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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00109
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: February 17, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00109
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text













WEEKLY


INDU. S-TRI-C E -D


PUBLSHED VERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO THE NAVAL STORES LUHIER AND MANUFACTURING in mriasi


~I hil up s Tuumsqwdmls Aagbi np0 27.-d r ~ dm ba6W Cm. Qi by Os Sbs dii Cedm si A es.IL00Lmen


Farming vs Merch ndisng,


Aidm. Ddiracd by V.R. Rddenbry, of Cairo, Ga. bedo the Interv
.. C.s Growmr' Convention, Mootgomery, Ala,. j'y 26, 05.
~~~W------------------------------


Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Con-
vention :-
The question might reasonably be asked
why should the topic: "Farming versus
Merchandlaing" be selected for discussion
at a Sugar Cane Growers' Convention.
It strikes me that the reason is all asud-
clent when we consider the fact that du-
ring the past century the drift of our popu-
lation from the farm to the city has been
so great that whereas only 15 per cent of
the population residing in the towns and
cities at the beginning of the century, we
now see the urban population Increased to
per cent, of all our people. This &
per cent must be fed and clothed by the
remaining 3 per cent. who are farmers.
Therefore. impelled by an instinctive
: love of the soil, and an earnest desire to
see this Bouthland blossom like a rose. I
feel that It is an opportune time to ap-
peal to our young men, especially, and to
show them that under the New Agricul-
ture which s now taking a firm hold in
the oith, that the door of opportunity is
open to them: and to show to our older
men, whoe abuse of this wonderful oppor-
tunity has almost made farming disrep-
utable, and has been largely responsible
for the drift away from the farm; to show
S these older men the error of their ways.
It is well known that nothing appeals
as strongly to reason as object lessons,
and no argument is so convincing as that
based on actual experience and test; as
for myself I have very little patience with
or consideration for theories that are not
demonstrated by actual test, as case In
point. I received a circular letter some
weeks ago from a party who wanted to
Ssm some watermelon seed. In that circu-
S la he gave detailed Instructions showing
how to grow W00 watermelons weighing
S to 41 pounds each on one acre of land-
this wouM be fully seven 0.00 Ilb. cars of
melons from one acre of land, and in as
much as I have been growing melons for
market for fifteen years and ..ad never
succeeded In securing over one and a half
to two care of good melons from an acre
I was naturally interested, and Immedl-
ately fired a letter back. In this letter I
asked him pointedly the questions: Have
you ever done this thing? If so, how
many times? Well, to be as charitable as
; polible, I received a very evasive reply.
SI know the possibilities of southern soil
Ssder the intensive system is almost un-
Uliited, and I dent say this thing cant be
done, but I am anxious to see the man who
has, not who can. but who has, grown
Pf watermelons weighing 3 to 40 pounds
each from one acre of ground in one sea-
SoIL
I therefore think that in order to be ful-
ly competent to testify as to the merits of
the .two avocations under consideration.
via: Farming and Merchandising, the wit-
ness should have large experience in both
and be able to furnish facts and figures
based on actual experience.
It is therefore In order tor me to say
that I have been through the mill. I was
raised up behind the counter in a thriving
country town, and at twenty I was man-
ager of a general merchandise store doing
an annual business of over 50.000. I made
annual trips to New York City to buy
goods. and enjoyed the reputation of be-
ing a successful country merchant. I know
all the pleasures and perplexities of such
a business. I know what it means to spend
sleepless nights trying to devise ways and
means to get money from those who owe
*. me in order to pay those whom I owe; I
know the humdrum routine of standing
S behind the counter and playing second fid-
dle to every cranky notion of an exacting
customer; I know what It means to have
a professional lady shopper call and have
you pull down a wagon load of dress
goods and then sweetly walk -out without
buying a yard. and while you feel like
citing a tea penny nall in two, you must
he an llBB. and then after the day's work
i Is 0. I Joiw what it means to post PP
the t -kf - le-n &- twelve o'clock
at nu-b yU t Ys succeed this


must be done day in and day out, year
after year. This experience applies to the
country merchant inour small towns, and it
is to these stores that our farmer lads
drift by the thousands every year. See
him at the age of 1f to 20 as he leaves
the farm and gets a job in the village
store at, say, ten to twenty dollars per
month. It he goes in for a good time, as
the great majority of them do, it means
that he will ever be an employee at the
beck and call of others-no independence
of character will be built up. no broaden-
ing of the intellect under such environ-
ment, he will never make an impression
worth noticing in the community, and fail-
ure is the final outcome. If on the other
hand, he avoids the pitfalls of sin and a
good time, and devotes himself unspair-
Ingly to the furthering of the interests of
his employer, financial success will crown
his efforts, but frequently at the sacrftce
of health and happiness.
Reverting back to my own experience, I
want to say that owing to the force of
circumstances. I am still engaged, to some
extent, in certain lines of merchandising,
but my greatest profit and pleasure comes
from farming. For fifteen years I have
been actively engaged in farming, and I
now live on the farm. I therefore have
tried both and know whereof I speak when
I say in all honesty and sincerity that un-
der the New Agriculture, the most invit-
Ing, attractive and profitable field for out
young men is the farm.
Now let us take a retrospective view of
agriculture in tethe South. Go ack to ante-
bellum times, if you please, and cast your
eyes over this Southland from Virginia to
Louisiana-where do you find the brains,
the money, the culture, the power? On the
old plantation. Don't tell me that slavery
was the cause: I deny it. Slavery was
merely an incident thereto, but It was an
incident that has retarded for an hundred
years the dawning of the New Agriculture
upon our Southland. Now follow the pros-
perous owners onr f these ie plantations
through four years of an unequal and hope-
less struggle, see them demonstrate to the
world the wonderful power there is in
Southern character, Intellect and blood,
which was inherited from the Invincible
cavalier. No people without mettle of the
finest temper could have held out against
such overwhelming odds and difculties so
long.
After being utterly crushed at the front,
see these brave and chivalrous men, who
had largely shaped and controlled the af-
fairs of State since the old collonlal days.
as they return to their old plantations,
now laid waste and barren, and bravely
take up the herculean task of reinstating
the former prosperity on the ashes of their
ancestral homes
Unfortunately for their immediate suc-
cess, the price of cotton had soared sky-
ward, and our fathers were lured to their
financial destruction by r cent cotton.
All their plans and contracts were made
with the expectation of getting this ex-
treme price for cotton; all other crops were
neglected, and for a number of years our
smoke houses and corn cribs were located
in the West.
Under this one crop system, the inevi-
table happened, the price of cotton con-
tinually dropped, and season after season
these good and brave men struggled
against an ever accumulating debt until at
last many fine old places were sold under
the hammer, and their owners turned from
the farm in discouragement and disgust,
and this movement continued until thou-
sands of these fine old plantations passed
on to the tender care of ne-ro renters,
the owners living intown and .the farms
going to ruin.
But there is a sliver linite even to this
dark cloud, which proves that there is an
overruling and all powerful Hand which
can and does bring good from evil. for we
see these same indomitable Southrons
turning their wonderful anieouurcefl tal-
ents to. the upbuilding of our industrial


South, aided largely by capital furnished
by our Northern friends who had confi-
dence in Southern ability. Witness the
Magnificent growth of our towns and cit-
ies; the hundreds of cotton mills eompet-
ing successfully with New England; see
the moe as It rides from the great fur-
naces and Iron mills and writes Eureka
against the background of our Southern
blue sky; see the steel rails as they stretch
their shining length from state to state
and hear the shrill whistle of the locomo-
tive as it echoes from hill to vale. herald-
ing the great industrial progress of the
New South.
Now we shift the scene: the old Instinc-
tive love of the soil, which was born and
fostered on the old plantations before the
war, is not dead, but simply slumbered
for a time. During the last decade we see
a most wonderful awakening of interests in
the culture of the soll and with the ush-
ering in of the new century, we witness
the birth of the New Agriculture
in the South. I have no fear for
the future of this New Agriculture
when I consider the fact that its fate is
in the hands of the same people who
built up such a magnificent, though feudal
system, under the old ante-bellum regime
and who when that system was crushed.
so adjusted themselves to the new order of
things, as to astonish the world with their
great industrial development. These same
people are now rapidly working out with
great success the New Agriculture.
What is the New Agriculture?
What does it mean?
First: Diversifcation of crops, and the
upbuilding of the soIL
Second: The summoning of science to
our aid in properly working out the prob-
lems pertaining to the soll.
Third: '-e adoption and use of labor
saving Implements and the application of
true business methods to agriculture.
To the young man of brains, education,
and energy, who will adopt the above
three planks as his platform, the door of
opportunity on the Southern farm is now
wide open. I am sure that there are
thousands of young men today who are
struggling along against competition ip
mercantile lines who if they would only
devote the same time, energy and thought
to farming, would achieve a vastly great-
er financial success, and would at the same
time enjoy the exhilarating feeling of In-
dependence and good health.
There is no avocation that can furnish
more food for the mind than can be found
on the farm. Deep scientific truths lie
buried in the bosom of mother earth wait-
ing to be unburied. The practical prob-
lems pertaining to the soil that can only
be solved by scientific research, are many.
What kind of soil is the best adapted to
a certain kind of crop? How deep should
the land be plowed? How deep and how
often should we cultivate? How to con-
serve moisture? How mush -potash, how
much phosphate, how much nitrogen
should we apply to any given crop? Is It
best to appipy the fertilier all before
planting, or at various, times whiln the
plant is growing? How to omnmk1t .t1aect
pests? How to formulate rations s.'-cat-
tle and other stock so as to get .e Preop-
er proportion of protein ad -ca"ib yites
for the best result? How to .redden the
blush of the peach and sweeten the fla-
vor of the strawberry? How to bioed up
our seed In order that we may get- rge
crops? How to extract the pure nectar
from the sugar cane and eliminate the
impurities? These are only a few of the
thousands of unsettled problems that con-
front our agriculturists and no man with
Intellect need complain of a dull time on
the farm if he will only use his head.
But will it pay? That is the question
that is of paramount Importance when
you bring the matter down to its last
analysis. Whenever our young men see
money in farming. I think they will be
falling over one another to get Into it.
The most convincing argument that
can be adduced to show that there is profit
In farming under the New Agriculture will
be facts and figures.based on actual expe-
rience.
Two years ago at the cane growers con-
vention in Macon. I gave a detailed account
of my farming operations In IMi. showing
a net profit of something more than 0,10w
on a 13 horse farm. In ISM owing to ad-
verse seasons and drouth, my profit was
reduced to 4.000. But IN was the banner
year on my farm so far as results am con-
cerned, and I shall give below the account


of receipts and disbursements as summa-
rised from my books:
RECEIPTS.
750 bu. oats from 4 acres ............$ .
4Jl bM. Collard seeds from s1 acres.. *11M 1.
17 cars watermelons from 24 acres.. U5-
Peaches sold from 6 acres........... U .10
105 bales of Cotton from 1X acres.... 101.
m00 bu Cotton seed.................... 2
20 tons peavlne and other hay ....... .
52W bu corn from I1 acres........... -
510 bbl syrup from I acres of cane, -.5 ;
7 head of beet cattle.................. m
M head of hogs, kIled-l-18 b pork.. Mi.
1000 bu sweet potatoes................ M.0 '

Total receipts...................m..... .
EXPENDITURES.
Paid Overseer .....................-.. ..
14 regular hands at 1.00 per mo. one
year .................................. i2 .
Extra labor for hoehng and gater-.
ing crop .............................. 0l1l.
Extra labor for making up syrup... .5
Picking 105 bales of cotton............ L -
110 tons fertilizer mixed on farm.... 2M ..
Feeding I1 head of mules...........MO.M
Implements fencing, wear and tear,.. M
Personal and family expenses ........ M. "
Ginning 1 bales of cotton.... ...... 14p.
Total expenditures ................. M i7

Total Receipts ..........................MIk '
Total expenditures ................... 9IXA
Total gain ........................... s
Thus you see I secured a net pret ovr
and above all expenses of 5,8M5.1 or a
little more than 14M.W for each mad
worked on the farm
I word of explanation on above Al +
may be in order.
I did not hold my cotton, but somd -
fast as it was picked, and I rushed the
picking. Began selling cotton in August,
and It was nearly all sold above to cents
per pound.
The corn, oats and hay are valued law
because I consume nearly all of sams as
my farm n feeding mules, cattle and boL
I also value the pork low because it I
consumed on the farm largely by the
hands employed.
The syrp is valued at just what'
receive for it t Iet all packed in can r
and sold under my own trademark, the
reputation of same having become so gsa
that I do not suffer from the decline I
price of barrel syrup.
These results were obtained on 41 ae n
of ordinary Southwest Georgia pine la.
and are exceeded in some instance os

to give their undivided attention to -n ..l
farm an. save the expense of an ver ra.
The profits per acre figured as closely -
possible are as follows
ugar Cane M.50 per acre.
Collards, 5 .0 per acre.
Watermelons. llI per acre. -'
Sweet Potatoes. .a e acre -: -- f-"
Cotton, n17.9 per acre.
While the profit per are is -se th isr "W
on sugar cane than on ay other cr, .- &-'
I want to emphasize the fact that I a
opposed to planting sugar ane ma an 4-
elusive crop. I am also opposed to pla- _
Ing cotton or any other one crop ex .us.v a.
ly.
There may be pertios ot the earth's i-....
face that wllM produce only one croipro : pdt
ably, but certainly In this favored sec eet
where sunshine and rain. heat and col mr -j
so evenly and graciously distributed r- -'
a soil that is adapted to the protat .
growing of perhaps ninety per cent. of al
agricultural crops known to. the mem .r
world, It is flying tn the face of a kind ad
wise Providence to confine ourselves to any -
one crop as a money crop, and the dlmu-- -
trous results which have always followed-.- -
the exclusive crop system in the st "
proves this proposition.
Perhaps it would be of interest and' he -
to practical farmers tor me to gO to s- de-
tails as to my methods of planting. eoltl-
vating, fertilising, etc. .
First In Importance Is the taet that "' -
make and use on this farm each e .
about 250 two horse wagon loads of lot abd *
sta..e manure; I use the bogase ro 1 0 .
cane mill as the basis of this msera1 1,0.
keeping my hoems and ow lots 1.4 I -,
bies well lterad with earn. I a lt "'.
manure on about acres of b04 "OPMC;


;c~J]


3


.. ii


-+3









4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

It on a -different field each year. Next I sweeps except I burst out the middles 1 m I 9 5 I 8 8 1 I ** I
grow all the peavinee and velvet beans with small turn plows. I cultivate shal-
polible for the benefit of the land Irst, low as possible and keep It up until the Z
and for the stock feed next. I fertilize cane is as tall as the mule. MERRILL-STEVENS
every acre I plant and strive to leave the When cane sla through suckering, I put -
land richer each year as well as my pocket, a second application of guano around p
The New Agriculture embraces that idea; same, being about 150 pounds of nitrate
while making yourself rich, don't impover- soda per acre.
ish the sol. An acre of cane cultivated as above will P
I break every acre I plant in all crops cost $5.00 to 165.00 per acre including costlerm making and R pairing
broadcast from seven to ten inches deep, of making into syrup, and should yield ;
using two horse turn plows and three and under favorable seasons 450 to 600 gallons # Still Boilers and Pum ps.
four boise disc plaws, thus saving labor syrup per acre, and will give a profit rang- *
and breaking deeper. I now have two disc ing from 40.00 to $100.00 per acre according 1 SHIP BUILDING nsd REPAIRING.
plows runfag with four mules each and to yield and price received for the syrup.
one hand each, the disc breaking plow is The method of manufacture is a matter
much to be preferred over the ordinary of great importance, and needs experience s J cksonvSilIS, Fla.
two horse turn plow for several reasons. to get the best results, but this paper is .
In preparing the land for cotton, I open too long already to permit me to go into * tI6>ls l lll l 1lll 4l0 S3 t Irll I88U&UIS S 6*
the furrow with an ordinary one horse gu- details of manufacture. I will simply say
ano distributor and put out four hundred that the important thing is to remove all
pounds of guano in this furrow. This gu- the impurities from the juice by proper WILLIAM A. BOURS JAMES 0. DARBY
ano analyses 10 per cent. of Phosphoric skimming. This can be done, and if done,
acid, 2 1-2 per cent. Ammonia and 5 per will greatly reduce the danger of fermenta-
cent. Potash. I next bed on this guano tion and will also render the syrup much
with four furrows at one trip down the more desirable for the table.
row with a two horse walking shovel cul- In conclusion I want to say a wordWILLAM A BOORS COMPANY
tivator with' two round shovels on the in- about the all absorbing subject of theE S I TuC ATC.
side feet and two turn plows on the two greatest interest to Southern farmers at EST ESTA RAM EE E STATE
outside feet of the cultivator, thus making the present time, namely: the price of
one hand and two mules do the work cotton and the efforts that are being made Hay, Grain. Feed, Garden
that it ordinarily takes four hands and to advance the price. I think that the
tour mules to do with one horse plows. convention now being held in New Orleans P Fk
Next, I plant the cotton with a Combined is all right, and will result in good, but
cotton planter with fertilizer attachment, I believe that if we would have more cane
this Implement drawn by one mule will growers' conventions, and hog raisers' Meal a rti-
open the furrow, plant the cotton, put out conventions, and cattle breeders' conven-
the guano and cover the furrow all at one tons, and fruit growers' conventions, as OU MOTTO: Pro mt Shm t. eae OeL m CMasglwe Fre
trip down toe row with one hand. I apply well as cotton growers' conventions, and
with this machine S0 pounds guano in the encourage the growing of other crops, the 206 EAST BAY ST, JACKSONVILLE, FLA
furrow with the seed. This was the meth- practical results would be better. If every
od adopted in I04. and which gave a yield farmer in the South would properly diver-
of 106 hles of cotton from 13 acres. I sify his crops and raise plenty of all pro-
expect to tertiise the same way this year vision crops, there wouud be no danger
and in addition shall put an application of of an overproduction of cotton and the
guano around the cotton after it la growing price would take care of itself.
and hope to get one bale of cotton per The farmer who will properly diversify
acre thereby. In cultivating the cotton, 1 and rotate his crops and will increase the
use the two horse walking shovel cultiva- yield per acre by proper fertilization and JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
tors altogether with ordinary sweeps on cultivation and at the same time reduce
same, and try to get around the cotton the cost per acre by the intelligent use of ROUGH &DRESSED LUMBER
once a week. this cultivator straddles the labor saving implements, will be entirely
row and plows both sides at one trip. Independent of slumps in the price of any
In planting corn, I plant on land that one or two commodities. This is the New
has been broken broadcast and use a corn- Agriculture that I want to see spreading w L L Y yellow P i
bined corn planter with fertilizer attach- over our beloved Southland. This. I believe L O I e l
ment This implement opens the furrow, was foreordained to be the ideal and nor-
drops the corn, puts out the guano, and mal condition In the creation of this won-
covers the corn-all at one trip down the derful soil of ours with Its adaptability to BOXES end CRATES.
row, with one hand and one mule. I usu- so many different crops, and in the gift of
ally apply 00 to 300 pounds of guano per this benflicent climate, so full of sunshine
acre -under corn. and rain, that such a thing as a crop
I plant a row of pinders between every failure is rarely known. ***S ****0 **000*O***********J*0*0********
row of corn and use the same planter in I long to see the time when the brains,-
the same way. culture, money and power will again be S tandd C lol
In cultivating the corn and pinders, I located on the Southern plantations. I
use a weeder first, running cross ways want to see a new aristocracy built up in n
over the rows just before the corn and pin- the New South, but I want it to be an
ders come up, thus destroying young grass aristocracy based on intelligence, educa- -
and weeds Just as they are coming through tion and character so that its influence
the ground, and before the crop gets up; shall be permanent and for good alto-
after that I cultivate with two horse shov- gether. O P i O Pr
el cultivators and with weeders alternately,
using the weeder until the corn as knee CYPRESS WATER TANKS -
high. In this way. I have very little or no
hoeing to do. tt Vo A
I plant oats in drills about 16 inches e ithe .
apart and put out 500 pounds of guano For delivered pric i write ASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
to the acre with the seed. I leave the fur-
row open until the oats are up good. I CyplMSS Tal Ce. MeobJ Aa 17 &ad m9 West Bay Street J- aM sonvl, PFIt R .
then cultiate the oats several times with etso ad Haw Hats. Spell Attentm Give to all Ordes.
iweeders until they begin to boot. I run 4-& H s t p l e G no l e
the weeder across the rows and lengthwise JOHN S. FRANZ, Agent **** e eu 1esuh o h o 1e Ieee ue u e e **e ge eaeIase
of the rows alternately.
