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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00111
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: March 3, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00111
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text




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IJACKSONVILLE, FLA. ATLANTA, GA.


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President, W. C. POWELL; Vice-Presidents, who with the President, constitute the Directory and Board of Managers, W. F. COACHMAN, B. F. BUI-
LARD, H. L. COVINGTON, II. A. McEACHERN, JOHN R.YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES

.. COMPANY..


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA, FLA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.

The Consolidated is Purely a Cooperative Company. Its
Interests are identical with those of the Producers. The
Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.


YARDS AT JACKSONVILLE, SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA AND PENSACOLA

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond,
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WEEKLY


INDUSTRIAL


RECORD


PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO THE NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING m i aubmb


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SAVANNAH, GEORGIA. |



A Leading Sunsthern City ,, Its Large Possibilitieq and EjcCptical Opportunietir
(Br -CHARLES TMPLE.)


A recent victor to Savannah, one of the
most prominent and wealthy real estate
dealers in the United States, stated upon
leaving the city as follows:
From Information and observation gained
while in this city I am certain that Sa-
vannah's future s an exceptionally bright
one, for it is not only one of the most
beautiful cities in the United States, but
that its possibilities and opportunities for
further development in its business, com-
meiclal and industrial progress places it
undoubtedly as one of the greatest cities
of the South.
It Is gratifying to realize that Savannah
has passed that point where any doubt
whatever can be entertained as to its com-
mercial future, of its maritime pre-emi-
nence on the South Atlantic, and of its
peerss progress n everything that is es-
sential to fix the status of a metropolitan
city. Its multitude of thriving industries,
Its Importance in commerce, its rise as a
center for production and supply, giving
Its advantages alike to the manufacturer
and the merchant, the capitalist and the
small investor proves those words most
conclusively.
The stranger who as not visited Savan-
nah in some years will be surprised at the
vast strides that have been made, at the
rapid increase in business, the signs ev-
erywhere of the great accumulation of
wealth, and the many opportunities that
have been opened and taken hold of for
the investment of capital profitably.
On all sides the improvement in recent
years have been enormous. Savannah to-
day and Savannah twenty-five years ago
are as different cities n many respects as
though they were not the same munici-
pality.
HISTORICAL.
The first time that a white man set foot
on the site of Savannah, according to tra-
dition, was In 15E when Sir Walter Ral-
eigh landed here and held conference with
an Indian chief, at a point near or upon
now what is known as Gas House Hill.
This Is also said to have been the burial
placeothe the chief, who chose the spot In
memory of his compact with the "great
white man with a red beard." Sir Walter
Montgomery secured from the Palatinate
and Lards Proprietor of the Province of
Carolia in 1717 a grant and release of all
lands between the Altamaha and Savannah
rivers. HM attempt to colonize the lands
failed and they reverted back to the Lords
Proprietor of Carolina.
The history of Savannah begins with the
settlement of Georgia in 171, the youngest
of thirteen colonies. The early existence
of the little colony that at lo ed on the
banks of the Savannah was one of difficul-
ties and sufferings. They were a hardy
and determined people, and a permanent
establshmeent was maintained.
John Laord Viscount Percival, James Ed-
ward Oglethrope and their associates ob-
tained from George II a grant for twenty-
one years of the country between the Sa-
vannah and the Altamaha rivers, and west-
ward to the Pacific ocean, in trust for the
poor.
The plan adopted was to found an asylum
for the poor of England and the Protes-
tants of all nations, where former poverty
would be of no reproach and where all
might worship God without fear of perse-
cution.
Roman Catholics were excluded and were
not admitted until Georgia became a Royal
Province, thirty years later. The first visit
of Oglethrope was in 173. He selected the
site for the colony and concluded a treaty
with Tomo-Chl-Chi, chief of the Indian na-
tion occupying the territory. On February
Ist, 1111 he landed on Yamacrow Bluff,
accompanied by Colonel William Bull, and
with me hundred and fourteen colonists.
Tht was te first occupation of Georgia,
ad the birth of Savannah, the name being
dmt ld ft the rive The little settle-


ment in time grew into a town, laid off The first Sunday school ever established
with open squares and streets crossing each In the world was founded in Savannah.
other at right angles. The land was dl- When Orglethorpe finally departed for
vided into two hundred and forty free- England in 1741, at the end of the first de-
holds, and the town land covered twenty- cade of the existence of Savannah, it had
four square miles. On July Uth, 173, grown to a village of three hundred and
shortly after the town had been laid out, fifty houses. A map draw n n 174 marks
a party of forty Israelite. arrived, all the places of note, so that the sites can
Only three families, those of Abraham now be readily found.
Minis, Benjamin Sheftall and Abraham De The four pines under which tents were
Leon, remained. The others removed to pitched by the colonists on their first night
Charleston. Immediately upon landing in Georgia stood directly in front of No.
they founded a synagogue, to which they 14 Bay street West. Nearby was where
gave the name Mickva Israel. On March the tent of Orglethorpe was located, and
12th, 1724, seventy-eight Sattsburghers ar- where he resided from February, 1732, to
rived and were established by Oglethrope April, 1734.
on a tract twenty-four miles west from The crane used to hoist goods up the
Savannah. They were driven out of Ger- bluff and the bell to call the colonists to-
WINE


HOM HERMAN MYEM
MYoprao Savsnsh Ga


many by religious persecutions and sought
homes and freedom in Georgia. They
named the settlement Ebenezer, In com-
memoration of their final deliverance from
their enemies. To-day it is revered among
the Lutherans of America. Two years later
John and Charles Wesley arrived and the
founder of Methodism preached in Savan-
nah his first sermon in America on the site
now occupied by the custom house. They
remained in Savannah two years. George
Whitfleld arrived the following year and
he laid in Savannah the foundation of his
fame as a talented and eloquent preacher,
He established the Bethesda Orphan
Home, where Jew, Protestant and Roman
Catholic united in founding Georgia's no-
blest charity.


gether were situated on the bluff at No. 24
Bay street west.
SAVANNAH IN THE REVOLUTION
The Court House and Tabernacle were on
the northeast corner of Bull street and
Bay lane. The public mill was on Bryan
street, where the Southern Express Com-
pany's building now is. The home for
strangers was at No. 22-4 Congress street
west The public oven was on the north-
east corner of Congress and Whitaker
streets. The draw well was in the center
of Bull street at the Intersection of Con-
gress lane. The church lot is now occu-
pied by Christ Church. The public store
was at 25 Bull street. The fort was locat-
ed on the line of President street, east of
Drayton street. The parsonage was on the


church lot, just east of Drayton street.
The Palisades started on the bluff at what
now is No. U1 Bay street west. The prin-
elpal streets were named for prominent
Carolina farmers who helped the Geor-
gians start life in the new world. These
are Bull. Whitaker, Drayton, St. Julen
and Bryan. Montgomery street derives its
name from Sir Robert Montgomery, who
held the first grant to the lands. After te
departure of Orglethorpe for England the
government of the colony devolved upon
the trustees in England and it anguished
in consequence of their chimerical views
and niH.m.pigement. Agriculture did
not flourish, commerce was not eneour-
aged, the attempt to establish silk culture
proved a failure, the settlers were leaving
to locate in Carolina and other American
possessions or were going back to nag-
land. In 17 the trustees decided to sur-
render the charter and Georgia became a
Royal province. Savannah survived under
the more liberal and the wiser protectio
of the crown and In time became the pros-
pering foster-mother of Georgia. The set-
tiers of Georgia were naturally an Inde
pendent people, and the "Stamp Act" had
the same effect upon them as their cousins
in Massachusetts, and Savannah frnished
much of the powder used in defense of
Bunker Hill. At the breaking out of hos-
tlities Oglethorpe, the founder of Savan-
nah, was offered the command of the Brit-
ish forces in America operating against the
Americans under Washington, but declined
It. A Georgia schooner was the first Gc-
missioned American vessel in the Revo-
lutionary War, and made the first cap-
ture of the war off Tybee, consisting of
16,000 pounds of powder. Savannah revolt-
ed against the Royal Governor early in
1776 and imprisoned him. Although the
youngest of the original thirteen colonies,
Georgia and Its chief city, Savannah, were
among the first to espouse the cause of in-
dependence. In 1777 the convention met in
Savannah and framed a State constitu-
tion. The city was captured by the Brit-
ish toward the close of 1778, after a say-
agely disputed struggle. Many of the dct-
izens were Ikayonetted In the streets and
others were imprisoned on board of Brit-
Ish ships. The people suffered the horors
of a rigorous military rule by the British
troops until the English troops surrendered
to General Anthony Wayne July Uth, mh,
the Rough Rider of the Revolution. In
Septeluber, 17 when English rule had be-
come all but Intolerable, a French fleet of
twenty ships of the line and dxtee
frigates, commanded by Count d'Estaing.
anchored off Tybee to aid the struggling
Americans A force of 5.00 of the best
soldiers of the French army, united wit
such that the colonial government could.
muster, laid a determined snege to tse
town. After making an assault on Oc-
tober th, the besiegers were compelled to
give up the attempt to wrest the town
from the British, leaving the city to the
mercies of the neraged English. During
this long and dashing assault, which last-
ed nearly two months, the chivalrous Pu-
laski lost his life at Spring Hill redoubt.
now the freight yard of the Central of
Georgia Railway. The gallant Jasper fell
near by, who had repeatedly proved his
love for the cause of liberty. Savannah
has on numerous occasions evinced its
patriotism. When visited by Washington
after becoming President he was received
with Joyous enthusiasm. Lafayette was
given an overwhelming welcome, and dur-
ing his visit laid the corner stones of the
Pulaski and the Greene monuments. So
were President, Monroe, Arthur, Cleveland
and McKinley received with every mani-
festation of honor and regard when they
visited Savannah. On each occasion the
Chatham Artillery fired a salute. Thi has
the distinction of being the next to the
oldest military organization in the m itry
In existenre. During the Spanish-Ameri-










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


an war the superior advantages of loca-
ti, healthfulness and transportation fa-
ciliies combined to make Savannah the
camping and the embarkation point of the
volunteers and regulars of the United
States army, despite the strenuous efforts
of other cities to secure selection. A per-
manent military hospital was also erected
here with 1,20 beds. one of the finest in-
titutions of the kind in the country.
MONUMENTS.
In the civil conflict the ordinance of se-
cession was framed in Savannah, and in
this city the Confederate flag was first un-
turled in Georgia. The port was closed to
commerce from 1I to 1116, The city was
invested by General Sherman December
11ti. 1UK after his famous march to the
-. Moortly after the fall of the city
Generals Lee and Johnston surrendered to
the Federal forces and the war ended.
From the days of the colonists Savannah
has cherished patriotism and valor. The
most beautiful avenue, Bull street, has its
square adorned with fine productions of
the sculptor's art. Beginning at the most
northern square on Bull street is the mon-
ument of General Nathaniel Greene of
Riode island, who shared with Washing-
ton the gratitude of the Revolutionary pa-
triots He settled on a tract of land near
Savannah in 17 and upon his decease in
171, his remains were interred in Savan-
ash with military honors. The Gordon
monument in the Court House square was
erected in 18 by the Central Railway to
its first president. In the same square is
the Imense granite boulder, rough-hewn
from a Georgia quarry, commemorating
the noble character and heroic virtues of
Tomo-Chl-Chl, the aged Creek, who wel-
comed Oglethorpe to his demesne and al-
ways remained a friend to the white set-
tiers.
In the Chippewa Square are the Bartow
and the MeLmws monuments, Confederate
heroes, and erected in 138. President
Cleveland took part in the unveiling of
the Jasper monument, located in Madison
Square, in 13. This is one of the finest
monuments in Savannah. The monument
to Brigadier General Count Casimer Pu-
lahk is situated on Monterey Square. The
Confederate soldiers' monument on the
parade ground is surmounted by a bronze
figure of a Confederate soldier, distinctive
for its faithful portrayal of the hardships
endured during the four years of warfare.
LOCATION AND BUILDINGS.
It silk culture failed in the early days
of Savannah. it is not a little remarkable
that in the ranks of this same people, one
hundred years later, an invention was per-
feoted which enthroned cotton as "King."
It was on the Savannah river, a short
distance from the city limits, that Ell
Whitney of Connecticut worked out the
secret mechanism of the cotton gin and
made Georgi and the whole South opulent
and powerful
The frst steamship ever built in the
United States was projected and owned in
Savannah. It was named the "Bavannah"
and in April, U 1, sailed for Liverpool,
eagla4,d completing the voyage across the
ocean in twenty-two days. Thus Savan-
nah revolutionized the cotton industry and
the commerce of the world. Savannah
also completed the longest and the most
important ine ti the South-the Georgia
Central Railway, thereby alacng In their
reach, though its harbor, The ocean com-
merce of the world, and hastening the de-
velopment of Georgia and the contiguous
States
Tolerance in religous opinion is prover-
bial in Savannah; it is rich in beautiful ed-
flaes of Protestant, Catholic and Hebrew
worship.
Christ Church is the oldest and was
founded in 174. John Wesley was rector
of Christ Church parish in 173.
The city has one of the earliest estab-
lished educational Institutions in the coun-
try, Chatham Academy, founded in 1788,
now the High School. It has the oldest
theater in America, the original portion of
which was erected in 18t The oldest Ma-
sonic Lodge of Master Masons, Solomon
No. 1, and the oldest lodge of Knights of

Pythias in Georgia, Forest City No. 1.
Among its numerous structures noted for
architectural beauty are the post office.
the hansomest public building in the Unit-
ed States, with the exception of the Con-
gressonal IAbray in the National Capital
the county court house, the finest public
structure in the State, the new union de-
pot, the Savannah Vounteer Guards ar-
monry, the Telfair Academy, the Hodgson
Hall, the Roman Catholic cathedral, the
Independent Presbyterian Church, the
Lawton Memorial Hall. the new Germania
Bank building, and the homes of several
other banks. The free public library is
under the joint control of the municipality
and the Georiga Histrical Society, to the
maintenance of which the city appropriates
annually C$,0. The new City Hall is a
magnificent structure and was built by
Savannah contractors and designed by a
Savannas architect.
Mavannah is situated on the Savannah


river, upon a steep bluff forty-five feet
above the river, eighteen miles from the
Atlantic ocean, and It is the government
eeat of Chatham County. It covers an
area of over 4,000 acres and has a popula-
tion of over 70,000, its growth in the past
five years exceeding the Increase in any
previous five years of its history its pop-
ulation in 1880 being less than aWWo.
Savannah is the Forest City of the great
and growing South, being richly endowed
by nature as a manufacturing center and
a place of residence; it is a city to live in
for health, for pleasure or for business pur-
poses.
It is the City of Opportunities.
It has a noble historic past, a past full
of romance and sentiment; but it does not
live In the past.
It draws inspiration from the glorious
deeds that have marked its history, but
its eyes are set on the future, a future
that is full of bright promise, of rapid de-
velopment, commercially and industrially,
a future that seems to hold in store for the
city wonderful growth in population and
vast Increase of wealth.
Savannah keeps footstep with the spirit
of the age. It throbs in unison with the
great business heart of the world.
One hundred and seventy-one years of
great deeds endear it to the patriot, the
historian, and to all men whose souls are
not callous to the achievements and les-
sons of bygone generations. It does not
rest content upon the laurels of the past,
but is pushing forward to new victories in
the varied life of to-day.
Savannah is pre-eminently a city where
trade, commerce, manufactures are de-
lightfully intermingled with the highest
culture, with unusual devotion to the
beautiful, with full appreciation of art.
where the aesthetic side of life is culti-
vated, while business opportunities are
being seized and trade expended in all
directions. And we say It with true pride,
it is the ideal city alike for the investor,
the merchant, the manufacturer, who de-
sires while establishing his business to se-
cure for his family the advantages of a
home in a community where the higher
things of life which make life worth the
living for, are not neglected.
Savannah's progress in recent years com-
pares most favorably with that of any oth-
er city of the United States, and Savannah
gives way to no city in the United States
whose citizens love their city more than
they do Savannah and who, if speaking
in lenghtened detail of its charms and Its
beauty, would be less mindful of being
told that they were becoming "intoxicated
with the exhubrance of their own verbos-
ity."
Its taxable values have jumped from
17,000,000 in 1880 to over $42,000,000 In 104.
on a moderate assessment, while its tax
rate has been reduced to $1.3 net on the
$100.00.
Its commerce, extending to all parts of
the world, have expended in volume from
600,000 tons of freight annually in 1880 to
1,500,000 tops, while its values are now
considerably over 10,000.000, as compared
with ..60,000,000 then.
A few miles of cheap tracks, with old
cars drawn by ancient mules have given
way to between fifty and sixty miles of


the finest electric Irad tin the country.
with care of the argest and latest pat-
tern.
The area of the city has extended south-
ward for over two miles, with hundreds
of fine homes, possessing every modern
comfort and convenience, covering what
was then unused and almost valueless
commons. Many hundreds of dwellings
have been erected in the ast five years to
meet the requirements of the fast ncreas-
ing population, and many additional ones
are in course of erection.
Forty odd miles of the fist suburban
paved roads of the South, extending in all
directions, bringing pleasure resorts with-
in easy reach and enabling farmers and all
kinds of produce growers So bring their
product to market in ease at a minimum
expense.
Sandy roadbeds in the city have given
way to up-to-date paved highways, over
thirty-four miles of asphalt, Belgian block
and vitrified brick pavements, now enabl-
ing all parts of the city to be reached
quickly and in comfort. Outside of the
city the country has been drained and op-
ened up to truck farmers.
SHIPPII.
Savannah was an important shipping and
commercial point as early as 116, for ti
that year George Washington, upon visit-
ing the city, noted in his diary that the
town was surrounded with rich and lux-
urient rice fields; that the harbor was fied
with square rigged ve-els, and that the
chief trade was tobacco, indago, hemp
lumber and cotton. The completion of the
Panama canal can be made of vast bene-
fit to the city of Savannah. if measure
are taken to make it the shipping point
for the coal of the mines in the west and
southwest that will be needed by the ves-
sels bound for the ports of WesternNu-
rope after having passed through the
canal.
HEALTH.
Savannah to-day stands pre-eminent
among American cities from the stand-
point of general healthfualnae For miles
around the country ha been thoroughly
drained. Supplemented by a modern house-
drainage system, the pla of the noted
New York engineer, tbe late Colonel
George Waring.
The entire water supply of the city is
obtained from artesian wells from 50 to
1,500 feet deep. This water is the purest
furnished to the consumers n the United
States, filtered by nature. The chemical
analysis to which It has been objected
show it absolutely free rom any dele-
terious matter whatever. It is clear as
crystal and flows at the rate of ten mil-
lion gallons daily.
The water works are owned and oper-
ated by the municipal government and the
rates are so low that al enjoy an abun-
dance of water for domestic and manu-
facturing purpose The death rate among
the white population of the city for the
year 194 was in nowise an exceptional
year as regards mortality, ws to the
1,000 population. In all there were but 5i
deaths among the whites from all causes.
One remarkable fact in this connection is
that S of these were of persons over 7C


years of ge. a fht that speas volumes
ar conditions prevailing here a to long-
evity. A health officer, with a large ad
efelent corps of sanitary agents, keeps
the city under careful inspection at all
times. The city is protected from invasion
of disease from abroad by the United
States Marine Hospital service. which
malntais a well-equipped quarantine sta-
tion at the mouth of the Savannah river.
"To see the fountain in.Forsyth Park on
a January morning with trees in laf,
flowers in bloom and birds merrily sing-
ng is a sight which must be seen to be
fully appreciated," or Forsyth Park in
midwinter, which is a charming spot for
visitors from the bleak North and West,
and so it Is with Oglethorpe avenue, a pdr-
feet highway with grass and trees that
are evergreen.
CLIMATE.
Savannah's climate is best described in
one word, "Ideal." Snow, sleet and sush
are unknown. lee is a rarity, although
the present winter, as in all other parts
of the United States, has not been as ac-
ceptable as one could wish, but this to
quite eeeeptional.
Extreme heat is as unusual as extreme
cold. While the North and West are in
the embrace of blizzards, Savannah enjoys
a temperature that is bracing, but not full
of acute suffering, producing distress. Tour-
ists have found Savannah one of the most
enjoyoble cities of the Bouth from Decem-
ber Ist to May 1st. When the Northern
and Western cities are complaining of ex-
ceedingly high temperatures, while their
hospitals, so to speak, are full of the vic-
tims of the heat, and the newspapers day
after day chronicle scores of cases of
prostration and sunstroke. Savannah rev-
els In breezes direct from the ocean that
temper the heat of midday and render the
nights cool and pleasant for repose. Bun-
strokes are practically unknown In Savan-
nah. Our entire summer often passes
without a night in which sleep is not to
be had with comfort. But ten miles from
the Atlantic in an air line, every afternoon
brings Its refreshing wind from that In-
exhaustible source of health and comfort.
The wide streets of the city, the beauti-
ful open spaces filled with shady trees, all
amist in making the summer pam more
plesantly in Savannah than probably in
any other city in the United States outside
of the mountains.
Fuller Information on any point wll be
most gladly furnished by making applica-
tion to the Mayor of Savannah or to the
Savannah Chamber of Commerce, the Cot-
ton Exchange or to the Board of Trade.
EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS,
Savannah's Free Public Library com-
prises all the very latest works best adapt-
ed to support its educational system, and
number considerably over W,1m volumes,
Over 7,000 pupils are enrolled in the pub-
ce schools of Savannah, occupying four-
teen school buildings and taught by nearly
,0 teachers. Of these 4,7 are white chll-
tran in ten schools, taught by 10 teach-
ers, and 2,17 colored children in four
schools, taught by forty-three teachers. In
he county outside of the city limits there
are B1 white children in thirteen schools,


Cation Vh" among^ CW.











