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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00108
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: February 10, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00108
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text



W. A. GALLAHER and X&IAMPLAIN, VIxc-PmuMums.


DOLECTOItS t C. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, A. Champlain. H.. MXcaeer and J. A.. Oranfoad, Jad ville;
B. F. Ballard, Tlmpa; C. M. Covington, PenMeola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


COo


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,ooo.

Mala Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches la Tampa, Peasacola, la.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensaoola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything In Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the mainoffice and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Cmalst o we Three.Story Basldla, 70x200; one two-story belldlg. 50x390; moe one.story buldlam, 80x280,
MAking the largest space of ay Company of the kiad IA the Soath.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacols, Fl.., end Sevnnnuh. Go.
- ---------- ----- d*& ---------~--L- -t---- ------~--r----------------- ----U--U--4L --"moo"-


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I -------- --- 060868889- -


C. H. HODG80W, m4e, sIew'a


C. IL OMX;M-a Iumsamp.








FTw of the Patterns we show in our Cataloue.
SPECIAL VALUES IN STRING SILVER.
Id*M am
am I


4
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"Rse"
"Rose"


Tm% %ao INW ai
sun" ftoo sam wW a&
Tawt rteg es o jar sI.
Tst KaUiM, boSJo mr pa.
Talkde Zae, b.an. peram.


M CHARGE FOR
ENAVING.


Greenleaf 6
Crosby Coa~ay


bomirs ano


41 West Bay StreL


in afa "~um &*n fL noe d we


Tm
"Gernnama"


Tepems %m m era
Dnmt aerm OWL& am I
TalkbUesCq
pwat frft &a P
Takm e,3t 0&4. a&
Tabk KMb fmae P "


WE PAY EXPRESS
C(AMES.


Wrte for C4talo..


ONE HUNamLu PAGES ILLUSTRATING
Siverware, DisoMads Watches, Jewelry, Cut Glass, Clocks, e*


Half Tones-Zinc things


illustrating and Engraving Department
OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES &NION.

Spadidlv equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most iaoved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets etc.


Il Mi BMW NKi EME Bl f MM R FA


I. Wnrmo OR APPLn. FOR PRCES. GIVE THE MOST EXPLucr D~SCk-oiIIO N OF WHAT a WW rT,
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED


.-4 Florida Enterprise.


Trv It


"~~W Wr"I I 7.. -;'


I















PUM*I= EVERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO THE. NAVAL STORE, ULUMIE AND MAMJFACTURWG UITUNTh

ens. 0. MW. by Os C w ~ms .1 Sm Tmris Ous.5 AmriLIs L ~b Eckjys ~in ibd ad,.d L A.i krCaesl r~es QL~LQ.rkY - ClO~amm'd Os O
ndrrQpidTIUSCrIi'I5k Anmci~ss. A~pkd ApI 2 MO~e bQ Orp0eL d Sac lhsm-Sr Cmw O~rc' ssinS byl Gssrl. Ssw~l As~ls. ~rOus d IrLL i




The Progress and Prosperity of the Queen City of the GuVm
go -----------9 -----------


Hail splendid South from out thy ruin
risin
l morning's glory from the night o
war;
courage, srvivors, all rancor past despise

* And wounds received in honor leave n
ear.
The New South, and that was Grady's fai
ideal,
S Stands now, through enterprise and gen
is, real.

The bales of tobacco, the bunches o
S cigars quietly but effectively call after
ton to the great industry of Tampa, while
the bearing orange grove protrayed in nat
ural hues, represents the chief produce
of our winterless region. A sky as cloud
S lss as our future and a sheet of water a
mooth a our progress complete the at
tractive picture. It is a glorious scene o
a glorious section-indicating a glorious
future.

Tampa is beautifully located at the head
of Hillahoough Bay, a projection of Tam
pa IBy, and is forty miles from the Gull
.o Mexico. It is about midway the wesi
coast of the penianula of Florida, and by
reason of its situation enjoys an unsur
passed combination of fin climate with
eommereal advantages. In this respect it
is udqu There are other places with
equally good natural advantages for husi
ss ~m m~s But there is none in which the
two are so excellently and completely
combian
The city of Tampa is an active an.I
S pirhing place of thirty-eight to forty
thousand people, situated on Hilleborougl
S By, the interior arm of Tampa Bay. It
is located on high ground, at a point where
the elevated ridge touches the water. Its
site i both picturesque and very healthy
It posme- in its activity and the amount
of buoanes it does, every creditable attn
bate of a pushing and progressive North-
ern city, from which section it derives a
large proportion of its population..
Historical.
The beginning of Tampa goes back to
the days when Narvae and DeSoto, the
two famous Spanish adventurers, landed on
ad near its site to begin their conquest
of the continent and the acquisition of
unlimited treasure. They failed lament&
bly, leaving, no trace behind them more
substantial than maps and names of the
localities they visited. The reception given
them by the then inhabitants of the city
was not of a kind with that which is now
uniformly extended to invaders. For the
ensuing three hundred years the barbarous
Indian possessed this fine region in peace,
but aiviliution was working its way from
the northward and with each successive
step it came prepared to stay.
l the early forties of the last century
the U. woramit eatahlished a mili-
'A P0 Mor week M the preheat