All of the crops are cultivated with the
two horse cultivators. I rarely ever let a R. TOLAR. J. 6. HART. T. H. BLACHLY. d. R. TOLAR, In
one horse plow go in my fields to side any
crop. I can't afford to pay two hands to (3atobltlhed 1872.)
side two sides of a row when one hand
can do it Just as well by using a two A H A T
horse cultivator. In plowing corn and cane
I very 'oft6a run four furrows at one trip, & O U .
two on each aide of the row, thus making 180 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.
one hand do the work of four.
I will now go more minutely Into the
planting and cultivation of sugar cane. Clt
The land on which I plant cane Is usu-
aty broken first and it becomes somewhat
ae before I et ready to plant, there end ers of l St res.
fore I aVlwas run a dise harrow over samend Jobb s f N v l stores.
the rahoead th ten plants ten plos as Liberal Advances on Consitnmen6s of Naval Stores and Cotton. Member of New
deep as one mule can pull It, and I put York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.
out about 00 pounds of guano per acre boldS Loc Co.
in the furrow. I then run a small scooter DiOe a fe Loc CO
in the fiprow and stir the guano with the JLckaonville. Florida JOSEPH D. WEED. H. D. WEED. W. D. KRENSON
soil. The guano analyses W0 per cent. Phos-
phoric acid, 5 per cent. Ammonia and 3
per cent. Potash. I cut the seed cane into
pieces about 18 Inches long and plant with
the ends barely touching and cover with D E C
two nall scooter furrows. I run weeders IAVA AMiA GEORGiA.
over tW land as fast as a crust forms.
usual gong. over it three or four times
whl tbe cane is coming up, and I keep up
this -ork with weeders until the cane is W ant
knee high, running first cross ways and
then the length ways of the rows; one WANTED-mall steam power clay
boy with .one mule can go over 12 to 18 brics-Aking machsteainmepowe y Bar, Hoop and Band Iron,
acres per day. In addition to the weeder brick-making machine good condion.
I cultivate the cane with the two horse Address- MAKE A SPECIALTY OP
cultivator, the first plowing being rather
deep with four scooters on the cultivator, BRIICK MACHINE,
running two on each side of the row. all
subsequent plowing Is done shallow with Cma WaRItrtiKgAC J Ni.JSe A Turpentine Tols, l Gluoe Battingg Etc,
TI= CO D S 8IPAC HA A BI MOnET VALUE.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


UNDUIRRABLE IMMIGRATION.
nile the agitation Is going on in regard
to methods of inducing immigrants to the
United Staetes to locate in the Southern
States, it should be remembered that there
is a limit beyond which we cannot go
without danger of doing lasting injury to
our section. Only a small per centage of
those who land in New York and other
ports on the Immegration vessels are at all
desirable for associates or citizens. The
immegration laws of the United States
are still so lax that we find officers of that
bureau protesting against them and urg-
ing greater stringency in order that the
United States may not be made the dump-
ing ground for criminals and paupers of
the old world.
Among the very interesting and valua-
ble official annual reports just Issued is
that of the Commissioner-General of Im-
megration for the fiscal year ending June
30.104. In this voluminous report is a de-
tailed statement of Commissioner Will-
iams, in charge of the Ellis Island immi-
gration station. He very boldly points
out a number of the flagrant abuses of
our laws in this respect, and calls atten-
tion to classesof undesirable Immigration
showing how the contractors and commis-
sion men are profiting by an industry
which is a positive menace to American
institutions. Commissioner Williams says:
"Some of the causes of undesirable im-
migration le on the surface. One of them
Is the continued violation of section 4 of
the act of March 3. 1901, which prohibits
transportation companies directly or indi-
rectly to encourage immigration except
by ordinary commercial letters or oral
representations 'stating the sailings of
their vessels and the terms and facilities
for transportation therein.' The fact Is
that certain portions of Europe are being
scoured for immigrants by persons who
receive commissions upon all tickets sold
through their efforts. Whoever drafted
this section had a very clear conception
of one of the worst evils incident to pres-
ent immigration, namely, the artificial
stimulation thereof by interests operating
In disregard of the welfare and even the
laws of the United States. This important
section should be amplified and re-enacted
with such severe penalties for Its violation
as will make it susceptible of ready en-
forcement.
"Another reason why so many undesir-
able emigrants are coming here is that a
considerable portion are of thel assisted
class. An a rule. that man will be the bet-
ter Immigrant who comes of his Inlative
and with his own money.
"A very large percentage of the present
Immigration is of the assisted class. I
believe that assisted Immigration should
be prohibited, subject to reasonable ex-
ceptions in cases of very close and other-
wise eligible relatives, such as fathers,
mothers, children, brothers and sisters of
responsible alllens who hove already resi-
ded here a sufclent length of time.
"We are receiving too many Immigrants
whose physical condition is poor. The law
now excludes idiots, Insane persons, epi-
leptics and those suffering from a loath-
some or dangerous contagious disease. To
exclude aliens suffering from other phys-
ical or mental ailments It Is generally nee-
pary to show that they are likely to bee-
comepublic charges, and yet it is obviously
impossible to exclude on this ground all
persona whose physical condition is poor.
I think that in all instances in which the
Unltd States marine-hospital surgeons
who conduct the medical examinations at
the immnirant stations certify in writing
that the physical condition of an emigrant,
depending for support upon his own phys-
ical exertions. is below a certain standard
to be designated by them by some aporo-
priate term. whether this be 'low vitality.'
'poor physique.' or some other similar ex-
pression, or that he is 'senile.' such Immi-
grant should be excluded, subject to cer-
tan reasonable exceptions of the charteter
described In the proceeding paragraph.
"In considering the proposed Illiteracy
test it Is to be remembered that while Illit-
eracy Aioes not of Itself necessarily render
an Immltrant undesirable, yet the statis-
tics show that much of the Immigration
which Is undesirable on other rounds con-
sists of persons who are illiterate. It Is
lnterestfnm to note that while the oereen-
tare of lHlteracy amongst the north Ital-
ians is only s2. vet It is as high as 4F among
the south Itallans. and yet the latter are
far more desirable immigrants than the
former.
"One member of a larwe family from
eastern Europe. composed of a father.


mother and six children, all under 10 years
of age, with hardly any money, and bound
for the tenement district of New York
City, was recently asked at Ellis Island
how he intended to provide a competent
subsistence for his family If allowed to
land. He answered: 'What do I care for
a big house if I can get one room to sleep
In. That is all we want; that is the way
we did in Russia.'
"This particular family was excluded.
But we are receiving many other families
of a similar character bound for the tene-
.pent districts of our large cities, and with
tspirations as narrow as those above de-
scribed, whom It is not possible to exclude
under existing law; for it does not nec-
essarily follow that they are likely to
become public charges from the fact that
they will go to an overcrowded tenement
district and occupy inadequate quarters.
It is full time, however, for us to appre-
ciate the fact that the settlers who made
the country great belonged to a totally
different class of people from those de-
scribed and came here with loftier views
of their prospective future, and that a
desire to emigrate can no longer be re-
garded as evidence of iniative, thrift or
courage.
"This rapid falling up of the country
with foreign elements, representing often
the poorest classes in their own homes and
differing in blood and customs from those
constituting the backbone of the United
States, is sure to be at the expense of
national character. It is sheer folly for a
country with a population of 80,000,000 to
increase deliberately the difficulty of solv-
ing its already great social and economic
problems, and to add to the burdens of its
educational and charitable Institutions by
continuing to admit elements of the char-
acter described. Aliens have no Inherent
riht to come here, and only those should
Dse allowed to do so whose presence will
eb of real beneft to the country; and,
laying aside all sentimental considerations,
staep should be taken to bring that about
before further mischief shall have been
done."-Tradesman.

BAGDAD'S SAWMILL INDUSTRY 60
YEARS AGO AND TODAY.
Fifty years ago the firm of E. E. Simp-
son & Co., located at Bagdad, successors
largest, AYERS 7t etaoin etaoln aoinlnn
to Forsyth & Simpson, was one of the
sawmill and planingmll firms in the South.
The members of the firm were E. E.
Simpson, Alien Simpson, Benjamin Over-
man. Benjamin W. Thompson, James
Creary and R. M. Bushnell. They owned
their labor and each member was assigned
to his department of the business.
The logs were cut and put into the water
to await a freshet to flfloat them to within
reach of the mill, requiring from six to
twelve months from the cutting of the
logs in the woods to the sawing of them in
the mill.
The mill was an upright gang sawmill,
with a capacity of about twenty thousand
feet- per day. The company cut almost ex-
cluively flooring, ceiling and weather-
boards, which were stacked for six months
and then planed and shipped by vessels to
New Orleans and Texas.
The company owned their lumber yard
in New Orleans, which was managed by
E. W. Dorr, father of Hawks and J. W.
Dorr, of Pensacola.
There were then located on the several
creeks emptying Into the Blackwater riv-
er a. number of small, upright water saw-
milbk making from one to one and a half
thousand feet each per day, which was
shipped.
Today the Steam & Culver Lumber Co.
is operating In Bagdad one of the largest
saw and planingmill plants in the South,
the capacity of which Is more than five
times that of the old E. E. Simpson & Co.
plant of fifty years ago.
They have a railroad running Into the
same sections then logged by E. E. Simp-
son & Co., and expect soon to reach out
into vast tracts of Umber that are al-
most virgin forests. Their log train can
leave the mills in the morning and re-
turn in the evening with a thousand logs.
The logs can be cut In the woods, hauled
to the mills, lumber cut. dried, dressed
and delivered In Cncinenati or Chicago in-
side of ten days.
Fifty years ago It took E. T. Simpson
& Co., twelve to eighteeen months to cut.
dry, dress and deliver lumber in New Or-
leans.
The Stearns & Culver Co. also carry a
stock of about ten million feet of export
lumber.


Joseph D. Christie, Business Agent

af y03 o ya-Uens rli Diaad il Jas-iwnl Fla.
Teltesaes 4Ss.
If you want to locate in Florida and contemplate going into business, let me
help you. If yeo hare a business to sell, list same with me.


"THE DIAMOND

e Whl ** :- d R.ell

Wines, Liquors and Cigars,

SSBole Agefats for tha e feaer w A. .C. seern als bthel "WUhelsr s nZselle NMis-
- errl Water. We ueareas enli U rands paut u by ns feul amesaair. a foellowa
Creme de Ia Creme, bottle .... $2.00 Diamond Brand, bottle ........ LO.
S [H~hly roma BMiicahir i ]a Heart Brand, bottle .......... .75
C. C. C. Brand, bottle ........ 1.50 Spade Brand, bottle ............ .0
w Club Brand, bottle ........... 1.25 Premium Brand, bottle ........ .J


MYERSON CO..
105 & 107 West Bay t.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Plsene I3.


u1gu1aauaaagauuum~ua1uua


AS. PENLETO u
PaYresis


W. IL Jonne
VMS Pm


JASLAIETE W.W.STWIM.
Sea. Me dier. Ass. Tressm


5he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,



Wholesale Grocers


402 04 Ie 4CO i0 ct y SL tres JMMsi Inia.
101R1CUS:


T. %. SKANW'
T. W. MAM&d


a L A. &. PENMETU
ffm. WAR.EMI


W. W.IU u
JAL~lfl


*Q*************~O** **. EE1 I3II3r-*h-*-
- a



J. A. Craig ). Bro.

f 239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BOCK


3 Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-

i ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.


Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.





The Bond & Bours Co.

WOLurESALE RETAM.


HARDWARE


Sash, Doors, RlinAs. Paints. Oils and Glass.

Stoves. Tinware, Countr7-Holloware.


1 WEST DAY TRJIET


Jacksonville. ria.


I ------------------------ ----
Cable Addres. Florida,


SStandard Naval Stores

-| Company.

:DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN


i R.OSIN

AND TURPENTINE.

Jacksonville. Fla.


DOW'T FA, TO Nu TWO RCORD =O ADvuasas&L


1~111~~~~111(~)1(11~~11111111











6- THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SPECIAL

Real Estate Bargains
MMCg AND gIgMESS IN NEW ENGLAND.
IN A QUIET STRICTLY AMERICAN
VILLAGE 25 MILES FROM BOSTON.
On best corner in village, near library, G.
A. R. Hall, high school, etc., substantial
2 story colonial house of 10 high rooms,
open fireplaces, lawn and shade trees; sta-
bie good size with two horse stalls and
room for five carriages; separate 2 story
store building, three show windows, piazza,
refrigerator, typewriter, scales, tobacco
cutter, oil tank, show cases, stove, lamps
and complete fixturres with the shelves full
of goods that at retail will amount to
more than price, $2,800;$1,000 cash, balance
4 per cent. Six acres free from stones,
fronting two streets, several house lots
might be sold, beautiful lake stocked with
fish. Village is elevated, one of the mose
healthful in New England, electric roau
now one mile will soon pass, real estate
cost $4,500; whole property with goods, hay,
wagon, etc., for $2,-o. Engraving postpaid.
Buyer's expenses from Florida deducted
from price. Chapin's Farm Agency, Herald
Bldg., Boston.
WHERE BOSTON MAN EXPENDED
$100,000.
Eighty-five acres under high cultivation,
no waste land, three minutes walk from
electric cars, 20c fare to Boston, 13c by
steam car mileage, cut 90 tons hay in 1904,
generally kept 100 cows, two silos 200 tons
capacity,150 choice fruit trees, grapes and
berries; 2 story house, 14 rooms, furnace,
piazzas, sets back from street, surrounded
by majestic elms, beautiful lawns; barn 1i,
by 40, cellar, Fairbanks scale and every
convenience, cost $10,000; piggery 125 ft.,
hennery, carriage house etc., perfect re-
pair, frontage of 3,000 feet upon three
streets, great prospective value for sub-di-
vision. Price $10,b00, part cash, which is
much less than the assessed value.
Chatin's Farm Agency, Boston.
CAMP ON LAKE OSSIPEE.
Every thing included-furniture for 12,
boat, etc., see 4 engravings of this and 400
others in farm catalog, postpaid.
%,-apin's Farm Agency, Herald Building,
Boston, Mass.
LAKE VIEW HOUSE.
One of the Most Charming Spots in New
Hampshire.
Three story house, 50 rooms and base-
ment, toilets on three floors, piazzas three
sides, water supplied by windmill, 26 cham-
ber sets, carpets and matting included;
stable 70 x 42, cellar. 12 stalls, bordered by
lake stocked with bass, banks lined with
cottages; hennery, ten acres of land; es-
tate once sold for $10,000; mortgaged $7,000
which has been discharged, now free and
clear. Price only $900, $800 cash, bal $100
semi-annually, 5 per cent.
Chapin's Farm Agency, Herald Building,
Boston.
HOME AND BUSINESS IN THE PIED-
MONT REGION.
same as Poland. Bottling house, pavilion,
6 houses within city limits, choice fruit,
high healthy location. Illustrated details
postpaid by Chapin's Farm Agency. Wim.
Goldsmith, Jr., Greenville, 8. C., will show
It.
FOR SALE OR RENT.
Store on first floor with museum on two
others, should yield fine income. Famous
Florida museum, St. George St., near City
Gate, will be sold with or without its 3
story building, or rented. Rare collection
historic relies and wonderful objects from
various sections of the world, one of the
most valuable in America. For details ad-
dress Box 744, St. Augustine.
"EAGLE INN" THE POPULAR AIL THE
YEAR HOTEL OVERLOOKING
THE ADIRONDACKS.
At Orwell, Vt., near station, four miles
from Lake Champlain; built 12 years ago
by present owner and successfully conduc-
ted by him all that time; 3 stories with 39
guests rooms, fine large dining room, office,
parlor, reading room, billiard room, music
hall with piano, etc. Peases combination
heater which cost $1,000, and every con-
venience, beautifully situated with five
acres of lawn and garden, choice fruit in
variety, private water supply pure spring
water; livery stable 60x30 with wing, 30
stalls, office, harness and carriage rooms
laundry building, etc., all slated, perfect
repair, buildings cost $30,000, mail route
paying $400 a year, complete furnishings of
house and stablewith ten horses and full
equipment of vehicles included for $15,000,
easy terms. We do not offer you a run-
down non-paying house, but an up-to-date
hotel paying a clere profit of $2,000 a year,
one of the best openings in New England;
apply in premises to owner, F. B. Kimball,
or to Chapin's Farm Agency. Herald Bldg.,
Boston.


SOUTHERN INDUSTRY. $51X1X10I
ALABAMA.