THR WS~ir INDUSTRIAL RECORD. &
mwqw a EE


taUgh by 5eta hcL md LM
colored n twenty-ven school
tadght by twenty-seven teachers, and in
the entire county there are SM, children
securing a free education.
One of Savannah's free public school
buildings, the Chatham High Grammar
School, has seating room for 1600 children.
Savannah was one of the first cities of
the Bouth to renognia the importance of
public schools. Its educational system i
now thoroughly abreast with the beet in
this country. In addition to the public
schools there are a number of private
schools in the city, and a well developed
tree kindergarten system, to the extension
of which especial attention la being paid.
The public library is for all white resi-
dents, who are eligible without any coat
whatever, and la a very valuable adjunct
to the public school.
The Telfair art gallery, which possesses
the' finest collection of art works In the
South, enables students to pursue their
work under many advantages. Special men-
tin must be made of that fine school on
Thirty-eighth street in the ne wueetion of
Savannah, which seats N children. The
curriculum in the public schools ti being
steadily broadened and the buildings are
the finest in the South for educational pur-
poses. The home seeker can find here ev-
ery opportunity to educate his or her chil-
dren at a minimum expense. In the State
there are several colleges, in addition to
the State Universty, at which tuition fees
and living expenses are extremely mod-
erate.
FINANCIAL INerITUTIONS.
*The conservatism and strength of Sa-
vannah's financial institutions have be-
come almost a proverb in the South. In
financial circles throughout the country
their stability and able management are
recognized. They meet in full the large
monetary requirements of the business
community. With a capital and surplus
exceeding 6,000,a and deposits in excess
of 10,000,000, and connected with the
strongest banking institutions of the
North, they are ever ready to supply the
wants of their patrons. Savannah has
not known a bank failure In a half century
of more. Every one of its financial insti-
tutions Is In a highly prosperous condition,
their dividends varying from 8 to 8 per cent
per annum, and considerable additions be-
ing made yearly to their reserve funds.
Their directorates include the leading busi-
ness men of the city, and each enjoys the
absolute confidence of the business Inter-
ests of the community and State. With cor-
respondents throughout the North, South,
and West, they are in position to handle
economically and expeditiously all busi-
ness entrusted to them and have been a
powerful factor in the splendid development
of Savannah's business during the past
two decades. Ten institutions conduct the
enormous banking business of the city.
their united capital approaching $20,000,000.
A coaling station is projected at this port
which promises to be of great Importance,
enabling vessels of all times to coal here
rapidly and economically. It is proposed
to make Savannah more and more a sup-
ply point for building materials. Its trade
in such articles has now reached over P,-

The value of the cotton handled through
Savannah for the fiscal crop year ending
September 1st, was n$72,,00. Savannah's
retail trade it valued at over WL000,00 a
year and is rapidly growing. The resins
and turpentine handled at Savannah for
the year ending September 1st, 1904 aggre-
gated in value $106000.


HOM JAN=3 Nt DAL ON
N6W pm 6M. of Uam Ga.


TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES.
Four great railroad systems center at
Savannah, and two splendid steamship lines
connect It with the ports of the North. Di-
rect communication is also had with the
countries of the old world by regular lines
of freight steamships, and scores of tramp
steamers and sailing vessels that visit the
port during the year.
The railroad systems centering at Savan-
nah give It direct connection with all parts
of the United States, and enabling Its Job-
bers and manufacturers to keep in close
touch with distributors and consumers ev-
erywhere, as follows:
System- Mileage.
Central of Georgia ................ 1.845
Seaboard Air Line ...................... 2.612
Atlantic Coast Line ..................... 4.034
Southern .................................. 7.139

Pour systems ............................15.63
States traversed-
Georgia and Alabama.
Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina,
Georgia. Florida, Alabama.
Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina,
Georgia, Florida, Alabama.
Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina,
Georgia. Florida. Alabama. Mississippi,
Missouri Kentucky, Tennessee.
Ten States. Population over 16,000,000.
The Ocean Steamship Company operates
eleven steamships with a total tonnage of
4.478 from Savannah to New York and
Boston.
The Marehmatm ad Mtnw Treasport-


tlon Company operates seven steamships of
17,100 tonnage, connecting Savannah with
Baltimore and Philadelphia. These vessels
carry both passengers and freight and give
three sailings weekly from Savannah to
New York, one to Boston, two to Phila-
delphia and three to Baltimore.
In all these railroad and steamship sys-
tems have terminals here covering 750
acres, and with a wharf frontage of over
25,000 feet, or nearly five miles.
A union depot costing, with approaches.
00,000, is used by all of the roads enter-
ing -here, except the Central of Georgia,
which maintains its own depot. St. Louis,
Kansas City, Omaha and other centers for
the distribution of food products, as well
as Chattanooga, Birmingham and other im-
portant points in the mineral section of the
South, are many miles nearer to Savannah
than to any of ti'e Northern seaports.
Nearly all of the cotton mills of the South
are within a radius of three hundred miles
of Savannah. svannah is recognized as
the natural port of entry and seaport for
the entire southeast, and for a great ex-
tent of Western country. The construction
of the Panama canal will strengthen its
position in this and other respects. When
that great waterway Is completed Savan-
nah will be 705 miles nearer to its mouth
than New York, 610 miles nearer than Phil-
adelphia and 550 miles nearer than Balti-
more. It will also be nearer than New Or-
leans or Galveston. All experts on the
commercial situation predict a vast and
rapid growth for the business of Savannah
with the completion of the anal across the


Isthmus. From a transportation stand-
point, Savannah offers many advantages to
the merchant and manufacturer.
COMMERCE.
Savannah is among principal seaports of
the South Atlantic coast Its importance has
been recognized for many years by the
Federal government, which has expanded
in all seven million dollars in the improve
ment and deepening its harbor. There in
now practically a depth of twenty-eight
feet at mean high tide in its channel from
the city to the sea. A movement has bee
inaugurated looking to a further survey
and appropriation for thirty feet at mean
low water. Competent engineers have ds-
clared this practicable.
In the foreign trade the average tonnage
of vessels visiting Savannah's port has In-
creased 115 per cent in the past twelve
years. The largest freight steamships
afloat now regularly visit Savannah for
cargoes. The chief articles of export are
cotton, rosins, spirits turpentine, lumber
and timber, phosphate rock, iron and steel
and manufactured forms, cotton manu-
factured goods, cotton seed oil and other
products of the cotton seed, fruits and
vegetables and miscellaneous m.qnufcts-
goods.
Savannah draws freight from twenty-two
States as follows:
Cotton from Georgia, Florida, at
Carolina. Alabama, Tennessee, Mtsissllpy
Arkansas. Louisana, Indian Territory, Ok.
lahoma.
Naval stores from Georgia. loruda, Ale-


THE NEW CITY HALL OF SAVANNAH.


This AMnifict Buildinug Vil Soon D Copeed, mad Will Be a Greg Credit tse My.










- THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


EDrTOR J. ESTILL.
Smanah lY M Nme

bama, Mississippi, South Carolina.
Phosphate rock from Florida.
Lumber, etc., from Georgla, Florida,
South Carolina, Alabama, Mssissippi.
Hardwoods from Tennessee. Cotton man-
ufactures rom Georgia, South Carolina,
North Carolina and Alabama.
Fruits and vegetables from Georgia,
Florida and South Carolina. Iron, steel,
etc., from Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee.
Grain, grain products and packing house
products from Mchigan Ohio, Indiana. I-
lInolta Msseour Nebraska. Kansas. Ken-
tacky, Tennesse, Indian Territory, Okla-
homa. Caqned goods from Georgia, South
Carolina. Florida Alabama, Mississippi,
California. Washington and Oregon.
Groceries, provisions, etc., from points as
far west a Cincinnati. Chicago, t. Louis,
Kansas City, Omaha and as far north as
Baltimore and New York and east as far
as Boston. Manufactured goods from all
points north and as far west as Nebraska
and Michigan.
Shipments of phosphate rock through
this ort increased from 7,00O tons in 1IM
to 18,M tons. Shipments of lumber and
timber Increased from UmA4,0 feet in 1880
to over 2M,0AA Shipments of pig iron
have grown from 11%, tons twenty years
ago to over M.3I tons. Shipments of cot-
ton seed and its products, cotton seed oil,
meal, etc., are now considerably over 50,000
tons a year. This clam of exports are
steadily increasing.
Cotton, the South's great staple Industry,
is handled in enormous quantities at Sa-
vannah. Savannah holds the world's rec-
ord for the largest cargo of cotton export-
ed In November, 19, the British steam-
ship St. Andrew was cleared from this port
with a cargo equivalent to 36,379 square
babies of 500 Ibs each, her registered tonnage
being 4,411. Savannah Is the outlet through
which the Southern mills, in increasing
numbers, ship their products to the mar-
kets of the world.
Savannah handles yearly over a million
barrels of roains and turpentine. It is the
greatest port and the chief market of the
world for these products of the South.
A sight of a general view of Seaboard
Air Lines at Savannah is indeed a great
one. Four million dollars have been spent
on these terminals in the past five years.
and here is the longest dock in America
being 2,20 feet in length.
MA.NTjACTI'nRES.
While Savannah Is comparatively in the
Infancy of its Industrial development, It
possesses a large number of most import-
ant manufacturing establishments, and
many of minor sise are prospering and de-
veloping rapidly, and increasing their capi-
tal, output and wage roll. The fifty prin-
cipal manufacturing concerns of the city
now employ about 4,300 hands, and have an
output yearly of the value of over $8,000,-
000. Every indication points to Savannah
becoming one of the chief manufacturing
clues of the nation within the next few
years. The stability of Its present indus-
tries, the success they have achieved and
the rapid increase in the capital invested,
the number of hands employed and the
value of their output speak strongly of
Savannah's future along this line. The
largest industries are located on the river
front, where the advantages of cheap
handling of their raw materials and the
manufactured products offer splendid In-
ducements. Ample room still exists there
for a number of industries. At other points
in or adjacent to the city land suitable for
further manufactories is to be had that


possess admirable transportation facili-
ties. One of the great advantages Savan-
nah possesses as a manufacturing point,
outside of the superior water and rail
transportation facilities. is the mildness
and equableness of the climate. Work
here, either indoor or outdoor, is not In-
terferred with and hampered by severe
weather, either extreme of heat or cold.
It is probable that there s less loss of
time in the average manufacturing estab-
lishments in Savannah from climatic
causes than In any other town of the
United States. There is also naturally a
considerable saving In heating, and the
long days enable the operation of plants
without artificial lights over the greater
part of the year. Fuel is cheap, taxes low,
labor easily trained. From Savannah its
manufactured products are distributed over
a half dosen or more Southern States with
an aggregate population of over ten mil-
lions. These States are rapidly growing in
wealth and people; their demands are
broadening every year and manufacturers
located at Savannah are in a position to
meet their wants underq onditions that are
most favorable for success. Many open-
ings exist for new enterprises. Considera-
ble of the goods of all kinds used in this
section are still bought from the North and
West, at great expense for handling and
transportation, which could and should be
made at home. Manufactures who en-
ter this field study the demands of the peo-
ple and meet them, will place themselves
on the high road to wealth. Savannah of-
fers every possible encouragement to men
embarking in manufacturing industries,
large or small Especially favorable are
the opportunities for manufactures into
which lumber, cotton and wool largely en-
ter, Savannah being a great market for
these raw products of the South. Every
article which enters into daily use could be
made here profitably. Savannah's manu-
factures now include fertilizer works, soap
factories, breweries, machine shops, iron
foundries, copper foundries, railroad car
works, locomotive works, candy factories,
cigar factories, crate and box factories,
broom factories, baking powder factories,
copper works, marine railways, Ice fac-
tories, sash, door and blind factories, plan-
ing mills, rice mills, mattress factories.
harness works, woodenware factory, cofmn
factory, roin oil works, paint and var-
nish works, proprietary medicine works,
boot and shoe factories, canning factories
and cotton seed oil works, etc.
WHOLESALE TRADE.
Its Jobbing trade, from a statement pub-
lished in 1904, wa over I M,00.00 yearly,
divided as follows:
Groceries ...................................... 1,00
Dry goods ........................... 7,0 ,000
Boots and shoes ...................... o000.000
Clothing ................................. 4,000,00
Hardware .............................. 4,0000
Fertilizers ............................. 8 00,00
Fruits, vegetables and provisions.. 5,000000
Liquors and tobacco ................. 10000,000
Hay, grain, etc ....................... ,000,000
Builders' supplies .................. 2,00000
The section of the South tributary to Sa-
vannah sl rapidly developing in population
and wealth. With its growth the Jobbing
trade of Savannah must continue to ex-
pand and prosper.
CITY GOVERNMENT.
Savannah has a thoroughly organized
municipal government, with all the depart-
ments pertaining to the most modern city,
well equipped for their work and main-
tained at all times in a first-class condition.
The city revenues, about 1300.000 a year,
enable it to provide all of its departments


MR P. A. STOVALL,
Ed1 of the SVaaabh Prs.


THB




Falstaf Restaurant

Fw Lon mmd flexntimwrt


Breast a k emft. Iaae.oa It to 3:20, Ma. Table &%se
dxinea r, to 9. 75c. Orstm on a half ashL MSte theaw


25 MAWS TREET,

JACXSONIVML=E FLORIA.




*msssmmammssmssmm lgs s mumssmsas&&@ mssmm~


MARL WMW. Pres.


T. U. "GeAWAW. 10m0s. "Mom GVEMI TOMM


SOUTHERN STATES LAD & TIMBER COMPANY,





Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCIANGE,


JACIISONVIU.L 11*


sol1119886889411111slls@l s elllOmllIoe@lslolvll e






AIRE YOU A




MERCHANT?




Then you should become a subscriber to the only
strictly trade journal in the Southeast. It costs
you only the small sum of 25 cents a month-
$3.00 a year-and the benefit you will derive each
isaue will pay for a year's subscription.
Fill out following blank form at ones and mail to


THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

DoTACB HE1M

INDUSTRIAL RECORD,
Jacka*eWvie, rna.

cgifin 9 fr Wtr wlch A seed th WEEKLY

INDUSfRIAL RECORD for a per'df -r awat to





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THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. .
- -- . . I I I I !


wit is tH ON.- e sr. to keep a a t-
il-sut number of trained employes In each
of them, and to carry on their business in
a manner satlfaetory to its eitiaena. The
direction of municipal affairs s centered
in the Mayor and twelve Aldermen, elected
bl-eanmally by the vote of the entire city.
The departments are under the direction of
superintendenta elected by the Mayor and
AldTmen. and subject to removal by that
body. The pollee force consists of nearly
a hundred men, about twenty-five being
mounted. It is provided with the Game-
well telegraph system and covers the city
effectively. Expenditures In. this depart-
ment are nearly StIMW annually. In addl-
tion there am four private police forces
regulated by eity ordinances, for the pro-
tectiq of ralreed and steamship terminals.
constating of ever fifty me. The ire de-
partment includes eighty-six men, operat-
irg seven engines of the latest pattern.
eleven home reels, one chemical engine,
three hook and ladder trucks, the expendi-
tures being 11000 yearly. The department
of public works, which include the main-
tenance and cleaning of highways, the
scavenger work, dralnaa etc., gives em-
ployment to over W men and expends on
such departmental work $UG, yearly. The
water works department, caring for the
artesian water plant supplying the city
with the purest, for all purposes, and a
reserve plant for the se of river water
In an emergency, expends 31,0M yearly.
The average daily pumpage for artesian
well water Is over 18,1,0 gallons or over
12 gallons for every man, woman and
child. The health department includes the
health officer, one food inspector and seven
sanitary inapectora. Its expenditures are
11SI yearly. The city Is lighted by 20
arc lights, at a coat of W1.AO One-fourth
of all the expenditures of the city govern-
ment, exclusive of sinking fund and In-
teret on debt. are for permanent public
betterment.
Savannah has Issued no bonds in a quar-
ter of a century. Its credit Is of the high-
et. Its old bonds command a fine pre-
mtum. The assessed valuations for 1904
are )MlItS.. Five years ago they were
.JMA. average yearly increase 51.100.
The city tax rate is 1.45 on the $100. less
10 per cent for prompt payment, making a
net tax rate of ct on the S0.
In the past five years over nine miles of
streets have been paved with asphalt. Bel-
gian blocks and vitrified bricks. The city
bas now forty mile, of paved streets and
lanes. and Is paving on an average of two
miles yearly.
The new city hall. In course of construc-
tion, will eost, when completed. 20,000, en-
tirely paid for out of the regular revenues,
without additional taxation or obligations
of any kind. A Park and Tree Commission
has charge of the parks, squares, grass
plots trees and cemetery. It is steadily
beautifyng the city. It puts out about
1,m0 trees each year. Savannah is known
far and wide as "The Forest City of the
Bothh"
The city has also a scientific house
drainage system, distinct from the regular
sewerage system, for carrying oft rain
water, etc.
SPORTS AND PLEASURl REORT8.
Bathing at the Isle of Hope, one of Sa-
vannah's nearby resorts, la enjoyed by vast
crowds during the summer season.
Burf bathing, still water bathing, yacht-
ing, rowing. fishing, hunting, automobiling.
road driving, golf; these and all other
pleasures are at the command of the Sa-
vannahlan.
Tybee Island, but eighteen mile from the
city, with an excellent train service
throughout the summer, poraese one of
the beet beaches on the Atlantic coast. It
baa a fine hotel, many boarding houses and
a large number of cottages which can be
rented for the season. Fishing, crabbing
and turtle hunting add to the enjoyment
of the visitor. Two days each week the
fare to the island from the city is but X5
cents for the round trip; on other days it
is 40 cent.. A book of fifty-two tickets.
good for a year, can be had for LS0. en-
abling one to make the trip to and from
the shore at any time for 25 cents.
Isle of Hope. Thunderbolt. Montgomery
and other suburban watering points, with-
in four to ten miles of the city, are reached
by trolley cars of the Savannah Electric
Company, at a total expense of 5 to 10
cents each way. At these places the visit-
or can enjoy salt water bathing without the
surf accompaniment Row boats, power
launches, tackle and bait are for rent, and
the finest fishing in the country is near by.
At Thunderbolt a casino with beautiful
grounds, admission to which is free, pro-
vides theatrical performances and various
kinds of amusement throughout the sum-
mer. Thi and other resorts are noted for
their fish dinners.
Among the fish frequenting the fresh and
salt waters about Savannah are the bams,
drum, black, rock, red snapper, Jack. whit-
ing, fresh water trout, sea trout, shad. ea-
val. sheephead. grouper, flounder, perch,
mullet, bream, croaker, "a cat, pompano.
stufeom and German arp, etc.


It is not infrequently that a string of a
hundred or more fish, weighing from one
to one hundred pounds, is the result of a C o
single day's sport. Some of the games
fish of America abound in this vicinity.
On the waters and in the country around C o n
about Savannah the sportsman finds ample
game In season. Deer and bear are shot
within a few miles of the city, and among
the birds that fill the gunner's bag are
partridge, every variety of wild duck,ine
sulpe, woodcock, plover, marsh hen, dove,
quail and others.
The finest paved roads for automobiling
and driving In the South stretch out in all
directions from the city, connecting with
the watering resorts. Running through the 135 and 13
pine woods and skirting the water ways.
present many pretty bits of scenery. They %;-WiW
are exceedingly popular with automobilists, -
a number of whom bring their machines
from the North and West and winter here,
the roadways being so splendidly construct- 4
ed. rarely cause a breakdown with them. Trpet
and most automobilista being skilled me- T
chanics, are equally able to make repairs
should such an accident occur. Locally, S Ta,
two hundred and fifty automobiles are 1
owned, ranging from the modest vehicle OlS 0 O TO r,
for two to the most powerful machines,
costing 5A. Savannah is the greatest au- C eosotc
iomobiling point in the South. A speedway
is projected and every year the improve- sl ts*
ment of the country highways continues. Dil8aBecta ts,
To the bicyclist Savarnah is a veritable
paradise, and the lover of driving finds Chacool, tc.
excellent service at the numerous livery -
stables. ACETATE OF LIME
Yachting Is a time honored sport at Sa- A ETATE W LIME
vannah. A number of fast boats are owned W
by devotees and the annual regatta 1n ana
TIH RECORD IS THB SOUrT O GRAT TRADE JOUNAL.


