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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00114
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: March 24, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00114
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text



OUSTRIAI


RE CORD


fK hY fIAVAL ITORKES,
IaVEd1WR'!D GEsIEAh
flOV TRIAbb FINtIIAIAs
Ij AfEWSPAER '
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JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ATLANTA, GA. SAVANNAH, GA.
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- 1-- ---- --- - -- -- ----- --- -,
Preslenat, W. C. POWELL; Vice-Presidents, who with the President, constitute the Directory sad Board of Managers, W. F. COACHMAN, B. F. BUL-
LARD, H. L. COVINGTON, H. A. MeEACHERN, JOHN R.YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES

.. COMPANY.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA, FLA.,


S NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
mall Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.

The Consolidated is Purely a Cooperative Company. Its
Interests are identical with those of the Producers. The
Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.

YARDS AT JACKSONVILLE, SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA AND PENSACOLA

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.
i Is -----lMatflFt6aPMgX3
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WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUDUSRIED E VY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO THE NAVAL STORES, LAM1 AND MANUFACTUMffG uwitnzmio

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Internal Commerce of the United States


Internal commerce conditions of the
United States during the month of Jan-
uary are summarid in the following
statement prepared by the department of
commerce and labor through its bureau
of statistics, and to be published in the
monthly summary of commerce and
fianee for January, 1905:
During the month receipts of live
stock at the five markets of Chicago,
Kaneas City, Omaha, St. Louis and
t Joseph totaled 3,235,611 head, being
nsidrably in excess of a like move-
ment in ether 1904 or 1903, and also
larger than the arrivals for the month of
December by over 50,000 head. The fa-
vorable conditions are indicated by the
latter comparison were principally due
to increases in live stock receipts at Chi-
cago, Kansas City and Omaha, especially
in the total inbound movement of hogs
and sheep, although a small gain in the
arrivals of cattle was also noted at each
of these three markets.
Live stock arrival at Chicago during
January aggregated 1,624,214 head, as
agaiat 1,540,711 hea for a corresponding
period in 1903; 30,5 ears being required
to handle the 1906 movement, or an aver-
age of 1,000 ears a day, illustrating the
enormous equipment for this single
branch of the transportation industry.
Shipments for the same months from
this city totaled 407,048 head in 1905
and 343,130 head in 190. Receipts of live
\stock at Kansas City for the month of
January amounted to 511,770 head in
1905 and 457,004 head in 1904. Heavier
hog arrivals are largely accountable for
the improved condition of the current
year's figures. Shipments for the month,
whih amounted to 70,179 head, were
much smaller than those for the similar
month in 190.
Live stock arrivals at Omaha during
January totaled 400,21 head, as compared
with 417,21 head for a like month in
1904. Shipments for a similar period
amonted to 53,155 head in 1905 and 43,-
680 head in 1904. At St. Louis similar
receipts for January amounted to 393,826
head, in contrast with 374,554 head in
. 1904. Shipments for the month totaled
63,1 head, as compared with 70,681 head
in 1904.
Total receipts of grain at twelve im-
portant primary markets show heavy de-
crease both in comparison with the
movement of the previous month and for
a similar month in 1904. Gains over the
December arrivals were made at Louis-
ville and Toledo, and were largely attrib-
uted to a heavier inbound corn movement
at Louisville and to an increased oat
movement at Toledo. However, these
increases had little effect as an equalizing
factor upon the total losses sustained at
the markets of Duluth, Minneapolis, Mil-
waukee, Chicago, Kansas City, Peoria
and Cininnati. .
Receipts of wheat at the four leading
spring markets for the present season
to January 31 amounted to 110,492,885
bushels, of which 00,042,880 bushels ar-
rived at Minneapolis, 7,038,390 bushels
at Milwaukee, 23908,410 bushels at Du-
luth and 19,505,206 bushels at Chicago.
Total wheat receipts at these cities for
a similar period in 1903-04 totaled 105,-
723,242 bushels, and for the same
months of 1908-03, 127,365,25 bushels.
At the four principal winter wheat mar-
kets receipts from July to January 31
hace been as follows. Toledo, 4,488,613
bushels; St. Louis, 18,40,882 bushels;
Detroit, 1,01,053 bushels; Kansas City,
31,50,4O bushels; making a total of
56,6,074 bushels, in contract with 47,-
11993 bushels for the same period of the
preceding season and 2,445,461 bushels
for 1083-8.


The amount of grain received at Minne-
apolis during the first month of the
present year totaled 10,081,199 bushels,
as compared with 12,073,250 bushels in
January, 1904.. Shipments for the same
month, which totaled 3,752,210 bushels,
differ but little from those of a like
month in the previous year. Milwau-
kee's total grain arrivals for January
amounted to 2,473,970 bushels, as
against 3,436,930 bushels in 1904. The
decrease as indicated by this comparison
was caused by a lighter movement of
wheat, oats and barley, and rye, corn
showing a decided increase. Total ship-
ments for the month, amounting to 1,-
855,633 bushels, were somewhat heavier
than those for a similar month of the pre-
ceding year.
Grain receipts at Chicago during the
month amounted to 16,00,218 bushels,
as compared with 15,649,009 bushels in
January, 1904. During January of the
current year corn arrivals. mounted to
9,36,218 bushels; oats, 3,280,00 bushels;
wheat, 1,673,400 bushels; barley, 1,946,087
bushels, and rye, 123,613 bushels. Total
shipments for the month, which aggre-
gated 11,381,505 bushels, were considera-
bly in excess of those for January, 1904.
The inward grain movement at Detroit
for the first month of the current year
amounted to 593,256 bushels, being only
about half the sie of that for the corre-
sponding month in 1904. Toledo grain re-
ceipts for the same period amounted to
1,821,400 bushels in 1906, as against 1,618,-
300 bushels in 1904, while similar arrivals
at Duluth were 1,616,414 bushels in 1905
and 2,300,848 bushels in 1904. Cleveland's
arrivals for January aggregated 2,110,718
bushels, 72 per cent of which were corn.
This total was considerably in excess of
a similar one for 1904, due to heavier ar-
rivals of both corn and oats. Shipments
totaled 1,085,785 bushels, an increase of
nearly a million bushels if compared with
a like movement of January, 1904.
Grain receipts at Cincinnati for Janu-
ary amounted to 1,521,830 bushels and
differ but little, in the aggregate, from
those for a like period of 1904, although
oat arrivals indicate a gain of approxi-
mately 100,000 bushels, and corn shows a
loss of over 150000 bushels. Total grain
shipments for the month were 730,166
bushels in 1906, and 972,97 bushels in
1904. Grain receipts at St. Louis for the
month sho wa remarkable shrinkage, as
compared with a similar period of 1904.
Wheat receipts, which amounted to 1,-
375,049 bushels, were over 600,000 bushels
lighter than the movement for the pre-
vious year. Corn receipts totaled 980,185
bushels in 1905, aeing nearly a million
and -a half bushels lighter than in 1904.
Receipts of grain at Kansas City for the
first month of the present year totaled 3,-
243,800 bushels, in contrast with 6,743,600
bushels in January, 1904.
Eastern trunk line movement of grain
from Chicago and Chicago points during
the first four weeks in January totaled
11,380.000 bushels, as against 9,80,000
bushels for similar weeks in 1904. The
heaviset shipments occurred in the first
week of the month, during which time the
railroads handled 3,616,000 bushels of all
kinds of grain. East bound flour with-
drawals for a similar period amounted to
475.342 ushels, being about 270,000 bush-
els greater than the movement for 1904.
Provision shipments, by a like compari-
son, show a decided decrease, being 99,688
tons in 1906 and 124,645 tons in 1904.
An unusually active interest was dis-
plyed during January relative to freight
rates on grain from interior primary
markets to Atlantic and Gulf ports. As
a rule, there are no through published
rates on grain from the Missouri river to


the Atlantic seaboard, but on January 30
the railroads filed with the Interstate
Commerce Commission and put into ef-
feet a rate on earn from common points
on this river to New York and Boston
of 181-2 cents, to Philadelphia 171-2
cents, and to Baltimore, Newport News
and Norfolk 17 eents. On the ame date
the railroads running to the Gulf re-
duced the export corn rate from Kansas
City to Galveston and New Orleans from
17 to 12 1-2 cents and from Omaha to the
same Gulf ports from 18 to 131-2 cents.
The exports of grain via the AlAtntie
ports during January amounted to*9,-
066,906 bushels and those from the Gulf
ports to 6920,213 busehls.
The total available supply of cotton for
the present year to the end of January 1
amounted to 9,132,528 bale, as against
8,177,421 bales for similar months in
1903-04. While the total available supply
for the past five months exceeds that for
a like period by over 0,000 bales, the
percentage of the total mop moved is ap-
parently not nearly so large as it was
on January 31, 1904, and this would seem
to indicate that considerable quantities of
cotton were being held back by the farm-
ers, presumably for a more advantageous
price. This apparent fact is further em-
phasized b stating that the sight re-
ceipts for January amounted to but 955,-
823 bales, in contrast with 1,801,44 bale
in December. 2,61,430 bales in November,
2399,328 bales in October, and 1,3829,
bales in September, the amount of re-
eeipts and the price both showing, in the
main, a steady decrease for the past three
months.
The net overland movement for the
five months to January 31 amounted to
611,881 bales, as compared with 616,881
bales for similar months of the preceding
season. Total export withdrawals for
the months under discussion amounted to
5,168,610 bales, being over 00000 bales
heavier than for the similar movement of
the previous season. During the present
season the northern mills have taken 1,-
356,277 bales and the southern mills 1,-
122,047 bales, indicating a decrease in the
activities of the northern mills, but an
increase in those of the south, if compari-
sons are made with last season' figures.
The total American stocks on hand Jan-
uary 31, both at port cities and interior
towns, amounted to 1,473,30 bales, as
against 1,168,924 bales on a like date in
1904.

NHW GONOIA RAMIlAD.
It Is to Traverse a Rich Sectiea of Seuth

Atlanta, March 22.-he Ocills, Pine
Bloom and Valdosta Bailroad Company
was granted a charter to-day by Secre-
tary of State Phil Cook. The company
has a capital of 20000,0, and will begin
the construction of its line at the termi-
nus of the Wadley and Mt. Vernon exten-
sion at the Satilla River, and run through
Willacoochee and Pine Bloom, in Coffee
County, through Nashville to Adel, in
Berrien county. a distance of about forty-
one miles.
The principal office will be at Pine
Bloom. B. B. Gray and nine others, all
of Coffee County, are the nlaorporators.

PROBLEMS OF COTTON GROW IIL
The collapse of the speculative move-
ment in cotton is followed by two move-
ments looking toward the strengthening
of the position of the planter along
healthy lines. One is the curtailment of
production and the other is the reaching
out for broader markets. A rather gen-
eral intention to reduce acreage for the
new crop is reported. Whether these in-
tentions will work out is problematical,
but they will no doubt have an influece


in reducing the acreage plated. There
is so muh to ppeal to theldtel-
ment in such a proposition that it i
quite resamable to suppose m y pat-
er will figure on their neighbors ett
dow acreage, while they, by mld- a
full planting m rp the
Some may even plat moe mdr tis
temptation, so there is not mueh to hoe
for from a movement of thh chraster.
The men who reduce their cotton acre
are the intelligent farmers who are a
to diversify their crops ad make money
with other duc1 or poassy the
planter who bee so ba dly hurt by
cotton specution that he had not the
means or the nerve to go into aoth se a-
son with a full planting
The other movement to ind broader
markets is a more binslike way far
the South to handle large eop. A gth-
ering held lst month in New reas with
such an object in view is describe as the
most important industrial assemblage in
the South sine the war. Thi was the
Southern Interstate Cotton Conveti .
Its representatives ealld upon Preident
Roosevelt recently to request that a spe-
ecal message be sent to CoDgrJ n
the subject of enlarge trade il
with China ad the east. For p-
pose a commission of experts i
This commimion is to vist C S ad
make a report upon the coemmar l p-
portunities that exist. Eight S a
work of similar character wasad
and was prodeutive of good resume. is
now felt that China is entering a
when her trade must greatly pand
the United State sho take stes t
secure a large proportion of this
business. It was pointed out to the pra-
ident that if the comsmptio of eattM
products per capita in China were a
great as it is in the United Statet the
would not be emogh of eettoa in the
world to supply sch a dumad. (Cin
imported in 190l cotton manmfature to
the value of $@l,0&0AM and to tMs the
contribution of the United States was a
decided improvement, as the Unitedl Etas
shipped $14,OOM0 of cotton doth to
China. It is expected that 1905 w
make similar strides. All thi i toak
as indicative of the promises held out by
the United States in insistig upon t
inviolobility of Chinese territory, wht-
ever be the outcome of the presat war,
and the pledges- given by all the po
to this request will tend to stimulate the
development of the Chinese empire. The
tendency toward American markets wll
be helped by the prstige whih ths o-
try has achieved by leading i semi
this protection to the Chie sep a
a well equipped commercial o les
would probably ind co-operation if sat
out by this country.
The country at large is concerned in
the present erops of the South, and i
vitally interested in the steady inrraease i
the sine of the erope The area mw 1t-
ised for the production of eoatt in that
section forms only a small peracntage
the land available for this purpose A-
thorities are looking forward to the tim
when the increase in op t in the
South will give opportunity for eott
planting on lads not now used for thi
purpose. The 120000 bale crp,ow
a source of panic, is expected to e a
natural development. The time when a
15000,000 bale crop is to be expected is
already discussed, and statistieians are
ealeulating upon still greater erops. vi-
dently the prime question in cotton is
not how to curtail erops, bt how to ft
consumers, and the appeal to Congress is
a step in the right direetion.-altimore
News.








4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
Wd V RIEY..1.A. CASON efo. WWNL


"Peonue" As It is Seen by Judge Speer.


Peouagqe an absorbing topic in tih
South at this time, was the subject ol
the charge delivered by Judge Emoq
Speer to the gre d jury of the
term of the United States District Couri
at Savannah this week.
The tenor of his charge indicated thai
Judge Spewr i in earnest about the pro.
ecatio of persons guilty of ommittin(
or holding others in a condition of invol
untary or voluntary servitude." He ere
ated somewhat of a sensation by declar
ing that enforced labor on a local chain
gang, imposed for any offense nol
amounting to a crime, is peonage
After outlying the duties of the granc
jury, which he sid, broaden with eael
reurring session of the court, Judge
Speer entered into an exhaustive discus
sion of the peonage statute.
Valnity f the Law.
He said that sweeping decisions of the
Supreme Court of the United States have
upheld the constitutionality of section
190 of the Revised Statutes denouning
a null and void any law in any tate
or territory authorizing the establishment,
directly or indirectly, of voluntary or in-
voluntary serve of any persons as peons
in liquidation of any debt or obligation
He said that in so fr as the validity of
the law was involved a unanimous opin-
ion was rendered in that ase.
Jstiee Brewer's definition of "Peon-
age" was quoted as follows:
"It may be defned as a state or con-
diton of compulsory service based upon
the indebtedness of the peon to the mas-
ter. The bsal fact is indebtedness. Up-
on this i based a condition of compul-
sory service. Peonage is sometimes class-
ifed as voluntary or involuntary, but
this implie simply a difference in the
mode of o in, but none in the character
of the servitude. The nem exists where
the debtor voluntarily contracts to enter
the service of his creditor. The other is
forced upon the debtor by some provision
of law. But peonage, however created,
is ompulsory service, involuntary servi-
tude of the peon."
To relieve the minds of those who
might desire to act tightly on the subject
Judge peer emphasized the following
langage of the Supreme Court:
"A clear distinction exists between
peonage ad the voluntary performance
of bor or rendering a service in pay-
ment of a debt. In the latter case the
debtor, though contracting to pay his
indebtedness by labor or service, and sub-
ject like any other contractor to an ac-
tion for damages for breach of that con-
tract, can elect at any time to break it,
and no law or force compels performance
or a continuanee of the service. That
which is contemplated by the statute is
compulsory service to secure the payment
of a debt.
Later and Labrty.
He said that it would perhaps be a
long time before that great appellate tri-
bunal will have the opportunity to ren-
der another opinion so vital to the future
of our country. "It is salutary to the
black man, but to the white man it is in-
initely more so," he said. As to the la-
bor and liberty of every citizen, he said
that the opinion ullifiees tat vicious
principle of the olden time, "Let him take
who has the power, anz let him keep who
Continuing he said:
"It is noticeably true that in a number
of cases of peonage, ready and willing
witnesses for the government are white
men who have been deprived of their
servants because the modern slave
catcher, usually a man of influence and
determination, himself armed, and with
armed followers, would invade the domain
of the small farmer and by violence, the
most cruel, and intimidation the most
reckless, take therefrom the lobarers
whose services the witness had en-
gaged.
"In the absence of nuch law, what
chance has the small farmer in the
maintenance of his rights against the
invasion of his powerful neighbor No
stockade is within the curtilage of his
humble dwelling, no guards armed to
the teeth stand sentinel over his hands,


