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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00113
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: March 17, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00113
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text











r CORD




VKh1Y IAVAh1 ToRES
IhVa ERD GE ERAh

ilD \O TRIAh FidMCIAI

0 ^ 5WS0PAPER



FROM THE TREE TO THE CONSUMER. A

IN this issue of the INDUSTRIAL RECORD will be found
the suggestion that an Export Company to be organ-
ized in Jacksonville next week by turpentine opera-
tors. This is the final move in making the naval stores produ
cers absolute masters of their industry, and is made at a time
when conditions point to full success. Time was when the
operator's domain was circumscribed to his own operations
around his still. Then he went one step further and became
a factor and financed his own products. Today practically
every factorage house In the turpentine belt is owned by
operators and practically every operator is interested in
a factorage house. To this time, however, the distributing has
been done by an association of exporters whose interests
have, in many cases, been antagonistic to the producers.
Now the producers should take the final step and supply
through their own organization the consumptive demands.
S* 5 They manufacture, they finance and they will distribute.
-a Verily-


OPERATORS ARE IN THE SADDLE.





S Preident, W. C. POWELL; Vice-Presidents, who with the President, constitute the Directory ad Board of Manager, W. OACHMAN, B. P. BUL.
LARD, H. L. COVINGTON, A. MeEACHERN, JOHN KIYOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.
0*


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES

.. COMPANY..


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA, FLA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.


The Consolidated is


Purely


a Cooperative


Company.


Interests are identical with those of the Producers.


The


Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.

YARDS AT JACKSONVILLE, SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA AND PENSACOLA

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.


Its












WEEKLY


INDUSTRIAL


RECORD


PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO THE NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING iN i IIIb i b.

Adobd SLed 1 2. 32,~ bvre~~d Ci d (ciieToqIelm Ouoc zr d ~fwss O&LL oiue d aoid SepL 8 9o. -r A..d ComLss 0a,-l a*.bc .1 abC G~mwd AsaCiDL Ai~ L U. so3 U.
i~

Dedsioa Against the Railroads in

TwoCent Yellow Pine Advance,


The Interstate Commerce Commission
has announced its decisions in the two
now famous cases brought several months
ago by the Georgia Interstate Sawmill As-
sociation and the Central Yellow Pine As-
sociation, which organizations cover
practically all the yellow pine manufac-
turing interests of the Southeast and Gulf
States, and who, as it will doubtless be re-
membered, brought suit before the com-
mission complaining of a two cents ad-
vance per hundred pounds instituted by
the railroads, effective June, 1903, on yel-
low pine lumber from Southeastern and
Gulf State points to Ohio and Mississippi
river crossings and beyond. The decision
is against the railroad interests in the
premises, a majority of the commission
holding that the advance in rates com-
plained of was, and is, not warranted, and
that the resulting increased rates are un-
reasonable and unjust. Commissioners
Knapp and Fifer dissented from the ma-
jority and held the advance not to be in
violation of law.
Of course, the final and absolute out-
come of this decision is yet in obeyance,
owing to the limited powers of the Inter-
state Commerce Commission, and as to
whether the decisions of the commission
may be finally applicable is dependent, of
course, upon the determination of the
court on the points and ruling made by
the commission in the premises; but it is
nevertheless of much gratification to the
Georgia Interstate Sawmill Association,
which was the father and prime mover in
the opposition to this advance, that the
ideas and contentions underlying their
original and systematic opposition to this
two cents advance met with like view by
the Interstate Commerce Commission,
and the triumph of this opposition is cer-
tainly a tribute to organized efforts and
to the progressive and aggressive spirit of
the Georgia Interstate Sawmill Associa-
tion.
Among other rulings is one that the ad-
vance in rates complained of was the re-
sult of concerted action by defendants and
other carriers, and while the question
whether such concert of action is in vio-
lation of the "anti-trust act" is for de-
termination only by the courts, it is the
province and duty of the commission,
when the reasonbleness of rates is in issue
before it, to consider whether the ad-
vanced rates resulted from untrammeled
competition or were fixed by concert of
action or combination of the carriers.
The case has been pending since the
spring of 1903, and has been bitterly con-
tested on both sides. The bill was first
filed in the United States Circuit Court of
Macon, over which Judge Speer presides,
and a temporary restraining order pre-
venting the increased rate of two cents
per 100 pounds from being put into effect
was granted.
At the hearing of the case before Judge
Speer it was held that the court of equity
had full power to enjoin the roads from
enforcing the new rates, but that the ques-
tion of the reasonableness of the rates
should be determined by the Interstate
Commerce Commission. Accordingly the
case was referred to the commission for
its opinion, and the decision Friday morn-
ing is the result.
Ellis, Wimbish & Ellis, of Atlanta, and
F. G. Boatright, of Tifton, the attorneys
for the sawmill association, will take the
decision of the interstate Commerce Com-
mission to Judge Speer, and on the
strength of it ask for a permanent injunc-
tion against the enforcement of the in-
creased rates. They have every reason to
believe that the injunction will be granted
in view of the fact that Judge Speer has


already decided he has full power to issue
the injunction, and only desired a decision
of the Interstate Commerce Commission
on the question of the reasonableness of
the increased rates.
The announcement of the victory be-
fore the Interstate Commerce Commission
will be hailed with delight throughout the
South, says the New York Lumber Trade
Journal, as hundreds of sawmills were af-
fected by the increased rate and forced to
pay two cents per 100 pounds more on
lumber shipments than they did before
the new rate was put in.
The fight over the advance in rates on
lumber has been a bitter one, as the new
rates practically have had the effect of
driving out yellow pine from the North-
west markets and worked a great hard-
ship on sawmill men in Georgia and Flor-
ida. Ellis, Wimbish & Ellis, of Atlanta,
and Attorney Boatright, of Tifton, made
able and exhaustive arguments in the
United States Circuit Court, winning a
victory there, and now the announcement
comes that the Interstate Cdmmerce Com-
mission has declared the increased rates
unjust, unreasonable and excessive. With
this decision of the Interstate Commerce
Commission before him the outlook is
bright for a permanent injunction against
the rates being put in. The history of
the case is well known to all lumbermen.
In the spring of 1903 the railway com-
panies in Georgia and neighboring States
advanced the freight on lumber shipped
from Georgia and Florida to Ohio river
crossings and beyond two cents per 100
pounds.
The Georgia Interstate Sawmill Asso-
eiation, composed of all the large sawmill
plants of Georgia and Florida, declared
that this rate was excessive, unureasona-
ble and unjust and would have the effect
of driving out yellow pine lumber from
the markets of the Northwest. After
much protests and many negotiations
with the railway authorities and obtain-
ing no relief or promise of it, the sawmill
association, through its attorneys, Ellis,
Wimbish & Ellis, of Atlanta, and F. G.
Boatright, of Tifton, filed a bill in the
United States Circuit Court at Macon, and
Judge Speer granted a temporary re-
straining order directed to the railway
companies and enjoining them from put-
ting the rate into effect until the hearing.
The case came up for hearing at Macon
and the railroad companies denied the jur-
isdiction of the court by demurrer and at
the same time filed answers denying that
the rates were unreasonable.
The court held that the court of equity
did have jurisdiction and full power to en-
join, but as the facts were disputed the
temporary order was vacated and the ques-
tion of fact and reasonableness of rate
was referred to the Interstate Commerce
Commission.
The commission convened in Atlanta
and sat nearly a weey in October, 1903,
hearing evidence.
In February, 1904, the commission heard
arguments in Washington, it having taken
several months to write out the immense
volumes of testimony produced on the
hearing.
In all the hearing the railway compan-
ies were represented by their general and
special counsel, men of much learning and
ability.
The commission holds tlat the advance
in rates complained of is not warranted
hy the facts, circumstances and conditions
disclosed in the case, and that the result-
ing rates are unreasonable and unjust.
Among other rulings is one that the ad-
vance in rates complained of was the re-
sult of concerted action by defendants and


other carriers; and while the question
whether such concert of action is in vio-
lation of the "anti-trust" act, is for de-
termination only by the courts, it is the
province and duty of the commission,
when the reasonableness of rates is in is-
sue before it, to consider whether the ad-
vanced rates resulted from untrammeled
competition, or were fixed by concert of
action or combination of the carriers.
The commission further holds that the
test of the reasonableness of a rate is not
the amount of profit in the business of the
shipper or manufacturer, but whether the
rate yields a reasonable compensation for
the services performed. The rates on lum-
ber prior to the advance complained of are
found to have been reasonably high when
compared with the rates on other com-
modities, which are at all analogous to
lumber in respect to value, volume, risk,
cost of handling and other circumstances
and conditions affecting the traffic. Nu-
merous other reasons are stated in sup-
port of the main ruling.
In the Central Yellow Pine ease the
complaint was of an advance of two cents
per 100 pounds on April 15, 1903, except
as to one of the carriers, as to which it
became effective June 22, 1903, in the
rates on lumber in carloads from points
in lumber-producing territories east of the
Mississippi river in Louisiana, Mississippi
and part of Alabama. to Ohio river points.
On September 9, 1899, the rate previously
in effect from May 1, 1894, was advanced
one cent, making a total advance of three
cents since May 1, 1894. The rates prior
to the advance on April 15, 1903, were re-
munerative to the carriers.
Substantially the same rulings are
made as in the case above mentioned, and
the commission also decides in this case
that the advance of two cents per 100
pounds was not warranted and that the
resulting increased rates are unreasona-
ble and unjust.

APPEAL TO THE COMMISSION.
Florida Saw Mill Men Show the Unjust-
ness of Freight Advances.
In accordance with action taken at the
Georgia Interstate Sawmill Association
February 21, the secretary arranged with
the Florida Railroad Commission at Tal-
lahassee, Fla., to hear a delegation of
Florida sawmill people regarding gthe ad-
vance in lumber freight rates, which hear-
ing was had on March 3. There were pres-
ent the following:
F. E. Waymer, Otter Creek Lumber
Company, Jacksonville, Fla.
J. A. McClellan, Jefferson, Fla.
L. N. Morrison. Jefferson, Fla.
W. S. West, Valdosta, Ga.
J. R. Roberts, Roberts Lumber Co,
Moody, Fla.
E. E. West, Jacksonville, Fla.
J. W. West, Valdosta, Ga.
J. B. Conrad, Bond Lumber Company,
Glenwood, Fla.
William B. Stillwell, Southern Pine
Company of Georgia, Savannah, Ga.
J. E. Hudson, Hampton, Fla.
C. H. Lutz, Owenaboro Shingle Com-
pany. Pasco. Fla.
J. A. Dezell, Mt. Pleasant, Fla.
J. L. Greer, Greer. Fla.
Thomas 3M. Hall, Woodville, Fla.
The sawmill people met first in the par-
lor of the I-on Hotel, Tallahassee, Fla.,
and formally organized by electing Colonel
W. S. West chairman and Elwood C. Har-
rell, secretary. Chairman West stated the
object of the meeting, and after consider-
able discussion it was decided to present
a rate schedule to the Commission for
their consideration, which was thought to
be fair to railroads and shippers; it was
also decided that Colonel West, Mr. Way-
mer and Mr. Stillwell should be the
spokesmen for the mill men. The meet-
ing adjourned to 9:30 a. m. and proceeded


to the office of the secretary of the Rail-
road Commission in the State Capitol
building, where they were most pleasantly
received by Commissioners J. L. Morgan
and R. Hudson Burr and Beretary Royal
C. Dunn. Commissioner Morgan acted as
chairman, stating that it was much to be
regretted that Mr. Jefferson B. Browne,
chairman of the Railroad Comminsion,
was unable to be present. Commissioner
Morgan also stated that the commission
was very glad to be able to give the en-
tire day, if necessary, to the Florida mill
men, and requested that they proceed with
the matter in hand. Colonel West spoke
first for the mill men. Colonel West stat-
ed that in view of a large number of mills
having been built with the understanding
that their product would be shipped at
rates then in effect, that it was manifest-
ly unjust for the advances to be made; in
fact, that if the rates as advanced should
stand, it would result in actual ruin of
many who had made investments in the
State; he also called attention to the
weight of Florida lumber as compared
with that from Georgia, saying that it
was much heavier, also that on account of
freight rates to western points it was al-
most out of the question to place orders
in that territory; therefore their output
necessarily went to the East via the ports,
principally Jacksonville and Fernandina,
and the item of difference in water rates
from the Florida ports as compared with
those from Georgia (amounting to $1-per
thousand and more), the Florida mill man
had to stand. Colonel West went on to
say that it was also true that Florida lum-
ber did not bring so much as Georgia lum-
ber, calling attention to reports of Flor-
ida and Georgia mill men at the last meet-
ing of the Sawmill Association, where
there was brought out a difference of from
$1 to $2.50. Mr. Stillwell them spoke, say-
ing that he was at this meeting, not be-
cause he was operating a sawmill in
Florida, all their mills being located in the
State of Georgia, but with a view of as-
sisting his Florida friends in getting a re-
duction in Florida lumber rates. Mr. Still-
well gave the commission some interesting
facts, saying that although the lumber
rates as advanced might be identical with
those in Georgia, still, in view of the fact
that the majority of the Georgia shippers
used special rates, it was not a fair com-
parison. He also stated that in his opin-
ion the Georgia rates should be reduced
20 per cent and that it was the intention
of the association to make such a request.
Mr. Stillwell and Mr. Waymer spoke very
interestingly, certainly giving the commis-
sion food for thought. The commission
asked the mill men quite a number of
questions, bringing out facts that would
be of interest to them in the further con-
sideration of this matter. One signifi-
cant remark was made at this hearing.
Mr. J. W. West, of the Strickland Lum-
ber Company, Kathleen, Fla., who is also
a very large holder of timber lands, tur-
pentine operator and capitalist, statdd
that his concern would build a railroad to
the Gulf if the railroads were successful
in having the advanced rate stand.
On account of the inconvenience of get-
ting to Tallahassee, the commission were
requested to hold the next hearing in this
rate question at Jacksonville; they stat-
ed that they could not say positively, but
thought this would be satisfactory, and
would advise Mr. Harrell, of the Sawmill
Association, later.

As a trophy of the prowess. Meessr Wil-
fred and Harry Masters brought home
from a hunting trip Wednesday two mon-
ster rattlesnakes, one measuring C feet 6
inches and the other 6 feet 4 inches. The
larger snake had twelve rattles and a but-
ton, and the other ten rattles and a button.
The reptiles were killed near Hulett
swamp.-St. Augustine Record.


_ ~ _i_ __II~ I__ __ __5 _~_ ~ ____1 __ C_ _____


s_







4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Forester Pinchot Talks on Forest Problems.