SBoth Phonas 597.

a fSMi 11 3ill- Ii, i
IUAIUAOTIuaEa or


Confectionery


and Chocolates

r Bull St. Savannah. Ga.
ggV


Bfltlr


L.LL LMm, c mW
P11111 OWL


SE. C. HEMMER CO.



E. C. HEMMER, Gen. Mgr.


cmasa N um c rYAHU B..


CHATAM COUNTY COURT HOUSE


~CT


m ~..... i


---------99


9999990"00090000099"-







8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
-I1> >>-.. .. -l --l ll- IIIIi Ii .> . . ..---- -----:- -
---- ---- ---- ---- --- m es m m #$see #661 08


J. WILLIAMS, Prmiaddt.
I P. vuWURY, 3d Virii as
.. DUSBIIMY, U ViofPtdet.


J. A. G. CAROK U VlwtPrwide
IK L KAYrO Sectary.


T. &A.N U W hd werun
IL P.E U(IENTm Tsin.


J. P.


WILLIAMS COMPANY


Naval Stores and Cotton Factors


AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

MaINm OHkI. SVAUAHN, eA.


BInPensacola, Fla.
Branch Offices : Jacksonville, Fla.


Branch Grocery House,
COLUMBUS, GA.


Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond with us.


ishlesum ummssmsh Mm $ Isisua see(iia$ 1*e141aIt18 6 888S8s8u u84h ..uuau4usmmaru


Chmner of Commerce, Savannah, Ga.


event of social, as well as sporting import- equipped quarters and visiting photograph-
ance. Scores of naphtha and gasoline era can enjoy every advantage for a nom-
launches dot the water near the resorts. final fee. During the winter the accommo-
The Savannah Yacht Club owns fine quar- datlons of the fine hotels and numerous
terms near Thunderbolt and has a member- boarding houses are often taxed. There
ship of several hundred. "TLs indeed a are three large hotels, the DeSoto. Pulaski
beautiful sight to see the yachts off Sa- House and Screven House, whose rates are
vannah Yacht Club at Thunderbolt." exceedingly moderate for the accommoda-
Te links of the Savan Golf Club are tons furnished. Good accomodati ns can
The lin of the Bavannah ol Club arebrding
recognized as among the finest in the be had in any of the numerous bardlng
South, and are deservedly popular with houses at very reasonable rates.
lovers of the game. The mildness of the
winter enables the Savannahian to extend
his out-of-door sports throughout the year. A ne W i
While snow and Ice cover the North and
West the waters and fields and woods of a limited amount of ppaer eups to be
this vicinity are open to the lovers of na- delivered from January 10 toFebruary 10
ture and the sportsman, adm as late as March 10 can get them
Amateur photographers here revel in of Vickers patent by writing-
opportunlties to secure beautiful views on m a lsKFBS
land and water. The Savannah Camera *E L VICKER
Club as4 large membership, excellently TIrTOn, O OROGA.


a. R. rPO"WE. CIA&. *- MAlRU. aIUaR AUIUV.
PreWidnt. VkI-hMet wAer Yrl aw. Jcer-.
DIRECTORS:
a. R. rPowel. cas. e. Mrr.. a cMtIIIa P. L. oateoremn a 7. CersMM.

THE

Southern Manufacturing Co.,
S Jacr ko Wt n iy ami da.~
JacksiUville, fieride.


Wholesale Drug l Commissary Supplies
We soliit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prism -a
anything i' the drug line. We make packed drugs a speeialty and eas ae you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.
*-*-* ---******-*MIMIII. IIIMIMMM ---------
Ci bL Addrw. FlorlId6 1

Standard Naval Stores

Company.


DEALERS


LXC LUSIVEFLY


IN


ROSIN

AND TURPENTINE.
Jacksonville. Fla.
, ,, , ,---------- ------


IF YOU TM A lM n av20QDuy ADE meMN 2OM.











THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


SAVANNAH TRADE NOTES.

J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY. the extensive business established about
twenty-eight years since and developed by
the members of the firm of J. P. Williams
& Co. The company was organized Oc-
tober 15th. 1897, under the laws of Georgia,
with a paid up capital of IX0,000. The cor-
poration are very extensive dealers in naval
stores and sea island and upland cotton.
advances being made when desired in money
or supplies on consignments or crops from
either Georgia, Florida, South Carolina and
Alabama. In addition an Immense trade is
done In groceries and provisions at the
spacious stores of the corporation.
The president, Mr. J. P. Williams. is one
of the most able, tireless and energetic de-
velopers Savannah has, and one of the
largest owners of pine timber in the South.
The vice president. Mr. J. A. G. Ct rson.


V


J. P. WILLIAMS,

No recommend is perhaps necessary on
our part to bring to the notice of our sub-
scribers the name of the J. P. Williams
Company, naval stores and cotton factors
and wholesale grocers, were it not for a
dedre on our part to give ourselves a real
pleasure In so doing.


J. P. DUBBNBURY,
31 V wicorP, I. V aea CO.
has been associated in business with Mr.
Williams over twenty-one years, and
whether you desire to gain Information only
or to conclude a purchase with him, his
uniform courtesy ia always present.
The second vice president Is Mr. T. A.
Jennings, who has long been connected with
the company and has charge of the Pensa-
cola branch, which controls the territory
in Western Florida and Alabama.
Mr. J. F. Dusenbury is the company's
third vice president, and also a member
of the Savannah Board of Trade. He is
one of those fine business men that Sa-
vannah possesses who are, so to speak,
ever "up and doing," as well as being,


J. A. G. CARSON,
Ih Vhm-Pmru J P. Viiam Co.
The principal office of the company is in
the Citizens' Bank building, their stores be-
ing located at 223-225 and 227 Bay street E,
with branches at Columbus, Ga., Jackson-
ville, Fla., and Pensacola, Fla.
The corporation is the outgrowth of


A. OIWNIWQS,
aYd VIkdha I. P. 101100 CO.


H. L. KAYTON,
Seuao ) v.m Co.
which Is well known, one of the most
courteous, attentive and energetic part-
ners of the company.
Mr. Kayton. the able secretary, began
his servicess with the company in 1 l3 as
office boy, and step by step of the ladder
of progress being made by him through
close and diligent attention, places him in
that important position, so well deserved.
Mr. H. F. E. Schuster, the treasurer,
came with the company one day earlier
than the secretary as rosin clerk, and is
not only an exceptional authority upon all
matters pertaining to the "pine," but one
of Savtlnah's most progressive eitisens.


H. F. L SCHUSTE;
Tamwur J. P. Vdm Cs

THE JACKSONVILLE COOPERAGE CO.
There can be no doubt whatever that
there Is only one way to be correct in de-
scribing the operations of any firm, and
that is by making a personal Inspection.
This, we are happy to say, has been done
by our correspondent in viewing the splen-
did works of the Jacksonville Cooperage
Cof. situated at Evegreen avenue, Spring-
field. Jacksonville, Fla.
This company do an enormous trade as
manufacturers In general cooperage, em-
bracing the making of all kinds of tight
barrels, staves and headings; also oil, tur-
pentine and syrup barrels. Of course. it
can be readily understood why this up-
to-date firm have made the exceptional
strides that ha been made by them since
coming to Jacksonville. but when we have
mentioned the names of W. T. Riley, Pres-
ident; J. A. G. Carson. Vice President; and
their energetic and courteous Secretary
and Treasurer, . Scovil, it Is easily un-
derstood and fully accepted.
Their plants are splendidly equipped with
all the latest machinery for producing their
goods, and It is indeed a sight on going
through their vast works to see the ex-


traordinary activity displayed tLren.
Jacksonville is Indeed proud of this ir-
did company, which is one of the principle
industries of the city.

J. D. WERD & CO.
Savannah's finest wholesale hardware
store, the pride of Its citizens, is the opin-
ion of every one without exception and it
is quite unnecessary for us to add a sin-
gle word more in speaking of this magnfl-
cent firm, were we not compelled to speak
also of the enormous trade that is done
by them within its doors. Their vast store
is a sight to be seen, and we believe we are
correct, and feel we will be supported by
all who had visited it, by saying that no-
where in the State is there a finer o larg-
er firm in wholesale hardware to be fund.
J. D. Weed & Co. are immense dealers in
wholesale hardware, bar, hoop and bead
Iron, and make a specialty of turpentine
tools, glue and batting, etc. The business
is, of course, managed by gentlemen of
great experience, viae Joseph D. Weed, B.
D. Weed and W. D. Krenson, and who, be-
ing in close touch with the times in keep-
ing only goods of superior quality, together
with the most modern charges made for
them, can rest assured that in no way
will their future trade suffer a retroode
step. All who should visit this fine whole-
sale store, as well known wll receive
not only the fullest satisfaction, but froa
all employed therein the greatest eoun-
tesy.

BUFFALO YELLOW PINE COMPANY
8BLLS OUT.
Valdosta, Ga.,-J. D. Rounds, who was
manager of the Buffalo Yellow Pine Com-
pany, has closed a trade with D. r. Al-
drich, of New York, for 11. aere of
timber near Haylow, nineteen miles fem
here. The Buffalo mill was destroyed by
rebullt
The timber lands which the company
owned were very valuable. It is understood
that the new purchaser will build a new
sawmill and shingle mill in a short white.
Mr. Rounds left for New York, where he
will reside in the future.
The Buffalo Yellow Pine Company was
practically owned by the large house of
Mixer & Co., of Buffal, Y.


TI VEHICLE & HARNESS CO.

C*. rwytf I Car St JSsUVwims fIA.

I Dealers In
Carriages and Wagons

nChme Il iiwh011 11., Wak k, 0.111 UKEf.

rurpestlme a" mIr marcezs. mr awess, a rg is, .sedery, a C assets, Dmery
Wagons. Surtles am everythiug kept is a first-class eastals.met
arrest Dealers to HFerMs.

sese*aswssnase******-- ===--=-


I. B. OICLTr. OCH.M.


CHESNVTT O'NEILL


Naval Stores Factors


I
Commission Merchant.

Office. Germansa Bank Bid.S SAVANNAH. GA.





Suwanee Spring Bottd from ttrwm-w Swame Spring
water. Cures I Indigetio
C^ and Kidney Trouble. The mawt '
freshing, natural sklng Ginger Ale
G in er Lknown. Bottled and oUd by the Lin
WE- Oak Bottling Works.'Live Oak Fa.
A For aL by Caaoidmated Groery Co.

SA laceo vil, a M P Soa & Co.


TH RE CORD WILL B3 WORTH DOL LAR8 TO TOW YLEV WB


W-r~- - -rrrr~c-L-- - - - -rr-r- - -- -- -










10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
-:------ --- --





LUDDEN & BATES SOUTHERN MUSIC HOUSE

JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.

Excusive Agents for the "MATHUSHEK," CHICKERING, WEBER, IVERS & POND,
LESTER and other High Grade Pianos. Be sure of the name and where made, as that is
all you have to know to insure getting the original and well-known "MATHUSHEK,"
made at New Haven, Conn. We also handle the celebrated E8TEY, FARRAND AND
LUDDEN & BATES Organs. Our motto is "The best Piano for the least money," and
from the cheapest that is good to the best that is made. Write us for prices and terms.


MillS 9 JACKSIVILE FLA,


VALDOSTA, GA.


TAMPA, FLA.


MACON, 6A.


SAVAAM, IA.


BARTIW IDR. GARUBTT CO.
As me of busme we are always inter-
ested to learn who ar the men who are "up
and doag." who t is, so to speak, who so
larly help to make Savannah what it is
to-day, and t is not difcult to know who
are its promieat pioneers when we have
before us the same of Hartfelder. Garbutt
& Co.. of West Bay street, a Savannah
ra who ae undoutedly aiding materi-
ally the bu Mldi up of the city, a it
were, ad by this we mean to convey that
the great progress made by this flrm is a
probt pltive that buyers of machinery
know where to place their orders, whether
for minim railroad suppies, engines, ma-
chinery or boiers. etc.
The active members of the firm are
Memsr s P. Hartfelder. whoe reputation
as an expert tn the milland railroad sup-
lies Hi wide world, and of whom one can-
not refrain from speaking In the highest
terms of admdration for the exceedingly
ourteous attetion wkh, going througir
their vast premise The vice president of
the company is Mr. R. M. Garbutt. of
lym, Georgia, who is an exceptional able
bdnes maa of tireless energy and in-
domitable enterprise; and the secretary and
treasurer to the company Is Mr. G. A.


Garbutt, also a native and highly respected
ctlt of Lyons, Georgia. Their fine, eli-
gible and commodious premises are sit-
uated at Bay and Jefferson streets, con-
sisting of a handsome four-story brick
building MiMIO feet In dimensions, and we
certainly take pleasure in advising all when
in the city to pay a visit to this vatstore.
It will surprise you, and we add with great
pleasure the greatest courtesy will be ex-
tended to all, be they purchasers or desir-
ing only to gain particulars.

THE SOUTHERN BANK OF THE STATE
OF GEORGIA.
The report that has Just fallen into our
hands of the semi-annual statement of the
Southern Bank of the State of Georgia,
Savannah, Ga.. at the close of business end-
ing December 31. 1904. gives a very positive
assurance that the banking business of this
fine, reliable bank is on the right track.
so to speak, and full speed ahead. Nor is
this to be wondered at when one learns
who are its helmsmen. The amount of
money deposited with the Southern Bank
of the State of Georgia during the past
half year was something exceptional,
which shows conclusively the extraordin-
ary progress this bank has made, a proof


positive (if proof were wanting) that it
holds the fullest onf dence of the people.
The resources of a city and the solidity
of Its business Interests are largely
Judged by the class and character of its
banks, and there Is no feature of Its mu-
nicipal commerce that shows more posi-
tively the unswerving and substantial
growth of Savannah than the Southern
Bank of the State of Georgia. with which
the ever courteous vice president, Horace
A. Crane, as one of its director. Ia assured
of a brilliant future.

M'MILLAN BRO.
Success. to a large extent in every
branch of industry, depends upon the in-
telligent proficiency which Involves a thor-
ough knowledge of all the minute details
embraced therein. Combining these char-
acteristics in an eminent degree with en-
ergy, enterprise and shrewd native ability
stands the fine firm of MeMillan Bros, of
the "Southern Copper Works," at IAberty
and Price streets. Without doubt, no one
can make an impeachment against this
firm for being behind the times, as it were.
They have been for many years leading
the way at a quick pace in making Sa-
vannah what it Is to-day. MeMillan Bros..
as is well known, are the leading and fin-
est manufacturers of "Turpentine Stills"
of the very latest and moat approved kinds,
as well as being general metal workers,


and have the largest i ad oYMrt asa
work in the State. their our toeters b-
ing at Savannah O.. Jadko.l. Fli.,
Mobile, Ala., Fayettevi. N. C.
The output from thee our fetal
enormous, and notwthstanding the late
lamentable fire some three weeks mloe, t
which it may be recollected two valuable
lives were lot. no interruption worth ms-
tioning, so to speak, has been permitted
These vast workshops are goita ft
speed ahead and are a sight to be sem.
and al orders by mail or wire wll re-
ceive immediate attention at ether of the
four workshops Prom what we have
learned they are very aenom**-" their patrons, In reeeving ol stild in sx-
change for new one, and they make
patching through the country a specialty.
In conclusion, we cannot refrain from say-
ing that Savannah is Indeed proe of Me-
MHlan Bros, who ar ever on the ide a
progress and development. It in upon thi
basis that the access of their lhea beine
has bee built, which is of many year'
standing, and the apprecation of the trade
of this large, progresave irm is shlw
In the fact of so largely an increase I-
tronage, which time ha brought about to
gether with the never-failHa eourtey ex-
tended to every one alike by Mr. Thomas
McMilan. as well a both the brother
who form his partners.
We would also wish to metb that their
general offees are located at the OGer
mania Bank building.


Union Passenger Station, Savannah, Ga


IF YOU AM3 iUon na iY36 ADVUMMu = = M OM'


SAVANNAH TRADE NOTES.


i









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11
,m


CRNUTT &T O'NI&.JA
T'lee ean be no r.eo-n.r-u' on more
attMe d with danger than in speaking
with positivenes of the value of dealing
with this or that firm. If their merit is not
kaown to he who makes the recommenda-
tion hbut in bringing before the notice of
our ubcribers the name of that well-
known naval stores Arm, Messr. Cheanutt
& NeWl, we do so with the fullest amur-
ages that we recommend one of the best
Armo of soldity in the State.
For the past twenty-ive years this firm
has been established as naval stores fac-
toar and commllsion merchants, doing a
very large business entirely on their own
ealtal. They are prepared to advance
money in any quantity to the turpentine
belt, doing their large business not only
ia Georgia and Florida, but an far a Mia-
sii.ppl. They have been doing their busi-
nem of a conservative nature for these
many years passed, and their reputation
having been established long ago it is
ea die on our part to speak of them in
any other degree than that of one of the
best Arms to trade with. Their fine suite
of oede= will be found in the new Ger-
mani building, and all who may approach
them can rest assured of receiving the
hilght eortesy either from Mr. Chesnutt
or Mr. O'NeIL

GRANGER & LEWIS.
One of the principal mercantile firms
that Savannah Is naturally very proud of
Is the Granger-Lewis Lumber Company.
whoe foreign and domestic commerce as
very enormous. The company control the
output of many mills throughout Georgia
and Florida. They export very largely to
egland, South America and other for-
ein countries. and ship extensively to all
astern amd Northern cities. The company
have correspondents In all the principal
dies of uagland, United States, and also
throughout south America. The opera-
tions manly include Georgia pine, car
sa5I defckldn brige and building timber,
rough add dred, kin dried floorin and
ceiling ahiagles and all kinds of dimension
lumber. They are also very large shippers
at heow te. Their commodious offices
are atuated at UL Bay street, in the
Standard Oil building. beside which the
company occupy over fifteen hundred feet
of river front.
The businea to which the company suc-


needed was originally established at Jack-
sonville, Fla.
The firm are thorough men of business
whose quick perception, true judgment.
and last but not least, uniform courtesy to
all their clients mark them as one of Sa-
vannah's foremost leading lumber firms.

CONIDAB.
In the manufacture of candles, choco-
lates, bon bona, etc.. not forgetting those
delicious Ices. Conida spares neither the
expense of time, money or labor to gain
for them the reputation for purity and
palatabity that places them pre-eminently
without a peer. Nothing but the purest
articles are used, the latest and most high-
ly approved processes and appliances are
employed, and every precaution is taken to
insure absolute cleanliness in the manu-
facture of ice cream, water ices and frozen
fruits, of which large quantities are pro-
duced, the trade for his cea rated peanut
candy being enormous.

JOHN R. YOUNG CO.
The John R. Young Co.. naval stores fac-
tors and commission merchants, are among
the leading firms in Savannah. Mr. Young
has long been Identified with the naval
stores industry and has large interests in
the woods, as well a in the factorage end.
The firm is well prepared to handle naval
stores and to take the beat possible care
of its customers. Mr. Young is prominent
in every avenue of industrial and commer-
cial life in Savannah. He Is president of
the Board of Trade, president of the Oper-
ators' Tank and Warehouse Co., a banker,
and with all one of the cleverest men so-
cially in the Forest City.

W. J. DONLAN. ESQ.
Our pleasure is certainly very great
when we have to speak of those who form
Savannah's most prominent citizens. Hence
it is that in making mention of W. J.
Donlan. Esq., secretary Chamber of Com-
merce, we do so with real feeling of grati-
tude for the most willing assistance lent
up in the compilation, however humbly
presented, of this Savannah edition. It was,
we learn, in March, 103, that Mr. William
J. Donlan was unanimously elected the
secretary of the Chamber of Commerce for
Savannah!


JON FLANNEY. Prest MIACE A. CRAM, Vle Pram JAMES SUMLVAI CareW.




SOUTHERN BANK

OF THE STATE OF GEOROIA.
SAVANNAH. og



DEPOSITORY OF THE STATE


CAPITAL


S500,000

Surplus and
Undivided
Profits

$520,574.80


IEPARTHEIT
S..,..


mmr mm
-U.E

WfE mmn -o
F= E i

)Iaruwow


DIRECTORS &


JMRN FLANNERY. JeOA FhErr Y CVMessy.
Catana.
J. A. WElL, C. A. V5UI C*. WbeIessib Sgeen
R0ftACR A. CRANE. Vice P-Ssgt-.
LEE NOr MYERS. LOS Rey MY a COe..
wbalssl Cigass Wu rbscca.
R. P. SMART. Caitait.


RUGME E IV. SNOW. Ne rerB.
W. V. "490N. W. V. ards. C4". uOr.
W. V. 61100-. Jr. Athisa at Low.
rmcw P runT. A. im.wi. Sss; a.
CIRES 41sUD SftV1AVWV I1be

.aaa01 J. WLLB5M16 Lawe1. NM 7=16


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade


Western White Oak Spirit Barrels



Capital $100.000

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.