io pack of trained hounds eager to
strike the trail of the poor victim who,
retrained by lawlessness, breaks away
and runs for liberty and freedom, are
tugging at their chains or yelping in
his kennels.
An Vn-American System.
"Thus it is that the small farmer of
our fields or forests, who, 'far from
the adding throngs' ignoble strife
pursues the even tenor of his way, like
the laborer who is captured and dragged
away, is also the victim of this infernal
un-American, un-Christian system at
which the Supreme Court has now aimed
its destructive fulminations. Nor is it
alone the slave catcher, and slave worker
who is wholly without pretense of legal
authority for his conduct, who should have
a careful regard to the phraseology of
this decision.
"I repeat, 'We entertain,' said the Su-
preme Court, 'no doubt of the validity of
this legislation or of its applicability to
the case of any person holding another
in a state of peonage, and this whether
there be municipal ordinance or State
law sanctioning such holding.'
"Here truly there is food for reflection.
Our thinking may be clearer and the ac-
tion of courts and grand juries and jurors
much more definite when the Supreme
Court has passed upon another case now
pending for determination upon its calen-
dar. That case involves the power of po-
lice magistrates-recorders' courts they
are sometimes called--to sentence to the
chaingangs with felons from the peniten-
tiary of men, women and children who
are guilty of no crime, but are merely
charged with misbehavior, but who have
been convicted and sentenced without
process of law, and often consigned by
the decision of one man to long terms of
cruel, degrading, involuntary servitude on
local chaingangs.
Servitude in Chains.
"That wise philosopher, the late Ben-
jamin Franklin, was sometimes in the
habit of imparting truths by asking ques-
tions. In view of this utterance of the
Supreme Court may we not for a mo-
ment imitate the example of that great
American
"Is servitude less servitude or is in-
voluntary servitude less involuntary
when it is rendered-in chains? Does nqt
the thirteenth amendment declare that
involuntary servitude except as punish-
ment for crime, whereof the party shall
have been duly convicted, shall not ex-
ist within the United States?
"Is it not also true that a petty mu-
nicipal offense like walking on the grass,
spitting on the sidewalk or going to sleep
in a depot, or loitering on the streets and
multitudes of other similar offenses are
not crimes for which involuntary servi-
tude can be imposed? Is it not also true
that for such an offense to sentence, and
hold a man or child for involuntary servi-
tude, is peonage, and that the penalty of
this statute is applicable to the person
engaged in its imposition, whether there
be, in the language of the court, municipal
ordinance or State law sanctioning such
holding?
"It may be possible, gentlemen, that no
case will be brought to your attention at
this term involving this inquiry, but it
may also be well for the profession of the
law, and for the laity also, in view of this
decision and of cognate principles set
forth in the noble code of our national
law, to inquire if men without reeard to
color are not daily deprived of their liber-
ty and subjected to peonage in utter dis-
regard of the laws we have been dis-
cussing.


Arrests for Drunkenness.
"It is not barely possible that many
stalwart farmers throughout our State
have loaded their wagon and hauled
their cotton to market, the cotton sold
and the proceeds collected, are be-
guiled into one of those glittering .places
of temptation and intoxication licensed
and encouraged by municipal government,
there to become slightly disguised with
drink and perhaps promptly arrested,
that 'the pile is sized,' that the fine is
adjusted accordingly, that without regard


Wd r. MI, J. A. 4L CAWaOHO.WO J. W*C06&
Preswt., Vlce-Prmdes. "See. m tas.

Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Mchine and Hand Factories.
8th Street R. R. Croming.a


JACKSONVILLE.


FLORIDA


..NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

,Of SAVANNAH. GA., U. 5. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
Presai

J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
8. A. ALFORD.


A. D covVINGrON,
Ylce-PreswWREn


C. 5. 8.LLI8.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J- B PADGIrT.
J. YOUNG.


Ha J. KAYTON,
searearii Treas-er.


R F. BULLARD
W. C. POWLL.
WALTER RAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. B. CHlrNUTT
G. W. DIEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the 8. A. L. and A. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRrIE aTrrR OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULAR.

s**e********o ******@****a*e*o***********I****e* O

J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,


Headquarters for
P

^ Distiller's Pumping z
S* Outfit
No plant complete without ne.
Hundreds of them a u in Gnor
SFlorida, Alabam, Mini dppi
4, South Carolina. Write s f par
Slhs ann prioen. We also manDuaarn pI
*^ fEngines, Blers aml Hilh .
Grade Macbhery,
as well a earry a full and complete
---soekof--t-
m Ml SuppUes PIpe,
+ B* olUer Tubes, Et.
IH i Advise your wants.
SMacon, Georgia.i

l; or Tkr We for Twr U "th rtinen ,

IIIIIIIII*IIIIIIIIIIIIII*I**ii *IIIIIIIIIiiiiiiiiiiiii,
John R. Yousg. J. W. Mo Ce. B. Parker, James MeNat W. Wiler.
PrssddeBn. Vie-pres. Vice-Pres. Vie-Pr=.. SIee.t u.



John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


: Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.

5 6Savaesnah R~ Brunswick. Ga.
*. I II O 8 I M ls# 1 86 I b 8 48...0 ,


Y~




n mr I Ir -. -. -I -I-~ -


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


to the necesities of loved ones at home
the labors of the year go to the enrich-
ment of the local treasury.
"The alternative to such a man is not
the trifling imprisonment which the law
permits, but months in the infamy and
degradation of the ehaingang which the
law does not permit. It is well for the
public to think of those aggresions on in-
dividual liberty. For myself, I do not hes-
itate to declare that enforced labor on a
local chingang, imposed under such cir-
cumstances, or for any offense not
amounting to crime, is involuntary servi-
tude and peonage in the light of the de-
cision of the Supreme Court of the United
States, no matter what the State law or
municipal ordinance on the subject may
be.
"Mr. Bryce, in his famous work on the
American commonwealth, declares in sub-
stance that the American people have
failed more in municipal government
than in all things else. The fault, how-
ever, is not in the American system, but
in the people themselves. They daily
submit to outrages upon private right and
personal freedom which, if inflicted by the
general government, would inevitably re-
sult at the next election in the change of
its control Aye, more, if the wrongs of
equivalent atrocity were imposed upon
American eitisens by any foreign govern-
ment, if not atoned for, it would result
in declaration of war as soon as Congress
could be assembled.
"Should the Sultan of Morocco or
Abdul Hamid at Constantinople consign
to an Oriental hainng ang p citi-
mns for such trivialities as are thus
daily punished here, before the sun went
down the steel-clad battleship of the Un-
ion would be speeding o'er mountain wave
of ocean to demand redress for the injury
or to avenge the wrong.
Rinht of ltividual.
"I have stressed these thoughts be-
cause I am convinced that aggresions up-
on individual rights have forced the duty
of protecting such rights secured by the
constitution of the Union upon the courts
of the United States. I have long be-
lieved, and have distinctly held, that un-
warrantable aggressions upon such indi-
vidual rights have forced the duty of ac-
tion for the protection of such rights up-
on the courts of the United States. These
conclusions have now received the au-
thoritative sanction of the highest tri-
bunal of the land.
"I speak impersonally. I speak if I
may to quicken the conscience and
enliven that sense of the responsibility
which every citizen bears towards his
countrymen. It is time that the people
should arouse themselves and crush crime
-crush all its hydra heads. No other
crime is so subtle in its operation, more
destructive in its results than that which
degrades the public conscience, until it
can tamely and without protest witness
the unlawful slavery of the citizen.
"Let but peonage continue and be
widely observed and the plastic mind of
the rising generation will become imbued
with principles vicious and regardless of
human rights as those of the Aiab slave
catcher or West Indian buccaneer. Labor
will be degraded because, demanding the
wages of freemen, the workingman can-
not complete with the labor of the un-
paid peon.
Wil All Be Slaves.
The degradation of the white man, and
especially the poor man, will keep even
step with the degradation of the black
man. It is as true now as in the days of
Abraham Lincoln that our Union cannot
live half slave and half free. Let but
this crime continue, we will be all slaves.
We will be slaves to our prejudices, slaves
in that like slaves we tolerate the viola-
tion of the constitution and laws which
we are sworn to support; slaves because
we slavishly fail or refuse to perform a
lofty civic duty.
"Let but peonage be fastened on our
system and all may soon, with Rienzi,
exclaim: 'We are slaves, the bright sun
rises to its course and lights a race of
slaves; it sets and its last beam fall on a
slave.'
"But, gentlemen, the blood of freemen
and not of slaves pulsates in your breasts.
Descending from the Old Continentals in
ragged regimentals fearing not;' descend-
ing from am who rode with Forrest and


Wheeler and Hampton, and fought with
Johnson and Lee; men of a noble strain,
men whose glorious history, from the re-
motest intiquity, has been lofty with
deeds of daring and heroism in favorem
libertatis-in the maintenance of human
liberty. I do not, I cannot dobut that
the great, noble, impartial jury body of
the Southern Judicial District of Geor-
gia, and of every American judicial dis-
trict, Americans all, will stamp out of
existence this monstrous abnormal
growth of recent years, the degrading
and brutalizing crime I have but feebly
and imperfectly described."
NEW MILLIONS INVESTED IN THE
SOUTH.
New Orleans, March 22.-The forma-
tion of a syndicate with a cash capital
of $2,000,000 to take over the holdings of
the D. H. Holmes Company of New Or-
leans is one of the striking and direct re-
sults of the pending construction of the
Panama canal and forestalls the wave m
commercial activity which has already
set in on account of this stupendous in-
ternational project. The announcement
of the deal was confirmed by the fiscal
agents of the new syndicate, the Hibernia
Bank & Trust Company, and by the deal
a concern nearly one hundred years old
passes into the hands of a group of New
Orleans financiers who assert that every
dollar invested is "home capital." Sev-
eral of the men behind the deal are mil-
lionaires, among them leaders of the finan-
cial and cotton markets of the South.
New Orleans is bidding on Panama con-
struction, commissary and other supplies,
and the new $2,000,000 corporation will
now become the largest institution of its
kind in the South and on a parity with
Altman, Wanamaker, Macey, Marshall
Field and other immense department
houses of New York, Philadelphia and
Chicago, and be in position to enter the
Panama, West Indian and Southern
States trade as against all Eastern com-
petition.
Soo,ooC ACID CHAMBER.
The Tennessee Chemial Company Be-
hind It.
An acid chamber to cost $200,000 will
be erected in Albany, Ga., this year by
parties interested in the smaller fertilizer
concerns of this portion of the State.
Application will be made for charter.
The plant will be located just north of
the city limits and will be in operation
the year round.
It is understood that the Tennessee
Chemical Company is behind the move-
ment, which was inaugurated more than
a year ago. About ten of the smaller
fertilizer manufactories in this part of
the State are interested, and it is be-
lieved that the new enterprise will go
through without a hitch. It was knocked
out at least once. by the Virginia-Caro-
lina Chemical Company, which has an
acid chamber and a large manufactory of
fertilizers here, but it now appears that
the new enterprise will certainly succeed.

HOMESEEKERS POR THE SOUTH.
New Orleans, March 22.-Following on
the heels of the $2,000,000 Holmes deal
comes the announcement of the New Or-
leans Progressive Union that a call will
be issued for a convention of mayors of
every town in Louisiana and Mississippi,
to meet in New Orleans at an early date
to discuss the question of turning the tide
of immigration into the South through
the New Orleans gateway. This is the
outcome of the successful effort made to
establish at New Orleans a big Southern
immigration station where the great over-
flow of homeseekers from European coun-
tries can be received, and instead of be-
ing turned loose in New York, Boston
and Philadelphia and the overcrowded
East, can be freed at once in the great
agricultural sections of the country. It
is the purpose to enlarge the movement
so as to include Texas, Oklahoma and
Indian Territory, Alabama, Arkansas,
Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, South and
North Carolina, and even Virginia, de-
spite its proximity to New York. The
site for the immigration station has been
selected at Port Clialmette, just below the
city, and the cost of its construction will
be largely defrayed by the various trunk
lines of railroads centering here.


*.usmuauauauaauumfahmmup miimuaaumiumm


THE DIAMOND!
Wkhslsual and ILetad

Wines Liquors and Cigars,

S*e Agaont fer the lias ar LamaWs a er, als "WMaelns ~uMs Ni-
Creme Wade. We datme e a.S ds nes uSD by M fad i s. e ....s 0 omew
Creme de la Cmem, bottle .... 8-00 Diamond Brand bottle ........ 1M


[' H. -- *" r I I* I Heart Brad, bottle ..........
. C. C. Brand, bottle ........ 150 Spade Bmad, bttle ...........
Club Brand, bottle ........... 1.25 Premium Brd, bottl .......


MYERSON CO.,
M05 a We Wesn t. G
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


'IuuI1gI1gUI1u1gg(g~uIIS1uiiii


Fhml


-75
.AS




32.


EU II EU UUUUUUU U US IEU E


SJ. A. Craig (L Bro.

S239 W. y Strmt EVERTT BLOCK.

SLeadersr in Men's and Bors' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishins.


Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hate; largest stock in the City.




The Bond & Bours Co.
WOLUAL It MLTAIl.


HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, RlHIds. Paints. Oils and Glau.
Stoves. Tinware, Country-Hoiloware.

M WEST JAY 8TT Jacklonve. Fru.

CYPR ISS TANKS
Are Best by Ever7 Temt

thesoa= twSooft(,, ousbqnB
w = w 0e Ift f to"
G. DAVIS -ei SON
mAm tbls a t a Lr el- a y oI Amp.



JSPALATRS. I .LO kIDA


-----------------------------------------


STEWAR.T COMPANY


REAL ESTATE & LOANS-

505 West Bldg. Jacksonvlle, Fla. Phone 1576

Large and sm& ll tramn o o vrtsn timber 0f lsh ttirad. sm.Misdenr s-
cated for R.R. and water trem rtatsM. tN amederss Wlr es. Wait* fr






I a-,e -t Mr. &
T5B UIg trW W mUr Pub .


*1
I


X


p
p


p


James Stewart


.I .Noleed Jr.







6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


BELL PHONE NO. 392 1.


HEDWICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY


A. DP ICfw Manager.


N Formerly of EdIekU a R&le,


sao fnnor vreome a"d adjoining tt o esy nterm. (The choice redodee Portiona
"at ihe =W l unaimjproved ger s former burst dit666 SprigdetiI-, sad
MONEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTORS.



Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Ivseemets iIe ltaeree to55 fa Saa ramnt at tae 'BfwUalw ates:
For week. *3e ae- a Use.
r t tmek. meats llne.
1ior thno wek so OWt a lse.
Pat fe nwt -.. 5 sont.s a lse.
Me wern of ordinary length make one Mae.
Nroj~ except the headman ens ie admitted.
Rtiam~se to aceu* y the d. No xtra charge for o et paper
at i l altbl st. cpay onM be is this o0 ot i ater thTan7 ay
.ornio t wec metln mlaJ paper


PostfM Wauted.
A as stier, very best rsfrenee
d. Add & F. Johaon, Mur-
phy. Fla. 4t
Help Sppmed.
Naval store m en eaa sea help by p-
pi ~to the City Employmet Bureau
8 BWat By treet Jaekrvlfle, Fia.

P I VWurtated.
A poittea as woodman for turpentine
firm. Beterene frinh.ed. Addre sG. E
Mtsom. Sutherland, I.
Wuated.
TWO GOOD MEN WANTED.-A good
woodsman and tiller; must have Al refer-
ese; mut be sober; new place and od
woods; no healthier place in all Florida.
Apply to J. T. MeNell. Wowhltchka Fla.,
or Apal chiola. P


Per Sle.
A good' turpentie location for sale at
oe. 0 ly ben run two years Price
S5la. Addrma J. B. utton, Harri, F.