Hon. Gifford Pinchot, chief of the Bu-
ran of Forestry of the United States De-
partment of Agriculture, and who is con-
ceded to be the best posted man in the
United States in regard to forest preserva-
tion and all problems relating to forestry,
arrived in Jacksonville Thursday and at-
tended a meeting of the Board of Trade
Committee on forestry.
For several years the Jacksonville Board
of Trade has been endeavoring to secure
the enactment of legislation providing for
the protection of the forests of Florida,
and the establishment of forest preserves
in this State. With this object in view,
Chairman rving H. Welch, chairman of
the Board of Trade Committee on For-
estry, secured the attendance of Mr. Pin-
chot, and the large attendance at the
meeting Thursday showed that the ques-
tion is one that is attracting the interest
of the leading men in the lumber and
naval stores industries of the State.
As any legal action that may be taken
will have to be in the shape of a law en-
acted by the Legislature of the State,
Senator Telfair Stockton and Representa-
tives H. H. Buckman and S. H. Melton
were invited to meet with the Committee
on Forestry and take part in the proceed-
ins.
Instead of advising the preparation of a
bill providing for the establishment of
forest reservations in the State, Mr. Pin-
chot pointed out that what first should be
done was to provide for a thorough in-
vestigation of the forestry situation by
competent foresters, and then take ac-
tion upon the report submitted by them.
He stated that the Bureau of Forestry
of the national government was prepared
to stand one-half the expense of making
such a thorough study of the subject.
provided the State appropriated the other
half of the amount. He was of the opin-
ion that $8,000 or $10.000 would cover the
expense of the investigation and study of
the situation in Florida and that an ap-
propriation of $4,000 or $5,000 by the
State for this purpose would be all that
the coming session of the Legislature
should be asked to appropriate.
After this matter had been fully explain-
ed by Mr. Pinchot, to the satisfaction of
all present, on motion of H. A. McEachern,
the chairman of the meeting was author-
ized to appoint a committee of five mem-
bers of the Board of Trade to take up the
matter and endeavor to secure an appro-
priation by the State Legislature for co-
operating with the national government
in the study of the forest problems of
Florida.
Nearly every member of the Committee
on Forestry was in attendance, as was
Senator Telfair Stockton and Representa-
tive H. H. Buckman and also a dozen of
leading citizens and several visitors, who
were deeply interested in the subject of
forest preservation.
President Garner, of the Jacksonville
Board of Trade, presided at the meeting,
which was called to order after Chairman
Irving H. Welch, of the Committee on
Forestry, had made Mr. Pinchot acquaint-
ed with each of the gentlemen present.
In introducing the chief of the Bureau
of Forestry, President Garner declared
that Mr. Pinchot was doing a magnificent
work for the preservation of the forests
of the United States. He was a man who
had devoted his life to the forestry prob-
lem, and had secured a national reputa-
tion for his work along these lines.
President Garner then stated that Flor-
ida had more problems, greater problems
and harder problems to solve in regard to
her forests than any other State in the
Union.
He called attention to the fact that
with a total valuation of $85,000,000 for
the exports from Florida for the year 1004,
the value of the forest products was $40,-
000.000.
After telling of the failure to secure tile
enactment of any legislation for forest
preservation by the last Legislature, Presi-
dent Garner dwelt upon the importance of
steps being take to preserve the forests, ,
and then introduced Mr. Pinchot to the
gentlemen present.
Mr. Pinchot's Views.
Tihe chief of the Bureau of Forestry ex- 1
pressed his pleasure at being with so


many representative citizens and having
an opportunity to address them upon so
important subject. He agreed with Presi-
dent Garner that no State was as much
dependent upon its forests as is Florida.
Mr. 1'inehot pointed out that Florida
had a great advantage over many States,
in that its great timber producing trees
were the long-leaf pine, and that it has a
low tax rate on unimproved lands, and
he expressed the opinion that there is no
place where steps can be taken more ad-
vantageously for forest protection than in
Florida.
ie then gave a brief review of what has
been done by the Bureau of Forestry in
other States in making a study of the for-
estry problems, so as to secure definite in-
formation in regard to the class of timber
best suited; the growth of the timber,
what restrictions should be agreed to as
to cutting trees of certain sizes, etc.
That an appropriation of $4,000 or
i.( 000 made by the State would be suffi-
cient for conducting such investigation
and study of the forestry problems of
Florida, was suggested by Mr. Pinchot,
as he said that the Forestry Bureau would
appropriate a similar amount and at
once arrange for the investigation to be-
gin.
The work will all be done by the Bu-
reau of Forestry and vouchers for all ex-
penditures will be returned to the State
authorities, so that the authorities and
the people of the State may know for
exactly what purpose the moneys are ex-
pended.
The work of the forestry experts would
consist of ascertaining just how many
trees should be grown on an acre; the
-rowth of trees per annum; the advant-
aues of not cutting trees below a certain
-,ize and allowing those of the specified
size and under to grow until they have
reached a size that will make them the
,nost valuable for timber; the replanting
of trees on lands that have been cut clean;
the acquiring of lands for forest preserves;
the best methods to pursue to get the best
results in taking rosin from the trees for
naval stores, and numerous other matters
in connection with the forest industries.
He also pointed out that President
Roosevelt was right in declaring that un-
til the owners of the forest lands and
those directly interested in the timber
business take up this matter of forest
preservation, the question is one that can-
not be solved.
A number of the gentlemen present
asked Mr. Pinchot numerous questions
and lie readily answered each question.
Senator Stockton and Representative
Buckman promised their support of any
measure that might be agreed upon by
the members of the committee and the
luisiness men present.
Other Visitors Speak.
W. S. Harvey. of Pennsylvania, presi-
dent of the Empire Land Company and a
nmeniber of the Executive Committee of
the National Board of Forestry, a gentle-
man who owns considerable land in Flor-
ida and who is vitally interested in for-
est preservation, was introduced by Chair-
man Welch and addressed the meeting.
Mr. Harvey gave a very interesting de-
scription of what the State of Pennsyl-
vania is doing in the way of establishing
forest preserves and the benefits already
heing derived.
Mr. Pinchot recommended that a com-
mittee be appointed to secure the co-op-
eration of the State Legislature and the
government t Bureau of Forestry with a
v:ew of inaugurating an investigation of
the forest problems of the State. He
declared there is no question so important
in internal economy as that of forest pro-
tection. .
Mr. A. H. Winchester. of West Vir-
rinia. an extensive manufacturer of lum-
ber, was next introduced and expressed
his views upon the importance of the
work being carried on by the Bureau of
Forestry.
After further explanation by Mr. Pin-
rhot of what is necessary to be secured
in the way of information before the en-
actment of any law on the subject, Mr.
McEachern made his motion for the ap-
pointment of a committee to endeavor to
secure favorable action by the Legislature


W. T. HRIC. J. A. S. CARSON, WO. J. SCOVEL,
Pres siet. VIce-PreslMcat. Sec. and frt .


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Factories.
8th Street R. R. Crodng,*


JACKSONVILLE.


FLOR.IDA


S.. NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH. GA.. U. 5. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
President.

J. P. WILLIAMS.
0. W. SAU8Y. P.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. D. COVINGTON.
Vioe-Prealdent.
DEVTORS:


0. S. ELI
L. SUTHE
J. B PADG
J. B YOUI


.I8. B. F. BULLARD
ISLAND. W. C. POWELL
ETT. WALTER BAY,
NG. A. D. COVINGTOI


H. L KAYTON,
Secretaryduad Trasu r.

J. B. CH ENUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
N. J.L.CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and re
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.




J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
e** $O*****e****S*e*******OOOeO*e*e*t***.**e *$*

I* Headquarters for

*: Distiller's Pumping
S* Outfit.
No plant complete without one.
B Hundreds of them in use in Geoi
SFlorida, Alabama, Mississippi ad
S* South Carolina. Write us for parI-e
lars and prices. We also manufacture
? Engines, Boilers and Hih ?
SGrade Mchinery,
*a well as carry a full and complete
---stockof-
S*; Mill Supplies, Pipe,
*o Boiler Tubes, Etc.
Advise your wants.
'."? Macon, - Georgia. .
1 A Leadl Sipetdalty of id
e* ii of Tak Work for Tierpot Steraw Porp

1 1 **i i *irI1111 1rgh11,11t111* iii *1*11 fin
SJohnaRYoung. J. W. Mott C. B. Parker, James MNatt, W. W. Wilder,
President. Vic-Prs. Vice-Pres. Vice-Pres. See. &Tre s.




John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


E Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.

SSavaunns h L Brunswick, Ga.

t ii*ss*si 8I8 *i IIISo Bts a 10t80,*11 4 aai Aiagi


M


___ ______







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


on the suggestion made by Mr. Pinchot,
that $4,000 or $5,000 be appropriated as
half the expense of conducting the desired
investigation.
The motion was carried and President
Garner announced that he would appoint
the committee later.

THE REPORT OF THE BEEF INDUS-
TRY.
To those who expected the report of the
Commissioner of Corporations to furnish a
vigorous indictment of the leading con-
cerns in the beef industry, the report of
Commissioner Garfield, transmitted to
Congress at the close of last week, will
certainly be a disappointment. It appears
that out of a total indicated slaughter of
12,500,000 head of cattle in the year 1903,
six packing companies killed 5,521,097
head, or about 45 per cent of the total.
The concerns referred to were Armour &
Co., Swift & Co., Morris & Co., the Na-
tional Packing Company, the Schwarz-
schild & Sulberger Company and the Cu-
dahy Packing Company, frequently desig-
nated in the trade as the "Big Six."
For three of the companies mentioned,
the Armour, Swift and Bchwarzachild &
Sulzberger companies, the true average
net profit for the twelve months ending
June 30, 1903, was 99 cents per head, not
including incidental profits. Instead of
the year 1902 being one of exorbitant
profits, as has been commonly supposed, it
was less profitable than usual, and during
the months when prices of beef were the
highest, some, at least, of the leading
packers were actually losing money on
every head of cattle slaughtered, so that
the changes in the margin between the
prices of cattle and the prices of beef fur-
nished in themselves no indication what-
ever of the changes in the profits of the
beef business. Furthermore, the margin
between the price of cattle and the price
of beef in 1903, instead of being unusually
high, was for each half of that year lower
than for any corresponding half year since
1808, and the increase in the margin for
the second half over the first half of the
year was no greater than the similar
change in other years.
According to the findings of the report,
the great prosperity of the country from
1800 to 1902 apparently led to a consid-
erable increase in the per capital consump-
tion of beef. The practical failure of the
corn cropof 1901 induced many cattle feed-
ers to send their stock to market in poor
condition, thus reducing the average
weight per head and the average percent-
age of beef to live weight. As a result,
while the total number of cattle slaught-
ered at five leading western packing cen-
ters during the first half of 1902 decreased
only about 1 per cent as compared with
the first half of 1901, the total live weight
of the cattle slaughtered is computed to
have decreased 4.3 per cent, while the es-
timated dressed weight decreased consid-
erably more. In 1903 the price of cattle
fell very sharply because of a large in-
crease in the supply. The number of cat-
tle killed in five leading western markets
during the first half of 1903 was more
than 15 per cent greater than during the
first half of 1902, and on account of the
increased size of cattle the quantity of
beef produced increased 22 per cent. In
the second half of 1903 the quantity of
beef derived from cattle killed at the same
markets was about 10 per cent greater
than in the corresponding period of 1902.
and under these conditions the price of
beef, instead of remaining at the high
level of 1908, fell during 1903 by a larger
absolute amount and by about the same
percentage as the price of cattle.
As the result of his examination the
commissioner arrives at the conclusion
that the six leading packing companies
discussed are apparently not overcapital-
ized, and that the percentage of profit on
the gross volumes of business, including
hog and sheep products and other com-
modities, is comparatively small. In the
case of one of the large companies the
profits have in no case exceeded over 2
per cent of the total sales for a period of
three years. In the case of another large
company the net profit ranged from 1.8
per cent to 2.3 per cent, so that 2 per
cent would seem to be a fair average.
The profit of private car lines in the pack-
ing industry on mileage is a liberal one,
approximate computations indicating a
net return of from 14 to 17 per cent, but


this profit adds little to the coat of dressed
beef to the consumer, the net profit from
the mileage of private cars being com-
puted at not more than 4 cents per-100
pounds of beef, or say, 25 cents per head
of cattle. Further profits arising from
the elaboration of by-products beyond the
first marketable stage, taken in connec-
tion with those just mentioned, would
add not more than 50 cents per head to
the average 99 cents set forth above.
Of course the fact that the six large
concerns already mentioned slaughtered in
1903 only about 45 per cent of the total
amount of cattle killed in that year, indi-
cates very clearly the existence of active
competition by other companies, in some
places at least. The six principal concerns
slaughter nearly 98 per cent of all the cat-
tle killed in the eight leading western
packing centers, namely, Chicago, Kansas
City, South Omaha, East St. Louis, South
St. Joseph, Fort Worth, Sioux City and
South St. Paul. In the same way they
control a very large percentage of the
trade in beef in many large cities, partic-
ularly in the east. In smaller cities and
towns in most sections of the country, on
the other hand, and even in large cities in
some sections, their operations are rela-
tively less important. In New York the
companies mentioned furnish about 75 per
cent; in Boston, more than 85 per cent;
in Philadelphia, about 60 per cent; in Prov-
idence, more than 95 per cent; in Bal-
timore, about 50 per cent, and in a num-
ber of other important cities their pro-
portion ranges from 50 to 90 per cent of
the total beef supplied. Such cities as
Buffalo, Cleveland, Cincinnati and Indian-
apolis, however, obtain only from a tenth
to a third of their supply from the big
six companies, and in the Southern States
they generally supply less than half the
total beef consumed in the larger cities,
and in the smaller cities and towns of that
section the proportion is generally less
than one-fourth. Except for the beef sup-
plied by the big companies, however, near-
ly all is slaughtered by local concerns.
ROSIN OIL AND PINOLIN.
Rosin oil and pinolin are now largely
used in varnish making, more especially
in the production of printing (bookwork)
ink and cheap lacquers. Both kinds of oil
are recovered by distilling pale French or
American rosin, the pinolin passing over
first and the rosin oil afterwards. The
stills are of iron or copper, which are
charged about half-full with rosin and
then heated gradually. In addition to the
oils mentioned, the products include crude
acetic and combustible gas, the latter be-
in gutilized for heating the stills. The
first runnings of distillate, crude acetic
acid and pinolin are collected together un-
til the density marks 0.890 to 0.892,
whereupon the contents of the receiver
are transferred to a vat, where they are
left for twenty-four hours. The fire un-
der the still is then strengthened, and a
second distillate is collected until the
density reaches 0.930, this being crude
rosin oil. The final runnings consist of a
heavy oil termed "cod" oil, and as the
flow ceases so the fire is damped down,
the residue of pitch being cleared out of
the still whilst hot through a manhole in
the bottom. The pitch is made up into
cobbler's wax or used for lining casks,
and the heavy oil finds employment as
cart grease, whilst the two lighter dis-
tillates are treated as follows: At the
end of twenty-four hours the first run-
nings will have separated into two layers,
the acid underneath. The crude pinolin
is syphoned off and stirred for twelve
hours along with 20 per cent of potash or
calcined soda, in order to neutralize any
acid that may have been drawn off with
the light oil. After settling for another
twenty-four hours the pinolin is separated
from the water and re-distilled in a cop-
per still. The first (yellow) runnings are
distilled over again in a subsequent hatch,
the remainder (density 0.826) being re-
fined pinolin and colorless. The residue
left in the still is united to the cart
grease oil. The crude acetic acid is con-
verted, by means of milk of lime, into
calcium acetate, which is heated to drive
off any tar present and then dried in an
oven, heing afterwards distilled with a
mineral acid for the recovery of acetic
acid. The medium rosin oil is used for
making printing ink and varnishes, which
dry quickly, but are brittle if the propor-
tion of oil is too high.-Farben Zeitung.


l*ovea I Ivotes Be Igoe ll 151 4 11 If* g I Im gmu


THE DIAMOND
W M hd1and Retail

Wines, Liquors and Cigars,

aole Agenta for te Stat fl Lacmmk's Ber. al "Wflh ImaMe X~aI te-
er l Water. We euarantee amU Braids put up by us fuU nesuse em is mwes
Creme de Ia Creme, bottle .... .00 Diamond Brand, bottle ........ 1.00
[ Highly ireme. dm Me]R lasion. ] Heart Brand, bottle .......... .75
C. C. C. Brand, bottle ........ 1.50 Spade Brand, bottle .........:. A0D
Club Brand, bottle ........... 1.25 Premium Brand, bottle ......... .0


MYERSON CO.,
105 t 107 West Bay St Pas 1712.It.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Iwe asml na mammanmn uiilmeli


Iogis IIIeafsseesagoII o


I J. A. Craig (40 Bro.

S239 W. Bey Street EVERETT BOCK.


Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-

ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.




The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE RTAIL


HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints, Oils and Glass,
Stoves, Tinware, Country-Holloware.


IO WEST BAY STJLEET


Jacksonville. Fla.


