolina,
and run a railroad from Norfolk through
Elizabeth City, Edenton, Bel Haven and
through the counties of Beaufort, Pamli-
co, Craven and Cartaret, with spurs into
Hyde and Tyrell. The Southern terminus
will be at Beaufort.
BIG FIRE IN TAMPA, FLA.
Property losses of forty thousand dol-
lars, five firemen injured, one of whom
will probably die, sum up the result of a
fire in Tampa Tuesday, which destroyed
two buildings at Franklin and Casa
streets, occupied by the Tamps Light In-
fantry armory, with all their contents,
Robert Mugge's Armory Saloon, J. W.
Jones' Beehive store and J. Gordon's
pawnshop. The fire was caused by the
explosion of a gasoline lamp in the Bee-
hive.
W. D. Kirk, fireman of Station No. 1,
was caught under a falling brick wall and
was crushed so that he will probably die.
All the arms and ammunition in the ar-
mory were destroyed, including five thou-
sand cartridges and fifty rifles.

RECEIVER'S SALE.
Mules! Mulael
Notice is hereby given that the receiv-
er of the Wylly-Gabbett Company, in the
foreclosure of mortgage suit of George W.
Owens as Trustee, against the Wylly-
Gabbett Company, now pending in the
Circuit Court for Levy County, Fla., will,
on
MONDAY, JUNE sTH, 9gos,
between 11 a. m. and 2 p. m., at the front
door of the court house in Bronson, in
Levy County, Florida, offer for sale at
public auction for cash, to the highest
bidder, 64 head of mules and three horses.
This sale will be made by authority of
an order made by the Hon. J. T. Wills,
Judge of said Court, signed the 12th day
of May, 1905, in the above entitled suit.
GEORGE W. OWENS, Receiver,
Savannah, Ga.
OWEN & SMITH,
Attorneys for Receiver,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Legal 2t-5-26 to 6-2.


I 2 VEHICLE & HARNESS CO.
Cr'. refsyt ami Ced. sta. lamiuaL, t.


Carriages and Wagons
wnime s aNd W ffH UwM W, lr. %om. Am JN. .

srpentle sad MI Eararss. Fagres. gagiss, Sliry. 2~ Carts, fetbry
gWagem.s series a" everytig sAept Is a fra.cl ass estalishent.
areu rersea as manars Bmaleemers ml-osrie--a-m-s.





Suwa iIn~ep AJg weart an" nrmostioN.il hwi*
aguS. 4 rom us ha S~thA
ad KIdey Trmdlf The and "



For sde by Cmiadai Gaoawy Co.
A le JfcmrlillS Jou-o-. King & CO. of
d. Jad lnvjle d LM FPmes SIs & Co.
Savannah. Gea


00 lull.,. 8|00000080000a000u00008000[i-_-_il...... u.......
W. W. CARNES, Prs. W. C. THOMAS, Meanaer. C. T. DUDIZY, BeS. a TL.r a


Tampa Hardware Co.


Wholesale

Hardware

Turpentine, Mill and rhosphate tipplies.

LuAGE STOCK CIGIL A IIIOLMES ACS AU FHILEU IA M.

TAMPA. FLOR.IDA.
I Ito I miiiiiISM8itIn isle





DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

i We -simply as a call. We cam show yeo, at correct am masey
saving prices, many papers @t lae pare wpa perfect

Dlamond sealers It Jacksoavllle, nd a r specialty Isto f rrom -
C* t gems and hI h-grade Waltham aed rlIg Watches.


HESS & SLAGER 0Im.1 13, I" "In-,eJe-iA



Tami Oe r wmaa mowe a Ia
emOMIA (misSatimoad fa 1ml.)
SOLD HARP WILLZA-Pu n Fin Old
Rye. By the gallUoa s.; tour tull quarts
$.2, express paepis
03O. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvtan
Rye; Rlch and Mellow. By the aUb C
$1.7; four full quarts .A. express prOpad.
ANVIL RYE-Pure Substantial Faily
Whiskey. By the gsalon "S; Oam fn
quarts a.0, express prepsd.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gallo. .5;
four full quarts L.5, express prepagd.
OLD K NTUUJLX CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehoms; f ne and old. By the
gallon 2.0; four ull quarts 1.5, express
prepaid.
OLD POINT CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon .0; four full
quarts .i, expre prygai.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whikes in the market
and will save you from U to 50 per cent on your purchases. Bend for prim iet and
catalogue. Called tree upon application

The Altmayer L Flatau Liquor Compeany,
MACOL. GA. AMD IruN An LA.








10 THU1 WUUKLY L.un-ISAL K EOO3D.


INDUSTRIAL RECOILD.
JAMS A. NOLLONON.


eaa I h)...S.- Per Amnum

-The Vnse an IfM eFlAseM.
All ma n tio should be addressed
Tk d Induusil Pimord Company.
Jack. mvll.*. FIl.
usums EdI-e*alad mmusnee MOlBees at
ALmln .sa. a anm Ga.
Entered at the Portoefie at Jacksonville,
Fla., as second-elss matter.
I~ -
Adopted by the Executive Committee
of the Trpentine Operators' Association,
September 192, sa its exclusive offi-
ial organ. Adopted in annual conven-
tion September 11 as the organ also of
the general association.
Adopted April 27th, 1905, as the ofi-
eal organ of the Interstate Cane Grow-
er' Association. Adopted September
11, 190, as the only official organ of the
T. O A.
Oummended to lumber people by spe-
eal resolution adopted by the Georgia
sawill Assoiation.
COPY FOR ADVERTISING.
Advertising copy (eheages or new ad-
vertiement) should reach us Tuesday
morning to insure insertion in the issue
of the same week.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the main offi-
a of the Industrial ord ompny
are leated at the intersection of Bay
and Newan streets, Jacksonville, Fa,
in the very heart of the great turpentine
and yellow pie industries.
The Atlanta, Ga, office is located inthe
Equitable Building, No. 723. Atlanta is
the center of the great manufacturing
trade of the entire South.
The Savannah, Ga., office is in the
Board of Trade Building. Savannah is
the leading open naval stores market in
the world.

NOTICE TO PATRON.
AN payments far ave'rtamg in the In-
dutrial Recnr ad sa eciptioa therto
Mut be mae direct to the heM emoe in
Jkm vfll. Ageta ar net allowed to
mtaa e a mti nder any circumetaMi
B for af rtagisn ad a mecd ariptesare
Smut 0 n the home 49e, wherkn m ,
am ad omitt s mnut be mae dirct

Inatrwi Recer PuUishing C.

TE RNCOMD'S NEW HOME,
The Industrial Record is now installed
in its new three story brick building at
Newman ad Bay streets. The plant han
been greatly elarged, the staff increased
and this paper is in better condition to
pleas its patrons than it has ever been
before. The eerd's growth since its
rat mmue, only a few short years ago,
has been nothing lees than phenomenal.
This growth has been of a stable, lasting
kid. The publishing plant that som-
prised one small job press at the begin-
ain is to-day one of the largest and finest
in the South. In the press rooms there
are to-day a total of ten presses that
range in cost from 200 to $5,000 eaeh.
AlI of this growth and progress has been
the result of faithful friends, and the
Record has made faithful friends because
it has been faithful to its friends. The
Record was born as the friend and cham-
pion of the naval stores operator. It was
christened in this doctrine; it was bap-
tized in this faith; and all of the oppos-
ing ifluences under the canopy of heaven
cannot change that policy. It has been
the turpentine producer's friend in sea-
son and out; it has fought his battles;


it has championed his cause, and as long
as the present management remains at
its head it will never do otherwise. It is
these friends-hundreds of them through-
out the yellow pine belt-that has made
the great Record monument of to-day a
fixed reality, and we desire to thank them
here for their many encouragements and
for their patronage. We trust we shall
always merit a continuation of the same.
In this connection, too, we desire to
call the attention of our readers to the
fact that we are better prepared than
ever in our job printing department to
give entire satisfaction, not only in ser-
vice, but in prices.