Wanted.
To buy a rat-el turpeais location
in Florida. Will pay t r for
the right pla. No t d e eed
l. L A. Ptteway, B a oy,
ViMa, 0 .rk tf

wrpe"tlse Mea.
Buy a -a .. aesoil PFumpiiug- Oa.-
St for y stil. Ne. I e1 1 pumps
pale per hrow at a ea of pb= d
lequire. am-M-' whi m "
meb s a V rhlr
State o I enm mss. J. P. 0plD,


W-ted.
Want position as woodman or stiller.
Am married and can furnish best of refer-
ence. Address P 0. Box No. 8, Holder,
Fla.


Ma .W
end an em se r pelateg for the
rpeatdas and semuhzy tb"s ti the
eard sels tIs b a PENN" II y.


mpafgaamfmfufamp 1 mm iue eseses uesssauu u************ *
PRICE LIST OF

Eureka Wine and Liquor Co.
The Great Southern Mail Order House.
zaseU ryuPAIDFm. rVuLL OVAT MseAvsR
Per Pour Six Per
Gallon. Quarts Quarts. Came.
Hatchett' Private Stock ..................4.00 14.M 15.5 $12.00
HatheteW Thear Whiskey ............ ... .. 4..3.60 4. 12.75
Hathetas Old Rye ... .............. .. .. .. .. .3 4.W 12.
Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy ................ 4.75 4.15 7.0 14.00
N. Apple Brandy .......... .......... .. .5 3.5 4.85 .70
Eureka Malt ................ ............. 4.00 4.53 5. 12.00
Zureka N. C. Pach Brandy .............. .. 4.75 4.S1 7.e 14. 00
N. Peach Brandy ...... .. ........ .. ... .. 1.6 4.85 9.70
urea N. C. Corn .................. .. .... .25 2.5 4.5 9.70
Burea N. C. Corn XX ................ .. .. .3 3.3 4.G5 .00
Eureka N. C. Corn. XXX .................. .75 2.75 4.15 8.0
Eureka N. C. Corn, XXXX ............. ...2.53 2.53 2.7E 7.50
Old Crow Ba.rbo. .................. ...... 4.0 4 .50 .5 12.50
Hefrmtae ye .. .A.................. ...... 4.9 4.50 6.' 1U.6
Sunny Brook Bye ....................... ... .1E .5 5.5 11.20 F
Sunny Brook Sour Maah ................ .. .. 1.75 .1 5.56 11.30
Echo Spring ........ .......... ........ .. .. 4.W 4.5 6.M 12.7
Silk Velvet .................. .......... 5.00 5.6 7.8 15.70
Oak and .... ............................ .7 4.00 6.0 12.00
G01 rOM 9.509 TO $5.5 PIER GALLON. DeLuvMrD
Have twelve labels of Hatchett' Private Stock and secure a bottle free.
Have twelve labels of Hatchett' Old Rye and secure a bottle free.
Have twelve labels of Hatchett's That's Whiskey and secure a bottle free. a
Save twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Corn and secure a bottle free. Save
twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy and secure one bottle free. Save
twelve labels of Eureka Malt and secure one bottle free. Prices of all goods
bought at company's store are 70e per gallon less than when delivered. No
charge for Juan, boxes or drayage. A. of my bottles are full measure. All
standard brands of whiskies sold over my bar at 10c per drink. 15
We also carry in stock liquors of cheaper grades. 10
All wines quoted on application.
Bpecal prices In large lots. packed any sises desired. Leaves 5 for you
atisfaction guaranteed or money refunded.
-EULEKA WINE AND LIQUOR. COMPANY.
WI WEST BAY STREET, JACKONVIILLE, FLORIDA.
lsses Nsel esss I I lmlllsse lls11ll lllllso*assee i *saa.ea


1I2 WEST FORSYTH ST.


Wholesal Drugs Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be ld to quote prim
anything in the drug line. We make packed drug a pelty s a y
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.


a__~ -- ------ -s------.Jdl -- !d 'INS_----Sm $ I'S--- -- S _--------- --------
Stand rd_ N vl-----So-----s
Cable Addre-s. Florida


Standard Naval Storesj


GoIrpany.


DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IV

ROSIN

AND TURPENTINE.
JackaonvllU, Fla.


I '


i


The Blount Real Estate Co.,

(Ineorporated S50.000 CaWitl.)-


rll re ad wal tr of Romt Timber, Pho te
S nd Fwming Lands of ad decriptima.
Write as for further Ifonoatrio ant part eras
THE BLOUNT REAL ESTATE CO..
OCALA. Fr-Oi 10o



Joseph D. Christie, Business Agent
mass 3 Wal-3 ell m ai. Jaiaeela, "IM.
Telephoane 4.
If you want to loete in Florida ad contemplate going ito b1elnm, let -
help you. If you have a busineu to sell, list me with me


W. J. LENGL.
Preent.


J1. W. WADS
VlooPrendlent.


11. 5u4Til


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PE3 ACOLA, FLA.


PWA ORlLKAN& LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


A. POWELL. CRAM. & aXis SAMM Y AmA,.
h'ese-Pt. rcsiesut and F01resM. Seinbug.
Diascreits:
a. a. Fwnei afts. a. 8sw. EN. mcmiiha F. L. Dnfhsrkld. i. r. Cormala


TnH


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
@mW ef weet Imy ad Mmss U-- a
Jakseuvllle, FuId.


0000111011111


----


Y--------------- --------- ---------- ------


aouo










THE WRIURY muiaubpIIAL UUCOUD. 7


Florida Bank and Trust Company
Capkl S1,000.000.00. Jaoklonvill. ria.
MDEOTAET or "TAT COuTmY ADT crrT rVUDS.
W. T. OOGACUKl. PrOM.at. W. S. JIUaNGS. Vise P .esit.
W. A. 3MDQ,.Glr. A dHUR PEYB Vim PYreside.
IF. xP. amIGm, Jr., Tr..t Gor
ea ml- eeoI n of iidividuntrlalu o*orporatis and rpay peras
eatu -s es safe deposit bonsk B ay.Vnd sa foreign change
k nes bamtn ofaie
' Aso saoftee, transfer agent, registrar sad filscl agent for OTsPcadm c and
..ai-M-is. Xmatm" an tructs moh as exeeutor, trustee uader wl or appwanet
of oertn tme e and guaeieems

Review or Naval Stores for a Week.

Review of Naval Stores for a Week.


aidea fer the Week at Savanmah.
Price Rept Sales Exp 19
Moan., Mek 2S. .8% 70 0 737
Tues, Mek 2..53 120 86 449
Wed. Mek ..53% 73 50 0
Thr., Mbek ..63% 527 12 325

S o fer th Week at Bavanah.
Monday, March 20. Lst Yea
WW .......... .. .&I16 4
WG ........ .. .. 600 3.
N............ . 4.75 3.
M .............. 4.50 3.
K .. .......... .. 4.0 3.
I .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .50 2
H............ 3.30 2.
0 .... .......... 3.06 2.
F ...... .. .. .. .... 29% 2
E .. ............ .87% 2
D............ .. 2.82% 2
ABC.. ........ .... l7% 2J
Receipts, 44; sales, 0; exports, 798.
Tuesday, March 21.-oasin irm; r
eeipts, 832; sales, 1,053; shipments, 1,W
Quotations: A, B, C, $.77 1-2; D, $2L
1-2; E, $8.87 1-2; F, *S2 1-2; G, $3.0;
$a30; I, $.0; K, $4.0; M, $4.5;
$4.75; WO, $5; WW, $.15.
Wednesday, March 22.-Lon firm; r
eelpts, 421; shipaeats, 85. Quote: A,
and C, $.77 1-2; 1 $ 1-2; ;, $2.87 1-
F, $S 1-2; 0, $.0; 3, *3; I, $3.
K, $6.0; M, $"4.0; N, $4.75; window gla
$; water white, .15
Thursday, Mare 2.-Rosin firm; r
ea ps, 75; ailes, 2; aipsments, 1,97
Qute: A, B and C, $77 4 .8
K, 2.87 1-2; F, *.M 1-2; 0, $.08 1-2;
$30; I, $.50; K, $4.06; M, $4.50;
s$4T; window lass, $; water whit

SavaMnna Naval Stwe Statm at.
Spirits. Bua
Stoa April I........... ,5 44
Reeeiptsa areh 3 ....... 5
Reeipts previously ....14,108 00
Total ................181190 650,
Exports March 23 ....... 326 1,9
Exports previously ......1,235 612,6
Totql ............... 100,5 614,5
Stock March 23 ........ 11,630 35,9
tock preioasly ........ 5,30 48,0


Bailey & Moatgomy's review.
04 'iew ork, March 22, 1906.
58 Spirits Turpentine-Stock, 1,402 barrels.
68 The market during the week has again
58 been very steady with an advancing ten-
58 dency. Mobt of the present stock in yard
belongs to one holder, therefore, stock in
first hands is light with that exception.
r. Thursday, March loth-56%c. steady.
O Friday, March 17th-56c. steady.
70 Saturday, March 18th-56%c. asked.
50 Monday, March 20th-66%c. asked.
35 Tuesday, March 21st-56%c. steady.
30 Wednesday, March 22--7c. asked.
g5 Rosin--tock, 14,330 barrels.
70 This market is also steady and business
65 fair. Stock of all kinds in first hands
0o remarkably light.
55 AC, $2.95; graded, D, $3.05 to $3.10; E,
50 $3.10 to $3.15; F, $3.20 to $3.2; G,$3.30
50 to $3.40; H, $3.60 to $3.70; I, $3.80 to
$3.90; K, $4.40 to $4.50; M, $4.85 to $4.90;
N, $5.10; WG, $5.30 to $.35; WW, $5.45
e- to $5.50.
0.
B ORANGE GROVE LOOKING GOOD.
H, The orange groves around Bartow are
N, looking good, and with but few exceptions
the trees show but little evidence of haV-
ing passed through severe cold.
. Indications of new growth are apparent
Sand the trees in many groves will be in
bloom in about ten days or two weeks.
2; Among the many groves In this vicinity
0; which weathered the cold so successfully
s is that of Hall & Richards, now owned by
Mr. H. C. Conner and others. It is in fine
condition and gives evidence of a heavy
crop for next season. There Is conadera-
ble fruit yet In this grove of the June
. bloom, and it i In good condition.-Courier-
0; Informant.
N,
, METROPOLITAN TALKING MA.
CHINE CO.
VICTOR
S TaiUhi Machiisse a l enssi D rs.
SWrite to Metropolitan Talking Machine
'5 Co. for catalogues of Neb Records and
Machines. Victors only. Largest jobbing
house in the South.
Agents wanted in every town. Retail
72 trade served. Old records exchanged.
12 N. B.-Columbia, Zonophone and Vic-
Stors accepted.
84 Metropolitan Talklind
Machine Co.
16
1 3ss Main St, JACKSOWVILLE, 7LA.


THE ARAGON
JACKSONV.L. rLIA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 90304 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS


19004 1190-02 1901-02


cptSa s. ... .......... ...............
Rodn., b&is..............................
Total .. .... ... .. ......... .. ........
oepoign
U casks.......... .. .. .. ........
bbis- b ....... ................ .........


Ro-iud bbisB ...... ........ ..... ............
New York
Spirits cesk............** *............


S cask ........... ................
R b ...........................


844,685


762,270

98,864
U8,171

85,668
87,863

9,8651
M.7TM


* 292496
i 940,607


I 29,480
I 975,428

S06,100
504,178

S41,76
138,121

$7,560
S387,784


814,8X4
1,071,446
1,386,780

814,876
62,687

217,446
586,042

68,7M7
129,060

48,0633
9S,#8
alr


The soesiph of Ipek an Iss die han39 by 9,4 cas, and of u.t 39,549W hbs

Crop of Spirhs and Rosaiu fia These Yem
GI US41L 1: UM amSu
@0i *. husea. Reds. iis.
= =ri. .... .. ... mini am I1s Uwe Iow
am.......... 116,1 U14M apff 266F iM 1*1,30
e.. .. ........ Iru NI @I'm AM TOM SAN am
NoOlens.. ........ MAY Us36 Sun IS"= AN O&
Yarsadl .. .. .. ...1... SAW d" so&mum u
New (kle..... .....1f 15.1 1311 1%6MW 5.S su.n6
cenmbeib......... ...ds Sw at Su JOANJ 8 mow
Qees& eva... .......IA' 46,10 s 13m81 4US li k 1,
Pmesb.~i...........,5 111,18 5,55 13.368110 36
Tamps...... ........ dines 0,1ON65 MU S
.l........... JOAN mru U5.U8 simWa 3*6,3


Impet f Turpentine to United rl ,
From official returns; ewts turned into barrels at 320 ewts, 4130 kilos,
1900 1901 100l 1M
From United States ................. 174,446 193,42 155,12 143,81
From France ......................... 2,283 850 1,56 4,0
From other countries ............... 840 3 004 516
177,560 196,341 157,8l 148,7
Russian Turpentine .................. 8,521 ,861 8,711 17J,
Total barrels ......................... 186,000 201,0 1 ,33 106
Percentage of Russian .............. 44.57 3.41 6.4 106
Average price of Ameriean ........ 3-4 27-1 33-1 42-2
Reported by James Watt & Son, London, England.


100 EM.


11


U-
147,370
17,76


1&076
41-2


COMPARATIVE PRIC W 2FIRflAh SVATAENA 103 WlI YEARS


April 1 ....................
April 8 ..................
April I .................
April ..................
y 1 ....................
May ....................
May 12 ...................
May 20 .................
Juay ....................
June 17 ...................
June 14 ..................
July ..................
July ....................
July i ...................
July 2 .................. .
July 28 ....................
Aug. 14 ...............
AuC. 12 ..................
AN. 1 ..................
Apt. .................
pt ...................
Sept. 1 .................
Sept. ..................
&at a ..............
OT3 7 ....................
Oct 14 ....................
Oct. 21 ....................
Oct. 28 ...................
Nov. 4 ....................
Nov. 11 ...................
Nov. 18 .. .........
Nov. 256 ..................
Dee. 2 .....................


RD

16%
46%


54%1
61%


62%
01%
53%
52%
52%

611%

01%

53%
53%
48%


48%
U"~k
13%j
Uir
11%
5%r
81%
81



IS
45


1901-01
ND
49%
'7
45
46
47%
47%
S0
4o%


4%

4%6
4r%

2%
81
sy

-
34
54%
56%




M%
66

56%


45%
*%
43





4'
45
45%









46%
47%





43%
43%




45%


84

n%
31A4N
n
N
311
21%


36%

32%




36%
25%
34%


W%
n
3'
26%
34%

34"
13%
34c


u--1

4g
4

47







44
4$
-





I




,i


27
4%


41
40

30


OTEL ROSELAND S.s m -9 .................... ..... .% .
HOTEL ROSELAND r--- -- 2 1M 37S% D e
Ilsb c... rrTs.t D.d pFa y Setol Dee. 30 .................... 4% %
JACKSONVILLE,E FLA. Jan. *..................... 7% 4 r7% 7
cVedore 0 8amme8t. Unexcelle d emaiNIe Northera ooo. Specia rates. r10 to ~8s
ir to ol, Ai entea Ia. IiBustrate booklet me. Cr nga to ostrih farm Y
We"=dk sHadquarters for Naval stores me, llmbfrmet tl Srore aU Y0f wC
forr mrra g= A. 0. wK OwLMy oor F ihY


_c.~.;.,--*------ ;----------. ---I------. ------F---- ---~-- -- I-----.










8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


NOTICE OF APICATION FOR CHAR-
TER.
Notice i hereby given that the under-
signed, oa Mondy, the 24th day of
Apil, 1906, will apply to the Hon. N. B
Broward, as Governor of the State ol
Florida, for letters patent incorporating
the undersigned and their associates into
a orporation under the laws of the State
of Frida, to be named THE JACKSON-
VILLE DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, the
proposed charter of said company being
as follows:
PROPOSED CHARTER
-OF-
THE JACKSONVILLE DEVELOPMENT
COMPANY.

