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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00119
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 28, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00119
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text





iIUSTRIAU L








n- of A E YIAVAL A ToRES. A, 17.
1VA1}5ERl OERDERIAh
f D VSTRIAI6 FIMCGIALh

Gj NEWSPAPERS


THE RECORD'S NEW HOME--- ~,
L. 10 THE Industrial Record Publishing Co., 10
I and all of the departments of
this publication, will move into its
new building at Bay and Newnan
streets, Jacksonville, in another ten
days. The building, which has been in
course of construction for several
months is now nearing completion,
and if we are permitted to say it, it is
one of the largest and most Com-
modious newspaper homes in the
entire south. This building stands and
will always stand as a monument to
the friends of the Record who have
made it possible for us to succeed and
grow. We invite all of our friends and
i customers to visit us with the remem-
brance always that the-


---LATCH STRING HANGS OUT





President, W. C. POWELL; Vice-Presidents, who with the President, constitute the Directory and Board of Managers, W. F. COACHMAN, B. F. BUL-
LARD, II. L. COVINGTON, II. A. McEACIIERN, JOHN I.YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B ROCKERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES

.. COMPANY.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA, FLA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS

Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.

The Consolidated is Purely a Cooperative Company. Its
Interests are Identical with those of the Producers. The
Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.

YARDS AT JACKSONVILLE, SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA AND PENSACOLA

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.
ISSBBS63 SSSB_^________________________________________________













WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBISHED EVERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO THE NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING INlrlfb .l-

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The National Association of Mmtufa.tures.

(By A. B. Farquhar in the Manufactruers' Record.)
On the 16th of May, in Atlanta, the had by meeting and taking counsel wil
beautiful central metropolis of the South- his fellows, let us encourage him to
hand, occurs the next annual meeting of that. But let us insist that the right
accorded him as a freeman he shall e
the most important and powerful business cept in the same spirit. He has no rig]
organization in the country or perhaps in to se his own liberty to repress tl
the world The National Association of liberty of others. Yet that is just whm
Manufacturers of the United States of the unions do when they contend for tl
America will then enter upon the tenth "closed shop," a flagrant invasion of ti
year of its vigorous and useful activity, freedom of the non-unionist, and that
with every promise of surpassing the lus- what they do when they undertake
ter of its earlier record of service by the coerce legislatures and congresses in
brighter splendor of the record it has yet rushing through their "eight-hour" am
to make. In view of this meeting, the "anti-injunction" bills. It was not
editor of the Manufacturers' Record combat the principle of labor unions;
asks of me an article giving an account of was to resist onslaughts in the name
the Association and showing the interest the unions upon our liberty and that
of all sections of the country, the South- our fellow-citizens that the National A
land especially, in helping to sustain it. sociation two or three years ago began
esteem it a high honor to be so invited, make itself heard before the congressiol
and am glad to comply to my best ability, al committees and in the press again
not only because of my devotion to the the coercive legislation dictated by tl
Association, but because of my high ap- Federation of Labor. If we had not o
preciation of the Manufacturers' Record posed these bills, they would probab]
and its untiring labors in behalf of the have slipped silently through, or ha'
best interests of the new South. The ad- overborne every protest with the resis
vanee of that important section of our less power of the organization behind
country in a career of industrial achieve- them, and that they are not laws to-da
meant will be a lasting benefit not only to is due more to the Association than
itself, but to all other sections with it. any other factor. The industrial inte
That the advance which is certain to ests of the whole country are gainers h
characterize the history of the Southland our activity, but if the benefits from
through the new century will be largely have been greater for one section than f,
along industrial lines is the general belief another, that section is the South, whe
of its wisest citizens. Unparalleled re- long hours of labor are more needed am
sources, such as those at its command, less exhausting than in regions whe
were given for development, not for neg work is done at a higher pressure. CO
et. And even under the supposition, 350 Southern fellow-members have bet
which no enthusiastic Southerner will be fully aware of this, and the help the
in haste to grant, that the commerce of have furnished in the cause is highly a
his section with other sections and other preciated.
countries is destined to continue to be There has been some complaint thi
made up mainly of the raw materials of those who represent Southern States
manufacture, nevertheless a wise econo- our national Congress have not come
my dictates that at least the goods con- the support of the manufacturers ai
sumed at home, formed from materials business men of their section; that hei
of home production, shall not be burdened as in some other instances, the politic
with the cost of double transportation, South has shown itself out of touch wi
but shall receive their final form in the the industrial South. But the same coT
land of their origin. To supply the im- plaint applies to other sections also, ai
mediate needs of a rapidly-growing popu- some of our Northern States (Pennsylv
nation will call for an ample manufactur- nia not excepted, I regret to say), ha
ing establishment, and in order that man- occasionally cause to blush for the mi
ufacturing may thrive it must keep they send to help in making laws for tl
abreast of the times. Is not this a dem- country. The truth is, the necessity f
onstration that the progress of the unremitting vigilance with regard
Southland is bound up with the forms those elected to the nation's legislati
ton within its territory of a sturdy body council, resting on all States alike,
of wide-awake, farsighted manufactur- everywhere toq much disregarded, and
ers who are wise enough to keep in touch too frequently happens that we suff
with those of their craft throughout the political manipulators to choose our re
country? What section is there-is there resentatives and senators, who cons
any section-in a better position to profit quently go to their posts less impress
by such an association as ours? with the duties thereto attaching or wi
The work of the National Association the permanent interests of the peop
in its firt ten years is an earnest of they represent than with the "ard
what is to be expected from it hereafter. civium prava jubentium"-the exactiol
Chief and most conspicuous among its of the demagogues to whom their exalt
services to the industrial welfare of the tion is due, and who urgently insist on
country may be named its efforts to quid pro quo. Associations of politician
maintain a proper balance between labor to get and keep official place, de not re
and capital in the control of productive resent the people, and thus we find oi
activity. The question is delicate, difi- Congress ready to put obstacles in t
cult and thoroughly two-sided. Labor way of policies which are evidently favu
unions cannot be suppressed at this stage ites with the people, just as we ha
of the world's progress, and we ought not found past Congresses eager to suppre
to suppress them in a country of free- reciprocity treaties and several succe
men even if we could. The workingman sive Congresses opposed to arbitrati,
is not intended under our system of gov- treaties, in the interest rather of a cliqi
ernent to serve as a mere piece of ma- than of the public. and thus we are su
chinery. He is recognized as a citizen in to find that the measures put forwa
all other relations. and even when he ro- and advocated in the alleged interest
operates in production, a situation where labor have a great deal more strength
his efficiency depends absolutely on Iis Congress than they have before the h
fidelity in carrying out the plans of those of common sense and enlightened popul
in charge of the work, he serves the bet- opinion. Thus is explained the apparel
ter for holding some status as a thinking popularity of the eight-hour and anti-i
and responsible being. Let him do what junction bills, the perpetually-recurrii
he fairly can to advance himself we all danger that some of those bills may b
agree, and if the best advance is to be come laws if our vigilance is for a m


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I II I I I


ment relaxed, the need of combating
them by the power of organization, and
the value of an organization such as ours
to all who might suffer from foolish leg-
islation.
But the National Association of Man-
ufacturers will by no means confine itself
in the future to watching and resisting
the labor agitators. Important as that
work is, we have a number of ofher tasks
of equal importance before us. Among
the most pressing of these is a railway-
rate regulation. There is much honest
difference of opinion on this point among
men qualified by information, experience
and judicial temper to form opinions, and
one might well be at a loss, considering
the question apart from the evidence of
actual experiment, which side could pre-
sent the better array of competent au-
thorities to support it, or whether more
weight should be g-ven to the arguments
for or to those against governmental reg-
ulation. The tendency of great masses
of capital to work in combination, with
little regard for the individual citizen
who may stand in their way, would be
accepted at once as a reason for interfer-
:ng for the protection of the individual
against the consolidation were there not
equal force in the general objection to
governmental interference in private con-
tracts, which should surely apply in this
case were there no special reason to ex-
cept it. But, in fact, the decisions of
practical men on practical questions are
generally governed by experience, and
those who favor government regulation of
rates can appeal with good reason to the
working of administrative boards in
Canada and in Great Britain as proof that
such machinery is actually adapted to the
ends sought. Much has been said, both
at home and abroad, about the incapacity
or corruption of the legislative branch of
our national and State government, but
such criticism rarely or never attacks the
judicial branch. The same high esteem
with which our judiciary is regarded has
been merited by our interstate commerce
commission in the eighteen years of its
existence, and would most certainly he
even more amply justified if its powers
should be increased to answer more fully
the objects of its first creation. This is
not the place, however, to argue the
question of regulation-only to call at-
tention anew to its importance, and to
insist that in a matter where shippers
have united interests there ought to he
a union of shippers to hold council to-
gether, fairly and impartially, not in a
spirit of opposition to the transportation
lines, but with an earnest endeavor for
what President Roosevelt has called a
"square deal" all around. That is all we
should ask, but nothing less should con-
tent us. Producer, transporter, consum-
er must divide fairly, and if rate reguln-
tion by a government office is a way to
bring that about, such regulation the Na-
tional Association will seek to introduce.
But it can only do so, as it can only do
anything worth doing, by united effort.
for to act separately is to act weakly, and
the whole strength of the South is need-
ed to aid our efforts. No section has
more at stake in the adjustment of the
transportation problem.
The unending tariff question is one that
we could not avoid if we would. In some
quarters there is a tendency to speak of
manufacturers as banded together against
the great mass of the people, their inter-
est being all for high duties at the peo-
ple's expense. Yet, in fact, there is as
wide a divergence in the interests of man-
ufacturers on this point as of politicians
themselves. Many of our number earn-
estly maintain, and in some eases doubt-
less with truth, that the preference al-
lowed them in the home markets is alto-
gether indispensable, and that equal com-
petition with foreign producers would
mean ruin. On the other hand, there is


a considerable and increasing number
whose interests lie all on the aide of
freer trade, and I have for many years
recognized that my own business belonged
to this latter class. But in this clash of
interests there is one point on which we
are all united-that we shun, above all
things, a commercial crisis, and seek,
above all things, commercial tranquility.
Nothing to be gained from putting a
tariff high to keep out competitors or
putting it low to favor export trade by
reducing cost of production but would be
dearly purchased at the price of financial
settlement. All the same, a readjust-
ment of the tariff is bound to come. It
is as impossible that this unwieldy, over-
grown Dingley law should be permanent
as that any other top-heavy structure
should sustain itself against every storm
that beats. Henry Clay, the great advo-
cate of protection seventy-five years'ago,
spoke of nine years as a full measure of
time within which any tariff law ought to
fulfill its object and establish the enter-
prises in whose behalf it was enacted
beyond the need of further fostering, and
it is hardly possible for our industries to
plead, after nine years of Dingley, that
further times is needed for each and ev-
ery one of them to prove its suitability
to conditions here. That our Associatio
would undertake the work of making
recommendations for the inevitable revi-
sion, if called upon to examine into the
question in a thoroughly conservative
spirit, guarding as far as possible against
a financial disturbance from which the
whole country would suffer, there can be
no doubt. And exactly at this point do
we need the hearty co-operation and the
best thought of our Southern fellow-eiti-
zens. If there are anywhere industries
that need fostering, the section where in-
dustries are less fully developed ought to
show them, and if, on the other hand,
the prevalent Southern preference for
free trade affects manufacturers as well
as planters, the manufacturer of the
whole country ought to feel the fu.l
weight of their opinion. But in any
event our movement should not be local
not of a State or of a section, but noth-
ing less than national. So only can it be
made to count.
Hardly less important is the work that
the Association may accomplish in behalf
of international arbitration. As to the
cruelty of war, 'it is for the philanthro-
pist: as to the folly of war, it is for the
political philosopher to speak; as to its
prodigal wastefulness, the man of busi-
ness is thoroughly posted. In the pres-
ent development of human society 'hie
only hopeful way of settling disagree-
ments between nations after they have
become too strained for ordinary diplo-
matic adjustment, appears to be the r
bitration tribunal. There should be a
fixed automatic rule for recourse to such
a tribunal applicable at once, applicable
to any country with which we may wlf
ourselves at any time and in any way at
variance. Such a rule could be adopted
for the United States in all cases if the
proper pressure should be brought to
bear in Washington. From no quarter
could the needed pressure ore oppropri-
ately come than from the business men
of the entire country. I need not insist
on bhat we have at stake; every one
knows it who can recognize the difference
between a country at peace and a count
try prostrated or paralyzed by war in
power of sustaining productive industries.
The National Association of Manufactur-
ers has expressed itself many times in no
unbious tones on this question whenever
it has been presented, and the Assoea-
tion needs a full representation from all
sections of the country to give it voiee
due influence and force.
On questions of national administra-
tion we ought no less to be heard. The
new Department of Commeree and Labor,







4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


whose head, Hon. Secretary Victor H.
Metcalf, is to address our Atlanta con-
vention on the third day, is eminently the
business branch of our government. It
consists of several important bureau.
transferred from other Departments where
they have already been of valuable ser-
vice, especially to manufacturers. I need
only to name the census bureau, the labor
bureau, those of immigration and sta-
tistics, and some new ones which have
already given promise of proving no less
useful, as the bureaus of corporations and
of manufactures. This Department was
created in response to a business need, and
it, in its turn, must often need the power
of the organized business interests of the
country behind it if it is to accomplish
for the public interest what it ought, if
its laborious researches and careful ree-
ommendations are not to fall unheeded be-
fore Congress. To make of this business
Department what it ought to become is a
work in which the business men of the
entire country ought to unite.
Very little space remains for a passing
allusion to a great many ways in which
the Association may be of benefit to its
members far surpassing the $50 per an-
num which is the cost of membership.
This benefit is not less to Southern than
to Northern and Western members.
Through the Washington correspondence.
with the main office at 170 Broadway,
they 'can be advised as to methods .-f
gettir-g government business; through the
law department they can be protected with
regard to taxation, and through the freight
bureau with regard to traffe difficulties.
Information is also furnished with regard
to the numerous humbugs infesting man-
ufacturing and with regard to our export
trade the particulars to be had are ample
and accurate. The whole. work of this
Broadway ofiee is an admirable exempiifi-
cation of the power of organization.
For the sake of the South and of the
Association alike a large accession of
Southern membership is to be hoped. The
Southern people are in need of us and we
of them. We want to make our body as
powerful and as beneficent as. possible.
Prominent and respected as we already
are, we want their help in r. making us more
so. We want to occupy some such posi-
tion as that of the Board of Trade in
Great Britain, called on by Parliament
for advice whenever a tarf or other meas-
ure affecting commerce or enterprise is in
preparation, and consulted by government
departments on all matters pertaining to
our business. The progress of the United
States in manufacturing is already the
world's wonder. Grant it this better or-
ganization and it will grow greater yet.
York, Pa.
CHRISTOPHER HONORED.
Jacksavmie Man Elected Presidet Ma-
chinery Dealers' Asociation.
John G. Christopher, of this city, was
elected president of the Southern Supply
and Machinery Dealers' Association at
Savannah yesterday to succeed Mr. Peter
4. Blow, of Knoxville.
Mr Christopher has for the last year
been chairman of the manufacturers'
committee and is a prominent member of
the organization. The compliment paid
the Southern section of the association
in electing a Jacksonville man to the
highest office was deeply appreciated by
the delegation from this section. Mr.
Christopher responded with a short ad-
dress, in which he thanked the organiza-
tion for the honor conferred upon him.
Mr. George V. Denny, of Savannah, who
is chairman of the executive committee,
and who has worked faithfully for the
success of the convention, was elected
first vice president.
Other officials elected were:
Second Vice President George A.
Smith. of the Smith-Courtney Company,
Richmond.
Executive Committee-S. Milner Price,
S. M. Price Machinery Company, Nor-
folk, Va.; T. J. Hyman, Hyman Supply
Company, Newbern, N. C.; Peter E.
Blow, Southern Brass and Iron Company.
Knoxville, Tenn., and Edward L. Stream,
Gibbons & Stream, New Orleans.