DEATH OF A BAD MEASURE.
The occupation license tax bill, which
has been before the Florida Legislature,
has met the fate it deserved. There was
not a redeeming paragraph in the entire
measure, and on the whole it was about
as infamous a proposition as could be
conceived of. The clauses referring to
naval stores interests in proposed meas-
ure follow:
"Distillers and manufacturers of spirits
of turpentine and roin, for each still in
operation during any portion of the year
ror which the same is taxed, on each still
with a capacity of ten barrels or less of
crude gum at each charge, shall pay to
the State a license tax of $25.
"Fifteen barrels and not less than ten,
$85.
"Twenty barrels and not less than fif-
teen, $46.
"Twenty barrels or more, $65.
"Owners, operators or managers of tur-
pentine stills shall return, to the Collector
of Revenue, annually, the capacity of
each still owned, operated or managed by
them, making oath to the truth of such
return. Any such owner or manager who
shall fail to make such return under oath
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and
shall be punished by a fine of not more
than 500 nor less than $200."
Industrially Florida is a comparatively
young State. She has progressed with
wonderful rapidity. Her future is bright
-but it is in spite of 'such men as the
author and advocates of the measure in
question, whose principal object in life
seems to be the discouragement 6f pro-
gress and the driving away from Florida
by unjust and prohibitive taxation indus-
tries that will give employment to her
people and make the State blossom with
prosperity and happiness.

OPERATORS STAND TOGETHER.
If there as one thing the Industrial
Record would preach above all others,
it is the necessity for all turpentine op-
erators to stand together in the present
great fight for the very salvation of the in-
dustry. Operators organized for their own
protection and benefit four years ago.
At that time a majority of them were
practically broke. The result of their
working together as one cause for a com-
mon purpose was quickly demonstrated.
Conditions immediately began to become
more tolerable. As the organization
spread and the opposing interests realized
that the producers were together and in-
tended to stay together the conditions
were continually bettered. Operators
themselves, by themselves and for them-
selves, became the architects of their own
fortunes. Realizing that they were able
to produce more profitably by standing
together and co-operating with each oth-
er, they began to enter into the factor-
age business, to finance their own opera-
tions, with the same results. Now op-
erators have gone the one step further,


necessary to place them in absolute con-
trol of their own affairs, and entered the
export business. Will they succeed! If
they will stand together as one interest
against a common enemy all of the Shot-
ters on earth cannot route them. That
is the one and only thing necessary-ab-
solute fidelity to their own cause. The
Record is in receipt of a letter to-day
from a prominent Loeisiana operator.
"I am with the operators in this great
fight for control," he writes, "and it may
be interesting to you to know that P.
Shotter has given out the information in
this section that he will spend a quarter
of a million dollars cash this year to
break the Naval Stores Export Com-
pany." Who comprise the Naval Stores
Export Company Is it not a company
owned exclusively by operators and fae-
tors, operators controlling the stock
Is it not a fact that ninety per cent of
the operators in the entire belt are stock-
holders in this company Who them, but
the great naval stores fraternity as a
whole, is Shotter directing his threat
against? And yet, this is the Shotter,
who, though he has spent a life time ac-
cumulating riches at the expense of op-
erators' interests, has been flooding the
country for the past sixty days with per-
sonally signed circulars daiming to be the
great friend and champion of the operat-
ors. Heaven deliver us! This is no time
for Jekly and Hyde affairs. Operators
are too intelligent to be swayed by flat-
tery into a finamal death trap. Mr.
Shotter and his associates are alrewd,
cold-blooded business men. They are des-
perate now. There is design in every
move they make. It is dangerous to tem-
porize with them. It must not be forgot-
ten that it is 8. P. Shotter and his asso-
ciates on one side and the entire naval
stores producing interests on the other.
The only thing needful to win out in this
fight for control is absolute faithfulness
on the part of all operators. Operators
must stand together, and the Record
knows them well enough to believe that
they will.

LET US HAVE STABLE PRICES.
The Record wants to see stable price
for turpentine and rosn-high enough to
be produced at profit and not too high
as to drive the consumers to dosing their
factories or employing substitutes.
Round timber is high and continually get-
ting scarcer. Spirits cannot be made to-
day for what it could two years ago, or
even a year ago. The supply is gradually
diminishing and consumers .m t know.
that turpentine, like any other commodi-
ty, is regulated in price by the law of
supply and demand. Operators must
have a profit on their productions. Amer-
ican turpentine cannot be made cheap
and consumers cannot expect to get it
cheap again. That much is settled. On
the other hand, there are many substi-
tutes on the market, especially in En-
rope, and the consumers am looking into
them. There is no substitute for pure
American spirits, but there are articles
on the market that will answer in some
purposes and by their employment thus
decrease the demand for gum spirits. We
do not want to see prices reach a level
where they cannot be sustained. This
would mean great financial lss to our
Southern producers, who are living not
alone in the present, but in the future.
We do not want to see a fictitious mar-
ket, posted for the purpose of manipula-
tion.


We are led to thee remarks by eu
editorial appearing in a recent issue af
the Oil and Colourman's Journal of L -
don. Extracts from tha editorial fdl-
low:
"A continuation of excessively dear
turpentine will inevitably dama the ex-
port trade paints and va wh
diminishing seriously the profts m the
home trade, and the question wll
worth the prompt attention of al enar-
getice mpmhsre of the community eagend
in the business. It is possible that some-
thing could be dome by a determined boy-
ott-whereaver possible-of the use of
American spirit. Admittedly, this is dif-
feult to carry out while we are provided
with more or les inefient substites;
but there are one or two competing spr-
its on the market, which deserve mae at-
tention than they at present obtain, and
which could be med in many cass where
America turpentine is now eple.
To take much fuller advantage of them
articles in all esses where the ee of the
American spirit is not absolutely iMpar-
tive would do much towards injuring the
interests of the American em tinim
and induing the controllers to bee
that permanent advantage will not re-
sut from equeesing the Briish esn
too vigorously. It seems to be almos
time to start a Total Abstaiers' Unaln
in relation to American spirit. But a bet-
ter and in every way a more sasftor
plan would be to promote the podntio
of turpentine in the British npire.
Some time ago we aluded to Indima tur-
peatine, samples of which have been re-
ceived in this country, the quality show-
ing promise of a very good article. This
production needs the stimulus of gover-
ment action, which might be made of Ji-
calculable benefit, not only to the i
and varnish trade here, but to our feow-
subjects in India. There is soe for a
very large output in the Peninsula, whh
might, within a comparatively short tim,
so compete with the American trae aa to
entirely break up present a g
combination and bring the spirit in to
a reasonable level. It was hoped tht t
greediness of the Americans woild have
received sme cheek fro the far, of
of the demand in this country, but the
gures relating to imports shw to
clearly that British cosumerms ae sM
ting their ordinary supplies fro A r
ea, notwithstandg the very hi pri
demand. The developed of t trad
in Rssian spirit is therefore not prsed-
ing fast enough to afford relief, ad the
prejudice against this substitute is g
too slowly. We would recommend e
trade to go into this question of Mnlon
spirit very closely, each msan smeerbs
ig for himself how far it will be poi-bL
for him to reduce his eomumpMla o
Amerian turpentine. The matter will
have to be faced spomor or later in any
ease, because, sold the scheme to hld
turpenine at at 0 per ton be mesS-
ful this year, no doubt a further schm
to hold it at f per ton wil bea ia-
rated next year; and,whle we mnti
to take the same quantity from Ameri,
whatever the price may be, there would
seem to be so limit to the tax which the
producers there ca extort from our n-
austry."
The Record is not in the light"
alarmed at the threatened boycott by this
organ of the British consumer In the
first place, conditions are not understood.
Up to this time the British market has
been supplied largely by P. hotter
and his associates and he has kept the
consumers on that side of the water in
the dark. Instead of being rightfully in-
formed as to the diminshing forests ad
the igh prices of round timber, the m-
pression has been cultivated that spirits
were manufactured to-day in the South-
eastern States as cheaply as ten years
ago and that the prevailing prices the
past three years were the reuslts of the
tyranny of a gigantic trust. It must be
remembered in this connection that the
one object of Mr. Shotter's very exist-
ence for the past few year has been to


_ __l___i__~_~ T~ ~~__ 1____~


I








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11



GUY'S BOWLING AND BILLIARD PARLORS.
120-122-124-126 WEST FOR.SYTH STREET. JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.
h fasw toe a Yrew. Fien Pa Yoameur we smi waw,.


7W CHRISTIE GROOVER o-

WHOLESALE DRUGOIBTS.