Abbeville-Fertilizer Factory, etc.-How-
ard Fertilizer Co., has increased capital
from $5000 to $25,000. The company was
previously reported to remodel fertilizer
factory and install new machinery; the
erection of cottonseed-oil mill is also con-
templated.
Anniston-Car Works.-Western Steel Car
& Foundry Co. of Chicago, Ill., previously
reported as having purchased the car
works at Anniston and now operating the A
same, has increased the daily output from
10 to 20 cars. Plans are also being prepared
for rebuilding the malleable and soft iron
foundries previously referred to. C. W. Brea
Wrenshall is superintendent. dinn
Bessemer-Ice Plant.-Reports state that lunn
the Bessemer Ice & Coal Co. is enlarging
plant, increasing capacity from 15 to 20
tons daily, and changing from the absorp-
lion to the compression system.
Birmingham-Saw Mill.J-The Case Lunm-
ber Co., it is reported, has purchased site,
150x800 feet, on which to erect plant for
pawing hardwood logs; about $25,000 will
be invested.
Birmingham-Fair & Exposition Compa- |*
ny.-Birminghiam Fair & Exposition Com-
pany will be incorporated with $50,000 cap-
ital by Robert Jemison, Rufus N. Rhodes, 11511$$11
M. V. Joseph, J. L. Parker, Ross C. Smith,
Eugene Fies and associates.
Birmingham-Water Works. The facts PARL WIN
regarding the proposed additional water
supply for the Birmingham district are as
follows: The Commercial Club is promot- SU
ing the movement and the municipalities of *
Birmingham, Ensley, Pratt City and Besse- W
mer are Interested. It is the intention to
secure authority from the legislature to
issue bonds for the construction work in-
volved-the gravity system being contem-
plated-and $200 has been provided for the 4
preliminary survey. The plant is not r
proposed because of any deficiency in the O
present water supply, but because it is 1 II
evident that as the Birmingham district
grows in population and its manufacturing *
industries are added to, there will be re-
quired a more ample supply of water, and
it is to provide for these future needs
that the present movement is being pro-
moted. W. P. G. Harding is chairman, and *
Joseph E. Babb, secretary, of the joint t 401-40i
conference committee. Julian Kendrick.
city engineer of Birmingham, is the con-
suiting engineer.
Birmingham-Coal Mining.-The Crockett '&*p*ls
Coal Co. has been incorporated, with $10,000
capital, by L. C. Gould, P. L. Williams, T. 11 11811
C. Hand, G. B. Sims and H. L. Gould.
Birmingham-Plumbing Company.-Incor- W. H. BEC
porated: The M. J. Harran Plumbing Co., .
with $6,000 capital. J. M. Harran is presi- BECI
dent and treasurer; Clifford C. Cole, see- B
retary and manager.
Birmingham-Machine Shop, Foundry,
etc.,-The Vulcan Machine and Foundry LARE
Co. has been Incorporated, with $10,000 capi- LA
tal, to operate the plant of the Wilburn
Machine & Foundry Co., recently purchas-
ed. Edward H. Wingate is president, and
George W. Hays, secretary-treasurer. *rA
Bryant-Coal Mining.-Reports state that TA A,
the North Alabama Coal Co., F. D. Pierce, a
president, will shortly begin developing its I i ,g
mines to their full capacity.
Centre-Cotton Gin.-Melton C. Smith and
S. C. Tatum, reported last week to build
$4,000 cotton gin, will install two 80-saw
outfit, Munger system, having a daily ca-
pacity of 20 bales of cotton. Company will
be known as Tatum & Smith.
Decatur-Bridge Construction. Decatur
Transportation & Manufacturing Co. will
build an Iron or steel bridge across the
Tennessee river at Decatur. For informa-
tion address W. J. Nesbitt, secretary.
Gadsden-Cotton Gin.-Gadsden Gin Co.
has incorporated with a capital of$15,0M0,
to operate cotton gin. R. R. McClesky is
president, and E. E. Whitman, secretary-
treasurer.
Gadsden-Tiling Factory.-Gadsden Tile &
Paving Co., previously reported organized
to manufacture hexagon cement tiling.
is erecting factory building on North Io- '
cust street.
Goodwater-Electric Light Plant.-Arthur
Salmon, of Dadevllle, Ala., has secured
franchise to construct and operate electric-
light plant.
Greensboro-Cotton Mill.-W. W. Over- Jams St*
street is reported as endeavoring to form
-ompany for the establishment of a cot-
ton factory. ST
Selma-Bottling Works.-Randolph Rich-
ard, Albert Thaleimer and S. J. Barnett
have incorporated the Central City Bottling
Co., with $5,000 capital.
Tredegar-Lime-Kilns. Anniston Lime R
& Stone Co., office, Anniston, Ala., has in-
-reased capital from $100,000 to $200,000 and 505 Wu
will put in a battery of kilns. J. W. Co-
-ner is president of the company.

Large ass
FLORIDA. acted for
Bartow-Phosphate Mining, etc., The partIcula
Peninsular Phosphate Co. has been incor-
porated, with $300,000 capital stock, to mine
TIB rAinORD I TIB OiUr GREAT TRAD


ilstaff Restaurant

For Ladies and Gentlermn;


kfast a la carte. Luncheon 12 to 2:30, 50. Table d'hote
r, 6 to 9 p. m., 75c. Oysters on half shelL After theater
lea a specialty.


25 MAIN STREET,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.




Il**mllsllllull SiSiIlaIugI s gl#gIise BIanIs
IIIIIIIIIII III IIIIIII g gggg ggg ggg4


T. 1 MCARTHY, WVie-P MAUCE STERM. Tras.


THERE STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.


MVImo n. W=L, Nagew.


'ida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


4 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, F


LA.


IIIIIIIIIIIII1 II II*sIIIasIsiliiiiiiiiii-
Ma

WITH. W. B. HENDERSON. G. C. WARIgL N.



TRACTS OF TURPENTIIE AND MILL LANS.

Rooms 1-2-3, First National Bask BalWlang.
SFLORIDA.

mIIIIIIImIllllllllllllll||il llllllll|||||l

CYPRESS TANKS

Ase Beat by Every Test
Cypim widanana the stes of heead end Of
better than any aer wood. shraaW ad swem I J
than other woods, Ismprvioh to acis, dsh plat
-w-ell andsts araora witho. deyi. La 4Ml
Sweat ee, riBe la thene at w rs c atme, we ar e
able to secure the best election of the woodd a at
very low prices. We have been buikg tanks for
amie thal a quMt of a centryad bo dir fsseit
tl oanks e beter built ow will lut kae.
nd f ctalk and prics.

G. M. DAVIS f SON
PALAT A. FrLORIDA


warx r. nded Dr.


EWAR.T & COMPANY


EAL ESTATE & LOANS

st Bldg. Jacksonville, Fl.. Phone 1576


Small tracts of virgin timLer of high drude. f 1 I.-
R.R. snd water truspwrtati*s. at mlederse triOe Writ' f
s.


UIUWUUIIII__________________~~il~lR~


U


ESafSSSSliS~L~UIYi~C;~k;SilC~C;~


I


rrr~rEICCCrc.ErrrCUC----------CI









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


The Oldest Whiskey

House in Georgia.
(P-*mhI.iwd in A881.)















OLD SHARPS WILLIAMS
Guaranteed 8 year old. By the
gallon. $.0& 4 full uart .50

G0O. J. COLKMAN RYE
Guaranteed 6 years old. By the
gallon, $2.7. 4 full quarts, $.L00
-res Prepad.


ANVIL RYE
Guaranteed 4
gallon, $2.5


years old. By the
4 full u rt .7 .
Kxr-r Prepad.


CLIFFORD RYE
By the gallon, P.25 4 full quarts
$2.50*
AM-w Prpid
OLD KENTUCKY CORN
Guaranteed 8 years old. By the
gallon, $3.00. 4 full uarts .2
=qres Prepai.
OLD PODINT CLUB CORN
Guaranteed 4 year old. By the
gallon, 20. 4 full quarts, $.75
pres Prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of
Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the mar-
ket and will save you from 25 per cent
to 50 per cent on your purchases. Send
for price list and catalogue. Mailed free
upon application.

TLe AbIyr& Flata LklorGo.
SSo-s5d-5so-5s Forth Street,
MACON GKORGI.



This Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.

Wdsleaub


Liquor Merchants

Proprietors


jMuMn rbttK Works

... Alants...


ACME BEER



w eem
11 400% = 71


phosphate. C. 0. Memminger of Lakeland,
r'la., is president, and E. C. Stuart ot
Bartow, secretary-treasurer.
Gainesville-Gas and Electric-light plant
-Charles W. Moore, Jeremiah Cushman,
Geo. I. Doig and John Cushman have in-
corporated the Gainesvilee Gas & Electric
Co. with 4100,000 capital to operate gas and
electric light plant.
Jacksonville- Naval Stores. Hodges,
O'Hara & Russell Co.. has been organized
with $400,000 capital, to manufacture and
deal in naval stores. Henry A. Hodges is
president; F. G. Russell, vice-president; J.
F. O'Harra, secretary, treasurer and gen-
eral manager.
Jacksonville-Dental Supplies.-The Flor-
ida Dental Supply Co. has been incorpora-
ted, with $20,U# capital stock, to deal in
dental supplies. Carroll H. Frink of Fer-
nandina, .'la., is President; F. E. Buck, of
Jacksonville, vice-president; Arthur G. Gil-
more of Jacksonville, secretary, and R. P.
Taylor of Jacksonville, treasurer.
Palatka-Sewerage System.-Guild & Co.
of Chattanooga, 'lenn., have contracted at
$,UT1.77 for the construction of sewerage
system, for which William W. Lyon, C. E.,
Aemphis, Tenn., was previously reported
to prepare plans.
Quincy-Mercantile.-E. B. Shelfer Com-
pany, has been incorporated with $25,000
capital, by B. Sheler and others.
Pabst Brewing Co. of Milwaukee, Wis.,
will erect cold-storage plant, and contract
for the erection of building has been let to
S. C. Edminater.

GEORGIA.
Meyer Reginstein and associates have in-
corporated the J. Reginstein Company,
with $50,000 capital, and privilege of in-
creasing to.250soo0.
Atlanta-Ferro-concrete Construction. -
Chartered: Southern Ferro-concrete Co..
with $30,000 capital, by W. H. Harrison and
F. Berne.
Atlanta-Lumber Company.-R. F. In-
gram, T. L. Hornsby and C. E. Battle have
incorporated the Ingram & Hornsby Lum-
ber Co., with $1000 capital.
County Commissioners are contemplating
calling an election to vote on the issuance
of u.00,00U of ,bonds for building roads
throughout the county.
Lyons-Telephone and Telegraph Sys-
tem.-Chy has granted the Bell Telephone
& Telegraph Co. permission to construct
telephone and telegraph lines through the
city; general offices., Atlanta, Ga.
Pelham-Woodworking Plant.-The Cres-
cent Variety Works will erect building 30x
90 feet and equip for a daily capacity of
10,0(0 feet of turn work, flooring, ceiling,
carving, mouldings etc. About $,000 will
be invested. R. S. Kell is architect and
engineer in charge.
Savannah Cornice Works.-The Shean
Cornice Works will be established with T.
P. Shean. Manager, for the manufacture
of galvanized-iron cornices, skylights, etc.
Ar. Shean can be addressed care of The
Pulaski, Savannah, Ga.
Savannah-Axe Factory.-It is reported
that W. J. Sager of the Sager Axe Co.,
Warren. Pa., is investigating with a view
of establishing axe factory which will have
a daily capacity of 1000 axes.
Valdosta-Water-works Improvements.-
City contemplates expending $10,000 in im-
provements to water-works, increasing the
capacity, etc. Address the Mayor.
Waycross-Soap Factory. Chartered:
The German Dye Soap Co., with $4,000
capital stock, by J. E. T. Bowden, George
W. Deen,. A.Sessoms, Dan Lott, E. P. Pea-
body, W. W. Sharpe and others, to manu-
facture soap, dyes, powder, etc. This com-
pany was previously referred to.

STEV ART & COMPANY.
We take pleasure in calling attention of
our readers and interested business men
in particular, especially turpentine opera-
tors and sawmill men, to the advertisement
of Messrs. Stewart & Co., office 505 West
Building, Jacksonville, Fla., as shown else-
where in this number of the Record.
They have secured a number of excep-
tionally fine tracts of Florida virgin tim-
ber turpentine propositions, ranging from
12,000 to 180,000 acres in one body, estima-
ted to cut from 3,000 to 6,000 feet, and from
50 to 70 boxes, per acre, all conveniently
located for shipment by land or water, at
from $1.00 to $6.00 per acre in fee simple.
They also have a number of sawmill tim-
ber tracts, cattle ranches, fruit groves Im-
proved with fine residences, packing houses,
barns and poultry houses, at prices to suit
all buyers. Parties Interested in any of
the properties in our list will receive full
information promptly, by writing them.


NUBIAN TEA Frr th Livwr aIm Key

BENEDICTA A m.ic .e for w-e

CUBAN RELIEF F:r calk cr.. am Dl-
CUBAN OIL inient *nmlcd for Cut, Burns
Bruises ald RIeMmastb.

A supply of these medicines is what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for prices and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,
Cbattaus Temmaee.



THE ARAGON
JACKMONVIULE, LIA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator ard our
own electric light plant.
ABt fH. N. O'NEAL, Prop.

Ideal Lecads s Deauifal St. Jeaes
HOTEL ROSELAND
Ilig-ClLss Twrist sod Family oetel
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Every comfort and amunment. Unexcelled alsine, Northern cooking. Special rates, $10 to ig8
weekly; 0S to S daily, American plan. illustrated booklet mailed. Car going to ostrich farm
puass hotel ground Headqrters for naval stores men, lumbermen, battle growers and Good
Roads Convention deegares A. C. ZKHOLM. PmopmRaIoaT



Windsor Hotel

Ja.se,.s: r,.es. a"
nIrld's Larget eatst

Year-Round Hotel.

u, DODGE & CULLENS,
O-- rs .iI Prepriters.

AMERICAN PLAN
GRAND VIEW HOTEL $2.00 PER DAY UP
SPECIAL WEEKLY RATES


ST. GEORGE HOTEL) "- -"4. A.
MRS. QIO, W. BROOK. PnIomITrl s.

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St, Jacksonville, Fla.


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


J. W. WADE,
Vioe-Preddent.


E. G. HUGHES,
Sec'y md Tress


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PBNSACOLA, PLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.










8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RBOORD.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week.


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903,04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


SPIRIT FOR THE WEEK AT SAVAN-
NAIL
Price Repts Sales Exp. 104
Mon., Feby 1I.... 2 4 53 40 62
Tue., Feby 14 .. 62 80 100 190 62
Wed., Feby 1 .... 62 2 68 100 62
Thur., Feby 1.... 52 2 0 2o00 6

ROSIN FOR THE WEEK AT SAVANNAH


Monday Feb. 13.


Last Yea;


WW .............. 6.15 l.6
WG ........... .... L00 34
N ... ............ ... 4.75
K ... .............. 4.60
I ............ ........ 4.0 025
H ..................... 320 2.70
0 ........... ... ...... 2.86 2.70
F... ........ ...... 2.7 2.65
E ... ... ............ 70 2.10
D ................. ... 2.6 2.5
ABC ................. 260 2.6o
Receipts S6 sales 1,414, exports 2,086

Tuesday, Feby 14-Rosin firm; receipt
M; sales &21,; shipments 2119. Quote: A
B, C, SL.62 1-2; D, Z6& 1-2;E, $2.72 1-2; P
S2.7 1-2; G, $87 1-2; H. 3225; I, $1.50; E
4.06; M, "4..; N, $4.7; W. G., $; W. W.

Wednesday. Feby 1-5-Rosin firm; receipt
W8; sales nothing; shipments 180. yuote A
B, C, 2.68 1-2; D. 32.67 1-2; E. 12.72 1-2; F
$.77 1-2; G0, $.87 1-2; H. L.25; I, 3.50; K
$4. ; M, 68M; N, S476; W G, $o.00; W W

Thursday. Feby 16.-Rosin firm; receipt;
ms; sales U; shipments 1,13 Quotation
A, B. C, $2.o 1-2; D, $2.67 1-2; E, $2.72 1-2
P, S2.77 1-2; 0. 2.87 1-2; H, 33.25; I, S3.50
K, L4.4; M. 4t.6; N. 4S.7; W G, .00; W W


SAVANNAH NA.AL STORES STATE
MENT.
Spirits Rosir
Stock April 1 .................... 6.485 44.50
Receipts Feb'y 16 ............... 2 961
Receipts previously ............171,5664 68482
Total ............................17.061 60,34.
Exports Feby 16 ................ 200 1,13
Exports previously ............165,2 8 608,00
Total ........... ............4... 3 9,131
Stock Feby !- .................... 18,6 CL.Z21]
Stock previously ................ 5,713 8680

TOLAR HART & CO.'S REVIEW.
New York, Feb'y 1, 1906.
The Industrial Record, Jacksonville. Fla.
pirits Turpentine.-The market has been
very quiet during the past week, the ex-
treme winter weather delaying any open-
ing of business. Stock 3 barrels. We
quote. Mahines a5 1-2. et.
Rosn.--Market continues dull. stocks ac-
cumulating. We quote: B-C 2.90; D. 2.6;
St.N; F. SL.1; H. .L2; H 81,0; I. 3.75;
K. 4.0; M. WO4.6; N 16.10; W.O. 16.30; W.W.
.5o. Tolar, Hart & Co.

EXPORTS FROM FR.ACE.
London. Jan'y 8. 1906.
Mditor Record:- We think it may inter-
set you to know the exports from France-
(in tons of .00 Kilos.) for the years-
112 129 1904
Turpentine ............ .- 7 7,2 .fi97
Rosin .................. :H4 2,M3 10.607
A decrease of 1,a tons Turpentine last
year.
..a increase of 7.671 tons Rosin last year.
James Watt & Son.

BAILEY & MONTGOMERY'S REVIEW.
New York. Feby 165 105
Spirits TaIpeatine.-8took :16 barrels. Af-
ter a long period of dullness there has been
more business in spirits of Turpentine
this week. as will be noticed, our stock is
pmalL
Thursday, Feby h. U 1-e asked.
Friday, Feby 10th. 6c asked.
Saturday, Feby llth, SMc asked.
Monday. Feby 13th. holiday.
Tuesday, Feby 14th. M6 l-Sc asked.