CYPRESS TANKS

SAr Best by Every Test
Crprsm wait&ands me esotsb at heatemnea
than either ulo s ies t ervio to a ecsag. Imn teb
= we are, rit in the enat Qrnm ftets, wmae
ve e ir prics. We l bae bees disaguia am* f
ableseue a hee smel or i- moral
more than a quarter of a century bold iaat
thla n t an us are better built a wil later.
01 Send for caltkand Paeis.
G. Me DAVIS ft SON
PA LAT A. t SLORIDA




James Stewart 9. HUamsd Jr.

STEWAR.T & COMPANY


REAL ESTATE & LOANS

505 West Bldg.. Jacklonville, F .la Phone 1576
AWSAuLE
Lar s and small bt otf t r Ia r timber tf h Ih grade. meonvaemoam ts-
cated for R.R. and water tra seartlo4s. wt moderate pesrte. Write for
partsculars.




Printing ,or. all Puroses.
S1The Induitrla ReeM d Pu. CO.
JatkavSle, IFt.








6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


CLYATT WILL GET NEW TRIAL.
In the peonage case of Samuel M. Cly-
att vs. the United States, the Supreme
Court of the United States reversed the
decision of the Circuit Court of Appeals
for the Fifth Circuit in favor of Clyatt,
who was charged with "returning" to in-
voluntary servitude two negroes named
Gordon and Ridley. The opinion was
handed down by Justice Brewer, and while
it upheld the constitutionality of the law
for the punishment of peonage, it held
that as the record failed to show that the
negroes had ever before been in custody.
the charge of "returning" them could not
be sustained.
Clyatt, who resided in Georgia, was
charged with taking the men in custody
while they were employed in Florida. The
proceedings, therefore, originated in the
latter State. Sections 1990 and 5526 of
the Revised Statutes were involved. The
court sustained their constitutionality,
saying:
"We entertain no doubt of the validity
of this legislation or of its applicability
to the ease of any person holding another
in a state of peonage, and this whether
there be municipal ordinance or State law
sanctioning such holding. It operates di-
rectly on every citizen of the republic,
wherever his residence may be."
Calling attention to the charge in the
indictment, the Justice said:
"It was essential to show that Gordon
and Ridley had been in a condition of
peonage, to which by the act of the de-
fendant they were returned. We are not
at liberty to transform this indictment
into one charging that the defendant held
them in a state of peonage, or that he ar-
rested them with a view of placing them
in such a state. The testimony discloses
that the defendant, with another party,
went to Florida and caused the arrest of
Gordon and Ridley on warrants issued by
a magistrate of Georgia for larceny, but
there can be little doubt that these crim-
inal proceedings were only an excuse for
securing the custody of Gordon and Rid-


ley, and taking them back to Georgia to
work out a debt. While this is true, there
is not a scintilla of testimony to show
that Gordon and Ridley were ever there-
tofore in a condition of peonage. We are
constrained, therefore, to order a reversal
of the judgment and remand the case for
a new trial."
He said that the trial court should on
this account have taken the case from the
jury.
Justice Harlan dissented, saying that in
his opinion there was evidence tending to
make a case within the statute.
"The accused made no objection to the
submission of the case to the jury," he
said, "and it is going very far to hold in
a case like this, disclosing barbarities of
the worst kind against these negroes, that
the trial court erred in sending the case to
the jury."
The case was tried originally by Judge
Swayne, and under the order of the Su-
preme Court will be remanded to his court
for another trial.
LUMBER PRICES STAND.
North Carolina Pine Association Decides
Against Advance.
At a meeting of the North Carolina
Pine Association it was agreed that the
contemplated advance on higher grades
of manufactured lumber, authorized at a
previous meeting, would not go into ef-
fect and that all grades be atlowed to re-
main as at present.
Captain John L. Roper was re-elected
president and John R. Walker was re-
elected first vice president. E. S. Fos-
burg, of Virginia, J. A. Wilkerson, of
North Carolina, and Maxwell Anderson,
of South Carolina, were elected vice pres-
idents to represent their respective States
in the organization.

Messrs. J. M. Watson and J. S. Bennett,
two leading naval stores manufacturers
of Durbin, Fla., spent last Tuesday in the
city.


8. a. POWELL. CRAS. a. IHAAS, amERY ASME.Y
PrsM eut. rlce-PrsiMest ad Treasurer. Secretary.
DiRCreConS:
a. R. Powell. Cams. 6. Harrs a. McMnlliUu P. L. SJtlerlasd, U Y. Coerfltes.


THE


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Cerir of Wet fIy a"d Mafea b.
Jacksnville, Florida.



Wholesale Drugs Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices on
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and am save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention,

***-----------------*------------------------------
Cable Addres. Florida.


aStandard Naval Stores

: Company.

DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN


IROSIN

AND TURPENTINE.

JacILsonville, Fl.


Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advertlseumets Will e Inserted in rlis Departcl t at the ollowDlg Rates:
For one week. 20 cents a line.
For two weeks, 35 cents a line.
For three wee, 50 centa a line.
For four weeks, 65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
coataliing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Thurday
norinag to secure lsertion in Frday's paper.


Wasted.
Manager turpentine place consisting of
twelve crops virgin boxes, location flat
lands, eight miles from Apalachicola. Ad-
dress Hays & Oven, Apalachicola, Fla.

PosItlIs Wasted.
A position as stiller, very best reference
furnished. Address F. Johnson, Mur-
phy. Fla. 4t
Help Suppled.
Naval stores men can secure help by ap-
plying to the City Employment Bureau,
840 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
Positloa Wasted.
A position as woodsman for turpentine
firm. Reference furnished. Address G. E.
Mixson, Sutherland, Fla.
Wasted.
TWO GOOD MEN WANTED.-A good
woodsman and stiller; must have Al refer-
ence; must be sober; new place and good
woods; no healthier place in all Florida.
Apply to J. T. McNeill, Wewahitchka, Fla.,
or Apalachicola. Fla.

For Sale.
A good turpentine location for sale at
once. Only been run two years. Price
$18,000. Address J. B. Sutton, Harris, Fla.


Wanted.
To buy a first-cla turpentine location
in Florida. Will pay the right price for
the right place. No flat woods place need
apply. G. A. Petteway, Box 2, Ieroy,
Marion Co., Fla. t
Turpentime Mes.
Buy a Blakesle Gasolin Pumping Out-
fit for your still No. 1 outt pamps ,090
gallon per hour at a semt of I emt aad
requires o attention while nr in.
Started in one minute. J. P. O(mpb ,
Oala. Fla.
Wanted.
A distiller. We want a good, sober
man with family, to run the still another
season. Can give steady employment
through the winter. None need apply but
first-class man with good reference. Ad-
dress F. & W., Jonesboro, Fla. tf
Wasted.
Want position as woodsman or stiller.
Am married and can furnish best of refer-
ence. Address P. O. Box No. 18, Holder,
Fla.


Send all orders for printing for the
turpentine and commissary trades to the
Record office to insure a prompt delivery.


The Blount Real Estate CO.,

(Incorporftd. S50.000 Capital.)

FOR Turpotin Locations. Saw Mill location
LO re anw d all tracts of Round Timber, Phosphate
and Farming Lands of all description.
Write us for further information and particular
THE BLOUNT REAL ESTATE CO.,
OCALA. FLORIDA.



Joseph D. Christie, Business Agent
Reem 303 DyaHl-Ulpc ure l Ml Plg. JariseuMi, l.
Teelcbone 455.
If you want to locate in Florida and contemplate going into business, lt m
help you. If you have a business to sell, list same with me


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


J. W. WADiE
Vice-President.


E M rOHeS,
Sae'y aad Tr--


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


WHEH WRITING ADVERTIKRS. MENTION THE RECORD.


a II __ -__I I __ ______ I II ____ I __I __ I II II I __ __I II I __- __ -- 0 -








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


Florida Bank and Trust Company
Cpital $1,000,000.00. Jacksonville rlia.
DEIPOITARY OF STATE. COUNTY AND CITY rVNDS.
W. P. COACHMAN President. W. 8. JENNINGS. Vie President.
P. P. FLEMOIN, Jr., Trust OMocer
RBeeelvs deposit accounts of individuals., frms, corporations and baks Pays 4 per
ent O ing de t. Rent safe deposit boes. Buys and slls foreign exchange and
issues letters of credit.
Ae as trustee, transfer agent, registrar and fasca agent tor corporation and
muniipealties. zeeutes all truths such as executor, trustee under will or appotment
of courreoeiver and guardian.
V.ounIdsefatdr 5k-M. Aeoo~n o com..nOJ l .v .



Review of Naval Stores for a Week.


Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Price Rept Sales Exp 1904
Mon., Meh 13..51% 92 166 279 58
Tues., Mch 14.51/ 63 44 166 58
Wed., Mch 15 .52 34 110 5 58
Thur, Mch 16.652y 112 72 250 58

Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1........... 6,495 44,550
Receipts March 16....... 112 373
Receipts previously ......173,679 603,189
Total .......... .. 180,286 648,112
Exports March 16........ 250 2,886
Exports previously ......166,755 606,002
Total .......... ..167,005 608,978
Stock March 16.......... 13,281 39,134
Stock previously ........ 5,118 56,175

Reia for the Week at Savannah.
Monday, March 13. Last Year.
WW .... .. .. .. .. 5.15 4.00
WG ............ 5.00 3.70
N .............. 4.75 3.50
M ............ 4.50 3.35
K .............. 4.05 3.30
I................ 3.50 2.95
H .............. 3.30 2.70
G .............. 2.97% 2.65
F ........ .... .. 2.92% 2.00
E .. ........... 2.87% 2.55
D...... .... .. .. 2.82% 2.45
ABC........ .. ... 2.77% 2.45
Receipts, 816; sales, 162; exports, 1,133.
Tuesday, March 14-Rosin firm; re-
ceipts, 186; sales, 844; shipments, 970.
Quote: ABC, $2.77%; D, $2.82%; E,
$8.87%; F, $2.2%; G, $2.97%; H, $3.30;
I, $3.50; K, $4.05; M, $4.50; WG, $5;
WW, $5.15.


Wednesday March 15-Rosin firm; re-
ceipts, 355; sales, 577; shipments, 85.
Quote: ABC, $2.80; D, $2.85; E, $2.90;
F, $2.95; G, $3; H, $3.30; I, $3.50; K,
$4.05; M, $4.50; N, $4.75; WG, $5; WW,
$5.15.
Thursday, March 16-Rosin firm; re-
ceipts, 373; sales, 733; shipments, 2,886.
Quote: ABC, $2.80; D, $2.85; E, $2.90;
F, $2.95; G, $3102%; H, $3.30; I, $3.50;
K, $4.05; M, $4.50; N, $4.75; WG, $5;
WW, $5.15.
Bailey & Montgomery's Review.
New York, March 15, 1905.
Spirits Turpentine-Stock 722 barrels.
Market during the week has been very
steady and trade fair.
Thursday, March 9, 54%c.
Friday, March 10, 54%c.
Saturday, March 11, 55e asked.
Monday, March 13, 55e steady.
Tuesday, March 14, 55e steady.
Wednesday, March 15, 55e steady.
Rosin-Stock 12,436 barrels.
This market has also been very steady
all the week with a good business, with
stock in first hands reduced to very small
proportions.
Graded-AC, $2.95; D, $3.05@$3.10; E,
$3.10@3.15; F, $3.15@3.20; G, $3.25@
3.30; H. $3.60@3.65; I, $3.80@3.90; K,
$4.40@4.50; M, $4.85@4.90; N, $5.10;
WG, $5.35; WW, $5.50.
Turpentine at London.
1905. 190. 1903. 1902.
Stock Feb. 25.. 14,765 24,293 31,711 35,936
Del'd this w'k.. 1,776 3,205 1,257 1,756
Since Jan. 1... 12,699 15,586 12,528 13,450
Price Feb. 25.. 36-9 44- 43-7% 30-3
April. ...... .37- 44-6 43-10% 30-3
Sept.-Dec. .... 35-6 40-3 37- 30-9
Savannah .. .. 50e 60 65e 42c
Reported by James Watt & Son, Lon-
don, England.


THE ARAGON
JACKSOMVILLE. fLA.
NOW OPEN
Under new maqagmenIet. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.


Ideal Lecatioa as Beastifnl St. Jebus
HOTEL ROSELAND -
Eigh-Class Toorist and Famiy ete
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
very comfort ad amnument. UnexoeUed cauaine, Northern eoookln. Special rates. 10 to 'l1
weekly; l to 8 daily, Americn plan. Illustrated booklet mailed. Car goag to ostrich farm
hotel rounada. Headquarters for naval stores men, lumbermen, cattle growers and Good
Coaved ato delegates A. C. EKHOLM. Pompruvon..


BELL PHONE NO. 592


HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY


N Formerly of Hedrick 4 Raley


Sole agency for Uverslde and adjoaing property on easy terms. (The choice residence portion
of the city.) Iprved and unimproved property in former burnt districLt Springfield, LaVla and
other TOburb. LoiAe bs Anee N property and Investments.
MONEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTOR.S.


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 190304 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


Recripts
Spirit a ............. ............. .
Roins, .bbl ......... ... ................
Tots al .................................



Foreign
Spirits casks...... .......................
Rosins, bb .. ... .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .
New York
iits, cas s.......... ...... .............
Roins, bbb ........... .... .... ..........
Sundries
Spirs*casks. .. .... .. .. ... ....
Rowisfbbis. ....... .. .... .....


1906-04 1902-03 1901-02


198,647
660,0988
844,586

188,308
752,270

98,884
888,171

85,658
87,863

59,361
826.746


292496
940,607
1,238,038

296,430
975,428

206,109
504,178

42,765
138,121

87,566
387,784


814,840
1,071,446
1,386,780

814,876
65,687

217,446
585,042

63,797
129,050

48,633
8 OB8=


The m dcps of r spMr e Is than 19 43 by 98A49 cau and of mdo 29,569 bume

Crop of Sprits and Rosin. or Three Year.
Cop 1--O Cep 1"843 hep IU3i4
Spirits. IRusin. Spirit. Rodls. OhiL Meal
Wilminte............1,11 W,6r 18,m 1133 1 31M
CMarlste ...... .... ,4A 3,811 3,007 11,N 3,88 13,0e
Savannah........ ...176r418 t770 0e 94 13,Mu 1i, d6
Brnswick.. .... .... 5MA 1863 60,67 3UM,18 76TM m1315
Moble.............. 1S U 50,A 108,93 7, nn 1.Aa maS
New Orls.a .. ........ 17 138,1u 33,1 106 M1 SU1m 6083
arabells.. .. ........elemn eloel 8,2aU ,14 617T7 4 1A
Gertorgw... ....... 7TJ, 4 4 150M7 4MW1 %WM .,U
Pseaal.. ........ .4, 5 206,13 UX7 18 8T7,7O 3TM 64
Jax. & Feradis ..1.... 18 61 3315 mw 1076 w 75,311 7460 t 3,mM
Tamp ...... ....... d.oed elmsd 1808 4MN 1M, 5I7

TMek.. .. .. ...... sMU MM "I'^M %laM s ZM- M 4U
Iorte Ot Turpentie to U. L
The following table is compiled by James Watt & Soa, of lamo, from the
official returns. For conveniees of comparison we have turned ewto iut barls
-320 ewt. equal 100 barrel.
137 leS lM 13m 1188 1M 11 UI
From U. S., bbl. .... 15I3, 173,71 149,375 174446 14 1 4,12 143,1
From FranM, bbls.... 161 66 617 2,31 6 166 46A
From other countries 1,46 78 0M 6s a M as
1M4, 174,90 14,9O42 177,6I 19,31 1T7,8 14
From Rumia .......... Z. a1 4,M 1 4,98 M1 6MI ,T71 17,M
Total Barels .. 15712S 179,0 16 15,940 186l,00 01,3 186,36J 1i660
Thus the import of Rusia Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 190 was double
that of 1902, and over six times as much as in 1897. It s intereting to ee how
this import fluctuates with the pries of American Turpentie.
Percentage of Import of Russia ..1.79 2.33 3.2 4.57 3A41 5J 1M
Av. Price Amer. Turp.in Ldm ..1-4 M-4 W4-1 2-4 *.1 1 4

COMPARATIVE PRICE OF SPIRITSAT SAVAlMA FOR WIVE TAI.