Jacksonville Grocerry Cop'y

S- L Wheleale sve and oIsl Ihr S ollkre aM.
ieasse ai WW s I-mit A. 0. LA -w dainhs.as, M


buy as cheap on this side as he could
fare the operator to sell, manipulate the
market aad unload in Europe at as high
price as the comers could afford to
pay. And the margin-that went to make
Mr. Shotter a mnlionre. We believe
that from this time on European eonsum-
ea will become better acquainted with
the producing ad of the industry and
understaM and appreciate conditions
In the meantime, let us have stable
prisea, high enough to be satisfactory to
the praer al sot pohibitive to the
e-m r. The bme inr t m at t ue-
ed without the other.
01M0non ADOPT D.
The resointiom adopted at the South-
ern Ildestrial Cngress this week follow:
"Urgin the government to construct


inland waterways in the South Atlantic
and Gulf States, and to improve the riv-
ers and harbors of the South; requesting
the Secretary of Commerce and Labor to
make immediate efforts to relieve the de-
pressed condition existing with the cot-
ton milling industry; urging the estab-
lishment by each Southern State of a bu-
reau of immigration; thanking the rail-
roads of the South for their efforts to de-
velope the resources of the section; au-
thorizing the president of the parliament
to appoint a committee of five, of which
he shall be chairman, to prepare a gen-
eral statement setting forth the advant-
ages, productions, resources and present
needs of the South, and directing the ex-
ecutive committee, together with the per-
manent president, to formulate a plan of
permanent organization; urging Congress


to reduce the tax on tobacco; indorsing
the proposed Pan-American College to be
established in the South; urging Congress
to make appropriations for the eradica-
tion of tick fever among Southern cattle;
iidorsing the bill to authorize the Com-
missioner.General of Immigration to es-
tablish at Ellis Island, New York, a bu-
reau of information for immigrants; urg-
ing the formulation of some plan whereby
cotton may be marketed as the world
needs it, and commending a bonded ware-
house system; and commending the bu-
reau of forestry of the Department of
Agriculture for its valuable work, and
urging the people of the South to prevent
unnecessary denudation of their forests.
Send the Recerd you orders for Com-
missary Checks ad aral printing.
Quick delivery.


MeMlu Brles' Capper Werks gtmly
Damaged by Firs.
The loal factory of the HeMillan
Bros. Southern Copper Works was par-
tially destroyed Thursday night by Ie.
The iku of stock and machinry wa
not serious enough to impair the mrie
of this enterprising bma, ad it is an-
nounced that they are prepared to 11 all
orders promptly. If say of their em-
tomen ~in this territory should retire
any article that canot be supped r -
the Jacksonville house it will be shipped
from Savannah, Ga., Mobile, Ala., or Fay-
etteville, N. C. At all which p es the
MeMillan Bros. have large etablih-
ments.

The total number of boxes of orange
shipped from Zolfo this ssaaon up to
Wednesday niht March wasu M001,
or 17,210 boxes more than were shipped
last season


W. F. COSACMA1
P980mut


J. P. WIUMAKSS,
Vice-PresMent.


W. J. xKLLY,
Vice-Preeat and Tress.


AL P. TNAGA23N
t.899"tarf.


The Naval Stores Export Company


Capital. $1.250.000.00


Branch Oflices:
SAVANHAH, GA.
FIrNADINDA, FLA.
PL SACOLA, FLA.
TAMPA, FLA,
NEW ORLEASS, LA
CHICAGO, ILL.
EW YORK.


PIIIPAL Jacksonville, Fla.


WILL COMMENCE BUSINESS JUNE 1, 1905

Owned and controlled by Naval Stores Producers and Factors throughout the Yellow Pine
District In South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas


Th Objctof ths Cepuy Is to Bril ProdMcer ud Cusmr IItI Clou Rdlatimk



For Quotations and Particulars. Address,


THE NAVAL STORES EXPORT COMPANY

Jacksonville, Fla.








12 THU W3NKL" frrbtru'kIUal ARCOUD.
.,mau....su..muauiumittig..-uaa


F. M. DOWLING COMPANY,

WHOLESALE GROCER.S.
PROVISIONS. GRAIN. HAY, FLOUR. GRITS and MEAL.
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.
SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903-04 AND TWO PREVIOUS YEARS
Receipts. 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
Spirit aks ................................ 193,647 292,490 314,346
Rosis, barrels ... :.......................... 650938 940,507 1,071,44
Total ................................... 844,585 1,233,033 1,385,780
Exports.
Spirits, easks ............................... 188,393 296,430 314,876
Rosins, barrels ............................... 752,270 975,428 62,637
Foreign.
Spirits, casks ............................... 93,384 200,109 217,446
Rosins, barrels ............................... 338,171 504,173 535,042
New York.
Spirit, casks ................................ 35,658 42,765 53,763
Rosins, barrel .............................. 87,353 133,121 129,095
Sundries.
Spirits, casks ................................ 59,351 37,556 43,637
Rosins, barrels .............................. 326,746 337,734 398,539
The receipts of spirits are less than 1902-03 by 98,849 casks, and of rosins, 289,509
barrels.


Cro of Spirits and Raosi for Thre Year.
Crop 1903-04. Crop 1902-03.
Spirits. Rosin. Spirits. Rosin. E
SWilmington ....... 16,11 89,667 18,883 113,968
Charleston .......... 2,409 3,159 3,007 11,836
Savaaah ...... ....176,418 650,938 270,670 940,507 3
Bunswiek ...... .... 65,00 184,527 68,947 144,106
Mobile .......... .. 12,315 50,380 18,960 79,272
New Orleas ........ 36,017 133,126 33,103 108,033
Carrabelle .......... osed closed 3,394 32,148
Georgetown ....... 7,515 44,214 10307 46,899
Pesacola.......... 42,564 205982 38,275 '192,20
Jax. & Fernandina ....187,10 653,210 91,976 375,211
Tampa......... ... ldosed closed 13, 40,664


T Totals........


..35,915 2,020,925


571,096 2,184,818


6


Crop 1901-02.
spirits. Rosin.
16,21 109,484
3,004 13,270
13,085 1,071,440
79,060 286,125
21,060 88,572
21,038 94,336
8,177 47,497
8,458 50,515
37,786 154,350
70,000 245,000
15,424 51,779
93,492 2,212,413


aIport. of Turpeatiu to United Kingdo
From official returns; ewts turned into barrels at 320 cwts, 16,230 kilos, 100 bbls.
1900 1901 1902 1903 1904
From United States ................. 174,446 193,429 155,122 143,851 14,400
From France ........................ 2,283 859 1,656 4,630 2,859
From other countries ................ 840 53 904 516 11
-- - -7 -
177,569 194,341 157,682 148,997 147,270
Russian Turpentine .................. 8,521 6,861 8,711 17,55 17,765
Total barrels ....................... 18,000 201,202 166,393 166,592 165,035
Percentage of Russian .............. 4.57 3.41 5.24 10.56 10.76
Average price of American ............ 35-4 27-1 33-1 42-2 41-2
Reported by James Watt & Son, London, England.

COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVANNAH FOR FIVE YEARS.


April 1 .................
April 8 .................
April 15 ................
April 22 ...............
April 29 ................
May 6 .................
May 13 .................
May 20 ...............
May 27 .................
June 3 ................
June 10 ...............
June 17 ...............
June 24 ...............
July 1 ................
July 8 .................
July 15 ................
July 22 ................
July 28 ................
Ang. 4 .................
Aug. 12 ................
Ang. 19 ................
Ang. 26 ................
Sept. 2 .................
Sept. 9 .................
Sept. 16 ................
Sept. 23 ................
Sept. 30 ................
Oct. 7 .................
Oct. 14 .................
Oct. 21 .................
Oct. 28 .................
Nov. 4 ................
Nov. 11 ............
Nov. 18 .................
Nov. 25 .................
Dec. 2 ..................
Dec. 9 ..................
Dec. 16 .................
Dec. 23 ........... .....
Dec. 30 .................
Jan. 6 ..................


1904-05.
ND
53
541/4
54%
53%
55
54%
541/4
53%
54
52%
52%
52%,
53
52%
52%
53%
531/2
52%
53%/
541/4
54%
521/.
521/
52
52%/
52%
52%/
52
51 %
50%
50
50
481/.

50%
48@ V/

491/,
50


1903-04.
ND
50
49%/
45
45
471/
47%/
49
45%/
46
47%
471/4
47%
47%
48
4914
50wk
452
52
52
55@ /
54
54%
561/
57
55
57
55%/
5601
55%
50
561
56
56
56
56
561/4
56%
561/4
57%2


1902-03.
45
42%
42%
43
42%@43
43
45
45%
451/,
45%
47%
48%
471/.
45%
45%
441/2
44
43%
43%
44%
44%
44%
45
44%
46
46%
47%
50
51%
53%
49
52
50
51
50%
51
50%
51%
52%
54


1901-02. 1900-01.