OFFICERS:
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vie-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasrer.


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


DIRECTORS:
C. H. BARNES,
W. P. COACHMAN.


J. W. WEST,
E. H. MOTE.


W. J. KELLY


TE -O------ OCULAT-- ALL OVER T-E W-LA-.
res Irr UMus&TW ALLI OTM T= MGM&a


I.\\\~\~MIIIIIIIIIMh~h~h~*i~~b~h~MIIMjC











1n THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RBCOBD.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week. SAVANNAH NAVAL STORE RECORD FOR 1903,04 AND TVO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


SPIIT8 FOR THB WEEK AT SAVAN-
NAH.
Price Repts Sales Exp. IM04
Mo.. Peby N .... 60 1 280 386 6
Tue., Feby I .... 0% 3 185 316 65
Wed., Mc. 1 .... 60% 8 172 170 6
Thur., Mch. 2 .... 50% 138 150 450 6

ROSIN POB THE WEEK AT SAVANNAH


Monday, I
W .....................
Wo .....................
N ... ... ... ... ... ...
S... ....... .........
H .. ... ... .... ...
G .........................
D ..........................
S.... .............. ....
ABC ...... .........
Receipts 2. sales 3B.


aeb. 27.
5.15
6.00
4.75
4.60
LsU
,&
LS
2.95
2.90
2.82%
e7%
export


Last Year.
3.75
3.55
1.3
3.30
L95
a.S9
2.2
L:
2.95
2.50
2.60
2.58
1.50
2.45
2.45
S 1,870.


Tuesday. Feb. -Rosin firm; receipts,
I.=; sales. M; shipments. U. Quote: A,
Band C, L.27; D, .-80; B, 2L11-2@2. 5; F,
S2.1e5.l1-2; G, 2.95; H 3.271-2; I. $.50;
K, $St.; M. $.10; N, L4.7; window glass.
:5; water white, 15.15

Wednesday, March L--Rosn firm; re-
ceipts O; sale s,38; shipments. 2864.
Quote; A. B. C. L2.72; D, 2.80; E. 12.86; F,
2.E1-2; 0. I.95; H, 1t.301r71-2; I, 1$2.0;
K, $4.M; M. 4.M;; N, .6; W G, $5; W W,
56.15.

Thursday, March 2.-Rosin firm; receipts,
2a; sales, 1.0B; shipments, 4.36. Quote:
A, B, C. 13.71-2; D. 295; E, 3 2.871-2; F,
a.M21-62.95; G, $MLe1-2; H. .2o; I, 3.5o0;
K. aL4; M. 4.E; N, $4.7; W 0, $5; W W.


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES STATE-
MENT.
Spirits Rosin
Stock Arl 1 .................... L45 .44A60
Receipts March 1 ................ 128 54
Reeipts previously ............ 172,36 D.436
Total ........................... 178.M 639,240
Exports March 1 ............... 460 4,30
Exports previously ............162,65 51,8956
Total ......................... ........ 16,415 s6,22
Stock March 1 ................. 5,4 43,013
Stock previously ................ ,172 8,133

TOLAR, HART & CO. REVIEW.
New York, Feb. 28. 1905.
The Industrial Record, Jacksonville, Fla.:
Spirits Turpentine-There has been a lit-
tle more business done during the past
week, principally in small lots, with prices
rather easier in sympathy with lower mar-
kets south. Stock m3 barrels. We quote:
Machines B31-2 cents.
Rosin-Tbere has been quite a little bual-
nees done in low grades, prices of which
are arm. ales dull. We quote: B. C,
I. K; D, 13.1; E. 1.5I; F, $1.20; G, 13.2; H.
1.1:; 1. Ls; K. $4.46; M. S4.85; N, $5.10; W
G. ML5; W W. 1.0.
TOIAR, HART & CO.


BAILEY & MONTGOMERY'S REVIEW.
New York, March 1. 1905.
Spirits Turpentine-Stock 5665 barrels.
The market during the week has done
some better, and sales have been fair.
Thursday, Feb. 23, 54 1-2c asked.
Friday, February 24, 531-2c asked.
Saturday, Feb. 28, 53c asked.
Monday, Feb. 27, 531-2c asked.
Tuesday, Feb. 28, 531-2c asked.
Wednesday, March 1, 54c asked.
Rosin-Stock 17,680 barreiiL
This market has also snowed some im-
provement. But business on the whole is
quiet. A. C, 2.9002.95; graded D, $3.00; E,
s3.0~e3.10; F. .15l3.20; G, $S3. 325; H,
$3.50f3.55; I, 1.80; K, 4.30@435; M, $4.8
4.S; N. 36060610; W Gt5.30 .35; W W,
$6.40@1.50.

H BOBINSON.Pres H. GATT.ARD. (ahier
W. B. OWN. Vies-Pres.

Commercial Bank,
State Depository.
BnAC Ig: Oami. Tl., Lake Oiy. rUi
JaCksonville, --- lorida


Wanted
We will pay 25 cents apiece
for copies of the Weekly In-
dustrial Record of the follow-
ing dates:
January 31.1903: March 15,1908; April
24. 1908; May 1,1908; May 29, 1908; Feb-
ruary 7, 1903.
Office of the Industrial Record.
Juckuonville. FI.a.


THOSE. G. HUTCHINSON
FELLOW AECUM ASSIIATIMN
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
Rena 7. oard of Trade Mg.
Plhas 312 JACKSONVILLE. iA.


ZINC NAILS


Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the dmly SAmB which will not injury
saws when left in the trees.

,Slenm Nail 0o.
S9 Pasl Jt. New VYerk, U. V.
Also Hitdquirters for Galvanised and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Eta rating and Roofin
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.


The Blount Real Estate Co.,

(Incorporated. $50.000 Capital.)

FOR Turpentine Locations. Saw Mill Locations.
Lare and Mmall tracts of Round Timber, Phosphate
and Farming Lands o all description.
Write us for further information and particulars
THE BLOUNT REAL ESTATE CO.
OCALA, FLORIDA.




Joseph D. Christie, Business Agent

Mao 363 py o-Ut-M U Jla ksou vlsf. Ftm.
Telephone 455.
If you want to loeato in Florida and contemplate going into busine, let me
elp ye. If yo have a bmnba to sell, list -sme with ma


Recipts
Spirits, casks............ .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
Rois, bb.............. ................
Total .... ...........................

Spatm ca sk o -o .. oo .o. .o. .o. .o o o *-
n bbl .. . .o . o o. .. . .. .. .. .o . .. ..


New York

Spirits cas o .......................... .....
Rosinstbb ...... .. .. ............ ..
ru York I

Spirits, abi............ .............


Rosins, b ........... .... ............


1908-04 1902-03 1901-2


198.647
650,988
844,585

188.398
752,270

98,884
888,171

35,658
87,853

59.351
826.746


z92 496 814,M46
9410,5071,071,446
1,23838 1,385,780

296,430 814,876
975,428 62,687

206,109- 217,446
504,178 585,042

42,765 53,797
138,121 129,06

87,556 48;633
387,784 896,686


The -raalpi of Vi peMe a tadh 1#a03 by 9.4 casks, and of msa, 29,59M -mls

Crops of Spiritd and Roin for Thre Year
(kop 13-4. Crop 11-24 Cep IuK4
Spirits. R;ubin. Spirit&. Baoe Bpirit& B-Bs
WDmingte.... .. .. ...1 411 ai8 11,1 113,36 ljl Ia.4
Carlesto.. ......... S,4AM 3 3,007 11,83 3,04 Ul ,r
Smvanlh.... .. .. ... 17T,418 3 370,L670 940,07 313,016 1,071A,
Brumwiek..... ... ... M5,a la4s, 8,47 44,1M6 To, S2M
Mobile ............. .11 W 104 1,96M 7,7r 3u, m"7
New Orhe .. .. .... .. .. 31l 13,11 33,10 108,031 21,031
(urabeoe...... .......lse elose 3SN 12,141 8,177 47,7
Gorgetown...... ... 7.9 44,14 1007 46m ,AS oAMU
Peesaela........ .. .. 4,4 M69c 36,t5 1868 s377, 14,3
Jaz. & FPrdims.. .... 1,Tse U3, W 91,97l 37M 311 7 4 MW ,
Tamps ...... ........elosed eclad 132, 40G, UIS4 5UJ

Tetals.. .. .........U5,1r 5 $, 5M 671,0 ,16a,81 1 3,4 ,1.418
lpeal 4 Turpetin tO U. L.
The following tabe is empiled by James Watt & Son, of Ladm, from the
official return.L For eonveniene of elmpison we have turned ewts int. %~rli
--320 ew. equal 100 barrels.
1a17 1i 1le 130 1901 13s less
From U. B., bbL. .... 11,M 173,78 14~,75 174A44 193,41 1U5, 143


u6,3 1 174,5M 14o94 177,N 1431 167, 146,J0
From Ruia .......... U81 4,11 4,108 8,81 6,1 8,711 17,A5
Total Barres .. 157,12n 179,00 15,4 18100o0 201,3 1031 1,6 U
Thus the import of Rumia Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 1903 was double
that of 190I aad over six times as muk as in 1807. It is interiting to me how
this import luetuates with the price at American Turpentine
Percentage of Imart ofRu iaa ..1.79 S.33 3.2 4.7 3.41 .34 1O6
Av. Prism Amer. Tu. e Loau ..31-4 3- 34-1 3-4 7-1 3-1 dB-

COMPARATIVE PRICIS OF SPIRITS AT SAVAMBIA FOR FIVE Y4ARS


April 1 ....................
April 8...................
pril1 ...................
April 2 ..................
Apr a ...................
May .....................
May 13 ....................
May 20 ..................
May 27 ......... .........
June 3 ....................
June 10 ..................
June 17 ..................
June 2 ..................
July 1 ..................
July 1 ..................
July 1 ...................
July 22 ...................
July 28 ....................
Aug. 4 ...................
Aug. 1 .... ..............
Aug. 19 ...................
Aug. 26 ..................
Sept. 2 ....................
Sept. 9 ..................
Sept. 16.................
Sept. 23 ..................
Sept. 30 ..................
Oct. 7 ..:.................
Oct. 14 ....................
Oct. 21 ....................
Oct. 28 ...................
Nov. 4 ....................
Nov. 11 ...................
Nov. 18 ................ .
Nov. 25 ..................
Nove. 2 .....................
Dec. 9 ..... ........ ......
Dec. 16 ..................
Dec. 23 ...................
Dec. 30 ....................
Jan. 6 .....................


10f-605
ND

63
62%
a%


53%
53%

U4%
53%

5U%





62%
52%
52%
53







50
50


as

as
a
36%
51%





48-W
50%
48%

5so


1903-04
ND
60
49%
47
46
46
47%
47%
49
4b%
46
47%
47%
47%
48
49%

4o%


553
54%
56%
57
65
57
55%
66%
56
6%
56
56


56%
W6%
56%
Sl7%


1303-00
46
42%
42%
43
42%-4
43
45.
45%
4%
47%
48%
47%
46%
45%
44%
43%

a4
44%
s44
44%
452
44%
46
46%
47%
50
51%
53%
49

50
51
50%

51%
52
62%
651
/4y


1901-M
34
32
32%
31%-3s
32
31%
32%
32%
22%
32
33%-%
34%
33%
34%
34%
33
32%
34
33
34
24
33%
34%
34
33%
34
a34
35%
a5%
35%
as
35

35%


35%
3P%
36%
36%
W46


1900-01
5%
4g
47%
4%
47
48
4e
46
44
4#%
43%
42%
43%

42

as
39%
311





3%
37
37%
40%
40%
40

39
36
36%
37%
36
.VI


Ia YOU ARX PtnoGnaRrUv, ADVErTISZ I TX am CORD.











THE WEEKLY iNUUSt;aIAL RECORD. 1*
I RIL "T -. A L C R, nl. .M@.,[ .uc _e


CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORE COM-
PANY.
"The Consolidated i purely a Co-operat-
Ive Company. Its Interests are identical
with those of the Producers."
These lines will be found in the com-
pany's advertisement in another part of
this edition, and it may be said that no
more explicit statement of the business of
the company is necessary; It practically
embraces every expression that might be
used to convey to its client on what lines
It moves and on what lines It is traveling.
No more lucid statement. we hold, could
possibly be made.
The Consolidated Naval Stores Company
are enormous naval tores factors, owned
ad controlled by practical operators. It
is purely a co-operative company. Its Inter-
eets being identical with those of the pro-
duces and are among the representative
firms prominent in the chief element of
the commercial importance of Savannah,
Ga.. particularly deserving of mention a
materially contributing to its conspicuous
activity and being one of the most Im-
portant of our commercial frms in the
State. Pew firm have acquired so great
and widespread an Influence In business and
finanlml cirle., and none are better qual-
fied uas naval store. factor. and operators.
which, since the company was founded, Its
Importance and scope has rapidly grown
each year.
The company consists of W. C. Powell
President. and the following Vice Pres-
dent, who, with the President, constitute
the Directory and Board of Managers: W.
P. Co aeman, B. P. Bullard, H. C. Coving-
ton, H. A. McEachern, John R. Young, J.
A. Crawford. D. H. Mcillan, C. Downing,
J. Saunders. C. B. Rogers, W. J. Hill-
man. B. Powell, and Auditor John Hen-
Ths e company satre that It ha paid in
capital stock of I5.00. A and a small
amount of ttock yet in rue erve to eall to
operator who can arrange to buy. They
have yards at Jacksonville. Savannah,
Pernandina and Pensacola and ato all
producer either to call or correapond
with them. As a nal word we give our-
selves the pleasure of saying that the firm
haJ by fotering the true interests of all
its patrons at every opportune moment cre-
ated that largely increasing business it
now enjoys, and we wish also to mention
Sparticular the name of its president W.
C. Powell, who I not only an active, en-
ergetic and conscientious business man of
exceptinal ability, but one who, by his
rnat courtesy, added to thee abilities, en-
oys the Implicit confidence of al with
whom he come. In contact.

3. C. HEMMeR COMPANY.
There can be but few subjects that have
In the past and at the present moment
hanged more of the thoughts of our finest
ative ad the labor of the best of our
workmen as the pine and ts product has
dome.
The B. C. Hemmer Company, whose of-
fices are to be found at No, I Bay street E.
Savannahtos a. are the authors of some
Interesting details in regard to the new
yste ar producnl woob d pirits of tur-
pentinre a process they claim which will
unquestionably revolutionize the turpen-
tine business
The company are without doubt one of
the most progreasve firms with whom we
have had the pleasure o coming in contact
itht They not only have a complete
equipment for construuting turpentine
plants, but remodel old one. and have un-
questi ably one of the largest and finest
lahoratorem whouth of Washington. D. C.
They are not only builders of turpentine
and hebesal by-product plants, but also
for tar and rosain. that can run four times
a day, and what we hold in so necessary
now-a-days to all orders, they give a
'"gIuarantee" of satisfaction: this. they
tate to be accepted n Its fullest meaning.
a bond being given whenever desired of
talthfud performance." What D also in-
utinhelmg them of tha t they state
their ability to make rosin oil about 50 per
ant cheaper tha the usual way of making
It excellent results being obtained. The
general manager of the company is Mr. E.
C. Hemmer, who has. in all probability, a
wider experience to-day, and a more ex-
tensive knowledge in this special line than
moat others He Is an untiring, energetic
many of usinea s full of courtesy and seal
in the bet interests of all who should de-
sire to place themselves In his hands.
The chemical manager Is Dr. Henry
Sundbel mer one of the mot able chemists
of the day. He Is a graduate of the Heidel-
berg University. and Savannah Is Indeed
Crod of having him as one of its principal
cidtlsens. and from whom It expects to re-
ceive the greatest assistance In solving the
many diicult problems connected with the
pine ad its products. As a final word we
would wish to say that the 3. C. Hemmer
Company having opened a new field of In-
vestmeat i the South, our readers will do
wel to et lato coamrpondence with the


company, who will be most glad to place
before all the "modus operandi" of their
Idea in the future treatment of the pine.

THE VEHICLE AND HARNESS COM-
PANY.
The vehicle and Harness Company of
this city, of which W. B. Myers, the well-
known turpentine man, is President, has
moved to its magnificent new building at
the corner of Forsyth and -Cedar streets,
and increased its stock until it is to-day
one of the largest establishments of the
kind In the entire South. The building oc-
cupied by this company is three stories in
height and covers a frontage of l6 feet
on Forsyth street. It is especially con-
structed and gives this enterprising frm a
most deservable home. Turpentine and mill
operators will do well to correspond with
or visit this firm when in need of any sup-
plies carried by them.

LUDDEN & BATES SOUTHERN MUSIC
HOUSE. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
This frm are the exclusive ients for the
MATHUSHEK. CHICKERIU, WEBER,
RIVERS & POND. LESTER and other High
Grade Pianos, who have, as will be seen,
an announcement elsewhere in this edition.
This firm do an immense business in
pianos and organs only of the highest
standard makes, having one dt the largest
stocks of these fine pianos In the Southern
States. It has been frequently quoted to
us that the putting of he of Ludden &
Bates grand pianos in your hdme is exact-
ty like putting your money In a savings
bank (and perhaps, we might be permitted
to add, with a greater degree of safety of
not loosing it), and a said and positive
way of adding to your worldly possessions.
It makes you feel better. abut your home
and happier and more coJfortable for It.
Such being true facts, do not hesitate
to bring it before your notice, and at the
same time point with the true pride of cit-
izens to the progressive strides this high
class piano firm has already made and the
many daily orders being received by their
manager, Mr. D. EnnW, whom we are
quite willing to say Iha by his close atten-
tion to business, together with his ac-
knowledged courtesy to his clients, be they
purchasers or enquirer of information
only, has In no small degree helped largely
to make It this success.

CONSOLIDATED GROCERY COMPANY.
The interest that is being exhibited in
the magnificent block of buildings now in
course of erection on East Bay street.
Jacksonville, Fla., by the Consolidated
Grocery Company is widespread. It will,
without doubt, be the finest building that
the city possesses, and together with the
company's enormous output of trade. In-
creasing every hour, will surpass any other
company in the State. As is well known,
the company have branches in Tampa.
Pensacola, Fla., and Savannah, Ga., and
handle everything in heavy and light gro-
ceries, grain, provisions, domestic and im-
ported groceries, turpentine tools, etc.
Shipments to all points that can be
reached the cheapest through the branch
stores of the company, and prompt atten-
tion given to all orders through the main
offices and branches. The Jacksonville
storage rooms of the Consolidated Grocery
Company consist of one three-story build-
ing 70x00, one two-story building 0x390,
one one-story building 0x30., making the
largest space of any company of the kind
In the South, their headquarters being
on the Riverside avenue viaduct. The
business of the company in the goods
above mentioned is an enormous one. Drov-
ing that where a company has as its direct-
ors men of untiring energy, rich with the
wisdom of long experience and possessing
the fullest confidence of esteem of its as-
sociates, its progress and success is, of
course, assured, and only what is expected,
and we give ourselves the pleasure of men-
tioning the names of those gentlemen
who form its directorate, vi.: C. B. Rog-
ers. President; W. A. Gallaher, and E. A.
Champlain, Vice Presidents; C. H. Hodg-
son, Secretary and Treasurer, and the fol-
lowing gentlemen are its directors, vis.: C.
B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Cham-
plain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Craw-
ford, of Jacksonville; B. F. Bullard. Tam-
pa; and C. M. Covington, Pensacola.

RECEIVER FOR LUMBER COMPANY.
Valdosta, Ga., March L-Judge Emory
Spear, ,of the United States District Court,
has appointed W. J. Butler of Macon and
J. P. Coffee of Olympla joint receivers for
the Minnesota Lumber Company, which
has large milling plants in Colquitt and
Clinch Counties. The receivers were ap-
pointed upon petition of the receiver of
the First National Bank of Faribault,
Minn., which holds claims of 10,000
against the lumber company. The com-
pany's assets are given at 10.00, and lia-
billties at tl4,a.0


', *. a gZ, J.. A.C I. CaA J. ?c .
Prede.L YVke-Pre806. a road


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.

MANUFACTURER OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS

Machine and Hand Factories,
Ath Street R. R. CroITn.,

JACKSONVILLE. N FLORIDA



... NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA.. U. 5. A.

JOHN B. YOUNG, A. D. COVINGTON, H.L. KAYTM,
PrsdeMt. Vie- Proumas. alueewreytj q r-w

J. P. WILLIAMS. C. S. ELUeS. B. BU.LARD J. B. CHBTT
C. W. SAUSSY. P. L. SUTHERLAND. W. C.POWLL. W. D1,
3. A. ALFORD. J B PADGETT. WALTER RAY. RAYMOND CAT.
J. R. YOUNG. A. D. OOVINTON. J. L. COOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the 8. A. L. and A. 0. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTCULARS.
*e*se*sO Oe***e***eeeee**e*e*e*e*e*e*e*,*e.-gg *e



J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,


e Ne Iqt..omrtere t oa r1

S*Distiller's Pumping


c No plans eomplaw wi mea, -e.
SHundrseds thm- in a- in
Florida, AslaiMs M)issalppi -1
o &uiathCarolina7. wnit w rpr
*6 las ama pies..
E~ugir epras WBero mmu lamm

S -- 'm- 5,
as wel ll rry full mad opleO

; Mm Suppesnt Ppe
1*^ ^ Beer Tuees, Et
Advise your wants.