April ....................
april 8 ...................
April 1 ...................
Apl 22 ..................
2A 9 ...................
May 6 ....................
May 13 ....................
May 2 ....................
May 27 ...................
June 3 ....................
June 10 ...................
June 17 ..................
June 24 ..............
July 1 .... ..............
July 8 ...................
July 15 ....................
July 2 .................. .
July 28 ....................
Aug. 4 ...................
Aug. 12 ...................
Aug. 19 .................
Aug. 26 .................
Sept. ....................
Sept. 9 ..................
Sept. 16 ...................
Sept. 23 ...................
Sept. 30 ..................
Oct. 7 ....................
Oct. 14 ....................
Oct. 21 ....................
Oct. 28 ...................
Nov. 4 ....................
Nov. 11 ...................
Nov. 18 ...................
Nov. 25 ..................
Dec. 2 ....................
Dec. 9 .....................
Dec. 16 ...................
Dec. 23 .................
Dee. 30 ....................
Jan. 6 .....................


ND

65
54%

54%
53%

53%
s63
52%
52%

asJ


52%
53%



513%
50%
50%
504%



48%








47%
8-%
50%
M2%
50%
50

48%
36%
47%
50%
SO-


1903-04
ND
60
47
46
45
47%
47%





486
40%




54%

64%


57
486



49%

50%
5@%







56
56%
50
57
55%



56%
55%



56%
56%






67%


10M1-01
46
42%
43
4%-U
43

46%
45%
48%
47%
47%
43%

44
43%
46%


464

46%
47%
50
51%
63%
47%
50




51%
50%
51
0at%
51%
62%
53%


32%
32
326
312A

32%
32%
32%
U



36%

34%
33%
32%



311%
35
52%
35%
35
34%
34
33%
35%
36%
3614
so%






35%
25-3
35
35
35k
35%
35%A
35%-~
Mv'
3%i
37%


19-041
03%

47%
41%
47


y
49







a
43
44%
42%
43%
43%
43
40
29%
38%
36%
U
35

37
37
37%
40%
40
41
40

38%
37%
35
37


112 WEST FORSYTH ST.


A. J. HEDILICI Manager.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


YELLOW PINE IN THE SOUTHWEST

The Burean of Forestry Has Been Study
ing This Important Tree in Colo-
rado, Arizona and New
Mexico
Commercially the most important tre
of Arizona, New Mexico and Southwest
ern Colorado is the western yellow pine
It is known locally as Black Jack, at,
in the lumber trade is frequently calls
white pine. The tree furnishes material
for all kinds of local construction; th
towns of Durango, Albuquerque ani
Flagstaff are monuments to its exceeding
usefulness and value. The quantity u
western yellow pine lumber shipped t
other parts of the county at present i
small, but it is rapidly increasing
Owing to the distance from the eastern
markets, shipments are largely in th
form of highly polished material, such a
doors and moulding. These enter inti
successful competition in the Chicagi
market with similar products made o
white pine, which the better grades o
western yellow pine much resemble.
In the Southwest this species is found<
scattered over the slopes of the Rock.
Mountains at altitudes between 6,000 an
9,000 feet. There are three regions, how
ever, where it extends over large areas ii
practically pure stands.
The first of these is in extreme South
western Colorado and Northwestern Nev
Mexico Here a belt of western yellow
pine forest, twenty-five miles wide, runs
northwest and southeast for 100 miles
There are six important mills operating
in this territory, supported mainly by
Denver trade and capital. A great part ol
the product of these mills is consumed in
Colorado. The Denver and Rio Grand
Railroad affords the principal means ol
transportation, and is one of the largest
users of the timber for ties, bridges and
general construction work.
The second region is in West Centra
New Mexico, in the Zuni Mountains
This timber area is smaller than the for
mer-only fifty miles in length by eigh-
teen miles wide. The stand of pine is
more uniform than that of the Colorado
forest, however, and over a large part of
the area it is of better development. The
Colorado timber is estimated to yield
from 3,000 to 4,000 board feet per acre;
the Zuni timber will average from 4,00O
to 6,000 board feet per acre. Stands of
from 10,000 to 25,000 feet per acre occur
quite frequently in the Zuni Mountains,
but are rare in Colorado. Lumbering has
just commenced in the Zuni Mountains,
and only one mill of consequence is work-
ing at present. The logs are hauled by rail
over 100 miles to the mill The output
will be largely finished material, which
will be consumed locally, or shipped to
nearby States and into Mexico.
The third and largest region occupies a
strip from twenty to fifty miles wide and
over 300 miles long, extending from Cen-
tral Arizona southeast into New Mexico.
The greater part of this tract is included
within Federal forest reserves. The tim-
ber is practically continuous over the
whole section, and is pure yellow pine, if
canyons, mountain tops and some dry
slopes, where spruce, fir and juniper oc-
cur, are excepted. This is the largest
area of pure pine forest in the Southwest.
Owing to the varied topography and to
local conditions, the stand of timber is
not uniform, but at its best it approaches
or equals that of the Zuni Mountains.
There are two large mills in Arizona
cutting the pine from private lands
within the boundaries of the forest re-
serve. Like the mill operating in the Zuni
Mountains, they are band mills having
dry kilns and planers, and are equipped
to turn out a product in no way inferior
to that of eastern mills. The better
grades of lumber are manufactured into
doors, siding and moulding, and the lower
grades into boxes for vegetables and fruit,
or sold locally for building material.
Fire, overgrazing and drouth are the
principal evils with which the pine for-
ests of the Southwest have to contend.
Fires have been universal, though of late
they usually have been confined to re-
stricted areas. One fire rarely does se-
rious damage to mature timber, but many
of the old trees now standing are more
or less injured by repeated burnings, and
where conditions have been favorable, as


'. in dense stands uith much undergrowth
and litter, mature timber has occasionally
- been killed outright. The greatest fire
loss has been through the destruction of
young pines from a few inches in height
to trees under sinx inches in diameter.
Overgrazing is a serious hindrance to
tree reproduction. It is an evil of com-
paratively recent development, and its ef-
e, fects are most frequently seen in the for-
Sest of the lower elevations, where there
Sis less moisture than is found further up
in the mountains. Large bands of sheep
e passing and repassing over restricted areas
d destroy young pine seedlings in great
number by trampling them, and, during
f years of drouth, when the growth of for-
o age is scant, the sheep are forced by hun-
ger to eat many plants they would other-
wise neglect. Under these circumstances
' young pines are stripped of their buds
and foliage, and are either killed or badly
stunted in growth.
s Drouth is perhaps the principle factor
in determining the distribution of this
f pine on the lower elevations. Ordinarily
f yellow pine produces seed plentifully ev-
ery second or third year, but in this see-
d tion drouth often interferes with the de-
velopment of the seed or prevents their
d germination. If a good seed year meets
a moist season excellent reproduction re-
Ssults, but if drouth continues for several
years, seeds are not produced or very
many of the seedlings die. Yellow pine is,
however, a hardy tree, and if the seedlings
obtain a year's growth a good number
may live through succeeding drouths.
The study which has brought out these
. facts reveals conditions and possibilities
Sof great importance to Colorado, Arizona
fand New Mexico. The forests of this re-
gion are a valuable source of lumber for
home use and for the maintenance of im-
Sportant industries. The timber is good,
t the forests are easily logged and indus-
tries other than farming and grazing are
needed for a rounded development of the
region. Without these forests the rail-
roads also would be forced to haul their
construction supplies long distances. Most
of the land in the forested area is too
high to be irrigated, but if the tree growth
is fostered the land which it occupies may
become an important factor in the con-
servation of water for the development of
agriculture in adjacent regions. The rain-
fall in this section is largely the product
of brief, heavy thunderstorms, or it comes
as snow during the winter. Gentle, con-
tinuous rains are rare. This condition em-
phasizes the need for a forest cover on all
the slopes, for when the hills are bared
by injudicious lumbering, fire or overgraz-
ing the storm waters rush rapidly to the
bottom, bearing great quantities of soil
and rock, or the snow melts with undesir-
able rapidity under the direct rays of the
sun.
For successful reproduction of pine on
lumbered areas, fire and overgrazing, the
two controllable agencies most destructive
at the seedling stage, must be controlled.
On the moist slopes and high elevations
seed bearing and reproduction are rela-
tively abundant, forage plants are plenti-
ful and water holes and streams are nu-
merous, hence there is little danger to
seedlings from trampling or browsing; as
is evidenced by the very excellent repro-
duction often found in places which have
been sheep grazed for years. Here fires 4
are the greatest danger, as there is more
grass and litter to feed them than at
lower levels and on dry slopes. A very
careful fire patrol of such territory, keep-
ing close watch on sheep herders and
campers during the periods when the for-
est is free from snow, will insure good re-
production of pine over these moist areas.

On the lower and dryer slopes over-
grazing is the most destructive agent
working against reproduction. Good
seed years are less frequent, the quantiti-
ty of seed is smaller and the conditions
for germitation are often very poor, so
that reproduction is meager as compared
to other areas. Owing to the scant growth
of grass and the light, isolated litter, due
to the open condition of the forest here,
fires are infrequent and very restricted in
extent, and the grazing further reduces 4
the ability pf fire to spread by reducing
the amount of inflammable material. 4
Scant forage and isolated watering places *
cause a closer working of localities ad-
jacent to such watering places. Tramp- q
ling and browsing of seedlings are the de- 4


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
dAOCKONVILLE. PLA.
CAPITAL $300=00 SURPLUS am UNMIVID) PROFIT $SmoMo
We imue Time Ceritnease of Deposit, whleh draw Iterest at ae rate hearse er per
aomi, i heMld ninety day. or loer., Take adrvta t t 4*t"Jt yuWrl asto-er=
semetug ftr- yo. Partielar attetion paid to Out-of-Tow oats. mimilw a k


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EAKrH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotation--
thispaper.
KINQAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Herbert A. Pord, Gee. H. Pord, P. L. Wtame
President. Vice-Pres. Camier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITAL, $50,000.00.
DIBEc rox: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Edwad Hiller, J. K. Christian, Ge.
MeKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpen e Operators and Saw Mill Mea Soicited.




SThe Wire Virgin Gum Co,
h In now ready to give you all the information you may want eomening the
way we are now gathering virgin gum from high boxes. By the s al a
Stin lip put up eloe to the chipping and so arranged to canse the gn to
strike wire and follow ame dow to the box, not striking the fae of the
Street. Wire is fastened on by two small nails, one rt above the lip a
o the other at upper edge of the oldbox, and stretdad tight so an to keep
O gum from dripping off, thereby main virgin gum and more of it. There
Share many benefit and big pay where parties can get a good many high boxe.
For further information write to
S THE WIRE VIRGIN GUM CO.. TIFTON, GA.



The West.Raley-Rannle Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jackseavlle, Fla.
A. N. WEST. Pras. .. L West. Vice-Pres. W. R. *asss, ViceP-re. H. r. eaer Sec. a Tre.ll



We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

------* ----------------- ***-*-*-*-** *-****-*-**-* I *


M. A. BRIGGS, Preideat.
iH. C. BRIGGS, Ist Vice-Presdent.


HNORMS ]OWN, 2n VIZOPrad&Lt
J. 0. McDONALD, Secy adlTress.


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

g VALDOSTA. GA.
_ Sole Southern Agent for--


RIXFORD AXES.

They are te BST. Others imitate but none du-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the finest
temper, hold the keenest edge, cut better and last longer
Than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual use.
Send us your orders.

I W. H. BRI66S HARDWARE COMPANY,
SValesta, Gerga.
ol$$1111$111111010060


___


__








THE WUIL9MY INDUSTBIAL RIMCED. g


JOHN S. FRANZ. Agent


f i
Cotb
00d
FdML


Diebold Safe & Lock Co.
Jalckonville. Florida

Sam'l P. Holmes& Co.
Steks, Bends Cotton,
Oral.~ and Prevsion.

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Bea Pboe 853 Baldwin Block
IRll IWxU ouANC-law t rates. I-
rea H. Gream & Oh, and 10 Ptk BldU
Jaekmwvilm, Fk. 0.


AILY OIINGONERY,
Commnlsion Merchants.
Navil Stores & Cotton
LgaIal adsvae made agalrnt d
mte Cemdsaanmmts mat*L
COTTON ZrCHANGE BUILDING,
NKW YORK CITY.


J6 P6 A001PANL,
- I- %wA FXA


termining factors of reproduction on these
areas. By regulating the number of sheep
to be pastured on any given area, limit-
ing the length of the grazing season, keep-
ing the bands of sheep moving and not al-
lowing them to be held on small tracts
near water holes chosen as handy camping
places by the herders, the greater part
of the danger from overgrazing can be
avoided or reduced to a minimum, and a
fair reproduction can be secured in these
least favorable localities.

AMONG THE OPERATORS.
Mr. T. C. Hall, a prosperous naval
stores operator of Ocala, Fla., was in Jack-
sonville several days this week.
Mr. p. J. Perry, of the Bordonville Tur-
pentine Co., of Bordenville, Fla., was in
the city last Tuesday.
Mr. J. S. Smith, a leading operator of
Waller, was among the naval stores men
in the city Wednesday.
Mr. S. P. Edwards, of Russell, Fla., was
in the city this week.
Mr. J. C. and Dr. Edwards, two promi-
nent naval stores operators from Green
Cove Springs, Fla., were registered at
the Aragon Hotel this week.
MAr. J. D. McConnell, an extensive op-
erator of Bostwick, Fla., was in Jackson-
ville several days this week.
Mr. J. D. Cay, of Tallahassee, was
;umong the leading operators here last
Wednesday.
Mr. A. O. Frink, of Maxville, Fla., was
a guest of the Aragon last Wednesday.

THE SOUTH'S ADVANTAGE.
The general trend of business develop-
:nent to-day is more pronouncely in favor
:,i the South than ever before. In every
direction there are signs of advancement.
Starting with the mineral regions of Vir-
i;nia and West Virginia, where there is
remarkablee activity in coal and iron in-
lerets, on down through Kentucky and
Tennessee to Alabama, where coal and
!ron activity is greater than ever before,
witl plans under way for developments
which will make the South a leader in
metallurgical progress, to New Orleans
and (ealveston, where the export grain
trade of the country is now centering,
there is in every direction improvement
and advancement. Cotton mill interests
:ire getting in better shape; water power
developments are under way at many
points, especially in the Carolinas, includ-
ing the immense undertaking at Yadkin
Falls, N. C., by Pittsburg capitalists; here
an'd there immigration is sufficiently
naked as to be commanding much atten-
tion. Five or six years ago, when the
treat hoom of that period swept over the
country, the South had scarcely com-
ienacel to emerge from the depressing ef-
'cct of years of low-price cotton and the
agricultural poverty which that condition
had brought about. Its iron interests
were not in a position to get the benefit,
except to a limited extent, of the pros-
oerity in iron and steel, and so the great
wave of activity had almost passed away
before higher-price cotton and improve-
ments and consolidation in iron and coal
and railroad developments had put the
South in a position to reap the same rich
harvest that other sections gathered. But
now the conditions are different. The big
profits on two or three years' cotton crops
sold at high prices brought such financial
strength to the farmers as to enable them
to hold this crop back from the market
to the despair of the bears, and the iron
interests, developed by new and modern
improvements and by the building of new
furnaces and steel works, are in shape to
enjoy the present prosperity in that trade
and to justify further developments on a
very large scale. Thus the South enters
this period of industrial activity in a far
better shape than before, and in the next
five years we shall see more real wealth
created there and a greater volume of
business than in the last ten years. We
shall now do in five years much more than
we have done in the past ten. That is the
assured progress ahead of the South.