Wednesday, Feby 15th, easy-- to 65 1-2c.
Rosin-Stock 22.40 barrels. This market
has remained quiet. Strained and good
strained, after a period of dullness, sold
rather freely to-day at a.. We quote all
grades quiet: AC. a.8; graded D. $2.96;
E. I3.0 to $3.,5; F, $3.6 to $3.10; G, $3.15 to
312.; H, NA8 asked; I, 3.MI; K, 14.30 to
S4.0; M. L4. to $4.; N .6L.00 to 6.605;
WO. U. to 3.S; WW, 16.4 to 16.6.


r.


McMILLAN BROS. COPPER WORKS
BURNED.
The Savannah Morning News of Wednes-
day, has the following to say which will
no doubt be of interest to our many read-
ers:-
During the greater part of yesterday two
streams of water were played on the still
smouldering embers .of the McMillan Bros.
copper works, which were destroyed by
fire Monday night, and hundreds of morbid
spectators gathered to witness the scene of
the tragedy the night before when father
anu son were burned to death before they
could make their exit from the burning
building.
The bodies of Mr. Gardner and his son,
the two men who were burned, were sent
to the family at Pooler, where they were
taken charge of for interment near Bloom-
ingdale.
After Investigating yesterday, Mr. Mc-
Mlllan placed the loss between $10,000 and
$12,000 as stated in the News yesterday.
He was more deeply disturbed over the
tragic end of such a faithful employee as
Mr. Gardner, and also his son. During his
twenty-five years connection with the
copper maunfacturing enterprises of Mr.
McMillan, Mr. Gardner had been a most
faithful and efficient workman, and guar-
ded his employer's interests as his own.
The theory advanced by the Morning
News, that both father and son were awak-
ened by the flames, and made an effort
to effect their escape, is further borne
out by the statement of a negro driver
named Best, employed by Mr. John Sulli-
van, who stated that he was passing the
building as the flames were spreading to
the roof. Best said he distinctly heard
some one shout: "Save yourself, I can do
no more."
.le beds which the two men occupied
were arranged in the northwest corner of
the building, directly on Perry lane and
Price street, and the fact that one body
was found ten feet away near the Perry
lane wall, as though an attempt had been
made to get out of one of the three win-
dows opening on the lane, and the other
fifteen feet away in a direction from the
cots. which indicated that an effort had
been made to reach the front door front-
ing on Liberty street, bears out the theory
that both men discovered their predica-
ment in time to make an effort to escape.
Most of the finished material was in the
yard east of the building which was
burned, and very little damage was done
to this. During the early hours of yester-
day morning the scene of the fire of the
night before was unusual. Long icicles
hung from the charred parts of the frame
still left standing, and all along the street
boys were skating on the ice which had
formed in the water wasted in the gutters.
The Record has been advised that the
fire has in no way caused any delay in the
manufacture or delivery of stills and that
all orders will have the same prompt and
careful attention.


Wanted
We will pay 25 cnts apiece
for copies of the Weekly In-
dutrial Record of the follow-
ing date
January 31.1903: March 15,1008; April
24,10 ay ; 1 May 9, 1,; Feb-
ruary 7. 1903.
Office* of the Industrial Lecord.
Ja.ckonville, Fla.


THOSE. G. HUTCHINSON
FELLW A113 AM4SKAIN M o
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
Ree. 7, bard of Trade dg.
Pfeos 312 JAMCIONVILLE. FL


ZINC NAILS


Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the am reMs which will not injury
sawa when left in the trees.

Salenm Nail 0o.
M57 r10m0 as OWr Pfk, M. r.
Also headquarters for Galvanised and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc., Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.


Rceipt
Spirris, cak............................
Raisins. bbl. ........ .............o
Tota ..................................

SpT ot a. . .. .. . . . . .. .. . . . . . .
Export
Spirit c .. *. ...... .......... **
Rosins, b .......................... .

Spirits, casks. .... ...... ................



Rosins, bbl .............. .. .. ... ........
SRndres
Spiritwcasks....... ................
Roasisbbs.s........... ............


190-04 1902-03 1901-02


191,647
650,988
844,586

188,398
762,270

98,884
888,171

85,668
87,853

59.351
826.746


z92 496 814,G46
940,507 1,071,446
1,238 381,386,780

296,430 814,876
975,428 62,687

206,109 217,446
504,178 585,042

42,766 58,797
138,121 129,059

87,556 48,633
387,784 898,586


The reiII of ykti are Is than 19MM03 by 96A49 ca" and of --s% 289AW bascols



Crop of Spiris and Rosins for Thur Yeas
rIe 16-6. Cop U"
Spirits. l Birit I
W flmint.a.. .... ....1911 W 1, 6 lis,
Charlesto........... .AW 3,1 3,67 11,3
Sauvan .. .. .. ...1740118 3,A 27070 310 1o 3
Bruawihk.. .......... 446 1 6 6 7 s 46c
Mobile.. .. .. .. ....... 12,5U 6a 18,9 79,7 S
New Orlwan ......... 3017 133,1 al6 14,03
C(rrabele...... ...... edsd -daed U3a 3414
Georgetown........7, 1 4-414 1,3 I 4,1o
Psasehe ......... 425" 205,0M 345 1 s6
Jax. & rFadla...... 17,l 3,1u n1, 76 7S511 7
Tamp ...... ........ dueeml dd 10 4,64 1

Totas .............. 7 **6I3,N 1~* *


Crop 1111-4.
pirita 13a3

0L0W I7AM,4

IUW M,1t



1,7" i&,AM
MM MrM

SAN Sea,19
MM~ 3,3743


Ipda Tujenti to U. L
The followbi tabe in compel by James Watt & Soa, of lMadon, front the
ofcial returns. for eovem n of eampriaoa we have turned ewts int. barre
-320 ewt. equal 100 bharrl.
U17 1 An 1M0 1MI1 L IM 1_6M
From U. S., bb. .... 1u, 173JM ,7 7 17A M A4,441 i U1 M 1
From FraMa, bbl... 1l1 6117 286 NW l,1 4,00
From other cuntrie.. IAM 7 6 1 6 5 M0 sI

I5M 174,w 141,4 177,mI 1u94, 157,6 14,M
From Run .......... 3 4. 4,3 3,51 G, VII3 17JW

Total Brrok .. 17,l 17n,00 S 0 logO W 01,2 16,3G 1SMA
Thus the iuport of Kuoima Turpentime (or Wood Spirit) in 1903 was double
that of 1~I~, ;a ovr six times as une as a 107. It is interting to s how
thin import loetuates with the prim of America Turpettia.
Percetage of Impot of B sia ..1.7l 23 3 4,57 .41 .5M 1IM
Av. Pries Asmr. ur. hi lal ..14 6 -. a6-1 1-4 37-1 -1 4-2

COMPARATIVE PRICE= OF SPIRITSAT SAVAIKAR OM F IVE YEARt


April 1 ....................
April 8...................
April 16 ...................
April ....................
Aprel 2 ...................
May ....................
May 13 ....................
May 20 ....................
May 27 ...................
June 3 ................... ..
June 10 ....................
June 17 ..................
June 24 ..................
July 1 ..................
July 8 ..................
July 16 ..................
July 22 ..................
July 28 ..................
Aug. 4 ...................
Aug. 12 ..................
Aug. 19..................
Aug. 26 ...................
Sept. 2 ....................
Sept. ....................
Sept. 16 ..................
Sept. 23 ..................
Sept. 30 ..................
Oct. ..................
Oct. 14 ..................
Oct. 21 ....................
Oct. 28 ..................
Nov. 4 ....................
Nov. 11 ...................
Nov. 18 ...................
Nov. 25 .................
Dec. 2 ....................
Dec. ....... .............
Dec. 16 ...................
Dec. 23 ...................
Dee. 30 ....................
Jan. 6 ....................


ND
as


s4%
54%
j3%

4%


ass


M1%
52%
6%3

5a%




53%
56%



50


50
48%


a3%
46%


61%

60%
3%
52%


60%
47%

53%k


im-o
ND

46%
.47
45
45
47%
4a
45%
46
4%
47%
47%


47oo%
48






M%
664%







al
57




54%
M5%

56%


67%
56
56
57


16M-01
45
4M%
42%

42%-43



r%
47%3
45
45

46%
46%

47%



44%
45%



44%
47
44%


4%
44%
50
51%
53%

47%
52
60
51%
653%
54
51


61%
652
52%
64


1911-ft
3u
34

32%
31%-32
3,
32
31%
3s%



a6
34%
33%
34%
14
32%
34
34%
33
ase





365
34
36t
36%


35%
34


36%

35
a5%
35%



36%
35

35%


37%


1900-01
5%
46
as
47%
44%
47
48
49
49
45
44%
42%
43%
43%
44%
43
42
3%


35%
U


36

y
37
37%
40%
40%
40
41
40
3.
39
38%
37%
35
35
37


11 YOU ARE PROGRESSIVE, ADVXETIS0 IN THE RECORD.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Florida


Electric Co.

Cobrctla Elctr Emimrs
Sell and Install Complete Electric Light
and Power Plants, Telephone Ex-
change. Wholesale Electric
Supplies.
Jac .ile, Fla.
Sand all order for printing for the
tarpeatine an enmmiasmry trade to the
Reme eIB to tuar a propt 4livery.

E CANNON COMPANY


BARRELS

ARE THE

STANDARD



WORLD


Use no Other


ats coaveitly located.
Home Office, OUITMAN, GA.
U.S&A.


IBU IN eD D igLEB .
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cottn. Saw, Fwtillse, Oil and leo Ma-
chiery, ad Supplis and Repairs.
CAPACITY FOR 300 HANDS
Maehine Tools, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shifting, Pulleys, Hangrs, Leather ana
Rubber Belting and Hose, Railroad and
ill Supplies and Too.
Plansd lMtimates furished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges
Steam Pump Fed Water Heate and
Hoisting En="M
AUGUSTA. OA.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,

from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati sad Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHASE. BLUM a Co.
917 asd 519 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, rLA.


TO RECORD READERS.
Dear Sirs:-Are you drinking a carbona-
ted beverage? If so, drink the best. You
can get it from the Live Oak Bottling
Works, R. H. Holmes, proprietor. Mr.
Holmes has been owner and proprietor of
Helena, Ga., Bottling Works for the past
twelves years, and was the original owner
of the Valdosta, Ga., Bottling Works, now
owned by Holmes & Barber.
We are now putting in a new Crown
Bottling Machine and have ordered a New
Continuing Carbonator. The power for run-
ning the machinery will be furnished by an
electric motor. We are getting in a car
load of new Crown bottles and new ship-
ping and city delivery crates.
Our Ginger Ale is pleasing to the eye as
well as to the taste, and gives better sat-
isfaction than that shipped from a dis-
tance. We also make all popular brands
of Carbonated Drinks, and make them
right. Every ingredient and every bottle
made undergoes a strict inspection, and if
not up to the standard--ust right-it does
not go out. We pride ourselves upon the
care and attention given to the manufac-
ture of our goods, and will not knowingly
substitute an inferior Ingredient or shirk
the slightest detail of our work.
Our plant is modern and up-to-date; our
goods are made from pure Artesian Dis-
tilled Water, every gallon used.
If you are not selling these goods, and
want to increase your trade, give us your
order at once.
LIVE OAK BOTTLING WORKS,
R. H. Holmes, Propt.
NORTH CAROLINA PINE PRICES AD-
VANCED.
A meeting of the North Carolina Pine
Association, Incorporated, was called to
order in Norfolk, Va., at 11 o'clock last
Friday, with President John L. Roper in
the chair. The importance of tne occasion
induced a considerable attendance of mem-
bers, who evinced great enthusiasm over
present conditions and prospects. Of the
thirty-ive mills constituting the member-
ship, twenty were represented at the meet-
ing.
Stocks were reported very low, as much
as 5 per cen. less than at this time last
yeat. Five manufacturing concerns were
admitted to membership as follows : An-
derson Lumber Company, Halsey Lumber
Company, North State Lumber Company,
all of Charleston; Clayton Manufacturing
Company. of Clayton, N. C., Newbern
Lumber Company, of Newbern, N. C.
The most Important business of the meet-
ing was the modifications of the price list.
In the rough list, narrow edge of all thick-
nesses. Nos. 1, 2 and 3 were advanced V1;
stock boards were advanced $2; nch edge
board and 12-inch box were not disturbed,
lx6, 8 and 10-inch box stocks were advanced
50 cents; 5, 6 and 8-4 box were unchanged;
Nos. 1 and 2 box strips were advanced $1;
culls were unchanged; dressed material
was advanced in accordance with the ad-
vance on rough stock.
Demand was reported as resuming ac-
tivity. A committee consisting of John L.
Roper, R. 8. Cohn and John R. Walker
was appointed to draft resolutions inten-
ded to assist pending legislation against
compulsory pilotage and the Littlefield bill
affecting this mater was indorsed. J. B.
Blades, of Elizabethtown, N. C., made an
extemporaneous address on the recent
American Forest Congress, and Secretary
Walker announced that he is preparing an
important report indicating how 500,000,000
feet of North Carolina pine, shipped last
year, was distributed.
The annual meting and banquet of the
association will be held March 16.
SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION.
Washington, Feb:. 14.-The House com-
mittee on appropriations to-day completed
and reported the sundry civil appropria-
tion bill. The bill appropriates $65558,880,
which is an increase of $771,669 over the
appropriations for the current year. The
increase includes excess required to meet
contract obligations for the construction
of public buildings, $3,24,339; excess re-
quired to meet contract obligations for
river and harbor works, $2,571,932.
The appropriation for river and harbor
work under contract includes the follow-
ing items:
Charleston harbor. S. C., 25,000.
Cumberland Sound. Georgia and Florida,
$40.000.
Winyah Bay, 8. C., $75,000.
Savannah harbor. 1175,000.
St. John's river. Florida. $205,000.
Southwest Pass, Missippi river, $1,250,000.
Tennessee river, below Chattanooga,
Tenn., Alabama and Kentucky,350,000.
The Items in the bill for public buildings
already contracted for. are as follows:
Anniston, Ala., $60,000.
Charlottesville, Va., $5,000.
Florence, S. C., $68,000.
Jacksonville. Fla., $100,000.
Macon, Ga., $60,000.
Nashville Tenn., $40,000.
Savannah. Ga., $80.000.
The bill contains an Item of 60.000 for
continuing the construction of the peniten-
tiary at Atlanta, Ga.


W.mE TA R.


W. T. RILEY, J. A. 6. CARSMO, OsO. J. SCOWL,
Presdest. Ylce-Pr weM. 9ec. rrfws.

Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Factories.
8th Street R. R. Crosing.
JACKSONVILLE. 9 FLORIDA



... NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA., U. 5. A.

I JOHN R. YOUNG, A. D. COVINGTON. H. L K.AYTON,
President Vloe-Presmoi SBeretry and TreIsmer.
MsCTroTM:S
J. P. WILLIAMS. C.. ELS. Bl. B1LLARD J. IL CHMSNUT
C. W. SAUSSY. P. SUTHEBLAND. W. C. POLL. G. W. DEEN,
S. A. ALFORD. J- B PADGTT. WAITER RAY, RAYMOND CAY.
J. R. YOUNG. A.. OOVINGTON. J. L OONOLY.

Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the 8. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charge for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE POR PARTICULARS.




J. S. Schofield's Sons o pny,
*....o.o.o...eoeoe*.*.Oo**.*Ooe**o**eO(.,e*****O0o*
*- *Hea*iWrterS ftr

Distiller's Pumping
Outft.
e., No plant eooplete without oe.
Hundrodasofth i n use GinrZia
Slorida, Al;ha M igipp_ sod
SSouth rlltu. Writus for pi.lcu-
Slars and prices. We also manuaheture
I.^ Engin-es." B.l rs nMl th .
Gra ft MUMMy,.
k s well as ry a full and complete
.---o-ekof-
Mi Sulis P
SCb0er Tubes, Et.
/Advise your wants.
S- ;Macon, - Georgia.

b lf Tamr TWeL fer TBlet teIa Paes
tte~(1~))1~11(tl~~A Looft I l lI11011 1 of a
;e$* *T*o***W**"* e* Te**dis*.**immi0


President. Vice-pres. Vis-Pres. Vioe-Pres. See. & Tress.

IJohn R. Young Co.,




Commission

Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale rockers.

Sa&v ,nnA dh Bk-unawic. Ga.
io ,e1 a IIaasaIsellsh11sees i aII-- I 14 I m Iso-m


9


T ramuc WaL WORT DOLI.As TO YOw V=rT WaLX











THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

,JAMES A. HO.LLOMON.
Eder amd Mn agr.
Pudblith d Ewvey Frsl y.
mmr (Dsmo m e)...83.00 Per Annum
(Fmrlva) .... 3ao .
"The Pire and Its Product.t.

Am oemmenettim shouM he addrease
The Ianduf ria. RLeord Company.
JLckmu nvilO.l. Fla.

Broame Eduraland Ju~neas Offloe at
Attant. Ga. 4 Savan ae. Ga.

Entered at the Poetoie at Jadonville,
Fia., a eeond-elas matter.

Adopted by the xeuative Ommitte of
the TurpetUe Operators' AseistiU,
September IS, 190, as its elusive official
rm. Adoptl d in aual ConventioB
pt b ar I, a th erga als of the
enral Association.
Adopted April 27th, 190, as the odlcal
ugam of the intetate CUe Grows' An-
.odatioM Adopted Spt. 11, 10, as the
sly ofidal orgm of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by spelal
solution adopted by the orgi Sawmill
Amasdatnma.



Advertidig epy (chanmes er msw ad-
artirmeot) rhteu reMh as Tuesay
rning to ihumre i ti- iu the iJes of
the -- week

TRE RECORD'S OFIIICS.



Ce.0 are mated at Jo- 11 Seth Hoge
Strot, Jackne ii i F. the very hart
of the great tuapetie and ylewv pliu
induatrie BnIch stCa, Savannah, Gat.,
ud Atanta, Ga.


NOTICE TO PATRON&

All payments for advertiing in the I-
dutrial Bcrd and ubecriptiuo thereto
ut bk made direct to the home ofice
in Jacknville. Aget are t allowed
to make ceollctio under any circum-
stame. ilk for advertising ad ub-
scriptime anre st out frem th home
eodg, whom ue, and all remittances must
be ma- direct to thin coumpuy.