The undersigned iororator hereby
associate themselves together for the pur-
pse of forming a corporation under the
laws of the State of Florida, and adopt
the following articles of incorporation:
1.
The name of this corporation shall be
THE JACKSONVILE DEVELOPMENT
COMPANY, aad its business shall be con-
duted in the'State of Florida, and in oth-
er States of the United States of America,
and in foreign countries, wherever neces-
Mary or convient. The principal office
of the corporation shall be located in the
City of Jacksonville, Florida.
The general nature of the business to
be transacted by said corporation shall
be to own, buy and sell, mortgage and
convey, ease and sub-let, operate and
control and deal in lands and rea estate,
houses, ofce buildings, factories, ware-
hoiesphosphte and other mines, tim-
ber, ad timber and turpentine lands,
farms and cattle ranches; and to manu-
facture and market, buy and sell and
trade in, both far its own account, and as
factors, brokers or commission merchants,
at wholesale or retail, naval stores, dry
goods, groeries, hardware, cotton, phos-
phate, fertilia., cane syrups, cotton
seed oil, soap, brick, lime and building
material, ol, e lumber, timber and agri-
cultural products, grain and provisions,
and all kins of merchandise and prop-
erty, and to conduct all kinds of manu-
faturig ad mercantile business; and
to conduct the business of mining, mill-
lag aad marketing ore, phphate and
mira, and any and all products and
by-produeta thereof; and to act as brok-
er, factor or agent, in the purchase, sale,
lease, management and disposition of real
property and the products thereof, and to
own, operate, hire, rent, ase, build, main-
tain and use, dwellings, warehouses, fac-
toris office building stores, wharves
ad docks, elevators, storage facilities,
turPtie stills, machinery, reaneries,
engines and boilers, mining machinery,
artesian wells ad all other kinds of
buildings and machinery advantageous
for the conduct of its business; to grow
battle, sheep and live stock and engage
in farming; and to buy, build, sell, lease
manage, own, ntrol, hire, charter or
operate vessels, tramways, railways,
lighters, steamboats, engines, cars, horses
and vehicles, pipe lines and all kinds of
transportation, for the purpose of trans-
portig the property or products owned,
held or controlled or manufactured by
said corporation, but not to use the said
means of transportation for the purpose
of doing the business of a common car-
rier; to advance money and loan upon
the security of real estate, bonds, mort-
gages, insurance policies, shares of stock
or commercial paper; to act as fiscal
agent and trustee for other firms, indi-
viduals or corporations, and certify and
guarantee bond issues, and to receive de-
posits of money from estates, persons,
firms or corporations, and hold the same
in trust, and invest the same and collect
and disburse the income thereof; to buy
city, country and suburban property, and
improve the same, and sell it upon instal-
mets or otherwise; to sell, mortgage,
sub-let, pledge, hire, lease or convey the
property of said corporation, or the whole
or any part thereof, at the discretion of
the Board of Directors; and to borrow
money, issue bonds, notes or other obli-
gations, and secure the same by mort-
gages, deeds, pledges or any other kind of
latru-meat; and to make contracts of any
kih whatsoever for the furtherance of


Sits purposes or business; and to subscribe
for, purchase, receive, own, hold for in-
vestment or otherwise, sell, dispose of
and make advances or loans upon the
stocks, shares, bonds, securities or other
obligations of other corporations whatso-
ever, wherever located or originated, en-
gaged in or pursuing any one or more of
the kinds of business, purposes, objects or
i industries indicated therein, or owning or
holding any property of any kind men-
Stioned herein, or of any corporation hold-
ing or owning the stock or any obligations
of any such corporation, and while the
owner of any such stocks, bonds or other
obligations, or holding the same as col-
lateral, or in trustor otherwise, to exer-
cise all the rights, powers and privileges
of ownership thereof, and to exercise all
and voting powers thereof; and to make
such by-laws in furtherance thereof as
may be necessary or advantageous, and
generally to exercise all such powers as
may be necessary or convenient to the
purposes of the business of this corpora-
tion, and to have, exercise and enjoy all
the rights, powers and privileges incident
to corporations for profit, organized,
chartered and existing upder and by vir-
tue of the laws of the State of Florida.
3.
The amount of the capital stock of said
corporation shall be Two Hundred and
Fifty Thousand Dollars ($0,000.00), to
be divided into ten thousand shares of
the par value of Twenty-fve Dollars
(*25.00) each. Payment for said capital
stock shall be received only in cash, but
stock subscriptions may be payable in the
manner and at the times determined by
the Board of Directors. The corporation
shall have a lien upon all shares of stock
of any stockholder who may become in-
debted to the corporation, either for the
amount unpaid on his stock subscription
or any other indebtedness whatsoever,
with the right to sell and dispose of such
stock or such portion thereof as may be
necessary to pay such indebtedness, at
either public or private sale, and upon
such notice or terms as the Board of
Directors may determine, and with the
further right to refuse to transfer such
stock until the full payment of such in-
debtedness.
Ten per cent of the capital stock shall
be subscribed and paid in cash before said
corporation shall be authorized to trans-
act any business.
4.
The term for which said corporation
shall exist shall be ninety-nine years.
5.
The business of the corporation shall be
conducted by the following officers: A
President, a First Vice President, a
Second Vice President and a Secretary
and Treasurer and a Board of thirteen
Directors. The offices of Secretary and
Treasurer may be held by the same per-
son. The number, of Directors may be
changed from time to time by the by-
laws, but shall at no time be less than
seven nor more than thirteen, and the
Directors shall be annually elected by the
stockholders. The above named officers
shall be elected by the Board of Directors
from among their own number. The
Board of Directors, by a resolution passed
by a majority of the whole Board, may
designate any convenient number of Di-
rectors to constitute an Executive Com-
mittee, which committee, to the extent
and in the manner provided by said reso-
lution, or in the by-laws of said corpor-
ation, shall have and may exercise the
powers of the Board of Directors, in the
management of the business and affairs
of this corporation, and shall have power
to authorize the seal of the corporation
to be affixed to all instruments. The
Board of Directors may appoint subordin-
ate officers of this corporation, having
such powers, duties and terms of office as
they may deem best. The President and
First Vice President shall ex-officio be
members of the Executive Committee.
The Board of Directors shall have full
control over the actions of the Executive
Committee and may at any time annul
its powers. The annual meeting of the
stockholders shall be held on the first
Monday in May in each year, but the date
thereof may be changed by the by-laws.
The by-laws can only be adopted or
amended by a majority of the outstand-
ing stock, voting in person or by proxy.


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JAOKSONVILLE. PLA.
CAPIrAL $300000 SURFLM ad UImVID D ROFS M S4I4760.
We iems Timo Ceslaates of Depodt, wbich draw ,erst at taA ap uetoe w wpere
remain, ifUh betyday or loser. Takeo sdvr-mtafssi ffewei ets.
mmtb f-r P ruutearl MMu tolaa p IideoOnlo-T-'lr.wM -e-o- -Il es e-k


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARtH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Order filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINOAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Herbert A. PFd, Oe. H. PeFt P. L. Wms.
President. Vice-Pmr. Cahier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITAL, $50,000.00.
DInucvons: L. Anderon, R. S. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Chritaan, Gee.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Acmunts dof Turpentine Opertors and Sew MKI Mea S@Ulfd.




The Wire Virgin Gum Co.,
4 Is now ready to giv O all the formation you may want smea t
way we are now gathering vi i gum from high bes. By the e ad
Stin lip put up dloe to the sippi and o arranged to mau the gIa to
Strike wire and foUow ame dow to the box, ot trikin the fe a t
: tree. Wire s fastened am by two small ails, oe jt e t he b ad
Sthe other at upper edge of te bo ad started tight so as to h-sp
gum from dripping of, thereby making virgin gum and m at It. T
are many besati and big pay where parties am get a good many high boems.
* For further information write to
THE WIRE VIRGIN GUM CO. TIFTON. GA.
meaa a a a n sa mmmi i e ma eam uia me>


The West.Raley-Rannle Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jackseuvlle, fl.
A. N. Wsst, sre. Ar. Ries, rVic-Pres. N. r. fasb. ee res.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sel your prop ty.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

---- --- ---- ------------- --*** ******************* *


M. A. BRIGGS, Presehet.
H. C. BEIOGS, Ls Vi~-Preident,


RONER BRmOWN, 22d VICs-PIMAl L
. 0. MODONALJD S"ey snd Tftes


W.H. Briggs Hardware Co.

VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-


RIXFORD AXES.

They are the BCST. Others imitate but none du-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the finest
temper, hold the keenest edge. eat better and last longer
than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual use.
Seud as your orders.

W. BRIG6S HARDWARE COMPANY,
Vadesa, Ge"g80.
- - - - - - - -








THn z wU miDn DU3TJAL RUQND. 9


JOHN S. rRANZ. Agent















Samil'I P. Holmes & Co.
Ste s





r ri a Pr





NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CUICAGO MARs OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
LEcal stoea and boada a .peeialsy.
DA bold Saf8 e LMw Blck.
J*B AW.o N !v(- ratde Io-
Sam P. Holmes& Co.
tOsG. e a Ctton,
Graln oanl Provham

NEW TOM GOTTEN EICHANGE
CHICAGO BOAR Of TRADE
Direct priate wire to all ex~~~,.
stoalP an d bonds a aleialty.
bn h PLrue 853 Bfldwi Block
lM DWNUXANCNI- mIme.A
krb~ills.


MY I MITINERT
comai..ionh Merchants
Ns6vmI Stores & Cotton
ZrmI Cnrdpn b -=Nto
-omn -CUN mXr 6
NONW YOMMr.


A ^. eAIN01069
-111104" FLA.


The first annual meeting of the stock-
holders shall be held on Monday, the 1st
day of May, 1906, in the city of Jackson-
ville, Florida, for the purpose of electing
officers, adopting by-laws and completing
the organization of the corporation.
Until the officers elected at the first
annual meeting are qualified the business
of this corporation shall be conducted by
the following named officers: H. A. Mc-
Eachern, President; Edwin Brobston,
First Vice President; J. A. Hollomon,
Secretary and Treasurer. H. A. MeEach-
ern. Edwin Brobston, J. D. Lawrence, J.
A. Hollomon, W. B. Owen, C. E. Garner,
D. T. Gerow, Archer S. Hubbard and Ray-
mond Cay, Directors.
7.
The highest amount of indebtedness or
liability to which this corporation may
at any time subject itself shall be twice
the amount of the authorized capital
stock.
The names and residences of the sub-
scribers, and the amount of capital stock
subscribed by each, are as follows:
Number of
Name. Residence. Shares.
H. A. McEachern..Jacksonville, Fla 200
Edwin Brobsto ...Jacksonville, Fla 200
J. A. Hollomon.... Jacksonville, Fla 200
W. B. Owen.......Jacksonville, Fla. 200
C. E. Garner...... Jacksonville, Fla. 200
D. T. Gerow...... Jacksonville, Fla. 200
Archer S. HubbardJacksonville, Fla. 200
R. Cay............. Jacksonville, Fla. 200
J. D. Lawrence.... Jacksonville, Fla. 200
State of Florida,
County of Duval-as.
I hereby certify, That on this 22d day
of March. 1905, in the State and County
aforesaid, before the undersigned, a No-
tary Public in and for said county and
State, personally came H. A. MeEachern,
Edwin Brobston, J. A. Holloman, W. B.
Owen and C. E. Garner, to me well and
personally known, and severally acknowl-
edged and declared before me that they
executed the foregoing charter as incor-
porators of The Jacksonville Develop-
ment Company, in good faith and for the
purposes therein expressed.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set
my hand and affixed my official seal, the
day and year last above written.
(Seal) R. M. SASNETT,
Notary Public, State of Florida at Large.
My Commission expires Aug. 29th, 1905.
CLYATT GIVES A SUPPER.
Celebrates by Giving Entertaiment to
a Number of Frienda.
Tifton, Ga., March 2.-Captain Samuel
M. Clyatt celebrated his victory in the
United States Supreme Court with a
Dutch supper to his friends here Thurs-
day evening.
The decision of the United States Su-
preme Court was in favor of Captain Cly-
att, sending his case back to the North-
ern District of Florida, where he is again
to be tried before Judge Swayne on peon-
age charges. The first trial went against
him, and it was to show his friends how
glad he is that he is to have another
chance that he gave the supper.
Fully 500 people from Tifton were
present, besides prominent turpentine op-
erators and citizens in this section of the
State.
Colonel C. W. Fulwood, in a hair-rais-
ing speech, explained that Captain Clyatt
had made preparations for the entertain-
ment, and wanted all of his friends to be
present and rejoice with him. Colonel
Fulwood was one of Mr. Clyatt's attor-
neys from start to finish, and his remarks
were loudly applauded.
The table, forty feet long, was supplied
with the most appetizing viands that the
market afforded. After luncheon cigars
and light drinks were served and other
%peeches listened to, among them one from
Judge John Morrow, which was appro-
priate to the occasion. Mr. Clyatt was
seized by the crowd and placed on the
platform, from which he made a short
talk.
Mr. King and Mr. McClain, two travel-
in men, sang several comic songs, which
contributed to the merrymaking. A song,
composed for the occasion by Mr. Joe
Stump, was sung by the author and re-
ceived great applause.


SMERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing
Still Boilere and Pufmpe
0 SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
SJcktonville, Fla.
$S111saee sate e IS B eeIIeI sellae4uega 8 e ehee
WILLIAM A. BOUR rJAMES 0. DARBY


WILUAM A.BOURS & COMPANY

Hay, Graln, reed Ormat


Grits, Meal a Fertllzer.
OUR MOelT: ft re 10 1 18sl eed.


CatMlm Fes


206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FlA.


Cummer Lumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES end CRATES.


I $8tandrd Cloth89in Compn0y 880
Standard Clothing Company!


One Price


44 00


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FUJRNIS"Ems,
17 W" 19 Wef Bay st. ,hsoinyw, FWMIL
li tstoosd Eaves Nets. Special Attle Olves to Nag Order..


I. TOLALR


J. H. NART. T. n. ULAHLYV.
(Established lr72.)


4. IL TOLAR, M


TOLAR, HART & CO.,
160 FRONT 8 I rema I, NEW YORK.

Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Narl Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Store and Cotton. embers of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


J. D. WEED Z CO.,
AVAMNAN. GOroGlA

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Blattles, Etc.


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. K ENSON


I I II I II










10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

er i.ed Pleima..e

-ik 1f:en .-d I-1m Any-r. m



The uasiJ im a"d Company.
Jn~ira mvii. fla
Dium DIhdrral sas U ee Coinsaes a



AdJafet. 0s6 dai m asn. Ge
Entered at the PoetoMee at Jacksonville,
ai., as second-clam matter.

Adopted b the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operator's Association.
ertember 3k U as its exclusive official
orran. Adopted in annual convention
September I, as the oran also of the gen-
eral amoodatin.
Adopted April ath. 1is as the official
orga of the Interstate Cane rowers' As-
socitito. Adopted Beptember i, 1~5 as
the only olicial organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
reoluion adopted by the Georgia Sawmil
Assciation.

OOPY FOR ADVERTIBaNG.
Advertslag copy (chaies or new adver-
tisenmenta) should reach us Tuesday morn-
Ina to mm-rs ertita in the issue of the
same week.

TEQ RECORD' OPPICEaS
The publihiag plant and the main offices
of the adutrl Record Publlshing Co.
are located at No. 8. Hogan street,
Jackaonvile, Ma., in the very heart of the
great taplta amd yellow ine industries
Tbe Atlata, a.., oaome is located In the
Equitable Blllajin No. I. Atlanta is the
Other of the great manufacturing trade of
the entire Death.
The savamah, a.. sU is In the Board
of Trade Buoald ag anavvh is the lead-
lig'open naval stores market in the world.

R P. TO lPATMU&
An nn-n f far agtig-ag i s- bi-
mm tUla ani .Uat theiet
mus toh mae a~t t the hem a e




Nt Takam e owi the totaled
nea who an an at emmn timn mast







valuatioa of all ral and persoaml prop-
erty, ale ie to thi d telegras
Iadmmei Nmen Publtihlag Cs.


FLOUIDA VALUATIONS
The statement from assessment rolls of
1900, in the office of Comptroller Croom,
at Tallahassee, showing the total asse

erty. including railroads and telegraph
limes, by countie, will be of interest to
readers of The Industrial Record:


Alachua.. .. .......
Baker.... .... .... ..
Bradford...... ........
Brevard.. .. .. .. .. .. ..
Osioun.. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
Citrus. ...............
Clay. .................
Columbia... ..... ....
Dade. ..............
De Soto.. .. ..... .
Duval.. .. .. .. ....
Esrambia. .. ..........
Frankli.......... .. ..
Gadsden.............
Hamilton.. ............
SHernando.......... .. ..
Hillsborough. .. ........
Holmes .
Holmes. .... ..........