34

31%/ @32
32
32
31%
32%
32%
32%
32
33% 4
34%
33%

343/
34',.
34%
33
32%
34
33
34
34
33%
34%
34
33%
34
34%
35
35%
35%
35




35%
35%
35
351/4
35%
35%
35%6
36%
37%


53%
53%
46
47
40%3/
47
48
49
49
40
43%
42%
431/,
43%
44%
43
42
39%
39%
38
35%
34
35%
351/,
35%
3 %
37
37
37%
40/.,
40%
40
41
40
39
39
38%.
37%
35
35
37


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


I Boilermaking and Repairing

S Still Boilers and Pump..
SHIP BUILDING mnd REPAIRING.

SJacksonville. Fla.
t$l I I Its Imts111111404 t t It &IIIA0 Ir |Is l A 1 800004**

WILLIAM A. BOUR8 JAMES 0. DARSY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
Tm OlmET rEsTUlI QUD GRAS A B iE i TST IAT!.

Hay, Grain, Feed, Garen
Seeds, Poultry Supplies, Ilsr,
Grits, Meal and Fertilizers.

OUR MOTTO: Prempt Sbhirmet, ReIaMe Geeds. Ctde~ng rf
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



Cummer Lusbher Co.

JACKSONVILLi. FLA.


ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.

1 1leii***setetI i i I itaSBBa mu5s ,.8* mu

f Standard Clothing Company




One rice One Price



4 FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FUIRNISIERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, - JI.cklov., Fml.s
Stetaso uad Hawes Hats. Special Attemtlem tveI to al Orders.


R. TOLAR. J. HART. T. H. BLAOHLV. 4. i. TOLU, da
(Established 1872.)

TOLAR. HART &. CO.,
160 FRONT STREET, NEW YORK.


Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores,
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotten. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futurs.

JOSEPH D. WEED. H. D. WEED. W. KRENSON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH, GEOR.GIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battiugs, Ee.







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 18


JOHN S. FRANZ, Agent


Diebold Safe & Lock Co.
J.asomovll*e Florida.

Sam'l P. Holmes & Co.
Sthek im<, COttn.,
OraG:i mii PrvlsM

FEW YOK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BARD OF TRADE
Direct private wire. to all oxqhanges.
=Lc toeku and bond a peeialty.
8os P6h0m am5 11wh Block
FIME Df8DKANCS-IA-I nf. Uf
n IL Oel & Oh. R-en r0 tk BUi.,
Jalaefifl 1n&, Oi..

BALY! I UOMIRY,
Commlw Merchants,
1Ntv1l Storo &a Cotto)
a, -n-In mmm,
y-to Wal St, s sts-z4-1s.
IKV TOU CIT.


CATTLE FOR THE CUBAN TRADE. a. POWELL,
President.


Captain James McKay, who has just
returned to Tampa from an extended trip
to Cuba, is of the opinion that Florida's
cattle trade with the island is practically
at an end, says the Tampa Times. Cap-
tain McKay has sent over several cargoes
this season and has lost money on every
shipment. The last cargo he was not
able to sell at all and now has them in a
pasture near Havana. He has three
more cargoes engaged and has offered the
cattlemen a liberal price to take the cat-
tle back, but this they refused to do,
and he will be forced to move them.
"The principal trouble is that the
Florida cattlemen are holding their stork
too high," said Captain McKay. "Tlhe
size of the cattle has been steadily grow-
ing smaller for several years, and the
price has been as steadily advancing.
The stockmen have only young cattle for
sale now-two and three-year-olds. It is
very rare that a four-year-old beef is
brought in, because the herds have been
sold off very close. The cattle shipped in
from South and Central America are
much larger, and they are offered at much
lower prices than the inferior Florida cat-
tle. I could not get the Cuban dealers to
even look at the last load I took over,
much less make me an offer on them.
And some of the Cuban ranchmnen com-
plain that a great many of the Florida
cattle shipped there last fall died during
the winter.
"Unless the price of good beef cattle
drops to at least $13.50 and cows to $15
the business cannot be pursued profitably.
"I was informed while in Cuba that a
great many of the Florida cattle men
who have been engaged in the business
there during the last year or so have
about decided to quit, as they are losing
money.
"I am certainly sorry that I went into
the business this season. I would have
saved a good many dollars if I had not
done so."
H OBINSON. Press GAILLARD. C0aher
W. B. OWIN. Vice-Pre.
Commercial Bank,
State Depository.
BaUCHom: Oeala. la.. Lake City, Fa
Jacksonville, - -lorida


Joseph Zapf & Co.

wlM. les r I. ad Igleir fl


AnheuserBusch

St. Louis Lager Beer

Wholesale


LIQUORS.


WINES.


CHAS. Wr NARRIS.
VJcV-Presidet and Treasurer.


ENanY ASELET.
S*V.rct-


DIRECTORS:
B. R. Powell Chas. Harris. I. McMPllma P. I. S terlaWt R. V. Cerlgtiu.

THE

Southern Drug Manufacturing

Company
Corner of West Bay amn Maote Sts.
Jacksonville, florlda.


Wholesale Drugs i Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices on
anything in the drug line. We make pked drugs a specialty and ean ave you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.




SStandard Naval Stores Co.,
: JACKSONVILLE

Pays Turpentine -Producers
s Full Savannah Market

SMakes no Charge for CommlalrMon, Stora o IolmriM
This Beats Savaiyma s aShi to

SStandard Naval Stores Co. JACKsoNv.W




The Blount Real Estate Co.,

(Inoorporated. 50.000 CapltaL)
R Turpentine Locatios. Saw Mill Ictions,
Large and small tracts o Round Timber, Phosphate
and Farming Lands of all descaiption
Write us for further information ad partleulars
THE BLOUNT REAL ESTATE CO..
OCALA. FLOLIDA.



Joseph D. Christle, Business Agent
Room 303 Dyal-Uppcurch BaI. JadcksolEv, n a.
Telephone 455.
If you want to locate in Florida and contemplate going into busine, let ms
help you. If you have a business to sell, list same with m.


Migtr NlR TakiMg MacbiN CO

Tada. ebane -- ead e-ed
Write to Metropolitan Talking Machine
Co. for atalogues of New Records and
Maehina. Victors only. Largest jobbing
house in the South.
Agents wanted in every town. Retail
trade served. Old records exchanged.
N. B.--Colmbia, Zonophono and Vie-
tors accepted.
Mtrelprtllfn Talking
Mapkhan Co.
3*3 Mali lt, JAKaOaVaLX, FLA.


Mineral Waters.

Writo for PriceA

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


VIRGIN PINE.
Along florida East Coast. For
over 75 miles the Canal Com-
pany owns a strip of Virgin Tim-
ber and authorizes us to sell
tracts to suit purchaser. For
particulars address,
BROBSTON, FENDIG & CO.,
Jacksonvill, Fla.


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


J. W. WADE.
Vice-Presidest.


K. G. HUGHES.
Sec'y and Trea


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.









14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


NOTICE OF INCORPORATION.
Notice is hereby given that the under-
signed incorporators will apply to the Hon.
h. B. Broward, Governor of the State of
Florida, on June 12, A. D. 1905, for Letters
Patent, inorporati-g the American Oak
Leather Tanmng Company, and we hereby
adopt the following Articles of Incorpora-
tion:
PROP08ED CHARTER OF THE AMERI-
CAN OAK LEATHER TANNING
COMPANY.
The undersigned incorporators hereby
associate themselves together for the pur-
pose of forming a corporation under the
laws of the State of Florida, and adopt
the following articles of incorporation:
L
The name of this corporation shall be
THE AMERICAN OAK LEATHER TAN-
NING COMPANY, and ita business shall
be conducted in the State of Florida, and
in other States of the United States of
America, and in foreign countries, wher-
ever necessary or convenient. The princi-
pal office of the corporation shall be lo-
cated in the city of Jacksonville, Florida.
IL
The general nature of the business to be
Stransacted by said corporation shall be to
manufacture and buy and sell, both at
wholesale and retail, the hides and skins
of all animals, and to tan and manufacture
the same by any process, and sell and
market the same, both at wholesale and
retail; and to own, construct and operate
tanneries, factories, plants, buildings and
machinery, necessary for the same; to
buy, sell and mortgage real estate; and to
manufacture and sell the hair obtined
from the hides and skins, and all other
by-products thereof; and to manufacture
by any process, buy and sell, tannic acid,
chemicals, oils and greases, used in and
about the manufacture of leather; and
to manufacture and sell boots and shoes,
gloves and harness, and all articles manu-
factured or made from leather; to own,
buy and sell live stock, rolling stock, and
to own and operate railways, vessels, light-
ers, horses and wagons or other means of