SMacon, - Georga.
Ad8ise pAlly or w
a efa el t far I~ paml Stoerws Psrpm



John R. Youa. J. W. Motte C. B Parker, Jam MeNat. W.W. War.
Presdet. Vico-PreT. VIeePr Vies-PrM. ee. A 1Tre.




John R. Young Co.,



Commission


Merchants.



0 Naval Stores Factors. Wolesale Grocers.


a Savannah L Brunswick. Ga.

8*** e*** g** g***g* ppgp- ;pgpggpppggg


=9 ECuMD 0=CWUA. ALL OVER TE2 WOEL











14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BCORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
JAMES A. HOLLOMOH.
Edle aadj Maass~.
Purmbshed Ewery rm"dy.
ms tD n"se .-83 Q0 Per Annum
IMO S( ig ... l .. ..
"The Pre and Its Pneduaf."
A ees-muen tMn --em st addremedl
The lnadumltr. Record Company.
JIckmonvlil. Fi1.


AtLaer Ga. ravrannLh. Ga.

Btred at the Poetem dt Jekmrvife




Baptesr IS, 1%9, as its emdive omfial
migl AdtJ Inta uual enmytior
BLirmbr 11, the O am ee a of the
itm Aoodikk.m
Adoptdll Apil 7th, M1, as the oanda
Wga of the nterstate CMa Grower' As-
aetam. Adopted Sept. 11, 103, a th
rny okil orlu of the T. 0. A.
O.nmM.ina to lumber people by spda
elation adopted by the Gergif SftwB


COPT F ADVERTISIn G
Alvrthiag oWpy (sduages r new ad-
vertimlMa) ahOM reach us Tuesday
mesaig to hra e r im tiam ia the iMe t
th wee

THE RECORIK S OFICIS
The uLehi *0lt su tnhe e-
me of the Indutrial record Publik
Cs are hated at Ia. is Sth NHgA
2f|est Jecmvi-fni li, in the very haut
af the nst turptie al yllow pine
hdl DSiah amic Svsanah, Ga,
ad Aftlant G&


NOTICE TO PATROL&

An pauy t fmr advrtiatas ia the In-
trial aMPr ad al -ti--i eioc- thereto
u ~ at e asde dict to t hme o.ce
Ia Jacknvile. Agents ae not allowed
to maks celectioes under any Crcm-
stamem. foW adverttisng and sb-
scptie am at out frm the home
af h te, ar% al an remittuaces nut
te mrds diect t tht mcmapay.
Inutrial heerd Pifshiing CO.

SAVANNAHH A CITY OF OPPORTUNI-

Acting upon orders received from our
editor and manager, Mr. James Hollomon.
I have this past fortnight visited Savan-
nah. Ga., the "City of Opportunities." and
in collecting from every possible source
the accompanying authentic facts and in-
formation concerning this most charming
and progressive city, feel that my duty.
as well as my orders, are not completed
until I have made a grateful acknowledge-
ment to all Its chief citizens with whom
I have had the honor to converse, for their
great kadnes shown me, and especially
would I desire to mention the names and
thank the following gentlemen in particu-
lar for their unfailing courtesy and valu-
able assistance given me: Colonel Estill
(Bavannah Morning News), The Hon. P. A.
Stovall (Savannah Press). Mr. W. J. Don-
ian, Secretary Chamber of Commerce;
Hon. H. G. Pierce and Mr. Sassy, Secre-
tary Board of Trade.
There are many others from whom I re-
ceived the most friendly aid and of whom
I have, however humbly, tried to ac-
knowledge their many courtesies and lib-
eral help, which will be found in other
columns of this edition. Respectfully
yours CHARLES TEMPLE,
Traveling Correspondent.


AMONG THU OPERATORS.
Mr. Goe Mattox of Orange Park.
was in the city one day this week.

Mr. J. M. Watson, formerly of Brown &
Watson, Green Cove Springs. now located
at Devon, Fla., was among the prominent
operators in the city this week.

Mr. R. B. Luttolock, a prominent naval
store man of Tallehassee, Fla., was in the
city last Tuesday.

Mr. John Broward of Broward & Me-
Geachey of Duval, Fla., was In the city
last Wednesday attending to matters of
business.

Messrs. J. C. Edward and W. C. Jackson,
leading operators of Green Cove Springs,
registered at the Aragon several days this
week.

Dr. C. H. Herty of Green Cove Springs
was in the city last Wednesday.

Mr. John C. Powell, inspector of naval
stores for the port of Fernandina, was in
the city last Tuesday.

Mr. J. D. McConnel, a leading operator
of Bostwick, Fla., registered at the Ara-
son last Tuesday.

Mr. J. S. Smith of Walla, Fla., was In
the city one day this week.

Mr. P. L. Sutherland has just returned
to the city from Ocala, where he has been
attending to business.

Mr. W. L. Edwards, connected with the
Hillman-Sutherland Co. in a prominent ca-
pacitl, has resigned and accepted a position
as Secretary and Treasurer of the Daisy
Bank. Daisey, Fla.

THANKS FOR COURTESIES.
Mr. Thomas Gamble, Jr., Secretary to
the Mayor of Savannah, has aided our cor-
respondent materially in preparing the
data, illustrations, etc., for the special Sa-
vannah story and the thanks of The Rec-
ord management are extended to him. Mr.
Gamble is one of the most prominent young
men in the South Georgia metropolis and
a most efficient assistant to the city's chief
executive.

ROUMANIAN TURPENTINE FORESTS
The Ministry of Forests of Runmania has
decided to replant the forests with pine
trees during the ensuing spring, some two
and a half million young trees being put
dawn. This should mean in the process of
time a good source of turpentine and rosin.


NEGOTIABLE WAREHOUSE RECEIPTS.
A report from Little Rock, Ark., says
that J. E. Walsh, superintendent of the
Gulf Compress Co., which operates a cot-
ton press and warehouse there, has been
notified by Mr. C. C. Hanson, of Atlanta,
Ga., president of the company, that the
American Bonding Co., of Baltimore. under
a contract made with the Gulf Compress
Co., now guarantees all the warehouse re-
ceipts issued by the latter, and thereby
making them negotiable at any place in the
country. This new plan, it is said, has
aroused special interest at Little Rock and
Arkansas, as it enables many owners to
hold their cotton while realizing something
on it immediately. It is true that ware-
house receipts have been accepted by the
local banks, but as the new plan will make
them acceptable anywhere, cotton owners,
will be assisted in obtaining loans, even
if local banks have all that kind of securi-
ty that they desire. The Gulf Compress
Co., operates warehouses in a large num-
ber of towns and cities throughout the
South.


A GREAT HARDWOOD INDUSTRY,

The Eight Principd Spcies of the Southern Aplm.Liam Heav Bm Shtudied
by the Bureau of Fotrdr.


The greatest area of hardwood forest and
the largest supply of hardwoods in the
United States are in the region comprising
the Southern Appalachian Mountains and
the country lying between them and the
Mississipp river. For the last two or three
years the Bureau of Forestry has been
carefully studying this region, which is
rich in commercial species, especially yel-
low poplar, white, red, black and chestnut
oak, chestnut, white pine, and hemlock.
A study was first made of the proportion
of each of these species in the various
types of forest, their merchantable yield,
and their rate of growth. Last summer
eleven agents of the Bureau were assigned
to an Inotitgatlon of the market condi-
tions goveoing the logging and use of each
of these species, and twelve more to a
study of the important characteristics of
each tree and the possibilities of each un-
der management. The data obtained in
this and previous studies are now being
formulated for publication. Several bulle-
tins will be issued, one of a general char-
acter discussing the conditions of the re-
gion as a whole, the others dealing with
the several species particularly.
The field study covered more than 400
counties. and included all of Tennessee,
Kentucky and West Virginia, the ex-
treme western part of Maryland, the west-
ern portions of Virginia and the two Caro-
Unas, and the northern parts of Georgia
and Alabama. The Bureau agents first vis-
ited the lumber centers of each county to
interview the mill men and lumber dealers.
Information was sought, especially on
these points: The remaining stands of
timber and their quality; the annual cut
and the usms to which it is put; land and
stumpage values, the cost of logging and
milling, and the prices of the finished pro-
duct; the methods of loggaig employed, the
specifications for timber in common use,
and how these specifications are changing,
and the principal markets for lumber. The
object of this preliminary work was to
gain a thorough understanding of the mar-
set and business conditions prevailing in
the hardwood regions. Bach knowledge
was necessary before the men could go
into the woods and work out intelligently
the best and most practical methods of
handling the forests.
The study of the general forest condi-
tions and the chrecteriti s of each of
the Important species followed. This study
included inquiry into the requirements of
each species as to light, soll and moisture.
its seeding and reproductive capacity, its
form and development in different types of
forest, and the ways in which the various
species affect each other in the competi-
tion for place and light; also the present
methods of cutting, waste in logging, and
the effects of logging upon the forest. To
determine the chances of natural repro-
duction under existing logging methods
second growth and culled lands in all
stages were carefully studied. The effects
of fire and grazing upon the forest were
also considered. Until the voluminous
data thus obtained have been tabulated
and compared absolute figures and conclu-
sions cannot be announced, but sufficient
progress has been made to warrant some
general statements of conclusions.
For market value and amount of stand-
ing timber yellow poplar and white oak
are the two most Important trees of the
region. These species were formerly
found throughout almost the entire region
in merchantable quantities but they have
been cut so extensively where there are
transportation facilities that It is now us-
ually necessary to go back a long distance
into the woods to nd first-class stands of
either of them. Poplar attains magnifi-
cent size in the coves of the mountain dis-
tricts and in the rich river bottoms of cen-
tral Tennessee and Kentucky, but its best
development is reached in the higher moun-
tains of Tennessee and North Carolina.
White oak reaches its best development in
the river valleys of Tennessee and Ken-
tucky. White poplar always forms a
small proportion of the timber of the area;
it very often forms a large proportion of
the merchantable timber. Whiteoak is
present in very much greater numbers
than poplar over the region as a whole.
and occasionally forms over 50 per cent of
the stand.
Lumbering has had a serious effect on
the reproduction of both poplar and white
oak. When the white oak is cut, as a gen-
eral rule It is partially replaced by infe-
rior species, as the red and black oaks.
Thus in many cases where the virgin
stand contained over O per cent of white
oak, the second crop contains less than 10
per cent. Often when poplar has been
lumbered, only the best trees have been
cut, and as these were comparatively few
In number and occrred at Irregular iter-


vals the forest has not been opened up
enough to let In sueficent light to allow
young poplars to start growing. n addi-
tion, poplar seedling are very easily in-
ured by fire; even slight ground fires ill
them. Fires have been very common
throughout the region, and thus susnm-
ful reproduction of poplar has often been
greatly hindered.
Hemlock occurs over a small portion of
the region, and white pine over a still smal-
ler part; both confine themselves to the
mountainous sections. As a rule hemlock
has not been considered merchantable be-
cause it is generally Impossible to log and
sell It in northern markets in competition
with hemlock from Michigan and Penn-
sylvania. The little remaining white pine
is lumbered in a few localities on a large
scale, and the supply will soon be ex-
hausted.
Chestnut is very abundant. It forms a
large proportion of the stand in the moun-
tain districts, but decreases in quantity
westward, until it practically disappears
In Western Tennessee and Kentucky. Ma-
ture chestnut is damaged more severely by
fire than any of the other species of the
region. A considerable part of its mature
timber is defective for this reason. Much
of the timber is also wormy. In the past
but little chestnut has been cut for lum-
ber, but the output is now increasing. A
new use for chestnut, which has developed
very rapidly In the last few years, so for
making tanning extract. For this purpose
all grades and sises of chestnut above
about five inches in d diameter are used
There are a number of factories maknl
the extract, one of whici consumes NB
cords of this wood daily. This Industry
makes possible the utilization of the limbs
and tops and the defective chestnut, which
otherwise would be wasted, and materially
assists in conservative management by
making this timber more valuable and
cleaner logging practicable.
Chestnut oak is abundant in the moun-
tains, its stand decreasing westward. It
is confined chiefly to the ridges, and in
most sections ls short bodied and-of little
value for sawlogs. Itis usually expensive
to lumber because of its Inaccessibilty.
The chief value of chestnut oak in this
region has been for tan bark, for which, in
some places, It has been largely cut.
Bed and black oak are most abundant
in the western lowland part of the region
where they often form over 70 per cent of
the stand. In addition to their use in large
amounts for lumber and slack cooperagse
they are also now extensively cut along
the navigable rivers for railroad ties. for
which purpose preservative treatment has
recently made them available. These oaks
form but a relatively small part of the for-
ests in the eastern mountainous districts
where In the past almost none of them
have been cut, owing to their low market
value. But now lumbermen who are oper-
ating in the mountains, take these oaks
along with the poplars and white oaks.
There ae a number or large permanent
mills, but over the region as a whole most
of the lumbering is still done by portable
mills. These move through the timber, and
the cutting in cleaner than it formerly was.
This heavier cutting, on account of the
requirements of the two most Important
species, poplar and white oak, for light,
Is usually a good thing for the future
crop, especially for poplar reproduction.
The demands upon this hardwood forest
are enormous and varied. Great indus-
tries employing large manufacturing plants
depend upon it for mill supplies. The most
important of these industries are those us-
ing hardwoods for slack and tight cooper-
age, for lumber, furniture, finishing, rail-
road ties, tannin extract and wagon stock.
In addition to furnishing wood for all
these and other purposes, the forest of this
region has a vital function to perform In
protecting a water shed upon which a num-
ber of States depend for a constant supply
of water. It is doubtful whether the Bu-
reau of Forestry has ever undertaken a
more Important study, and its forthcom-
ing bulletins should prove very valuable to
many commercial interests, as well as to
forestry in general.

DEAL IN TIFTON REAL ESTATE.
Tifton, Ga., Feb. 2.-Mr. I. H. Greene,
a multi-millionaire of New York city. has
purchased from Capt. H. Tift twenty
acres of land in the city of Tifton and Is
having the land surveyed In city lots of
5OxIS feet and will auction them off. The
lots are in the prettiest portion of the res
idence part of the city. Mr. Greene has In-
vested largely in South Georgia property
recently.








0
THE WEEKLY ILNDUSmRIAL RECORD. i5
---- ---
- pg --;- ,, aa Oeeeo^eee".ee**eee**OCee~e~e**Ce**e*~ii e- -----------


E. P. HArLamaDn, President.



HAR1



I M

E


301-303-305 Bay


G. A. GAC rTT, See'y and Treas.


R. M. GABUrT, Vice-President, Lyons, Ga.


FELDER-GARBUTT CO..


lill and Railroad Supplies,

engines. Machinery and Boilers


Street, West, corner Jefferson St. -


SAVANNAH. GEORGIA. i

j; ;i @~00 @@g WwOirj9~903919


THE CHRISTIE GROOVER D 0oo.,

WHO L ESA LE DRU IB TS.
M rg-aW rum -! r amr Am e aw AI arr .m- emAr. .MW n me.L


MAYOR MERMAN MYERS.
No man in the world Ia better acquainted
and more devoted to the affairs and inter-
erts of Savannah or of its rich contiguous
territory, and in closer touch with the hap-
pines and welfare of its citizens than Mr.
Herman Myers, Savannah's noble and
gracious mayor of this charming city, and
to attempt to give a true expression of the
high esteem in which Savannah's chief
executive is held by all who have the for-
tune to be ts sons and fair daughters
would indeed be a somewhat difficult task,
almost an Impossible one, but especially
to "the stranger within its gates," and it
Is the latter who, In receiving the many
courtesies and valuable assistance at his
hands, is helpless with mere words at his
command to give true expression of that
rel gratitude which he so deeply feels and
for Which he Is so deeply indebted.
Mayor Myers' administration has (as is
well known and recognized by every one)
been one of remarkable success, one that
will ever associate him with the history of
the city and its progress. He has been one
in the front rank of the army of Savan-
nahiasn who have carried the city through
succeeding periods of calamity and depres-
sian into the full and clear light of its
present commercial prestige and promise.
giving to It that high state of grandeur it
now holds. Without a doubt, and with good
reason, too, Savannah need well be proud
of its chief, who is ever on the side of
progress and development, a true devotee
to the interest and happiness of all, be
they rich or poor, high or low.

NATIONAL TANK AND EXPORT COM-
PANY.
'Tim always a great pleasure to speak of,
and bring to the notice of our many thou-
pands of readers the name of one of our
most progressive firms of the State. We
allude, of course, to the National Tank and
Export Company of Savannah, Ga., U. S.
A. TIs one of the city's leading enter-
prises, identified closely with its promi-
nence in the structural trade. Being an
exceptionally high class tank and export
company, their tanks are well equipped
and thoroughly enameled and are con-
veniently situated at the terminals of the
8. A. L. and A. C. L. Railways. And what
is also important to learn and bear in mind
is that their charges for storing have been
revised, the company especially asking that
any information desired may be made di-
rect to either of the following members of
the firm, who are: John R. Young, Presi-
dent; A. D. Covington, Vice President, and
H. L Kayton, Secretary and Treasurer.
The directors of the company are: J. P.
Williams, C. W. Saussy, A. Alford, C.
. Elli P. L. Sutherland. J. B. Padgett,
J. R. Young, A. D. Covington, B. F. Bul-
lard, W. C. Powell, Walter Ray, J. B.
Chesnutt, G. W. Deen, Raymond Cay, J.
L1 Conoly, all of whom are exceptionally
Interested in the progress of the city, and
being public spirited citizens, are ever
ready to do their utmost to promote its
welfare. Especially are they notably popu-
lar in business and social life.


FILARIDA CONVICTS LEASED.
C. H. Barnes & Co. of Jacksonville Pays
$207 Each for Them.
At Tallahassee Wednesday the contract
for the Florida convicts for the next four
years was awarded to C. H. Barnes & Co.
of Jacksonville, their bid being 2)7 per
capital per year for all convicts.
The contract was awarded by the Board
of State Institutions, Governor Broward
presiding, after the bids had been opened
in the morning in the presence of a num-
ber of naval stores men and lawyers. From
the names of the bidders it is evident that
there were only naval- stores operators or
factors to put in a bid for the convicts The
bids were opened as follows:
M. G. Warde and Walter Ray, for all
convicts, $165.75; for one-half of them,
$180.25 per head; one-third, 581.25.
C. H. Barnes & Co., for all, 207.
A. Cord & Co., one-third of convicts,
$210.26
R. H. Paul & Co., for all, $l8.10.
E. G. Rose, for all, $16&.6
W. J. Hillman, for all, $174.
Enterprise Lumber Company, for one-
third, S91.75.
W. J. Bryan. for all, $95.
Florida Naval Stores and Commission
Company, by W. F. Coachman, $187.20; $255
for 50 per cent, first choice selected.
Downing & Blount, for all, 203.50.
George L. Drew & Co., $18.5 for one-
third.
When the board met in the afternoon the
bids were all carefully considered and it
was determined that the bid of the Barnes
Company was the most advantageous one
to the State. The contract was awarded
and the company notified the board that It
was ready to present the required bond for
acceptance at any time.
There has been great interest in connec-
tion with the disposition of the State con-
victs ever since the advertisement asking
for bids appeared In the papers of the
State. Owing to the great Improvements
which had been made in the care and con-
dition of the convicts by the Florida Naval
Stores and Commission Company, the pres-
ent lessees, the people of Florida had as-
sumed a more active interest in the dispo-
sition of convicts than was formerly felt.
The price which the successful bidders
offered was a great surprise, however,
since it was an advance of $55.50 per capi-
ta over the price paid by the present les-
sees, and means an annual increase, figur-
ing on 1,200 convicts, of about M6,6O0, or an
increase for the four years of the lease of
266,400.
The contract of the present lessees does
not expire until January 7 of next year,
which will give the new lessees abundant
time to arrange for the caring of the pris-
oners and for the organisation which is es-
sential to their keeping and proper care.

W. E. CARRAWAY SELLS.
Messrs. Borson & Smith, of Crescent
City, Fla., have purchased the large tur-
pentine Interests of Mr. W. E. Carraway,
of Carraway, Fla. This place is consid-
ered one of the best locations in the State
and the consideration was quite large.
Mr. Carraway left Monday for points in
Georgia, where he will take life easy for
awhile.


W. W. CARNES, Pres. W. C. THOMAS, Manager. C. T. DUDLEY, See. & Treas


Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale

Hardware

Turpentine. Mill and Phojpha&te $tSpplies.

LAIRE STOCK CMKIL All NMLMES MACKS Al PULLEU UAM.