Laayette.. ............
Lake ...............

levy..................
IAberty .............. ..
Madison.... .. .. .. ..
Manatee.. .. .. .... .. ..
Marion. ..


Aggregate
Valuation.
* 4,905,040
850,002
1,800,008
,939,155
1,195,410
1,263,222
1,121,054
2,229,254
4,120,149
3,178,783
12,251,461
6,647,053
890,377
1,286,968
1,517,932
1,104,483
9,759,128
998,112
2,314,447
.1,637,555
1,140,830
2,344,707
1,687,092
2,5(A183
1,718,087
960,223
2,123,171
1,959,403
4,453,129


GREAT GATHERING OF OPERATORS AND A MLIJON DOLLAR
EXPORT COMPANY UNANIMOUSLY AGREED UPON.


One of the most enthusiastic conven-
tions of naval stores men ever held under
one roof in the South gathered in the
Board of Trade rooms in this city yes-
terday to discuss the advisability of
forming a Naval Stores Export Company.
There were producers from every section
of Florida, South Georgia and from points
west of the Alabama river, representing
approximately 300,000 barrels of spirits
based on this year's prospective produc-
tion.
These operators were called by their
factors to advise with them and with each
other regarding the export movement,
and when over 300 men, every one of
whom was personally identified with the
industry, gathered in the auditorium, the
success of the undertaking was more
plainly demonstrated than mere words
can explain.
It was announced by the factors that
for good and sufficient reasons, which they
explained in detail to the audience, the
contract which has heretofore existed for
two years between the exporters and fac-
tors was not renewed at the conference
in Savannah ad that in their judgment
the time and opportunity had arisen for
the organization of an export company,
to be owned by the operators and factors,
by which the product could hereafter be
distributed to the consumers of the world
through their own organization. The an-
nouncement met with a spontaneous re-
sponse of approval, and without a dis-
senting voice in the great audience a reso-
lution was passed declaring in favor of
the organization of the proposed company
with a capital stock of $1,00,000, and
pledging not only the support in a per-
sonal way, but their factors were in-
structed to sell their products to their
own export company.
Several prominent producers discussed
with ringing enthusiasm the desirability
of such a course, and as the motion was
put to a rising vote, first ascertaining by
roll call the credentials of every person
present, every man in the hall was on his

The subscription books to the proposed
Naval Stores Export Company were then
opened and the operators present came
forward in order and subscribed to stock
on the basis of $2 a barrel estimated on
this year's production. For forty-five
minutes the operators were signing these
lists and several hundred thousand dol-
lars of the stock was subscribed during .
the session of the convention.
A committee composed of W. F. Coach-
man, chairman; J. P. Williams, John R-
Young, C. H. Barnes, J. E. Harris, W. E.
Summer, R. .L Paul and wv. M. Toomer,
all of whom are leading operators or fac-
tors, was appointed to procure the re-
mainder of the subscriptions, prepare ap-
plication for the charter and otherwise
proceed with the organization on the lines
established by the convention, to the ef-
fect that operators shall have 75 per cent
of the stock and factors 25 per cent.


Monroe.. ............ 1,84,915
Nassau.. .. ........ 2,215,574
Orange. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3,976,701
Osceola.... ......... .. 11,512,613
Pasco.. .... .. ........ 1,507,088
Polk.................. 4,297,501
Putnam.. 2 .....,707,5A
Santa Rosa ............. 1,813,937
St. Johns...... ........ 2,728,575
Sumter.. .... ....... 1,502,531
Suwannee. ............. 2,564,959
Taylor. .... .. .. .. .. . 1,326,287
Volusia. .... .. .. .. .. 3,822,636
Wakulla................ 710,20M
Walton. ............ .. 2,156,219
Washington.. .......... .2,022,395

Total.. ......... ..$117,064,840
The above table shows the aggregate
valuation of property by counties for pur-
poses of taxation, and shows a net in-
crease over the valuation for the previous
year of $5,731,106.


The certainty is that the stock on this
basis will be even more than subscribed
and this company will control not less
than three-fourths of the entire naval
stores production of the United States.
The convention was in every way har-
monious and adjourned after the most
important move ever made by operators
in their own interest without a dissent-
ing voice as to any feature of the great
work accomplished during the session.
The meeting was presided over by A.
Sessoms, of Bonifay, Fla, one of the
largest operators in the State, and James
A. Hollomon, of Jacksonville, Secretary.
A convention of the shareholders in
the Naval Stores Export Company will be
called as soon as preliminaries entrusted
to the organization committee are com-
pleted, for the purpose of electing a
Board of Directors and the directors in
turn elect the officers of the company,
whereupon the $1,00,000 corporation,
with headquarters in Jacksonville, and
with tank facilities at all of the Atlantic
and Gulf ports will be ready for business.
This is in many respects the most im-
portant industrial and commercial move-
ment ever taken in this city and means
a great deal for Jacksonville For the
turpentine operators it means that they
are now in control of their business from
the time that the raw gum is dipped from
the boxes until it reaches, as a finished
product, the consuming demands of lbhe
world.
Operators realize that the exporters,
whose interests have frequently been an-
tagonistic to the producing interests, will
make a bold and aggressive fight for their
lives, but as the operators control the
products, which must be distributed, and
are determined to distribute them through
their own corporation, they see nothing
but success for their movempet.
This is a day of corporation and the
factorage houses in the South are now
practically owned by operators, and in
becoming their own exporters as well as
factors, the producers' trade chain is com-
plete.
In this movement the operators and
factorage houses are one and the same
and all the factorage houses are corporat-
ing with the same enthusiasm as are the
men in the woods.

The Southern Supply Dealer' Conventin.
Savannah, Ga., March 20-The final
meeting of the local entertainment and
reception committee of the Southern Sup-
ply and Machinery Dealers' Asociation
was held last night at the De Soto and
the programme which was outlined at the
last meeting was adopted.
The convention will convene here on
April 25 and will last through April 28.
About 350 delegates from all over the
South and West will attend, and it is ex-
pected that a large number who are not 1
delegates to the convention will visit the
city with the delegates and increase the
number of visitors to about 500. The De
Soto will be the headquarters of the dele-
gates.
After the meeting the members of the
committee were tendered an informal
banquet in a private room at the hotel
by Mr. Clifford Wharton, of New York, a
who is a traveling salesman for The I
National Tube Company of that city. I
The officers of the association are:
President, Peter E. Blow, of Knoxville; 1
Vice President, C. H. Briggs, of Dallas;
Lnd Secretary and Treasurer, C. B. Car-
er ,of Knoxville. The entertainment
features of the programme which will be
arranged by the local committee, are of
m elaborate nature and could hardly be a
improved upon.
The first session of the convention will
e held in the banquet hall of the De Soto
nd the public will be invited. It will ii
'pen with a prayer by Rev. W. A. Nisbet, 8
astor of the Wesminster Presbyterian n
church, and an address of welcome will si
e delivered by Colonel J. H. Still, Pres- n
lent of the Chamber of Commerce. The p
response will be made by the president, ti
?eter E. Blow, of Knoxville. Mr. William r,
ffilmot, of New Orleans, will deliver the t
address of welcome to the manufacturers b


and this will be responded to by Mr. W.
M. Mix, of Wishawaka, Ind.
The report of the entertainment onm-
mittee, which will be read by Mr. George
V. Denney, of Savannah, will end the
business of the session. In the afternoon
the convention will re-eonvene and the
minutes of the Old Point Convention will
be read The president will make i m-
port and the report of the executive
Committee will be read by Mr. H.
Briggs, of Dallas. The secretary ad
treasurer will read his report and that
of the Transportatio Committee will be
read by Mr. J. J. Dimeway, of Atlanta.
The reports of the Manufacturs mad
Grievance Committees will be read by
Mr. John G. Christopher, of Jacknville,
and Mr. Tloamai G. Hyman, of Newborn,
S. C. The Nominatin, Auditing and
Resolution Committees will be appointed
at this session.
The entertainment feature for this day
will consist of an automobile ride for the
ladies. They will leave the DeSoto in the
afternoon and all the points of interest
in Savannah will be visited. At night the
delegates will-be entertained in the dining
room of the DeSoto with a smoker. Musd
will be furnished and several informal ad-
dresses will be made.
SOn the morning of April 2k, a. bsinas
session will be held at which the Npmi-
nating and Auditing Comnittees will make
their reports. The new president will be
elected and a discussion on the Executive
Committee's suggestions will take plae
In the afternoon the delegates will enjoy
an excursion down the river on the Me-
chants and Miners Transportation OCr-
pany's steamship Iexington, which haa
been tendered by the company. Refresh-
ments and music will be furnished am the
excursion. At night an informal re
will be held in the dining room of the De-
Soto. A feature of the beaquet will be
an address on the "Reign of the Dema-
gogue," by Hon. John Temple Graves, of
Atlanta.
On the morning of April 27 a joint
session of deale and v.- nf-dtfw will
be held. Open discussion will be held o
the following subjects: "What has been
the practical result of the estaliahmest
of minimum prices by the afatu-
rers?" and "Is it to the int of the
dealers to have manufacturers establish
minimum prices?" These discussions wil
be opened by Mr. Joseph W. Wll, of
Quiney, Ill., and Mr. William G. Simmaos,
of Nashville.
In the afternoon an executive semmi
will be held at whih the following pa-
pers will be read: "Methods of Fhng
Catalogues in the Office," by Bayless Iee,
of Memphis; "The Southern Supply Deal-
er-His Worst Ememy," by Thomas ritte,
of Chattanooga, aad "Our Salesmn," by
Forbes Liddell, of Montgomery.
In the afteron there will also be give
a trolley ride for the ladies. The ma
will leave the D oto sad will ead at
Mrs. Bammon's at Thunderbolt, where lumh
will be served. At night a daaen will be
tendered the ladies and the delegates at
the DeSoto by Messrs Watson & Powr
Refreshments will be served and the eand
march will be led by Mr. Charles W. Mar-
in,.Jr, of New York. On the morning of
April 28, the honorary members will be
invited to a session. There will also be
in executive session in the afternoon.
The delegates will be speiay notified
hat on the opening day of the onventio
meeting will be held in the gentlemen's
parlor of the DeSoto for the purpose of
perfecting a permanent organization of the
manufacturers and their representatives.
t is hoped that at this session the rnum -
acturers will effect an orgaization to
vork in conjunction with the Southerm
supply Dealers' Association. The after-
moon and night of the closing day will
e spent at the Casino at Thnderbolt
nd the delegates will enjoy a dinner and
vaudeville performance.
The eergia Inter-State.
Yesterday was the day set for a meet-
ng in this city of the Georgia Interstate
lawmill Association, but owing to the
meeting of the Florida Railroad Commis-
ion being paotponed until March 28, the
neetiqg of the Sawmill Association was
ostponed until that date. The associa-
ion will have a hearing before the Rail-
oad Commission, and endeavor to have
he increase in rates on lumber removed
y the Commission.


I I


_I I










__ THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11




TE CHRISTIE GROOVER oDaW.,

WHOLESALE DRUQISTS.
.r~ wrnm a w1 io a wz. IT..




GUY'S BOWLING AND BILLIARD PARLORS.
120-122-124-126 WEST FORSYTH SlK LLi. JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.
ah r e w fam e y 4Ves e r i mors mway.


BMg Devdopnunt rompamny is Organtwd-


A quarter of a million dollar develop
meant company for Jacksonvillel Thi
News, made public to-day for the first
time, will erete a startling interest, mno
only in thi city, hat throughout the en-
tire State. The Jacksonville Development
ompy s the mami of the ew corpora-
tio, ad it is offered and manned by
an agregtio of the leading apitli
and businsu men, not only of Jackson-
ville, but of other various sections of the
South. The formation of such a company
illstrate the gat faith in Jacksonvile
held by the moneyed interests of this
eetion. That the company will be a
shaeaal -see from the beginaiag,
a=d will -be frum this time on the lead-
ing factor i the boiling and development
interets of this ity is vouched for by
te character of the m who are actively
behind the mnvemnt. It isoe corpora-
tion which has hroaght the man of wealth
and the man of limited mean together,
side by .de i a common eause, amd a
some one said in discussing the company
to-day, "it i the first great corporation
organed here that gives te ll wage
earner the same i tment opportunities
as the capitalt."
DemOn d for Steck.
The stock sumbeription lists have only
been out a few days, and yet actically
all of the stock has alre been sub-
cribed, and so popular has t been that a
million dollars worth of stock could be
written if the capital had been placed at
that amount. As to whether the capital
stock will be irmaesed, however, remains
for the stockqhde to determine at their
first annual lsetin, n Monday, May
1st.
There are already over 300 shareholders
and among them are such men as H. A.
MeEachern, W. F. Coachman, C. E. Garner,
Edwin Brobsto, Judge W. B. Owen, Dan
iel T. Gerow, Archer 8. Hubbard, J. A.
Hollomon, Clonel Raymond Cay, Edwin
W. Lane, Dr. Henry oiso, Arthur F.
Perry, George W. Wilson, P. L Suther-
land, W. R. Carter, E. West, Leopold
Surchgott, John Upehureh, D. H.H McMil-
an, J. A. Craford, W. B. Clarkson, C. B.
Rogers, E A. Champlain, A. D. Coving-
tn, V. Covington, 8. B. Hubbard, Jr.,
W. C. Powell, J. H. Caoby, J. C. Little,
John B. Young, of Savannah; C. Down-
ing, of Br swik; T. C. Hal, of 00oa;
John H. Powell, of Ocills Ga, and scores
of other rerestatives of great wealth
and business sumem.
To BuSl Hmes.
The principal business of the company
is to build home and sell them on terms
of easy payments, and in this manner
serve the double purpose of providing a
home for the homeless and a savings ac-
count for thobe who otherwise might nev-
er accumulate anything.
The compsay', capital stock is $250,000,
divided into 100. share of $25 each. Pay-
meat for the shares of stock is to be re-
ceived only in cash, and the payments are
to b ade in motly instalments, ma-
turing the stock in wo years. It is pro-
vided that 10 per eat of the capital shall
be paid in cash before authority is granted
for the company to transact business.
The term of existence of the corporation
is ninety-nine years.
It is provided that the officers of the
comny rare to be a president, first vice
ps t, econd vice president, secretary
and treasurer, and a board of thirteen di-


* rectors. The Board of Directors is em-
i powered to designate an Executive Comr
mittee.
S OfficeMs the Company.
Until the first annual meeting the offi-
cers of the company are as follows:
President, H. A. MeSachern.
First Vice President, Edwin Brobston
Secretary and Treasurer, J. A. Hollo-
mon.
Directors, H. A. MeEachern, Edwim
Brobston, J. D. Lawrence, J. A. Hbllomon
W. B. Owen, C. E Garner, D. T. Gerow
A. S. Hubbard and Raymond Cay.
Inspire Cofidence.
The names of the officers and directors
will at once inspire individual confidence
in the great enterprise. Mr. MeEachern,
the president, is one of the moat pro-
gressive men in Florida. He is vice presi-
dent of the Consolidated Naval Stores
Company, a director of the Florida Bank
and Trust Company, and is identified with
a number of successful business enter-
prises. He is a man who stands for busi-
ness integrity and honor second to no
man in Florida. Mr. Brobston, the vice
president, who it is also understood will
be the manager, is one of the most suc-
cessful real estate men in the State. He
is progressive, enthusiastic and a man of
great force and ability in his profession.
Mr. Hollomon, the secretary and treasur-
er, is one of the most successful business
men in the city, and a man of great per-
sonal popularity. He has succeeded at
every enterprise with which he has been
identified.
How Company Was tarted.
The organization of this powerful com-
pany, which is to be a great factor in the
development of Jacksonville, was brought
about by a number of far-seeing business
men realizing that on account of the won-
derful growth and prosperity of Jackson-
ville, there must in the immediate future,
be a tremendous enhancement in valua-
tions of suburban land. Also,. that there
is constant and growing demand for
houses that can be had on terms of easy
payment, such as are supplied by the great
companies in the large and progressive
cities of the North and East.
It was considered that while individ-
uals have constructed hundreds of houses
during the past year, they do not seem
to cover the field.
In order to encourage the people of mod-
erate means and the people working for
small salaries to become investors in this
company and participate in the profits
and benefits, the company will not permit
any large holdings of stock. It is the
purpose of the company to protect its
stockholders against manipulation by pro-
viding that no one stockholder is entitled
to hold more than $5,000 worth of shares.
For the purpose of popularizing the
company and its subdivisions, it was
deemed to be desirable that the stock
should be held as widely as possible. As
a result, a large number of persons have
secured stock in this company who never
before had an opportunity to own stock
in one of the great companies organized in
Florida during recent years. The object.
has been to provide means by which an
investment that will yield a revenue pro-
portionately as great as that received by
the rich individual.
No Forfeitures.
As before stated, the payments for the


St. George Hotel

EUROPEAN PLAN.