OIS98 I 8 I8 8 8 8D 54 814 8 O 0 1 m t O O 0 i 9 10 0 il 8I iii
MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING end REPAIRING. ;
Jacksonville. Fla.
s* selua le su1I ,es .II stvitlu I I a 808918a8s|II uhuI i

WILLIAM A. NOURS JAMES O. DARBY


WILLIAM A. BOURS COMPANY
TE OLDEST ESTAonLIND RAIN AU SE E TUE STATE.

Hay, Grain, feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Supplies, Flour,
Grits, Meal and Fertilizers.
OUR MOTTO: Prmpt Shblmet, Re aMe Geeoo CatatMe ree
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Cunmmer Lulmber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES end CRATES.



I Standard Clothing Company


One Price


One Price


* FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
S17 sad 19 Wet Bay Street, - - Jacksonv, PFr11d.
* Stetso and Hawes Hats. Special Attentlea G1ive to a1al Oers.
STOOO| i riooo*oiroii Jo|iiiii oioiiiJJii


R. TOLAR.


d. HART. T. H. BLAOHLY.
(Established 187.)


4. IR TOLAR, da


TOLAR. HART & CO.,
160 FRONT STREET, NEW YORK.

Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


JOSBPH D. WEED.


H. D. WAED.


W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.








10 TM WEMELY INDUSTRIAL 31IOO.


INDUSTRIAL R.ECOR.D.
JAM- A. HOLLOMON.


-Domeet) ...30 Per Annum
PuU-h-lEv-yr riAxs.
m )..a mS)...r o .

"TKO vine an Its Pdhuoa-."
AM mm. m ceeM Ia bai maw
The IndustriaJ I record Company.
Jcksonville. Fla.

-imh Edmusalls ad snieas Ofes at
Asni. Ga. & SavannIh. Ga.
Entered at the Postofflce at Jacksonville,
Fla., as second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operator's Association,
September 12, 190 as its exclusive official
organ. Adopted in annual convention
September 11, as the organ also of the gen-
eral association.
Adopted April 27th, 190, as the official
organ of the Interstate Cane Growers' As-
socation. Adopted September 11, 190, as
the only official organ of the T. 0. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.

COPY FOR ADVERTISING.
Advertising copy (changes or new adver-
tisements) should reach us Tuesday morn-
ing to insure insertion in the issue of the
same week.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the main offices
of the Industrial Record Publishing Co.
are located at No. 1i S. Hogan Street,
Jacksonville, Fla., in the very heart of the
great turpentine and yellow pine industries.
The Atanta, Ga., office sa located in the
Equitable Building, No. 72. Atlanta is the
center of the great manufacturing trade of
the entire South.
The Savannah, Ga., office is in the Board
of Trade Building. Sanavvah is the lead-
ing open naval stores market in the world.

NOTICE TO PATRBOS.
An payments f atntiesng in the Ia-
u trial BRert asn abcription thereto
mut ie mas e direct to th home office
In Jachnsmrvl Agets are not allowed
te make eelectlsi under any circum-
stames. Bi for advertising ad sub-
sdrptims ae et out from the hme
M, when *du, and an remittau must
be mae diret to this empany.
Industrial Recr Publihing Co.

SHIPMKETS OF LUMBER.
Lumber shipments from the port of
Jacksonville Wednesday amounted to 1,-
708,00 feet, according to the manifests of
three vessels clearing at the customhouse.
The steamship Algonquin carried out
675,000 feet for New York, the schooner '
Anna R. Bishop carried out 313 feet for
Elizabethport, N. J., and the barge Wil-
Ham D. Becker was cleared for New
York with 18,000 railroad cross ties, equiv-
alent in board measure to 720,000 feet of
lumber.
The total amount of lumber and cross t
ties shipped from Jacksonville during the
first fifteen days of the month of March
amounted to 11,596,078 feet, of which 10,- b
327,940 feet were shipped to coastwise l
ports and 1,268,138 feet were shipped to
foreign ports
The demand for lumber in New- York h
and Philadelphia continues good, and
there are at the present time a dozen or t
more sailing vessels in port taking on car-
goes.
If the remaining fifteen days in the t
month of March continue as good as the
first fifteen days, the record for lumber
shipments will be broken. The present t
prospect is that equally as many vessels b
will clear during the remainder of the
month, and that shipments will be equal- b
ly as heavy. a1
The Clyde Steamship Company alone
has ten vesessls scheduled to sail for New a
York and Boston during the next fifteen d
days, and these ships carry an average of
nearly a half million feet of lumber each. R


THE OPERATOR IS HIS OWN FACTOR AND SHOULD ALSO
BECOME HIS OWN TIOxurORi


The contract that has existed for two
years between the naval stores factors
and the association of exporters, by which
the exporters take the receipts of the fac-
tors, will expire by limitation next month.
It is to be hoped that the contract will
not be renewed. 'As a matter of fact, a
conference between factors and exporters
was held in Savannah only this week,
looking to a renewal, and at this writing
no renewal has been made for good and
sufficient reasons on the part of the fac-
tors; and the indications now point to
no renewal and the organization of an
export company, the members of which
company shall be the operators themselves.
This is as it should be, and The Record
will welcome the day when the operator
will take this one step, which is not only
so vital to his interests, but the one and
only step now necessary to place him in
absolute control of his product frop the
raw gum until it supplies the consump-
tive demands of the world as a finished
product.
This is a day of co-operation. It has
been successful in every industry to
which it has been properly applied. It
has been peculiarly successful in the
naval stores industry. The great devel-
opment of that industry has been accom-
plished around the operator as a nucleus.
He planted his still in a pine forest and
converted the crude gum of his trees into
turpentine and rosin. The factor financed
his operations and handled his product.
The exporter bought from the factor, as
the consumer's agent, and distributed to
the consuming world. The factor was in-
dspensible to the operator; the exporter
was needful to the factor. But the op-
erator took one step further. He began
to finance his own product by becoming
a factor as well as a producer, and the
very minute the interests of the producers
and factors thus became identical, as they
ire to-day, the success of the move was
apparent. It is a fact that practically
every factorage house in the pine belt to-
lay is owned and controlled by producers. (
The distrust that existed prior to that
ime between operator and factor disap-
eared. An era of prosperity unknown
before in the industry followed. But one a
ink to make the chain complete has been
missing. The operator has manufactured I
is stuff and financed it through his fac-
orage house, but he has been in a degree
t the mercy of the distributors, whose in-
erests have not always been in sympathy E
rith his interests. And now the oppor- O
unity is here to take the final step and o
become master of the situation in every i
ranch of the trade from tree to con- V
umner. The operators and factors-one o
nd the same-should also be their own m
distributors. And they will be. The o
record predicts that they will see the ad- n


vantage of this course and organize at
this opportune time an export company
that will make the trade chain complete.
Will an export company, owned and
controlled by the operators and factors
succeed
The same question was probably asked
when the operator first began to think of
becoming his own factor and the history
of the industry for the past few years has
given the answer. It will succeed from
more than one standpoint. If a few men
of foreign interests, in a close corporation,
or an association of two or three lose
corporations can succeed, why should not
a corporation composed of several hundred
men who are vitally interested in every
branch of the trade proportionately sue-
ceed? Another standpoint: The world
needs and must have turpentine and rosin.
The market is made purely on the law of
supply and demand. The men who make
the supply and finance the operations so
they can make it, will succeed better in
carrying that supply themselves direct to
the demands. They have the brains, they
have the connections, they have the
money-why shouldn't they?
As in all matters where co-operation is
the key note, there must be complete
unity. In the movement now progressing
to organize an export company practically
every factorage house in the pine belt is
interested. Every operator must now be-
come interested, and look at the situation,
not only for the present, but for the fu-
ture. The present exporters will natur-
ally fight the movement. They will prob-
ably spend a great deal of the money they
have made out of the operators to con-
vince them that it is not to their interest.
For the purpose of fighting only, they may
make some offers to the men in the
woods that may appear alluring, on their
surface; but to yield, when once under- I
taken, would mean inevitable disaster in
the future. Temptations that mean ruin
ire sometimes offered on silver platters.
No, there will be no yielding. In this year
f our Lord Nineteen Hundred and Five
he turpentine operators are able to take
are of themselves, and they are just as
well prepared to distribute their product o
Is they are to make it.
q

. O. A. AND TANK COMPANY COM-
MITTEES MEfT NEXT WED-
NmSDAY NIGHT.
There will be a joint meeting of the t
executive Committee of the Turpentine b
operators Association and the Directors
f the Operators' Tank and Warehouse Co. n
n the Committee's rooms, Jacksonville, t
Wednesday evening, March 22nd, at 8 l
'clock. Every member of the two com-
littees is urged to be present as matters p
f importance are to be considered at this e
meeting. tl


FLORIDA AS A STOCK RAISING STAT

Local Real Etate Firm Emopsie the
State's AvtatatM.
In my travels through Florida I nd
that some of the Northwestern cattlemen
are making investigations a to the ad-
vantages of Florida a cattle rauig
proposition as compared with other
States, especially those of the Northwes.
It is claimed by some of the battle peo-
ple of Florida, and who have made a suc-
cess of the business, that cattle will net
only subsist, but are well maintain all
the year round on Florida grasses. Prom
very careful investigation with a lar
number of stock people I am satied that
the pasture will furnish good maritenans
for nine months in the year, and to Ai-
ish and fatten it will probably be nees-
sary in some cases to feed either velvet
beans, cassava, cowpeas, pastalum, Jap-
anese cane, etc. Velvet beans and casava
will maintain and fatten at least three
head of stock to the acre, and I am told an
good authority that five head per acre
have been fattened.
Cassava is an exceedingly good adjauet
to the velvet bean. It produces a suea-
lent root, and while it is a little more ex-
pensive to feed, in lieu of the fet that
it must be gaRpered (velvet beams can be
fed dry in the pasture where they grow),
it goes a long way towards balaning the
velvet bean feed, which is a strong pro-
tein. In addition to this, they have a feed
very high in protein known as cowpeas,
of which they make three crops per yar
on ordinary pine land. Can cut two of
them and feed the other out of had.
These will produce from two to three tos
of dry forage to the ace. I And another
valuable feed that can be fed fro June
until frost is the Japamne an. Thi
feed is exceedingly strong in arbo-hy-
drates and a fine fattening food. Oats
can be produced as a fair pastaag for a
short time in the year, and pragras is
excellent for nine months in the year.
In addition to the cultivated feeds ma-
tioned above for finishing and fattaig,
Florida produces for masintea e the
many varied wild grasses from nSBi to
twelve months in the year. Velvet beans
will grow abundantly on any of the high
lands of Florida without fertilizer. assa-
va and the other cultivated feeds require
a little fertilizer, say 00 pounds to the
acre, at a cost of (28 per ton.
From my talk with several of the sua-
cessful stock people and observations gn-
erally, I verily believe that in a very few
years Florida will be the greatest cattle
raising State in the Union. Hundreds of
thousands of acres of most excellent stoek
land can be bought to-day for $1 to P$
per acre; and lands adjoining, I am re-
liably Informed, ar netting the podoa s
to-day from $50 to (200 and over per acre
in beans, tomatoes, celery and other
tables, as was fully set forth in my art-
:le in the January number.
It was clearly shown by speakers at the
great cattle convention last year that
States like Florida have ininnite advantage
over the West in forage plant, in feed-
ng in winter, in shelter, in shorter peod
f fattening, in lower percentage of
by death from all causes. The catte of
Florida do not die of drouth in summer or
bizzard in winter, as on the great ranges
if the far West. The testimony of the
attlemen's convention last year wau also
convincing that improvement in size and
qualityy by breeding upon the native stock
s entirely practicable.
The above facts which I have set forth
cry briefly have aroused such widespread
interest among the great ranch owners
md cattle breeders of the United States
hat the nt n national convention of the
Lmerican Cattle Breeders' Association will
e held at Jacksonville in March. All the
Teat cattle breeders hold membership i
his association, and so impressed have
aany of them become with the advant-
ges of Florida for large cattle ranches
hat many of them are taking options on
large tracts of land in that State for eat-
Ie raising. One large real estate nrm at
aeksonville, the West-Baley-tannie Oom-
any, controls over one million acres of
excellent grazing lands that they a sell
t from $ to an sare. This firm is of
ie highest standing and responsilHty,


_ _







THE WEEKLY INDUSTB'IAL RECORD. 11



THE CHRISTIE GROOVER DRw c.,

WHO L SALE DRUQOISTS.




GUY'S BOWLING AND BILLIARD PARLORS.
120-122-124-126 WEST FOR.SYTH STREET. JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.
YA. M#*a to MAlet Yem FOmmb and Paw Your tftw7y *Aememes Away.


one of its members having for years been a silo. One of the crops which are spe-
enmnected with one of the largest railroad cially adapted for the growth and devel-
systems of the South, and their acquaint- opment of live stock, as well as for cows
ame with every section of Florida is thor- which are used in the dairy, is a crop
ough and intimate. Many of the big cat- known as Japanese sugar cane, which
tlesen of the country above referred to crop can be cut every two or three weeks
are negotiating with this firm to select for during the spring, summer and the fall
them large tracts of grazing lands at the seasons, so as to produce a large amount
low pries quoted, and which they will of green fodder containing a very large
transform into vast battle ranches that per cent of saccharine matter.
will rival the majority of those in the Cattle will subsist on our Florida
West and Northwest. grasses, Bermuda, St. Augustine, crab,
The real estate Afrm of West-Raley-Ran- water, crowfoot and other at least ten
ie, spoken of above, are familiar with months in the year. The increase in cattle
live astk conditions throughout the Cen- has averaged 85 to 90 per cent where no
tral stat, as well the States which green feed is given them. This country is
are traversed by the Roky Mountains, specially adapted for raising early matur-
and have no hesitation in saying that ing pony beef cattle.
Florida presents conditions offering great- Florida is the only State in the Union
er opportunities for profit in the live stock where lambs are dropped out of doors in
industry aad dairying, and for an increase January. This gives sheep breeders the
in the value of lands than any other State May and June markets, when lambs sel'
in the Union, andml t spal information at $10 to $13 per hundred for New York
concerning the live *tock husbandry will trade. All sheep breeders have Iveraged
be gladly furnished upon applicaton to 90 to 105 per cent increase, which is far
them In advance of the great cattlemen's better than the average, even in New Mex-
eonvention to meet at Jacksonville in co, where the drouth often limits the in-
March, they are sending to all the great crease to 20 per cent. We would be glad
stock raisers of the country the following to answer any specific question concern-
letter, which I have been permitted to ing any part of Florida for purposes of
copy: raising horses, cattle, hogs or sheep. We
"Gentlemem-We have been asked to have special information for farmers who
sed you a description of some crops which desire to go into the dairy business. But
are espeeally adapted for live stock pur- ter is now selling in our inland Florida
e We are familiar with live stock towns at 40 cents per pound. It is possi-
aio d price. of land in Western ble for farmers to raise green feed all the
Ca a, Montana, Idaho Colorado, New year through with the least possible ex-
Mexo, Arima and Texas, and are will- penditure for cultivation, because of the
ag to substantiate by proven facts that soil being so easily cultivated.
there are greater opportunities for the We have many thousands of acres of
live stock industry here and for crops i land producing grasses and fattening food,
Florida than in any other mat of the as stated above, that can be bought at
United States, Canada or Ol Mexico. the present time from $5 to $25 per acre.
Yours very truly,
"This letter intended to reach both WEST-RALEY-RANNIE CO.
the live stock men, who produce beef for It would seem from the above as though
the market, and also the dairymen; and all the available grazing lands in Florida
we have not attempted to give specific in- would soon be snapped up.-Chicago Faan
but we would be glad to give specific in- Loans and City Bonds.
formation, in this letter for either industry,
formation on either of these subjects, or
any other division of live stock husbandry 3o,5oo Acre Lumber Land Deal in DeSoto
Siniry. Our Florida lands are spe- County, Fla.
l adapted for forage crops, such as
so um peas, velvet beans, cassava, pas- News has just been received of a big
pah, ete. We believe you know the timber deal in DeSoto county, Fla., in
geat value of sorghum as a forage and which Valdosta parties are largely inter-
fattener. We have statement of North- ested. The deal involves 20,500 acres of
rn farmers who are now residents of land which was owned by M. M. Smith &
Florida ,that they produce from six to Co. and Smith & Conoley. It was sold to
fifteen tons of sorghum per acre, and it is parties in Florida for between $75,000 and
oneMded by the agricultural experiment $80,000, the sellers making a very hand-
ollege that sorghum at $5 per ton is some profit on their investment.
more valuable as a producer of fat and It is understood that half of the tract
gain than eorn at 30 cents a bushel. It belonged to M. M. Smith, of Valdosta, and
neds no further comment, therefore, to that half of his interest was purchased
show the value of this land for the pur- last year from the Winn-Ashley Land
pose of producing cattle, hogs and horses. Company. Mr. Smith's profits upon this
Velvet beans and cassava (the latter half interestamounts to as much as the
succulent root which is an exceedingly land cost him a few months ago.
food adjunct to the velvet bean), will
maintain at least three head of steers to LACKMANIS BEER.
the acre, ad will fatten two. In fact, & Co., proprietors of the
more than this has been done. All our Myerson & proprietors of the
Floridlands, excepting those very low "Diamond" Saloon, 105-107 West Bay
aza swampy, will produce velvet bans street, Jacksonville, are the sole agents for


yhi 250 pounds to tbe arn e d t a cst oi only for its superior taste, but for its
$28 per ton. Our cowpeas, of which we medicinal qualities, and we can assure the
make three crops per year, producing three readers of The Record that if they are in
to five tons per acre each crop, is a very search of a splendid beer they should give
high feed in protein, and during the win- this brand a trial.
ter season, with comparatively no trouble,
a green pasturage of winter rye or winter Mr. D. E. McKeithen, manager for the
oats will keep stoek in better condition Hillman-Sutherland Co. at Baldwin, was
than eailage made by corn and fed out of in Jacksonville last Monday on business.