Inumtrial Record Publihing Co.

WHAT BUSINESS MEN SAY OF LAST
WEEK'S ISSUE OF THE RECORD.
Editor Industrial Record. Dear Sir :- I
desire to favorably mention the last issue
of the Industrial Record. I was greatly
impressed with the Tampa article. I
knew that our South Florida Metropolis
was a progressive, hustllag city, but I had
not before comprehended fully how great
she really is, and the wonderful prospects
ahead for her. I commend you in bring-
ing forward Florida her marvelous re-
sources and the people who are developing
her. I hope you can keep up the good
licks. I would like to see the great devel-
opments of the East Coast properly shown
up. Show what it was before Mr. Flagler
and Mr. Parrott came to it. what it is now
and what it bids fair to be. I would like
to see an issue devoted to the Phosphate
industry and one to the long cotton indus-
try, etc. Let the good work go on. g
H. A. McEachern. t


"I think with the exception of the Man-
ufacturer's Record of Baltimore, which Is
in a class by itself, I know of no other
trade paper in the country to be compared
with the Industrial Record."
P. L. Sutherland.
a


"Last week's issue was very fine indeed.
The illustrations were as fine as 1 ever
saw. I enjoyed reading It with a great
deal of pleasure." E. M. Petting.


"All right, fine paper-last week's issue
exceptionally fine" Charles Blum.

"I think the Record is all right."
T. W. Ellabee.


"The Record presented a very credita-
ble appearance last week and contained a
great deal of matter pertaining to the bus-
iness of Jacksonville and Tampa, and other
parts of the State. On the whole, it pre-
sented a very neat and creditable appear-
ance." Mr. Clark,
Manager Jacksonville Branch,
The J. P. Williams Co.


"Last week's Record was the finest thing
I ever saw in the shape of a trade paper."
D. H. McMillan, Vice-President,
Consolidated Naval Stores Co.


"It was one fo the finest issues ever got-
ten out. Bright and up-to-date."
W. A. McMillan.
McMillan Bros. Copper Works.


"I think last week's issue of the Indus-
trial Record was exceptionally fine."
C. H. Barnes,
President of Barnes & Jessup Co.


"I think it was good. The Tampa arti-
cle was splendid and also the Consolidated
article. The paper was well made up."
J. C. Little.

"I think last week's issue was very good
and one of the finest I ever saw."

J. A. Cranford.


WESTERN TURRPENTINE OPERA-
TOR'S ASSOCIATION.
Roosevelt, Miss., Feb'y 6, 1905.
Dear Sirs :-
The Executive Committee of the Western
Turpentine Operators' Association will
hold its next regular meeting in Gulfport,
Miss., on Tuesday, February 21st. 1906.
All operators who are members, and
those who are not members, are cordially
invited to attend this meeting and take
part in the discussion of important mat-
ters, which will come up before the Execu-
tive Committee for consideration, among
which will be :
The compilation of important statistical
and other information important to tur-
pentine operators.
To ascertain what will be the ruling price
for labor for the present -season.
A representative from the Florida Asso-
liation is expected to be present and ad-
dress the meeting upon the subject of the
successful operations of the association I
irganised in Jacksonville three years ago.
Yours respectfully,
A. Pridgen, President.
P. M. Anderson, Secretary. (

t
AMONG THE OPERATORS. n
Mr. W. C. Jackson of Green Cove Springs
was in the city this week.

Colonel Raymond Cay and family, to- t
tether with Mr. Cay McCall, have moved r
o Jacksonville from Tallahassee. and will h
nake this city their permanent home.

Mr. P. L. Sutherland returned last Mon- i
ay from a short business trip to North
larolina.

Mr. A. D. Covington is in West Florida v
nd will be absent from the city about a
reek.


"Last week's issue of the Record was fine
-something to be proud of." E. H. Mote. Mr. D. E. McKelthan of Baldwin, Fla.,


I


IN YOU AMR PROGarSsIv, ADVERTISE IN TUE RECORD.


_


ADDRESS OF PRESIDENT.
The following was the address of Presi-
dent S. H. Galtsul, at the meeting of the
Southeastern Stockgrowers', Association,
Tampa, Fla., Feby. 1, 1905:
"To the Members and Friends of the
Southeastern Stoctgrowers' Association.-
it seems meet at thus tune to make a full
declaration of the aims and objects of our
association.
% e would be fully understood and have
our purposes known to all men-and it
seems tnat some people think our object
as to accomplish one hmng and others tnmk
we have a diterent object in view 'We
nope alter this meeting there will be no
such diversity of opinion, but that we ma)
be known all over the state as just wnati
we are-that is, the Soutneastern Stock-
growers' Association. Some seem to think
we are looking after the interests of cat-
tle alone, and others seem to think
that we are thinking of purebred cattle
only, and others, that we are working in
the interest of the beef breeds of cattle.
and still some few seem to think that we
are worKing for the advancement of one or
Lue beet breeds only. There are others
that seem to be of the opinion that we
are not thinking of stock of any kind,
particularly, but that the sole object ot
this association is to run down and pun-
ish whoever injures or maims an animal,
or does any act that is in any way detri-
mental to what we think is of interest
to stockraising. It is a pleasure to me to
have this opportunity to show that a great
many of these ideas are erroneous.
First and foremost, this is just what our
name purports it to be, that is, a stock-
growers' association. We desire to aid in
the upbuilding of all kinds of stock. We
are paying more attention to beef cattle
just now than other stock, because it is
the most important branch of the industry
at present. More people are interested in
this class of stock, and at present this
class of stock is of more value to the State
than any other, but when I say beef cattle,
I would not have you think we mean the
pure bred cattle only, for we are vitally
Interested In the native cattle.
"A great question now facing us is: What
are we going to do with our native steers
We feel that the day of his usefulness is
nearly past. We know that he has been
a great factor in the upbuilding of the
State, that he has not only furnished a
good living for a great many of our people,
but he has brought wealth and affluence
to many. We know that a great many
boys and girls have been educated from
the proceeds arising from the sale of the
native, that he has built and furnished
many comfortable homes, and there Is
within us a tender feeling for him. Call it
sentiment if you will. We cannot help
but praise the bridge that allows us to
safely cross a stream, but now we feel that
the time has come when we must begin to
prepare to say goodbye to this old friend,
his day of extermination is dawning, and
It would be folly for us to close our eyes
tothi s fact, and wait for the full noonday
of his passage before we fully realize that
he must go, and it behooves us, to begin
to prepare for his successor.
"We have made a free Cuba. and we
are proud of the part we played in help-
ing this people to freedom, but the day we
made Cuba free, was also the day that
rung the death knell of the Florida na-
tive steer. All of the territory covered by
this association has been helping to fur-
nish Cuba beef, but Cuba will soon be
producing her own beef, then the question
to be answered is, what are we going to
do with our native cattle? The very fact
hat the Northern part of our territory-
Georgia and Alabama-has been sending
native cattle to Cuba, should tell the Flor-
da grower plainly that there is no market
north of us that will take our native steer.
They have not taken the Georgia and Al-
abama native, and it would surely cost
Very much more in freight charges, to get
>ur steer up North. I can see no promise
if an outlet north of us that would pay
'or the native steer. We might be able
o ship hides, but not that kind of beef up
lorth.
"I can see but one solution. We must
nake a better steer, this I am sure we
an do, but it means better blood, and not
o many cattle on the range. We must
save better blood to give more breadth to
he frame work, and less cattle on the
ange, so that our steers will not
Lave to work so hard for their feed
-but less cattle does not iqean less

3 in the city this week.

Mr. E. O. Frank, of Maxville. a prom-
nent operator of that section, of the state,
visited the city this week.

Mr. Henry E. Pritchett of the Hillman-
utherland Co., has been in the city most
f the week. i


profit, as the northern markets now
pay good prices for good cattle, but would
not have our natives as a gift. I have
seen a farmer in Kentucky sell one hun-
dred steers at $1U0 per head. I have seen
bunches of cattle that averaged AUl
pounds per head, gross weight, sell for
seven cents per pound, making them bring
$112 per head. This one steer would do
well where you now keep ten or twelve
head of natives. I think it was Mr. Light-
sey that said he counted ten acres to keep
a steer. Don't you believe one hundred
acres would keep a much better steer-
today a 1400 pound steer, ready for market,
would sell for five cents per pound, mak-
ing $i0.00. I am sure a good living could
be found for this one steer where you now
Keep enough steers to bring $t0.00. We are
now trying to get ready to make a better
steer, because we see the day approach-
ing when we must have better cattle, if
we would have any cattle to market at all.
This same line of thought will apply to
our hogs and our sheep, the native hog
does not produce the ham that the present
day market demands, and we must get in
position to have the thing to sel, that some
other people wants to buy. When we pro-
duce a fitty-pound lamb four months old,
and have him fat, the same people that
pay 10 a head for this fat lamb now, will
gladly take ours, but we must make lambs
they want, and not the lamb we think
they ought to be satisfied with. We also
feel a deep interest in the milk breeds
of cattle, as that is pre-eminently the
family cow, and a good cow is or should
be, a part of every home, and anything
that becomes a part of our home is of
vital importance to us. We try to keep in
touch with people that are handling the
dairy breed. Only last week, I had a letter
from a gentleman living in Cocoa, ask-
ing me to tell him where he could get a
pure bred bull of any of the dairy breeds,
and I was glad that I could tell him where
we could get a pure bred Guernsey. It,
makes me feel good when I am asked to
give aid in getting pure bred sires, let it
be of cattle, hogs, sheep or goats, for 1
believe pure bred sires will prove the
road that leads to success.
"We are also interested in corn, cowpeas,
velvet beans, Bermuda grass, blanket
grass, crab grass, Alfalfa, beggar weed,
In fact, all grains and grasses that prom-
Ise to aid us in the making of the better
steer, in fact we are more deeply Interested
in feed products than we are in good
blood, as no kind of a steer can be made
without feed, neither pure bred nor scrub
-but given the feed, either grasses or
grains, and with good blood the problem
is easily solved, and the making of better
grasses and more to the acre is of great
consequence to us as an association for
we cannot be a Stockgrowers' Association
without the things that are essential to
the growth and development of stock.
"The detection and punishment of those
who steal cattle or hogs, or maim or kill
our stock, or cut our fences, is only an
incidental, but truly a part of the business
of our Association, as protecting the stock.
protecting anything that aids in the devel-
opment or the upbuilding of the live stock
industry, from the depredations of the mis-
guided or the evilminded is of as much
importance as the introduction of good
blood, or the production of better grasses.
We have had some work to do In thhi line
but we hope to have but little of this kind
of work, as we believe, there is not a
man in the State but will soon realize that
he makes a mistake, when he cuts a fence,
or hurts a pure bred bull. We have no
feeling of ill will towards these misguided
persons, and no desire to punish them.
but what we do in this line, will simply be
to teach them that they had better de-
sist, and to protect the live stock industry.
but whenever we have any work of this
kind to do, we propose to work at it Just
as persistently and vigorously as we do
the introduction of better blood. or the
growing of more and better grasses.
"We have no desire to hurt or Injure
any one, but we have organized for the
good of the live stock industry, and if
this is made a part of our work, we pro-
pose to do this. as well as other things
pertaining to the good of the industry-
to the best of our ability."

J. R. DAILY DIED LAST WEDNESDAY.
J. R. Daily, one of the best known mill
men of Pensacola, expired at his home, 520
W. Gregory street, at about 10:30 o'clock
last night after an illness extending over
a period of about three months.. The fu-
neral will take place from the family resl-
lence this afternoon at 3:30 o'clock and
interment will be in St. John's cemetery.
Mr. Dally several years ago represehte8
Escambia county in the state legislature.
He was superintendent of the mills at Mill-
view for five years and for the last three
rears had been superintendent of the mills
at Milville, up to the time -.e "tken
11. '
Mr. Daily leaves a wife and juro jj-
Iren to whom the sympathy of their mania
friends is extended in the hour of their
sad bereavement.











THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11





HE CHRISTIE GROOVER om co,


WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS.

NW7,%.& yaM AT w= MW MW11 A7 m yIF. dr4wMIJ.f


Wondrful Growth of the E. O, Pain,


ter Fertilizer Compaay Is ness,

One of the best displays of citrus fruits ments being badly wasted and having to
in this city since the otl duo-'ropical 1aar be repackea. Aur. Painter had samples 01
was on exaioluon at N. C. V aKooldt s bull taken irom the groves and aualysea.
store, at tne corner of Hogan and sMonroe 'his analysis showed where the trouble
btreeis. last week. lay. 'Inere was scarcely any potash in
The cause of this fine display was due to the soil, out an aounuance of pyospnoric
the tact that the E. U. painter bertil- acid. repeated anai+ses anowed mLe same
tier Company had ottered some ine premm- conoluon. 'neretoie the logical conclusion
umns for me best tdsplay of oranges and was tat more potasn must De auuea anu
grapetruit grown wita neir famous brand less pna~o none acid. Ine surplus amount
of hmmon pure tertirsser. uf pnuapnoric acid had accumulated trout.
From litue acorns mighty oaks grow. lear to year because tne teruisers appueu
In connection wan the -lsplay it would coutaineu a much larger per cent. man wan
undoubtedly be of interest to our readers neetea by tne trees. As it was almost.
to know something of the hrm who maue impossible for the grower to buy poLabs
this display polmole by offering the larg- at that time, Air. kamter tooK up tn.
est premiums that have ever ueen offered direct importation of tis article, ana soi
for oranges and grapefruit, it to the growers, to be delivered on arrival.
While the HI painter Fertilizer Com- of the vessel m Jacksonville. It is neeu-
pany is comparatively a young corpor- less to say that tne growers appreciates
auon, being now only in its Wourth year, Ltese efforts, and a large amount of boti.
yet the K. O. Painter tertilier has been high-graue and low-graue potash was so-.
well known all over the State for a good m tiis way. in tailing with Mr. kain-
many years. Mr. Painter, the President of ter on this subject, ne said tnat while he
this company, came to this State twenty- did not make a very large pront per ton,
eight years ago, with a view of growing yet the quantity of goods sold was so
oranges, which at that time was the great great that it proved to be a very good
attraction in this State, when it was sup- venture on his part. When we say tnat
posed that all that had to be done was to the price of low-grade potash was lowered
plant out a grove, wait a few years and a from aP6 per ton to *a; per ton, f. o. b.,
fortune would be made. After doing some cars Jacksonville, our readers can well
work in the orange grove line, Mr. Fainter understand what it meant to the growers
accepted a position on the Florida Agri- at that time.
culturist. After being advanced from one In the fall of 1897 Mr. Painter came to
position to another in the Agriculturist of- Jacksonville, rented the Robinson ware-
fice, the editorship fell to him on the death house and commenced the manufacture of
of its venerable editor, Co. C. C. Coddring- tertiliser in this city. Being located in
ton, whose name at that time was almost a Jacksonville, shipments could be made to
household word among the growers any part of the h tate promptly without in-
through the State. creased of freight rates, which was not the
It did not take long for the orange grow- case when the business was located in De-
ers to discover that to get best results from Land. Jacksonville being a seaport and a
their orange groves, and to get them into basing point, raw material trom abroad
bearing more quickly, especially on the pine could be shipped in at the very lowest pos-
land, fertilser was ne y, and what slble rates, so that the location in Jackson-
was true in regard to the ge trees, was vine was an ideal one for a business of this
more so with the vegetables. Having kind.
planted an orange grove of his own, and The business, after being started here,
made an attempt to raise vegetables, he gradually increased until the whole Robin-
soon discovered that fertilizer was the es- son warehouse, which was three hundred
sential for successful crops. At that period by sixty feet, was occupied by this firm.
commercial fertilier was very high, and One morning in October the fire bells
while there were some reliable brands, of this city told the people that a great
there were others that were not so reliable, conflagration was on. The mammoth
except in the price asked for the goods. In- warehouse of Baker & Holmes was soon
formation regarding fertilizer and fertilis- enveloped in flames, which spread rapidly
ing materials also were very scant, and the to adjoining property and soon the E. O.
fertiller factories at that time guarded Painter Fertilling warehouse was in a
the manufacture of their brands with as heap of ruins and the stock entirely de-
much secrecy as the Russian sheet-iron stroyed. The fire had scarcely died out,
manufacturers did their process. Through however, before arrangements were being
friends, and the department at Washington, made for the erection of new buildings
Mr. Painter was able to secure a supply of and within three months from the time
chemicals for experimental work, which the fire occurred a new factory with new
proved to be the foundation of the now machinery and everything up-to-date had
successful business. The first factory con- been erected and fertilizer being manufac-
slated of a very small room that could tured and shipped. The factory built
hardly be called more than a shed, but as seemed at that time to be amply commo-
time went on and the results showed up, dious for the business, but a year had not
there was an ever increasing demand, so passed before it was found to be entirely
that up to the time of the freeze of 1904-5, too small, and larger buildings and more
the output of the factory amounted to machinery were needed to keep up with
about twenty tons a day, which, while not tre constantly growing demand for fer-
large as compared with the amount turned tiliser. A building one hundred by three
out now by the present factory, yet for the hundred feet was added, new machinery
section around DeLand. was considered a put in and comfortable and commodious
very good business. Mr. Painter early con- office rooms were built. The small stock
ceived the idea of special fertilizing for that was needed a few years before to
special crops, realizing that it was impos- carry on this fertillser business would cer-
sible for any manufacturer to make one tainly seem lost in these large warehouses,
brand of fertilizer which was adapted to but there was no spare room. Every bit of
all crops and suitable for all soils, space was taken up with stock needed
There has possibly been no greater revo- in the preparation of the fertilizer which
lution in any fertilizer for a special crop was going out at the rate of from fifty to
than in that for the orange in the last one hundred tons a day.
twenty years. The pioneer growers of the When It was found that still larger quar-
State who first commenced using fertilizer ters were needed, it was necessary to look
can well remember that the average brand elsewhere for room, as all of the space
that was sent to the State contained but controlled by this firm on the river front
from 2 to 3 per cent. (and at the most had been utilized, and also it would be
4 per cent) of potash, while today there is impossible to operate an acid chamber
scarcely a brand sold in the State, known within the limits of the city. Therefore,
as a fruit-producing fertilizer, that does one year ago, when the Little Brothers
not contain 12 and sometimes as high as 14 plant was offered for sale, it was pur-
per cent. of actual potash. This great chased by this company, who immediately t
change has been brought about mainly set to work remodeling same, tearing out s
through Mr. Painter, assisted by the late the old machinery, and putting in the up- i
Professor Robinson, who not only served to-date kind, changing the pyrites burners q
as our State Chemist, but was also the of the old-fashioned fines to the lump and o
chemist of the I. O. Painter Fertilizer bringing the plant in all its different de- o
Company up to the time of his death. It apartments right up-to-date. d
was a well known fact that the fruit from Besides putting in new machinery and a
the older groves, eighteen years ago, was otherwise making the acid plant as com- o
going to market in bad condition, and re- plete a one as there is in the South. a
ports were continually received of ship- large warehouse was built to accommodate n


THE RECORD IS THE SOUTH'8 GREAT TRADE JOURuAL


I_ I~ __ ~ _I_


tramp steamers, so that the potash and
pyrites from aboard could be discharged
into the building.