Mr. R. L. vev, of DeLand, was in Jack-
sonville several days this week.


STATE OF TRADE
As Reported by Bradstreta.
Trade reports are irregular in character,
distribution of seasonable goods at retail
being retarded early by cool or rainy
weather at the west, northwest and
south, where truck, fruit products and
young cotton were damaged by frosts.
Industries, however, are active, jobbing
trade at some centers is still good, and
retail business toward the latter end of
the week became more animated. Build-
ing is brisk ,money is firmer, bank clear-
ings have increased heavily, prices in gen-
eral display a downward tendency, weak-
ness in grain and securities being especial
features. Railway earnings are still on
the up grade and western wheat crop
prospects continue favorable, timely
rains helping winter wheat, though cold
weather has delayed spring wheat and
oats seeding and corn plowing. While
iron and steel still continue buoyant,
demand for pig and old iron is less pro-
nounced, and the markets therefore pre-
sent a quiet appearance. Inquiries for
foreign billets are numerous, their scar-
city here being the immediate feature in
the market. American houses are said
to be figuring on the construction of iron
and steel works in Japan and China It
is usually a quiet season for jobbers, but
paints, oils, lumber, plumbers' supplies
and building material are active, while
agricultural implements are in good re-
quest. Here and there industrial distur-
bances have cropped up, but so far the
situation in this respect is very satisfac-
tory.
The price movement this week has been
in a downward direction. Prominent in
this respect has been wheat, which, al-
though helped by reports of cold weather
and decreases in the visible supply, has
weakened. The May option has led the
decline, and there is talk of the corner
being abandoned. Cash wheat is 7 cents
lower on the week and 21 cents off from
the highest reached in February. Corn
has also weakened slightly, but oats have
hardened on cold weather reports. Cot-
ton has weakened a little, speculative
liquidation being a feature, offsetting
crop-damage reports. The movement
continues heavy for this season of the
year. Weakness in the egg market is
notable this week. Receipts at Chicago
have broken all records, and heavy buy-
ing for storage purposes is reported. But-
ter is higher on the week.
Railway earnings for the first half of
April indicate a gain of about 10 per cent
over the same period a year ago. Febr-
uary net returns are poor, as was expect-
ed, a decrease in gross receipts of 3 per
cent comparing with a falling off of 10
per cent in net
Detailed trade reports from some cities,
while showing a shrinkage from some
weeks ago, all point to heavy increases
over the same period of preceding years
Chicago reports wholesale business be-
yond expectations and reorders satisfac-
tory. Kansas City reports a heavy busi-
ness in farm implements; St. Louis a fall-
ing off in wholesale trade, but a good
Easter business at retail. In the north-
west retail trade has increased in both
the city and country, while robbing trade
has naturally slackened. Exceptions to
this are noted at Duluth, where strikes
in the iron range country interfere with
business, and at Sioux Falls and Sioux
City, where the weather has been too
cold for retail trade. Along the lakes,
Milwaukee and Detroit report retail'
business backward because of unseason
able weather.
Damaging frosts visited the south this
week, Charleston, Chattanooga, Atlanta
and Montgomery all reporting more or
less injury from this cause to fruit, gar-
den truck and cotton. The peach crop of
Northern Georgia has been injured, but
the crop in the central and southern parts
of the State seems to have escaped
Heavy ra:ns and cold weather have de-
layed cotton planting in Texas and in the
Memnphis district. -lacksonville reports
tc.urists going north, truck shipments
large and a slight decrease probable in the
cotton acreage.
Unseasonable weather at the east re
tarded dry goods trade at retail, but
later on a good Easter business was done
Wholesale trade in dry goods has been


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JAOKSONVILLE. PLA.
CAPITAL S304000 SURPLUS and UNWVDED PROFIT $41476091
We i Time e Certiee of Depsit, whieh draw gtewestt rat t are pter casntm
am-mm, if dh ibe y a51 or seasbr. Take aso to ad h yar a~l-s i rM
mettUulag re. Psarneulr useUttl eI tool .on seeomm. meIsMes byes -

STAVEC NONE BETTER MADE

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SOUTHERN ELECTRIC CO.
BOARD OF TRADE *UILDINO. 31 MAIN STREET.


SELL PHONE 1880. JAOKSONVILLW. FLA.



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in the Setam cmwL





4,*


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


THE LATEST FRENCH SUMMER MILLINERY.
De't Fal Wh i Jacksonville to Pay a Visit (Whether You Buy or Not)
to the Magnificent store of
IWMDT NEXT
STATE BANK HENRY JACOBS TArTE BANK
5 EAST UAY STREET.
Where are now on view all the Latest Creations of the Highest and Iatest
Paris Conceptions of Millinery Art showing what are the very latest and
most correct fashions in Head Wear. Buy nowhere else your new Hat until
you have paid a visit to this Grand Exhibition.
N. B.-There arelso to be seen all the Newest French Walking Skirts,
French Suits and French Waists for summer wear.
S---------------- y----w 9-


naturally quiet Reorders of men's wear
woolens have been small in volume. Ex
port inquiry for cotton is good and
many makers are sold ahead well into
1906. American trade in cotton goods re-
sembles that of Great Britain, in that
the export branch notes relatively most
eager demand. The wool market is quiet
but firm as regards old supply of Amer-
ican wool. Foreign grades are, however.
in good demand, and reports from the
west that the bulk of the new clip has
already been sold at high prices, much of
it still being on the sheep's back.
On the Pacific coast the outlook seems
to be without a 4aw. The California
gain yield will be large; the Washington.
winter wheat crop is in satisfactory
shape, and the same report comes from
Oregon. The Southern California orange
crop is a heavy one, and good prices are
being obtained. A very heavy export
trade with Asia is looked for on the coast
this year.
Recent advances in prices of meats and
provisions have affected consumptive de-
mand. Receipts of live cattle at Chicago
are large and prices are lower.
Especially good reports as to demand
come from the lumber trade, which feels
the impetus cf the record-breaking ac-
tivity i building. Some exceptions to
this are noted at New England points,
but in the west demand is unprecedented
and limited only by available stocks.
Lake navigation in lumber has opened
and prices are $1 to $2 higher than a year
ago. At the south lumber dealers are
actively engaged.
Old material shares with pig iron the
quiet and easier tendencies noted in this
industry. Finished products are, how-
ever, active. Pittabmg notes that billets
and sheet bars command premiums of
from $3 to $6 per ton over the market
prices. Steel tails are in active request
at Chicago. !Filadrlphia reports tha. the
market for ir,;n pipe is quieter. Iron
consumption is of enormous volume, and.
except for cok'. raw mat-rials are in
greater demand than supply. Congestion
by ice in the lake channels has impede
the movement of ore eastward and of
coal westward. Core prices have softened
considerably during the week. Anthracite
coal is active .lnd the April production is
estimated at 6000000 tons, or in excess
of a year age but the soft coal situation
is rather unsatisfactory, recent conces-
sions in wagev in the eastern district
having place .hose sections at a disad-
vantage as i mpared with western re
gion
Bank cleariL.gs for the week ending
S with April 20 aggegate $3,154,591,220, 5
per cent large than last week and 65 per
cent in excess of last year. Exchanges
outside New York city total $964'44,-
985, a gain of a fraction of 1 per cent as
compared wit. ,ast week and 21 per cent
over last year
Business failure for the week euiding
April 20 number 183, against 196 last
week, 199 in the ike week in 1904, 152 in
1900, 181 in ll-0g and 214 in 1901.
Wheat, inclh.ing flour, exports for the
week ending .A-il 20 are 1,242,267 bush-
els, against I lJ),1 bushels last week
1,045,428 busai'ls tL.s week last year, 3,-
888642 bushe': in 1903 and 3,750,589
bushels in 190? From July 1 to date the
exports are 51,074,914 bushels, against
120,712,907 bu-.els last year, 133,672,049
bushels in 19KC and 20b,031,241 bushels in
190. Corn ex- orts for the week are 2,-
232,9 4 bushe.-. against 2,299,767 buwhels
last week, 20 792 -ushels a year ag., 1,


499,906 bushes in 1"03 and 376,186 bush-
els in 1902. l'From .uly 1 to date the ex
ports of corn ar 05,377,646 bushels,
against 48,743,306 bushels in 1904, 53
101,708 bushels in 1903 and 23,905,982
bushels m 1002.
STANDARD ELECTRIC COMPANY.
Jacksonville is looking forward with
the keenest interest to a number of large
concerns that have recently launched, as
it were, on the commercial seas of our fine
State, for the growth of Jocksonville day
by day in this direction is simply marvel-
lous. Nowhere can this go-aheadeduess
be more noticed than with that splendid
firm of electricians who have just started
business under the title of the Standard
Electric Company, and whose premises are
located at 16 Forsyth Street. The coni-
pany has been organized with ample cap-
ital and most efficient management, to con-
tract for the wiring of residences, the con-
struction of private and municipal light-
ing plants and trolley roads, and in a word
every class of work required in the gas and
electrical business, for which they have
collected the very latest dynamos and mo.
tors, etc., as well as a full line of gas and
electrical supplies.
The officers of this fine company are:
President, W. G. Toomer, who is secretary
and treasurer of the well known Wilson
& Toomer Fertilizer Co.; Vice-President
and General Manager, C. O. Patterson;
Treasurer, H. C. Hare, lately with one of
our largest insurance agencies; Secretary,
Froman Smith. C. 0. Patterson was for a
city electric light pklant of Jacksonville,
number of years superintendent of the
and for the past four years has been en-
gaged in the electrical contracting business
and is probably the most expert electric-
ian we have in the State. As an example
of his splendid work, we are pleased to
mention amongst the many fine contracts
that e has of late completed are to be
found those of Senator Taliaferro, J. R.
Parrott, T. V. Porter, S. B. Hubbard, the
Continental Hotel at Atlantic Beach, as
well as building the North Jacksonville
Street Railway Co., and more recently he
completely renovated the Jacksonville
Street Railway power house, and many of
our finest residences to be found in the
city.
The company have been fortunate also
in securing the services of Mr. Froman
Smith, who has traveled most successfully
for the past many years for the largest
electrical firms in this section of the coun-
try, and we are sure Mr. Smith will bring
with him that high courtesy and indomita-
ble energy which has ever been closely as-
sociated with his name.
Under these favorable conditions we
predict an immediate and permanent suc-
cess for Jacksonville's latest fine electrical
company.
TO INCREASE CAPITAL
Stockholders of the Naval Stores Export
Company to Meet Again.
A special meeting of the stockholders
of the Naval Stores Export Company will
be held in the Board of Trade rooms,
Jacksonville, Fla., May llth, 1905, at 10
o'clock a. m., for the purpose of amend-
ing the charter of this company by in-
creasing its capital stock to $1,250,000.00.
amending by-laws and transacting any
other business which may be transacted
at a stockholders' meeting.
Mr. W. C. Jackson, a popular naval
stores operator of Green Cove Springs, was
in town last Wednesday.


THE DIAMOND.
-Whelesan J ILenJl

Wines, Liquors and Ciars,

*olo Aent w5 the g fg 1ar s Lma-a' arB, al. -WihelasU ZXsou Mn.
aere Waer. We luarefte aOnl Daanda t up by wi fua B ssema as Ib2lwes
Creme de la Creme, bottle .... $.00 Diamond Brand, botte ........ 1.00
[I shir--n -....nuad" i I.] Heart Brand, bottle .......... .75
C C.C. C. Brand, bottle ........ 1.50 Spade Brand, bottle ........... .AA
Club Brand, bottle ........... 1.25 Premium Brand, botUle ........ .0

: MYERSON CO.,
105 a 107 Wo Ba# t. p 1712.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

8 8 O***********II*IS***I****i 8HI 8II 10


J. A. Craig 4)v Bro.

239 W. SBy Store EVERETT BLOCK.

g Leaders in Men's and Beos' Fine Cloth-
S imng and Up-to-Date Furnishings.


Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.




The Bond & Bours Co.
WiOlKt.AW a RETAIL


HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Rliuans. Paints, Oils and Glass
Stoves. Tinware, Country-Holloware.

1t WEST BAY STRJET Jachkonville Fla.


Jamese Stewagt 3. Debead Jr.

STEWART %& COMPANY
505 West us" TIMER. LANDS J.keksonvlle. L.
2,560 acres Virgin Timber, Liberty County, Fla. Will ut 6,000 feet and a
boxes per acre. Price, $5.50.
50,000 eres Virgin Timber, Washington County, Fla. Will cut 5,000 feet p
acre. A large amount of Cypress also. Price, $5.0 per acre.
5,760 acres Virgin Timber, Liberty County, Fla. Will cut 5,00 feet and 100
boxes per acre. Price, $4.75 per acre.
Numerous other treats of both Virgin and Saw Mill Timber in all part
of the State. Orange Groves and Truck Farms, Improved and Unimproved
City Property. Loans negotiated. Correspondence solicited.


I *I88(u*1**I*iiiiiii8IIII*i6SS 8** i8 IIlI *- S* i
John K. Younc. J. W. Mtott, C. B. Parker. James MeNatt, W.W. WdM
Preidnt. Vee-Pres. ViePres. Vioe-Pres. See. T



John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


SNaval Stores Factors. Wholesale Grocers.
4
SavPnia ih L Brunswick. Ga.
see -----------------ii m --





6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

Q. R. CHAPLAIN, A. D. COVINGTON, M. 0. HUTTO, E. A. GROOVER,
PRESIDENT. VICE -PRESIDENT. MANAGER. SECRETARY AND TREASURER.


( "The Northern" j
1 TOURING CARS AND RUNABOUTS
SUniversally Admired.
These are the cars of masterful mnchan~u and exclusive excel-
lence, not the cars which simply "rattle and ran." .They e
considered by the most expert Northern and French chauffeur to
be the best types of design in this country and are the most prac-
tical and most reliable machines yet produced.
They are the Real Proposition for 1905.
Send us for descriptive catalogue and terms before purchasing
elsewhere.

The Largest and Most Up-To-Date Automobile Company in the South.
ALL CABR EQUIPPED WITH THE FLORIDA STANDARD GUAGE 60 INCH.


ThEast Coast Automobile



Company

18- 20 22 Ocean Street. Jacksonville, Florida.

Dealers in Automobiles and Marine Engine Supplies.
STORAGE LARGEST IN THE CITY.
1905 Models of the very latest designs are now ready for immediate delivery. The Northern and Cadillac Automobiles are the
talk of the Automobile world, because they have been proven over and over again to be the liveliest, snappiest and most speedy
ears that have yet been produced, being light in weight, perfectly comfortable, strong and durable, very handsome and stylish,
together with being most graceful, easy-running and powerful, makes them "La Premiere in Autos."