is site of Tampa. About it assembled camp- in the city. It is a guarantee that the
followers and settlers, and in time a small article is a genuine material and that its
f village grew up. It had become the seat workmanship is equal to the best in the
of salt works, ship-building and sufficient world.
- commerce to attract the attention of the The high wages paid and the delight-
federal authorities during the civil war, ful surroundings have drawn here the
o and was captured without resistance worth most skilled workmen in the world, and
the name, though slightly fortified, the re- their best product is exacted of them.
r mains of the earthworks being traceable Other manufacturers must come where
to this day and a few of the old cast-iron they can get this class of labor and where
- cannon still occupying positions as curios their location is at once an advertisement
in the yards of several residents, and a guarantee, and in three years the
Following the civil war the little village parent city of the Havana cigar will be
f struggled along, acquiring considerable distanced by Tampa in out put, as it al-
commerce and being the port of a large ready is in excellence of quality and char-
cattle trade with Cuba. By 1880, it con acter of workmanship.
tainted 720 inhabitants. In 1884 the first Jobbing Interest.
railroad arrived, and the growth then in- During the last fourteen years, the
creased as if by.magic. In 1890 there wholesale houses of Tampa have grown
were 5,532 people in the city, and in 1905 from two in number to forty-eight and
there were more than 40,000 in the munici- the capital employed from a few thous-
Spal limits and its contiguous suburbs. This and dollars to nearly two millions. These
increase of population has been accomp- concerns serve a large territory which is
lished by a corresponding enlargement of expanding in sie and growing richer in
commerce and manufacturing. The main every line of development. In a these
feature of the business of the city is the years there has never been a failure
making of clear Havana cigars. The ad- among them. On the etrary, most of
vantages offered by Tampa were such that them have risen from small beginnings
several of the leading manufacturers of and are now as large and strong as can be
Key West-then the foremost point in found in any young eity of the country.
Sthe United State in cigar manufacturing, Almost every line of business is represent-
moved here. Their experience was so ed-groceries, dry goods, hardware, paints
agreeable that they have since been fol- and oils, confectionery, fish, building ma-
lowed by others, and now no less than trials, and in fact everything really
sixty to seventy of the leading manufac- needed to the continued development of a
turers of the country have their factories wealthy and prosperous city. The facili-
here, with more than two hundred of ties for receiving and distributing mer-
smaller size. chandise, the crucial point in the estab-
Tampa is at this moment the scene of lishment of a large commercial city, rank
the most phenomenal activity, principally with the best.
with the manufacturers of these clear Ha Owing to active water competition, the
vana cigars. This industry has grown rates are very low, and the presence
steadily and beyond the dreams of its of two railroads to most points, with the
most far-seeing business men. Eight thou- fact that much of the tributary territory
sand seven hundred people are now engaged ai reached by water and independent
in this industry, with an output of nearly boats, the distributing rates are excep-
two hundred million cigars of clear Ha- tionally cheap. The permanence of the
vana tobacco, sold for $13,750.000. The benefits of water rates is assured by the
cash wages of these people exceed $6,000, fact that the channel to the docks of the
000 per year, and this money is mostly city, which is already sufficient to be a
distributed into the ordinary channels of controlling factor, is being steadily deep-
business within twenty-four hours after ened through congressional appropriations.
it has been paid to the workmen and The government engineers have just ree-
women. This immense factor is the back- ommended a depth of eighteen to twenty-
bone upon which has been built the large two feet and a powerful railroad is behind
and rapidly growing commercial city which a systematic effort to have an ultimate
Tampa now is. In aid of it, and secondary depth of twenty-four feet at the earliest
to it, is the deep water transportation possible date. Deep water may, therefore,
which the city possesses, which insures in the fullest commercial sense, be re-
low charges for freight over the railroads guarded as a fixed fact. There is still room
as well, and secures fair and equitable for new enterprises, and new men and
methods of and charges for distribution. more capital. With the development of
Nor has the end of this remarkable commerce with Cuba, other West India
growth been reached even in this peculiar Islands, Central and South America, Tam-
line. pa is destined to be the busiest, as it al-
The past twelve months have witnessed ready is the nearest, American port.
the removal to Tampa of a larger number
of clear Havana cigar factories than any Metroplita.
previous period of like length, and there Ifaving made its growth so recently,
is every indication that this will continue. Tampa is a modern city in every sense of
The superior reputation of the Tampa- the word, notwithstanding the largely
made cigars is an asset to every factory foreign and almost eonmopstan ebarse-
TE lUam W =L 0 Woyr DUn.AR S X1W 1WRT W


ter of its population. Its mad lieii
substantially paved with brH or A
its leading thoroughfares esempit
splendid service of electric rn
ars being equal in modern es
and comfort to those found h
cities, its streets and homes
electricity and gas, and its water
by the highest analysis, is a th
and most abundant character. TWO*l
three excellent daily newsps-ywn
trunk and three branch rir& e
ship lines to Havan and Mobi i~
lines to New York and other
points, and also covering the W: I
and Central America.

There are several fAe hodtb, bh
largest hotel, the world-fiamd
nowned "Tampa Bay" and ea Is
for the reception and comfort if
and other winter visitors, tin
character of Tampa Bay Hotea is
and shines brightest. Every mdaM
venience for daily life ad biM t
their disposal -

The city of Tampa has smr
its own in the banking worU. ti
national banks, and one iSta i
a total capital of S450, .sriaL
and undivided pro et to eqr 1 s
deposits exceeding three and a
lion dollars. "-.-
Of the territory described a
Tampa is the business esmatr, tsi
four-sevenths of the banking r i
fifths of the surplus, and
the deposits. These facts are
to be disputed that Tami is t
olin of the fastest growing ie m o
ilar size in the State.
Growth at Tw.dtuy.
While the population has gaedsi b*~S
(6,000 in the city alone), the pvsmLsM
exported for sale as a Vw s of
have increased many times ma i in
fruit crop of 1904 reahe f lly se -:
quarter million dollars, the garil Id-l
as much, the item of vegehshis s
feeding 25,000. Celery ad
this season will together bri ng
of net profits to the growers. Ahel
sixth of the total output of phs |r
the State of Florida is mined he ti glfl:
ritory, and hundreds of thumaN-s itr-,
lars are annually expended n wa&p*
supplies. The disbursemeets fIm
industry, when added to those In ias
the turpentine and lumber prodeus, V Ci
easily foot up a million and a qn
These items are mentioned =e -m-w
clinching proof of the ma&i asse~m
made in support of the strength a
and the permanence of the sour -e of
wealth and power.
The AIjacet Coetry.
There are nearly a millim o a o
available land lithhelh in taethw
ty in which Taimpa is a I-- -
small parties of t is 9i0 Zn








4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
,seu-ussuma ii -uises mmmuesuuuuuuu.


but the whole of it is well fitted for both
fruit culture and farming. This is the cen-
ter of the great orange, pomelo and pine-
apple production of Florida, and large
fortunes await those who will engage in it
with skill, prudence and energy.
Winter truck farming finds here its best
'field and greatest profits. The kindly cli-
mate, suitable soil and unequalled trans-
portation facilities, make this an unri-
valled region for this light and wholesome
avocation. It may be embarked upon with
the smallest capital, and every one strong
enough to wield a hoe may be a candi-
date for its benefits. Lands are cheap
and the other inducements are unequalled
anywhere in the world.
Sport and Recreation.
In this department of public interest
Tampa and vicinity stand without a rival.
The pursuit of game may be indulged in
every day of the season without encoun-
tering any extreme of weather which
would forbid. Deer, turkeys, quail, squir-
rels, snipe, ducks and scores of other ob-
jects of the sportsman's gun abound in
profusion and are easily reached from the
city or any one of the twenty or thirty
neighboring villages of sufficient size to
afford the hunter suitable headquarters.
Not only is game plentiful, but guides are
reliable and all accommodations are reas-
onable. All the surrounding country is
free to the visiting sportsman, no license
being required, and he meets with a cordial
reception, being perfectly welcome to
shoot all he wants to-provided he does
not overstep the law which limits the
number of deer, turkey and quail that may
be brought down by one gun.
It is in fishing, however, that this sec
tion justly prides itself as being without
equal iLthe world. The waters in the vi-
eini'tyLae of every variety, from the deep
ni ro"lf iig Gulf to the fresh water lakes
which are the home of the bass and bream.
Wide bays and winding straits and passes
afford the calmev surface for boating by
sail or oar, and are the home of countless
millions of the finest and gamiest of fish.
And at the same time the necessary bait
is afforded by the same waters. There
are literally hundreds of miles of the most
perfect fishing waters, surrounded by
smooth and smiling beaches, with unnum-
bered spots which entice to eamp and
rest, with abundance of fuel and other
accessories. Nowhere can life outdoors be
made so ple-at a- here.
For the hoMer angler there are the lordly
tarpon, the virile king-fish, the splendid
sea bass and other of kindred size and
gaminess. For the gentler and more timid
sex there are scores of kinds of beautiful
mnd toothMome denizens of the shallower
wterer-whome pursuit and capture will
atiadi tl gratify her desire for this
most exhilarating and health-giving sport.
Oysters, crabs and clams reward easy
search, and in short there is no form of
athletic or gustatory appetite which can-
not here be satisfied to perfection.
To Make Inquiry.
All persons who may wish to obtain
further particulars about this attractive
city and section can do so by addressing
inquiries to the Board of Trade. All quer-
ies will be promptly, courteously and relia-
bly answered. Information on every sub-
ject will be furnished, and it will be taken
as a favor if any one desiring it will apply.
Address the Board of Trade.