Jacksonville has enjoyed for years a
coastwise trade with sailing boats and
steamers, but it was not until the last
year that she knew what it was to have
large tramp steamers arrive with cargoes
murect trom foreign ports. No little curios-
,ty and interest was manifested by our
people when tne mammoth Jngush turret
steamer Nordsap arrived at tnis port load-
ed with potash direct from Hamburg. This
vessel was three hundred and seventy teeL
long, forty-eight feet beam, and when
uacked into tne slip at the E. O. Painter
company's old dock her bow projected
eventy feet into the river. The slip re-
terred to was built large enough to ac-
commodate two of the largest schooners
that come to this port. We mention this
to show how lhy prepared the docKs of
Jacksonville were for a vessel of this size.
ihe new warehouse built m South Jacia-
sonville can accommodate the largest ves-
Sel that can come up the river, so that
ner cargo can be discharged with dis-
patch, being the only place in the port of
Jacksonville where a tramp steamer ot
-wenty feet draught can tie up and dis-
charge without trespassing or overlapping
on some other dock property.
The development of this fertilizer busi-
ness has been helpful, not only to the
growers of Florida and remunerative to
the stockholders, but also to Jacksonville,
for every improvement which has been
made has meant more business for this
port, and consequently more money scat-
tered among the working people. With a
pay roll of over a thousand dollars a week,
every line of business must be benefitted.
To grasp the real significance of the
growth of this business, one has but to
imagine a small building with a total busi-
ness amounting to 37,1000 in one year, and
then look at the present large and com-
modious warehouses and factory buildings,
full to overflowing with materials of all
kinds, and to know that the sales this
year will amount to nearly $600,000.


ATLANTIC NATIONAL ELECTS OFFI-
CERS.
At the last meeting of the board of direc-
tors of the Atlantic National Bank of Jack-
sonville, the following officers were elected
to serve during the ensuing year:
Edward W. Lane, president.
Fred W. Hoyt, vice-president.
Thomas P. Denham, cashier.
Delmer D. Upchurch, assistant cashier.
John Denham Bird, assistant cashier.
At the stockholder's meeting held on Jan-
uary 10 all of the old directors were re-
elected, with the following additions:
D. M. Flynn, vice-president of the West
Flynn & Harris Company, naval stores
factors of this city.
J. B. Conrad of the Bond Lumber Com-
pany, wholesale lumber, DeLand, Fla.
J. H. Powell, president of the Bank of
Ocilla, Ocilla, Ga.
A. Sessoms, president of the First Na-
tional Bank of Waycross, Ga.
Since this bank was established It has
been one of the greatest financial institu-
tions in the South, covering a broad and
prosperous field, and having on its board
of directors gentlemen of financial prestige
In all sections of the state and a number
of the financial kings of Georgia.
From the first it has assumed a field of
great activity and progress, and has won
the confidence of the people of Jackson-
ville, Fla., and all bankers In the country.
It has a capital stock of $360,000, all paid in, i
and, as an evidence of its prosperity, its
deposits on January 11 aggregated $2,540,-
51.2.

THE SAVANNAH BOARD OF TRADE
ADOPTS NEW RULES. t
Superintendent C. W. Saussey is sending
>ut the following to the producers and fac-
ors of naval stores:
"Please note that the Board of Trade
has adopted a new rule regarding the in-
pection of rosin for false or mixed pack-
ng. Heretofore inspectors have been re- d
luired to examine on bottom, head or side 1
f barrel at least 6 per cent of every mark r
f rosin grading K or better quality. Un- e
ler the new rule, inspectors are now re- g
uired to sample 5 per cent. of every mark A
if all grades of rosin, and should false or t
nixed packing be discovered inspectors
nust examine the entire lot, the expenses a


of said examination to be paid by the sel-
ler.
There have been so many complaints
within the last few months regarding false
or mixed packing of common rosins that
t-e Board of Trade has passed the above
rule requiring that all grades of rosin be
now examined by the inspector for false or
mixed packing. This being the case, it is
of great importance that you see that no
false or mixed packing is done on any
grades of rosin. If you have any dross ros-
in, it would be best to ship same in sepa-
rate barrels and not use same to pack up
barrels of other grades of rosin. All cotton
batting, trash and dirt or other foreign
matter should be carefully kept out of the
rosin, as barrels containing same will also
be classed as false packed."

CAPITAL STOCK INCREASED.
On account of the steady increase of the
deposits and general business of the Com-
mercial Bank of this city, the stock hol-
ders have authorized the issue of five
hundred new shares of stock, par value of
one hundred dollars each, thus dubhng the
capital stock from fifty thousand dollars to
one hundred thousand dollars. This addi-
tional stock has already been subscribed
and paid in.
The Commercial Bank is considered one
of the best managed Institutions of Its
kind in the State. They also have branch-
es in Ocala and Lake City, two of Flor-
ida's most progressive and up-to-date in-
terior towns. This bank is under the able
management of Mr. H. Robinson and Mr.
H. Gallard, two men who thoroughly un-
derstand every department of the banking
business, most conservative in all their
dealings and courteous to all having busi-
ness with them.

BIG PEONAGE CASES MAY BE TRIED
It is possible that the big peonage cases,
in which Thomas McClelland and other
prominent Georgians have been made de-
fendants, will come to trial during the
March term of the United States District
and Circuit Courts In Savannah. All that
is holding them back is the decision of
the United States Supreme Court on the
Clyatt case
Acting United States District Attorney
Alexander Akerman, of Georgia, was in
Savannah yesterdayy on legal business, hav-
ing gone there to look after the interests
of his clyant in the case of the Pensa-
cola Lumber Company against Bailey.
A partial hearing of the case was heard
before Special Master W P. Hardee.
The latter hearing will be concluded at a
later date. After the legal business had
been disposed of Mr. Akerman, in speak-
ing of the peonage cases, said :
"Ap has beep published heretofore in
the Savannah' Morning News, the Clyatt
case has been argued before the Supreme
handed down almost any day. If they
sustain the conviction of Clyatt, the
points raised being similar to those in the
cases against Crawley, McClellan et al.
I shall press my cases for trial at the com-
ing term of the court here .
"Until the decision of the Supreme Court
has been received, however, no action will
be taken in these pending cases. Of course
I am anxious that the questions be decided.
If the decision is against us, it will prob-
ably mean that the cases will be dropped.
If for us, we shall at once go to trial.
In either event. I hope to see the cases
soon disposed of."
It will be remembered that demurrers
were filed in the big peonage cases heard
in Savannah by Mr. W M Toomer, counsel
for the defense. The jurisdiction of the
United States was questioned. Judge Em-
ory Speer overruled the demurrer and or-
lered the defendants to trial. Before the
case went to the Supreme Court and other
lases were held up pending a decision of
hat body.
In case McClellan, Crawley and others
ire convicted, another appeal is probable.


THE PINHOOK COMPANY.
At the annual meeting of the stockhol-
lers of the Pinhook Company held at Tal-
ahassee last week, the old board of dl-
ectors was re-elected and R. Cay was re-
lected President: F. Wilson Carroway.
generall manager; Chas. A. Cay, treasurer;
t. Wilson Hall, secretary .and superin-
endent.
A dividend of S0 a share was declared
nd paid.












S0OB1ONIN Prea. H. GAILLABD. Oahler
W. B. OWN. VIM-Pres.

Commercial Bank,
State Depstory.
Banesca: Ocala. PFa.. Lake Ctt. Pla
Jasksmufville. - Florida


Anyone Wishing
a limited amount of paper eups to be
delivered from January 10 toFebruary 10,
and as late as March 10 an get them
of Vickera patent by writing-
E. L VICKERS,
TITON. GEOROIA.


Sam'l P. Holmes & Co.
Steaks, Bes, Cotten,
Gral amn Prevslens

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Bel Pihse 853 Balwin Block

FIRE INSURANCwe- wt rate. Le-
res IL Gree- & C, a. d 1O Park lUg.
Jacksonville, Fla. 01.


MILY I NmOITM1iRY,
Commission Merchants,
Nvw Stores & Cotton
-Ik t ak-- -rn- -
COTTONl XCHANG lUiLDIEG,
N-W TOKI CITY.


J6 J16 "As
Ahw -IALA


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


NEW SOUTHERN BANS.
Ceres. Okla. The Farmers' Exchange
Bank has been chartered with a capital
stock of i0,000. The incorporators are: E.
E. and P. J. Van Slyke and H. L. Ather-
ton, all of Ceres.
Covington, Ga. The Bank of Newton
County has been chartered with a capital a
stock of lU0,LL0. The incorporators are a
T. C. Swann, J. R. Stephenson, T. A. Per-
ryman and A. B. Simmons, of Covington,
and G. A. Adams and Capers Dickson. of
Oxford, Ga.
Commerce, Ga.-The First National Bank
has increased its capital from 25,000 to
$40,000. W. B. Hardeman Is president.
Dallas, Tex. The Southern Bank and
Trust Co., minimum capital 25,000, has
been organized here, with Otis McGaffery,
vice president, and E. P. Spears, tempora-
ry secretary. C. C. Walker is also inter-
eated. k
Enid. Okla.-The comptroller of the cur- t
rency has approved an application to or-
ganize the Western National Bank. of this
city, with a capital of M10,000. H. J. Cham-
plin, James French and others, directors.
Edmonton, Ky.-The Farmers' and Mer-
chants' Bank has been organized to begin 1
business March 1. with $15000 capital.
Fayette, Miss.-The Meridian Bank and
Trust Co., contemplates establishing a 1
branch bank here with a capital of $30,000.
Henshaw, Ky.-A $15,000 banking company
has been organized to do business here.
Dr. W. H. Nunn will be the president, and
T. C. Bingham, the cashier.
Greenville. Ga.-The Greenville bank has
been granted a charter. Capital $30,000.
The incorporators are: I. J. DeLoach, W. I
C. Perkins, J. L. McLean, W. F. Durrance,
B. J. Woodcock and others.
Hamilton.-The Bank of Hamilton has
been granted a charter with a capital
stock of $26,000. The incorporators are J.
S. Barnes, B. H. Williams, J. H. Mobley,
C. H. Cook and C. J. Hudson. Jr.
Hendersonville. N. C.-A $16,000 banking a
company has been organized here, with
W. J. Davis, president, and K. G. Morris,
cashier.
Lahoma, Okla.-The Farmers' and Mer-
chants' Bank has been organized with a
$15,000 capital. Incorporators: T. H. Miller, a
William Graf, M. W. Wood and others.
Lake City, S. C.-A new bank will be or-
ganised here with $5,000 capital. J. S. Mc-
Clain will be the president and B. M. 0
Clement, cashier. a
Madisonville, Ky.-A new banking insti- 0
tution has been organized here with a cap- a
ital of $15,000. T. C. Bingham, cashier; Dr.
W. H. Nunn and others, directors. 4
Milton, N. C.-The Bank of Caswell, au-
thorized capital $25,000, has been chartered.
The incorporators are: R. L. Watts, R.
D. Dunn, F. B. Jones, D. L. Morton, R. L.
Walker and W. W. Kitchen.
New Decatur, Ala.-The Commercial Sav-
ings Bank and Trust Co., with a paid-up
capital stock of 25,000, has been organized
and will commence business in a month or
two. The directors are: Dr. W. B. Wat-
son, E. C. Payne, Judge W. H. Simpson, A
E. H. Allison. Dr. J. A. Hill and Sam
Blackwell, all of New Decatur.
Ocean Springs, Miss.-The Ocean Springs
Bank, capital $16,000, has been organized
here and will begin business in about five
weeks. I
Paradise. Tex.-A new bank will be or-
ganized here with $20,000 capital. Dr. W.
R. Thompson, of Fort Worth, will be pres-
ident.
Pelham, Ga.-The Pelham State Bank has
been chartered with a capital of $50,000.
David C. Barrow and others are the In-
corporators. *
Perry, Okla.-A charter has been granted
to the Bank of Commerce, of Perry, with a
capital stock of $1,000. The Incorporators
are: John A. Hansen, Charles E. Dennis,
J. C. Fleming. C. E. Farmer, Jas. Bryan,
Mary Augustine and R. A. Felt.
Ravenna. Tex.-A bank has been organi-
zed at Ravenna with a capital of $10,000.
The officers are: J. F. Anthony. president; 4
J. E. Spies, vice-president; C. F. Christen- 4
sen, cashier. The stockholders outside of
Ravenna, are: S. D. Simpson, Bells; J. M.
Z. G. Neal, Bells; J. M. Adams, Tishomin-
go; Hon. J. I. Harbison, Collinsville; J. N.
Hughes, Bonham; C. F. Christensen, Bells.
Snyder, Tex.-Application to organize the
Snyder National Bank, of this city, has
been approved. Capital (60,000. A. Yeonga,
and others, directors.
Sklatook, I. T.-The Sklatook Bank, cap-
ital $10,000, has been incorporated.
Sklatook, I. T.-The First Bank of Skia-
took, I. T., capital $16,000, has been incor-
porated. 4
San Angelo, Tex.-The First National 4
Bank will increase its capital on April 1,
from 8100.000 to =20,000.
Terlton, Okla.-A charter has been Issued
to the Farmers' State Bank. of Terlton,
with a capital stock of $10,000. The Incor-
porators are: W. E. Canfield. J. Q. New-
ell, and Frank Adams, of Jennings.
Temple, Okla.-The Temple State Bank
has been chartered with $10,000 capital.
WaN wrITING ADV TransERs,


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
dACKSONVILLE. PLA.
CAPTrAL S300000 SURmLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFrS S300,00
We issue Time Certlflates of Deposit, which draw tIterest at the rate of tree per cet per
seem, if held ninety days or aloer, Take .Arrt-ff this aI kt a-r ayvl rs oe emer
aMtUigo tra y. Particular attention paid to ut-of-Town aonnat. sending depomit bya



"Kingan's Reliable."

lams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
et price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotation--
hispaper.
KINGAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

lerbert A. Ford, Oeo. H. Ford, P. L. Wataen,
President. Vice-Pres. Cashier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CA P1 -TA I-, $50,000.00.
DIBREcroas: R. L. Anderson, B. 8. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
IcKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men elicited.


i mittosetuummii iiemmiuumsuimiiiiiiumiuui mmimulaiii


The Wire Virgin Gum Co.,
Is now ready to give you all the information you may want concerning the
way we,are now gathering virgin gum from high boxes. By the use of a
tin Ap put up cloe to the chipping and so arranged to cause the gum to
strike wire and follow same down to the box, not striking the face of the
tree. Wire is fastened on by two small nails, one just above the lip and
the other at upper edge of the oldbox, and stretched tight so as to keep
gum from dripping off, thereby making virgin gum and more of it. There
are many benefits and big pay where parties can get a good many high boxes.
For further information write to
THE WIRE VIRGIN GUM CO.. I7fTON. GA.
I'u I # t9 1 11aill 0,11#8 19teteS 101 of glo I B aI8898


The West.Raley-Rinnie Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksoville, Fla.
. we. s.wS. Pes. E. west, r ce.-res.. n Vice-PFes. r. Raly, Sc. a rres.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
er Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

^****W- eeeeee--- --**-****o*e**e**
M. A. BRIOGS, Presdent. HOMER BROWN, S2 Vice-Preldeat.
H. C. BRIGGS, 1st Vice-Presdent. J. C. MoDONALD, Se'y and Treas.



W, H. Briggs Hardware Co.

SVALDOSTA. GA.
i Sole Southern Agent for-


RIXFORD AXES.

They ar e he Ba r. Others imitate but none du-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the finest
temper, hold the keenest edge, cut better and last longer
than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual use.
Send as your orders.

W. H. BRIB6S HARDWARE COMPANY,

p~~6Y- C--- -- ------- ------ ---~-------------
4 Valesia, aeerg.

MXNTOX TME R1C0D.
Miwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwpp


I _ 1 __11111










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 18


Incorporators: E. E. Shapley, F. M. En-
glish, G. W. Crosby, and others.
Talledsga Ala.-The Talledaga National
Bank, capital $ 000, has been chartered,
wita J. LH. cks, president; R. W. Hender-
son, vice-president; J. M. Hicks, cashier.
Tuscumbia Ala.--J. W. Herreld wiU or-
ganise a 5.000 bank here
Tuscumbia, Ala.-The Tuscumbia Bank
and Trust Co., capital 25,000, has been
chartered here by John E. Delony, W. L.
Standley, D. 0. Mathews, T. F. Simpson
and others.
Whitt, Tex. A new banking company
has been organized here. The officers are:
Cicero Smith. of Mineral Wells, president;
G. N. Bailey, of Whitt, vice-president; and
E. N. Miller, cashier.

COTTON REPORTS TWICE A MONTH.
The major portion of the Senate debate
In connection with the agricultural appro-
priation bill was based on an amendment
suggested by Mr. Bacon providing for semi-
monthly reports on the condition of the
cotton crop, which was amended so as to
cover the last five months of the year and
adopted.
Mr. Bacon, in offering his amendment,
said that no provision could be of so much
importance to the cotton producers as this
one. He traced the failure of the growers
season's crop to the infrequency of the
official reports. The loss in one month on
this account had not been less than $40,-
000,0. He also urged that the secretary
should publish a synopsis of the infor-
mation on which his estimate is based, as
well as the estimate itself.
Mr. Proctor presented a letter from the
chief statistician of the Agricultural De-
partment saying that the adoption of the
Bacon cotton amendment would involve
an additional expenditure of 336,000 per
annum.
The amendment lead to extended debate.
which was participated in by Messrs. Clay,
Bacon, Bailey. Money and Proctor. Mr.
Bailey thought if the increase could be
made for the months of August, Septem-
ber, October and November. It would an-
swer all purposes of the farmers.
Mr. Money said that the estimates of the
Agricultural Department are entirely re-
liable.