"The Cad ilac"


Great Favoxurite Cear
A MILE In I Minute, 7 4-5 Seconds.
Cadillac cars and motors are the embodiment of the very latest
novel and essential features of merit.. They are the cars upon
which the automobile public has set its seal of approval. .It can
be relied upon every day of the year.. The Cadillac combines
strength, durability, quietness and speed and requires the least
attention, which is not possessed by other cars.
Write ns for all particulars and prices.
Headquarters of the East Coast Automobile Company.
.* *@ "" "d A A
v '








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


~m, %%au%%%%%%~


~1


Florida Bank and Trust Company
Catpitl S1,000,00. 00. Jacklonvalle. Fla..
DPOirTARY OF STATE. COVMTY AND CITY FrvND
W. P. COACHMAN President. W. S. JENNINGS. Vice President.
W. A. RIDDIG, Casier. ARTHUB F. PERRY, Vice President.
F. P. PLIRNG, Jr., Trust Officer
Reeelves depMost aeounU of individuals, firms, orporUtons and banks, Pays 4 per
eat o savia depots. Rets safe depooit boxes. Buys and sells foreign exchange and
-M letter. of credit.
Ae s trustee, transfer aent, registrar and fiscal agent for corporations and
m.aleipeiUte. xeeutes au trusts such as executor, trustee under will or appointment
of court, receiver and guardian.
Vno du a e". Aooomnts Saolieted. Co t -P iwsd Invited.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week.


Resi for the Week at Savannah.
Monday, April 24. Last Year.
WW .. ........... 4.10 3.80
WG ...... 3.95 3.60
N ............ .. 3.90 3.20
K ............ 3.85 3.15
1 ............... .4 2.80
H .............. 3.30 2.65
G ....... ...... .3.15 2.65
F ............ 3.10 2.00
E ................ 3.06 2.55
D ............ .. 3.00 2.50
ABC ........ .... 2.95 2.50
Receipts 1,304; sales 1,921; exports 2,135
Tuesday, April 25.-Rosin firm; receipts
1,524, sales 1,104, shipments 1,847. Quote:
A, B, C, $2.96; E, $&.00; F, $3.05; G, $3.10;
H, (3.25; I, $3.45@$3.50; K, $3.60; M,
$3.75@$3.85; N, $3.85($3.90; WG, $3.90
@$3.95; WW, $4.00g$4.06.
Wednesday, April 28.-Memorial Day.
Thursday, April 27.--Roin firm; re-
ceipts, 233; sales, 1,408; shipments, 488.
Quote: A, B, and C, $2.90; D, $2.90; E,
$3.021-2; F, $3.071-2; G, $3.121-2; H,
330; I, $3.40; K, $3.50; M, $3.75; N,
$3.80; window glass, $3.85; water white,
$4.05.
Turpati at London.
1906 1904 1903 1902
Stock April 8 6536. 15,682 26,245 26,151
Del'd this wk 1,759b 1,477 1,105 2,086
Since Jan 1 .. 21,677 24,247 20,478 23,779
Price April 8 44- 41-6 43-6 31-9
July-De. ... 38-9 40-3 35-9 32-3
Savannah .... 0c 53c 50c 42%
(a) includes 872 French; (b) includes
105 French.
Telar, Hart & Co.'s Review.
New York, April 25, 1905.
The Industrial Record, Jacksonville, Fla.:
Spirits Turpentine-The market has
been steadier during past week. Supplies
have been light with our market in good
position to quickly respond to any im-
provement in the South. Stock, 144 bbls.
We quote Machines, 59@59% cta.
Rosin-The scarcity of low grades con-
tinues with prices very firm; mediums;
are about steady; pales are weak with
quotations nominal. We quote:
BC, $3.30; D, 3.30; E, *3.35; F, $3.50;
G, $3.6; H, $375; I, $3.95; K, $4.30; M,
$4.70; N, $4.75; WG, $4.86; WW, $4.90.
TOLAR, HART & CO.


Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Price Rcpts Sales Exp 1904
Mon., Apr. 24..54% 338 387 15 53%
Tues., Apr. 25..55 1,074 573 290 53%
Wed., Apr. 26-Memorial Day.
Thur., Apr. 27-551/ 880 102 510 53%
Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 ........... 5,400 25,335
Receipts April 27 ...... 880 2,33
Receipts previously .... 7,076 18,517
Total ................ 13,356 46,185
Exports April 27 ........ 510 488
Exports previously ...... 8,510 28,371
Total ............... 9,020 28,859
Stock April 27 .......... 4336 17,320
Stock previously ........ 5,413 35,885
Bailey & Montgomery's Review.
New York, April 26th, 1905.
Spirits Turpentine-The market during
t..e week has been very steady and prices
on the upturn again. Business has been
fair.
Thursday, April 20-591/c.
Friday, April 21-58c.
Saturday, April 22-58e.
Monday, April 24-58c.
Tuesday, April 25-5882c. a. m.; 59/ec.
p. m.
Wednesday, April 26-59%4c. nominal,
owing to scarcity of stock.
Rosin-Stock, 5,550 barrels.
Our stock is considerably reduced and
the low and medium grades are firm; pales
are nominal. We quote:
AC, $3.20 to $3.25; graded, D, $3.30; E,
$3.35; F, $3.40 to $3.50; G, $3.50 to $3.55;
H, $3.70; I, $3.90; K, $4.25 to $4.35; M,
$4.75; N, $4.85; WG, $4.90; WW, $5.00.
Mr. B. F. Bullard, vice-president of the
Consolidated Naval Stores Company, with
offices in Savannah, Ga., was in the city
several days this week.
The many friends of Mr. Goss Mattoxm
will regret to learn that he has been con-
fined to his bed for several days with a
serious case of pneumonia, which has been
followed with congestive chills. Mr. Mat-
tox is considered one of the best operators
of naval stores in the State, and the Rec-
ord hopes that he will soon be sufficiently
recovered to be out and among us again.


Turpentir.e

Cups
sIf you expect to use the HERTY cup
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices and all informa-
tion cheerfully furnished on
Cups, Gutters
~nd a11 Tools
used in the Herty system of turpentining.
Address

Chattanooga Pottery
* -.- Company,
Jadcsesvik, Frida


Special Notice.


READ THIS CAREFULLY.


In answer to numerous inquires, I de-
sire to state to my many friends and
business acquaintances throughout the
South, that I have no interest in or
connection with the Ludden & Bates'
Southern Music House, which was es-
tablished by me and J. A. Bates about
thirty-five years ago. I am now inter-
ested largely and solely in the LUD-
DEN & SMITH MUSIC COMPANY,
and in the LUDDEN-CAMPBELL-
SMITH COMPANY, of Jacksonville,
Fla., who continue the same policies
and business dealings which built up
for us the largest music business in
the South. WM. LUDDEN.


I desire to have it known to my
friends and 'cqwin*ts~- that I have
no connection with or interest in the
Ludden & Bates' Southern Msic
House, establied by Wa. Luade and
myself in z87o. Mr. Ludde and my-
myself sad Jaspersm Sith many
years associated with us, are new in-
terested in the LUDDN-CAMPBELL-
SMITH COMPANY, of Jacksemvill
Fa. Co far as I am aware, not a sin-
gle individual who helped to make the
Luddm & Bates name so well known
throughout the South is now caneeted
with the same. J. A. BATES.


We print the above letters in order to correct certain
misleading impressions which are being made among our
many friends and customers. We believe that most buy-
ers wish to deal with the PEOPLE whose policies and
methods gave them the greatest reputation ever accorded
any piano dealers in the South.


LUDDEN-CAMPBELL SMITH CO.,
18 West Bay Street.

Pianos, Organs, Musical Merchandise.


Pres., W. G. Toomer. Vice-pres. A Mar., C. O. Patterea. Treas., H. C. Hare, See., P. Smith

STANDARD ELECTRIC COMPANY
16 Forsth St, Jackdonill, Fla

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS AND SUPPLY DEALERS


BOARDS


Any mW a lvinl board to lis-
pose Of write ie witk prtits-
IBar WEi aMtraet fr ~ lard *t-
put, kil r rled, ir-dried or treen.


FRANKLIN E.DTOWN, 22 Hegan Street. Jack-sevlle.. Fa.


Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal Lioe. Cemst, Brisk, Painte.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.

H. E. Pritchett, Pres. P. L SUTHERLAND, Vice-Pres. A. D. COVINGTON, Bee'y.
J. P. COUNCIL, Tress and Gen' Mgr.

THE OOUNOIL TOOL 00,
General Office: JACKSONVILLE, PLA.
Factory: WANNAlISH, X. C.
Jfimdraewrers fof Nigd* ramde rois


112 WEST FORSYTH ST. BELL PHONE NO. 592
HEDRICI'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY
A. J. HEDILICK. Manager. C Formerly ef Hodrick d Raley
Sole agency for Rlverside and adjotaing property on easy term. (The eholee resideee porUet
of the city) Improved and unimproved property in former burns dltrit, SpriLdgie, i Vuil sad
other suburbs. hoee business property ad Investments.
MONEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTORS.


*ss~j~Ei~rsrr~u~








8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.




LUDDEN & BATES W. P. "

af-. e The South's Largest and Most Reliable Music House. s =""T.rl 'I
1 ~ ~lh. a. aaav vv,


Mr. Me-achen's Ten Days Vacation

and Some Notes Made Aong the Way,


Mr. H. A. McEachern, vice-president
of the Consolidated Naval Stores Co., has
returned to his office from a ten days'
vacation in West Florida. The Record
takes great pleasure in publishing below
some notes Mr. McEachern made of his
trip and it is safe to say that the hun-
dreds of friends of Mr. McEachern who
read this paper every week will be as much
interested in the letter as the editor, to
whom it is addressed:
(By H. A. McEachern.)
Lanark Inn-on-the-Gulf, Lanark, Fla.
Dear Hollomon: I have been off for
ten days on a little vacation and inas-
much as I have had occasion to note things
directly or indirectly connected with na-
val stores matters, I do not know that
your readers will object to a few words
as a kind of report of my meanderings.
My frst stop was at Tallahassee, where
the Legislature was in session. I was
there only one day and met only a few of
the law makers. The first man I met was
the Hon. Steve Melton, who instructed the
"landlady" at the Leon to see that we
got the "very best in the shop," and his
orders were obeyed. "Uncle Steve" is pop-
ular with everybody and especially with
the ladies. Steve is cheerful and good
humored, so much so that some people only
see this side of him, but as a matter of
fact he is a man of a great deal of good
common "horse-sense" and is making an
excellent member of the House.
It get the impression that the Legisla-
ture as a whole is conservative and will
do its best to do that which is most bene-
feial to all the people. There seems to
be less disposition to "do" or "get even"
than usual.
Gov. Broward's "discouragement" to the
"third house" has had a good effect. I get
the impression that there are fewer mem-
bers who take a stand relative to certain
measures and at the same time let it be
known that they are "open to conviction"
than usual. May the time come when all
such "money-eyed" cusses shall be rele-
gated to the dark past.
Leaving the capital city, we went to
Panacea Springs. These springs are lo-
cated on the Gulf of Mexico between St.
Marks and Carrabelle. To reach the
Springs we left the Georgia, Florida and
Alaama Railroad at Sopchoppy, 31 miles
south of Tallahassee, and took private
conveyance about seven miles eastward.
There is a wooden tram road out to the
Springs on which is pulled a home-made
truck by mules, but to our comfort this
was out of repair. These are wonderful
Springs. As an anti-malarial remedy, in-
cluding stomach and kidney troubles, these
Springs are at the head of the list. The
hunting and fishing in this section are
flrst-class, also. t is a great pity that
the owner of these Springs will not him-
self or arrange with others to properly de-
velop this property.
Lanark-em-the-Gulf.
After leaving Panacea Springs we went
to lanark, which is located on the Gulf
also, on the G., F. & A. R R, 45 miles from
Tallahassee. All things considered, I re-
gard this as winter and summer, pleas-
ure and health resort superior to any
point I have ever seen. Here there are
more advantages than can be found almost
anywhere else. The Lanark Springs fur-
nishes an abundance of the best water to
be found in this country. It is as pure as
Poland water and in addition has sufficient
mineral qualities, so that it is to be rec-
ommended for all forms of dyspepsia, gen-
eral debility, loss of appetite and consti-
pation. I also found it beneficial for the
kidneys.
The Lanark Inn is located on a hill
in a large natural grove, composed of


beautiful oak, hickory, gum, great num-
bers of magnolia, holly, pine and other
trees, within two or three hundred yards
of the Gulf. The trains come up, two in
winter and three in summer each way, in
the grove within 50 yards of the hotel.
Fishing and Hunting.
Lanark is located on an island or delta,
called St. James Island, made by the di-
viding of the Ocklocknee River, some 15
miles from the mouth of the western
branch, and 6 to 10 miles from the mouth
of the eastern branch, the two mouths
being some 20 miles apart. Thus it is
that on two sides there are fresh water
streams and on one side the Gulf, afford-
ing one of the greatest fishing and boat-
ing grounds in the world. There are but
few people living in the country in this
section, therefore hunting is good for tur-
key, deer, quail, etc. The hotel has been
overhauled and improvements made, such
as electric lights, bathing pools, both salt
and spring water. It is now well kept
and under good management.
Lanark is held by the Lanark Improve-
ment Co., of which Mr. J. W. Callahan is
president. (We all know John Callahan
as one of the most prosperous turpentine
men in the business.), The land has been
laid off into lots which are being offered
for sale and I understand several have
been sold and parties will build cottages
on them.
With good spring water, good shade,
good breeze, good fishing and hunting,
good transportation and good bathing, I
see no reason why Lanark will not become
a mecca for thousands of people from Geor-
gia, Tennessee, Kentucky and many other
States north of here. It is the most de-
lightful place to enjoy a period of resting
I have ever tried.
J. P. Williams and His Work.
The Georgia, Florida and Alabama Rail-
road is the result of the wonderful brain
of Mr. J. P. Williams. Mr. Williams has
devoted his life to naval stores operations
almost since early manhood, and has made
more money than any other one individ-
ual in the business. It is much out of the
usual for a man who has devoted his life
to one line till he passes 50 years to make
a success in an entirely different line and
especially on as broad a scale as in this
case. And no man unless he possesses the
highest order of itnellect and executive
ability can do it. But Mr. Williams has
succeeded in railroad operations to as
great extent as he has in naval stores'
operations. He has over 150 miles of first
class road in operation which is making
handsome profits all the time. His line
now runs from Carrabelle on the Gulf to
Cuthbert, Ga. He is preparing to extend
it to Columbus, Ga., and also to build
from Havana to Quincy and thence to
Apalachicola, Fla. With proper approia-
tions Carrabelle can be made a most excel-
lent deep water port. This done, the G.,
F. & A. will be the shortest and most
direct route to the Panama country.
Mr. Williams' associates on his direc-
torate are mostly turpentine men, so much
so this can be considered a naval stores
railroad, owned and directed by turpentine
R. Sharpe, John Morrison, T.lne A.iinunO
men as J. W. Callahan, John R. Sharpe,
John Morrison, T. A. Jennings and per-
.haps others I do not call to mind at the
moment. The G., F. & A. is and will be
the greatest railroad success that has ever
been undertaken in the South, with per-
haps the single exception of the Florida
East Coast. Henry M. Flagler and J. P.
Williams are in a class to themselves and
are our greatest benefactors. But this
article is three times as long as I intended
it to be when I started. I had a most
enjoyable and beneficial ten days' vaca-
tion.