The Mineral Paint and Varnish Works.
The sanitary condition of homes and
public buildings is mainly due to the paint


that is used, and we, therefore, from our
knowledge of what we speak, strongly ad-
vise all in using paints or varnishes to
procure only those brands which are ground
in pure linseed oils and which can be
highly recommended. Thus it is that in
mentioning the name of The Mineral Paint
and Varnish Works whose proprietor is W.
D. Wiggins. No further notice from us
would be necessary, were it not for the
fact that we desire to give ourselves the
pleasure of saying that the "Panther
Brand" of paints, which he manufactures,
is of the highest grade possible. A spec-
ial and noticeable feature of his business
is that none but experienced and high-sal-
aried men are employed on painting and
paper-hanging work, which is a very im-
portant item when considered in its true
light. The close attention given to every
detail intrusted to his charge, together
with his well known courtesy to all, has
made for him a host of warm personal
friends and acquaintances in the city that
rejoice at his continued success in busi-
ness.

The Hillsborough Grocery Co.
Among the many wholesale enterprises
of Tampa may be mentioned in particular
one doing an enormous grocery business in
Provisions, Grain and Feed Stuffs. We
allude with great pleasure to that fine
wholesale store occupied by the Hillsbor-
ough Grocery Company, its president being
B. F. Bullard, its vice-president and gen-
eral manager, L. J. Cooper, and its secre-
tary Bernice K. Bullard. These gentle-
len are without doubt sagacious and suc-
cessful business factors in the building
up of one of Tampa's most commendable
enterprises as proved by the enormous
output made by them during the past
twelve months. The business enjoyed is
by no means local, but extending through
the Southern portion of the State. The
firm are ever ready to accept orders and
complete same with dispatch to the
satisfaction of its patrons. It is upon this
basis that the success of the business has
been built, and the appreciation by the
trade of this fine, progressive firm is
shown in the fact of so largely an increased
patronage, which time has brought about,
together with the never failing courtesy
extended by their energetic manager, L.
J. Cooper, to all when visiting their ware-
houses.

Mayor F. A. Salomonson.
To attempt to give a true expression of
the high esteem in which Tampa's chief
executive is held by his fellow citizens
would indeed be a somewhat difficult task,
something like attempting to paint the lily
or to regild fine gold, for there can be no
doubt whatever but that Mayor F. A. Sal-
omonson is beloved by all of Tampa's no-
ble sons and fair daughters.
His administration has been remarka-
bly successful and one that will ever be
associated with the history of the city.
Under his regime many improvements have
been completed and numerous other im-
provements inaugurated. In his adminis-
tration he has the hearty co-operation of
the council, which has made one of the
strongest and most substantial govern-
ments the people have ever had, and that
he is the right man in the right place is
proved every moment of the day by the
manyan nd various expressions of pleas-
ure heard from the numerous visitors who
had come in contact with him in his official
capacity as head of Tampa's "Queen of
the South," for his unfailing and uniform
courtesy to all.


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


SBoilermaking and RepairingO

Still Boiler and Pump..
SSHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
* *
e J#ckLonvtlle. ela.
* ****SiiUi*lirii********iiti**iliuililiiuaiuaiairm81i

WILLIAM A. BOUIR JAMS C. DARSY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THi OLeET LaumIgU aWMm sE arB uE M IE TAT.

Hay Gri, n eed, Garde
Seeds, Pultry Supplies, feur,
Grits, Meal and Fertilizers.

OUR MOTTO: Prempt SLpmuet, elalMe Goods. Cataleime Free
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Cummer Lumber Co.

SJACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.


I Standard Clothing Company IIe$
: Standard Clothing Company I


One rrice


-f


One Price


* FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
* 17 ad 19 West Bay Street, - Jacksov, Reidl
Stetson and Hawes Hats. Speeal Atlention 6lea to Mal OrdesS,
ltmilaslAeIIIIIIIIIIlalmommuuullululalahumulagagsggau


R. TOLAR.


J. H. HART.


T. i. LAOHLY.


4. R. TOLAR, ad


(EItablished lT72.)

TOLAR. HART & CO..
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KREN SON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY 01

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battlings, Etc.


THE RECORD IS THE SOUTH'S GREAT TRADE JOURNAL.







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


C. B. ROGERS, President W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLI N, Vice-Presidents. C. H. HODGBON, See. and Treas.
DIRECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A.Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. MeEac'ern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville.
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensaeola.




Consolidated Grocery Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL. $500.000.


MAIN OuFICE AND STORAGE ROOMS
Jacksonville. Florida.


Joa


BILANCHESs
Pensacola. Fla. and Savannah. Ga.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Grocries, Grain, Provisions

Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, Etc,


sHIPITS TO ALL POINTS THA T CAN BE REACHED THE CHEAPEST THROUGH THE BRANCH STORES OF THE COMPANY, AND PROMPT AT-
TEITION GIVE ALL ORDERS THROUGH THE MAIN OFFICE AND BRANCHES.




CONSOLIDATED GROCERY CO.

WATER STREET, TAMPA.


Heaqurters: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Branches: PENSACOLA, FLA, and SAVANNA, GA.