TAMPA. FLORIDA.
'I*gIIgIIIIIIirIIui ieuisimuiismse .i. ii-ii




DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply a a call. We can show ye,. at crect ad mosey
saving prices, many paper of lase pCAr whre, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is or desire to cmntLe bei the largest
Diamond dealers i Jacksron vle, and ar specialty Is ie rrfoe ;
cut gems ams high grade Waltham a Elgi0 Watches.

SUC 0 AP D1D Dia dis, WatSs, JeWlY. |
HESS 4 SOLAERLil DN&, W.t,, J1 0 M F.



NUBIAN TEA ror tie ver ri momey

BENEDICTA A mWleis fr wt n

CUBAN RELIEF r Cra""s an DI-
CUBANA OIL Ah limentem dM fr Cuts, Burns

A supply of them medicines is what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for prices and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,
Cbattaaega, Temamas"

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal. Lime. Cement, Brick, Panta.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonvile, Fla.


I _ ---- = - _-= L _I iX II II 1.11 1 iI ii iI ZI =i ii X : ir Ii IZ Z= TI IiT II if








16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
0000 .... ..I- -


.JOHN S. FRANZ. Agent




Writ(
fcl
C-b
re


Diebold Sae & Lock Co.
JLcL.eonvlle. Floridea

Sam'l P. Holmes& Co.
Stoks, Bends, Cotten,
Grain amn Previsolns.

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
BeN Phome 853 Baldwin Block
FIRE INSURANC--Lowmt ratoe. IA-
re H. Green & Co, and 10 Park BIdg.
Jacksonville, Fla. amo.


BAILEY MONIGOMERY,
Commusion Merchanta.
Navel Stores & Cotton
Liberl advances made against ip.
-e.ta Cw-4,--st sUelited.
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDII G,
NEW YORK CITY.
ao


JI P. DAASPM
S1 ____ I F 1MILA FZ


Florida


Electric Co.
Cotractig Ejtrical Eglimrs
Sell and Install Complete Electrie Light
and Power Plants, Telephone Ex-
changes. Wholesale Eleetric
Supplies.
Jackaovilnl, fa.


THE CANNON COMPANY


BARRELS
ARE THE
STANDARD
go THE
WORLD


Use no Other

Plants coavelestly located.
Home Office, QUITMAN, GA,
U. & A.


oiU lR IIlOfit IW Ceo.
BUILDERS AND DEALER8 IN


ENGINES. BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilar, Oil and lea s-
chinery, and Supplie and Repairs
CAPACITY FOR 300 BANDS
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hanger, Lather a
Rubber Belting and Hose, Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridge..
Steam Pumps, Feed Water Heaten and
Hoisting Engines.
AUGUSTA, CA.

Whiskies, Gins,
Rums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
( van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM d& CO.
S17 and 519 West Bay Street.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Are yoe reau yonur ow osser
or one berrnowd ftom a melhboirt
If the later -e the ese write to-da1
WaEm WrITI e ADVY rTUARS


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSNVILLE
JACKSONsVILLE. PA.
CAPITAL S30000 SUR LUS a UrVIDED ROR Sr30o,00
We isseae 'lime Cerfletes ot Depoit. wMoh draw Ciestat r ae a thee ~er I a
-u-ui. ihld ninety days or loner. Take adr.rtf Jreyw aad hrt** --ye h e u
sMthug tsr yr. PwUeCoru atu-tlon pU aMtou iomsO U I T

"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EArT.L
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest ar
ket price. Your patronage is repeotfully solicited. Se qnotatiom
thispjper.
KINOAN & CO., Ltd., B. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, PLA.

Herbert A. Ford, Oee. H. Fd, P. L. Wetm,
President. Vice-Pres. Caher.
The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.


CAPITAL,


- 0450,000.00.


DIRucoi : R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. L Christia, Gee.
McKay, Gee. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators ad Saw Mill Mol 5elitd

1111111 11111188911)8849 81811 818811118 ,

The Wire Virgin Gum Co.,
Is now ready to give you all the Information you may want eommerng the
a way we are now gathering virgin gum from high boxes. By the M a
w tin lip put up lose to the ehippiag and so arranged to ame the gm to
Strike wire and follow same down to the box, not str~i the ia of the
Stlee. Wire is fastened on by two small nails, one jut above the lp ad
the other at upper edge of the oldbox, and atreted tight so ua kto
Sgum from dripping off, thereby making virgin gum and moa of T. e r
are many benefit and big pay where parties can gt a good many igh buan.
For further information write to
- THE WIRE VIRGIN GUM CO.. TIFTON, GA.
,'O9840 888ollsII i um m emi 11111111111] llll

The West.Raley-Rannie Company.
114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksrvlle, ria.
A. N. WSr. Fe. w. W. est. rVice-e. w.- ric-fre.s. r. I. er., as. d nefs.

We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

***www--t***ww***M i I I*


M. A. BRIGGS, President.
H. C. BBI0GS. Ist Vice-Presdent.


noMaM OWN. god Vlee~trades5
0. McYOMNAYD se end Tram


*W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.
VALDOSTA. GA.
* sole Southern Agent for-

SRRIXFORD AXES.
4T rhey are te BCr. Others imitate but none du-
* plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the fine
C temper, hold the keenest edge. eat better and last loner
than any other axe.
0 This has all been proved by years of actual use.
Sed is yoar orders.
W. H. BRI66S HARDWARE COMPANY,
* ValMesta. merg.,

MINTION TUH 3a0Wn.








THE WEEKLY LNmUbUtilAL RECORD. 17
7 1k ___ ? ---- --uess 1 ._ 7*


112 WEST FORSYTH ST. BELL PHONE NO. 592
HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY
AJ. EDRICK. Manager. % Formerly of Hedrick 1 Raley
ole gecy for Riverside and adjoing property on easy terms. (The choice residence portion
of the city ) Improved and unimproved property in former burnt district, Springfield, LasVili and
other sulmrb. Choice business property and Investments.
MONEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTORS.



Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advmrtisemnts Wa e isrte d I TUhs Deprtmet t t he rollawir i*tes:
For one week, 20 cents a line.
For two weeks, 35 cents line.
For three weeks, 50 cents a line.
For four weeks, - 65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
otaalaing advertisement. Copy must be in this oflfce not later than Thursday
.aorg to secure insertion is Friday's paper.
Wasted. Wanted.
Manager turpentine place consisting of To buy a first-class turpentine location
twelve crops virgin boxes, location flat in Florida. Will pay the right price for
lands, eight miles from Apalachicola. Ad- the right place. No flat woods place need
dress Hays & Oven, Apalachicola, Fla. apply. G. A. Petteway, Box M, Leroy,
Marion Co., Fla. tf
Position Wated. Turpentine Men.
A position as stiller, very best reference Buy a Blakeesle Gasoline Pumping Out-
forshed. Address 8. F. Johnson, Mur- fit for your still. No. 1 outft pumps 0Ao
phy. Fla. 4t gallons per hour at a east of 3 eat aad
requires no attention while ramming
Help SD ed. Started in one minute. J. P. Omnpbell,
Naval stores men can secure help by ap-
plying to the City Employment Bureau, Wanted.
840 Wept Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla. A distiller. We want a good, sober
man with family, to run the still another
POIslalO Wasted. season. Can give steady employment
A position as woodsman for turpentine through the winter. None need apply but
frm. Reference furnished. Address G. E. first-class man with good references. Ad-
Mixson. Butherland, Fla. dress F. & W., Jonesboro, Fla. tf


Florida Bank and Trust Company
Capltl S1,000.000.. Jacksonvllle. Fl..
DEPOSITARY OF STATE. COVXTY AMD CITY FUNDS.
W. F. COACHMAN President. W. JENNING.S. Viei President.
W. A. BEDDING, dashier. ARTH1 F. PERRY, Vice President.
F. P. FLEMING. Jr., Vice President.
Receives deposit aeeounts of individuals, flrms corporatins and b ks. Pays 4 per
cent on saving depts. Rents safe depot boxes Buys and sells foreign exehsnge and
issues letters of credit
Acts as trustee, transfer agent, registrar and isal agent for corporations sad
municipalities. Exeutes all trusts such as executor, trustee under will or appointment
of courtreceiver and gua n
Unequaled'FaUUel s. Aeaamntm Selleed C-.. d Imwsd.



THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. VLA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thosoughly
renovated and repaired throughout, In-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
W ^H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.

ideal Localieso a Beauiful St. Joso
HOTEL ROSELAND -
Mg-Clmss ToertM u oamy ft"
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Every comfort and amusement. Unexcelled cunaine. Northern cooking. Speeial rates, 6$10
weekly: I2 to 83 daily, American plan. Illustrated booklet mailed Car going to ostrih term
passe hotel grounds. Headquarters for naval stores men, lumbermen, cattle growers sa ood
Roads Convention delegates A. C. EKHOLM. Popmuoarm.


Windsor Hotel
YeJake ar-Round hlt aMd
FlorIa L[sgeat a" Best

Year-Round Hotel


-a-v-a amsh a sDs L A EDODGE & CULL NS.
$ A IILTCASL tIMM. BaknN a. szmy 3.o sfl Go .l
* IAWm 3. IEIS. rS use, MA SIDNEY ). SflBS, .Mcom Ge, .Oum's O mw Pruldsrsa.
L AMERICAN PLAN

RRA GRAND VIEWHOTEL)2.00 PER DAY UP

ST. GEORGE HOTEL) U. E.
MRS. OW. ROCK. PIrPm Taa.
Sucessers to
W. J. L'ENGLE, J. W. WADE. E. HUGUES,
GRANGERSTUBBS LUMBER CO. resen. vie-Prn., a- are, .
s-a. Union Naval Stores Co.
B. B. HUNTING & CO. MOBILE. ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
m w 00 DEALERS IN
j A..Iw carcat Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
SAVANNAH, GA. 100000n nn SAVANNAH, GA. Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
RUNS GA. BALTIMORE, MD locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
J UNS GA. eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
IACKSONVI.E, FLA. Feet per Year. NE YORK N. Y. solicited.
FERNANDINA, FLA. J*ACKSONVILE, FLA. Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


Dressed TImbers, any size or length, and Factory Floorlag K night Crockery Co.
DEALERS IN CROCKERY. CHINA. GLASSWARE. TINWARE AND
are aaong our Specialties. HOUSE PURNISHING GOODS.
Moonuf.oturin_ As nts 12-14 last Bay Street,
e oader too large for Oar facilities or too small for ow careful Prios forwartsd per rotuar mnll. Jackasevfle, Florlda
attentlo. --
mtte st/orSE+SIgM, For Prompt Doivery Sld Us Your Cmismry Chck Ordin
WHRN WRITING ADVENTI El MENTION THE RICOD.










THE WEEKLY miUDUrISTAL RECORD.

O


SPECIAL

Real Estate Bargains
msME AMD U SUnes NME E MOLAMD.
IN A QUIET Bri 'n TLY AMERICAN
VILLAUH 26 MIu LI FROM BUdITON.
On best corner in village, near library, G.
A. R. all, nigh school, etc., substantial
3 story colonial house of 10 high roomsr
open replaces, lawn and shade trees; ta-
ble good sma with two horse stalls and
room xor ave carriages; separate 2 story
store building, three snow windows, plsaa,
refrigerator, typewriter, scales, tobacco
cutter, oil tans, show cases, stove, lamps
and complete nxturres with the shelves tull
of goods that at retah will amount to
more than price, ,80; ,00 cash, balance
4 per cent. SBx acres tree from stones,
fronting two streets, several house lots
might be sold, beautiful laae stocked with
ash. Village is elevated, one of the mose
healthful in New England, electric roaa
now one mile will soon pass, real estate
cost $3t,; whole property with goods, hay,
wagon, etc., for 4-.A. Engraving postpaiu.
Buyer a expense from h lorida ueductea
from price. Uhapin's Farm Agency, Herald
Bidg., Boston.
WHERE BOSTON MAN EXPENDED
4100,0,
Elghty-five acres under high cultivation,
no waste land, three minutes walk from
electric cars, Ic tare to Boston, ie by
steam car mileage, cut 9o tons hay In 19U.4
generally kept I1 cows. two slos 200 tons
capacityfU hooice truit trees, grapes and
berries; 2 story house, 14 rooms, Lurnace,
piasas, sets back from street, surrounded
by majestic elms, beautiful lawns; barn la.
by 40 cellar, Fairbanks scale and every
convenience, cost lu,u00; piggery 1 ftt.,
hennery, carriage house etc., perfect re-
pair, frontage of 3au feet upon three
streets. great protective value for sub-di-
vision. rice 419UW part cash, which is
much less than the assessed value.
Chatn's Farm Agency, Boston.
CAMP ON LAKE OSSIPEE.
Every thing ncluaed-furniture for 12,
boat. etc., see 4 engravings of this and 40o
others in farm catalog, postpaid.
..apin's barm Agency, Herald Building.
Boston. Mass.
LAKE VIEW HOUSE.
One of the Most Charming Spots In New
Hampshire.
Three story house. I rooms and base-
ment, toilets on three floors, piazsas three
sides, water supplied by windmill 26 cham-
ber Sets. carpts and matting included;
stable 70 x 4. cellar. 12 stalls, bordered by
lake stokeed with bass. banks lined with
cottages; hennery, ten acres of land; es-
tate once sold for 10,000; mortgaged 17,000
which has been discharged, now tree and
clear. Price only 2.00M., eAo cash, bal $10U
semi-annually. b per cent.
Chapin's Farm Agency, Herald Building,
Boston.

HOME AND BUSINESS IN THE PIED-
MONT REGION.
same a Poland. Bottling house, pavilion,
6 houses within city limits, choice fruit,
high healthy location. Illustrated details
postpaid by Chapin's Farm Agency. Wm.
Goldsmith, Jr.. Greenville, S. C., will show
It.
FOR SALE OR RENT.
Store on first floor with museum on two
others, should yield fine income. Famous
Florida museum, St. George St., near City
Gate, will be sold with or without its I
story building, or rented. Rare collection
historic relics and wonderful objects from
various sections of the world, one of the
most valuable in America. For details ad-
dress Box 74, St. Augustine.

"EAGLE INN" THE POPULAR ALL THE
YEAR HOTEL OVERLOOKING
THE ADIRONDACKS.
At Orwell, Vt, near station, four miles
from Lake Champlain; built 12 years ago
by present owner and successfully conduc-
ted by him all that time; 3 stories with 39
guests rooms, fine large dining room, oface.
parlor, reading room. billiard room, music
hail with piano, etc. Peases combination
heater which cost .000, and every con-
venience, beautifully situated with five
acres of lawn and garden, choice fruit in
variety, private water supply pure spring
water; livery stable 60x30 with wing, 30
stalls, office, harness and carriage rooms
laundry building, etc., all slated, perfect
repair, buildings cost 320,000, mall route
paying $00 a year, complete furnishings of
house and stablewith ten horses and full
equipment of vehicles included for $15,000.
easy terms. We do not offer you a run-
down non-paying house, but an up-to-date
hotel paying a clere profit of 2,000 a year,
one of the best openings in New England;
apply on premises tb owner, F. B. KImball,
r to Chapin's Farm Agency. Herald Bldg.,
111tes.


NEW EXPERIMENTS IN TURPENTINING. The


The Burau of Forestry Enadeavcring to Further Increae the Capacity d Han
Lengthen the Li of the Southrn Pine Tree OU

The old system of boxing Southern pine Through the public-spirited and cordlar
trees for the production of turpentine and co-operation of the Hillman-Sutherland
resin has very greatly reduced the pine Land Company of Jacksonville, Fla., a
timber wealth of the Southern States. stand of about 4,001 pine trees In Clay
Three years ago the Bureau of Forestry County, Fla., with other facilities, have,
determined that something should be done without cost to the government, been
to eliminate so destructive a method of placed at the disposal of the Bureau for
procuring naval stores. Its three years of experimental purposes.
experiments towards this end have demon- The principal experiments now set on
strated that a new system of turpentining, foot comprise the practical working of a
which requires the use of earthen cups and number of different turpentine erops. One
metal gutters, not only greatly conserve the set of trees will be used to determine the
life of the timber tapped, but also gives an best width of face to be cut on thees of
increased yield of resin, and therefore a different diameters.
greater profit than is possible than by Another set of trees will be used to de-
boxing. The box method and the new cup monstrate the rate in height at which
and gutter system of turpentining are ful- weekly chippings should proceed in order
ly described and illustrated in Bulletin No. to stimulate a full flow of resin. It is be-
40 of the Bureau of Forestry. lived that the weekly chippings now prac-
While the new system is not yet in use ticed cuts away in height, at one time, too
by all turpentine operators, its application much of the living wood. At present this
is extending as rapidly as the necessary upward chipping amounts to about eighteen
equipment can be secured. At present inches every year, and it is thought that
there is but one company supplying the this can be reduced at least one-half or
kind of cups and gutter iron required. It two-thirds. Such a saving in face height OLD 8HA
is hoped, since the demand for this ma- will permit a considerable Increase in the
trial is very great, that in the near fu- number of crop years, which should give Gua ma
ture the supply will be sufficiently Increas- a much increased total yield of reain, as gll
ed to enable turpentine operators to pro- well as reduce the demand upon the area
cure the needed equipment, of pine forests. There will also be an
While, in the work just completed, the economy for operators in not having to GO. J. C
Bureau of Forestry has performed an Im- move their equipment from one set of
portant service to the turpentine industry, trees to another, as frequently is the case u
it feels that a still more conservative meth- at present. gMallo
od of turpenaining can be found which, Still another set of trees will be devoted
consistent with a maximum yield of tur- to finding out how deep toward the center
pentine, wil inflict the smallest possible of the tree each streak should be chipped. ANVIL 1
injury upon the trees. With this in view. Under the present practice it is believed G. lt
the Bureau has begun an entirely new line that an unnecessarily deep cut is made,
of field experiments in order to determine thereby greatly reducing the vitality of the ao
to what extent the wound now made in tree and consequently its capacity to pro-
tapping the trees can be lessened. duce resin.
........... CLIFFORD


MORE COLONIES.
Arrangements looking to Establishing in
Georgia and Florida.

Arrangements are now being made for
the establishment of a number of colonies
along the line of the Georgia, Florida and
Alabama Railroad, several of the colonies
to be located In Southwest Georgia and
several in Northwest Florida, says the Sa-
vannah News.
Judge E. M. Blalock of Jonesboro, Ga.,
and Colonel W. M. Legg of Bainbridge,
Ga., general manager of the Georgia, Flor-
ida and Alabama, were in the city yester-
day consulting with Mr. J. P. Williams,
the president of the road, in regard to the
plans.
It was announced after the conference
that several of the colonies would be es-
tablished just as soon as possible. Within
a yea these officials expect to have pros-
perous colonies in both Georgia and Flori-
da along the Georgia, Florida and Alabama.
The plan is to establish colonies for the
raising of tobacco and for truck farming,
the country through which the road runs
being admirably adapted for both these
purposes. Efforts will be made to get peo-
ple from Ohio and neighboring States, and
also Virginia and North Carolina to settle
along the line. Special Inducements will
be offered.
Colonies are to be established in Decatur,
Early, Randolph, Miller and Calhoun coun-
ties in Georgia and Gadsden, Leon and
Franklin counties in Florida. For some of
these colonies arrangements have already
been made and several hundred settlers
will probably be secured during the year.
Two of the colonies are to be in Franklin
county, Florida, and two in Decatur coun-
ty, Georgia. One of the colonies in Deca-
tur county will be about ten miles north
of Bainbridge and the other about seven
miles south of that point. Another colony
will be established about ten miles aorth
of Tallahassee, on Lake Jackson. Arrange-
ments are now being made for a colony In
Early county, Georgia. also.
Both Judge Blalock and Colonel Legg
state they expect to see the country
through which the road runs develop very
rapidly within the next few years. Colonel
Legg states that Bainbridge will undoubt-
edly become an important distributing
point in the near future. Judge Blakely is
especially interested in the development of
the town of Lanark, which is just below
Tallahassee. Lanark, he says, will be the
residence portion of Carrabelle, the port
which is now being developed.
A hotel has been built there and lots are
being sold rapidly, says Judge Blalock.
There is a mineral spring with excellent
properties, he says, and an ideal health re-
sort will in time be built. A number of At-
lanta people are to have homes there, he
says. The country is ideal for sports of
all kinds, and now that it has become ac-
cessible, he expects to see many visitors
thee.


WHITE BLAKESLEE MANUFACTU-
RING COMPANY.
A visit of one of our representatives to
the manufacturing plant of the White-
Blakeslee Manufacturing Company, Birm-
ingham, Ala., where the famous "Blakes-
lee" gas and gasoline engine is built, ena-
bles us to favor our readers with a few
facts in reference to this energetic and
successful firm.
The new factories, which have been
equipped without regard to first expense
with the finest machine tools and facil-
ities for handling their special line of
work, represent undoubtedly the most ef-
ficient and well managed plant of this kind
in the country. Their factory buildings are
of the most modern machine shop construe-
tion, and every convenience is afforded
their employes for producing the best work
possible. Their line of engines and con-
nected outfits for 190 represents the most
complete and carefully thought out lne
of goods on the market this year. Their
new catalogue for 106 will be mailed to
any one who is interested in gasoline en-
gines or connected outfits, and covers the
requirements of a man desiring anything
in a line of vertical engines from 1 to 6
H. P. and from 2 1-2 to I H. P. of the
horizontal line, together with a large num-
ber of pumping outfits, etc. The success-
ful business of this concern sl conclusive
evidence of the high standard of excellence
reached in their line of manufacture and
liberal treatment of their trade. We wish
for them, as they deserve, an unpreciden-
ted year's business.