HOTEL BARTHOLDI ""wWe"t a, r8..
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly. Furnished Throughout. Near
all Big Stores and Places of Amusement. Cars Pass the Door for all
Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings. Large Sample Boonm for
Commercial Travelers. Here you find no grand and magnifient deeo-
rations; no luxurious grandeur; no awe-spiring srondi ; no
elaborate bill of fare, printed in French; no clerks tht will disda to
No employee in any wa, inattentive.
speak to you.
But just a cozy, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the hearts of
those who are looking for solid comfort. Good, plain American eook-
ing, and affable and courteous treatment.
MILTON LOBLEE. Propretor.


CYPRESS TANKS


cmein w-n Ike sbe aetsnommm
bena tkm ww ab. -k -b #ad am"A
weli ans lastorarwsean.ed.ca .AA~i Eceani
vaber to rjse We bfa loof wmahaat
more t a qutartea s ce n honr bm
tat so V webiunt afrt wi --- boon

G. M. DAVIS 4L SON
PALAT o I.o A. FLORIDA


660066 - .- a ft .


SL A. BRIOGS, PreeldUnm
a C. nmOos, 1a Vie-Premdieet


HON=R BROMW. 21 V168e-P0miinS
.. Mc.XDON)XAL Seer .i Yre


I Wm H. Briggs Hardware Co.

0 VALDOSTA. GA.
* Sole Southern Agent for-

SRIXFORD AXES.

SThewy are the BEST. Others imitate but none du-
plicate. They are made of the beet steel, have the finest
temper, hold the keenest edge, uet better and last longer
than any other axe.
I This has all been proved by years of actual use.
* Sead as your orders.

| W. H. BRIGG66S HARDWARE COMPANY,

I~+ILU~~ --~UU~~-- -----------------------
VaMes, Gorwgh.




St. George Hotel

i.E EUROPEAN PLAN.

Rooms: 75c, SL.00 ad SL5m
PHONE 317.

MRS. GEO. W. BROCK,
PROPRISTRU".



F Y Want a Turpentine Lcatin?
YMu Want a Sawmill LcatMon?

You Want any Kind of IForlda Land?

F YOu Mean Busis?
Ceam en er Writ teS
J. H. LIVINGSTON A SONS,
Ocala. Floridkl
^********^ g*OO***e* eeCggeeeee eee 8e44 4444 J444


I







THN WIUKLY T INDUSIAL ZIORD.


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 190304 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS


1908-04 11002-03 1 1901-02


Ms. .0ro.............................

Faa
combs ... .... ......................

calm bbl..............................

rr bbN .............. .................
Pai YQin
= bbis- .


1U8,647
660,9188
844,685

188,398
762,270
98,884
888,171

85,658
87,853
59,351
826.746


292 490
040,607
1238,034

296,430
975,428
206,109
604,178

42,766
138,121
87,556
387.784


814,846
1,071,446
1,386,780

814,876
62,687
217,446
586,042

63,763
129,096

48,637
898,589


The. midb f. l ame -im h a. 13 by 9 ,549 s a i a d ra s 20a,569 bhseM
Crops d Sphiri and Roam. ar Thim Yema
1903-04. Crop 190-03. Crop 1901-0&
p os. Spirits. BOsie Spni. BO B.
Wilm'gtam ...... .. 1,511 80,067 18,83 113,908 10l1 100,484
Charstao ........ .. 2,400 3,16 3,007 11,836 3,00 13,70
Savammak ..........176,418 060,98 270,670 940,507 313,086 1,071,440
Brunswik ......... .. ,0OB 18657 68,97 144,106 79,00 286,25
Mobil............ 123165 50,80 18, 79,272 21,00 88,572
New Or(e ...... ... 3,017 133,l1 33,0 108,033 21,03 94a3
Crrabel ...... .... dosed losd 3,34 32,148 8,177 47,497
eorgtown .. .. .. .. 7,516 44,214 10,307 6,0ea 8,468 60,615
P .. ........4 4 05, 75 19206 37,788 164A 0
Jax. &r FLieAdi ....187,20 063,210 91,976 375,211 70,000 245,000
Tamps .. ... ... .. emd closed 13,560 40,664 15,424 51,779
Tots ... .. .. .. ..635,1 2,00,25 671,0M 2,184,818 5e3,49 2,212,413
Imert of Turpmtie to United Kbedes.
From oelial return; ewts turned into barrels at 320 cwta, 16,30 kilos, 100 bbls.
1900 1901 1902 1908 1904
From United Stats .................174,44 1793,4 2 15 6,1 143,51 144,400
From rns ........................ 2,283 869 1,6 4,o0 2,68o
From other countries ............... 840 63 004 516 11
177,509 194,341 157,088 148,997 147,270
Rumin Turpmsie e .................. 8,1 6,861 8,711 17,6 17,765
Total barrels ....................... 186,090 201,o20 1606,33 166s 166a,
Percentage of Russian .............. 4.57 3.41 5.24 10.56 10.76
Averg pries of American ......... 356-4 27-1 33-1 42-2 41-2
Reported by Jams Watt & BSo, Landon, England.


-- ---' -- ---'


co5PARA2I2" F11111 OF WIRIUT


Apr ..................
April 8 ..................
April 1 ...................
April ..................
April ..................
May 1 ....................
May 1 ....................
May 0 ...................
Jay I ...................
Juy 3 ...................
Ju e 1I ...................
June 17 ..................
June 2 ..................
Ju 1..................
July I ...................
Juy 1 ..................
July ....................
July ....................
A 4 ..................
Au 1. 1 ...................
AS. U1 ...................
Aug. 3 .................
Oat. 3 ..................
t. ...................
aet. 1 ....................
Oept. .................
ovt. 14 ...................
OL. 3t ...................
OM ...................
No. 4 ....................
No. 11 ...................
Nov. 18 .................
Nov. 3 ....... .........
De. 9 .....................
Dn I ...................
Des. 26 ...................
DeM. a ....................
Ja. .....................


ND
w-o

50
62%


0%
5%
a%
55

M4%
5%2

5sa
51%
U5%
48%
M5%
u5



rjC
38%







as
sa%
s%


47%
4s.%


AT AAVANEAN FOR FIVM


1903-04
ND


46
47%
47%
47
45%
40
4a%
47%
47%
47%
49%
49%
a






0%
66%


W%

56%


57%
87
56



6%
5%
5%G
5%~


1OU-0s
46
42%
42%
as
42%-4a
45
46
45%
46%
47%
48%
47%
46%
44%
44
43%
a3%
44%
6y%
44%
45

46

al%
a%
so
60%
61
58%
51
60%
56


1901-02
34
a
31%U

38%


33%-%
33%

36%


34%
3a%





36
34%
34%



36%
3a%
34%

a
36
3%



34%
35
3s%


35%
35%
36%
36%


36%
37%
-%


YKARM
1Mo-01
a5%
as

4%
48
47


43%
4334

424
42



37



37%
40%
40%
40
41
40
38
as





38a
37%



36
36
o07




as
37r


Fr Pr" Nur" Ud Us Yor GinulW CMak Orinm


One Price


One Price


; FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND PFRNISHERS,
17 I 19 W tay Strt Jtreat. mn, RI .
s teote -nd awes Hate. SpMeal Attentim Glve to Mal Or er.
m(g g gggII niggg rfMggMiii


R. TOLAR.


d. PL HARI. T. H. LACHLY.
(EAtasblileho 1672.)


J. R. TOLAR, ad


TOLAR. HART & CO..
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.

Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of Now
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANKAN. GOR1140A.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Tirpentino Tels, Glue, Battins, Etc.


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


1 Boilermaking and Repairing I

Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
JacLkonville. Fa.


WILLIAM A. SOURS JAMES 0. DARBY


WILUAM A. OURS & COMPANY
TE ULEST ESTaGMaiES 6UORA au m MiE M E STTLE.

Hay. Grain, feed, Garden
Seeds, Pultry Supplies, flur,
Grts, Meal and ertizers.
OUR MOTTO: Pr1m Skimeut, uei S "eWis.L Cteses Free
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Cummer Ltimher Co.

JACKSONVILLB, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES and CRATES.

S anda1)1 *Co*lln iiomp1 I ms11 asnasy11ass *********.

: Standard Clothing Company :


1041000,10,








10 THE WEUIY jJDBi uSrzIAL 350WD.


INDUSTRIAL R.ECORID.
JAMES A. MOLLONON.
Wr, d .,--. ._.
uisur e"d naesagar.
PuIabblbsed Every rriday.
S(D )..83.00 Per Annum
(r --8.... 3 "
"The Pnoe and Its reduos."
All communications should be addressed
The InduatrlAl Lecord Comepany.
Jcksaonvfll*. Fla.

Se--ih dmeal auJ Wumin Ofml at
ALtents. Ga. SavaAmunah Ga.

Entered at the Postoffce at Jacksonville.
Fl., as second-class matter.
Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operators Association.
September 1. U a Its exclusive official
organ. Adopted In annual convention
September 11, a the organ also of the gen-
eral amolation
Adopted April 1th, N11, as the official
organ of the Interstate Cane Growers' As-
soclaton. Adopted September U, 1h as
the only official organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by social
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill

COPY FOR ADVERTISING.
Advertisin copy (chaeoge or new adver-
tieementa) should reach us Tuesda morn-
tug to insure inaertion in the issue of the
same week.
TH RECORD' OPFICES.
The publishing plant and the main offices
of the Industrial Record Publishing Co.
are located at No. U 8. Hogan Street,
Jacksonville. P., in the very heart of the
great turpentine and yellow pine industries.
Th Atlanta, Ga.. office i located In the
suitable Building, No. 73. Atlanta Is the
esater of the great manufacturing trade of
the entire Bouth.
The Savannah. Ga., office i n the Board
of Trade Bulng. Sanavvah to the lead-
ain open naval stores market in the world.

NOT=I TO PATRON&
A11 paymsts for advertling in the In-
duntril Ear .ain suberiptiou thereto
muat be m e Erect to the home offce
in Jacadmvll. Agts are met allowed to
mal elMtiss Umder any circmstance
ifla fr advertising and abcriptions are
mt t rt rem the home ece, whme due,
uSd all rmittanuc m t be made direct to
this egmgpany.
Industrial ecer PubHihing Co.

ALL OPERATORS SHOULD HEED.
At a full meeting of the Executive Com-
mittee of the Naval Stores Export Com-
pany held in Jacksonville Wednesday,
April 26, the following resolution was
unanimously adopted:
"Resolved, That the Naval Stores Ex-
port Company offers to buy, and the ope-
rators are requested to sell through their
respective factors, one-half of their tur-
pentine and rosin produced during the
months of June to December, 1905, in-
elusive, at the following prices:
"Turpentine, 52 cents per gallon.
"Rosin-B-D, $2.50; E, 2.55; F, $2.60;
G, $2.06 H, $2s0; I, $3.00; K, $3.10; M,
$325; N, $3.50; WG, $.75; WW, $4.00."
Operators will immediately realize that
these are extreme prices-the highest ever
offered-but if the operators generally
will agree to sell a considerable part, and
not less than one-half of their product dur-
ing the months mentioned, the Naval
Stores Export Company, operating in the
interest of the producers, will undertake
to receive it at the prices named, at Sa-
vannh, Ferandina, Jacksonville and Pen-
sacola. In order, however, to carry out th
plans, of which these prices are made the
basis, it is necessary for the Export Com-
pany to have an immediate acceptance,
and the Record hopes that all factors will
present the matter to their operators
at once. It is the best proposition ever
made for future delivery and is another
evidence that the organization of the Na-
val Stores Export Company was the best
move ever made by the operators, in main-
taining and advancing their own interests.


The attention of our readers is called
to the following copy of a bill recently
introduced in the Florida Legislature,
which appears to us as being exceedingly
dangerous. This bill is now being con-
sidered by the Judiciary Committee of
the Legislature, and we urge that every
employer of labor in Florida immediately
communicate with his representatives and
senators, urging them to do everything
they possibly can to defeat this measure.
The purpose of this bill is to repeal
the limitations present laws place upon
the liability of a master, making it com-
pulsory on his part to prove everything
and the plaintiff to simply make the
charge. A study of this bill will prove
that there could not be anything more
calamitous to the interests of business,
and steps should immediately be taken
to bring about its complete defeat.
The measure proposed follows:
A BILL
To Be Entitled
An Act Regulating and Defning the Du-
ties, Liabilities and Rights of Master
and Servant; Providing for Procedure
and Rules Thereof in Personal Injury
Cases and Actions.
Be it enacted by the Legislature of the
State of Florida:
Section 1. That all persons, co-partner-
ships, steam or electric railway compan-
ies, or other corporations, except munici-
pal, engaged or operating in the State,
shall be liable for damages for all per-
sonal injuries inflicted or sustained by any
employee while engaged in the service of
such purpose, co-partnership or corpora-
tion, in any of the following cases:
First. When such injury is suffered by
reason of any defect in conditions of the
works, plants, tools, ways or machinery
connected with or used in the business of
the employer, as aforesaid, when such de-
fects shall be due to negligence of the
master, or the negligence of some one
entrusted by the master with the duty
(whether temporary or permanent) of
keeping such works, tools, plants, ways
or machinery in proper and safe condi-
tion.
Second. When any such injury shall re-
sult from the negligence of any person in
the service of the master, to whose orders
or directions the injured employee, at the
time of the injury, was bound to conform
and did conform.
Third. When such injury shall result
from the act or omission of any person
done or made pursuant, or in obedience
to any rule, regulation or by-law of the
master, or in obedience to the particular
command or instructions given by any
person delegated with authority by the
master in that behalf.
Fourth. When such injury shall be
caused by the negligence of any employee
in the service of the master who has con-
trol or charge of any signal, signal sta-
tion, telegraph instrument ,telegraph of-
fice, switch, switch yard, shop, mill,
roundhouse, locomotive, stationary or oth-
er machinery or appliances, engine, car
or train of cars upon any railroad track
or side track.
Fifth. When such injury shall be
caused by the negligence of any fellow-
servant engaged in the same common ser-
vice in any of the several departments of
the master, the said negligent servant,
co-employe or fellow-servant, at the time
being and acting in any position of au-
thority over the injured person, and the
person so injured, obeying and conform-
ing to the rules or regulations of the mas-
ter, or the orders of some person at the
time of the injury having authority to or-
der or direct him, but nothing herein shall
be construed to abridge the liability of
the master under existing laws.
Sec. 2. If any person or co-partnership
or corporation shall claim that any injury
to any employee, so injured while engaged
in the service of such person, co-partner-
ship or corporation, was sustained or re-
ceived by such employee on account of con
tributory negligence of such servant, then.
upon the trial of such issue joined, such
master, firm, co-partnership or corpora-
tion, shall hold the burden of proof of
such issue.
Sec. 3. The damage recoverable under
this act shall be commensurate with the


injury sustained, unless death result.
from such injury, when, in such case, the
actions shall survive and be governed in
all respects relative to procedure by the
laws now in force. Provided, that where
any such servant recovers a judgment
against the master, and such master shall
appeal said cause to an appellate tribunal,
and pending such appeal said servant shall
die, and the judgment rendered in the
trial court shall be reversed, then the
right of action shall survive to the per-

sonal representative of said servants
Sec. 4. In case any person, co-partner-
ship or corporation which owns or op-
erates a railroad system, extending into
or through this State, or into or through
any other State or States or Provinces,
and the person in the employment of such
person, co-partnership or corporation, be-
ing a citizen of this State, shall be in-
jured, under any of the circumstances
provided in this act, in any State or
States or Provinces where such railway
system is operated, and a suit shall be
instituted in any of the courts of this
State for damages on account of such
injury, then it shall not be competent or
a defense to such suit or action for such
person, co-partnership or corporation to
plead or prove the decisions or statutes
of the State or Provinces where such
person shall have been injured.
And all contracts made by such person,
co-partnership or corporation, with their
servants, or rules or regulations thereof,
which may release such master from
liability to employee having a cause of ac-
tion, as in this act provided, are against
public policy and void.
Sec. 5. In suits for damages under this
act, if the plaintiff and other servants of
the company, person, co-partnership or
corporation, are both at fault, the plain-
tiff may recover, but the damages shall
be diminished or increased by the jury
in proportion to the amount of default
attributable to the injured person.