The amendment was adopted after being
changed so as to require semi-monthly re-
ports for the months of August, Septem-
ber, October, November and December, and
$10,000 was added to the amount appropri-
ated.


A FOREST RESERVE FOR THE SOUTH-
EAST DISCUSSED.
In the establishment of some of its wes-
tern forest reserves the federal govern-
ment had to contend with a hostile local
sentiment, due to misunderstanding large-
ly and yet none the less violent. In marked
contrast is the history thus far of the ef-
forts to establish a forest reserve in the
southern Appalachian mountains. Here it
is local sentiment which is taking the initi-
ative and the legislative branch of the
federal government which is digging its
heels into the earth and balking the prog-
ress of the movement.
All the beneficent results which are claim-
ed for forestry reserves anywhere can be
claimed for the proposed Appalachian re-
serve, and they are benests which a large
population already exists to enjoy not
prospective benefits which will some time
accrue to the future inhabitants of what
is now sparcely settled country. If the
federal government can practice refores-
tation and irrigation jointly, in an effort
to reclaim the western alkali deserts
and make them habitable, it can as well
do something in the east to preserve exist-
ing forest cover on the watersheds of riv-
ers which flow to every point of the com-
pass and furnish power, river transporta-
tion and water for man and beast and va-
ried agricultural anu manufacturing pur-
poses over a wide portion of the southeast
where aridity now holds sway.
It may be the fact that forest reserves
were not altogether appreciated in some
parts of the west in itself marked the
need of their establishment and that fed-
eral efforts should be exerted chiefly in
behalf of those states that are at least able
or at least willing to do what is needful
for themselves. Certain it is that fores-
tation in the older states has been done
under state supervision. In the Appalach-
ian territory, however, state supervision
is not adequate to the work that needs to
be done. The boundaries of five different
states meander through this great water-
shed, and even if effective joint action be-
tween these states were practicable their
efforts would be for the benefit of all the
other southeastern states, all more or less
contiguous to its flow-off.
The legislatures of all these states have
passed bills ceding jurisdiction to the Uni-
ted States for the control of a forest re-
serve; and it only remains for congress to
act. Probably in its ponderous consider-
ation of other questions which are consid-
ered of wider importance there is little


prospect of action at this session; but the
next session should see such a focusing
of sentiment on the subject as shall com-
pel recognition.

GLUE AND GLUE TESTING.
(A paper read by H. J. Watson before
the Nottingham section of the Society of
Chemical Industry.)
Originally it was intended that these
notes should deal exclusively with the
analysis of glue, but in view of the many
sources from which glue is obtained, and
the different methods employed in treat-
ing the raw material, it has been thought
essential to the proper grouping of the
experimental results to classify the sam-
ples, in the first place to the sources- of
material, and in the second, to their order
of derivation. Upon the quality of glue
desired depends the material and process
a manufacturer will adopt. In the first
place under glues, we have skin, bone and
fish glues, and again under gelatins, skin,
bone and fish gelatin, these being sub-
divided according to method of treatment
and order of derivation. In the first group
under the subdivision, I place what 1 term
osseine glues, being those glues which are
produced by the reduction, fully or par-
tial, of the material to a form of osseine.
The term is one well known in the trade.
there being in existence some factories
wholly engaged in its production. From
osseine thus prepared, high-class colourless
glues and gelatines are manufactured. In
the production of this class of glues and
gelatines the preparation of the material
has been carried to the highest pitch of
perfection known, and the extractive pe-
riod under heat has been reduced to the
shortest possible, probably not more than
two hours. We may assume, for all practi-
cal purposes, that this is an ideal standard.
lIne samples, however, produced from one
osseine material may represent 13 or 14
grades, all of successively lower qualities
and representing in each case successive
stages of extraction, each of increasing du-
ration under heat. With regard to skin
glues under this group there is a deviation
in grades according to the needs of the
factory. In any case the first extractive
quality will not amount to more than 25
to 30 per cent. of the total product.
In the second group I designate original
glues in that they are composed of 60 per
cent. of the material contents of gelatine.
and contain the total practicable extrac-
tive value of the material. Skin and bone
glues come under this group. In the third


group I designate reinforced glues, sad
include In this class those samples which
are prepared from the lower grades of the
osseine gluesa blended with a certain pro-
portion of original extractive gelatin from
lower classes of material. In the fourth
group I designate average glues. I place
those samples which are prepared on a
continuous system in which the latter ex-
traction results are passed into fresh ma-
terial, and which therefore, contains a re-
suit from a number of extractions o fthe
same materials in different stages of ex-
haustion. In the fifth group I place suc-
cessive ,glues, inclusive of those glues
although produced on a system similar to
the third group, are reinforced from .the
same class of material. This grouping does
not by any means exhaust the variations
in these products. Under each group head-
ing there will be found a number of minor
modifications due to special blends of ma-
terials operated upon, the particular mar-
ket catered for, and also to some extent
upon the individual caprice and Inherited
traditions of a manufacturer.
Analysis. Practically the valuation of
glue by analysis to the manufacturer is
one thing and to the consumer quite anoth-
er. It must be borne in mind that it is to
the consumer that the ultimate decision is
valuable, and the chemical analysis not
giving him any appreciable data of service.
reliance is placed almost wholly on one or
more of the many physical tests invented.
I may here say that the four principal
points of value to the consumer are: (1)
adhesiveness; (2) strength or cohesion; (3)
rate of setting; (4) carrying power or medi-
um absorption. Adhesiveness is best shown
by viscosity; strength or cohesion, by con-
cistency jelly test; rate of setting, time
taken to congeal. Of course it is Impossi-
ble to generalize in this matter, as the
special value to one consumer is quite a
different physical property to another. As
an example of what is required by a con-
sumer, one of our customers specifies that
t.e glue shall be submitted to the follow-
ing tests:-(1) Percentage of. water in orig-
inal glue at 110 to 1U per cent. C.; (2)
percentage of ash and quality; (3) acidity
(total and volatile); (4) capacity for drying;
(5) percentage of foreign matters not glue;
(6) viscosity, along with the physical test
of smell of glue size with water absorp-
tion, &c.
e s yew orr fr s C saHmB

mry ecks thu ae tp iti = m-
sany dleke tian an the pkthag heome.


^%%%%%%"%%%%%*%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%,%%


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade



Western White Oak Spirit Barrels





Capital $100,000


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.

We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.



OFFICERS:

J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


DIRECTORS:

JOHN E. HARRIS, C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST,
W. C. POWELL, W. F. COACHMAN.


W. J. KELLY


THE RECORD 18 THE SOUTH'8 GREAT TRADE JOUR AL.


kh~h~-~Mh;~Mlllh~-*r~Mh~n~Clh'Sh~CL~IS~h ~"~-~-~-~'~-~"~,VII1I-


.1








14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


THE


COVINGTON


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Co.


hWl SHOES -
Wholesale: DRY GOODS.
'0 DIE"Y GrOIDS*


" Success


For Our Customers


is Success


For Us."


ABSTRACTS
Title and Tax Abetract, Mapa, etc.,
of large tracts in all part of Florida and
South Georgia, prepared for owners and
intending purhasers. Correspondence
solicited.

REALTY TITLE A1D TRUST CO.
law Exchange Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.

WM. D. JONES
.j T SPECUT

FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.
MaI Orders Solicited.
THl

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
Ezian b the U pbb wvuet ,deetrugr tae
we"d ime. rnma oat a arse In lam than
twemtr-tesr hour. Makroeo rm twenty to
forty- ve on ta m s4o at wood.
Makes pmo water wt te artt. tree from
tho oer at tar or eremote. No hemimle
ued a reatiat the ptrlta. Needs to be
difefled y oM a e after Gmalr from re-
tam.
No troeabl with b-preducla. the Iprilt
prenounMee to be far th nest ever pro-
durIem ae frm wood. Only oeoe *de
of 5r1tt prduad e and that the highest.
ABJOLUTRLY NO DANOIR FROM FIKR
Bailt of Iet material by high-grade
workmea. The eapest malshIG sotedl to
the puMble.
We sabeasoe eemvprmen et output sam
quality e preset. We asarute output
and qtudy.
The nrl Bet CmstuKti Cu.pamy
P. aO. Bx RAU IH N. C.



10. R. FSR, JR.
MANUFACTURER O.


BR IC K.

I[E HE MICU.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Montb.


m. n o tehnes or aew
adiwe aemsnut abeaoutl& moet us
Inei --'neuml to Iuan taeeo
6e a. s t v eos -ui wee-k.


COURSE OF PALE AND MEDIUM ROSINS AT 8AVANNA FOR TWO YEARL


DATE
April 1 ........
April 8.........
April 15........
April 99........
April 29........
May 6.
May 13 ........
May 13........
May 27........
May 27........
June 3........
June 10........
June 16........
June 23........
July 1 ........
July 7........
July 14 ........
July 28 ........
Aug. 4 ........
Aug. 12 ........
Aug. 18 ........


W.W.
1904-05 11
*4.10
3.80
3.80
3.80
&80
3.80
&86
3.95
4.35
4.50
4.00
4.65
4.75
4.76
4.70
4.52%
4.67%
4.60
4.0.%


103-04
&.00
3.50
3.40
3.35
3.35
2.42%
3.65
3.65
3.00
3.40
3.30
3.30
.30
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.40
3.50
3.50


1904-05
3.80
3.75
3.00
3.00
3.60
3.50
3.50
3.55
3.65
4.05
4.10
4.15
4.25
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.25
4.42%
4.35
4.37


1903-04
$3.60
3.45
3.35
3.256
3.25
3.25
3.27%
3.35
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.30


1904-05 19i-0o
$3.60 .50
3.60 3.36
3.46 3.25
3.45 3.16
3.45 3165
3.35 .16
3.30 3.17%
3.30 3.2
3.40 3&26
3.85 3.20
3.85 &00
3.8 3.00
3.90 3.00
4.00 3.00
3.95 &00
3.90 &00
3.82% 3.05
4.00 3.&
4.00 3.15
4.02% 3.16


190-05
P.35
3J35
3.20
3.20
3.3
3.20
2.20
3.30
2.66
3.65
3.86
3.66
3AO
3."
3.86
3.72%
3.90
3.85
3.87%


1903-06
$3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
3.20
3.15
2.95
2.95
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
2.95
3.06
3.06


1904-05
3Jo
3.30
3.15
3.15
315
3.16
&.16
3.15
3.25
3.40
3.40
&.40
3AO
3.40
3.55
.56
3.50
3.65
3.57%


1908-06
LO
.OO

am%
.s6o
3.00
3.00
3.00

10
3.10
3.10
3.05
2.86
Las
2.85
2.98
2.80
2.80
2.86
2.95
2.95M
2M


1904-60
2.96
2.90
2.80
2.80
3.00
3.60
3.00
3.10
3.25
3.30
3.30
S.46
3.46
3.46
3.o0
3.30
3.30
3.32%


1908-06
le.
LS
tM
L.5
L.5
2.87%
3.00
sm
3o0
L0O


t2.


2.80
2.70
2.80
LSD


rf~cESFJF1lf~rr~~F~f~rr~lf~~D~ 1~II~%%~;IC~%%~i


GETTING'S


...FOR...


FURNITURE


22-30 West Bay Street

JACKSONVILLE


K


D(


Send for

Catalogue


ohn = Furchgott = Compan;
WHOLESA DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


don't forget your subscr
WHEN WRITING ADVIETIIER. MENTION THE RCORD.


y.


option to the Record.


~21~F~af~I~l~lr~~-r~cmccrcrr~~mT 161WOMWOMM;Jm


--









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


Buyers' Directory

These advertisers are in this issue. If
you want anything, look through this
elamied list and write to the mrm ap-
peming therein The Record guarantees
a prompt response

ABSTRACTS
Realty Title and Trut Co.
BANKS.L
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
central National Bank, Oeal, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, FIn.
BRICK.
Fate, Go. B., Jr., Jacksonville,
Southern Fuel BSupply Co, The, Jackson-
vill, Fla.
CARS.
South Atlantic COr & Manufacturing Co,
Wayeroas, .
CLOTHING.
f t Bro, J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
nfoe ;o., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn Furehgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Coiwa&SION. MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
COINVTANCING.
Realty Title and Trt Co.
COOPERAGE.
Canon Co., The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksoaville Cooperage Co., Jacknanville,
Fla.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS--WHOLESALE
Southern M-suf-trnig Co, Jacksonville,
FI.
DRY GOP DS-WHOLVS* I
Covington Co, The, Jacksonville, Fa.
Koha, Furelgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
Merrill-Steven Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Sehofld's Sons Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
gusta, Ga.
FERTILIZERS
Bours & Co., W A., Jacksonville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
Murphy, T, Jakaonville, Fla.
Scbo id'Ws Son. Co., J. a, Maonl, a.

Southern Fel Suapply Cso, The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
FURNITURE.
Fitting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GFTSO FURNISHERS.
Craig f Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
iefroe Co., H. A., Jackonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Cosolidad Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hargraves Co., C H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Johnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fla.

Bours & Co., Wm. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HARDWARE.
Baird Co3, L E., Jaekskoknville, Fla.
Bqnd & Boure Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Bres- Hardware Co.. W. H.Valdoeta, Ga.
Mario Hardware Co., Oeala, Fla.
Weed & C., J. D., Savannah Ga.

MeMmrray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fa.


Thomas, W. B., Gainsville, Fla.
HAY AND GRAIN.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fi.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, F.
HOTELS&
Aragon, The, Jacksparil', Pl.
Grand View, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
Roseland, Jackonville, Fla.
St. George, Jacksonville, Fla.
Windsor, Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stvens Co., Jacksoevilla Fl.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. Maeon, Ga.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Croeby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, Fla.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
Muller, Gus. Jacksonville, Fla.
Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Maeon, Ga.
MEDICIHES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
MAPS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. ., Maon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CmSS.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. 8, Macon, Ga.
MEATS
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jacksoaville, Fl.
METAL WORKERS&
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros, Savannah, GLa
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co, W. H., Valdoeta, Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barnes-Jeup Co., The, Jacksoaville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Standard Naval Store Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Al
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bour Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
PECANS.
Griffing Bro. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H, Valdoeta, Ga.
Campbell, J. B., Oeala, Fa.
Marion Hardware Co., Oela, Fla.
PUMPS
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Maon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmitgkb-m
Ala.
TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Wannanish, N. C.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savrnah,
Ga.
TuRPETIkJA TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Wanannish, N. C.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa,
Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
Buekman, C., Jacksonville, Fla.
Christie, J. D., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H.. Ocala, Fla.
Southern States Land and Timber Co.,
Tomlinson, E. H., Jacksonville, -Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla.
West-Raley-Rannie Co, The, Jacksonville.
Fla.


SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonvile, Fla.
STEAaMSHIPS
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & 0., SBenm P., Jacksonville Fla.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla
TANKS
Cypress Tank Co, Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatk, Fla.
Schofleld's Sons Co, J. 8., Maeon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., The, Wamsaish, N. C.
TURPENTIrE APPARATUS
Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksonville, la.


The Wire Virgin Gum Co., Tiftoj, Ga.
AUPEMIAlU IPMOCES.
Pine Belt Construetion Co., The, R a-gh.
N. C.
TUzPEjutIs STILLS.
Baker, L A, Brunswi, Ga
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
tumarsa-I ik STILL TU
Davis & Ba., G. M, Palatk, Fla.
axUKr san sa VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
VEHICLES
MeMurray & Baker, Jacksn viBe, Fa.
WATCHES.
Greenle & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jsackonvflle, Fh.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fl.


...THE... Black Jee and Standar
Macks,

COUNCIL TOOL CO. a d
amawd Edge Macks,
WANANISH, N. 0. soee a d zeff.
Say, broys we t e tirJ d w -be cametiMl Iryhg tso inue
-r sked Ihbr tot Om ie th they my A tan m to ae IWe Usae Dcks,
eed Tebs. Pescem! ine toe ea d a stu unroserity.o a 0nM $7.00 a dozes.
GOES TIE PICE. Fr Pallers add SOc a deun.
Prices am olmes Tools a applicalfts. Noe but Aihest ski ma.
Jan. 24. 190I. J. P. COUNCIL. bet tr

R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V P. and Mgr. L J. KNIGHT, See. and Treu.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.



H, A. Renfroe Co.


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suit to Orde at Resdy~Md Powce MaIl Ord&= Give Peesl Auenlas
439 W. Bay Street JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ItV I A II 1 2 11 a 11 a I aa ft t t 1 11 21a 111 Ia a a a aa a I l I la


. J. P. WnrIIAMS. President.
ST. A. JmNINo, 2nd VIe-President.
E H. L. KAYTON, Secretbry.


J. AQ.G. CAmBO, lt Vice-Prldst
J P. DusB uBTV.3d Vice-Prsidea
D. White Treasurer.


= J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

S1111 SLUOS I EC01M FClTOI W SI OilE. -
- Main Offlr. AVaVINXI OEOROAOI. -
rmanch orneie: .j cPI COviLa, FLA. Om O.

SNaval Stores Prodacers are Iavited to Correspoad With Us.
Z- 1t 1111 l i11111111i 11111I111111 I lllll IllIIIIsIIll l -


U. A. BariR,



Baker Impr v

Seemless Turpw-


Write me for pries min iuues
.0. O.B oany point in Gegia. ir
Ildas Alabm a or MitansiPp. All
stills old under a guarantee.
Job work through the
--r- -_.- -II


SEEDS. t- r c1uu 1ry a Bj IEaMIy.
Bours & Co., Win. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
The Larrt .nd Oie4t Copper qRmn aUlcf b kl
SHIP YARDS. Works in Geor. runsw
Cummer L.umer Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Str ,vPen Co.. Jacksonville, Fla. 4W My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.
WRITE THE RECORD FOR ANY IFORMATIOe bDwEm


i








16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY
Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located In the heart et the Lumber District gives Us advia-
tage of heleest material at lowest eust


I12 WEST FORSYTH ST. BELL PHONE NO. 592
HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY
A. J. HEDRLICK. Manager. < Formerly of Hodrick Raley


Sole aey for rerside and adjoing property on easy terms. (The choice reidenoe ptlo
of the odt.) I.pMored nad unimproved property n ormerburnt district, Springfield, LsVU and
other Sbw Choice business property ad investments.
MONEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTOILS.



Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advertsiemnsts WIa e Inserted i rhs Fa M rtment at the Feloewlg Rates:
For one week. 3 oents a lie.