S. St. George Hotel

SEUROPEAN PLAN.

^itlrffhLL KRoorms 75c, $. and SL5 P9Sa)
PHONE 317.

MRS. GEO. W. BROCK.
PROPRIETREss.



South Atlantic Steamship Line


FROM FERNANDINA TO ALL PORTS.

Next sailings to Hamburg about March 15th, 30th and April 15th.
For rates, etc., address

NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION AND TERMINAL CO., Agents.
JACKSONVILLE AND FERNANDINA.

T oa erAePr HIKI WOUuK e IN
GmORUtIA. (in-,man-a- am n a1L.)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pure Pine Old
Rye. By the gallon a.00; four full quarts
$3.50, express prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
2.75; four full quarts 3.00, express prepaid.
ANVIL. RYE-Pure Substantial Family
Whiskey. By the allon 2.50; tour full
quarts 2.90, express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gallon 0.5;
four full quarts $z.e, express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
gallon 3.00; four full quarts S.2~ express
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon $2.G; four tuU
quarts P.90. express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskies In the market
and will save you from 25 to 50 per cent on your purchases. Bend for price st and
catalogue. Mailed free upon application.
The Altmayer (a Flatau Liquor Company,
MACON, GA. AND BIRLMINGHAM ALA.


I W11blAt LLLCWuu011
! Turpetliw e F..m.t Il .,a M
S Rosla, Tar,
S Oils of Tar, T
S-E .C.HEMMER CO.
C reosote, E. HEMMER .EKN. MOn.
SDi-latff--s- Offces and Laboratory,
Sa8 Bay Btreet E.
* Chaoal, Etc. SAVANA, GA.
Turpentine Operators whose timber Is ex-
* TThausted are invited before making other
SACETATE OF UME plans to write the company for a paper
* giving full particulars of this new proees.



Knight Crockery Co.
DEALERS IN CROCKERY. CHINA. GLASSWARE. TINWARE AND
HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS.
Manufacturing Ajgnts 12-14 East Bay Stret,
Pricem ftrwarded er retun mal. Jackswarki, FlSlda.







12 WEN WUNLY DTD MU8UTAL INUCUD.


PRODUCTION OF SULPHATI
Since 1893, when the first plant c
product coke ovens in the United i
was completed at Syracuse, N. Y.,
quantity of coke produced in such
has increased so rapidly that in 18i
per cent of the total coke output c
United States was thus manufac
In making it annual canvass of the
mining and coke making industries
the last two years, the United StateE
logical Survey has therefore extend,
inquiries to cover all plants producing
*and coke from coal with the recove
the tar and ammonia. Reports wei
ceived in 1903 from 528 companies.
facts gleaned from these reports ar
forth by Mr. Edward W. Parker in
per entitled, "The Production of
Coke, Tar and Ammonia at Gas V
and in Retort Coke Ovens in 1903."
report is published as an extract froi
Survey's forthcoming volume, "M
Resources of the United States, 194
The total quantity of coal carbon
in 190 was 5,843,538 short tons. Th
companies produced 33,483,430,989
feet of gas, of which 2,433,99,478
feet were lost or unaccounted for,
31,049,461,511 cubic feet were sold.
this total 73.9 per cent was sold f
luminating purposes and 20.1 per cei
fuel. The average price per 1,000
feet for all gas sold in 1903 was 97
Prices for artificial gas are low in
States which have coal and natural
among their resources. Such States
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, ]
sylvania, West Virginia and also M
chusetts, where a large portion of th(
gas made is a by-product from coke
ing in retort ovens.
The total production of coke amoi
to 3,941,282 short tons, of which 1,88
short tons were obtained from by-pr
coks ovens and 2,058,888 short tons
the product of gas houses.
Only about 20 per cent of the comp
that manufacture coke and gas rep
the recovery of ammonia either in
form of ammoniacal liquor or sulI
The total quantity of ammonia 1
produced and sold was 64396,002 ga
which would be equivalent to 17,47
pounds of anhydrous ammonia, or 67
465 pounds of sulphate. The total q
ity of sulphate of ammonia produce
sold in 1903 was 11,925,752 pounds.
total production in 1903 reduced t
equivalent in sulphate, was 79,74
pounds.
Comparatively little progress has
made in this country in the manufa
of chemical products from coal tar.
though we produce over 50,000,000 ga
of coal tar annually, we import at
same time millions of dollars' wort
chemicals obtained from coal tar. A
servative estimate would place the
value of these products in the who]
markets of the country at $12,000,00
SOME STATE STORIES.
The people of Suwannee county a
easier circumstances now than they
been for years. The reason is plain.
raise their own hog and hominy, as a
live at home and attend strictly to
own affairs. That policy followed a
years will win success every time and
where.--uwannee Democrat.
According to the crowded state o0
passenger trains passing down the
Coast, we conclude this will be a
prosperous tourist season in Florida.
present heavy tourist travel has cause
railway companies to work like Tr
and put on extra trains. Each of the
way companies who run trains into
sonville report very heavy bookings
their passenger trains. It is not onl
weather and the magnificent hotel ac
modations which the East Coast of
ida afford, and which are to please
year; but the fishing, hunting and
many other pastimes which have been
vided on a more elaborate scale this
than ever before in the past; and
greatest care has been taken to pr
for the pleasure and recreation of
tourist.-Indian River Advocate.
The rumor of a new county to be
from the lower part of Brevard has
terialised in the shape of a notice publ
in the Fort Pierce News to the effect
application will be made to the next
Islature for the enactment of a law c
ing a new county, which shall compri.
that part of Brevard county lying sou
the line dividing townships 30 and
the medial line of the south fork of th


Sebastian river, down the middle of said
river to its confluence with Indian river,
by- thence southerly along the east shore of
.tee the said river to the first-named township
the dividing line-30 and 31-thence to the At-
ens lantic ocean. The supposed division will
7.4 leave Brevard county about sixty-six
the miles long, while the new county, which
rumor says -will be named Flagler, will be
ed. about forty-two miles long. If the division
oal Is made, each county will contain about
for the same area of land, there being nearly
eo- forty townships in each division, as pro-
its posed. At this time there is probably no
well-defined opposition to this new political
s move and the News takes the position now
of as heretofore, that if the people of Brevard
re- county want the county divided, all right.
"he -Cocoa and Rockledge News.
set


)a H ROBINSON. Pre. H. GALLJABD. Casher
Gas,
Vorks W. B. OWEN. Viel-Pres.
This Commercial Bank
ineral
3."1 State Depositry.
inized BmNcHm: Oasis. hi.. LLke city, rla
e 528
cubic Jacksonville, - - F rida
cubic
and
an Wansted
or il-
it for We will pay 25 cents apiece
cubic for copies of the Weekly In-
cents. dustrial Record of the follow-
Sthoseng dates
are January 81,1903: March 15,1908; April
Penn- 24, 1908; May 1,190; May 29, 1908; Feb-
assa- ruary 7, 1903.
coal
mak- Office of the Industrial Record.
Jack. onviUe. Fla.
hinted
2,394
er ZINC NAILS
anies
irth Turpentine Cups
hate. Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
iquor strong but soft light metal. They are
lions, the amly mai which will not injury
9,759 saws when left in the trees.
Unt alenm Nail Co.
I and
The 79 PoamI st aowMr YerIS, N, Y,
0 it Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
7,217 Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc., Slating and Roofing
been Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
cture Tacks.
Al-
dllons
t the I
;h of
con- This Space Reserved for
total
resale

SGus Muller & Co.
re in
have
They Wholesle
rule,
their
few jjf
any Liquor Merchants

f h Proprietor.
very
The
d the
rai- Jacksoville Botflie Works
rail-
Jack-
for
y the ...Agents...
;com-
Flor-
this
the
prhe ACME BEER
year
the
ovide
the

made
ma Anyone Wishing
shed a limited amount of paper cups to be
that
Leg- delivered from January 10 toFebruary 10,
areat- and as late as March 10 can get them
se all of Vickers patent by writing-
th of
1 to E. L. VICKERS,
ke St. TIFTON, GEORIOA.


I _,: Vl __, :6_1 11_*cum_u7-mt :.= idiT_1-1:


Cer. FeoWyth aml Cedar Sts.A JACIKSVIE, FLA.
Dealers In
Carriages and Wagons
krrfg ad Wq IIluWi, Whil., 4es, lim, his ElI.

g rrpeNtisr e MIdl I aress. Wagers, uggles. Saddlery. Dump Carts, DVler
SWagUos, Sarrles sad everythUg kept in a first-class establisamet.
LSargest DOalers in Fbrla.
IXIXI1 13WIXIIX>X NIX*IXINSEXKItX*X%4K*4K11@4X


I


SuwanneeSpiring



Ginger



Ale


Bottled from amous Suwae Spring
water. Cure R -un'.*- IndigC5tioa
and Kidney Trouble. The most e,
freshin, natural, spardin, Ginger Ak
know. Bdottd and old by the Lie
Oak Bottling Work. Live Oak Fla.
For sale by Co.w.trd Groceray C.,
Jacksonville, and M. Fert's Sons & Co,
Savannah Ga.


* W. W. CARNES, Pres. W. C. THOMAS, Manager. C. T. DUDLEY, See. Trea


Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale

: Hardware

: Turpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

LARGE STOCK COUNCIL All NOLMES ACKS All PVULLERSU I Ml.

TAMPA. FLORIDA.





DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ask a call. We can shew ye, at correct ad muney
savlng prices, may papers oft ooe pure white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is oar desire to comtlmme being the larger
Diamond dealers in Jackseoville, and oar specialty Is foe rwted-
cat gems and Uigh-grade Waltham and Elaim Watches.

Diamonds, Watches, Jewery,
LHESS SLA LERI ll-13ai.t., 331. hy, jhies f, .r L



NUBIAN TEA for the Uver aml Kidney

BENEDICTA A medlne for women
CUBAN RELIEF ,r Cl Cramps- Dl-

CUBAN OIL ^ """.t Cu. Burns
Bruises and Rhiumatim.
A supply of these medicines is what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for prices and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,
Chattuega, nTesesee.

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime, Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St.. Jacksonville, Fla.


U U


~








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


Florida


Electric Co.


Sell and Iutall Complete Electric Light
ad Power Plants, Telephone Ex-
ehanegi. Wholasale Electric
Buppliea.
Jacbhmill, Fla.



w CANNON COMPANY



BARRELS





o1 THE
STT DADAR D



WORLD


Use no Other

mms" -u watedL

Home Office, OUITMAN, GA.
US. A.


blliht I ISol 0.
BUIUDERB AND DEALX8 IN


ENGINES. BOILERS.
otsm, Saw, rutiHr, Ol and Im Mea-
-hary d Sa ppte ad Repairs.
CAPACITY IOR M0 HAND
Machine Teoo, Wood-Wae Mahinary,
mUftro P1.fl 0 Htow 5 e.r00
"he"" ama.
Reb-er 3e.t aad Hags Baioaed and
Algency a" I and
Mill BppBU and Toal.
l aand -i ats furaahed for Power
Pnatu and Stel Bridgl s
Steam Pm s, rces Wter Heates amd

AUGUSTA. CA.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,

from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.

Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Cea troll Blum's Monogram and Syl
ea Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
ati and Paest Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM & CO. -
817 am 519 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

r Ses baeenwae ero sa aggbo l
aw ihe ar be hae tho eas rre u o-i


IMMIGRATION BUREAU DISCUSSED.
Real estate agents and other progressive
citizens of Florida are beginning an active
campaign in favor of the establishment of
an immigration bureau for Florida, and
hope to have a bill pass at the coming ses-
sion of the Legislature which will make an
adequate appropriation for this work.
Those who have been giving the most
thought to the proposed plan have decided
to make an effort to have a bill passed and
it is said that a senator has promised to
introduce this measure and to work for
its passage. The plan as suggested is to
establish an office in Jacksonville, where
all those coming to the State arrive, and
where there will be competent men in
charge to give information and to accom-
pany large parties of bomeseekers who are
brought here by the cheap rates In the
fall of the year to any part of the State
they prefer to visit. The object of the
plan is to have some practical farmer, who
knows how to reach this class of people
and how to interest and direct them to
take charge of the field work, and to see
that no prospector comes to the State who
is not looked after carefully and that ev-
ery plan is exhausted to locate him where
he can make a success.
Of course, the plan contemplates a great
deal for advertising the resources of the
State and the sending of an agent to those
section from where the largest crowds are
expected to come. At a recent meeting of
a few of those interested in this plan it
was urged that the time to prepare for
securing the passage of this bill is now. A
feature of the plan which commends itself
to the Legislature is that all sections of
the State are to be included, and no effort
made to build up any one part of the State.
Those who have been entrusted with draft-
ing a bill will first confer with Governor
Broward in reference to the plan and en-
deavor to secure suggestions from him be-
fore the bill is drafted.
There is beginning to be some interest
aroused in the matter in other parts of the
State, as the following from the Gaines-
ville Sun of last Sunday will show:
On the eve of the convening of the Leg-
islature of Florida, the Sun would like to
see a discussion of the practicability and
advisability of the establishment of a bu-
reau of immigration in this State. From
what was said in reference to this public
question a few weeks since at a meeting
of real estate agents in Jacksonville, it is
evident that there will be up for considera-
tion at the next session a bill seeking to
establish such a department of govern-
ment.
Reasons are assigned why a bureau of
immigration ought to be established in
Florida. They are all good claims, intel-
ligently advanced in the interest of what
Florida has been needing for no little time.
The only difficulty discernible at this time,
and the only argument which has been
made against a competent appropriation for
this work, is that the scheme will get into
politics and work more harm than good
by creating a spirit of rivalry and Jealousy
between the sections. This, however, con
be obviated if the legislators would debar
politics or prevent injury through Florida's
variety of political agitation and strife.
What is needed is some plan whereby
people may not only be induced to come to
Florida, but be guided and directed after
their arrival. Too many people come here
from the north who are misguided and
who are not sufficiently informed to intelli-
gently take advantage of the many re-
sources that this State has to offer to the
homeseeker. The failure of the State to
look after this class cost Florida hundreds
of thousands of dollars this winter. Never
has there been such a tide of travel south-
ward as that which has come here this fall
and winter. Thousands have come to Flor-
ida, and they have constituted a class
anxious to locate if they could do so to
advantage.
This winter it has been a constant story
of disappointment to Intended investors and
settlers. They have come, found nothing
and returned, all because the State has
made no provisions to acquaint them with
her resources. Every section of this State
during the fall and winter months, when
the railroads are bringing people by the
thousands at half rates, needs a competent
man to take charge of these people, and
some place where intending settlers may
go for information and proper direction.
Nothing of the visionary sort, such as is
seen in some of our exaggerated advertis-
ing matter, scattered broadcast, is wanted,
but a good, competent, truthful and care-
ful system of propagating needed informa-
tion is one of the greatest essentials to
Florida's future development.
The time is coming when this State will
need settlers for her farms which must ul-
timately take the place of some of the in-
dustries at present furnishing the greatest
wealth to the State, but which will pass
away in time. The time is ripe for action
along these lines, and the press of Flor-
lad ought to agitate the matter in the in-
terest of bringing about an intelligent un-
derstanding and the best practical plan.-
Times-Union.