IMPORTANT GUARANTY DECISION.
A case of considerable interest to
manufacturers who buy machinery on a
guaranty was decided in the United
States Court at Boston, Mass, before
Judge Putnam last week. This was a
breach of contract case, where the Ark-
wright Mills, of Fall River, were the
plaintiffs and the Aultman & Taylor
Company, of Mansfield, Ohio, was the
defendant.
The Aultman & Taylor Machine Com-
pany sold the Arkwright mills three 250-
horse power boilers with the guaranty
that they would evaporate 10 pounds of
water to 1 pound of coal. The boilers
were purchased in 1898, and for thirteen
months afterwards the defendant com-
pany, through its machinists, worked on
the boilers for the purpose of perfecting
them, because they failed to fill the guar-
anty. It came out in the evidence that
the boilers fell 10 per cent short of what
the guaranty called for. Judge Putnam
ruled, as a matter of law, that the delay
which the Arkwright Mills allowed to
elapse while the repairs were being made
on these boilers to perfect them preclud-
ed the mill from suing on this guaranty.
The plaintiffs' counsel claim that this
ruling is contrary to recent decisions
bearing on this question.
The Aultman & Taylor Company fur-
nished the boilers and plans for their
erection and it also had a man who su-
pervised the work of erection. The
Arkwright mills also furnished men. The
plans called for the lining to be of fire
brick with special kind of brick for the
rear of the boilers. When the supervisor
for the defendant company arrived he al-
tered the construction of the brick work
and his attention was called to this fact,
but in spite of the protest the work con-
tinued along this line. The Arkwright
mills sought to recover for this, but
Judge Putnam ruled against it. On the
question of the heating surface of the
boilers, the jury found for tue Arkwright
mills and awarded the sum of $440. This
award carries costs, which are very large.
The plaintiffs' counsel took an appeal
to the United States Circuit Court of Ap-
peals on the points as cited against
them.


A Florida Bill That Should Be Killed.


ATLANTA WIDE OPEM.

Invitation for the Natioal Ass-iatiom
of Manufacturers Covetim.
Mr. Robert J. Maddox, chairman of the
committee on arrangements for the meet-
ing at Atlanta May 16-18 of the National
Association of Manufacturers, is issuing
personal invitations to manufacturers and
other business men throughout the coun-
try to come to Atlanta on that oceasio.
Accompanying his invitation is a symbolic
presentation of the golden key to the city
by Mayor J. G. Woodward. Chairman
Maddox writes:
"We all know how hard it is for a busy
man to break away from the treadmill,
but there comes a time when it is well
worth while to get out of the races and
rest mind and body, letting the eye rest
on new scenes and the lungs breathe a dif-
ferent atmosphere. That time will soou
arrive, and the place to go is Atlanta, the
key to which I herewith hand you. At-
lanta is like champagne, and its after ef-
fects are much better. The National As-
sociation of Manufacturers will meet here
the 16th, 17th and 18th of May, which is
our ideal month. It will be a great oe-
casion. Our best efforts, combined with
that of your officials, are preparing a pro-
gram which will be both pleasant and
profitable. The manufacturers will be roy-
ally entertained, and we want you to comes.
May we not expect you?"

STAVES FOR EXPORT TRADE.
Bearing on the demand for staves for
export trade and the constant decease in
the supply of white oak, from which the
beat stock is made, T. B. Allen, of Mem-
phis, Tenn., exporter of staves and hard-
wood lumber, is reported as saying:
"We make staves, the best ones, from
white oak, and the supply of suitable ma-
terial is getting exceedingly scare. Many
experiments are being made with other
material, but thus far no substitute has
been found for white oak in making casks
and barrels for wines and other liquors.
It used to be that when the retailer was
through with a cask or barrel he either
broke it up or put it to some other us.
Nowadays every cask is returned to the
manufacturer or wholesaler to. be remed,
and great care is taken that no damage
occurs to them. There is always a de-
mand for good white oak staves in Ger-
many, Ireland, France, Spain and Italy,
and the United States furnishes many
thousands every year."

LUMBER AT LIVERPOOL.
In their monthly timber circular for
March Duncan, Ewing & Co., of Lverpool,
report that the import of hewn Amerin
pitch pine was 13,000 cubic feet and the
consumption- 7,000 cubic feet, with stocks
at Liverpool 123,000 cubic feet and at Man-
chester 8,000 cubic feet; of sawn pin the
import was 265,000 feet at Liverpool ad
130,000 feet at Manchester, with aggregate
consumption of 264,000 feet and agge-
gate stock of 809,000 feet; of planks and
lumber the import was 255,000 cubic feet,
the consumption 186,000 feet and the stock
424,000 feet. Large average hewn wood
was in good request on April 1, with pries
ruling firm. The stock of saw timber
was not heavy as compared with former
years, and cargoes had been sold head
at higher prices. The stock of planks anad
lumber showed an increase, but pries still
ruled high.

MISSISIPPf8 LUMBER.
Perhaps never before has Mississipp
experienced such activity as at present in
her lumber interests. Sone time ago
nearly all her valuable tracts of yellow-
pine timber had begn sold to large lumber
syndicates, and it is now asserted that
in every county of the State where virgin
forests of yellow pine and hardwood exist
for the past several weeks there have bee
numerous speculators and buyers seeking
to acquire them either for themselves or
syndicates which they represent. Among
the latter arecompanies and corporations
with large capital at their command, and
whatever the immediate outcome of these
negotiations, it is thought that before long
hundreds of planing mills and lumber-
manufacturing plants will be established
and Mississippi's timber resources will be
fully developed.


i




o

THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11


GUY'S BOWLING AND BILLIARD PARLORS.
120-122-124-126 WEST FORSYTH STREET. JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.
Yw PMate to Meet Yeam Frnds am Pass Yem Weory aE Away.


THE CHRISTIE GROOVER on ,co-

WHOLESALE DRUOISTS.
sapa-&W F R ANNOR AT M a wE M M 11E YE. 2 oMEE a m uuson


Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y
S"- Wholesale Bnes0 anSd DIsllers' Suppl1es.
1 WOlibe and Weheme VAYdMt A. On L~. Amnv, Fk1R
EA N 5 W ie.n


NEW BAWKIMG HOUSES.
The Sunlight Insurance Co., of Atlanta,
Ga., has been granted a charter. The in-
coporators are 8. J. Sheffield, E. Y. Crock-
ett and J. N. MeEaehern of Atlanta, G. W.
Roberts of Haralson County and John L.
Craton of Floyd County.
The Merchant and Farmers' Bank has
been organized at York, Ala., with $50,-
000 capital. The directors are E. F. Bal-
lard, president; W. A. Altman, vice-presi-
dent; R. S. MeKnight, cashier; W. A.
Curry, J. H. Coleman, J. F. Woods and
Frank HIlnm
SThe Citizes' National Bank, capital
S0,00, will soon begin business at Al-
bany, Ga., with the following officers: J.
K. Pray, president; A. P. Vason, vice-pres-
ident and Edwin Stene, for a number of
years past assistant cashier of the Ex-
change and Albany National Banks, cash-
ier.


The Bank of Ybor City has been char-
tered at Ybor City, Fla., with $50,000 cap-
ital. The incorporators are John Trice,
Ignacio Haya, Adam Katz, W. I. Porter,
Frank Bentley, Frank M. Simonton, Ed-
ward LH Steinberg, Maximo M. Diaz, John
Grinaldi, O. G. Sexton, A. J. Knight, Max-
imo Cards and Ignacio Reina.
The People's Bank of Richland, Ga.,
with $25,000 capital, has made application
for a charter. The organizers are R. L.
Dixon, M. G. Richardson, R. E. L Bar-
num, E. L. Alston, D. W. Nicholson, J. C.
Layfield, A. D. Dillard, Buck Ellington,
J. E. Coffin and N. C. Alston of Stewart
County and L. O. Benton, of Jasper Coun-
ty.
A new bank with $15,000 capital has
been organized at Granville, Tenn., by
Gayle Ford of Dixon Springs. The offi-
cers are: F. A. Kelly, president; S. S.
Conner, vice-president and Craik Jackson,
of Frankfort Ky., cashier. Directors are
Dr. Abe King of Chestnut Mound, H. Ap-
ple, S. P. Burton and W. R. Watts of


Greenville.
The New Market Banking & Trust Co.
has been incorporated to do business at
New Market, Ala., with $10,000 capital.
The officers are W. E. Rodgers, president;
W. F. Yarbrough, vice-president, and T.
C. Wesson, cashier; directors, W. F. Yar-
brough, J. M. Payne, W. E. Rodgers, J. W.
Cochran, T. C. Wessoin, L. P. Esslinger,
J. O. Orman, A. J. Wilson and Thos. Wil-
son.
M. E. BEAN. C. L. BEAN.
(Formerly E. Beal & Son.)
FLORIDA PAPER COMPANY
Dealers in all kinds of
WRAPPING PAPES, PAPER BAGS,
FOLDING BOXES, TWIMES AND
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
WRAPPDIG PAPERS
Robinson Bailing, Viaduct.
Telephone 192. Jacksaville.
Corresponence Solicited


RAT LL&&S ve aind
AT Lot Lte kPries
Light's Restaurant
S05 W BNy arft
. A. LIGHT. Free.. Jhekeis.e,


VIRGIN PINE.
Aliig flora East Cost fr
*ver 75 miles tih Caral CoM-
pany owns a strip of VMlrl Tim-
ber aim authors us to sel
tracts to saut purcOser. Ffr
particulars alress,

BROBSTON, FENDIG & CO..
JasLhSmRvl, Fla.


Tampa. Naval Stores Comp'y

TAMPA. FLORIDA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS,


DEALERS IN SUPPLIES.


Producers requiring


advances will


receive special rates


of commission.



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.


Flet Savannah Market Guaranteed at Tampa.

NAVAL STORES BOUGHT FROM INDEPENDENT PRODUCERS FREE OF ALL I

CHARGES EXCEPT INSPECTION.

S----- ---* -g P ^WIM-I


1

1
1

j








I1 TMU WUNKLY !NDUffrUAL 3003).


F. M. DOWLING COMPANY,

WHOLESALE GROCERS.
PROVISIONS. GRAIN. HAY, FLOUR.. GRITS snd MEAL.
JACQSONVILLEJ FLORIDA.


LODGEPOLE PINE

A Tree of Incresing ImportnceHow
Fire Assists Its Eatabdiamet.
The lodgepole pine, which is known in
the Sierras of California as tamarack
pie, ad in Colorado and Montana is
sometime called white pine, jack pine,
pinyoa and scrub pine, bears the com-
moa name of "lodgepole" from the fact
that the Indiana used its long slender
trunks as supports for their wigwams or
lodges. Its geographical range is along
the Rocky Mountains from Alaska to
New Mexico and westward to the Pacific
coast. In the United States it is found
in w-re.-ntsble quantity and dimensions
on the spurs and eastern slopes of the
Rocky Mountains throughout Southern
Montana, Wyoming and Colorado, in the
Bitter Root Mountains of Idaho, the
UIntah Bange in Utah, and in the Big
Horn Mountains of Wyoming. The Bu-
reau of Forestry is studying the species
throughout this range of its best commer-
cial distribution.
Lodgepole pine grows at all altitudes
between 3,000 and 10,00 feet above sea
leveL In the Gallatin Mountains of Mon-
tana and in the mountainous country
south and east of Yellowstone Park it
reaches its largest sise at elevations be-
tween 4,00 and 8,00 feet. In Colorado,
however, towards the southern limit of
its range, the conditions which are neces-
sary to its best growth are found between
9,000 and 10,00 feet elevation.
Lodgepole pine is valuable, for one rea-
son, because it grows on high mountain
slopes, and also on old "burns," where
other trees find difficulty in finding a
foothold. It readily adapts itself to most
diverse soil conditions, but thrives best
where there i considerable moisture. Its
roots accommodate themselves to the
shallow soil common in the localities
where it grows. At a very early age this
tree produces cones in large quantities,
and after it is ten years old the seed are
generally fertile. The cones sometimes
open and distribute the seeds as soon as
they are ripe, though more commonly
they remain on the trees for years with
their seed carefully preserved beneath
the scales. In many cases squirrels cut
out the closed cones and hide them away
in the ground. If a fire occurs before the
seeds are eaten it will cause the cones to
open and set them free. As a rule, how-
ever, the cones of many seasons remain
on the trees until a fire comes along and,
by heating them, liberates the seeds,
when a dense growth of seedlings follows.
In many localities where lodgepole pine
now grows, the ground was originally
covered with Engelmann spruce in mix-
ture with red fir and other species. Re-
peated fires laid waste these forests and
prevented their reproduction by destroy-
ing the seed and the thick forest floor of
decaying leaves and litter, which is ab-
solutely essential for the seed germina-
tion of these species. Lodgepole pine,
hoewver, thrives on an impoverished soil,
and its great seeding capacity and the
ability of the cones to withstand fire
cause it to spread quickly over burned
areas. In places where the pine has car-
peted the ground again with a quantity
of forest litter, and where lumbering has
thinned the forest sufficiently for the
light requirements of Engelmann spruce
and red fir, these more valuable trees are
found taking the place of lodgepole pine.
Thus if fire can be kept out of the woods
of this region, these more important
trees can be produced in many places
where they are now virtually extinct.
The wood of lodgepole pine is light yel-
low to nearly white in color, with a
coarse but straight grain. It is more
resinous than the eastern white pine, but
less so than the yellow pines of the
South. It is soft and easily worked, and
would make excellent finishing lumber
were it not for the abundance of small
though hard knots, and for its tendency


to warp and check with seasoning. With-
out doubt the best use of lodgepole pine
at present, and the one to which it is
most largely put, is for railroad ties and
mine props; but to be utilized with the
greatest profit for these purposes the
timber must first be subjected to preserv-
ative treatment. The Bureau of Forestry
has for some time been conducting, in
Montana and Wyoming, exhaustive tests
in seasoning and in preservative treat-
ment of this pine, and a comprehensive
bulletin on the subject is now in prepara-
tion.
During the season of 1903-4 between
1,300,000 and 1,400,000 lodgepole ties
were cut, most of which were treated
with preservatives. The cut of this sea-
son will exceed this number, and without
doubt the use of lodgepole pine for ties
will increase yearly. Trees between 11
and 14 1-2 inches in diameter breasthigh
are hewed; those larger are logged and
sawed, as the hewers refuse to work
them. When a tree reaches 11 inches in
diameter it is mature for ties; this makes
it possible to remove a quantity of ma-
terial from the dense natural forests as
soon as a number of the trees have
reached that size, and thereby to stimu-
late the smaller ones to a more active
growth. At the same time a new genera-
tion may be started in the openings
from the seed of the felled trees.
Great quantities of lodgepole pine are
also used for props in the numerous
mines of the region where this tree grows.
The timber is cheap, and in its natural
condition answers for temporary pur-
poses in mine development; when well
seasoned or treated with preservatives it
may be used for permanent construction.
Miners use poles as small as 5 inches in
diameter at the top, and this demand for
small timber works another advantage to
the forest, in that it offers a means of
utilizing the upper parts of trees cut for
lumber, which in the ordinary way of
logging are left on the ground to become
dry and increase the danger of fire. It
also makes possible the thinning of pole
stands which contain few or no trees
large enough for ties, but which are so
dense that the trees have almost stopped
growing.
By far the larger part of the mer-
chantable lodgepole area is within exist-
ing or proposed Federal forest reserves,
where the lumbering regulations which
the government put into effect some
time ago will protect and benefit the
forests.
Other objects of the Bureau of For-
estry in this study are to ascertain the
rate of growth of the tree, and how it
may be increased; to better existing
lumbering regulations; to devise a sys-
tem of fire protection; and to extend
the commercial uses of the wood. A con-
trolling consideration is the need of main-
taining the forests on all the mountains
they now cover, and of causing them to
spread more widely, if possible, since the
most important function they can per-
form is to safeguard the watersheds
they include. This study will enable the
Bureau to carry out more effectively the
work of forest reserve management late-
ly entrusted to it by Congress. The re-
sults of the study should also prove of
largee value to railroads and private own-
ers, who hold a great many odd sections
of land all through the lodgepole pine re-
gion.