- 511rr m:-m ~SIIS~l~'~


W. R. Fller & Co
No man in the world is better acquaint-
ed with the affairs of Tampa, or of iti
rich contiguous territory, or closer in touch.
Switch its people than W. I. Fuller, Tampa's
Snoble president of the Board of Trade.
Mr. Fuller has worked himself to the
front in the army of industrial Floridians,
who have carried the State triumphantly
through succeeding periods of calamity
and depression into the full and clear light
of its present commercial prestige anm
-promise. Among those who have devoted
themselves to advancing the interests of
Tampa and its wonderful territory, Mr.
Fuller holds a place of preferment hard to
equal, and as president of the Board of
Trade no man is more beloved, not only
for the immense amount of work that he
yearly gives Tampa, advancing it step by
step to the proud position it now holds,
but whenever a movement for the general
benefit and advancement of the community
is projected, Mr. Fuller is one of the first
men whose aid is enlisted. And it may
be said his assistance, always so intelli-
gently directed, has been indispensable to
more than one plan for the improvement
and development of Tampa and South
Florida. The business of W. R. Fuller &
Co., in grain and fruits is an enormous
one, the inrease these past few years
proving that where a concern has as its
directors men of untiring diligence, rich
with the wisdom of long experience and
possessing the entire confidence and es-
teem of their associates, as Mr. Fuller
does, it progress and success is, of course,


only to be expected. The firm of W. R.
Fuller & Co. consists of Capt. Carnes,
Mr. Fuller and Mr. Jackson, who have been
in the State twenty years, none better
understanding the peculiar needs of Flor-
ida's people in distributing. Their ware
houses are splendidly located for this pur-
pose, being "on the rail" and "in the wa-
ter," as it were, and as wholesale distrib-
uters of building and crate materials, fer-
tilizers, groceries and fruit, as well as
brick, lime and cement, their three
branches, playing an important part oi
this distribution.
The firm are also agents for Capt. Gac-
ner's splendid line of steamers, and have
lately disposed of many carloads of the
celebrated "Rubberroid Roofiing,' 'as well
as 300 carloads of crate material and mil-
lions of brick. In conclusion, we should bi
certainly doing an injustice to Mr. Jack-
son if we omitted mentioning how greatly
we are indebted to him, not only for these
brief particulars, but for the great cour-
tesy shown our correspondent. Without
doubt Mr. Jackson makes the company a
good, conscientious and honorable menm-
her, always guarding its interests, and
ever on the side of progress and develop-
ment.


THE DIAMOND
WhlwsrleJ R.a LNAs

Wines, Liquors and Cigars ;
Sol Aent far for he aume A. B.C. QNews. aLe the Wi3m.Ika ZqUs>
Srnil Water. We gsarantee a ds rad up buy ues fuNM neasse aels lom
Creme de la Creme, bottle .... $.00 Diamond Brad, bottle ........ 1.A
[ HtijWy od1 ,i, M..idnti Heart Brad, bottle .......... .7
C. C. C. Brand, bottle ........ 1.50 Spade Brad, bottle ...........
Club Brand, bottle ........... 1.25 Premium Brand, bottle ........

: MYERSON CO.,
105 o 107 West Bay St. tPIe 7U
6 JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
S111188 88s1118 IIIII ---iiiii ii i*i"
W. J. L'ENGLE, J. W. WADEI, . HUG.Ma .
President. Vi e-Pretde. See'y andwn


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.


m l. NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
SamI P. Holmes& Co.RS IN

treks. nds,* Cetts Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Graln and Provisiens
msIsEs Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
NEW YORK GOTTON EXCHANGE, locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
Direct private wires to all exchanges. solicited
Loeal stocks and bonds a specialty.
Ba Phoe 8, Baldwi Blocck Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.
IF YOU ARE PROmIsVs. ASV RaIEm IsN 2= BRCOO.








6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The H. Bomford Plumbing and Supply Co.
Success, to a large extent, in every
branch of industry, depends upon the in-
telligent proficiency which involves a thor-
ough knowledge of all the minute details
embraced therein. Combining these char-
acteristics in an eminent degree and tran-
sacting an extensive trade (the annual ag-
gregate of which is a very significant
item in the general total of the city's com-
merce) stands the fine firm of the H. Bomn.
ford Plumbing & Supply Co., 111-113 Laf-
ayette Street, Tampa, whose president is
J. S. Craft, vice-president and manager,
H. Bomford, and directors, Messrs. Perry
D. Wall and A. W. Price, who is secretary
also. Energy, enterprise and shrewd na-
tive ability will always take precedence
and assume a prominent position in the
first rank. Such an establishment have
we in the one whose manager is so ener-
getic and courteous a man of business.
This fine firm has now been incorporated
eighteen years, and consequently are well
known for Plumbers' Supplies, Gas En-
gines, Acetylene Generators and Puimps.
They have gasoline engines, both station-
ary and marine, and have a large trade
in gas generators, and are contractors for
high-grade sanitary plumbing, steam-heat-
ing, etc., and what we must not omit men-
tioning to our readers is that they are
agents for J. B. Colt & Co., one of the
most prominent manufacturers in the
State. They also have had large govern-
ment contracts, consequently all orders,
as well aa mail orders, placed in their
hands will receive prompt and careful at-
tention.

J. Martime
Compieuous amongst the very great
number of clear Havana cigar manufac-
turers that are to be see in Ybor City
and West Tampa stands one firm preemi-
nent among the rest. We allude to the
fine factory of J. M. Martinez, manufac-
turer of elear Havana cigars, his leading
clear Havana brand being the "Norma
S;M er" eigar, which has gained an ex-
:-* lr eVputation throughout the State
Sid Europe, also, as being one of the finest
clear Havana cigars made in either West
Tampa or Ybor City. Mr. Martinez started
eight years ago with two men; to-day he
is working 200 steadily, each departmer
being in the hands of members of the firm,
who have spent a lifetime in the business
of making lear Havana cigars. The firm
is composed of J. M. Martinez, A. A. Mar-
tines and W. J. Webb. Their leading
brands, beside the Norma Martinez, are
the Garantiza and the La Bengalear and
it has been through the energy and enter-
prise of the members of the frm that it
stand to-day pre-eminently among the
rest.


knowledge to be the purest, exhilarating,
invigorating and most health-giving of all
drinks. In fact, by the last analysis, it
has been declared "absolutely pure," its
chemical test showing that it was entirely
free from adulteration, artificial preserva-
tives and impurities. The Coca-Cola Bot-
tling Co. is managed by that energetic
manager, Sidney B. Sharpe, whose close at-
tention to the wishes and orders of all
t'-ir customers has in no small degree
heledl to make the output of this favor-
ite drink an enormous one.

Tampa Hardware Co.
Tampa is the recognized center of mler-
cantile activity, and no interest has at-
tained such a remarkable degree of devel
opmient as the wholesale hardware busi-
ness, and prominent among her most act-
ive, enterprising and successful houses en
gaged in this line of trade, is that of the
Tampa Hardware Co., whose turpentine,
mill and phosphate supplies, Council and
Holmes hacks and pullers are widely used
and well known. The enormous trade done
b y this firm during the past twelve months
is a proof that its management is in the
right hanas, nor is this in the least degree
a surprise, when one learns that it is Mr.
W. C. Thomas, whose persevering study
and close attention to the best interests
of the firm is ever noticeable, and who
as a prominent citizen, is everlastingly
pushing Tampa forward.