RoomS: 7k5c, "M d S" Am' -
P1MB 31j.

MRS. QEO. W. BROCK,
pnOPRIETNEIM.


~- SLW W333 rni
UOIra. (T lmasah r IIn 1L8.)
OLD HARP WIIAMS-Pure Who Old
Rye. By the gallon (.-; four all quart
$.66, express prepaid.
EOO. J. COLEWMA-Pure Pamsylvaia
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By ths galo
1.5; four full quarts .S.I express pnald.
-IA X, tBY--P-Ure Sublllrnln Rmunr
Whiskey. By the galloa t .t : our fll
quarts 4.3,% express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RB --By the BgallU .5;
four fun quarts t. expreu prn~ d.
S OLD KENTUCKY COBR-Diret trem
Bonded Warehouse; ne and od. By the
gallon 3I.; four full quarts 82.5 m, e
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB COOR Rlch
and Mellow. By the sallm I.M; tor full
Squares .L, exprem prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskes In the market
and.will save you from I to a per eant on your purchases Bend for price t and
catalogue. Maled free upon application

The Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Company.
MACOK. GA. D lIRJUNGIM LA A


shares of stock are to be made in monthly
installments, maturing the stock in two
years. In this company there are to be no
fines of forfeitures. In many building and
loan and other companies, by reason of
fines and forfeitures, it hae been discour-
aging to the small wage-earner, who in
the past has tried investments with them.

It is provided in the charter of this com-
pany that such subscribers as have fallen
by the wayside before paying in the full
amount of their subscriptions to the point
where they will be entitled to receive a
stock certificate, shall at the end of two
years be paid back the money which they
have paid in, together with 4 per cent in-
terest for the average time, or be given
paid up stock for the amount they have
invested, at the option of the company.
Bufidihg Pka.
As to the building, plans of the com-
pany: It is a well known fact that few
individuals who purchase a house already
built are satisfied in every particular with
the plan of the houses which they pur-
chase, but are compelled to be satisfied
with them because of their inability to
construct a home to their own notion.
Under this plan the company will permit
would-be purchasers to select plans with-
in limit of the cost desired, and after the
purchaser has paid into the company a
sufficient amount to justify it in doing so,
it will build the house on the plan selected
and upon easy terms of payment.
Assured of Sccess,.
The necessity for a company of this
kind exists and has existed for some time
in Jacksonville, and now that such a
company has been organized by such reli-
able and responsible business men, it is
assured of success, for individuals will be
willing to enter into an agreement with a
company that they know can sad will


cay out all of its agreements.
The company is purely a eonstrtion
company, and is not a building and loan
company in any sense of the word The
plan upon which it is organized is a popm-
lar plan and there has been a great de-
mand for shares of stock.
The company doe not propose to create
a boom, but will work to prevent a boom,
for fictitious boom are always harfuL
The city is growing steadily, but the
is no boom and no boom is wanted.
The shareholders of the company repre-
sent men in every walk of life. Many per-
sons are anxious to get into the company,
for they realize that it gives a man of
limited means a chance to realize on his
investments.

SOUTH FLORIDA AND HAWAIL
In comparing the Hawaiian slnds with
this section of Florida, Kirk Monroe the
famous author, says in the Homeseeker:
"The Hawaiian Islands, on account of
their climate, which is said to be the most
delightful in the world, are known as Th
Paradise of the Pacific.' Recently I vidt-
ed them to test their wonderful cellmate
and to make a study of Hawaiian products.
To my surprise I found both climate and
products to be Identical with those of my
own home on Biscayne Bay, at the south-
ern extremity of Florida.
"In. both places the normal winter tem-
perature Is 5 degrees, and that of summer
85 degrees, while both places grew cocoa-
nuts, pine apples, oranges, grapefruit, man-
goes, avocadoes, guavas and bananas, but
the fruits of the Hawalin Islands ae far
inferior in flavor to those grown In the
Biscayne region, while it Is 4, miles fur-
ther removed from the great fruit markets
of the United States."








2 THE WUNIY DODUBVId" RUOORD.


ATLANTIC AND BIRMINGHAM.
Wte for Pssager and right Statim
Purchased at Bruanwick
Bunswick, Ga., March 22.-The desa
for the site for the passenger and freight
terminals of the Atlantic and Birmingham
Railroad was Anally closed here thii
week, after a special meeting of tiu
mayor and eounueil, of the commissioner
of roads and revenues, and a final meet-
ing of representatives of the two bodies
and General Manager George Dole Wadley
of the Atlantie and Brunswick.
All lots desired for the site were pur-
ehased some time ago, but one piece ol
property, owned by Tax Collector H. J.
Read, was the stumbling block, and for
several months the deal has been pend-
ing. The railroad company offered Mr.
Read $7,05 for the land, which he re-
fused. Condemnation proceedings were
then instituted, but the matter was set-
tied to-day and Mr. Bead received $11,00
for his land. The railroad paid $7,05,
the mayor and ounueil appropriated
$1,3g.50 and the commissioners of the
; tn, a like amount, making a total of
There were several others owning prop-
erty desired for the site, and they have
an mold, the entire site costing ,800.
The site purchased for the new passen-
ger ad freight depot is among the most
valuable in the cty. It is located just
in the rear of the Orglethorpe Hotel,
about fifty yards from the water, and is
a lar triangular lot, bordering on three
streets.
General Manager Wadley stated this
afternoon, after the deal for the last lot
of-the site had been closed, that work on
the new depot would begin as soon as
ble. The building will be a very
adome one. The ground floor, of
course, will be used for a passenger sta-
tion, the second floor for the offices of
the company, and, if a third story is de-
cided upon, it will be used by other de-
partments of the road.
The people of the city generally com-
med the action of the City Council
and the County Commissioners in appro-
priting a sum for the purchase of the
site.

WOOD TuPsaPUTw QUOTATIONS.
While the makers of wood turpentine
have not yet reached the stage where a
market for the posting of quotations and
statistics of their product is imperative,
this time is apparently not far distant,
and is by no means out of place to con-
aider now. The Savannah Board of
Trade is the only official body in this eity
where such a market ma conveniently be
established. It is the proper place for
t -ft market.
A impression prevails among wood
spirit men, however, that the interests
ef the naval stores factors and wood
spirits are nimical, and a feeling seems
to exist among the latter that they are
not being reognied. Elsewhere we print
aa Interview from a well-known wood
spirits man on this subject. Our in-
formant was laborin under the impres-
sio that the naval stores men have not
co-operated heartily with the wood spir-
its makers.
For this impression there is no appar-
cut good reason. Persons with knowledge
of the men now in the gum spirits trade
understand they are a successful lot of
business people, practically to the man,
and that they stand ready to join in any
enterprise that would contribute to the
interests of the trade. It is natural they
may not enter into ecstacies at first,
knowing wood spirits to be a competitive
product, but they cannot consistently an-
tagonie a product which is, to a limited
extent, supplying the gum spirits deflei-
ency. The stady working of the pine
forests for the past several years has de-
pleted the timber until the question of
supply has become one of moment, not
just now, but involving a scarcity which
must come later on. Wood spirits prom-
ises to supply this deficiency. It is idle
for gum spirits makers to think of
ehcking its development as a merchant-
able product, for t has already gained
headway that has warranted capitalists


H 10BINSON.Prs. GAILLARD. (OnMer
W. OB.W le-Pres.
Commercial Bank,
State Depentory.
BDANCH: Oms,. Iks. Lak COLt. Pte
Jalsk vle,. -.... florida


ZINC NAILS

Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the dm ymM which wpll not injury
saws when left in the trees.

Saemu INaf C0o.
RW P l t. OW Ye*, WN. Y.
Also Headqirters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc., Slating and Roofing
Nails, waters Tool, Copper Nails and
Tacks.



Thtf Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.




Liquor Merchants

Proprietors


Jaksvlls Bi lll Works

...Agente...


ACME BEER




Anyone Wishing
a limited amount of paper eups to be
delivered from January 10 toFebruary 10,
and as late as March 10 an get them
of Vickers patent by writing-
E. L VICKERS,
TWTON, OEOIRU.


in investing largely in its manufacture.
When the wood spirits men get ready
to have their product quoted on the Sa-
vannah Board of Trade the Cotton Trade
Journal hears from an authorative source
that such an application will be consider-
ed. However, we do not see how they
can expect recognition from this or any
other commercial exchange until they
have joined and become spokesmen in its
conduct. Certain it is that wood tur-
pentine will not be quoted on an exchange
in which few, if any, of those interested
are members.
The companies now actively engaged in
the wood spirits industry are establishing
plants all through the pine belt, contract-
ing to take their entire output as an in-
ducement to their building. This work is
going steadily along. Some of these
companies refine the product on the
grounds, while another will have it
shipped to Savannah, where a refinery is
being erected on Hutchinson's Island.
The outlook for the rapid development of
the industry is promising. The demand
for the product seems ample to warrant
investments, which is about the best indi-
cation of what business men think of its
future.--Savanah Cotton Trade Jour-
nal.


NUBIAN TEA Fr tr urL...r Kmay
BENEDICTA A ie r w-e
CUBAN RELIEF rw c cr.. a

CUBAN OIL A"igLa*' qas tfr C"t, "Mra

A supply of these medicines l what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for prices and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,
cbmainsnaa Temsssss..

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply 0o.
Anthracite, Seam and Blacksmith Coal Lime. Cement, Brick, Patint.
Foot Hogan St., Jackonvie, Fla.


I TLE VEHICLE LHARNESS CO.


Carriages and Wagons
ftribes o ado NA". fisbl. Kels, ftpsss I"rn hIss

rurpeun- 000 MIDw Daise. pWase. "memo, gee. Ssdily. Carts. Mamy
Wage.. Suers A" everylUg kept ft a ab-t-class .losahtWmet.
Largest Dealers As Flas.



SuwinnneSpring Botbd imen finwo 8
waier. Cures RhId InAyiw
mad idulay Trouble. The ma tno
frahia&n wut V4Ahg&-Gi8a Ak
known CT w anm 2 d said by &* Uwe
Oak GdoinWe" aivs[e akn FL%

Jamny~,rl MWL nes. Sas & Ce.
Savameb. G..


41semote 60000*0il loats@ 686689. loss@ go ISSUE III1M
iW. W. CANNES, Pres. W. C. TR)MAS. Manager. C. T. DUDIZY, Oft. &Trea

,1Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale

Hardware

Turpentine. Mill end Phosphate Supplies.



r ~~TAMMPA.. L O LIDA.





DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We ~y ask a caffU. We can abo yon6 a crrct and money
PIIAIGNDg. It is er desir to 'I be ta Mo "room
Daisead dealers i In JcmWV Wea am wpeclalhYito t remd-
c act Bems an dIt--rode Watm and Comm Watches.


HESS 4 SLAGE I143K01y,waw kmode.


_ _









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BECORD. 18


Florida


Electric Co.

anrtrec Bicr EWMf
Sell and I-tall Complete lectric Light
Mad INw POlat, Telephone Ex-
chnrges. Whoal-e Electrie
Supp-e.



T CANNON COMPANY


BARRELS



STANDARD

W TINE

WORLD


Use no Other

Ptbs cMedesitly Bcted
Home O Oic UITMAN, GA.
U L A.


UM k1 WlB l iA.
XUILm AND DI rIBn IN


ENGINES. BOILERS.
oetum, Bw, tlrMm. l and e Ie m-
My, nd fa and r q pk.
CAPAITrY M O HARN.
M1110 Too61 WQed-W%4kif Ma4lrY,
G-UMO PQnky afInS- 1JM GM
WaghisMies, Ga ins,

Pbt aAd BAtl Bride.
aLnat P N^t MI lwarw Heate a

AUGUSTA. OA.


Whiskies,' Gins,

Rums,

from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
COatrollers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van ye-Agents for Jung, Cinein-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Bee.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM & CO.
917 Mal 819 West Bay Street,
J4KSONVILLe, F"L.
LE lea 35SS *W OW 30W
MMwe eamuea ber on em- am-
@ buw"ei to a metoh
a 9 be In". s*es weft* to-anw


"TI~" NAME OF NW COUNTY.
Tifton, Ga., March 22.-A meeting was
held here this week to take action upon
the report of the committee which had
sleeted "Tift" as the name of the pro-
posed new county to be created here.
Colonel Fulwood, besides stating the
object of the meeting, said that the new
county question had originated from Tif-
ton. A vote was taken on the action of
the committee in selecting the name of
Tift, and it was agreed to by a unani-
mous vote.
8. M. Clyatt, Briggs Carson and T. 8.
Williams were appointed a committee of
three to wait upon Mr. Tift and request
i presence at the meeting.
On their return Mr. Tift was introduced
by Mr. 8. M. Clyatt and was greeted with
a round of applause.
Mr. Tift appropriately thanked the
meeting for the honor conferred upon
him and assured them of his heartiest
appreciation. He said that it was his be-
lief that Tifton would certainly be the
county site of one of the counties to be
named at the next session of the Legis-
lature, and that he felt sure that it
would prove to be one of the wealthiest
and most prosperous counties in the
State. After the meeting the visitors
present were entertained by Mr. Tift at
dinner.

A MOVEMENT FOR THE SOUTH.
An important conference was held recent-
ly at the Bureau of Immigration, the
parties to it being Prank P. Sargent, Com-
missioner General of Immigration, and a
delegation of railroad men, representing
the passenger departments of railways of
the South. The conference was held for
the purpose of discussing the distribution
of Immigrants. The railroad men present
were: A. H. Hanson, of the Illinois Cen-
tral; C. L. Stone, of the Louisville and
Nashville; John M. Beall, of St. Louis; W.
L. Danley, of Nashville; W. H. Tayloe and
M. V. Richards, of the Southern Rallway;
W. J. Craig, of the Atlantic Coast Line;
Geo. H. Smith, of New Orleans; W. L.
Glessner, of the Georgia, Southern and
Florida, and J. W. White, of the Seaboard
Air Line.
Commissioner Sargent embraced the op-
portunity to outline to his callers his views
regarding the distribution of Immigrants,
not only through the South, but also
through other parts of the United Statep.
He proposes, if Congress will give him
power, to establish at Ellis Island immi-
gration station in New York Bay a bureau
where arriving Immigrants may obtain au-
thentic information regarding the possi-
bilities of employment in all parts of the
country. Information will be obtainable
at the bureau concerning not only all sorts-
of employment which Immigrants are like-
ly to want, but also concerning the cost
of land in the various States, where it is
located, and what its products are. It is
Commissioner Sargent's idea that States
desiring immigration be invited to make
displays of their products and advantages
in the bureau and, if deemed desirable, to
have agents at the bureau to supply the
immigrants, under the direction of the
United States oflcers, such detailed data
as may be needed.
The commissioner Informed his callers
that he hoped by the adoption of this plan
to. break up, to some extent at least, the
alien colonies now forming In New York
and other large cities, particularly in the
East. He said that he regards these col-
onies, as they are being constituted at
present, an un-American In principle and
dangerous in practice, whereas if the Im-
migrants could be distributed somewhat
evenly through the country and given rea-
sonable opportunity for employment their
residence in this country might prove good
for them and for the nation.
This plan, he pointed out, necessarily
would have to be under the absolute su-
pervision of the national government in or-
der to secure perfect impartiality and
strict honesty in dealing with the immi-
grants. He informed his callers that the
government would not sanction any adver-
tising by Americans in Europe for immi-
gration to certain sections. The flood of
immigration, he said, Is now heavy enough,
the problem being now properly to dis-
tribute the immigrants who annually are
arriving at ports of the United States.
While no definite conclusions were
reached at the conference, the railroad men
expressed their satisfaction with the sug-
gestions of Commissioner Sargent and cor-
dially approved of his plan. They will lend
their aid to secure the enactment of neces-
sary legislation by Congress. Mr. Sargent
informed his callers he thought the South
afforded excellent opportunities for Immi-
grants.-Washington Poet.