CAMP'S SAW MILL BURNED.
White Springs, April 27.-Fire here to-
tally destroyed the immense sawn-ills,
dry kilns and veneering plant of R. J. and
B. F. Camp, also the commissary, two
million feet of lumber and several houses.
The aggregate loss is estimated at $250.-
000. This was one of the most complete
milling and veneering plants in the State
and its destruction throws a large number
of men and boys out of employment.


ST VEHICLE & HARNESS CO.
Cot. Feytlh am Cedar St. fJACKM L tL


Carriages and Wagons
C011in`1111d vW w &WWril, Whelk eim, MWMW Ell.

rare-stie sa il ermess. aSges., ggiaes. Setlae". M e Carts. e ary
Wreos, Srrfes sa ereryts fept Is a first.class esahmesmt.
Largest a alers hs FiorMs.




Su W Bottled from faumm SUwaniMe SPCi
UW-atnteep11ig water. Cures P)-"--+- Indpon
and Kidney Toube. The Mnwd ne
m frhing, nm ura aiding GlaW A
F We knownw. Bifted and soU by the Lwr
G in0er Oak Bottline Vorf iv e Vot A
For sak by Cosowiderkd Grocry Cow
A | Jacati~lk wU. dhMins KinC & Co. fl
Jakasonige, aad M. Fe ne Soi mr & Co.
Sarannah Ga.



wW. W. CARNES, Pres. W. C. THOMAS, Manager. C. T. DUDLEY, See. A Trees.


Tampa Hardware Co.


Wholesale

Hardware

4Turpentine, Mill end Phoaphate Supplies.

ULARE STOCK CiNIL Al NOLIES HACKS AN FULLEU IAM .

TAMPA. FLOR.IDA.

ift 19089ug88608 08 goal sol Iui0IIl181





| DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We sipljy ask a call. We can how yoN, at correct and rmey
MraviE prices, ruany papers o* Ios pe pmW rhite. perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is r desire ta costume befg Mhe iswe V
'.f med dealers in Jacksnvwrile, and eMr specilty it As Wr,1d-
cat gems aud high-grade Waftham aud EigiD Watcheso.



HESS& S0LAGER 0 s 11-11 r M.hy JbdFyL


oeN rlDW1 inss21 oum3 nm
HGROEIA (utObIS-- ea I.)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pur ine Ol
Rye. By the alloa $.0; four fU quartz
3.60. express prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMOAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Rye; Rich and Melow. By the ggim
2.76: four full quarts 82.4O, expres prepai.
ANVIL RYE-Pure SubatantlWI Faly
Whiskey. By the allon 1.60; our fu l
quarts 40. express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gall SIM;
four full quarts 32.6k express prepaid
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct fro
Bonded Warehouse; fin and old By the
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rieh
and Mellow. By the allon 83.M0; four ftl
quarts $.3. express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskies In the market
and will save you from a to 50 per cent on your purchase. Bend for price ho awd
catalogue. ailed free upon application
The Altmayer ah Flrata Liquor Company.
MACOO. GCA. AMD r11NGO AIIA. ALA.










Florida

Electric Co.
GMlri4 E.Mcl EBmrs
ell and Istall Oomplete Electric Light
a"d Powr Pait, Telephone Ex-
amo. Whole Electric
--ppliea


!m CANNON COMPANY


BARRELS
ARtE M
STANDARD
Wrm
WORLD


Use no Other
amh cosmMey ecd
Home Office QUITMAN, GA.
IU.S.A.

IM ki fM IMS h.






ENGINES. BOILERS.
OttaIE 6w rliSr, 01i sad ee Ma-
iiryi, ama Bl esR ard Repainr
CAAcprr mM TO HANMD
Mas"Es oeKn Wed-Wurking Machwiy,

Plas ar -M-um" farla ed for Powr
Pimat ard Steel Brde.
team. P WreS WA HWa ten sa

AUGUSTA. GA.

Whiskies, Gins,
Rums,
From $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Oaetrolles Blum's Monogram and Syl
van RyAgents for Jung, Cinein-
ati ad Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM & CO.
917 a m 519 West Day Street.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
A" re oal n 0V ownm ~aa
O OMe be Moe h. vre.t. to-4w
n. ,.. .... a -


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RCBOOD. 1I


JOHN S. FRANZ. Agent


fer

asd
Prices.


Diebold Safe & Lock Co.
Jefckoonville, Florida
Sam'l P. Holmes& Co.
Stocks, Bends, Cottn.
Gral i and Provisions.
NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Bell Phone 853 Baldwn Block
FIRE INSURANC-Lowst rate. L-
ren H. & 0o 9 sad 10 Park Bldp
Jacksonville, a. ..

HILY i MOIImIER,
Commission Merchants,
Naval Stores 6 Cotton

COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
NEW TORK CITY.


ALXRS


XXC LUSIVXLY


IN


RIOSIN

AND TURPENTINE.
Jacksonville, Fla.
---------- --------------- --------


The Blount Real Estate Co.,
(Incorporated. $50.000 Capltal.)
FOR Turpentine Locations. Saw Mill TIrntioa,
Large and small tracts of Round Timber, Phophate
Sand Farming Lands of all description.
Write us for further information and p utiesoul
THE BLOUNT REAL ESTATE CO.,
OCALA. FLORIDA.


Joseph D. Christie, Business Agent
Rsou 303 sfya-Up oear Io BuL Jae.ve rla.
Telephone 455.
If you want to locate i Florida and contemplate going into business. lt m
help you. If you have a business to sell, list same with me.


W. J. L'ENGLE,
Preeedent.


M a I if 1811A FLs
e-----*-mso Pl

Metrpollt Talkill Mamin Co
VICTOR
Ta&Iin Maocbi es and eoosedA.
Write to Metropolitan Talking Machine
Co. for catalogues of New Records and
Machines. Victors only. largest jobbing
house in the South.
Agents wanted in every town. Retail
trade served. Old records exchanged.
N. B.-Columbia, Zonophone and Vic-
tors accepted.
Motropoitan Talking
Machine Co..
323 Main St, JACKSONVILL]k FLA.


J. W. WADE,
Vioe-Prede*t.


. G0. HUGHESr
See.*, a.a Tres


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


A. .POWELL. CEAS. I. WArS, exaYr daSlIr.
Presidet. VCew-Prgiu.t med ret-.er. S.cretry.
ItaCCroaS:
B. I. Powell, Cam. 6. Aruris, D. N. ncUlaa. P. L. SBterlMad. Jf. V. Cor.lgtee.

THE


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Corir of West ay i Mianem s .
Jacksonville, Florida.


Wholesale Drugs i Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices oa
anything in the drug line. We make peaked drugs a speelalty ad esa mve you
money. Mail orders am given prompt attention.
-------------------------m ----- ----**= *-
Cable Addres. Florida

Standard Naval Stores

Company.








14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


AMONG THE OPERATORS.
Measr. R. 8. and T. C. tall, of Ocala,
Fla., were in the city to-day on business.
Mr. Wm. Pritchett, of Dublin, Ga., was
in the city yesterday. Mr. Pritchett has
large aaval stores interests in Georgia and
Florida.
Mr. D. E. McKeithen, a leading operator
of Baldwin, Fla., spent one day in the
city this week.
Mr. George Pritehett, a prominent naval
stores operator of Titusville, Fla., was in
town this week.
Mr. H. L Covington, vice-president of
the Consolidated Naval Stores Co., of
Pensacola, Fla., was among the prominent
factors in the city this week.
HENRY JACOBS
We sometimes feel a little guilty of al-
ways catering and directing the right road
as it were for the man to take, to insure
their suecesaful purchase being made in
this or that class of merchandise, and we
can well believe their "better halves" con-
sider us somewhat greedy in this direc-
tion, however, he now having had our con-
seince pricked are willing in the future
to make greater consideration for those
who are ever on the alert to please our-
selves by pointing out at the opportune
moment any news from fashion's center
that might be interesting to them. We
shall start at ones by making mention of
that grand display of French millinery now
being made by Florid's leading head wear
store. We allude to that splendidly fitted
up grand millinery house of Henry Jacobs,
No. 5 East Bay Street, next to the State
Bank. There will be found a vast collec-
tion of all the latest creations of the high-
est and latest Paris conceptions of milli-
nery art, showing what are the very new-
est and most correct fashions in head
wear, also a most superb collection of
French Walking Skirts ,French Suits and
French Waists. Don't fail when in Jack-
sonville to pay a visit (whether you buy
or not) to the above magnificent store.


RECORD BREAKING EXPORTS.
Shipments to China for Fiscal Year Larger
Than in Any Previous imila Period.
The prediction made in these columns
some time ago that the exports of cotton
goods to China during the fiscal year end-
ing June 30, 1905, would greatly exceed
those of any previous year is partially con-
frmed by the figures just issued by the
Department of Commerce and Labor show-
ing the exports for the eight months end-
ing February 28.
These figures for this period of the
last ten years are as follows:
Year. Yards. Dollars.
1895 21,658,837 1,082,774
1896 38,272,985 2,016,836
1897 85,351,867 4,828,252
1898 64;354,802 2,998,913
1899 135,604,310 6,080,355
1900 133,349,440 6,240,409
1901 26,028,080 1,478,501
1902 207,248,181 10,094,836
1903 180,012,598 9,026,768
1904 53,713,135 2,762,078
1905 276,276,166 15,445,948
Exports have already exceeded those
for the same period of 1902, which has re-
mained the record year until now. The
sales that have already been made for
deliveries to July 1 make it certain that
the increase shown by the final figures
for this year over those of the fiscal year
1902 will be relatively largely than that
for the first eight months. It can also be
predicted with equal certainty that the
exports to China for the calendar year
1905 will greatly exceed those of any pre-
vious year on record.-Textile Manufac-
turers' Journal.

Capt. Joiun I koung, president of the
John R. Young Company, of Savannah,
was in Jacksonville this week.
Mr. T. A. Jennings, vice-president of the
J. P. Williams Company, with offices at
Pensacola, Fla., was a visitor to the city
one day this week.


Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advertisements WA bI e Inserted ts aDls eprment t oat th FMwls:
For one week, pses allme.
For two weeks, 35 eeatsa le.
For three wee. So oets a Ule.
For four weeks, - Mts uh e.
Nine words of ordinary lesgth make o lie.
Hean coasts as two lines.
No disn y except the headings ea be admitted.
Remittances to sacoompasy the order. No extra charge for egoesae r
containing advertisement. Copr must be ia this oles sot later thae r U- NI
morning to secure insertion i lday's paper.
nMM-


Wuted.
WANTED-Timber lands. W. J. Wil-
lingham, Muncie, Indiana. (Until May
1st address me at Tallahassee, Fla.)
Turpcatine Mem.
Buy a Blakesle Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still No. 1 outfit pumps M
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 eats ad
require no attetion while u
Started in one miute. J. P. akp ,
Ocala. Fl.


Fer Sale.
Five year turpentine privilege 3,000
acres very fine timber land Will at
about twelve crops; on line railroad. Ad-
dess S. P. Holmes & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.

Help Supplied.
Naval stores mea aseu help by ap-
plying to the City -Empoyment BUman,
840 West Bay Street, Jaekdmvi, 1.


Wanted. Wasted.
To buy a first-elas turpentie location TWO GOOD MEN WANTb D.-A ood
.i .. ml oodsman and stiller; mat have Al refer-
in Florida. Will pay the right prie for must be mobrn nw phlae ad od
the right place. No at woods p need woods; no.healthier place in all Flda.
apply. G. A. Petteway, Box roy,. Apply to J. T. McNell, Wewahltehka. Fa..
Marion Co., Fla. tf or Apalachieola, Fla.


IMPORTS OF ROSIN INTO
From United States .....................
From France ..........................
From all other countries. ...............
Total Tons ...................
Percentage from United States ........
Reported by James Watt & Son.


UNITED KINGDOM.
1900 1901 1902
87,116 87,98 79,015
2,5 3,126 13,584
424 200 318
90,079 90,24 92,917
96.71 96.33 85.0t


1903
81,642
2,486
510
84538
96.46


1991
7M

900.


OPERATORS




SBear in Mind That During Your


KOd.




c6pe, Aram,
Dowm
Gat Ban,
ad anl
other at-




Tarpietis

Stills ail

Fixtures.


I


Busy Season



YOU MEET WITH A MISHAP
YOU BREAK DOWN

YOU BURN OUT

IFYOU NEED US


Over in the Left-Hand Corner Will Interest You.




McMILLAN BROS.,

Southern Copper Works.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


hbvanah, Ge
Mobile Ale
fty*teflhe N. 0.







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


THE


COVINGTON


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Co.


Wholesale


SHOES


- -


DRY1t GwOODlS.


"" Success


For Our


Customers


is Success


For Us."


ABSTRACTS
Title ad Tax Abltrnem, Map1, etc.,
of large traetv in al parts of Florida and
Somut Georga, prepared for owners and
imtmdtg poremeam Corrempondenm
moluditd.

REALTY TITLE AID TRUST CO.
Law ebnage Bldg., Jacksonville, FI$.

WM. D. JONES
ESNIMP SDOCIAUST

FAMILY DRUQGIST
107 L. BAY ST.
MaM Orders suecled.
ODmm YOUR

Whiskies
SWies

.Wines


HENRY FREE

The Only Up-to-Date Mail
Order lHoue In the South.
x6 wad s Clay Street as 5so W. Bay.
JACKSONILvL, FLA.


40. 1. IMSI 1.
MANUFACTUIBR 01'


BRICK.

iEnHI W.
Capacity of Yard 80000 Per Month.

'PM. 390.

THOSE. G. HUTCHINSON
rEW AMUAEIM ASU IUMN O
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
be. 7. B *-r Trade Ms.
Msm mX JAmCeMLL niA.


COURSE 01 PALI. AWD MEDIUM tOS8s AT SATVAN Ar FR TWO TEAR


DATE
April 1.........
April 8.........
April 1........
April 22........
April 29........
May p ........
May 13........
May 20 ........
May 27........
June 3........
June 10........
June 16........
June 23 ........
July ...........
July 7 ........
July 14 ........
July 28 ........
Aug. 4 ........
Aug. 12 ........
Aug. 18 ........


W.W.