THE




Falstaff Restaurant

For Ladics and Gentlemen.


Breakfut a I earte. Luneheon 12 to 2:30, S5e. Table d'hote
dinner, 6 to 9 p. n., 75. Oyster on half shell. After thel er
lunchae a Speialty.

25 MAIN STREET,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.



aisitols ifsel s llsa lll assas &@ lam asats18668l9l @@selll
IXIIKIK136gggggW6MfiW6WfWgggg (iW6Mg6gf>g6g(ggMW6

llim~1~rrriiiimi111 m mm11mi 1**11**


PEARL WIOIT. Pres.


T. M8. MeCARTHY, Vie-Pre. MI"IE STERM. Tres.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.

meviM ". WELH. Momner.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


AR.E YOU A



MERCHANT?



Then you should become a subscriber to the only
strictly trade journal in the Southeast. It costs
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Fill out following blank form at once and mail to

THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

DETACH HERE

INDUSTRIAL RECORD,
Jacksoaville, Fla.

SEclofsed ifa l tor whilc se the WEEKLY

SINDUSTRIAL RECORD Mfr a perfed *o mohs to the
following address.




Date, 1905.

Sw^^~i~iiakfikgi^^~aasa^j







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscriber, and advertising patrons of this paper and no
charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more o the blanks following, a

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attentions


rF Tmeatme. Sawem r Faetry upteaks er Mieeery ef oAyr mw
DATP
INDUSTRIAL RBCORD, Main Omfee, Jacksonvlle, Fa.
la the market for the followlg


FPloe aotif where e can be aeoured.
Signed

State speifealy the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or second-handed
Leealm or Tarpem me. awmil er Fatery., or r Am s ludestrl terraMe.
DATE
INDUSTRIAL, BOORD, Jaekonville, Bla.
Pleawe advie the mdernined reading a good location in (state or section of
state) for
together with full information about labor condition, taxes, tra ortat on fiOllities,
local emouremeat, ete.
--mar


Sa*V1


Fre Thmber. rwnlwl er a ae Lardi.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD JacLkonville. Ia.
I am in the market for lands for the purpo .o
Prefer in State of Pleae put me In communicatio
with responsible parties and give me other Information.




DATIE


Fer Ceeeinlar, Offls er ieuaseelai SUpe. SasMl ar Turpesgli Mele,

DATE
INDUSTRIAL BREORD, Jacksonvlle, Fia.
In the market for

Please give me infomatio as to bet places to bay, et.


e YeI WetAt ta 8se eu ? Are tYem TalhtMd or ImeetS ?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL ROORD, Jankso ville, Ia. INDUSTRIAL RZOORD, Jaelks ille, Mla.
Have for ale the followi-g Can you give ay iaormals as to the relabllty of the fwllowlt am or eorpor

UtBn

Can you smuet a purchaser? Bea
Signed Signed


me Teto Walbt to Elpley a Mam? eYeTm Welt Emle~met?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RBCOD. Jacksotville, N. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jaekonvlle. Fa.
Waat a man to all the position of Want a portion --

with the following requirement Refer to the folowmle

Can you n eet mob a man Can you amst me t
Signed Sigmed



CLIP THIS COUPON I
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD,
When you m mwai g an ise n from the columnM of etis paper,hethr you are making as inquiry or placia a oder, pMae ut Cou the oe
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_






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15
- mt .. .-


THE


COVINGTON


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Co.


lhW 1 SHOES -
Wholesale: DRY GOODS.


" Success


For Our Customers


is Success


For Us."


ABSTRACTS
Title and Tax Abtraeta, MIrp, et.,
of large tracts in all put of Florida and
South Georgia, prepared for owners and
intending purchaer. Corrpondence
solicited.

REALTY TITLE AND TRUST CO.
law Exchange Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.

WM. D. JONES
PricSCIPTIO SPECIAUST
FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. PAY ST.
MaI Orders Sellcted.
ORDER YOUR

Whiskies


. Wines


--BY-


HENRY FREE

The Only Up-to-Date Mail
Order House In the South.
16 and i Clay Street and 501 W. Bay.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


1o. R. IOsR JR.
MANUFACTURER 0-


BRICK.

inER P1PE.
Capuity of Yard 800000O Per Month.
'NI. 390.

THOSE. G. HUTCHINSON
FB0W ACAM ASSIACU Of
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
em 7, I-ad t* Trade 3Mg.
Pmh aX JACKWHUVLL .L


April
April
April
April
MAy
May
May
AeY
Juni
June
Jun
July
July
July
July
Aug
Aug
Aug


DATE 10046- 1M8-06
1 1......... *t.10 .
S8......... 3U 3.&0
S15........ 3.l 30S
S22........ 3.80 &40
S29........ &80 .35
6........ 3.80 3.5
13........ 3. L.4%
20........ 3.5 S
27........ 3.M 3.
e 3........ 4.3 3.0
i 10........ 4.50 3.
e 16........ 4.00 3.L
23 ........ 4L. 3.0J
1 ........ 4L.7T5 3
7 ........ 4.75 3.3
14 ........ T4.70 .
28 ........ 4.2% 3.40
4 ........ 4.87% SA
12 ........ 4.00 3.O
18 ........ .4.% 3.50


22-50 West Bay Street

JACKSONVILLE


K


196-05
63.80
m375
3.O
3.8O
3.00
3.U0

4.L
4.10
4.15
4J.
.40
4.40
4.MO
4.6
4.35
4.37


1903-04
$3.00
3.45
3.35

3.25
3.27%
3J6
3.35
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
LJO
3.10
3.10
3.0
3.20
3.30
3.30


19060- 1101-04
3.00 3$.
3.45 L.15
3.465 LI3
3.36 3.15
33 3.17%
3.30 3.81
3.40 3&6
3.85 3.80
4.a 0 u
3.90 3S.A


4.00 3.
4.00 3.15
4.65% 3.15


1964-6 1903-04
a.m $3.40
L.M 3.2O
3.8 3.15
3.0 .10
3.6 3.10
am U
3. 38.10
3.6 3.12%
3.2 3.
3.3O 3.
3.S 3.15
3.6 26.U
3.a 2.95
3.8 2.90
MS s.2
3.79% .95
3.0 2.96
3.85 3.065
3.7% 3.05


1901138 19S4,
3JO 3.0
3.15 S3.
3.15 3.80
3.15 3.L
3LIS
315 3JO%
3.15 3.16
3.40 3m
3.40 M6
3.40 .

3.S LM
356 L
MS% 26


104-06 1-804
S.M IU
La0
L(M L6
M6 SAS

Mm J7%


3LSD 3L76
D L7
3.a us
aM L.70

M 1.70
3.30 .00
3.=% L.e


Send for


Catalogue


ohn = Furchgott = Compan

Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Don't forget your subscription to the Record.
I=UB 3minD 3 1B MwX QEUAT =TA*B J"OgKAL


COURMB O PALB AND MEDIUM ROm88 AT ATAJIAl FOR TWO TARM.
W.W. W.G. M M K


%%'%%%%%%%~


GETTING'S


...FOR...


URN ITURE


y


fJaElf~E1CS~)r~S1Ci)r:~:~,;2I~fJE~fSE)f






16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


THE

Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville.
U sMND STATES DEPOSITORY.
Cai l sag SrpasU .............................. 4sso
.R ..... .................. ... . ........... soo,oo.oo
In edition to our regular bnn business, we maintain a Svings Depart-
ment, under government peri, payg interest quarterly.
We have for rent Safe Det Bos in burglar and fireproof vaults at rea-
onabs rates, by month or year.

C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain., Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men' Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY SIKLLI
Jacksonville. Fla.


GORGIAU ITIR-STATZ SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
Minima Coatwise Piue List for r -hntbtbic Rules zgo4. Adoptel at Titea,
Geerga, July I, 1904


Feet Feet | Feet Feet | Feet I Feet I Fet I Fet FPet Fest
SIZES 0&U 1-2652-30 31-351 36-40 41-4514-50 51-55 5-40 1-
1 xl0 to 20 .... $12J135014.5041600 $18.00420,a023.50426.5 M.tt 40oA.00
2%xl0 to 8x10 .... 12.00 1 3 15 4.00 16.50 17.60 90.00 23.00 .00 35.00
Sxzl0 to lO 0.... 1.so 13.00 14.00 15.50 o16.0 10 I 1so .00o s0 SA 37.00
1 zx to Sl2x.... 14.00 15.50 16.0 18.00 21.00 4.00 28.00 325 3400 4 00
2%4xl2 to 1 2.... 1300 13.60 14.50 16.50 18.50 21.00 4.0 2650 34.00 4.00
10%x1 to 12i2 .... 13S. 14.00 15. 17.50 19.50 2.00 25.50 30.0 3m50
1 xl4 to 34.... 14.00 19.00 S0.00 22.00 24.50 7.50 32.00 370 44.001 7.00
3%x14 to Ilx14.... 14.0 1650 1&800 20.50 22.00 24.00 28.00 3 .50 40.00 .00
IS%x14 to 14x14.... 1.50 17.00 19.00 21.00 23.00 23.00 30.00 340 42.00 56.00
1 xI6 to 4x6l.... 20.50 .00 4.o50 27.50 31.00 34.00 38.00 42o.50 5.00 M6.
4%X1l to 12a1.... 19.00 300 32.00 25.50 29.00 31.00 35.00 30.50 48.00 69.00
1kzal to 10l06.... 19.50 20.50 .00 26.50 30.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 50.00 .00
2 x18 to l...... 3 01 L650 8.50 31.50 35.00 39.00 43.00 49.00 .01M 79.00
6%xrz to 14x18.... 21.00 32.00 26.00 29.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 45.00 57.00 0.00
14Wl 8 to 18I.... IM. SI.00 7M.0 30.00 38.00 4L00 48.00 I.00 74.M
Team: Net Cad
Paoes ae P. 3. Can Savanma, Brunswick, Ferandina anu Jaehsavifla.


~------L1---------------------''''''''


McMILLAN BROS.,

Florida Copper Works.


Turpentine Stills
a" general Metal Werlirs.
Old stills take n exhange for
new ones. Pthiu tro th.- con-
try a specialty. Order by mal or
or wire will receive prompt attento. _
at either of the lowwomig works:


rAYETMVILE N. C
Hnnzt MJa


SAVANNAl. SA.
JicUWUV3.LE LA.


*8UI11111111111(1)1~13131311)111131333133up*pupg


------------.. ~ ~ -- - -- - -


We fld a Tmw eaitl P- .r...l --


Whaf AleWd S*w Mill Thimeht?
10.000 Acres Saw Timber ................... 2.50
40000 ...................... 250 to 5.00
50000 ........................ per Aerw.
26.000 Acres Virgin Timber................
150.000 .........
10.000 ..................... per Aere.
192.000 ....................
4sd for ear F NDI CO

BROBSTON. FENDIG & CO.
afe W. Fem at, Fa-- 0.


NOTIC.
At a meeti of the Georg Interstate
Saw Mill Assoeiatic, held at Jacksonvill,
ie., March 1, 190I the following 0aml-
entiou and Bales for a of Yel-
low Pine were o lly adopted, eetive
amJuly 1, 1304: ___

Pine Lumer.
Genal Rule--AII lumber must be
Sound, well-.-at-e". full to ine and
saw butted; free from unsound, looe aud
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;
through ashkee, or round shakes that
show on the surface; square edge, unlea
otherwise spelled. A through shake a
ereby ddnead to be through or connected
from side to id or to tede, or side
to ede. In the measuremet of dressed
lumber the width ad thekaeMs of the
omb ba oe drying must be taken;
lnas than inch thick shall be measured
a ams inch.

CLASSIICATION.
Flooring hall embrace four and ive
quarter inhea in thieknes by three to
six inhe in width. For example: 1x3,
4, 5 and 6; 1%x2, 4 ", 6, a. .
Boards shall embrace all thiekna
under one and a half idnhes by even
inches and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width
For example: %, 1, 1% and 1% inches
thick by 7 inches a up, wide.
Beating shall emb- .ee all ses from
two to fe tnhes in thickness and two to
six inehe in width. For example: 2S2,
2x3, sx4, 2x, l, 30x 3Sr, 3a, 3x, 4x4,
4x5, 4xU, Wx and 5zd
Pleak.
Plank hal embrace all ie from one
ad oae-half to six inches in thicknes.
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. F example: 1%, 2,
%. % 4. 4%, 5, %, 5%x7 iehe
and up in width.


Dimeuion siem shall embrace all ims
6 inches and up in thickness by seve
inches and up in width, imnding six by
six. For example: axO, i07, TxT, 7xa, 1t
and up.

Stepping shall embrace om to two aad
a half inches in thickness by even iahes
and up in width. For example: 1, 1%,
1%, 2 and 2%x7 and up, in width.
Rough Edge or Fitch.
Rough Edge or Flitch shall embrace all
sizes one inch and up in thikness by eight
inches and up in width, sawed on two
sides only. For example: 1, 1%, 3, 3, 4
and up thick by eight mehes and up wide,
sawed on two sides only.

INSPECTION.
Standard.
All lumber shall be sound, sap no ob-
jection. Wane may be allowed one-eighth
of the width of the piece measured across
face of wane, exLeding one-fourth of the
length on one corner or its equivalent en
two or more corners.
All size under nine inches shll show
heart entire length on one side or edge;
sizes nine inches and ove shall show
heart the entire length on two opposite
sides. Wane may be allowed one-eighth of
the width of the piece measured aeros
face of wane, and extending one-fourth of
the length of the piece on one corner or
iti equivalent on two or more owners.
Primn.
Scantling shall show heart on two faces
the entire length; other sise shall show
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
cent. of the pieces, wane may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the piese meas-
ured across face of wane and extending
one-fourth of the length of the pis on
one corner r its equivalent on t or
more e-nera.


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipmeats a Speclaty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


C. H. BARNES, Pr


J. D. SHAW, Vie-Prea


am" JESSUP, Sem.-Tra


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Predncers' Company. Cages,
Grades am Wigbts Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksnville. Pensameda, fermania adI Sava~im
Correspondene Selsited. JACKSONVILLE. LA.


McMURRAY & BAKER,


Siw Mill II Tuwenilne HawwIbO. aU lma
We are =esa a p 4-e leam.r ast mmas
Iwprbes. wa, harness b-m- uermisdag we have a a~ Mo seems
an goods In touch wt al. Turpinm wnas e "s an hrses a spe. nesf
torset we ea beat Me weMtW a hand made haera-.

IkMll! X I E, 4 3 U il.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


- mwr SACE RAS A an9 Moll= YALM


---'` I~c~cclcleeee~CCI


---------------- 99999010


rsr~----- --- -------------------------- --





~I


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


Buyers' Directory

If you want anythnt loek
threug thi s assl list and
write to the firm appearing
there. The Reerd guarantees
a prempt response.