Falstaff Restaurant

Fwor Ldie mad G fktlm-

Breakfast a Is erte. Luncheoa 12 to 2:30, 0e. Table d'oht
dinner, 6 to. ., Oysters on half shell. After theater
lunmehs a =psilty.

25 MAIN STREET,
JAcKSONVILLE FLORJD .


TN. I URIW. VWes-res.


Mi- ETML Tress.


SOUTHERN STATES LAD1 & TIIER COMPANY.

invm uM. WEL sedl er.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSON VIU. rL.


#$tIaIIIIIi 860.48 8lllgog ue,----- 699689mm 6ll





AR.E YOU A



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Dafe, RO5M


i'








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

fi~lflt^^^^^^~~1Ey~tfsEJFxxFoa(XX3


Industrial Record's Department of Information


This department is condutd for the benefit of the ubecriers ad advertising patr of this paper ad ao
carge i made fo ar any infmatmwl supplid or ervie rendered. Fill in may one or more the bam following a
you may require clip out and mail to this office ad the um will have prompt atenion

~Tcnrmm.. s.OmL raeftrm e.a.r Mm wm. or A .. rw "n=r. r w a f.e Lad.
DAT" IDDUSTRMIAL RMOD. MJa, lme. ha.
an d"M e. Jeblila. a. am imn s U mes trr as tm -o" -ao
a tt. mtor teW tfowlPr Prefer in Stta of P ras pmt me Ita "- mistir
$i rsepomblo purismo 5mo gus elar Ia n lma.
Sem -L i
leaM "nw wmee -ame ee 10emed. No


SJte SeMAMfl ul t btd lof Mas me wasted ad wbether nw or woomde-b4ded. DATI
aljmeMm Str TUrlwmMl.a wlM- w 'aters.er r Ar lmuIatrM Ester~bs. Frwgummisarwy. w ms MaumubSupml pMe swm r Tagme Mmssw
DAT
IDUMtMAI a JaUedlsmwem, Mlae.
INDUSTRIAL 2000M JasmmvlMe, Is.
Pleso lb tim endasuemd ame rdim as losadm In (mtae or rstlum o
satt) for In tbo eamk tf
I utIhr wk tiatsejsm abost labor comaddtles. tramper. tlna I969tflims
S memmsI- Pe gtire me fe5 om5a5 aM to m 9l8s a br. ye.



ma Yeu ame a smam? AM TI m T MbId of MM Vt?
DATE DAe
IWDUnTRIAL COOMa JihMo s M INDUaMIn L msOnaM JaeamoinMe. mS.
S ave slr* s feMowift o p om gre ,y Jtoematn a to dM la t as nmbawof m Bai-- ear r*pm&r,
sli





as Y"es wmU as Empea a Neam? as en Wnt Emuomgu ?
DATB DAB
lUSRIAgLy uamD Jseavnle, P. INDU TRIAL UOOmD Jadsmyet Bal *
W am to la r ee of Wast a poetl aft








CLIP THIS COUPON!
STO A~tL IADns OF -THBn RORD -

bdm md aesa it he lew. will pey you.

COUPON.
Yoar advertiem wras e l tI& ladSIl eslrd. ime dr



ST INDUTSTIAL BnCORD of JraolhnWle,f U.,n as ava uu. tI, asUoBa'srt art
weeky trde ujou~rL



The Record takem a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser. and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.
_ww w 'gh, -Air^Fsx


- I I M


WWWWWWIaC


VWaIM""161







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RACOQD. -


THE


COVINGTON
JACKSONVILLE, FLA


Co.


lWhole*. salSHOES --
Wolesae : DRY GOODS.


"Success


For Our Customers


is Success


For Us."


ABSTRACTS
Tta la Tax Abhtrets Ma &t.,
of kfr tit. in an par"t of Rorida u
atk h orgia prep" for ownrw sad
iumlil pqarcen. Ormpomme.
selletted.

LHW M TIT JaND TRUST CO.
lwr BgawW BNf, Jaeksonvile, Fla.

WM. D. JONES
IIemmIm s IrMI
FAMILY DRUQQIST
107 MAY *T.
min a ssn.
ODm= YTOUM

Whiskies


,. Wires


COUW1 OF PALE AD MEDIUM = Omr A SAYTAVA WOR TWO TAM


W.W.


DATE
April 1........
April 8.........
Apri 1........
April ........
ay 13........
Nay 0 ........
May 16........
Jmu 1........
July 1........
JuyM 3........
July I ........
July ........
.ly ........
Au. 4 ........
Aug. 1 ........
asu. I ........
Aug. is ........


su
LU
LIS
3.M
Lee
3.W
4.5

4.7
sers
ufj
Ieen


P.M
as

us
LU
US
sis


Lu
Lu
SAM
Us
3"
Us
Ls
us
LIG
Sil


W.G.


3.7<
3J75
au
ase
3JS
3JO

SMA
sm
4.10
4.15
4.A
4.M
'4M
'er
4SM


a z


1908-O
S.4
3L4
3.35
3.2%

3.30
Lu
3.10
3.10
310
3.10
310
Lie
LAO
LUse
LU.


P.m am.
3J45 Us
Sil Lu
si 3=%
LU Lu

LU Lu
L3 3Lu
4. LUI
LJ L U
48% LUI


.M UOSO
L3JW
U LI
3.J 3.10
&I0 3L10
UO LuO
L11 3.15
3. 3.M&


am L"u
LIND LU1
Lur Lu
&,2% LU


asn Uam
SLU LU
AM LU
uLs u&

SO LUS
un LU
iLU L
LU LU
us LU


LIN I
a3% MU


I- -
gM, l39 --

uso L5
.3" LN
LI La
LU tL
.U LU%
P--. .%

UB LU
Lu Lu
uso sj

UO Uo
LU LU
UB LU

Un Ua
LU% LU


%~W%~SW ft


F


-mY-


HENRY FREE
Tle OClty Vp.e-DMae Ma
Orde M Imr lathe Southr.
re ia C lay atrest am sox W. Bay.
JACKMElLLLa IA.





BRICK.

cpy of lara 800,000 Per maith.


THOS. G HUTCHINSON
VELW AMOUM ,-Ai U N
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
-- 1. *bm of Trl Il.
1m1o M smseu nL.


F


GETTING'S


...FOR...


FURNITURE


22-30 West Bay Street

JACKSONVILLE


K


ohn= Furchgott= Compan
WHOLESt DALE WLRS 4 *
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS (lEN PROMPT ATENTION
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Y e


Don't forget your subscription to the Record.


Send for

Catalogue


,,







16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


THE

Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville.
-MM MAW3S DMPOUTOY.
CaLtal au Daiphi ............................... 40sacaao
.--.. .............. ..... ........... I -OP |
In .l.dita to our nVi akl bu buine, we maintain a Saviog Depart-
ment, aundr g-me t mi paying intret quarterly
We ha for rt f bit Ba es burglar and proof vaults at r-
om isl, t 'by mosth or yer.

C. H. HARGRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS
Grain. Hay. Feed
Spe ll aMeaMoir to TurpeMtinl aned Sawmill Men's Requalromeait
A FLORIDA IRM FOR FIORzIPIA4S.
514-516-518-520-522- 524-526 EAST BAY SIaKI1
Jacksonville, Fra.


I-


IaO mi-aI saW' A MILL A88ssOcIAs0.
itml m CMlome Pdie Idt fr Meu hastable le4s o. AetMtes at Wie.,
erinl July' 1904.

1 4e6 to Sl .... tO eU1) 44 S O5aO ,18 aS1 0"aq M A M
< to 010 .... IM 13.a 134o 14.00 15.00 17.0 21.00 1.00 3M3 .
to Ite1.... 1Mil U16 14.0 15.50 165 15. 21.00 3MO SAM WA7
1 xl to Sil.... 14.0O 15IM 1.50 18.00 21.0 24M 3 A00 A .5 3. 410.
S%xi to Itls.... IU3 13U 14.0 1.50 1&.50 1.00 m56 M0 M a. 4W.0
10%xUI to 13I1.... 1 43.5 17.50 109.50 .00 125.56 16 M3 48.6
1 l4d to S14.... 14M M1. 3M 22.00 4.5 7.50 1.0M 37A 44.l 57.6
x14 to m1a14.... 14M0 1 4e 1i4s0 2040 2. 234.00 3306 2t 5 Mi0d d.6 a
12x14n to 14314.... 1S IT. 1.0 21.00 23.0 h 0 3M SLAM 43L M.50O
1 zlI to 4Z14.... 0MM 22.W ST W 27.50 31.00 34.00 38. 419 0 4.0 M.
4%xi to IO 1.... 14M 0MO 2.00 .50 2 A 2.00 31.00 30 I.M 40M MI.O
1I%xl0 to J4l1.... .50 M 26.00 32.56 30.00 33.00 37.00 41.66 53.66 U.
i xI to 3:1.... .0I 2 310 35.01 3.0 43.0 4.. 71.0M
%xl3 to 14dl.... 1.0 M .0 r 00 9.00 330 37.00 41.00 45.0f 57.@ M.
14%X1S to l1.... EM 36. 3M 34.00 34.00 38.00 4.00 4M0 M. 7443M


Trms: Not Cash.
palsiare T. 0.3& Cam ltamaush Drunawlek Fernandina aug Jeteuvillh.


McMILLAN BROS.,

florida Copper Works.
Reamesburews of

Turpentine Stills
a m h ""etl mkrs.


Old stills tau in d o in h
new a1 f "Ig t)i"gq the eo-
try a peeIsty. Oderby mil o
or wire will riM prompt attc,
at either of the oamrig woar:
rAYCrTEVI, U. eC.
MMEAMlA


SVMUAL U.
JM~d6ELLFL


sees suamssauaelluusIm Mumuseuussmmusmu


At aI ull a the Goao Ja I**t
ur Mll A tiet-, hed at lTashvlle,

low Ple we o re oehly e- -eive
July 1,136:

Plue. Lwmh i
aGenral Rlm -All lumber meut be
sound, wo -Bufaoture, fau to Sin ad
saw bette, s f-m r ound, oose d
ollow knots. warm and knot hal .
thrk gk hake, or round shakes that
sew the rfafe; .uare adg e, une..
Mberwle speciled. A through shake "I
reby a to e through or eamneted
fa id to i, or ed to ee, or side
to edge. In he mesuremet of drnesed
lhmb*r the wdt a u thiiiish o tho
h ri bi1er. dreing mint ibe ika;
1I than iluk thick shall be me iared

rfA-9InCAT1W.

Flooring aH embroc four and ie
q-rter ih i t*hisa- by thae, to
ansh. iA width. For md aple: 1x3,
4,5 6ad ;A 1'4 4, ,e aM-d .
Boards donl ebrae al thikeM s
umder ao ad a half tches by Meen
iinhes ad up wid, eluding oe and a
half inch in thickness by even i with.
For emPUI: %, 1, 1% ad 1.inchaes
think y heas and Upd wide.
Smiuting Ahall mhses all a i from
two to Ave inhes an thiekne ad two to
ix inches i width. Far example: ize
2x3 rt, Xu4 x6, 23, 3x4, 3, 3x6, 4z4,
4x6, 4xB, ha i atnd tL
Plnk.
Plank hll embrace all ims from one
and oame-half to six itoeM in thireknes.
not including six inches by seven inches
a p width For example: 1, 2,
3 4 43 % 5 *, 4%.. T s&eh
up .a 'i VCdth.


Dlommdm
Dimension soes shall emorlse all sl
6 inehea ad up i Ml--kem by seve



teppi mbrae o to two ail
a hal ima in thi-e by m- iuhe
and up i width. For eampi: 1,
1%, 2 and 2/&x7 ua up. i wdtn.
Naeuh me *or Hitc.
Rough Edge or Fliteh hl ebra all
sies one inh in thiakneeu by eight
inehe and up in width, arwed twa
side only. For example: 1, 11, t, 3, 4
and up thick by eight inches am up wide,
sawed on two sides only.


standad.
All lumber shall be souad, sp ne ob-
jection. Wane may be allowed one-igth
of the width of tho piee messurd aer
face of wane, etadn one-fourth of the
length on one earer or its equivalent e
two or mar cares.
All sixe under nim Indhes shell Uhow
heart entire length em aide or aedge;
ae nine inch ad over shl sow
heart the entire length On two opposite
sides. Wane may be allowed on-eighth of
the width of the pieee m sed aer
face of wane, and etmding one-fourth
the length of the piec on o M ermer or
its equivalent on two or mre earnea.

Seantling shall show heart on two faces
the entire length; other Mis shll show
two-thirds heart entire length n two
opposite side. On not exeedin per
cent. of the pieces, wane ay be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the pieee mea-
ured across face of wane and extending
one-fourth of the length of the piece on
one orner or its equivalent on two r
more erers. ,


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED


LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shpments a Speciaty.
WAT22RTOWN. FLORIDA.


C. IANES Press.


J. I. SIAW. Vice-Prm


mar. JEMWsa, SOs-Tnss


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Stritly a Paredters' Cpauy. Geges,
Grade a We"igts Cuaratee.
Deliveries at Ja'cks is a. Pasela, Fenmi Wldl SImavam
Cerespmi S6 JAC*SO*VILLE FLMM


McMURRAY & BAKER,


Mw Mill n1d Tu1enino nh Ii XBI
We m e d0102 1 t6sls i e ImI I
LJewroe., wpLm. nm armam a e trIn w E"be a sau yoft
m C inlo 01 to WId l IItWrPItme wan a amaiM. stt
target we MaR beat ma wrM" bena e

UI IJACK VILE FLA.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


vol MOMW6M am Nat Z" aSP U9u VAL=E.


Weuld a TpeI- -.- P- ep.s.ee.
l;dl-oIt Yore P


Wiha Aielt Saw M1IN TImwaw
10.000 Acres Saw Timber ........................ 50t 5.00
40000 ................... 50 5.00
50 000 ............... .
26.000 Acres Virgin Timber................
20.000 .. ........$250 t S00
130.000 "
10.000 ..............er A r
192.000 .....


BROBSTON. FENDIG & CO.
mie W.Fe in. J -
- . . . . . . . . .- - --.. . . . . . .


.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


Buyers' Directory

If yous wot maythig eek
trelm tMa eosWMit Nut md
write to tie fi apparuig
thiri. Th Rowrd glarantees
a prmpt rmpom

iMlty Tit nA Trrmt O
ACCOUNTANTS.
T. HuBthimoa, Jacksonville, Fla

AtmlatiL BNa al Bak, Jaavill, F-
omrawdl amo, JTcKanMioe, na.
*0satral NatioMal Bank. 0-1 F1a.
lorida Bank & Trust Co, Jacksonville,
National Bank f Jaomwlle.
80=- AMD CAUSL
Commer Lamber Ok. Jasmvrille, 11a.
DowmIW ANID 9rw-iAnia
Guy's Bowli and Billiard Parlors, Jack-
avDfle, Fk a




& B WY. A, Jarw l. k.
BLoh es O JL. j nfL Ha.
anar CaithI. e, oaonvlo, Fla.
uKahr FearUs afh te Jabeak ia

1aly Mat1ry0M 0. New York Cty.
Tlaur, Hrt & o Nhew York Cty.

aMIty TitL ad Tra.t 0.


J _M -l ON40t CO 6 Jdm-aMavlDe

CROCKERY.
hKight Crockery Ca, Jacksonville, Fl.
arVI.
KBork & Jo, Ja l., JacksonviFla.e, F.
Cbarile-roovr D ru o.. Jacksonvile,

n sa. n J. r

@earGM Pmn tuning C0 Jacksnavile, Fle,.
S t
33" QOUS.-WEW pEAT!




oavi n ta, C. T, e Jacktsoae, fk.
Kaha, Flrehlott & Co., Jackvinlle, bk.
ELECTR SUPPLIES.
Florida Electric Co, Jacksonville, la.












BMra-s4v COa. 0e Jacksevl. 31.
MJrrin COterk ., JaekTBle, la.
WsBamrs Br, J P 8, 8 Ga.





Young Coi, John R., avanah, Ga.
Boars & Co, Win. A., Jacksonville, Fla.