THE BLOUNT REAL ESTATE COM-
PANY.
We beg to call attention to the adver-
ticement of the Blount Real Estate Com-
pany of Ocala, Fla.. which appears else-
where in this issue. This company is com-
posed of some of the best known men in
the State, men who have made a life study
of timber, timber lands and phosphate
lands. They are thoroughly reliable, and
the Record predicts great success for this
new firm.
The officers and directors are as follows:
President, B. W. Blount; Vice President,
A. P. Btuckey; Secretary and Treasurer,
E. K. Nelson. Directors-R. S. Hall T. C.
Hall, E. P. Taggard, J. D. Robertson, J. N.
Tiller, L Horn. Edwin Brobston, J. L.
Young. C. Downing, William Hocker, L. W.
Duval. The company is incorporated and
have a capital stock of I0,000.
This concern is now prepared to offer for
sale some of the best property now on the
market in the State. They make a special-
ty of timber and phosphate lands, turpen-
tine and saw mill locations, farm and
grazing lands, orange groves, vegetable
lands, city and town property. They have
first-class connections, both in and out of
the State, and are amply prepared to han-
dle any business placed in their hands.
Any one wishing to sell or buy will do
well to consult them before doing so.


By the


OLD sr.J




OLD POnI
Guarsnt


We hand
Rye and B
ket and wi
to 50 per i
for price f
upon appii

TlltUa

5-3C


oldestt Whiskey


se in Georgia

taushlid sm.)


13WILlIAMB
a S year. OIL. By th




as!6 Yeasom d OI y the
P.71. 4 mio quar6, smS


Sa 4 yer.n OIL By t

~pow


gallo, V.5, 4 fenE quaris


UCaxY CORN
ea 8 years id. Dy As
Win 4 un quws. WA
Z1ymmin I --r


r CLUB Cow
~ 4 yam eL. Dy V
4AO2 4 full quaik, mIL



ci ars you frms W pr a"
101t eR your puraM.. b
it and eatalogsm. Mafisim km




-ps a F lew& aS

EAlCOZ 030301


This Space Resrvd for



Gus Muller & Co.


i-elessale


Liquor Merchants






Jubluuhs hflIt Wuks

...Aen...



ACME BEER



tAem lyleT^M W
ow^ J* ome&ae .

If the *Imeemy h-3JW u





THE WEE KLY mI.#UsA u1AL RORD. 19
-- - -- - -


McMILLAN

BROTHERS


Southern Copper Works
MANUFACTURERS OF
TURPENTINE STILLS AND FIXTiRESf
AND GENERAL METAL WORKERS.
Old stills taken in exchange for new ones. Patching through the country a specialty. Orders by mail or wire
will receive prompt attention at either of the following works :
FAYETTEVILLE. N. C. SAVANNAH. GA.
MOBILE, ALA. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
-- --- ------ --- --------- --- --------- ----------- -------- -----


Half Tones-Zinc Etchinqgs

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF
THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.
I SPITl IS Is OF Il8111, RETiIIIII 0 IE MIBlIII PI IPIS PI ECS.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES. GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED

A Florida Enterprise. Try It.
TUa raCOReD SPACX AS A IG MONar VALUE.







20 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


888**8*.. auaeeeusa.*8am84ouseusauseaamuaeuaaheu

.THE DIAMOND
Whol--Jl ud e toUa
Wines. Liquors and Cigars,
al Agent. fr t.he f.ao A. b. D erL a. the "WUlheIm Zuael Min-
*s J Water. We guuuatee all Branda put up by us ful measure, as follws
Creme de la Creme. bottle .... 2.00 Diamond Brand, bottle ........ 1.00
Ildywr ,-e-am.redyir) ime" ] Heart Brand, bottle .......... .75
C. C. C. Brand, bottle ........ 1.50 Spade Brand, bottle ........... .00
Club Brand, bottle ........... 1.25 Premium Brand, bottle ........ .50


MYERSON CO..
Ms a Mi W.et Raw ..
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Paherne 17112.


J. A. Crai (. Bro.
239 W. Bay St TIETT E OCK.

Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Steteon Hate; largest stock in the City.


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE S RJITAIL

HARDWARE
Sash, Doors Blinds. Paints, Oils and Glass,
Stoves. Tinware, Couintry-Holloware.


Jacksonville. Fla.


CYPRESS TANKS
Are Best by Every Test
Cypress withtande the effects oft and miatue
better than any aoter wood, shrinki and swells les
thn her wood, is ipervio to acid., ho. d paint
well nd las far ages with decain. Locamd
as we are, right in the great cyre fret, We are
able to secure the bat selection of the wood and t
very low prices. We have been building tank for
more than a quarter of a ceatry and ho dly assert
that no tank are better built or w t htla gr.
594jbr fcir asd p,.
G. M. DAVIS Ql SON
PALATRA, FLORIDA


Jame Sewart B. oboeed, Jr.
STEWART Q. COMPANY
mRBa A TP aW M AM


KIAL EbIAIIE &. LUAIb


505 West Bldg. Jacksonville, Fla. Phone 1576
FOR SALE
L-arge ad smill treat a virgin timber of high grade. eenvidently le-
eoted for iR.. nd wter it--- tws a.t mderate do oo. Wrtt for
xeailxxxmxxx6Xxx.S a^


Printing


For all Purposes.
The Industrial Record Pub. Co.
Jaekonvlle, FIa.
0u OW -N 1on,01


nU ii* III~IIII 11111a et I....


am me m ciii mu mmi minus m


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.

Boilermaking and Repairing
Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
Jecksonville, Fla.

WILLIAM A. *OUI1S dAME* 0. DARSY

WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
TE MOEST ESTAISMEB ORAM AA lEES MuhUE TIE STATE.
Hay, Grain, feed, Garde.
Seeds, Poultry Supplies, flour


Grits, Meal and Fetizers.


OUR MOTTO: Pre t Sbimen t, 11el1e Goods. Catdlgem IrVe
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Cummer Lumbher Co.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER
Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES and CRATES.
I'II IIai* i li i a *** 8** I ai i a *l* i**aa*Alma******


Standard Clothing Company


One Price One Price

FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and i9 West Bay Street, Jacksonvile. Friday.
Stetse sand Hawes Hats. Speelal Attentlemi Give to Mail Orderw.


R. TOLAR. d. H. HART. T. H. BLACHLY. J. R. TOLAR, Je
(Established 1672.)
TOLAR, HART & CO..
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.

Commission Merchants
end Jobbers of Navel Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Member, of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


C


JOSEPH D. WEED. H. D. WEED. W. D. KRENSON

J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.
Wholesale Hardware,
Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.
e LJ smas su


i WET MAY STREET


I


!


K8K SINXS`SNNN ---------


~ESr~rS~XmffXSJaE~SC3E3C~i3iSf3iSC~~








THE WEEKLY LNuJiarl~IAL RECORD. 21


Atlantic Natinal Bank of Jacksonville.

110110 .... ... .I. 0 4*&00
KUNHD in*XS DIPOSITORY.

m.. ...... .. .........-..... ........ ]i i ,ro
In adaltm to -ar g ulr heMdnki busis, we maintain a SftaTn Deart- *
ment, der gvwerumeo .M paying interest quarterly.
We hae for et Hafe Depot Boem in burglar and fireproof vaults at re-
mal ratie y *mouth or 7er.


C. H. HARGRAVES CO..

WHOLESALE GROCERS
Grain, Hay, Feed
Speelal atntdom to Tarpestine *snd Sawmill Mea'i RAqulrements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY S IKLI
Jecksorville, Fla.
GSa1 IO n R-UTATX SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
ihl-lum Cetwir e Ple Idst for M s ebaatable Rals iog. Adopted at Titte,
GeOaM a, J1ulyis, 904.
Feet Feat I FeetFeet Fet Feet Feet i Feet Feet Feet
maE p6M U91-96 96-30 31-36 3-4 41-45 48-50 61 -55 r-80 61-
1 xrs to bI..: Pn r is 1i4J.AMioo 1. a420oo50 o 23.5 5en.o3.ooo.0o
9s'1e o Sle1.... 1.l 1.56 13.5 14.0Io 16.ao 170 0.00 2s.00 9.00 o s3.0
Palz@ to Itle.... Il06 1.00 14.00 10 16.50 18.60 21.00 14.00 9.00 n7.00
1 xlI to Ixt..... 14.01 16.J 16.50 18001 21.00 24.00 28.00 32.50 33.00 4.00
3 ol to 141l2.... 1.6 13.50 14.50 1610 16.50 21.001 24.50 28.0 34.00 43.00
IYxu to t10lt.... 136 14.00 1I.50 17.60 19.50 22.00 2 5.50 30600 36 4".
1 X14 to 3x14.... 14.61 19.01 200I 22.001 24.50 27.50 3.00 37.00 44.00 57.00
3rx14 to 1rx14 ... 14.J 160 18.0020.501 22.00 24.00 28.00 32.50 40.00 .00
xi4 to 14d14.... 15.5 17.00 19.00 21.001 23.00 2900 30.00 34.50 42.00 55.00
1 X16 to 411.... 95 20 94.50 27.560 31.00 34.00 38.00 42a 2.0W 6M.
4 l to Itll .... 190 9.00 2.00 25.60 20.00 31.00 36.00 39.50 48&00 5.00
1I rl to 1... 1U. 910.0 32.00 26.560 30.00 3&01 37.00 41.00 60.0 08.00
i x.1 to l.... 94.6 5s.e o 31.501 36.00 39.001 3.0 0.0oo 62.0 7*9.00
6%zxr to 14xl3.... 21. 2.006 926.00 29.001 33.00 7.0 41 00 45.00 57.00 6 9.00
14%xlr to 1-131.... 4.00 27.0AA 3000| 34.00 3.00 42.00 48.00 e .00 74.0
Trps: Met c.
P aes re P. La. Care Savanu h, runsawick, Pernandina and Jacksoavill.


,Besll IaII*****$t es issues u I*Sm iuassam


McMILLAN BROS.,

Florida Copper Works.
Shefamrtarers o

Turpentine Stills
ad-l S Me a Worksr.
Old stills taken in ex a forfor
new onee. Patehinu throub the soum-
try a specialty. Order -by mail or
or wire will receive prompt atteatiooSq
at either of the lowwi workm:
SrAYETTEVILLEu, II. C. AVAmNNAH. A.
SMOMLS, ALA. JACKSONVILLE, LA.


*ihu**uuughga------------ uu "Sao". .u u .

f- ~L~~*~rr**~~~~ ~~1


Weoul a NTrpearse reo.a1li la

Iteresrt oYew


Whal Ae-" Saw Mill ITillhe
10.000 Acres Saw Timber .................... $2.50 to S5.00

26.000 Acres Virgin Timber.....................
20.000 .......... 250 to s6.00
150.000 .....................
10.000 .I. .. ...... .... per Acre.
192.000 .. ..................


BROBSTON. FENDIG & CO.


J1 W. rF.adb p.


ohmaoUweI, fi.


**9~ww###~W@PP@W9#* ##9~-~ 99son


NOTICE
At a *mit the Georgia Interstate
Law Mil AMO tiNm, held at Jaekorvlle.I
Fak. Mardh 1s, 190, the following Clai-
latin d Roase for Iapeetio of Yel-
law Pee were eoMally adopted, efestive
u in mta nd 8i p *ectim at yeflw
Pile Lumbe
General Rules--All lumber must be
sound, well manufaetured, full to aim and
saw batted; free from unsound, loose and
hllow knots, worm and knot hoes;
thrkgh shakes, or road shakes that
show the surface; quare edge, unless
otherwise speefied. A through shake is
hereby deed to be through or connected
fro side to ide, or edge to edge, or side
to edge. In he measurement of dressed
Inmber to width aad thiekness of the
lumber before dressig must be taken;
les than oun inch thick sall be measured
as ou tsinh.

CLASSIICATION.
floorig shall embrace four and five
quarter insees i thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: Ix3,
4, 5 and 6; Ysx3, 4, 1 a. d 6.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under ou and a half inches by seven
inhes and up wde, including one and a
half iml in thiekes- by wseve in width.
For example: %, 1, 1%S and 1% inches
tm by iMb- and u, wide.
enatHlag shall emhraes a sis from
two to Ve lashes is thiknees and two to
ix inhes ia width. For sample: 2x2,
2s3, 4a, Sus, z 3s%, 3x4, Sx., 3d, 4x4,
40. 4xd 5.5 and 5~
Plank sha embrace all sias from one
and re-half to six ihebes t thickness.
not iluding six hes by seven inches
ad up i width. For ma m e: 1%, ,
3, 3% 4, 4%., 5, %,%T ash
upt wI no 1.


Dimeoals.
Dimension sizes shall embrace all sels
6 inches and up in thicknesa by seven
inches and up in width, including six by
six. For example: 6x6, 6x7, 7x7, 7x3, ix9
and up.
Stepping.
te pping shall embrace one to two and
a half inches in thickness by even inches
and up in width. For example: 1, 1%,
1%/. 2 and 2%x7 and up, in width.
Rough Edge or Flitch.
Rough Edge or Flitch shall embrace all
sizes one inch and up in thickness by eight
inches and up in width, sawed on two
sides only. For example: 1, 1%, 2, 3, 4
and up thick by eight inches and up wide,
sawed on two sides only.

INSPECTION.
Standard.
All lumber shall be sound, sap no ob-
jection. Wane may be allowed one-eighth
of the width of the piece measured aro
face of wane. erxending one-fourth of the
length on one corner or its equivalent on
two or more corner.
Merchantable.
All sizes under nine Inches shall show
heart entire length on one side or edge;
sizes nine inches and over shall show
heart the entire length on two opposite
sides. Wane may be allowed one-eighth of
the width of the piece measured aeros
face of wane, and extending one-fourth of
the length of the piece on one corner or
its equivalent on two or more coerne
Prime.
Scantling shall show heart on two faces
the entire length; other sizes shall show
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
cent. of the pieces, wane may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the piece mes-
ured across face of wane and extending
one-fourth of tile length of the piece on
one corner or its equivalent on two or
more "rers.


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Steamer Shipments a Speciaty.
WATERTOWN. FLORIDA.


C. H. BARNES Pres.


J.. SHLAW, Vice-Pres.


RALPH JESSUP, Sec.-Tren


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.


Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Predusers' Company. Guaies,
Grades amd Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jakse-viNe. Pensasela, fernandina and Savannah
Cerrespodrnee Sclsited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


McMURRAY & BAKER,


SOw Milll d 0re nilm n HNia Ut frtd
W rea reean y i e-dee peawre ai buamn vehiksti 1 tror.
Lawroaes, whal, harue ad ba hornet furnlin we have a nobby Ue. Pri
and poods in touch with al. Turpentioe walem sad haruses a speelatty. Demt
forget we can beat the word oa hand-made harness.

rIMyn I Bl 4 11 413 Tl ST.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


TED COM SPAC A 311 o110113 VALVE.


A- --








STHE WEEKLY INDUSBTRIAL RECORD.
I _ I l


Industrial Record's Department of Information



Th department is ducted for the benefit of the subcribers and adertisin patrol of tis paper and n

cde e is made for any information supplied or ervce rendered. in any one or more of the blanks following,

mu may require clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention

8smr T.....i - rue. iaYo esa . .mr. oFr aA mF.a r a 1r-,8 w memo ".a1.
DATW INDUSTRIAL RMOCOD. Jasooville, ta.
IN L M *a& OIme J t I sm bo e, a f af Ia fo the puxpose of
nI a- miln Is tfre fasonowg Prefer in State of lease put nme I eonnsmcatim
with respomnable parti am give me other la ornion.
BemSF =
PiMt oURy where sme oma be secured.
Sign f

Staten qeeinsm as Wd of nmeopery wanted and whether new or second-handed DATE
Leenatm sr Turpsewums. wm er Faste y. ae r AMar estrial r Eterpwise. Fr Cemmesary, es a SeaebejM 8mwmwea. awmll ea Toarpeb Males
DATE es.
zuIDUmIIAx. Bwxm0P, Ji5tooSTU1, j* DATE
INDUSTRIAL ECODM JaoaJa slloe, ta.
wease a thl aueaiigne ruegadin a good loeatiom (sate or aetoao of
st t) tor In the maket fW
-ftktallforti about labor eoodiloes. taxes, trm'ortatio l ln tetlaes,
B-WRa Ploas give lato matio a to be"t plaes to buy, etr.




Soe Ver We st U l8eg i ? Are YeTm T W o iest1 ?
DATE DATE
INDUSIAL RECORD, JashaekTiai, rta. INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jaekhaovile, sa.
HmE r ~atle the foowi Can you rgiv any I traform to the renablUty of the te lo lt ar or comera
uton

am ye sngeed a maner?m
sign" Signed


bo YOR Weat t Eam"y a Mam?
DATE
ngDWsrIaAL RECORD. JOaehornffle, It.
Was amas to al the position of

wtA ath foWowiw rOqumenat

cn yeo sugea" men a smas I


me Tm t Easplramet?
DATE


INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jaeboonvlle, rfa.
Want a pomti -
Refer to the tfaowti


Can you smlt met
BIamed


CLIP THIS COUPON!
TO ALL RADERS OP THM RECORD
When you e answring an avertIsement rom the columns of this paper, whether you are making an iquary or placing order, pls cut out the coup
lw ad attmch to the lettb. hIt wll ay y.

COUPON.
Your advertiement was eea in the laldugtral Reeord. issue 4d-



The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonv lle, Pl, and Savannah, Ga.. s the South's great
weekly trade Journl.



The Record takem a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.


OW -W WV0.1111"111 LA32 CRAMi VAP


ll~lii1~)~~59
no_









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. u


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commimary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec'
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. reamery, 00 lb. tubs.. 261
A.C. Cramery, .. 27
10 " .. 281
A c. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Any Fll C eam........... 14

Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... 64
50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
6-lb tin. ............ 8

Vinegar

Bed Apple Cider bbl........ 86

Sugar
granulated Sugar, bhls..... 600

Coffee
Reception Blend Moah and
Java, 801-lb cas to came,
per Ib................. 22
Simon Pure, 0 1-lb can to
ease, per lb............. 22
Green Coffe good. .........18
Geen Coffe, medium ...... 11
Gre eodffee, common....... 10
Arbtkles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages.......market price
Lion Brand Cofee 1 lb pack-
ag .............. market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 17
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 16

Tea
Extra fine quaity.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 27
Englh B'fast, 10 lb.. 97
Formosa, 10 lb....... 27
Pagoda Tea, 6 and 10c sixe
10 lbs to cae, per pound-.. 40

Salt
200-1b seek............... 100
100-lb mel................ 60
Ie Cream, 200-lb scks..... 1 00
100-lb sacks..... 60
Pocket Saltin bbls., 8-b.... 265
6 44 2"-lb.... 275

Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-b tin.............. 17
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 dos to box
sifter top, per dos...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per dos......40 and 80
Corn

CuaLat rat k
W.Corn,110lb, 1 29 1 80 1 82
lOO1b, 1 27 1 20 1 84
Mxdeoom,lOlb,l I 186 146
00b.l l 1 2 186


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon..... 81
Oats
n0 8k LOW 100
Cua t Lot sk L.ot
W.clip'd,1261b, 182
S 1001b, 145
White 1251b, 175
White 100lb. 1 38
Mixed 1251b
S 100lb,
Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice .... 1 85
fancy..... 185
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 6 2
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 lb sack.........6 00
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 6 25
Pillsbury's Best .....7 50
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 7 40
bbl....
Flour, Boes,.............. 700
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 8 20
S92-lb sacks........... 1 85
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 8 25
92-lb acks....... 1 35
Rice


Good...................... 41
Choice...... ............ 61
Fancy Head............... 6
Broken................ 2j
Canned Vegetables
DoX
Tomatoes, 8s, Chief........ 85
Tomatoes, 2s ........ 65
Clayton, 3s............. 80
Clayton, 2s ............... 60
Sifted Peas, 2s............1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........ 1 15
Lima Beans,2s ...........1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8s........... 90
Baked Beans, s ........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets. 3s...........
Saner Kraut, 3s ........... 85
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin,'3s ............. 90


car lot
Choice....
No.1 Tim.
No. 2 .......
No.1 Cl'ler 17 00


ay
W e bale I%
loU quanutlt
18 0
170o
1600
1760 16 0C
P FIL. TO uuu


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 dos
to case, per dos....... 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 dos
to case, per dos........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 dos. to came
per dos.............. 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 dos to ease, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one dos to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two dos to cae,
per dos ................ 1 4
Peaches, a two dos to case
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
cae, per do. .......... 1 46
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per do ........... 100
Damson, 2S, two dos to care.
per dos................
Brandy Cherries 2s per cae 8 86
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 6*
'* 10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
Ib.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per Ib........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 26-lb box,
assorted, per Ib........ 61
Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 12
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 11
Fancy Apricots 26 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice " "
Ev. Apples. 50-lb. boxes.....4 00
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 06
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lb. package 25
Ev. Apples, 24 2 25
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. ase 8 00
Prunes, Calf cleaned 36-lb
lb.x, 40-50............. 6..
Prumes, Calf cleaned 25-1b
box. 50-60............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 26-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 76
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box .......... 1 70
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 60
Extra H P, .... 6
Seed Peanuts, ..
New Nuts


Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds................ 18
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Peacans................... 12
Filberts................... 12
al0 nuts........... ...... 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 10l lAM
Slot slk.iat sk. t
SCottonseed Meal 2700
S Hull 9 50
O tU1B 1e00DC TO ADvPmr


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 41
Wooden ware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop.. ...... 90
8 hoop .........
Nest Measures, 6 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per dos....... 1 60
Sieves, per dos. No. 18......1 00
6" nested......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per dos 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per dos.. 60'
Ax Handles
Two dos crates per dos.. .. 1 20

Washboards A
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay......... ...... 00
176 Diamond Glass .........8 28
O. W. D., 17 inch, per dos 1 06
Clothes pins, five gross to box 76
Canned Fish
Oysters, s, 2 dos to caae, per
dos .................. 9
Sardine, American, 100 to
case, per eam ........ 826
Sardines, 6 cae lots........8 20
Salmon Is, Tale 4 dos to case
per dos Alaska........ 96
Salmon, 1s, 4 dos to case,
per dos Col. River .... 2 86
Salmon, 4 dx to ca, per dos
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two do in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 9

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerl,
20-lb pails............ 8 60
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box............. 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hms, 8-10 ag ..... 133-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avg .... 131-2
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avsr .... 141-4
"Reliable" Shoulder, 7- ag .. 101-2
liablel" California Hass, 6-8 3-4
Breakast Bacon, light av ...... 13
D. Bellies, 16-18 av. ........ 83-8
D. L Belliee, 20-M av. ......... 81-8
D. & Bellies, 25-30 a r........... 7-8
D. Plates ..................... -4
Bacon Plats ................... 73-4
D. Butts .................... 6-4
Bologna Suaes .................
sayssa in an ................ .75
buttea Chae.
"traberry" Creamery, 0-lb tubs 27
20-lb tubs.... 211-2
"Reliable fll enau ebhe .... 131-2

"Iandiama Pur. LIaf ........... markt.
*bes-oamn" Copommd ......... mmrt.