transportation, to transport the property
or products owned or controlled by this
corporation, but not for the purposes of
doing the business of a common carrier;
to own, buy and sell and trade in, both
at wholesale and retail, dry goods, grocer-
ice, hardware, produce, lumber and naval
stores, or other kinds of 'merchandise; to
mortgage, lease or convey the property of
the corporation, and to borrow money and
secure the same by notes, bonds, mort-
gages or deeds; and to purchase, receive,
hold for collateral and make advances upon
the stock, bonds, notes or other obliga-
tions of other corporations, including
corporations pursuing the same kind or
kinds of business transacted by this com-
pany; and generally to have, exercise and
enjoy, all the rights, powers and privileges
incident to corporations for profit, char-
tered, organized or existing under and by
virtue of the laws of the State of Florida.
m.
The amount of the capital stock of said
corporation shall be Thirty Thousand Dol-
lars, to be divided into three hundred
shares of the par value of One Hundred
Dollars each. All or any part of said stock
may be payable in money, property, labor
or services, at the discretion of the Board
of Directors. The corporation shall have
a lien upon all shares of stock of any
stockholder who may become indebted to
the corporation, either for the amount un-
paid on his stock subscription, or any
other indebtedness whatsoever with the
right to sell and dispose of such stock,
or such portion thereof as may be neces-
sary to pay such indebtedness, at either
public or private sale, and upon such no-
tice or terms as the Board of Directors
may determine, and with the future right
to transfer such stock until full payment
of such indebtedness.
IV.
The term for which this corporation
shall exist, shall be ninety-nine years.
V.
The business of the corporation shall be
conducted by the following officers: A
president, a vice president, a general man-
ager, a secretary and a treasurer, and a


board of not less than three, nor more
than thirteen directors. The offices of
secretary and treasurer may be held by the
same person. The directors shall be an-
nually elected by the stockholders at their
regular meeting, and the other officers
named above shall be elected by the Di-
rectors. The Board of Directors, by a res-
olution passed by a majority of the whole
Board, may designate not less than three
nor more than seven Directors to consti-
tute an executive committee, which com-
mittee, to the extent and in the manner
provided by said resolution, or by the by-
laws, shall have and may exercise the
powers of the Board of Directors, in the
management df the business and affairs
of this corporation. The duties and pow-
ers of the officers of this company shall
be prescribed by the by-laws of this com-
pany or by resolution of the Board of Di-
rectors, either or both, and the by-laws
may be adopted by resolution of a major-
ity of the Directors at any regular or spe-
cial meeting, and amended in the same
manner. The annual meeting of the stock-
holders shall be held on the first Monday
in June in each year, but the date may be
changed by the Directors. The first an-
nual meeting shall be held in the city of
Jacksonville, Florida, on Monday, June
12th, 1905, at 11 o'clock a. m. at the Board
of Trade building, for the purpose of ac-
cepting this charter, electing officers, and
completing the organization of this cor-
poration.
VL
Until the officers elected at the first an-
nual meeting are qualified, the business
of this corporation shall be conducted by
the following named offers. President,
C. E. Garner; Vice President, W. F. Coach-
man; General Manager, C. H. Mann; Sec-
retary and Treasurer, A. F. Perry. Direc-
tors: W. F. Coachman, C. H. Mann, C. E.
Garner, A. F. Perry, Edwin Brobston,
Raymond Cay, D. T. Gerow, D. H. MeMil-
lan, H. A. MeEachern, L N. Wilkie, J. C.
Little, C. B. Rogers and W. E Brown.
VI.L
The highest amount of indebtedness to
which this corporation shall at any time


subject itself shall be twice the a&nmnt o
the authorized capital stock.
VII.
The names and residences of the sub-
scribers and the amount of eapitl stock
subscribed by each, are as follows:
1H.H A. MeEachern, Jacksonville, Fla,
25 shares.
2. Chas. L Mann, Jacksonville, Fla, 2
shares.
3. C. E. Garner, Jacksonville, Fai, 2
shares.
4. A. F. Perry, Jacksonville, Fl., 10
shares.
a Edwin Brobston, Jacksonville, Fla,
shares.
& Raymond Cay, Jacksonville, Fla, 10
shares.
7. D. T. Gerow, Jacksonville, Fla, 1
shares.
& D. H. MeMillan, Jacksonville, Fh.,
25 shares.
9. W. F. Coachman, Jacksonvill, Fl.,
25 shares.
10. L N. Wlki Jacksonville, Ft., 2
shares.
11. J. C. Little, Jacksonville, Fla., 10
shares.
12. C. B. Rogers, Jacksonville, fi., 10
shares.
13. W. K Brown, Jacksonville, h., 5
share.
State of Florida,
County of Duval, as.
I hereby certify, That on this 4th day of
May, 1905, in the said State and county,
personally came before me, C. E. Gunr,
W. F. Coachman and A. F. Perry, to me
well known, and acknowledged before m
that they subscribed the foregoing artleles
of incoropration of the Ameriean Oak
Leather Tanning Company, as neorpora-
tors of said proposed orporation, in goad
faith for the purposes thereinxpress
In witness whereof, I have hereato set
my hand and afxed my ofiial sal, the
day and year last above written.
RUSSEL E. COIA0 RD, (Seal),
Notary Public State of Florida at Large.
My commission expires Febrary 16,
1900.


OPERATORS




Bear in Mind That During Your


Nxha





Notw a"-





worpims,
taelffmt



Tirptle









Stills aid
flitre


I


Busy Season



YOU MEET WITH.A MISHAP

YOU BREAK DOWN

YOU BURN OUT

IFYOU NEED US



Over in the Left- Hand Corner Will Interest You.





McMILLAN BROS.,

Southern Copper Works.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


ftvanask, a&
NWA*l A]&.
vayMu~vmsh N.,0.






ITHE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15
- I


THE


COVINGTON


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Co.


Wholesale


SHOES


- m


DRY GOODS.


4,6Success


For Our Customers


is Success


For Us."


THE RECORD'S JOB DEPARTMEB
The Industrial Record, i its new ha
is prepared, as it has never been befoi
Im f ABSTRACT to furnish quick and utisfactry som
in printing for the Turpentine and La
Title and Tax Abstracts, Maps, etc, her businesses-bootk, stationery, oi
of large tracts in all parts of Florida and supplies, commisary checks, etc., etc.
South Georgia, prepared for owners and you are not buying your printing sappli
from the Record don't fail to do so in t]
intending puchaser. Correspondent future.
solicited.
REALTY TITLE AID TRUST CO; THOSE . HUTCHINSON
Law Exchaue Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla. FL AW AMMCA ASUICA1K OF
.. PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT
WM D. JONES ,- '. =S", .,
PHESMPTM SPECIALIST
FAMILY DRUGGIST Light's
m^ e-l s... Restaurari
503 West Day St., JACKS t VILLE. i
Aliny mr


1


r-S^SWS~tXKSSW^!^n^


Timmons Blour


W. W. TIMMONS,
President.


B. W. BLOUNT,
Vice-President.


Naval Stores Fac
And Dealers in SuppHes of all Kinds f
Operators.


Correspondence Solicited.


Address


TIMMONS- BLOUNT


t American National Bank M.


it Co.
J. P. CARSOI,
Secy & Treas.
tors
or Turpentine

CO. $ -
TAPA rFLORIDA.


Whiskies

. willes
-BY-
HENRY FREE
Thke Only Upto-Dat M"il
Order Hoe In the South.
is and is Clay Street at 5o01 W. Bay.
JACKSONVIE, FLLA.

a0. ORl. .
SMA0NUACTURER O

BRIC K.I
'IM R F1 ES.*
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.
W 9 I.
M. IL BLAN. C. L. BI.
(Formery l Bn & Soa.)
FLORIDA PAPER COMPANY
Dealers in all kinds of
WRAPPING PAPERS, PAPER BAGS
FOLDIIG BOXES, TWINES AND
F* UIT AD VEGETABLE
WRAPPING PAPERS.
Robis BuildiaE Visiuct. .
Telsophme1 i[7. =ielle. L


GETTING'S


...FOR...