Realty Title sand Trt Co.
ACCOUNTANTS.
T. .G Hutehinson, Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jakoamaville Fla.
Commneal Bank, Jacksonville FIm.
ral National Bank, Oeala, Fla.
Florida Bank & Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonvill.
BOXES AND CRATIS.
Cammer Lumber (C. Jacksonville, M M .
BOWLING AND BILLIARDS.
Guy's Bowling and Billiard Parlors, Jack-


Southern Fuel 6 Supply Co, The, Jackson-
villa 11.
CLOTHING&
I r Bro., J. A, Jackonville, Fla.
Lrroe 0,, A, Jackbmvil Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, Fi .
CLOTHING--WHOT rAT X
Koa, Furebgott & Co, Jaeksonville, Fl
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Bailey & Motgomery, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & C, New York City.
CONVZYANCING.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
COOPERAGE.
C ean Co. The, Quitman, Oa.
Coprag Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jakabmvllb Co-pmag On., Jak-asifle,
Fla.
CROCKERY.
Knight Crockery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Joss, Jaksonville, Fim
Chrltle-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRUGS-fWHOLESALE
sLouthern m-f-ctri Co., Jacksonville,
Fl
DRY GO0DS-WNnm wT A
Covington Co. Th Jacksonvbille, F.
KobA Furebgott & Co. Jaekmoaville, F
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES.
Florida Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lomberd Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
Merrill-Steve Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Seholeld's Sam Co., J. S., Maoo, Ga.
-at Gm.
FERTILIZERS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Sehofeld's Saos Co., J. ., Maeon, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sovilfle, F.
FURNITURE.
Fitting Frniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GENTS FURNISHERS.
Craig A Bro. J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Benfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing C., Jacksonville, F
GROCERS-WHOLESALE,
nolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
Hargraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fa.
Johnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fa.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
GINGER ALE.
Live Oak Bottling Works. Live Oak, Fla.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Koh, Furehgott & Co., Jaeksonille, Fla
HARDWARE.
Bond & Bour Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Brig Hardware Ca., W. .,Valdoeta, Ga.
Mario HBardwa C Oa. O lr
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Wed & Co., J. ., vaun h. Ga.

MeMurray & Bake, Jamksavile, FJa
Vehicle and Harnea Co., Jacksonville, la.


HAY AND GRAIN.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fl.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jaekmsoille, i
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksovrille, Ia
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksoville, Fa.
HOTELS.
Aragon, The, Jacksonvila, 1.
Hotel Barholdi, New York City.
Roseland, Jackonville, Fla.
St. George, Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusts, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens CO, JasbklnflV Ik.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Sehofield's Sons Co., J. 8, Mason, Ga.
INSURANCE.
Loren H. Green & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELERS.
Greeleaf & Crosby Ca, Jacksoville, F1.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Blum & Co., Cha., JacksoMville, Fl
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
Muller, Gus, Jacksonville, Fla.
Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Mason, Ga.
MEDIC=IS_
Spencer Mediins Co., C-ht. Te.
Southern M.anfll enring Co., Ja nville,
Fla.'
Christie-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville
Fla.
MAPS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksoaville, Fl.
Schofeld's Son Co., J. S, Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPEITINE PRO-
CESS.
Shofield's Sons o., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd, Jacksoville, Flm.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., savannah, Ga
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co, W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Marion Hardware Co, Ocala, Fh.
Schoield's Sons Co., J. 8, Mason, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Baily & Montgomery, New York, N. Y.
Barnes-Jesup Co, The, Jacksonville, Fl.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackso-
vill, Fla.
Standard Naval Store Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York, N. Y.
Union Naval Store Co., Mobile, Ala.
Williami Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Oeala, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Oeala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Mason, Ga.
White-Blakemle Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Al.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tak & Export Co, Savannah,
Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
Brobhton, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Blount Real Estate Co., Ocala. Fla.
Christie, J. D., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Oala, Fla.
Southern States Land and Timber Co.,
Stewart & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hedricks Real Estate Agency, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Wete-Raley-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville,
Fla.
SAFES.
Diaboll Safe and Lock Co., Jacksonville.
Fla.


SHOES-Wwor WaT m
0ovington Co., The, Ja. konve Fl.
STEAMIPS.M
Clyde Steamhip Co., The, New York City.
South Atlantic Steamship Line, Jackson-
ville and Fernandina, Fla.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., amuel P., Jacksonville Ja.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jakamvlls FLh
TANKS.
Cypre- Tank Co., MUL, Al.
Davis & Son, G. X, Palatka, F.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Maeon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trst Co.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jackaoaille, kla.
The Wire Virgin Gum Co., Tifton, Ga.
TURPENTIIE PROCESS.
The E. C. Hemmer Co., Savannah, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILLS
Baker, M. A., Bruuswik, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, a.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
Davis & Son., G. M, Platka, Fla.
TUKP5i.zur VATS.
Davis & Son, G. K, Palatka, Fla.
MeMurray & Baker, Jakaonvifle, Fla.
Vehicle & Harness Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jackmoaville, Fa.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.


R. S. HALL, Pres. T. C. HALl, V.P. and Mgr. J. K neaT, See. and Tres.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.



H. A. Renfroe Co.


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at ReadyMade Prices Mall Order Given Peonal Attenion


439 W. Bay Steet


JACKSONVILAE FLA.


lIII II l it lli II I ii i IA 13 II Ii 1 all IISAIIRIIIIIII


SJ. P. WILIAM, President.
. T. A. Jax 2nd Vioe-President.
SH. L. KAYTx, Secretary.


J. A. G. OPoN, l ice-Presidest
J. F. Dssnuuav VimPresden
D. A. Wdite Tesrr


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,
-w


NI1 SIwt aEEC Mo lM FI IS l OUhlE E.
- *adma Offine etMVJLMf .H, Z oomg, -
S r sa PNaCOLA, FrLX. AI anelk Oresry ~Mne,
Branch Ofie JICXEOINVILL, rLL COLUsmUI, X.
: Naval Stores Producers ae lalvted to Correspod With Us.
ll illl lllllll ll lll lllllll l IIIll ullll ullllll. A. B ER


^f^ M. A. BAKRn,


SEEDS.
Bourt & Co., Wn. A., Jacksonville, Fla. The Cpe
Y-ARDS The Larlet and Oldert Copper
SHIP TARDS. Work in Ge L.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jackonville, la. Works In Georoa.
Merill-Stevs C., Jadomavlu I. T My specialty is large wor
-m SB B -I=i aI AZT 1m5Mm am mln '


l B er Imprev

Semiess Turpen-
tite StH.
Write me for pries as eutasia
r. 0. B. any point in Geri1a, l.
,da. Alabama or Milesl api. A
stuL s aoM MAer a guarates.
Job work through the
V +B country a specialty.

Brunswick, Ga
ma and heavy bottom that do not lek.


____;_~_ ___ __ ____


YELLOW PIZE LUMBIE
OCamme Iummer Co. Jadsonvl 11.
East Coast lumber C., Watertown, 1



Trade Checks

FOR THE


cOMMissART INSs.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.

COMMISSARY CHECKS
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Ilustrlal Record Go.







18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BECORD.
i


T. MURPHY
JACKSONVILLE MACHINE AND IRON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS

FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Iren
and Bras Castings, and machine repairs.of all kinds.
MAR Meff E AND BOLERS PULLEYS AND SHAFTING.
Agent for Stationary Engines, Boilers, Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden-
mrs. Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Goods
fWER TIIIMSSIO Ull WATER WOKI EIQIMEIT AS IPECAIUTT


JACKSONVILLE


- FLORIDA.


The Clyde Steamship Company
*


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
T"e ar""rlt MN "Ua a n apie m to "a ftn W, laMag
at ChmWr8-H & C. both ways.
PFom new Tsak, Prom aaesemevu.e saw
~(P wort m**ve). AM NUN. VhaW-leO .o ew Tar .
Saturday, Feb. 18, at 3:00 pm .... ALGONQUIN ......Thursday, Feb. 23, at 7:30 am
Tuesday, Feb. 21, at 3:00 pm ... .ARAPAHOE .... Sunday, Feb. 26, at 10:00 am
Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 3:00 pm .... IxMOHICAN ... .Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 11:30 am
riday, Feb. 24, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ... .Wednesday, Mar. 1, at 12:30 pm
Saturday, Feb. 25, at 3:00 pm .... IROQUOIS ....Thursday, Mar. 2, at 1:00 pm
*xHURON ...... Friday, Mar. 3, at 4:00 am
Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 3:00 pm .... COMANCHE ....Sunday, Mar. 5, at 4:30 am
Wednesday, Mar. 1, at 3 pm ........ALGONQIN................Monday, March 6, at 5.00 am
Friday, Mar. 3, at .00 pm...............ARAPAHOE........Wednesday, Mar. 8. at 6 a. m.
Saturday, March 4, at .00 pm..... -xNEW YORK.........eThursday, Mar. at 6L30 am
Tuesday, Mar. 7, at t00 pm...............APACHE................unday, Mar 12, at 8 am
Wednesday,, ar. at p..........II OI..........ond t am
Friday, Mar. 1U at a00 pm.............COMANCHE.........'Wednesday, Mar. 15, at 11 am
*xMOHICAN.........Wednesday, Mar. 15, at 1 00 am
Saturday, Mar. 11, at .00 pm.......ALGONQUIN.........Thursday, Mar. 16, at 12 00 n'n
Tuesday, Mar. 14, at 3 00 p. m.. ARAPAHOE..........Sunday. Mar. 19, at 4 00 a. m.
Wednesday, Mar. 15, at 3 00 p. m., xHURON............Monday, Mar. 20, at 4 30 a. m.
Friday, Mar. 17, at .00 pm...............APACHE ..........Wednesday, Mar. 22 at 6.30 am
Saturday, Mar. 18, at L00 pm...........IRIQUOIS...........Thursday, Mar. 23, at .00 am
IxNEW YOAK............Friday, Mar. 24, at 6.30 am
Tuesday, Mar.1, at L00 pm...........COMANCHE.............Sunday, Mar. 26, at 8.30 am
Wednesday, Mar. at 2.00 pm....ALGONQUIN.......... Monday, Mar. 2. at .30 am
Friday, Mar. 24. at .00 pm............ARAPAHOE......Wednesday, Mar. 29 at 11.00 am
Saturday, Mar. 5, at .00 pm........xHURON.............Thursday, Mar. 30, at 12.00 n'n
xMOHICAN..............Friday, Mar. US1, at 1.00 pm
Tuesday, Mar. 28, at .00 pm.............APACHE................unday Apr. 2, at 4.00 am
Wednesday, Mar. 2, at .00 pm..........IRIQUOIS..............Monday, Apr. 3, at 4.0 am
Friday, Mar. 31, atL.00 pm.........COMANCHE.........Wednesday, Apr. 5, at 5.00 am
--Bostoa via Bruamwick and Charleston. xFreight only. --Boston via
Bruwiek.
TIE CLYDE NBW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
roservis. Detweso Ja.u em.vie, et.. and P vldem. saln m slld-
e PS1 wate Haasr at Charlesten Both Ways.
...II-W-.IK.iT WAru IIt
ertlbd in .. .. .. ............ .. ....From foot of Catherine Itreet, JlaeseTll
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
aetwee Jakl eavrll anm lasete4.
SteMsg at nlaftka Astor, t. hraane s. Beressord (De Lad) sad latersealat
landwn aen ft 36bs rivw.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
ts ase- ted to sl as elews: L.ave Jacksonillo. Sunday, Tuesdays ad Thurs-
days 8s p. R eturnm, leave ISanor Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridas 9: a. sm.
Oi~8~urCrjU* NOBTRBTHOUlD,
aIsaia ,-. I eaO ur .
Lav L..................... ..Jaks.rvllen...................... Arrve f a. u.,
Ls .I..::........ .......Pt ...................... ..... ave ~M p. am.
I m a. SL ....... ........At.......... ............................. a p. .
IsaM 4 a. L ........... ... .. .rausL .............. .......... av Is p. a.
.............. .......B eord (DeLanOd).................L... ,,O neM
Arriv a. ml......... .................Sard................... ...... IIeVO *:d a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m.I................. .nterprise.................... Ly. 10:00 a. m.
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, 122 W. BAY ST., JACKVILLE.
P. M. IRONMONGER, JR., Asst. Gen. Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St. Jacksonville, Fla.
W. Q. OOaPs. J3I. LIal Frt. Art., JaOkv'Tlle. C. P. LOVUZLL. Aast. Supt.,Jaek'viln
Foot Hogan Street. Jacksonville.
AL C. wAmQa T. G. P A., Nw York, OLYDU M.TLa F. A.. New Teori
ewi lm Manm m. OP. eL A tL .
h Neflng il Ubg. 2tate Otres. New Te.


********************** $So@00 @$********- 0000
SYou Want a Turpentine Leatlen?
SvYou Want a SawmnI LesatiUe?
: You Want any Kind of Fleorid Land?
IF You Mean Business?
C-1 on or eWres ft
4 J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS,
Ocala. Florida
***************-----***-----*** --***- *------_
MS11111 50001fiKle1l<1111111 114$411111111



Record Readers:



The job printing department
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. It is reason-
able to suppose you will get
better and more satisfactory
printing supplies-letter heads,
envelopes, commissary checks,
pay-roll reports, etc., by having
us make them.

Industrial Record Co.,

Ja-cs-vle Frida






|7el Metropolls


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida ..


$5.00 a Year $2.50 Six Months

2 Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.


CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.





-h- u---hu--h------Sa h ----- I Ih I: I- I---lulIuI*I**IIm I 9mp8mm


C. L. NOGmSR, Pasmurr.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, Vxcz-Pnxs mnm.


C. H. HODG8ON, 1ac, and TUas's.


DIRECTORS s C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEahern and J. A. Canford, of Jaksoavlle;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GIRoCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


IConsolidated


Grocery


Company


Cosaist of ee Three-Story Balldlag, 70x200; one two-story balldlag. SOx390; oae oee-story belidiag, 80x250,
maklag the largest space of amy Company of the kind la the Soeta.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacole. Fla.., and Sevanneh. Ge.


I


ANIIII InIeIIInsee I$III! i >sMIII **t* IM 06 to I I IIIIIis I $Iaes I #to It asIs IIIgoMtII @II>s iiM




Iz


dl)j)JErl~l~ll~~i j *-~ urn~ u4~a;~~~~ii.~ I


-a' i~


Two of the Patterns we show in our Catalogue.
SPECIAL VALUES IN STERLING SILVER.
bs>s -
us.


THE

"Rose"
Teaspoous 9.oo "r do..
Dessert 8poo, Sx&oo per doz.
Table Spomrs, a3.o0 per am.
Dessert Forks $6.oo per dos.
Table Forks, s3.o per dos.
Dessert K .es, Sao per do..
Table Knives, $3.oo per do.
NO CHARGE FOR
ENGRAVING.


Greenleaf o
Crosby Company


3tlckrzs anb
biloet mitbzf


41 West Bay Street
Jacksonville
MTW hiafst md faner srtoc tis PeMt dl
sLem 5ss. Prompt attmle to mR edaSe


THE
"Germania"
Tespoom goo per d4.
Dessert Spoo, I per ds.
Table Spoons, OnJ pr des.
Dessert ork%, g.o per 6M.
Table Fork, 3.50o pr A.
Dessrt Knivs, *9-oo par -.
Table KniTe, a.oo per de.
WE PAY EXPRESS
CHARGES.


Write for Catalogue
ONE HUNDRED PAGES ILLUSTRATING


SSilverware, Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Cut Glass, Clocks, ekc.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings


Illustrating and Engraving Department

OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.

Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.

I SPEMlTl 18E I MSIMEN, REOUNM II EEli MI PIORIOUS U PMIIE.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


I


I:*
;-*