190346
03.90
3.00
3.50
3.40
US3
3.36
42%
3.065
3.00
LO
3.40
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.39
3.39
3.40
.40
3.50
3.50


1904-06
64.10
3.95
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.86
3.06
4.36
4.50
4.00
4.06
4.75
4.75
4.70
4J2%
4-67%
4.0%
4.2%O


W.G.


190-05
3.756
Leo
3.00
3.00
3JO
3.50

4.06
4.10
4.15
4.256
4.40
4.40A
4.40
4.
4.42%
4.37


1903-04
$3.60
pm
3.45
336
3.26
3.25
3.27%1
3.35
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.30
3.30


1906-f 1908.05
1200 10-u
3.00 3.36
3.4 3.5
3.45 3.15
3.36 3.15
3.30 3.17%
3.30 3.5
3.4O 3.
3.5 3.36
3.85 3.20
3.5 3r0
3.90 3.06
4.0 3.20
3.90 3.L
4.20 3.1
4.%OO 3.1
4.00 UIIs


19304-6 1903-06
$.3 S 3.40
3.5 3.30
3.0 3.15
3.O 3.10
3.0 3.10
3O 3.10
3.20 3.12%

3.5 3.15

&a 2.06
3.O 2LO
3.86 2O
3.71% 2.90

3. 3.065
3.7% 3.06


104-6 1M4-04 190-6m
pm 82 em m
SAO am -am
3.15 SAO 2M
3.15 L3O L
3.15 3.00 Sa
is15 m ami
3.15 3.% SAO
3.15 3.10 SO
3.6 83.1 3.8J
3.40 am 3.10
3.40 3.2 3.5
3.4 3. 1 &4
3J tLO tam
L3M LSJ LO
3a 2L- 3.36
La LS 3. 5


a37% s 3. a


a.m
X.6
3.5
23S
LS.
LJ

3.M
3.O
LTO
sm

Lma
.70
Ln

aL
2.7
amO


GETTING'S



...FOR...




FURNITURE


S22-30 West Bay Street

JACKSONVILLE


Send for

Catalogue


Kohn = Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVOWEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Don't forget your subscription to the Record.


0







16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

a ~Jl8 --------- -tl~p-g--p- ee~eeeeee- eeeeeeegm


Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville
REAURCES THREE MILLI" N DOLLARS.
We invite especial attention to our Savings Department, which is operated
under GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION.
tITWIU T CONPOVNDEI OQVARTERLY.
\ ----------------W---**-*-----

C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO..

WHOLESALE GROCERS
Grain, Hay, Feed
Spelal attention to Turpentinoe ud Sawmill Men's Requirememnt
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY SIKLLI
Jacksorville, Fla.
aGnaA IETM-BTATU SAW MILL ASSOATIMW
mlmea Cestwie Pd.M t f r oerehantable Rslm. 9o+. AdeSted at TUt
besgis, Jalyrs, 1904
Feet PFeet Feet Feet Ft Feet Fet Feet t Feet
EMs 21-2 230 31-3640| 41-6 46 4 -50I 61-5 "-O a1-4
I xlO to 21xO... W-)I] s1350lll 14AOlM004 1 2&0 "0QWVS M 203S.30044.MO
UO to 8l0.... lt.0 10M 1MIS0 14.00 15.50 17.0 20.00 O 1 0 3L00
w e to Itlo.3... ILO 14.00 100 1. 16. 18.0 .00 S L.00 nS M 7.00
I xli to fali... 14.00 16.50 16.50 18.00 21.00 24.00 2600 3L60 3.M 4.00
xzlu to 1la .... 1 .00 1 140 16.50 18.0 21.00 80 S8.50 8.00 43.00
1exis to I1la.... 13.50 1 15.50 17.50 19.50 2.00 2o.50 30o 304 6.
1 xl4 to 3x14.... 106. 19.(0 300 22.00 24.50 27.50 3.00 37.01 44.0 57.60
3%x14 to 12a4u.... 14.0 16.0 18.00 20.50 2.00 24.00 00 3.0 Uo 4.08 UM
Iltxl4 to 14l14..-. 0 17.00 19.00 21.00 23.00 s00 I0.00 3.50 4.00 5.00
1 z8 to 4xzl.... Ma S3 9160 7.50 3 1.00 a340o 38 4. M M. M
4%xl to Itl16.... 19.00 .0 200 25.50 29.00 31.00 35.00 30.50 48.00 M
1ipzx to 10x12.... 10 50 3.00 96.50 30.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 86" .06 o
2 zil to tlx8.... 364 26.6 26. 31.50 35.00 o,00 43.01 4.00 UM 79.0
%xrI to 14x1S.... IMnA .OO 2600 20.00 33.0 37.00 4 1.00 4.L 4 7.00 W SO
14yg to l4t1e.... M S.300 7ST. 30.00 34.00 3&.004.0 0 411 .M 74. M
Toms: Net C
Pske aem 0. I Csan awimaa%, Druawick, Fernanlan s ja Jad m ha v
ROTSN Diammie.
At amt od the GeorMg Itaos Dimenion sis shall embsree all elm
Saw Mill AMotieb, hedat -ehsel 6 inches ad up in thicknes by ere
na, Nar 15, 1048, the owing Caat- bnaes and up t width, n ading ix by
mdgtiM and Rain r b1e 1r Of Y six. f orexample: O4*x 7, 7x7 ,7x,7x 'V7
low PI m were seay by d, esL ad up.
July 1 me. at ppin.-g.
-._ n,_ Stepping shall embrace one to two e ad
Hae P um haldfinwes in thicknes by serm inehe
General le-All lumber mut be and up in width. For exmpe: 1, 1%
sound, well manfetoed, full to Nem and 1%, 2 ad tx7 aTd a w idth.
saw butted free fre e unsound loose and
mhlw koot worm and knot holes; augh Ee or rnt.
thronh hak, or round hakee that Rough Edge or Flitch hll embrace all
show o the surface; square edge auless sies one inch and up in thickness by eight
otherwise pediedl. A through shake s inches and up in width, sawed on two
ereby deied to b through eneted ,idesonly. For ample: 1, 1%, 2, 3, 4
from sid to side, or e to 4ed, ar ide and up thick by eight inhes and up wide,
to ede. In the mea m of dressed awed on two sides oely.
lume tih irth d thike of the
lumber before dae mt be takew;
ess than em iahk h shall be measured INSPzCTION.
an- meo h. Standard.
-- All lumber shall be sound, mp ao ob-
CLAiCA jection. Wane may be allowed one-eighth
of the width of the ieee maured eros
n r aT face of wane, exmd oe-fourth of the
Flooring a113 eh ree four ad e length on one corner or its equivalent on
qurt r lnsce tisekmn by three to two or more cornma
six ine. i width. For example: 1x3,
4, a and 6; lX, 4, a, as m6.
war s All sies under aie Ianhes shall show
Doard rhall e an tlhin heart entire length o m side or edge;
under om ad a half abhes by ee sizes nine inches ad over shall show
inbes sad up wi including one: a heart the entire length on two opposite
alf ia i thicess by seve in idth side. Wane may be allowed oe-ghth of
For mmple: %, 1, 1J sad 1% imch the width of the piee measumrd aross
thik by 7 p, ,ide. face of wane, and extending one-fourth of
= v"' Sthe lentbh of the piece onone orner or
,P --u-,I -* lbr.16 1 ll fro thm it uivalent on two or more corners.


two to veo mehs in thieknes and two to
aix inaes in width. For example: 2x2.
2x3, rt4, 2, 2 3, 3x, 3xz1, 4x4,
uxs, 4x1, 6xs and 6x.L
PIk.
Plank hall embraces all sas from one
and on-half to aix indes st thikneve.
not including six inches by even inches
and up in width. For example: 1,
:. 4, c 4, 6,% 5%. b s


Prime.
dMa&
eantling shall show heart on two faces
the entire length; other sims shall show
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
cent. of the pieces, wane may be allowed
one-eihth of the width of the piece meas-
ured across face of wane and extending
one-fourth of the length of the piece on
one cornr or ts equivalent on two or
more euroe.


WIME m Tr-psWale Pr -pee N
Iaterst Yes P
Whal AlMf Saw MMll Tlehomp
10.000 Acres Saw Timber ........................ $2.50 to $5.00
40.000 .......................
50000 o ........................ per Acre.
26.000 Acres Virgin Timber...................
20.000 ...... ... 2.50
150.000 ...............
10.000 per Acre

"... fo e--

BROBSTON, FENDIG & CO.




THE ARAGON
JACWuonvirL nIa.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. ThoreaLgh
renovated and repaired throughout, i-
cluding n eet eltri eevator aad our
own eectrie light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.


SJ. S. Schofield's Sons Coapaay,
********eee**************:*eO OeO*********eO.eO* eOO:* *
*- ets f
~; Distiller's Pumping
Outfit
No plant complete without ns.
I*H Hundreds of them in use in Georeia
Sordid Alaba, MiesLdMppi amd
So.uth Carolina. Write as or psrt
; < .*r.ngmiJes, muers sm HUfe
I I=sa prices. We Shle .

Grads Masimry11.

SMill Su toekM P~i .
k l wer ToUes, Ete.&
Advise your wants.
*? Macon, -- Georgia.
"A Ltiss imar of a s
*a of To- k ftr Teriee samer PMo~ r
**** Of ******* ***-*******C***0**** ******** *


C. N. BANES, Pres.


J. .L SHAW, Vife-Pte&.


Ram" EsSUa. See-Tr


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Cemplmy. Gules,
Grades aad Weights GuaranteeLd
Deliveries at Jacksenvlle. Pensacla, Fernauina amd Savamma
Coresp deaee Solcited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.



East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Sbipments a Specaty.
WATERTOWN. FLORIDA.







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17

HARNE8S. SHIP TADMB. Enww.m
Buyers' Directory vehleoHarneo. Jac n a C r Im O, m VehAek Hae ,J o 1
Br Vehicle and Harnes Co., Jackmonvlle, Fla Cumnmer Limber Ok, JaMemmW Ia& Vehicle & Hum Co, Jaekamostu, Mk.
HAY AND GRAIN. Merrill-Stre0 C., Jasmeavmiis, i.n
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, FIL 8O8leWrl.acvwn WA lC a.
If y-l wHt ytMAS. okington The, Jia kma v, r-L Hi A Rw col.Pa.. .L
through this rlasilf Iet and aig & Bro., J. A, JaeksonvflreL H. STRA B wwN
-Refre Co., H. A., Jaeksoavill, FPa. Clyde Steamship o., The, Nw York City. YELLOW PIN LUM1I.
wrte te the firm aP9l lng Standard Cothing Co, Jaeeksanils, Fr. STOCK OKERS. Cmumer Lumber CO, Jasdminlv e
therein. TieC ResL t guMrteeS Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Holmes & Ca., Saa P, Janekeeville ,la t CEoat ILber Co, Watatso, IL
nrno t roM-o. rHOTELS. TAILUs
a prompt rs Ago The, asonv rin RnL fr O ., H. A., Jsamvlle,
Hotel Bartholdi, New York ity.
St. George, Jacksonville, Fla TALKBING MACHIhE
ASTRACTs. Light's Restaurant, Jacksonville, Fla. Metropolitan Talking Machie Co., Jack- hec
Raft Tul ad Trust Co. IRON WORK, onvile, TA Nl
ACCOUNTATS. Imbard Iron Works Supply C, Au- Cyp Tk OR Mobie, AN k
T. a Htuo., Jacksonville, Fla. gustas a. D Svis So., 0. M., Psktkt, r1. FOR THE
AR MSrll-St M Cb, JMk gi, s. Schosdad's son Co., J. 8., Ma.M. G
AtM Natabmal Bank, Jeko.nvills PM. hof's s ns OCn, J. 18 M&a5 G TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
O eal Boanok, JasevilLe, 31. INSURANC. Realty Title and Trnt Co.
Florida Bank & rust Co, Jackonville, Cay, Shine & McCa Jacksonville, Fla. usas APPAAT
L. Loren H. Green & Co., Jacksonville, Fla. CauAt5.sS. ACJSPARISTUAR E
Chattuaoog oey (n., Jaekeinile, Ils THE INDUSTRIAL BEODED manu-
Natieal Bank ad M ,UEPsuaNs iiOCIU. factures more of them than al1 the rint.
BOZ11 BaBND CA1I Greenleaf &CrosyC-, J5ckson^,n% ia k='!zi PCU print- mpp^ ^ c
DOESs AND CRATES Grcsneaf & C1 by 1 The E. C. Hemmer o., vannah, Ga. ing and office supply houses in the ou
C onmer Lumber O Hess & lager, Jac. Lsonville. Fla. IuPsjax STILLS combined.
LIQvon.
DOWLING AND ILTAnsB Blum a Co., Chn, Jackanvil1e Fb Bak, X. A, wick COMMISSARY C ECKS
Guys Bowling and Billiard Parlors, Jack- Henry Free, Jacksonville, Fla. Mcildia Bros., Savanns, COMMSSARY CHECKS
movill Ji L Muller, Gus, Jacksonville, Fla. JLUPz is STILL TUBS. Send ll order for Commissary Cheeks,
OTI C Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, Fla. Davis & 80n, G. M., Plta, ja any color, any A4min, padded or
C m h a. TTUNfPlxudl VATA loose, to the
ne, NJ Jr, Jadanvt, pL. Altmayer 6 Flatan Liquor Co, Maaon, Ga TUP, S, loose, to the
Davs So&,0. M.,,,s ?%si Ir0stral t. C
&&eahol D & apy on, Th, Jaksom- Eureka Saloon, Jacksonville, Fla. ruxPEsalllu TOOLS. tr Rc
vil IsL MEDICIES. Council Tool Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CaSpencer Medicine Co, Chattaooga Tem.
m A Bra J. A., Jacks.ill a Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonvill, R. S. HALL, Pres. T. C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L J. J. KmM, Se. and Ties.
Z0 ., 0, A., Ja.mbo inrril la FL
eniar h .,tin ....g Os, Jakoa avifl, &. Christie-Groover Drug Co.. Jacksonville M AR ION H ARD WARE C O.,
CLOTPIDF6-WMAI.IPN HASWOWAlRC C u.
Kas, Fherhgtt Oma, Jamekrville, Fla Realty Title and Trust Co.
Mm 1RADTW MACHINE WO IL L AN
Bailey & Ms iry, New York City. Lombard Iron Works & Supply Oa, Au- IARDWARE, MILL AND
TrS. S O& :,. Yok Ciy. .,g t G.. TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