Tampa Foundry and Machine Co.
As men of business, we are always in-
terested to learn who are the men who
are "up and doing," who it is, so to speak,
are the builders of fair Tampa city, and it
is not difficult to know its prominent pio-
neers when we have before us the name of
the Tampa Foundry and Machine Co.
Without doubt no one can make an im-
peachment against this firm for being be-
hind the times. They are leading the way
at a quick pace in making Tampa Florida's
leading city, and when we mention the
name of W. W. Carnes, president and gen-
eral manager, J. K. Merrin, secretary and
treasurer, and Ernest Kreher, superintend-
ent, we support what we state. Their
foundry and machine shops are very large
doing an immense trade in machine, boiler-
making and repairing, and especially are
they well known throughout the State as
brass and iron founders. Their vast work
shop is a sight to be seen and we strongly
recnmmnend a visit being payed them.

Warner's Curiosity Store.
If the curio hunter does what we expect
he will do when he visits Tampa, he will
have visited Warner's Curiosity Store on
Lafayette Street. It certainly is an extra-
ordinary and rare sight to see alive as it


Tampa Trade Notes,


EARL louNT. Prs.


TN. M CAR1Y, WNYueepres. "Mom GUAM. Ues.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.

mrVIMG WELC, Meader.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


lull.. mom mun mmmc iism 1imI 1mi mli mum
W. H. BECKWITH. W. B. HEN0DSON. G. C. WAUUREN.

SBECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.


LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE AND MILL LANDS

Rooms 1-2-3, First Natiomal Bbak bIlflag.
-TAMPA, LORIDA.



^ CYPRESS TANKS
Are Best by Eve*r Tet


Cyiem wonst fte effeas t bwatoem
baea Oeaw sar waor* u i, andb fmiwi hm
oonbther woo"..is p m. a ." ."
wenl and Iwo for MW ebb"n Zau.efi. cae
.e rise Inu de ls g Wootw *wor we on
AMClo scare thd ehteeikmano fte was at
vety hewpdic Weis have hem aisgakset
mmtnd oltr t ama ucl3w md ht mate
thotnsIam as better b a will l1ng".
Send4 f- o aT .pf
G. M. DAVIS 41 SON
PALATHWA. FLOlRIDA


Were, an enormous collection of rare birds,
Coca-Cola. snakes, alligators and shells, besides a
We believe we are perfectly correct in lovely exhibition of jewelry. Thousands
saying that the king of all soft drinks is and thousands of souvenirs for those wh-,
Coca-Cola. Its wonderful strides in be- visit this beautiful city to make choice,
coming the public's favorite drink is sim- from await them, and we feel sure that
ply marvelous. Everybody is wanting and whether you go there to make a purchase
drinking this delicious and refreshing bev- of a pretty souvenir for some of your fam-
erage. They ask for it, and they will have ily or maybe distant friends, who have not
it and are not to be denied, if offered some been as fortunate as yourself in viewin.
"fungi drink" attempted to be pushed on th;s lovely city of the South, or only to
them in lieu of this delicious drink. It pass an interesting half hour, you will be
has surpassed all drinks of a similar kind equally as welcome and courteously re
and "swept the board," as it were, of all ceived. On no account should one miss
others attempting to be its rival Nor is seeing the live alligators and snakes which
this to be wondered at, now that it is ac- are, of course, on free exhibition also.


SJamne Stewart B.. Hebesd., Jr.

STEWAR.T ( COMPANY


REAL ESTATE & LOANS

505 West Bldg. Jacksonville, Fla. Phone 1576

SLarsre d smal trast ofa virgi timber of f geh ade. oernvmensmlr Is-
csted for R.R. and waer tr&auwsrteAse.s at moderate rteAe. Wrte for
Spartlculars.
%XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX)C%90f^


ANN YOU A sUs9Ch3 TO THU RECORD?


THE




Falstaff Restaurant

For Ladies and rentldenn.


Breakfast a a crte. Luncheon 12 to 2:30, 0. Table d'hote
dinner, 6 to 9 p. m., 75c. Oyster. on half shell After theater
lunches a specialty.

25 MAIN STREET,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.



ID lt 1Tl lO88l 8 8 8 8 8ill 8
111( 1111 11~~~11)(1111








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


r THE I


EXCHANGE


Depotory of United States
Depotory of State of Florida.
Deoitory of Couty of Hlsboro.
Depostory of City of Tampa.

Preident, A. C. CLEWIS Vice-


President, EDWARD MANRARA


NATIONAL


Cashier, J. A. (RIFFIP


BANK


TiM'ouly quipped i every deprtmet fw
handling Comercial ad Deposit Accuts.
UMequaled faclities- Accomts cited.
CorrespaMndee invited.

N Asst. Cashier, FERD. LUTJENS.


Tampa Bay HNte
The Tampa Bay Bay Hotel is one of
the most luxurious and beautiful hotels of
the world and no trip to Florida resorts is
complete without a stay at the renowned
"Tampa Bay HoteL"
This magnifiesnt hotel, with its gran 4,
imposing proportions, rises from garden'
of rare tropical beauty on the sloping
green banks of the Hillsborough river
The unusual attractions offered to visitorA
at the Hotel, the unequalled climate, the
variety of healthful pastimes, makes th:-
region the Mecca of the traveler, and a.,
the development of its natural advan-
tages continues, these tourist crowds art.
increasing each season.
The "Tale of Ten Travelers" could nevir
have been written Md it not been for the
inviting comforts of European hotels. Tc
the weary and toil-worn traveler, a good,
comfortable hotel is an oasis in the desert
of travel and unrest. Hence it is an old
saying and a very true one, that a good
hotel is a city's best advertisement.
The Tampa Bay Hotel is under the
able management of that prince of enter-
tainers, Thomas J. L. Brown, a hotel man
of the wide experience and probably one
of the best known managers in the South.
After having partaken of his hospitality
it can be truly said that Mr. Thomas )
L. Brown looks after the comfort of his
guests, not merely from self interest, but
from a real pleasure in seeing others happy
and comfortable. His patience, gentleness
and courteousness have won the love of
the great public, who know a born hotel
man when they come in contact with hinm,
and he richly deserves the many flatter-
ing notices given him by the press in many
States. Long may he live and prosper, is
the wish of not only the writer, but the
thousands who have partaken of his in-
viting hospitality.

Tampa DBusine Conege.
Tampa would certainly not be complete
or properly equipped for her future greater
developments were there to be no busi-
ness college, and it is certainly to be
congratulated upon having such a magnili-
cent one, presided over by that most cour-
teous gentleman, L M. Hatton, M. A.
The Tampa Business College is certainly
one of the largest and best equipped busi-
ness and shorthand schools in the State,
if not in the entire South. Their attend-
ance of late has grown so much, which has
caused them to move itno larger and more
commodious quarters in the Krause build-
ing, their magailcent halls offering every


thing and every convenience for a higher
commercial college training. It is there-
fore we take the greatest pleasure and a
large degree of pride in bringing to the no-
tice of our readers Tampa's fine business
college, and that all parents should make
the greatest efforts for their children to
attend this beautiful institution, and so
gain a solid foundation for their future
prosperity, goes without saying.