Mph, nT, J cka onvfle, k.a














WAW AR AE.
B a80 B01 00owo, J.S., MXe1.0 Qa.



SMBer & Bp S lya T Ta JM k






s...ame W.v, .tk.








N cU.E OmiJnB
F6ta r Fda 0e, Jaek .vl. A, a. F
Graig & re., J. A, JadmMamfle, 1a.
Kohn, Furehgtt & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
B-a-d0k6, HLA, Jakouvill, fk.
Stlanda Clef Ok. Jwml- Ea.Ik

oledatu dGroe Co., Jak ille, Ca.
Haigrave 011, L JaekORnlle, F1a.
Jahaa. Ca, W. 1, Jaeksonvl, Fll .
WIHaso OIa. J. P, Savaah, G.
Young Co, John R, Savannah, Ga.
Boow & Co, Wi. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
GINGER ALE.
live Oak Bottlng Workas. Live Oak. Fla.
XATn-WWO! W91 3
Kahn, r&N &0 Co., Jmae.fil, JaM.

Un & Oa I (., The, Jadmsavimw Fla.
io Hariwm CIL. W. KV.Ma..ts, Ga.L
Mario. Hardwaw O96 Qsiea 1k.
Toma Hardware Co, Tapa, 1k.
& t Oa I J. D ehvanlh Ga.

Vehicle anod ainM Co, Jackwonvi, Na


HAY AND GRAtI.
Bors & Co., Win. A., JckMrnvill, F
HATS.
ra & Bro, J. Al, JaskaI ville a.
e Co., H A, Jaskmeavll% a.
Standard Cdothi O C., JAskaarTBl, fa.
HOTELS.
Arago, The, Jaekksovle, a.
Hotel Berthold, New Yok City.
Roeland, Jackonville, l.
St. George, Jaeksonvile, ba.
IRON WObXS.
Lombard Irto Works & Supply Ok, Au-
gusta Go.
Merriu-StereMr Ga, JakbmnvMl I&.
Murphy, T., Jaeksorille, Nla.
BehoieM's ons G ., J. 8., m-n, a.
INSURANCE.
Loren H. Green & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

OGreem f & Croby Co., JacksaMrvl, Fl
Hess & Blager, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bhns & Co., Chsa, Jackomvila, Fl.
Hanne Bros., Jaksornvilk, Fla.
Muller, Gus, Jaeksonville, Fla.
Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Lquor Co, Mao, Ga
WrDICreT
Spener Median Co Cattasas, Ta.
Souther WM-ufnetnri (,le,
Fla.
Christie-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville
Fla.
MAPS.
Realty Title sad Triut Co.
MACHnIN WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply o., An-
guata, Ca.
Murhy, T., Jaeksotill, Fl
d eld's Bar Co., J. B, Maeao, La.
MATERIALS FOR i UPsuxsur PRO-

MEATS.
SeholelU* So- Co, J. S, Maeon, Ga

KoLgaa e, Ltd., Ja. 8.Ms as, 7l.
MXTAL WORKERS.
Baker, K1 A., Brunswick, Ge.
MeMillan Brosa, Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co, W. a., Vadosta, Ga.
Marion Hardware oa., Oeala, r.
sehofeld's Bor 0., J. S, Maao, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, FIl.
Weed & Co, J. D., Savannah, Ga.
NAILS.
Salem Nail O., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Baily & Montgomery, New York, N. Y.
BareMJeup Co, The, Jadmmvill., Fla
Cmoiodated Naval Storme Oa, Jaksn-
villeFla.
Standard Naval Btore Co., Jaksonville,
Fla.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York, N. Y.
Union Naval Stor O., Moble, Ala.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Yeung Co., John R., Savanah, Gae.
PAINTS.
Bond & Boura Co., Jacksarille, Fa.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardwre Co., W. I, Valdosta, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Omia, Fl.
Marion Hardware O, al, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens CO, Jacksoville, 1il.
Schoaeld's Born O, J. B., Mam, Ga.
White-Btkslkea Mfg. OC, Bir-i-lgb-4,

TARR 8sTOAmL
NatoUal Tank &6 port Oa, Sranuah,
Ga.
REAL ESTAT.I
Bro ton, Fendig & Co., Jaedkonville, Fa.
Bldnt Real Estate Co., Ocala, Fla.
Christie, J. D., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Soss, J. H, Omal, ha.
Southern a BteM Ind and Timber 0C,
Stewart & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hedricks Real Estate Agency. Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Wet-Raley-Bannie Co., The, Jackonville,
Fla.
SAFES.
Diabold Safe and Lock Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
SEEDS.
Bours & Co., Win. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
8HP YARDS.
Cummer berI br a., Jaeksoville, i.
Merrl-Stevns 0a, Jackmmvill, F a


Covington Thu, Jadmiml. 1a.
STIZA1UBM
Clyde Steambhip C., Th, New York City.
South Atlantic Steamship Line, Jackson-
ville and Fernandin, Fla.
8TOCK BROm8S.
Holmes & o., Suni P., JaIhmri,rli
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A, JskanmTl FhL
TANKS,
Cyprm Tank 0l aMIfe, Ah.
Davis & a, G. M., PBa a, lkA.
Schoield's 8omU Co, J. 8, Ma0, Qa.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Ralt Title and Trust 0R.
.u PsA j-z AFFARATuS.
Chttmaooga Pottery O., Jakmrnwls 1sa.
The Wire Virgin Gum Co, Tifto., Ga.
TUPraUSm IrOCness.
The E. C. Hemmer Co., avrannah, Ga.
TUPsJ &aUs STILLIL
Baker, M. A, Brmswiak, Ga.
McMillmn Bros., Saraak, Oa.
TUxPEKITa s TILL TUD.
Davis & Son., G. M., Pattk., 1f.
TUmPmnaujr VATS.
Davis & So, 0. M, PiaatM, Fa.
MeMurray & Baker, Jaeworf, la.
Vehicle & Harness Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
WATCHKU.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jackmdnill, I1.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, l.


YITMLW 1m LVEU
C Lu mber el Jhaev1br %v N.
Best Oeat Lmber G, Wati twn, m.



Trade Checks

FOB THE



THE INDpSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.

COMMISSARY CHECKS
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

mIstrl recrd Go.


R. 8. HALI. Pres. T. C. HALL, V.P. and Mgr. IJ.. KJ. Kasn Soe. ad Trea.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.



H. A. Renfroe Co.


TAILORS Stetson Hats

Suitl to Order at ReadyoMade Prices Mll Orde& Give Pom Attntol a
439 W. Bay Steet JACKSONVIIJ EFLA.

iilIllII 3 !IIIII 3 I Elma 3ll lll5 I l3i3 lllillllllas


J. P. WILLam, Pesideat.
T. A. JairGa d 2ViePrealdent
H. L. KAo, Secretry.


J. A. G. CAiSO,
J. P.D. DamrT,
D. G Wuit Tra.


- J. P. WILLIAMS COMPA

SU SOU Ia NIM fOi i Ia E I
SMaaOfi o .VJ xv manM, nROOin. .
S ranch -Of fmg ENo r aco@LB., VrL. m 411ek e ery ose n.s,
- ar-tJaC ornt. n@cxoiV=,a, r&LA. f COLUMe A*. .
SNaval Stores Prodcers are Islvted to Comrespo WIth Us.
:--ll3ll33lll3llilllil 31 411111133lll1llllilllllii3llii







Wor a oR. url









"~ My specialty e l woms nd heavy b W is t.
WrTt r fa pr Pim a"e
Ii.. Albaa or An

Job work through the


The L ngt ad Okms Copper -nswt da~ Ga
Works n1 Georgia.
W My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that dot l.


- = b sm im A A


.







18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RBOORD.


T. MURPHY
JACKSONVILLE MACHINE AD IRON WORKS
ENGINER, IRON AND BRASS


FOUNDER AND MACHINIST


Loreenmiw, steamboat, awmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Iren
and Bra- Oastin, and nmahi.n repainof all kinda.
MA-I1 MGO AND OILm S PULLEY AND) SAFI7
A t for tationary Enginass Boilers. Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden-
serai rad ta ad Valv, Centrifugal Pumps, HoM, Belting and Rubber Goods
rB IUUsi UM W AB IA U EtWIET IA EaMLW
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.

The Clyde Steamship Company
1


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
as em t u sl- tm k In b Ctga as N e6 s
I RA LOIRRd &a.bt aa


room lw Tousle
"Worn -a noemt nwag.)


elom a.Bmrvne saw
gal -go commeam aemS mew TOmb.


saturday, Mar. 25, at 3:00 pm*xHURON........Thursday, Mar. 30, at 12:00 1
xMOHICA N.... Friday, Mar. 31, at 1:00 ]
Tuesday, Mar. 28; at 3:00 pm..APACHE...... Sunday, Apr. 2, at 4:00 i
Wednesday, Mar. 29, at 3:00 pm..IROQUOIS.....Monday, Apr. 3, at 4:30
Friday Mar. 31, at 3:00 pm..COMANCHE... Wednesday, Apr. 5, at 5:00
Satuay, Apr. 1, at 3:00 pm..AIrGONQUIN.. Thursday, Apr. 6, at 5:30
Taeday, Apr. 4, at 3:00 pm..ARAPAHOE...Sunday, Apr. 9, at 7:00
Friday, Apr. 7, at 3:10 pm. .APACHE...... Wednesday, Apr. 12 at 9:30
**xNEW YORK. Friday, Apr. 14, at 11:30 i
Saturday, kpr. 8, at 3:00 pm. !'ROQUOIS..... Friday, Apr. 14, at 11:30 i
Taday, Apr. 11, at 3:00 pm..COMANCHE.. .Sunday, Apr. 16, at 12:30 ]
Wedneday, Apr. 12, at 3:00 pm. .ALGONQUIN.. Monday, Apr. 17, at 1:00
Friday, Apr. 14, at 3:00 pm. .ARAPAHOE... Wednesday, Apr. 19, at 4:30 1
*xHURON ....... Thursday, Apr. 20, at 5:00
Teday, Apr. 18, at 3:00 pm..APACHE...... Sunday, Apr. 23, at 7:30
Wedaeday, Apr. 19, at 3:00 pm..IROQUOIS.... .Monday, Apr. 24, at 8:30 1
Friday, Apr. 21, at 3:00 pm..COMANCHE...Wednesday, Apr. 26, at 10:30 i
Saturday, Apr. 22, at 3:00 pm..ALGONQUIN.. Thursday, Apr. 27, at 11:00
xNEW YORK...Friday, Apr. 28, at 11:30 1
Tuesday, Apr. 25, at 3:00 pm..ARAPAHOE... Sunday, Apr. 30, at 12:30
- Friday, Apr. 2, at 3:00 pm. .APACHE...... Wednesday, May 3, at 4:30 ,
Saturday, Apr. 29, at 3:00 pm .IROQUOIS.... Thursday, May 4, at 5:00 1
*xHURON....... Thursday, May 4, at 5:00


--* v ~I arm asad Char lesto. xnsret esly. *--atoa via

TyM CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Euve. Son es mur e.. J .w..Ue Nest. umd W w.vAme m a
was V.6mb aslll at Oobaletem mom Waga.
- .................... ...........R wa. ad.mme
we...em......................... .. ..,r.. feet ml .*wm Sheet. Jab.v..
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
SAEtweem CImeTsmOU JaC Somuta.
*llsmespat Wse. A.s tt. Presaes, Deueers (De Imsu0 a laterStme

STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
is easl te s a a kamw: Leave 5Jaeasnl ameae, Tsebps ad Th arm.
daa o m-. easmba Nseabem, ameavu weems a V.sa. is. a.


a.gs -i........... ...... ..... .. ....... ......... sr. a.
e-a. a ......... . ........ 3 ....... .aw 1MM e .
Sm a. ..... .. .... ........St a............. .......... L e 1i 6 eL
.............. .... ...... .....-e..f cDoA ............. .......... aaM m 1 -
A~m s H ,a. ......... ............s.. e......... ... ............. ...... e e a. a
Ar. l0 a. ................... strprie..................... 6v. ale ,.
GOMRAL PASMNGR AND TICe T 01FICr, 12. W. BAY ST., JACK'VILL.
r. M. IRONMONGER, JR., Asst. Gen. Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St. Jacksonville, Fla.
W. &. 0ro L., Lsal WI. AWLt. 1atvlle. C. P. LOVwLk Amst. apt..J.ak'vt
Poot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
a c AOm Aerr. aL P. A. New Tork. OLYDB IEnjW, O. . e. w Te.t
WinE=. L. mDmU 6 WIS. M . CLYDE a Co.
nal Maensar. General Ages
--- Bolding. ustatf reet Mew Tls.


Knight CrocKery Co.
Dr 4ir"S 1N CROCKERY. CHIMA. GLAUSWAR. TNWARE AND
HOUVE PURNIWUISO 00OD.
Mamd.5t.hsg Aam- 13a-14 Ea ~51
PMri-ca f Lrwa-e -m mes. JsJu r me


South Atlantic Steamship Line


FROM FERNANDINA TO ALL PORTS.
Next mailing to Hamburg about March i th. th mad April Ih.
For rate. etc.. address

NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINAL CO., Agets.
JACKSONVULLB AND FUMNANDIMA.
------------- -HI---- o --------------------
omrpat. mblm LLL At smm i
iRosal, Tar,
i 911 ar, E.C. HEMMER CO.
Cresoae, .. 1MM- ..s. me.
DI ldffffOIem and la bortory.
Dlsldect8ts, .U Z
:Carlleal, Etc. I savAF, ea.
Tu --rpentie Operator whoeo tmber Is se-
STBr w^ *hau are Imnvi ftiedttA IrIof -a Osk
ACETATE O LM to write the y fr
*sgivsringfa full paurticulam sa tbl m asm I

;*******************^**********
I YF m Wart a TurpemM LemU-?
:WIat a SaWIU Leetis?
*Y t Yo y KiMl ef FtorMa LM?
Yu M Bm8050?
.I o o Wt, as J. H. LIVINOSTON & 6ONS,

seeteste: 4 e $to gag0 ;


Im ry~~ l~h-ruru-rrC--Y-hYa..u*YY


lM etropolls


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper m Florida ..


$5.00 a Year $2.o Six Months

Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.


CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE. ILORIA.
r, "..mr- n4manurwmarmeasrerameramnaeanesmamanes..


JS




-I __ _


I------------**** 86t68988lll m Iri gooIsleltlll*l8ll *all-------l-- i --- ..----. 410> 1
C. B. ROGERB, PmBIDmNT. W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, Vica-PxaPsumms. C. H. HODGBON, Sac, and Tas'a.
DIALECTORSIL C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEaehern and J. A. Cranford, of Jackonvile;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.
Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches nl Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensaoola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Ceulst of oe Three.Story Buldlasg, 70x200; one two-story beuldilg. 50x390; mee oae-story beldljel, 80x280,
maklag the largest space of amy Comipay of the klad Is the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Penmacola. Fla., and Ssvannsh. Ga.


so $lio i i i 08 1 $#to ())1~118#1g ols$16401 s86#84 gs l ilso








Two of the Patterns we show in our Catalogue. I
SPECIAL VALUES IN STERLING SILVER..
is.a ^^^


THE Greenleaf &
"Rose" Crosby Compay
Teaspoons, Sgoo per do. an
Dessert Spoons, i$&oo per doz. W ri a
Table Spoon, 23.0o per doz.abuliesu itttb;
Dessert Forks *z.oo per dos.
Table Forks, 623.o per dos.
Desert Knives, So per do. 41 West Bay Stret
Table Knives, Sa3.oo per doz. ack
NO CHARGE FOR
ENGRAVING. ~ ea s" Ie n W poae el do
seda.. safmss. Prompt auttadom to mMi ord


THE
"Germania"
Teaspoons o00o er dos.
Deuert Spoons, I6.So per es.
Table Spoons, 3."o pr s.
Dessert Forks, .6So per ts.
Table Forks, m3.0 per Ids.
Dessert Knives Soo per do.
Table Knives, Oss.o pr des.
WE PAY EXPRESS
CHARGES.


Write for Catalogue
ONE HUNDRED PAGES ILLUSTRATING


Silverware, Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Cut Glass, Clocks, etc.


I'


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings


Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF -

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.

Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.

I MiTL 13 IS DEI IM. RETIIMI II FMIlluI NIOeI I I ME.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED

A Florida Enterprise. Try It.


~