zeftt Te lad Trst Co. MATERIALS FOIR iuaPau z PRO-
COOpeW*A CSS. OCALA, FLORIDA.
Onmes ~, Te, Qu itm, Ga Scholeld's Sons Co, J. 8, Maeso, Ga
OeSgSc Ci n. 1 Jaft e (106Dk METAL WOURS.B
m o,1dav Cl F Baker, A., Brwik, TLT
DRWU MeMillan Bros, SBvanash, Ga.
Kirk & JeMe, JadsmMvill, 1l. MILL SUPPLIE o C
Cbrmse-,roov- Drur Co., JackonvIe Brigg Hardware Co., W. H., Valdoeta, G.
Marion Hardware Co., Oass, M
Scholaid'. Bons Co., J. 8., Maeon, Ga.
-,--,-. II.~o-..ds so J. %TAILORS Stetson Hats
er Manfatuaring Co., Jacksonville, T a H Tmp Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
FIa. Weed & o., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
MEy OOas -WWOrY AT MILLINERY.
ot 04 T Jaoil, Fl. Henry Jacobs, Jacksonville, Fla. Sit to Orde at RadMaiyo Pric Mal Order Gir Paeroas AltM
HorC. &Ok Fot Na' Co., New York Cty. 439 W. Bay Street JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
NAVAL STORK.
UI;CTRIC 8UPPLIES Baily & Montgomery, New York, N. Y.
Florida Eletric Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Barns-Jemsup Co, The, Jacksonvlle, PFl. 1 1 1 1lIl lllllll 111111 11111 I I 111 11111
Standard Electric Co.. Jacksonville, Fla. CoaMolidated Naval Store Co., JaLeac- J P. WIUAM, Presidet. J. A. G. CA.mms, i Vicet-ealesm
m.Gi- vill, Fla. T. A. Jniun i ViesPlsredent. J. P. DuInDmm7r.YVieP4edest
Lad Ire Wedrlks ly Clo, Au- standard Naval Store CO., Jacksonville, H. L. KATOM, Secrtary. D. Wai Tmarer.
Merd1-8tveWin OL h y Fl a
s sil- a Csm L Tolr, Hart & Co., New York, N. Y.
SUnion Naval Stos os, obie, J. P.WILLIAMS COMPANY,
i- -. _Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
^ Young Co., John R., Savannah, On. 11111 S N iW I MaTTO FKTM II N U MK i B
Bor.n Co.. Wi. A, Jacksonville, F Tampa Naval Stores Co., Tamps, Fla. 0
FOUNDRIES. JPAIN S a m. tst 4 um omo0esa.
Sehel'"s em O, J. S., it s Ga Bond & Bourn Co, Jaeksonvillla, I Wun olr Lx. r11 ek mfy, mouse
FEL. PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES. m-rame ofnfles { o Io.. 0I CeLMWLaS, ML03..
smLthers aul &6 -ply r. T, Jack- Brigg Hardware Co, W. H, Valost, Ga. -
mrnvi.l Cnmpbell, J. B., Ocala. Nava Stores A.r l ers awe InvRted to Comrespe With Vs.
rr mt Marwnion Hardware o, Oa., Fa.
p te atg CO., Jaolla, ]la. Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla. I11ll II l I I111111lll11111III 11Illll 11111111aII
GRa W ,rmJ.8 FJl.orida Paper Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
aalf & n. J. A, Jaso e Fl. PIANOS. 0. A
Koha, Furehtt & Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Ludden & Bates, Jacksonville, Fla.
Ratres Cab, E. A., Jas esville, Fla PUM *
Otmud, ` (o.,04 Jakvidmi, U M Merrill-Steven Co., Jacksonville,
8*uart-Bernatein Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Sehofeld's 8ons Co., J. 8., Maeon, Ga.I d
OUCVS I-m wrATr White-Blakeelee Mfg. ao., Birmbg--l.
Bours Co., W. A., Jacksonville, Fla. Ala.
O-nimated Griery Co., Jakoavlls, hla. TANK STORAGE. kW imp
-Dowling & Co., F. M., Jacksonville, Fla. National Tank & Export Co, Savanah, T
HaFrave Co. C H., Jackamville, Fla. Ga.
Jacksouville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla REAL ESTATEL
Wilham CI, J. P., Bvamans. Ga. Brobston, Fendig & Co, Jacksonville, 1L.
Young Co, John R., Savannah, Ga. Blount Real Estate Co., Ocala, Pla. Wrt me i
GINoGR ALE. Christie. J. D., Jacksonville, Fla. .0. Mw P m ee0s u m-
ive Oak Bottline Works. IAve Oak. Fla. Livingston & Sons J. H., Oeai. Ps. Albsma or asms. All
AT-WwdermAr Southern States land and Timber CO, amsalesmaerssa
Lmn, d D uo a Co, JLameli,. Stewart & Co., Jacksonville, Flr. C Job work through the
AWA0. vi laHedricks Real Estate Agency, Jackson-
S ms Jr l vinle, Fla country pe lt,
DMnd & a O, The J~emvlul, lh. SAIES
b ei wH~rr ., W. H.,Vabosta, Ga. Diabold Safe and Lock Co., Jacksonville, The Larges and OMd1est CrUpp
Wm.S n.., Os, 0. ( L Fl. .p en C ldarw. Bn ldrunswick Ga
T.IM Na..crdreO..0 Tama., "am. sWs.Gr
W A & 0CI, J. I%, Lm iT6. G(. Bour. A Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla. Sr My speolalty is large worms and heavy bottem that do Mt leak.
*








is THR WNULY INDUSTRIAL EROORD.


NUBIAN TEA rr the Liver and Kideys

BENEDICTA A medicine fr we-

CUBAN RELIEF or Cel. Cramps c an Dl
arrhoea
CUBAN OIL A linnt unequale d frCts. Burns
Braoes and Rheumism.

A supply of these medicine is what every family needs to
inamr good health.
Write for pries and booklet..

Spencer Medicine Company,

The Clyde Steamship Company


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES


no us at gssapsaghiins tLh m are afeitd to MR as ftas, eaag
a &as- &,beth ways.


Fre NOW TOR04
(new M ewrth mk~).


prom jaefneksemvfse w
Val 9M Chasteness six& New Yorik.


PRICE LIST OF

Eureka Wine and Liquor Co.
The Great Southern Mail Order Houe.


ElP"ms PEEPAI3.

Hatchett's Private stock ...... .....
Hatchett' That's Whlkey ..........
Hatchettf Old ye ................
Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy ........
N. C. Apple Brandy ..............
Eureka Malt ..... ..............
Eureka N. C. Peah Brandy ........
N. C. Peach Brand..............
Eureka N. C. Cor ........ .......
Eureka N. C. Corn. X .... ......
Eureka N. C. C .orn, .... ......
Eureka N. C. Corn, XXXX ........
Old Crow Bourbon .... .. ......
Hermtage Rye ..................
Sunny Brook Rye ................
Sunny Brook Sour Mash .. .........
Echo Spring ................ ....
Slk Velvet ......................
Oak and .................. ......


I
3

.. .... ..o
.. ....
..

.. 3
... .
.4..
4.. .


FULL OQVT mBACSVU
.er Four Six Pr
alln. Qarta. Qnarta. C1a0
. 4.0 .0 aL
.3 8.3 4.0 3.*
.1 4.2 7.0 14.

.76 4.15 7.0 14.0
.5 S.5 4.5 .W
.5 8.5 4.5 9.3
.0 3.0 4.5 8.0
L. 3.. 8.5 71.5
I.n l.1i 4.15 ISi
I.1 S.W 2 .i TIn
>.E 4.1 6.3 3.
.M 4.0 6.15 3.
. 2.5 5.5 n.W
I. 4.i 4. U3
.0 5.5 LU U."
i. 4.0 6.0 3.0
I.I 4.1 L. U.-


GIN FROM S2.50 TO $5.0 Pr GALLON, DUVIVIED
Save twelve labels of Hatchett' Private Stock and secure a bottle free.
Save twelve labels of Hatchett's Old Rye and secure a bottle tree.
SSave twelve labels of Hatchett's That's Whiskey and secure a bottle free
Save twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Corn and severe a bottle free. Save
twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy and secure one bottle free. ave
twelve labels of Eureka Malt and secure one bottle free. Prices of a goods
bought at company's store are 7eO per gallon lem than when delivered. Ne
charge for Jugs, boxes, or drayage. An of my bottles are ful measure. A
s standard brands of whiskies sold over my bar at 10 per drink. 15
We also carry in stock liquor of cheaper grades. U
All wine quoted on application.
Special prices in large lots, packed any sises desred. Leaves 5 for yea
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded.
EUILEKA WINE AND LIQUOR COMPANY.
SWIBT BAY STREET, JACKSONVI3 "L1ORIDA.
l;W6668lsleslallislll88llll8Ilil0&
uimual uuumeuaI~ l tease~~crrlr *SSIISIIIIIIII-- Ii


T. msL 4CARTSv wkepre SIA40S SEnm.. Town&


Saturday, Mar. 26, at 3:00" pm*xHURON....... Thursday, Mar. 30, at 12:00 n'n
.xMOH[CAN.... Friday, Mar. 31, at 1:00 pm
Tuesday, Mar. 28, at 3:00 pm..APACHE...... Sunday, Apr. at 4:00 am
Wednesday, Mar. 20, at 3:00 pm..IROQUOIS.... .Monday, Apr. 3, at 4:30 am
Fridy, Mar. 31, at 3:00 pm..COMANCHE... Wednesday, Apr. 5, at 5:00 am
saturday, Apr. 1, at 3:00 pm..ALGONQUIN.. Thursday, Apr. 6, at 5:30 am
Tuesday, Apr. 4, at 3:00 pm. .ARAPAHOE... Sunday, Apr. 9, at 7:00 am
Friday, Apr. 7, at 3:30 pm. .APACHE.... Wednesday, Apr. 12 at 9:30 am
**xNEW YORK. Friday, Apr. 14, at 11:30 am
Saturday, Apr. 8, at 3:00 pm. !IROQUOIS.... Friday, Apr. 14, at 11:30 am
Tuesday, Apr. 11, at 3:00 pm..COMANCHE...Sunday, Apr. 16, at 12:30 pm
Wednesday, Apr. 12, at 3:00 pm..ALGONQUIN.. Monday, Apr. 17, at 1:00 pm
Friday, Apr. 14, at 3:00 pm..ARAPAHOE....Wednesday, Apr. 19, at 4:30 am
*xHURON....... Thursday, Apr. 20, at 5:00 am
Tuesday, Apr. 18, at 3:00 pm. .APACHE...... Sunday, Apr. 23, at 7:30 am
Wednesday, Apr. 19, at 3:00 pm..IROQUOIS.....Monday, Apr. 24, at 8:30 am
Friday, Apr. 21, at 3:00 pm..COMANCHE.. .Wednesday, Apr. 26, at 10:30 am
Saturday, Apr. 22, at 8:00 pm..ALGONQUIN.. Thursday, Apr. 27, at 11:00 am
*xNEW YORK...Friday, Apr. 28, at 11:30 am
Tuesday, Apr. 2, at 3:00 pm. .ARAPAHOE... .Sunday, Apr. 30, at 12:30 pm
Friday, Apr. 28, at 3:00 pm..APACHE...... Wednesday, May 3, at 4:30 am
Saturday, Apr. 29, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS .... Thursday, May 4, at 5:00 am
*xHURON....... Thursday, May 4, at 5:00 am
*-BoDtoa via Brunswik sad Char leston. Freight only. --Boaoa vi

THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
rseet4 Imesee Detweem JmeasoavIne', eoteom uand Prevdaes n ad an nme..
ea Par es OalnA at Charlestoen th Way.
n-U-W-- T eIUi IamBa
I .. ............................... . . . . Fr)ea LewIl Whrt, at
3l0tbald .. .... .. .... .......... .o--m foot of CatherIno treet, Jae.mmvn
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
setwean Jameb avtil amd Smafer .
Ste glp at Palatk, Astor, St. Franci a, Beresord (De Ldand) ad latrterel
amisee n ft. Jobins ryer.
STEAMER "CITY OP JACKSONVILLE"
ia aaated to sll a fkSllow: Leave Jaaksonville, undaya Tuesdas and Thus-
am s aSM U. tretUata. leave Sanford, Moadays. Wednesday & Fridays 9 a. .L
VaJffZ, ihl WOm.OZYan D,
atd 60- 36Rad MW
Leav 9 m ...... .......... ...J on...Jacoaville.................. Arrive Ia. se.
Lve m.I ..................PalUaa.. ..... ... ae 8 p. ,
Lev 8 a. m. ............ ..........stoa................ ..... .... Leave 2 -.
av 4* a. .......................t. rw .......... Iave 1M
....................... Beresord (Da ............ ......... ve ,n4: me
ArtIve l ...... .................aor. d................ ...... Lsave a a. m
Ar. 10:00 a. m.................... .terprse..................... Lv. 10:00 a. m.
GENERAL PASS NGER AND TICKET OFFICE, Is1 W. BAY ST, JACK'VILL.
V. M. RONMONGER, JR., Asst Gen. Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St. Jackonille, Fla.
W. 0. 0. O00 a., L.eal Ft. Act., Jaf'vlle. C. P. LOVBLL. AMt. Supt.,elek'vile
moot Hosan Street, Jacksonville.
A. C. HAGOHITT. 0. P. A, Nw York, OLYDE MTLNE. G. F A., New Yer.
4,L 3I ,. WI. P. CLYDE CO.
Q emnl Manar. General Agem .
rCherweh uinga. 1I tate street. New Tesk.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.


liI i WEL. M r.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKMOUVILILI LA.


llillllllllll llll 8 1 880001 888ll$&



...NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, OA.; U. S. A.


JOHN YOUNG,
Preaddeat


J. P. WILLIAM.
0. W. SAUBSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-PreeaienL


0.s. LIJS.
P. L. SUTHERLAND.
J. B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


H. L. KATTON,
Secretary Tiearmer.


a F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL
WAJLER RAY,
A. D. OOVINGTON.


J. aL camurN
0. W. Dnm,
RAYMOND CAT.
J. L.OONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. 0. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRIT BITTER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS



Prntinor all Purposes
The lhedh trial Reseed Pub. Co.
.JacklL I tl.





mmeBases maui uuu eesu IuhI sseesuseeu seei IusuBefuallsuIuIuIuII1111111116111611111


C. B. ROGERS.


PRaSIDrNT W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, Vlcx-PRaEisDNTu. C. H. HODGSON, Sac,
DIRECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain. H. A. McEaehern and J. A. Cranford. of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Waval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the .Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries,


Grain, Pro-


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Corasst of oe Three-Story Bulldlag, 70x200; one two-story buildlag. 50x390; one ose-story bulldias, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind Ia the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fle., Penscola,. Fla., end Savanneh. Ga.


and Tnuaus'.


III Ota Is $1'a INS 644446*44s 18441tits 040#1 4


mwm







Two of the Patterns we show in our Catalogue.
SPECIAL VALUES IN STERLING SILVER..
sob ede
11"I)


THE Greenleaf &
"Rose" Crosby Company
Teaspoons, g9 o per do0. 3etbwtkr. anb
Desert Spoons, 16.oo per doz.
Table Spoons, $23.00 per doz. WL i t
Dessert Forks $x6oo per doz.
Table Forks, 23.oo per dos.
Dessert Knives, ooo per doz. 41 W est Bay Street
Table Knives, $23.oo per doz. Jckso vil
NO CHARGE FOR
ENGRAVING. laget and fin sto. i tbi *pat tof d
soamtl States. Prompt atteuton to mal order


THE
"Germania"
Teaspoons 90oo per doz.
Dessert Spoons, $6.5o per doz.
Table Spoons, 823.50 per dos.
Cessert Forks, $s6.5o per doz.
Table Forks, $23.5o per dos.
Dessert Knives, $g.oo per dos.
Table Knives, 2200oo per dos.
WE PAY EXPRESS
CHARGES.


Write for Catalogue
ONE HUNDRED PAGES ILLUSTRATING

Silverware, Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Cut Glass, Clocks, etc.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings


Illustrating and Engraving Department

OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.

Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc. ,

I SMPLTY IS E Il DI HSIM. RETKI I U ENI illH Pimi pTOU I PIN E.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


I~ ~P - ~ -~-C~-~-----LIaC-I;-~ -n-~R--I~ --~1 -7 -*3-----17--~-~--_1-.~- --1
F.- P, art' i


--