The Exchange National Bank.
The report just presented by Secretary
Calhoun to tile Board of Trade gives a
very positive assurance that the banking
business of Tampa is on the right track
and full speed ahead. Nor is this to be
wondered at when one learns who are its
helmsmen. The amount of money depos-
ited with the Exchange National Bank
during the past year shows conclusivel,
the extraordinary progress this bank has
made, a proof positive (if proof were want-
ing) that it holds tile fullest confidence of
the people.
The resources of a city and the solidity
of its business interests are largely judge I
by the class and character of its banks
and there is no feature of its municipal
commerce that shows more positively the
unswerving and substantial growth of
Tampa than the Exchange National Bank
which with the ever courteous cashier, J.
A. Griffin, as one of its directors, is as
sure of a brilliant future.
Ludden & Bates.
There can be no recommendation more
attended with danger than in speaking
with positiveness of the value in dealing
with this or that firm for pianos or organs,
etc., if their merit is not known to he
who makes the recommend, but in bringing
before the notice of our subscribers the
name of Messrs. Ludden & Bates, we do
so with the fullest assurance that we are
recommending one of the best firms in the
State. They make, and have always made,
but one grade of piano-the best. They
have no need of any second grade pianos
to help them make money, and have the
reputation with the trade of making the
finest finished cases, using the handsomest
veneers and securing the best patents of
any firm in existence, and in speaking of
the wonderful progressive strides th's lead-
ing music house has made and is making
we refer with real pleasure to the many
orders daily being received by their man-
ager, W. C. Gaither, whom we are quite
willing to admit has by his close atten
tion to the wants and wishes of all their
customers, coupled with the most cour-
teous and genial manners, made an excep-
tional success for Messrs. Ludden & Bates.


H. G. WARNER


The Largest Curiosity Dealer

IN FLORIDA.
116 Lafayette Street, Tampa, Fla.
Come and see the Live Alligators and Snakes on Free Exhibition.




THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. PIA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
ow H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.

Idea Locatism smut"lf. St Jobs
HOTEL ROSELANDt
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Every comfort and amusement. Unexcelled cuisine, Northern cooking. Special rates, $0 to it
weekly; $2 to 53 daily, American plan. Illustrated booklet mailed. Car gain to ostrich farm
pass hotel grounds. Headquarters for naval stores men, lumbermen, cattle grower and Good
roads Convention delegates A. C. EKNOLM. Pnopumron.


Windsor Hotel
,,hi ";; .*r t/;
Jalckneusmea Fwhsst r
lMla's Laruet am '

Year-Round Hotel.:,,
DODGE & CULLENS,
owuers am@ rersrn,


GRAND VIEW HOTEL }EIA
s SPECIAL WEEKLY MATE "S
EUROPEAN PLAN
ST. GEORGE HOTEL) "o
MRS. QuO. W. BROCK. PnOPNIETNaRS.

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paint.
Foot Hogan St., Jackspnville, Fla.


TU RECORD TE IWUTWZ8 GJUAT TRADE JOURNAL


OF TAMPA, FLORIDA


Capital and Surplus, $145,000.00
Deposits over - $500,000.00
Resources over - $700,000.00


~h~,~L1Mll~*m~II~rM~----------m~


r-. .
.yr










8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.





KNIGHT WALL COMPANY.

TAMPA. FLORIDA. AND HAVANA. CUBA.


Engines, Boilers, Pumps, Machinrery,

SHAFTING. BOILER TUBES, IRON, PIPE, OILS. ETC.


Osmral BHurdw ,
Bulding Supplies,
8pert G*o,
Ship Chandla y,
Pat, Oi, Varunihes.
MiBfl BapgM,
K Ail Ma&MOy,
Chall-ar hirnle Mill,
Garsa Steve Machinery.


AGENTS-

Canton Pump Co.
Erie City Iron Works, Engines and Boilers,
American Steel Split Pulley.
South Bend Wood Speed Pulley.
DeLoach Mill Manufacturing Co.
Keystone Grease.
Goulds Manufacturing Co.


A Veritable Love Feast of City Pride at

Tampa Board of Trade Annual Meeting.


In the presence of a large throng of
leading gentlemen and ladies of the city,
the Tampa Board of Trade held its annual
meeting in the music room of the Tampa
Bay Hotel last week, prior to a splendid
reception and banquet given in their honor
by Manager T. J. L Brown.
President W. B. Fuller, who was unani-
mously elected to a third term as the
head of the Board of Trade, delivered his
annual address to the Board prefaced by
his stereotyped statement that he is no
speaker, which he always proceeds to
effeetually contradict by his force and style
of speaking. Mr. Fuller referred in a gen-
eral and very comprehensive manner to
the manufactures of Tampa, the prospects
for deep water in view of the appropria-
tion carried in the Rivers and Harbors
bill, the public building of the city, the
spirit of progress shown in the voting of
$300,000 worth of bonds for public im
provements, needing, he said, only the
act of the Legislature to validate them;
and to the other evidences of progress
shown during the past year.
Hereafter, said the President, the peo-
ple of Tampa must work on broader lines
for the general good. He stated that
from now on the Tampa Board of Trade
would hold quarterly meetings, explained
their work and what they have done, and
invited the co-operation of the public.
At Mr. Fuller's request, Capt. C. E. Gar-
ner, president of the Jacksonville Board of
Trade, and a gentleman closely affiliated
with the business interests of Tampa. ad-
dressed the gathering. He congratulated
the city on its progress and its prospects
for the future, and the Board of Trade on
having such competent officers as President
Fuller and Secretary Calhoun. He com-
pared' Tampa now with Tampa twenty
years ago in a very entertaining manner,
and said that he hoped between Tampa
and Jacksonville there woudl always exist
a keen and friendly rivalry. His presents
tion of the patriotic and unselfish work
done by the boards of trade was very ef
festive.
Mr. Drebton's Speecah.
Edwin Brolmton, one of the real estate
frm of Brobston, Feadig & Co., a Georgia
gentleman who imported himself into Flor-
ida, and has developed into a loyal and
enthusiastic adopted son of the Peninsular
State, was invited by President Fuller
and made a brief and very highly appre-


ciated speech, dwelling principally on the
future of this State.
Dr. W. C. Richardson, on invitation of
the chair, addressed the meeting. He spoke
of the very healthful condition of Tampa.
and showed that this city is in the small
area which has the most sunshine in the
United States. He also made a strong re-
quest, for Rone Tinney, of Ozona, who
could not be present, in behalf of the
Board using their influence with the Coun-


ty ('onissioners to induce the latter to
,on4truct a hard road between Tampa
and the West Coast, setting forth strongly
the claims of that section to recognition.
In closing he requested the Board to in-
vite the State Horticultural Society to
hold its next meeting in Tampa.
Senator James E. Crane, a former resi-
dent of the West Coast, supported Dr.
Riihardson's arguments, and offered a reso-
lution requesting the Commissioners to
construct the road at their earliest con-
venience.
It was seconded by Mr. Abe Mass and
unanimously carried, the chair appointing
Messrs. Crane, Drawdy and Gunn to pre-