FURNITURE


22-30 West Bay Street
JACKSONVILLE


K


Send for


Catalogu4


ohn = Furchgott = Compan
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


B


i
I









I


y.


don'tt forget your subscription to the Record.


i


A --- -------EEF~ICm~~~c_(l


MX V %VF?-VIEX %- %"Mv- %- NMI- M-3):_L-mulm-ITI


E~ct~S\Ji~;~:~\~*~i~L*;i~:;JF)~~~m~~\~, I~l~c~:~L~mEIC~.


ORJ YU







16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville f
RESOURCES THREE MILLION DOLLARS.
We invite especial attention to our Savings Department, which is operated *
under GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION. 0
INTERE8T COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY.



C. H. HARGRAVES CO..

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY STREET
Jacksonville, Fla.
GEORGIA INTER-STATE SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
Mia mau Coastwiae Prie List for Merchantable Rules 9go4. Adopted at Tifton
Georgia, July, 12, 1904.


SIZES.


S2eelt
120 tU


I 10 to 2xl0.... $12.5
214x10 to 8xlO.... 12.00
8%xlO to 10xl0.... 12.50


1 X12
210x12
1 X14
3%x/r14
3Y4L/Ix4


to 2x12.... 14.00 15.50
to 10x12.... 13.00 13.50
to 12x12.... 13.50 14.00


Feet j Feet I FeetI Feet I Feet I Feet Feet Feet Feet
21-251 26-301 31-35| 36-40| 41-45140-501 51-551 56-60 61-65
$13.50$14.5($16.00$18.001$20.50[$23.50j$26.50i32.00;$40.00
12.1 13.50( 14.001 15.50 17.501 20.001 23.001 28.O00 3.00
13.001 14.0 15.501 16.501 18.501 21.00 24.001 29.00 37.00


14.
15.50


to 3x14.... 16.00 19.00 20.00
to 12x14.... 14.50 16.50 18.00
to 14x14.... 15.50 17.00 19.00


l.u. 21.o00 24.u1i 28.0I 32.51 38.' 49.00o
16.501 18.50 21.001 24.50 28.50 34.00 43.00
17.501 19.50 22.00| 25.5(0 30.00 36.50 46.00
22.0 24.5o 24.5 00 3 1 37.00 44.00 5.00
2a 22.00 24.0 28. 1 32.501 40.00 52.00
21 23.00 26.0 30.00 34.50 42.00 55.00


1 x16 to 4x16.... 20.50 22.00 2450 27.501 31.00 34.00 38.00 42.50 52.00 6.00
4%x16 to 1xl6 .... 19.00 20.00 22.00 25.504 29.00| 31.00 35.00 3.50 48.00 59.00
12%xl6 to 16x16.... 19.50 20.50 23.00 26.501 30.00 433.00 37.00 41.00 50.00 62.00
2 x8 to 618.... 24.50 25.50 2850 31.50 35.00 39.00 43.00 49.00 62.00 79.00
6%x18 to 14x18.... 21.00 22.00 20.00 29.0 3300 37.00 41.00 45.001 57.00 69.00
14%x18 to 18x18.... 23.00 24.00 27.00 30.00 34.00) 3800 42.00 48.00 59.00 74.00
Teir: Net Cas
Prices are 0. B. Cars Savannah, Brunswick, Fernandina and Jacksonville.
NOTICE. Dimension.
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate Dimension sizes shall embrace all sizes
Saw Mill Association, held at Jackson- 6 inches and up in thickness by seven
ville, Fla., March 15, 1904, the following inches and up in width, including six by
Classification and Rules for Inspection of six. For example: 6x0, 6x7, 7x7, 7x8, 8x9
Yellow Pine were officially adopted, effec- and up.
tive July 1, 1904: Stepping.
Cla nation ad potion of Yellow Stepping shall embrace one to two and
ne Lumber. a half inches in thickness by seven inches
General Rules-All lumber must be and up in width. For example: 1, ,
sound, well manufactured, full to size and' I/, 2 and 212x7 and up, in width.
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and Rough Edge or Flitch.
hollow knots, worm and knot holes; Rough Edge or Flitch shall embrace all
through shakes, or round shakes thatI sizes one inch and up in thickness by eight
show on the surface; square edge, unless inches and up in width, sawed on two
otherwise specified. A through shake is; sides only. For example. 1, 1/,, 2, 3, 4
hereby defined to be through or connected and up thick by eight inches and up wide,
from side to side, or edge to edge, or side sawed on two sides only.
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken; INSPECTION.
less than one inch thick shall be measured Staar
as one inch.
__All liiniber shall bIe sound, sap no ob-
rT A TcwwraFdprTnw jection. Wane may be allowed one-eighth


Flooring.
Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: 1x3,
4, 5 and 6; 1/x3, 4, 5 and 6.
Boards.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses un-
der one and a half inches by seven inches
and up wide, including one and a half
inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %, 1, 1/4 and 11,4 inches
thick by seven inches and up, wide.

SScantling.
Scantling shall embrace all sizes from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2x3, 2x4, 2x5, 2x6, 3x3, 3x4, 3x5, 3x6, 4x4,
4x5, 4x6, 5x5 and 5x6.
Plank.
Plank shall embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness,
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: I11, 2,
21/%, 3, 3%1, 4, 4%, 5, 5%, 5%x7 inches
and up in width.


of the width of the piece measured across
face of wane, extending one-fourth of the
length on one corner or its equivalent on
two or more corners.
Merchantable.
All sizes under nine inches shall show
heart entire length on one side or edge;
sizes nine 'inchTes and over shall show
hearth the eture length on two opposite
sides. W\ane ne ma- allowed one-eighth of
the widthl of tlie piece measured across
face of lwane, awl cxtendling one-fourth of
the length of the piece on one corner or
its equivalent on two or more corners.
Prime.
Scantling shall show heart on two faces
the entire length; other sizes shall show
two-thirds heart entire length on t\wo
opposite s ids. )n not exceeding 5 per
cent of the piev,i wanie may be alln\\ed
one-eighthl of th; \xidth i ,f lti, piece uensa-
ured arm- l,,s face of wane and extending
one-fotrlth if the length of tile piece on
one corner or its equivalent on two or
more corners.


SWWW* 11111--------------------I

I Wmed a Tm-pestlIe P=.wpeed_
Itf eretp Yt a

WhaJ A ItaI Saw Mill TFimlerP
10.000 Acres Saw Timber ....................... 2.50 to $5.00
* 40.000 ...... .... ";..... to $5.00
S50000 "................per Acre.
: 26.000 Acres Virgin Timber.....................
* 20.000 .. .. .................... o
I 150.0000 .. 2.50 to S6.00
S1 .000 .. .. ..................... per A e.
192.000*-- -


BROBSTON. FENDIG & CO.

Woo5 sW. wo. j n own.
- - - -- - - -


ARAGON
JACKuONVLLU. FLA.
NOW OPEN
SUnder new management. Threaghly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electrilight plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.


J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
*


HeaIIartfers fr -

:^ Distiller's Pumping
Outfit.
No plant complete without 0
0 Hundreds of them in um in Gor
a e
Florida, Alabama. Mississippi Z d
oath Carolina. rite u fr prtu-
Slwo am prioe We also manfacture
I tEngines, B efteri d -lh
Graie Mau bory,
Sae well scary a fuoll nd ea omple *

i 9 Mill 11Su01pies, Ppe,.
* 9IB Boeler Tube, E tc
9H Advise your wants.
I i Macon, eorgia.

SN If f T Wm t for TIrg ls Stt- PFa fm
**s*@***e*ese*e*o*******e Oee*e*,e4**e* .*@st*see:O :


C. H.BARNES, Pre.


J. D. SAW, VGe-Pre&


RALP JESSUP, Se.-Tres


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Cempany. Gmges,
Grades and Weiglts Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksnville. Pensacote Fenrmudlna amd Samvaia
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA



East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Speclaty.
WATERTOWN. FLORIDA.


THE


'








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

If y wnt amytiN leek
tlru g tins slaluled list and
writ* to ti fir appearing
tIhrlRl The Rerd IMrantees
a ptupN respes


Realty Tie and Trt Co.
ACCOUNTANTS.
T. A HutekismoO, Jacksonville, Fla.
BANK&
Atl-sti National Bank Jacksonville, Fla.
Conn1I hl.k, Jakasaoville, FI.
Gurnty Trust & Savings Co, Jackson-
FleorA Bank & Trust Co, Jacksonville,
Pla.
Nattimsl Bak ad Jaksonville.
OXt 8 AMD CRAT.L
a Lumber 0C, Jaconville, Fla.
OWLUO AND VnTLLTA B
Guy% BowHig and Billiard Parlors, Jack-
sonville, Fla.