For two weeks, 35 oentsa line.
Nor three weeks. ee5D e a laie.
For fourweeks, - 65 oents a lie.
Nine wee of ordinary length make one line.
Headiang eoats as two Ues.
No display except the heading can be admitted.
Bemlttaces to aooompaay the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
cotalislr advertisement. Cop must be in this office not later than Thurday
morasni to secure insertion .la riday's paper.
Wasted. PosItlio Wasted.
A good woodsman that can still or over- A position a stiller, very best reference
look stilling wanted. Seven crops of vir- furnished Address F. Johmon, Mur-
gin boxe around the still. Gaulden, phy. Fla. 4
Chaire & Co., Oldtown, Fa.
Help Sped.Woodsmas Wated.
n p SUppl Woodsman who is strictly sober and
Naval store men can secure help by ap- able of controlling and keeping labor.
plying to the City Employment Bureau, Address, The Callahan-Colwell Co., Prid-
840 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, gen. Fla. t


Wated.
Manager turpentine place consisting of
twelve crops virgin boxes, location fiat
lands, eight miles from Apalachicola. Ad-
dress Hays & Oven, Apalachicola, Fla.


Wanted.
Position by experienced bookkeeper and
commissary man with lumber or naval
stores frm. Best of references. W. J. S.,
care Industrial Record, Jacksonville, Fla.
Wated.
A woodsman, to commence work at once.
Must be sober and able to furnish labor
to work or ride. Will pay the right price
to the right man. L S. Petteway & Co.,
Gabriela, Fla. 2t
Wasted.
A first-elas distiller with small family
must be able to furnish good reference.
L 8. Petteway & Co., Gabrella, Fla. 2t
For Sale.
4000 acres sawmill timber for sale.
Water or rail transportation; a bargain.
Address Box Vg. Pomona, Fla. 4t
Wasted.
To buy a Art-clas turpentine location
in Florida. Will pay the right price for
the right place. No flat woods place need
apply. G. A. Petteway, Box Lroy,
Mara. Co., FI. tf


Wanted.
A position as book-keeper or commissa-
ry man or woods rider, with reliable tur-
pentine operator. Address Box 142, States-
boro, Ga.


For Sale.
Small turpentine location. Can work
about ten or twelve crops with about
four hundred acres round timber already
secured. Also one thousand acres back
box timber secured. Plenty of round tim-
her available to still for four or five
years' cutting. Address T. M. Kelly,
Black, Ala. tf


Terpemtlac Mes.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. 1 outt puI mp
gallons per hour at a eaet of eto ai
requires no attention while rn g
Started in one minute. J. P. 0spbel,
Oeala. F
Wasted.
A distille. We want a ood, ober
man with family, to run the tll another
season.. Can give steady employment
through the winter. None need apply but
first-clas man with good referemee. Ad-
dress F. & W., Jonaboro, Fla. t
AwevrtStSm 0ar (ebases ew mew
sdvertlesemets) oueld wmen u-
hTueso m manslW to lsmarum sample
Sthe n ms et she esme week.


Suwanee Spring



GiAlger


Ale


Botted from the femoon Sarwna Spring
water. Cur"s P s..43 Ingeepstion
nd Kidney Troubl. The* awt re
frawhin neural, sparlshi Gifgr Ale
known. Betled and~ald by the Lie
OA Bottling V :liWU Oa4k Fla
For male by ComtlidMad Gtowy Co.
Jaclonwef and I. Puree Sons & CO.
Savmnael. CG


A. A. POWELL, CRAS. 6. AWRIS, MERRY ASELRY,
Presieet. rVce.Presdest ad r~esmrer. ecretarr.
IIREC ORS:
N. X. POwell. Chas. 6. aarrfas D. N. .McMMlsu. P. L. SUthera-so, R. V. Cer.ufteo.


THE


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Cealr of West Say a" M ia1s1 Sat.
JasksOu ville, Fi ridi.



Wholesale Drugs I Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices on
anything in the drug line. We make packed drug a specialty and ean save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ast cal. We ca slew yea -a corect Wad mey
saving prices, way papers of elose pre white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is r desire to ceatame e*g te largest
S Diamol dealers to Jackaedtle, sd -ar specialty Is fRue rmmd-
cat gems mad lb-grade Waltuam ad EBIgi Watches.


lOHESS OLAG ERi i-1l3 f ., 33l.hS J.b Mes. Fl


You have been pay g rent for years What have you to show
or t. Why not owyour own home sad by s with the Inma
roa n a pw a ing every rn th fer rea Y ou an do so s
STOP ahrve lome i w hich o re"yth oel and we y barge
i per oent simple Interest. Trye da ofremd by

PAYING BI Standard Guaranty & Trust Co.
Of WahidleM. D. .

RENT! W. W. SHEPPARD. state Agt..
lt Sktea-s ~MS. JA CKMVI. rLA.


T= zEom a viz3womanow UUA&MUW







I-*


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
U


THE

Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville,
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
Capital ad Surapu .......................... .o
Depe.t ......................... ...........
In addition to our regular banling business, we maintain a Savings Depart-
ment, under government supervision, pay ng interest quarterly.
We have for rent Safe Deposit Boaes in burglar and fireproof vaults at rea-
sonable rates, by month or year.

C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay. Feed
Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requiremnmnts
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY SIKLLI
Jacksonville. Fla.
GoORGIA INTER-STATE SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
MIiimim CoastwHi Price List for Marchentablo Rules 1904. Aodpt at Tiftse,
Georgia, Julyr, 190.
Feet Feat Feet Feet I Feet Feet I eet I Feet Feet Feat
8IZES 20&U 21-25 26-30 31-35136-40 41-46146-560 615 56-3 80 61-6
1 xlO to 2x10.... 412.50413.50 14.5lo.OOi 8.00il 60.50 sO23.5 6a043g2.0040.00
2%x10 to 810.... 1200 12.50 13.50 14.00 160 17.0 20.00 23.00 2L00 35.00
8%xl0 to 10 10... 12.50 13.00 14.0 155 16.50 18.0 21.00 SO00 29.00 37.00
1 x12 to x12 .... 14.00 15.50 16Q 1&800 21.00 24.00 28o00 32.6 38o ro 4
2%x12 to 10x2.... 13.00 13.50 14.60 16 18.50 21.00 24.50 2650 34.00 43.00
10%xl2 to 12x1.... 13.50 14.0 0 1 60 17.50 1950 2.00 25.50 30.00 36.M 6
1 x14 to 3x4.... 1600 19.00 20.00 22.0 24.50 27.0 3.00 37.00 44.00 67.00
3%x14 to 1214 .... 14.50 160 18.00 20.50 22.00 24.00 28.00 32. 40.00 2.00
12%x14 to 14x14.... 1.50 17.00 19.Oh 21.001 23.00 26.00 30.00 4.50 4.00 65.00
1 xlO to 4x16.... 20.50 2.00 24.50 270 31.00 34.00 38.00 42.5 .00 06.00
4%x6l to 12x16.... 19.00 00 22.00 25.50 29.00 31.00 35.00 39.0 48.00 56.00
2I%xl6 to lx10.... 19.60 20Q 23.00 260 30.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 60.00 6.00
2 xl8 to 6x18.... 24.0 2.501 28. 31.50 35.00 39.001 43.00 4.00 6 7.00
6%xl8 to 14x18.... 21.00 22.LO 26.0Q 29.00 33.00 37.1 41.00 45.00 57.00 .00
14%xl8 to 8Ixi .... 23.00 4.001 27.00, 30001 34.00 38. 4L00 48.00 5.00 74.
Terme: Met Cash.
Price are 0. B. Canm Savannah, runwick, Fernandina and Jackseavile.


NOTIcE. Dimension.


At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Asmuiation, held at Jaeksonvillei
Fla., March 15, 1904, the following Clasi-
acation and Rules for Inspection of Yel-
low Pine were ofiially adopted, elective
July 1, 1904:
Claml06ati2 and isapectiom of Yellw

Oearal Rules-All lumber must be
sound, well m-ncrf-rtm&4, fll to min and
saw butted; free from unsound, looe and
hallow knots, worm and knot holes;
through ahakes, or round shakes that
how on the surface; square edge, unless
otherwise specified. A through shake is
hereby defined to be through or connected
from side to aide, or dg to edge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of drem)ed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken;
less than one inch thick shall be measured
as one inh.

CLASSIFICATION.
Floortn.
Fluoring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: lx3,
4, 5 and 6; 1%x3, 4, 5, and .
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
inches and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %, 1, 1% and 1% inches
thick by 7 inches and up, wide.
Scantliag.
Scantling shall embrace all sines from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
aix inches in width. For example: 22,
2x3, 2x, 2x, 2x, 3x3, 3x4, 3x5, 3x 4x4,
4x5, 4x6, Sx5 and 6.L
PIRak.
Plank shall embrace all sie from one
and one-half to six inches in thieknes.
not including six inches by eveo inches
and up in width. For example: 1%, 2
2S. 3, s%, 4, 4%, 5, 5%, 5%x7 inches
Md up la width.


Dimension simes shall embrace all sime
6 inches and up in thickness by seven
inches and up in width, including six by
six. For example: xa, Ox7, 7x7, 7x8, 9
and up.

Stepping shall embrace one to two and
a half inches in thickaes by seven inehes
and up in width. For example: 1, 1%A,
1%, 2 and 2y/x7 and up, in width
Rough Ege or Flitch.
Rough Edge or Flitch shall embrace all
sizes one inch and up in thickness by eight
inches and up in width, sawed on two
sides only. For example: 1,, 2, 3, 4
and up thick by eight inches and up wide,
sawed on two sides only.


INSPECTION.
Standard.
All lumber shall be sound, sap no ob-
jection. Wane may be allowed one-eighth
of the width of the piece measured aero
face of wane, extending one-fourth of the
length on one corner or its equivalent on
two or more corners.
.-rchatfbl,
All sizes under nine inches shall show
heart entire length on one side or edge;
sizes nine inches and over shall show
heart the entire length on two opposite
sides. Wane may be allowed one-eighth of
the width of the piece measured across
face of wane, and extending one-fourth of
the length of the piece on one corner or
its equivalent on two or more corner.
Prime.
Scantling shall show heart on two faces
the entire length; other sizes shall show
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
cent. of the pieces, wane may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the piece meas-
ured across face of wane and extending
one-fourth of Pte length of the piece on
one corner or its equivalent on two or
more erners.


-IIII---------'


McMILLAN BR(

Florida Copper Work


Turpentine Stills
sa GoMw t"al Workers.
Old stills taken in zehae fEfo
new ones. Patching through the coma-
try a specialty. Orders by mail or
or wire will reeeive prompt attention,
at either of the lowwoag ort ks:


rAYETVNLE, A. C.
mHLE, ALL


AVANINA G&.
JAC1I5UUVUU., PI&.


**^^* ** eee--**** e****,*4 -**e -*** *** *** ta

Wei-d a Twmpemfe P e~flWe

Iwster"t Yoer

What AMOW Saw WMillN Tlw r 7
10.000 Aeres Saw Timber ........ ...... 0 to S
40000ooo ....................... 2.50 to S
50000 : :.:.. .::: per Acre.
26.000 Acres Virgin Timber.....................
150.000 "
20.000 $2.50 to $6.00
192.000 .....................
10.000 per Acr



BROBSTON. FENDIG & CO.
* feW. Fa da-aufea.
? ..............-.-...,,,.,,|....


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONO LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Stemer Shipmnts a Speclaty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


C. H. BARNES. Prs.


J.IL SHAW. Vise-Pres.


RALPH JESUP, Sa-.Treas


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.


Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strutly a Preda ers' Cemlpm.. Guate
Graes mud Welpgts GOratee.
Deliveries at Jasksevie. Pensasla, fen~tadi and Savam






Sow Mill nndRi T iiN Hamwes ttt
We o e m eseloiY der e- toe pleme n1 au s vener S entr
leairbee. whl*a, ais em d herse trnlaidd we ave a aeuhy I f. Pe
and oode In taash with an. Tmrgentine wangm a" harmes a spalaity. Da**
forget we ea beat the world o haad-mde aeernm.

AW IRI N 1 B, L T I.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


THE RPCORD CIRCUvLATZ ALL OVER THE VDOLD.


r










MURPHY
ILLE MACHINE AND IRON WORKS
INEER, IRON AND BRASS
AND MACHINIST
SSawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Iren
ram Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
S AND BOILERS PULLEYS AND SHAFTPNG.
as. Hydrats and Valves, Centrifugal Puaps. Hose. Belting ao4-1iar- odn
NrIMMiniMuln ffm IS EFrlNEIT A SPECILTn
KSONVILLE FLORIDA.


The Clyde; Steamship Company


ANW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
I- 1--*est i~r r" H.. an appidta o to f tl la5a mafntg
*at vs lte o- & C. beth ways.


From JE. Ceeeand E fre
mum. Cbs ovion and Now York


-. .*<, -a. -. U, at 3:00pm ..***xMOHI CAN .......Friday, Jan. 27, at 9:30 am
'iy* ifJan. 2M, at 3:00 pn ....APAO HE ......Sunday, Jan. 29, at 11:30 am
W "i1mdy, Jan. SE, at 3:00 pm ..IIOQUOLI ....Monday, Jan. 30, at 12:00 n'n
2 3xHUBON ...... Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 1:00 pm
S gjjs, Jan. 27, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ...... Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 1:00 pm
lml, Jan. 28, at 3:00 pm ... .ALOONQUIN ....Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4:00 am
T h la r, Ja 31, at 3:00 pm ... ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, Feb. 5, at 5:00 am
... **xNEW YORK ......Monday, Feb. 6, at 5:30 am
ta Fe b 3, at 3:00 pm ........APACHE .... Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 7:00 am
M Tb 4, at s:13 pm ......IROQUOIS ....Th.urday, Feb. at 7:30 am
SxMOICAN, ....Friday, Feb. 10, at 8:00 la
Ta ,'Fdleb. 7, at 3:00 pm .... COMANCHE ...... Sunday, Feb. 12, at 9:30 am
W'y, Feb. 8, at 3:00 pm ..ALGONQUIN .... Monday, Feb. 13, at 10:00 am
Srpy, Feb. 10, at 3:00 pm. .....ARAPAHOE .Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 12:00 n'n
: -i Feb IS, at 3:00 pm .. **xHURON ..... Friday, Feb. 17, at 1:30 pm
,i. Feb. 14, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE .... Sunday, Feb. 19, at 4:30 am
W mmisay, Feb. 15, at 3:00 pm ... .IROQUOIS .... Monday, Feb. 20, at 5:00 am
S*NEW YORK ....Tuesday, Feb. 21, at 5:30 am
Fea, L IT, at 2:00 pm ....COMANCHE ..Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 6:30 am
S '"y~ Feb. 18, at 3:00 pm ... .ALONQUIN ......Thurday, Feb. 23, at 7:30 am
a..y., Feb. 21, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE ....8unday, Feb. 26, at 10:00 am
S y, aFeb. 22, at 3:00 pm .... !xMOHICAN ... .Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 11:30 am
MS4 24, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE ..Wednesday, Mar. 1, at 12:30 pm
fe y Feb. 25, at 3:00 pm ... IROQUOIS ....Thursday, Mar. 2, at 1:00 pm
*xHURON ...... Friday, Mar. 3, at 4:00 am
T TIday, Feb. S, at 3:00 pm ... .COMANCHE .... Sunday, Mar. 5, at 4:30 am
Se.-i n em via Brnunwlrk and Charleston. xFreight only. *-Baoton via

S tie CLaYD NeB ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN UNes.
gga See veoe metweerm .lnomenaie, Se and Pr vdemoene ama an s.
om polnts. Oalumn at Charlet othk Wary .
S*u*..-WKBiKLT iAIIBi. ..
S.. .. From toot of CatberTsm* street. Jake.vlu
C -LYDC ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
'-twe. C JIkeswu ll v and &Sato.dL
gt --e at Pebktka. Asto. 9t. Frand A. Beresor (De eLad) and tatermediato
bom"FL- an OL Johns
STEAMER "CITY OP JACKSONVILLE"
b a-tal to asol as tea:ew.: lea JaUk enple. Uanday.. Tuesaays and Thur.
Sm. teramY lran. eare n ord iday.s Wednedaym a ridays : a. E.
ro -Ir... ....... ....... ........a .. ... ..... ... ... Arrt s a..
"--, I,, ........t .. .. ......Palatlna ..................... ...... LoMs Bi P. N
Sal .. ...... ................ tor................ ..............Lesw : p. as .
a ape s5 ....... ...... ........a. Fanesa........,............... L rae E.
....... ....... .... .... ...r... sttwd l D--, ......... DAMVe . noeR
0. .00- aL. .I .................... U aore......... .......... .......pa ** a. -.
Ar.. lMe 3 m.................... ntrpri. .................... IL. 10:00 a. m.
f rL rPAJMKSXR AND TICEKT OFFICE, zss W. AY ST., JACL'VILL .
IF. r ONMONGER, JR.. Asst. Gen.. Paas. Agent, 122 W. Bay St. Jacksonville, Fla.
W.. & COOPM. S.L. Leal Pet. Ast., Jak'ville. C. P. LOVULL. Anat. 9upt..Jaek'Tvil
F ot Hoean street, Jaeksonvlle.
C4 na. aan aL . A.. New York, CLYDE MILNE I. A.. New Yrt
-e. 4611m, 10I wm a. c m a c .
eneal lmense. G- eer Am
g C Waeagdhin. is state street. New Teah.


ISSseteseSSisulsSBse...L*subshmsugyQ7jY


F W"u a TpeBnUm LesIs.?
Yw fta at SawrrN U*Ww?--
Yu Wat my MW el t F11wils Lam
IF you Bem susia?
Cmofof Writef
J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONI
00r


ala.


me pga tIl, ago t ~ee~ess~sIt Ie~


Record Readers:



The job printing department
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. It is reason-
able to suppose you will get
better and more satisfactory
printing supplies-letter heads,
envelopes, commissary checks,
pay-roll reports, etc., by having
us make them.

Industrial Record Co.,


zhel etropolis


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 house ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida..


$5.oo a Year $2.50 Six Months


Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.


CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVI.LE FLOS A.


E~ccrurryyrr~~uy~r-rrp---- ug *


k
I::


110ASS1 6 6sa-ml mw


a~ Terr 1~
an wer b a'-).


?


Fin 1


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