HON. T. J. L. BROWN,
President of the Florida State Fair Association, and
Manager of the Tampa Bay Hotel


SAN PEDRO. No. 2.8 HAVANA. CUBA.
General Barwar a cater largely to all
Sugar and Teobee. Plautatim .
STATE AGrNTS at Cuba, Psto .ico, for
the JOHN DEZRE PLOW CO.
Most Americans stop at the above ad-
dress and make it a bureau of information
whenever they go there, it being one of the
oldest in the town.


sent the resolutions to the Commissioners.
and requesting Dr. Richardson to go along
with them.
The President called upon the host, Mr.
Brown, for a speech, to which that gen-
tleman responded with a motion to adojurn
and eat, drink and be merry, which was
promptly adopted.
After spending a few minutes of social
conversation in the rotunda of the hotel,
the guest repaired to the Gold room, where
a splendid course of refreshments were
served, while delightful music was rendered
by the Tampa Bay Orchestra.


REPORT OF SECRETARY.

Annal Meeting, February ist, 1905.
Mr. President and Gentlemen of the
Board
The active membership of this body at
the corresponding date of last year was
129. Since that time 15 new members
have been admitted, making a total en
rollment of 144. Four have resigned, three
have been dropped for non-payment of
dues and one has died. The active mem-
bership at this date is 136.
The receipts for the past year, with
balance at the beginning, were $1,303.42;
the expenditures, $1,400.71-leaving a
small debit, in addition to an indebtedness
of $100 for printing.
The secretary has printed and distrib-
uted, under direction of the Board of Gov-
ernors, 5,000 copies of his last annual re-
port and 2,000 copies of a folder embrac-
ing the leading facts about the city and
illustrated with several typical pictures.
Besides the good done by the distribution
of these documents on the outside, there
is reason to believe that their presenta-
tions had much influence for good among
our home people, making them familiar
with the extraordinarily favorable cir-
cumstances surrounding our city, the great
progress it was making, and the bright
prospects ahead- and giving them an or-
ganised and perfect confidence in the fu-
future. It has been the habit and aim of
the secretary to confine himself to facts
of public record, and what he has present-
ed to the public has been unassailable by
doubt or disbelief.
He has during the past year received
and replied to nearly one thousand direct
letters of inquiry, and within many cases
the happy result that the writers are
now with us either -temporarily as visitors
or permanently as citizens.
The year 1904 was simply an addition
to the season of prosperity of which 1903
was fairly the beginning. The year pre-


----------
-- ---- --- -










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


-U'---- -


Water Front View of Tampa Bay Hotel, Tampa, Florida


sented in all lines of business an average
increase over the year before of more than
25 per cent. For purposes of comparison
the figures of 1903 are used, and it must
be borne in mind that the statements foi
1904 show the given percentages over those
for the previously greatest year in the
business history of the city.
The principal industry of Tampa is so
closely identified with the receipts of th.
various sources of revenue to the govern-
ment located in the city that the sunms
they receive are a faithful index of th<
general prosperity.
The gross collection of the custom house
for the year 1904 were $1,501,189.73, com-
pared with $1,318,531.58 for the previous
year-- gain of $182658.15 or 14 per cent
This gives an inadequate idea of the real
increase in the importation of tobacco,
to arrive at which the 20 per cent. reduce
tion in the tariff must be taken into con
sideration. At the rate of duty prevail-
ing for 1903 the gain would have been over
$400,000, or nearly 30 per cent.
The collections of the internal revenue
office in the city for the year 1904 were
$596,252.67, compared with $510,000644 for
the year 1903-a gain of $86,186.23, or 17
per cent.
The total receipts of the postoffice for
1904 were $00,267.11, compared with $47.-
597.16 for the year before-a gain of $12.
(18.95, or 26 per cent. This magnificent
showing of growth is beyond doubt or
quibble.
The year has. been ,one of unprecelenteJ
success of operation, both in volume of
output and profits. The total number of
cigars made and sold is 196,961,000, a gain
over the previous year of 29,330,000, or 17
per cent. The number of working people
employed has been increased 15 per cent.,
making a total of employees, 8,700 A
portion of the increase in output has been
absorbed in additional work by employ-
ees, hence the number has not grown in
full proportion, but the workmen have been
benefited by more steady employment.


The amount of wages paid to employees Tle number of permits issued by tihe
for the past-year was $6,084.000. and tlh chief of the tire department for new build-
value of the product. $13,713,860. The im- *ngs within the city limit' for the year
portance of this great industry cannot be 1I1U4 were 501, compared with 458 the
overestimated, and its prosperous condi- vious year. Tile building done in the sub-
tion is a matter of congratulation. $tai2,000, ) a against *602,000 for the pre-
The amount of money on deposit in the vious year. The building done i nthe sub-
hanks of the city December 31. 1904, was urbs. outside the city lintits and of which
$3,500,872, a gain of more titan ten per no exact record can be had, is conserva-
cent. for the year. The items of banking tively estimated at double the year 1903-
capital, surplus fund and undivided profits which was *212,000-Zrrying the total
show a gain of 55 per cent. The estab operations in the building line in the city
lishment of the American National bank and suburbs beyond the million mark. A
marks the transfer of a quarter of a mil- portion of this, however, was due to re-
lion dollars from the deposit account toI placement in West Tampa of buildings
the item of capital. lost by fire.


The total number of business licenses ia-
sued by the city for the year ending Sep-
tember 30, 1904, was 1,228, with cash col-
lections of $26,924. Between October 1,
of the present license year and the 1s
of January, 1905, the number issued was
1274 and the collections $30,859. For the
same period of the previous year the nun-
ber was 992 and the collections $24,145-
an increase in number of 282 and in eash
receipts of $6,714, or 28 and 23 per cert.
respectively.
The number of State and county li-
censes issued for the year ending Septem-
her 30, 1904, was 1,598, the cash collected
Continued ao Page 11


Scenes in and Aroul Tampa.
THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.








10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


L. W. NATTOW.
1Damu? AND TOaRua


C. E. WORTH.
VIOC-PRWeIDMNT


HERSERT S. PHILLIPS.
EOMuTlANY


STOCKHOLDERS

Hon. C. E. Worth, Collector HIlsboroaw h Cownty.
A. C. Clewis, Esq., Presideat Exchalse NatlaAl Bask.
Abe Maas, Esq., Sealor Member Maa Bros.
Gordon Keller, Esq., Retail and Wholesale Clothier.
Hon. Herbert S.'Phlllips, State Solicitor.
L. S. Oppenhelmer, M.D., Surgeo:Tampa Electric Co. ad S.A.L.
Railway.
Prof. L. M. Hattoa, Master Accts.