4he, (Ge. 3L, Jr., Jaonlf, Fla.
Toinhe r Fl & 8ult Co, The, Jackson-

COCA-COLA.
Jacksonville Bottling Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
CLOWIQM6
& eaJ. A, Jaidmsville Fla.
onet A0 JaedmLvine, Ph.
Sta8~ri athe Oa, Jacsodm il la.
CLOuMnme--oW 7E.,ALU
Kohb, 7Peht0 & Co., Jachsomville, Fla.
C-I-im MERCHANTS.
Bailey M A- ry. New York City.
Tolar, BHat & Nevw York C(ty.
COVrTACINGIM.
Relty Tide ad Tr t 0a
COPP-ACE.
O1-1n C., Tb, Qitha, Ga
O0pIrsap G6, The, Jaaaonville, a.

Kirk & Jeas, Jaeshmnil llie .
Chriatoe-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,

sltr Wtra .r OC, Jacksonville,
a.
DRY GOOD8.-WT0' OAT
Ouagllt GaCI, The, Jacksonville, Fla
Koha, Purhktt Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Henry Jaeobs, Jacksovrlle, Fla.
-UCT=IC SUPPLIES.
Florida Eectric Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Electric Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.

Loabaud Ire Warks & Spply Co., Au-
Mrrill-ltevms Jacksoniti 1a.
ehaisl's 8es C0, J. L, Maeon, Ga
gu1;W, Gas.

Bors & Co., Wn. A., Jacksonville, Fla.

ScheabM's 8oa C0., J. ., Maeon, Ga.

8Athern Prul & e B ly C0a, The, Jack-
sonville, P
PUXRITURK.
Getting FV iture C., Jacksonville, Fla.
GETS' FURISHERS.
Greg & Br., J. A., Jacksville, Fla.
Kohn, Furehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Rearoe Co., H. A., Jacksonville Fla.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksonville. Fla.
Euart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GjDCXRS-WVOLZSALE.
Bours & Co, Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Ouuolidated Groeery Co., Jaeksoaville, Fla.
Dowling & Co., F. M., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hargraves Co, C. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Williams O, J. P., Savannah, Ga
Young Co., John R-, Savannah, Ga.
GINGER ALE.
Live Oak Bottling Works, Live Oak, Fla.
A&Lh l-WW rL a all
Kahn, Furvs # & 0., Jasbunville% 118.


HARDWARE.
Bond & Bours Co., The, Jacksoville, Fi.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co, J. D., Savannah, Ga
HARNESS.
Vehicle and Harness Co.. Jacksonville, Fla
HAY AND GRAIN.
Bours &, Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, F
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fia.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTEL&
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
St. George, Jaksonville, Fla.
Light's Restaurant, Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, .
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Maeon, Ga.
INSURANCE.
Cay, Shine & McCall, Jacksonville, Fla.
Loren H. Green & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, F1.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville,a.
Henry Free, Jacksonville, Fla.
Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
Eureka Saloon, Jacksonville, Fla.
Juseph Zapp & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co, Chattanooga, Tea.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Christie-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonvllel
MAP&
Realty Title and Trust Co.
MACHINE WORIS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply 0C., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8, Mnaon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR T zPEUTIjU PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKKIS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocla, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Maon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
MILLINERY.
Henry Jacobs, Jacksonville, Fla.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Baily & Montgomery, New York, N. Y.
Barne-Jesup Co, The, Jacksonville Fl.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Standard Naval Store Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Tinmmons-Blount Co., Tampa, Fla.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York, N. Y.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile,. Ala
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
Tampa Naval Stores Co., Tampa, Fla.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co., Jackonville Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Campbell. J. R., Ocala, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Oeala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
PAPER.
'lorid; Paprr Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PIANOS.
.tudlten & Bates. Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Sehoficld's Sons Co.. J. S., Macon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
TANK STORAGE
National Tank & Export Co., Savmnah,
Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
Brobston. Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Blount Real Estate Co., Ocala, Fla.
C'. Bucknran. Jacksonville, Fla.
C'lristie. J. D., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Oeals, Fa.
Southern States Iand and Timber Co.,
Stewart & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hedricks Real Estate Agency, Jackson-
ville. Fla.


SAFES.
Diabold Safe and Lock Co., Jacksonville.
SEEDS.
Bours & Co., Win. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHIP YARDS
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fl.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksnville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jaksnvil Fla.
STEAMmSIPS
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville F.
TAILORS
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksovill* Fa.
TALKING MACHINES
Metropolitan Talking Machine Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cyprea Tank Co. Mobile, A
Davis & Son. M., Palatka, a.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. Meon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS
Realty Title and Tret Co.
TURPENTE AIPARATUA.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jacksuvils, Mla.
TuKPE NTImE STILL&
Baker, M. A., Brunniek, Ga
MeMillan Bros., SavaaMk, Ga.
TURPETIN STILL TUDS.
Davis & Son., G. M., Palatka, Fa.
TUDPEr nZUl VATS.
Davis & Son, o. M, Palahtk Fl.


17


TURPENTINE TOOLS
Council Tool Co, Jacksonvile, Fla.

Vehicle & Harness Co, Jackonville, Fl.
WATCHES
Gre leaf & osbsy a., JakMonvilh, F.
Hess & laser, Jacksonville, Fa.
YELLOW PINE LUDMBE
Cummer Imrber OC, Jadkoeville, 1k
Eut Coast Lmber o., Watertown, Mf.



Trade Checks
FOR THE


COMMEY BAlisI.
THE INDUSTRIAL RHBOOD manu-
factures more of them than all the print-
ing and office supply houses in the South
combined.
COMMISSARY CHECKS
Send all orders for Commissary Cheek,
any color, any denomination, padded or
loose, to the

lB strial Record G0.


.... - - - - -


Record Readers:

The job printing department

of this company is conducted

for the exclusive benefit of the

naval stores, lumber and man-

ufacturing trades. It is reason-

able to suppose you will get

better and more satisfactory

printing supplies-letter heads,

envelopes, commissary checks

pay-roll reports, etc., by having

us make them.


Industrial Record Co.,

Jadteks i, ida.


caa d 9he
Baker Improved

Seemles Tirpm-


-Write -e for priem and outst.
T.0. B. any point In Georg*. wr-



country ,a speiaty.
The Largest and Oldest Copper lrun sw ic ia
Works In Georgia.runs c
Wir My specialty is large worms and heavy bottom that do not leak.


.








II THU WNEUKLY DIDUVrIff"A RUCOD.-


NUBIAN TEAIn Liquid orm
Ta wll kewn remedy is now put up in lquid, as well a pew-
Ie f.. In the Mqui it is READY FOR USJ.
It b a rfect =ndc11% sad extremely palatable. E children
Item t ita e ely E o nta a bottle.
It w caW murelt Biliousnes, adiieotiom, ftoeia and
all dihes seem ltig frm a torpid liver or disordered kidayu.
WRITE US FOR PRICES.

Spencer Medicine Company,




The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES.
'no --n a--nh f o Uf t s are aoppted to MRl as nwt, calliN
siia-. L C. both way.


Veg slor Uosf
~l aeva =VONww


Pre ss, amkmmiris Saw
VISA 113. CbaOSlesen and ReW YOk.


iii i I I 6 6U3M 8S0ii6S 65686103833. Iiia s8HI I
PRJCE LIST Or

Eureka Wine and Liquor Co.
The Great Southern Mail Ordwr Houme.


*ue8h-8h809809 606600uh 600a


mu mu mum u mu uss


PCA3. wrW. Pre.


TN. I egASRTE. MagPne..


min slew Trels.


Tuesday,
Wed-meday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tueday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tumeday,
Pr=ds ,
Wedaeaday,
Friday,
Monday.
TWednay,

Tharday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,


Apr. 18, at 3:00pm..APACHE......
Apr. 1, at 3:00pm..IROQUOIS.....
Apr. 21, at 3:00pm. .OOMANCHE...
Apr. 2, at 3:00pm. .AIONQUIN..
*xNEW YORK...
Apr. 2, at 3:OOpm. .ARAPAHOE...
Apr. 2, at 3:00pm..APACHE .....
Apr. 2, at 3:00pm. .IROQUOIS.....
*xHURON .......
May 2, at 3:OOpm.. AGONQUIN..
May 5, at 3:00pm..COMANCHE...
May 9, at 3:00pm..APACHE......
May 10, at 3:00pm..IROQUOIS. ....
May 12, at 3:00pm. .AILGONQUIN..
May 15, at 3:00pm. .COMANCHE...
May 17, at 3:00pm. .ARAPAHOE...
May 19, at 3:00pm. .APACHE......
May 23, at 3:00pm.. ALGONQUIN...
May 26, at 3:00pm. .COMANCHE...
May T, at 3:00pm. .ARAPAHOE...
May 30, at 3:00pm. .APACHE......