Kigses Csmel MIets.
"ealiable" Ourmd B Is ......
orasd Be2, as ......
B Rast Bst, Is ........
ROStA BMs, S ........
at Potted han Ad Taira
.- ............ ..............
SSUed Be, ..
Visa ...assae. l..
aTdis..................


pIA.
am



La
Ln










24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
B- .A\ umm__U ..... .


THE


COVINGTON


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Co.


Wholesale


SHOES


- i


DRY GOODS.


"Success


For Our Customers is


Success For


ABSTRACTS
Title and Tax Abstracts, Maps, etc.,
of large tracts in all parts of Florida and
South Georgia, prepared for owners and
intmding purchasers. Correspondence
solicited.

REALTY TITLE AND TRUST CO,
law Exchange Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.

WM. D. JONES
PSRIPTIOW SPECIAUST

FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.
Mall Orders Solicited.

THE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.


hztemts the pirts without deetroyr the
weo Ure. Runs out a charge in less than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-ave gallons from curd of wood.
Make pure water white spirits. free from
the odor of tar or creosote. No chemicals
used in renlnta the spirits. Needs to be
dtilled only once after coming from re-
tert.
No trouble with bi-products, the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
duced and from wood. Only one grade
of spirits produced and that the highest
ABSOLUTELY NO DANCER FROM FIRE
Blult of finest material by high-grade
workmen. The cheapest machine offered ti
the public.
We shllienge comparison of output and
quality of product. We guarantee output
sad quality.
The lb Belt Costctlen Company
P. O. Bx 4L RALIGOH. N. C.



go0. R. FOSR JR.
MANUFACTURER OF


BRICK.

EINT F1 PRICES.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.

'P01E. IM.
Se-d all orders for pritnti for the
turpatiae and commissary trades to the
lMord oM to insrae a prolmt delivery.


COURSE OF PALE AND MEDIUM ROSINS AT SAVANNAH FOR TWO YEARS
W.W. W.G. 1 M K


DATE
April 1.........
April 8.........
April 16........
April 22........
April 29........
May 6........
May 13........
May 20........
May 27........
June 3........
June 10........
June 16........
June 23........
July 1 ........
July 7 ........
July 14 ........
July 28 ........
Aug. 4 ........
Aug. 12 ........
Aug. 18 ........


K


Do


1901-06
$4.10
3o
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.86
3.95
4.35
4.50
4.00
4.65
4.76
4.75
4.70
4.52%
4.67%
4.00
4.02%


1903-0t
$3.90
3.60
3.60
3.40
3.35
3.35
2.42%
3.66
3.65
3.60
3.40
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.40
3.50
3.60


1904-05
$3.80
3.75
3.60
3.00
3.60
3.50
3.50
3.55
3.66
4.06
4.10
4.15
4.25
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.25
4.42%
4.35
4.37


1903-04
$3.60
3.45
3.35
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.27/,
335
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.30


1904-05
$3.60
&60
3.46
3.45
3.46
3.35
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.85
3.85
3.85
3.90
4.00
3.95
3.90
3.82%
4.00
4.00
4.02%


1903-04
$3.50
3.35
3.25
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.17%
3.25
3.25
3.20
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.05
3.05
3.15
3.15


1904-05
3.35
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.65
3.65
3.65
3.65
3.80
3.80
3.86
3.72%
3.90
3.85
3.87%


1903-04
$3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
3.20
3.15
2.95
2.95
296
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
3.95
3.06
3.05


1904-06
$3.30
3.30
3.15
3.15
316
3.16
3.16
3.15
3.25
3.40

3.40
3.55
3.55
3.55
3.50
3.65
3.55
3.57%


1902'"
L0
3.00
3.0e

3.10
3.10
3.00
3.o

X.86


Lt0
.86


1904105
w.95
LUW
2.

3.0
LSe
3.10
L3.


3.4
3.S
3.30
3.%


190846

m
3.-
SA.
Lu
S3.

LS.





3-
3.0
La
L.70
3.7
LM
2.0
L"

LM
L"


ohn = Furchgott = Compan:
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


n't forget
tw uacom U TrK IO


V.


your subscription to the Record,
Ta" GREAT TRADE JOURNAL


Us."









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 25


Buyers' Directory

These advertsers are i this issu. If
you want anything, look through this
elasilled Hat sad write to the firm ap-
pearig threla. The Record guarantees
a prompt rmpom.

ABSTRACTS.
Realty Ttle and Trust Co.
BANKS.
Atlatie National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Co~b eial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Otra National Bank, Oeala, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
CuLner Lumber Cok. Jaekaomvile, Fla.
BRICK.
Feter, Geo. R., Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
Souther Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jackson
vill Ji.
CARS.
South Atlntie Car & Manufacturing Co.,
Wayeroes, Ga.
CLOTHING.
Zraig & Bro, J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Reafroe Cao, H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Koha, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Toar, Hart & Co., New York City.
CONVEYANCING.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
COOPERAGE.
Caunon Co., The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jackaosville Cooperage Co, Jacsoaville,
ha.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville.

DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
SKoha, Furehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lombard Irom Worka & Supply Co., Au-
Merrill-Steven Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Sebolld's Soma Co., J. 8, Macon, Ga.
gusta, Ga.
FERTILIZERS
Burs & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES
Murphy, T, Jadonville, Fa.
Should's ons C., J. s, Maon, Ga.
mrUL
Souther Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonvills, Fla.
FURNITURE.
Fetting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GETS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Br., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co.. Jacksonville. Fla.
Hargraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, bla.
-IJhnson Co., W. B.. Jacksonville, Fla.


Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fla.
HAY AND GRAIN.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Kenfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS.
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Grand View, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartlioldi, New York City.
Roseland, Jackonville, Fla.
St. George. Jacksonville, Fla.
Windsor, Jacksonville. Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta. Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jaeksornille, Fi
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S.. Maeon, Ga.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, FLa.
Blum & Co.. Chaa., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
Muller, Gus. Jacksonville, Fla.
Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.


MAPS
Realty Title and Trust Co.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jacksonville, Fa.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdoata, Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barnes-Jessup Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidatel Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
I'nion Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
Young Co., -ohn R., Savannah, Ga.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co., .lackonville, Fla.
PECANS.
Griffiing Bros. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Campbell. J. R., Ocala, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co.. Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Wannanish, N. C.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Wanannish, N. C.


REAL ESTATE.
,Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa,
i Fla.


Williams Co., J. P.. Savannah. Ga i Rrolston. Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Young Co.. John R.. Savannah. ':a. r~loiint Real Estate Co.. Ocala. Fla.
B1curs & Co., Win. A., Jacksonville, Fla. 'liriste. .1. ).. Jacksonville. Fla.
.ivingston & Sons. J. H.. Ocala, Fla.
HATS--WHOLESALE. Southern States Land and Timber Co.,
K.hn, Furehgott & Co., Jackson. lllt Fla. If-lrirck- r al Estate Agency, Jackson-
vill-, Fla.
HARDWARE. Jneksonville, Fla.
Baird & Co., 1. K., Jackskoknville, Fla. West-Raley-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville.
Bond & Bours Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla. Fla.
BriKgg Hardware Co.. W. H..Valdosta, ;a. SEEDS.
Marion Hardware Co.. Ola. a. a. Bours & Co., Wm. A.. Jacksonville, Fla.
We4 & Co., J. D., Savanna Ga. SHIP YARDS.
SHIP YARDS.
HARNES. Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
MMibmy & mBar, Jaiknmlll Fa. Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
WRITE TH RECORD FOR


SHOES-WHOLESALZ
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville ,Fa.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jakaonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cypress Tank Co, Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. ., Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8, Macon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksonville k la.
The Wire Virgin Gum Co., Tifton, Ga.
TURPENTINE PROCESS.
Pine Belt Construction Co., The, Raleigh,
N. C.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS
Davis & Son., G. M., Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
VEHICLES.
McMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
WATCHES
Greenlraf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla


YELLOW PIN LUMBER
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, iFa.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fa.



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FOR THE


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THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
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than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.

COMMISSARY CHECKS
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to the

Industrial Record Co.


R. S. HALL, Pres. T. C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. Kxioar, See. and Tres.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.



H, A, Renfroe Co,


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at Ready'Made Prices Mail Orders Given Peronal AttenMio


439 W. Bay Street.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA,


1111! 111 Illilli I I Iv it hull III hllillIl I a 334 I I 3 3 3


J. P. WLLIAMS. President.
T. A. JSNaaxN 2nd Vice-President.
H. L. KAYTO. Secretary.


J. A. G. CAasoN, 1st Vice-Preident
J F. DusaNBUy. 3dVice-Prsident
D. G. White. Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

NAIL SORES II COTI01 FIORS ID IHIESIE MI S.
AMala Office SJVAjfNX, GeO1GAJL.
earnch Orrifce: PIRN1ACOLI, fLX. ( Braneh Groecry eouse
jACKXsoNVILLrFL.A. COLL smBU, e.A.


SNaval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Vs. -
S-4 I 1- 1 I I I 111 I I I I 11 II I 1t I 1 1 I i 1i I I 111111 11


I he Largest and Oldest Copper
Work in Georgia.


M. A. BAKER,
Inventer and
Marlacturer of the

Baker improved

Seemless Turpen-

tine stills.
Write me for prices and outts
F. 0. B ary point in Georgia Flor-
Ida. Alabama or MissisSippi. All
stills sold under a guarantee.
I Job work through the
country a specialty.

lrunswick, Ga


W My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.
AT INFORMATION DESI~D.









26TEWEKYIDUTII EOD


T. MURPHY

JACKSONVILLE MACHINE A NDIRON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS

FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARiEN NGINES AND BOILERS. PULLEYS AND SHAFTING.
Aent for Stationary Engines, Boilers. Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden-
sea. Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Goods
mER TUISIN UI ll WTEBR MIS EmIPMEIT SPECIALTY
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


The Clyde Steamship Company

11111 "k


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
n i.mot I" tu ars a ppe.. to MRs el felwa cal li
t Chrt C_ beth ways.


(reIs n ew ITok
afers North River).


hres Jacksonvtlle for
AL mRR. Chalteton and New York.


Saturday, Feb. 18, at 3:00 pm ....AGONQUIN ...... Thursday, Feb. 23, at 7:30 am
Tuesday, Feb. 21, at 3:00 pm ... .ARAPAHOE ....Sunday, Feb. 26, at 10:00 am
Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 3:00 pm .... !xMOHICAN ....Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 11:30 am
Friday, Feb. 24, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE .... Wednesday, Mar. 1, at 12:30 pm
Saturday, Feb. 25, at 3:00 pm .... IROQUOIS ....Thursday, Mar. 2, at 1:00 pm
'xHURON ...... Friday, Mar. 3, at 4:00 am
Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 3:00 pm ... .COMANCHE .... Sunday, Mar. 6, at 4:30 am
Wednesday, Mar. 1, at 3 pm ........ALGONQUTIN.............Monday, March 6, at .00 am
Friday, Mar. & at 300 pm..............ARAPAHOE........Wednesday, Mar. 8, at 6 a. m.
Saturday, March 4, at .30 pm.....*xNEW YORK.........eThursday, Mar. 9, at &30 am
Tuesday. Mar. 7, at LO. pm...............APACHE................Sunday, Mar 12, at 8 am
Wednesday. Mar. at 30 pm..........IRIQUOIS................ onday, Mar. 13, at 9 am
Friday. Mar. 1, at .00 pm............COMANCHE.........'Wednesday, Mar. 15. at 1 am
*xMOHICAN.........Wednesday. Mar. 15, at U 00 am
Saturday, Mar. 11, at L30 pm.......ALGONQUIN.........Thursday. Mar. 1, at 12 00 n'n
Tuesday, Mar. 14, at 3 00 p. m., ARAPAHOE..........Sunday, Mar. 19, at 4 00 a. m.
Wednesday, Mar. 15, at 3 00 p. m., xHURON...........Monday. Mar. 20, at 4 30 a. m.
Friday, Mar. 17. at L.0 pm...............APACHE ..........Wednesday, Mar. 22, at 5.30 am
saturday, Mar. 18, at 100 pm...........IRIQUOI8...........Thursday, Mar. 23, at .00 am
IxNEW YOAK ............Friday, Mar. 24, at 6.30 am
Tuesday, Mar.21, at LO0 pm............COMANCHE..............Sunday, Mar. 26, at 8.30 am
Wednesday, Mar. 1, at 3.00 pm....ALGONQUIN............Monday, Mar. 27, at 9.30 am
Friday. Mar. ,t at 300 pm............ARAPAHOE......Wednesday, Mar. 29, at 11.00 am
Saturday, Mar. 5, at 3.00 pm ........ xHURON............Thursday, Mar. 30, at 12.00 n'n
xMOHICAN..............Friday. Mar. 331, at 1.00 pm
Tuesday, Mar. 28, at 300 pm............PACHE..................Sunday, Apr. 2, at 4.00 am
Wednesday, Mar. 2, at 300 pm..........IRIQUOI................Monday, Apr. 3, at 4.30 am
Friday, Mar. 31 at.00 pm...........COMANCHE.........Wednesday, Apr. 5, at 5.00 am
--Boatoa via Bruswick and Charleston. xFreight only. *-Boston via
Brueswriel
THE CLYDE NBW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
lroed Seos. be twree Ja.oL nvlle. osrtorn ad ProTvidena s oond l
en Polats. CagllaI at Charlesteon Bth Ways.
*MI-WEEKLYT SAIIJNa.
Southrs....... .. ........ .. .. .. ........ .. ....rom Lewis Whart, Boatmo
rthbn. ....... .. .. .. .. .. .... Prom toot of Catherine Street. Jacksouvlle
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jaeka ailIl and Santri.
rapping at Palatka, Astor, t. raned s. Bersford (De Lead) ad Iatermedlate
laa *isa Lt. Jeoba rvw.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
It apsentod to san as follows: Leave Jaskseovile, aundays, Tuedays and Thurs-
dayM, 8:1 Returnaig, leave Santord, Mondays, Wednesays & Fridays 9:3 a. m.
ourl-z eOum lI NORTHBOUND,
Read down. I Read up.
Leave : p. M............. ......Jacksonvlle........ ....... .... Arrive 0 a. m.
L.ave 8: p. m.... .. .. .. .....prlth f ........ Lea4 p. m.
Sa ..............Ator .............................. Lea v 3J0 p. m.
Leave : a. mLI ...... ................t. -r-est.......... Leave 1: p m.
.................. ............Bereford (DeLsad).................... Leave 1. noon
Arrive8:a. m........................ aat.. ................... ......|Leave 9:J a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m. .................Enterprise..................... LY. 10:00 a. m.
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, is2 W. BAY ST., JACK'VILLE.
FM. IRONMONGER, JR., Asst. Gen. Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St. Jacksonville, Fla.
W. 0. COOPR, JR., Ieal Prt. At., Jae'ville. C. P. LOVELL, Aat. Supt.,Jack'vlle
Foot Hogan Street. Jacksonville.
C. HAGOORTY. 0. P. A., New York, CLTYD fLfN. 0. P. A.. New Tert
e 6.. ziE, WE. P. CYI.D a cO.
eesral Manager. Gesa al Assat
c- Reng W eta. t tate street. ew Tesrt


YOU want a Turpentlims Lesatis.?
~You Want a SawmIni Lenatle?
T.. Want miy Kind of Flierli Lpini
*I Ye. Mean Bushmes?
40 ckL. o or Wrias to
J. H. LIVINGSTON & SON$,
~Ocala, F&r ds
ge*II


Record Readers:



The job printing department -
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. -It is reason-
able to suppose you will get
better and more satisfactory
printing supplies-letter heads,
envelopes, commissary checks,
pay-roll reports, etc., by having
us make them.

Industrial Record Co.,
JacksvIk, Hidw


Ihe M etropolis


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida ..


$5.oo a Year $2.5o Six Months


Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.


CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
.R JACKSONVILLE, FLORDA.
u-----M- - - -


26


THB WBFXLIY DMUSTRIAL~ BIWORD.






ImIII,*$ I I I uuIIIuIs*$mImIuIseI 11$41$u 1111temat$$$seemI ImamI I Igo I h u mae s I sees#$mh$IuI.,ums@II$IImmgu


C. B. ROGERS, PaImDmnT.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, Vic-PassWDeNTs.


C. H. HODGSON, 6ac, and TuzAs'L


DIILECTOILS C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain. H. A. McEcahern and J. A. Cranford, of Jaclonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Maln Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Conalidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval .Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro.
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


SShipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Casist of ore Three-Story Balldlag, 70x200; one two-story baeldiga. 50x390* ome ome-story balldis, 80xz20,
maklag the largest space of amy Company of the kiad Is the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.


BrEnches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola. Fla., and Savennah. Ga.


aeuaeumeeI.uI( $$uife a Ieeuuuua sf ma 1







Two of the Patterns we show in our Catalogue.
SPECIAL VALUES IN STERLING SILVER.


d86


lka
I F.p no9


THE Greenleaf &
"Rose" Crosby Company
Teaspoons, Sg.oo per doz. W ire! anb
Dessert Spoons, $16.oo per doz.
Table Spoons, $23.00 per doz .ilam
Dessert Forks Ix6.oo per doz.
Table Forks, $23.0o per doz.
Dessert Knives, 2o0.oo per doz. 41 W est Bay Street
Table Knives, $23.oo per doz. Jakso villa
NO CHARGE FOR
ENGRAVING. Ie lte nd rfiesit sto in this pas* of sh.
Southern States. Prompt attention to nail ordrs


THE
"Germania"
Teaspoons .- Sg.-r per dos.
Dessert Spoons, $16.5o per doz.
Table Spoons, $23.50 per dos.
Dessert Forks, $16.50 per doz.
Table Forks, $23.50 per doz.
Dessert Knives, ig.oo per doz.
Table Knives, $22.oo per dog
WE PAY EXPRESS
CHARGES.


Write for Catalogue
ONE HUNDRED PAGES ILLUSTRATING
Silverware, Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Cut Glass, Clocks, etc.


A.~ u 4I4A-IA.4iSAA


SHOTTER COMPANY
SAVANNAH, GA.


a9rrufastur9 all rsades of


ROSIN


OIL


Ormfde M Refled. Alse


PITCH AND


PINE


TAR


~-mY11-V


S.


P


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f


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