Sunday, Apr. 23, at 7:30am
Monday, Apr. 24, at 8:30am
Wednesday, Apr. 26, at 10:30am
Thursday, Apr. 27, at 11:00am
Friday, Apr. 28, at 11:30am
Sunday, Apr. 30, at 12:30pm
Wednesday, May 3, at 4:30am
Thursday, May 4, at 5:00am
Thursday, May 4, at 5:00am
Sunday, May 7, at 6:30am
Wednesday, May 10, at 8:30am
Sunday, May 14, at 12:00n'n
Monday, May 15, at 12:30pmr
Wednesday, May 17. at 4:00am
Saturday, May 20, at 5:30am
Monday, May 22, at 7:00am
Wednesday, May 24, at 9:00am
Sunday, May 28, at 12: 00n'
Tuesday, May 30, at 1:00pm
Thursday, June 1,at 4:00am
Sunday, June 4, at 5:00am


--ita vi hIruwltM k sad Chtalestoe. xFeight only. *-DBtaM vi

IWE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
wavt Se"wams Unetwwe AS eAI estoem and Previaeame mad an none.
ee Fas, anin at a oemetn t -Waomw.
SIM3..WEKLY SAILIEGS.
............ ... . ...... ........ .. ..FWhm B...rm Lew1 Whar Bot
S.--- .. ...."...."........ .... Frn ftot of Cathert street. Jaekeof ea
SCLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Betwem a JiOkmvTlI mad Smend*.
egS l at hl@ata. Aetar, St. frmelld a. Bemfidor CDe La d)and latermelto
ieam S. le hab b ver.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
o aegaefm to se aU tease: Iave Jack onavIle, Sundays, Tuedays and Thue.
da, & p. ml atin. leave Sanmtrd, Moadays, Wednesdays & Friays 9: cm.
SaU-m INORTHBOUmND
Lam S: B 4......................Jak< ll.................. .....Iv.... a 8o a. m.
Lew sc at........ .. .... .....-- ...... .* ...... Ia S < p. I.
S4I i a...B..................!.. n.eLad..........................ILme 1n pn
.............. .... |.... ..... ....Bn*e r.. (Denzud)....................... |l T n.4e no.a
Antl-a. I1 .......... .......... frd..... ...... ......... Lefav *0 L
r. 1:m0 a. l. ............... p ....................L. T10:00 m.
RNlERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, 122 W. BAY ST, JACK'VILE
P. M. IRONMONGER, JR., Ast. Gen. Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St. Jacksonville, Fla.
SW. O. 0OP. 3L., IKOal Pt. At., Jask'ville. C. P. LOVELL. Afst. Dupt..Jack'vfl
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonvillle.
A, C. A P. A. New York, OLYDB 3lLNE P. A.. Now Yeo.
s w WI. P. CLTDI CO.
anmlam ell 0tate ee a AnTt.i.
6-k-- f Du ftld, USICtate Mrgt. Pew Yrkt,


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TMER I MAY.


uVuS uIL. Umua m1r.


Florida Timber, Grazing 8


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE.


JACI(SUVUU ILA


... NATIONAL ...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA., U.S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
Preadent.


J1. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A.- D COVINOTON.
VioePreideaL
SGTRS


0. S. ELLS. B F. BULLARD
P. L SUTHERLAND. W. C. POWWL.
J- B PADGETT. WAILMR AT,.
J. R. YOUNG. A. D. OOVDINo..
8


B L .AYTON.
Swe.1- T m


J. IL 00NUW
C. W. -,
RAYMOND CAT.
AL L.OOKOL.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly siaueled and an
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. 0. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE ErmeT OF THE ABOVE F o PARTICUAs.




Printing r all Purpose

f CUl. Fi-B.
Ta a


----------------


EIXPRM PMfAl WVFUL QMOVA rUIV"U
Per Pow a F
oansm. Qu i e merem ase
Hatchett' Private stock ..................K.4 I"S 6.0 i.
Hatchett'a Thlat WhIkey ................ .. .1 M 4. .0
Hathet:a Old B e .......... ............ ..3 a 4
Eureka. N. C. Ale Brandy........ .... .. 4 4. -T. M36
N. C. Apple Brandy .. ................ .. ..3.5 4i.5 S.
Eureka Malt .. .. .. ........ .. .... .... .I. 4. .6
Eureka N. C. Pc Brd.... ................ ... . .
N. C. Peach Brandy ................ ...... 4.
Eureka N. C. Corn .................. .... ...5 .5 4.15 .
Eureka N. C. Corn, XX .. .. .. .. .... .. .. .. ... 3 4, .I
Eureka N. C. Corn. X .............. .. .. .5 4.5 .
ureka N. C. Coin, XXXX .... .... .. .. .. .. L. 3. I .
Old Crow Bourbon ........ .... .. .... .. .. 4 4. 3.
Hermitage Rye .... ............... .. 4.0 4.10 6.1 138
Bunny Brook Rye .. ............. ....... a S. a 1U
Sunny Brook our Mash .. .......... .. .. .. .. .L L.5 1.
Echo Spring ................ .............. 4. 4 6. IL3.
ilk Velvet .. .. .... .... ............. a.. T.SJ .W
Oak and .................. ...... .. .... L. 4.a .0 .W0
GI PIOM L .50 TO $3.50 PIUGALWLO. ZMUVaUY D
Save tw elve labels of H atchett Private Stock a d aaM e a battle free.
Save twelve labels of Hatchett' Old Rye and seem a bottle fee.
Save twelve label. of Hatchetta That's Whlbie and ee m a bettl te.
Save twelve label, of Eureka N. C. Corn and seure a bottle fee. ae
twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy and mecue one bottle free. Sv
twelve labels of Eureka Malt and secure one bottle free. Prtee of aB mao
bought at company's store are I0o per gallon less than whe delivered. No
charge for Jugs, boxes or drayage. A. of my bottles am fai mammmi Al
standard brands of whiskies sold over my bar at et per drink.
We also carry Ia stoek liquors of cheaper grads
All wines quoted on application.
Special prices in large lota, packed any alum dedred. Ieavs for ye.
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded.
EULEKA WINE AND LIQUOR COMPANY.
I WBT BAY STREET, JACKIONVIIL. PI IDA.






.............- ii Ioe> Isteeiel .... I I .......... I ..I .> i311i i i3i sft1 aa W


C. B. B oGEB. PauzmR.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, VICx-PaaxDzmN.


C. H. HODGSON, acu, and TUAS'a.


DIRECTORS i C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain. H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jackesoville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GiROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches la Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the'.Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything In Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Cmiast of ome Three-Story Bildlag, 70x200; one two-story balldlag. 50x390; one one-storyl uldlag,'iSOx28O,
making the largest space of amy Company of the kild Is the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Brandche Tamp&, lv.., Pensmcol .. FI., and SavannJah, Ga.


.a......uu--------uuh---h-u-----f-...u.. u a.--asseuasu, ss ..u..m....iiiii.. ..-..--


cc


r






I



I







WRITE


4'


FOR OUR 100 PAGE


ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE


I j


* I
I
*


CLOCKS


CUT GLASS


CHINA


SILVERWARE


We Prepay Express
Charges on Mail Orders


No Charge for Engraving


V.--1t 1

4.
_W-C-5i


BRIC-A-BRAC


Mail Orders Filled
Same Day Received


Satisfaction Guaranteed


I


QREENLEAF &


OROSBY CO..


41 W. Bay St.. JACKSONVILLE


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings


Illustrating and Engraving Department
01OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidlequipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the m t ved
uad aidfahn ltir? for iwspapers and al kinds of ommwercia Wodr. Pa wet& |

a"fn Bslm m t m an mWe mm i m. ,
IN WRTmm OR APPLYING FOR PRICES GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCImION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


The Most Complete
Stock in This Section


DIAMONDS
WATCH ES
JEWELRY


The Most Complete
Stock In This Section


r-


__