702.704-706 FRANKLIN STREET


CAPITAL STOCK. $10.000
INCORPORATED 1904
ESTABLISHED 1890


JONE W3WflnSON,
Purlint attassoma Psttry C"

Th Chattanea Pttery Co, makers of
th Hrty Cua
The Chattanooga Pottery Co., sole man-
ufacturer of the famous Herty cups, has
a page advertisement in this issue of the
Record, to which the attention of our
readers is respectfully called. As an in-
edent merely we are publishing elsewhere
in this issue also a letter from James
Watt & SBo, of London, the well known
naval stores dealers of the great Euro-
pean metropolis, calling special attention
pean metropolis, calling attention to the
to the aup system of turpentining and ex-


J. A. CRA FtOD,
S*ctary Chattamo Pottery Co.


pressing the hope that the system may
becoipe generally in use in America, as it
is to-day in France. The system is be-
coming more and more popular, as it has
been clearly demonstrated that the cup
in lieu of the "box" not only preserves the
life of the pine, thus perpetuating the
industry, but actually produces more spir-
its and better rosin. The factory of the
Chattanooga Pottery Co. is located at
Daisy, Tenn., a short distance out from
Chattanooga, where a desirable clay is
found, and where the kilns are in close
proximity to the fuel. The general offices
of the company are in Jacksonville. John
Henderson, auditor of the Consolidated
Companies, is the president of the com-
pany, and J. A. Cranford, vice-president
of the Consolidated Naval Stores Com-
pany, is secretary. The company is never
able to supply the demand for cups though
the factory at Daisy has been improved
and enlarged at various times until it rep-
resents to-day a vast outlay of capital and
is a most up-to-date and scientifically con-
structed plant.

The Consolidated Grocery Company.
The enormous business done by the Con-
solidated Grocery Co., since the unity of
those three large concerns, the C. B. Rog-
ers Co., the Florida Grocery Co. and I. S.
Giddens & Co., is a proof positive that the
amalgamation was a wise one, Nor is this,
perhaps, to be wondered at, when we know
who are its immediate directors. The vol-
ume of business done by them as import-
ers and wholesale grocers in Provisions,
Grain, Hay, Flour, Grits and Meal is some-
thing very large indeed, keeping pace with
the onward march of the city, proving con-
clusively that it has fully merited and
retains the confidence of its customers.
Success is like a pyramid-broad at the
base as the thronging millions that crowd
it; towering upwards its point narrows:
scattered along its sides are the men who
have achieved something more than usual
prominence in the world of affairs. At
the top are the few who have grandly sue
needed, their forms lit up with the sun-
shine of merited fame, and so it is with
the Consolidated Grocery Company, Tam-
pa branch. Not a little of this success is
to be attributed to its being managed by
W. A. Gallaher, whose energy, quick per-
ception, true judgment and last but not
least, uniform courtesy to all who may be
fortunate enough to come in touch with
him, whether they be traders or visitors,
is proverbial and well known to every one
in Tampa and many other cities.


NUBIAN TEA F.r te Uwr a Kmsys

BENEDICTA A medie for wen

CUBAN RELIEF For Cok cr-."p a. I-

CUBAN OIL A 1lniumnt Mnequad fr Cuts, Bums
Bnitale aH Rbemmatism

A supply of these medicines is what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for prices and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,


64i************* M ------.

I J. A. Craig Bro.


239 W. BDy Street


EVERETT BOCK.


I Leaders in Men's and Boys Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

* Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.




The Bond & Bours Co.
WOLR ULE TAIL


HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Ilinas. Paints, Oils and Glass,
Stoves, Tinware, Country-Holloware.


10 WEST BAY STREET


A. a. PENOLETOl,
PreasdeaL


W. U. J111181.
Vim Pro&~


Jaclionvile, ria.


JAI LASIETER W. W. STOIPU US.
Gee Rimester. lat Treanuv


5he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers


D. %L IFLV.
WILLTIER BA
T. W. SMARdS.


402 t004 408 4o0 8t sa s street, .absmemla VIm.
IRECTOU:

**gM W IL


*4j&nff


IF YOU DOW'T FID IT I TIH RECORD WRITE U


- -- --~---









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11


A Veritable Love Feast of City Pride at

Tampa Board of Trade Annual Meeting,


Continuedlfrom.page 9.
for the State, $43,164.50, and for the coun-
ty, $22,73625. For the last quarter of
1904 the number issued was 1188, the col-
lections being $49,923. The gain over tlho
corresponding quarter of the previous year
was about 10 per cent. and when the year
is completed it will show a greater in-
crease.
The number of vessels arriving at an.d
clearing from the Tampa customhouse
during the year 1904 was 854, compared
with 694 for the previous year. The ton-
nage for 1904 was 794,447, against 591 ,'3
for the previous year. The gain in nu:..
her of vessels was 160, in tonnage, 202,191
-increases respectively of 23 per cent in
number of vessels and 40 per cent in ton-
nage.
While there are still some items lack-
ing to make an exact statement of the
tonnage coming into the Hillsborough Riv-
er, which is the harbor of Tampa, it may
be safely stated as not less than 321,000
tons, a gain of about 35 per cent over the
preceding year. The direct ocean tonn-ge
into the river from Havana, New Orleans.
Mobile, New York, Philadelphia and other
ports on the Atlantic have more than
doubled during the past year in its month
ly arrivals.
The number of persons carried on the
street railway for the year 1904 includ-
ing transfers, was 6,278,451, as against
5,426,073 for the preceding year-a gain
of 864,378 in number and more tihm 1;
in percentage. In this connection it may
be said that the Tampa Electric Company
is adding several miles to its trucks, and
a new company is preparing to install an
additional line in the city and suburbs.
Telephones-Number in use December
13, 1903, 2,913. Same date in-1004, 3,091,
a gain of 981, or plus 33 per cent. This
excellent showing follows the phenomena'
gain of 63 per cent during the previous
year.
Exports of phosphate from Port Tampa
for the year 1904 were 459,789 tons, val-
ued at $2,551,994, against 370,794 tons and
$2,410,101 for the previous year-making a
larger gain in volume than-in value.
The quantity of lumber exported from
Tampa during the year 1904 was 16,483
thousand feet board measure, valued at
$206,613, a gain of 70 per cent.
Notwithstanding the complete cessation
of shipments of live stock to Cuba during
the closing months of the year, the ex-


ports were 13,113 head, of a value of
$160,594-far in excess of the previous
year.
The quantity of fish shipped for tlhe
year was 3,789,694 pounds, with a value of
$127,160-an increase of 20 per cent in
volume and 25 per cent in revenue le-
rived from the returns.
A number of cigar and other manufac-
turing plants have been established in the
city during the past year, adding largely
to the wage earning population. The moit
notable of these is a plant for making
brick of lime and sand, which, although
the plant itself is located at Valrico, is
in every sense a Tampa enterprise.
A conservative estimate of the increase


whenever it does become a law this depth
will be certain for Tampa. In this good
work the ability and fidelity of Congress-
man Sparkman have been constantly em-
ployed, and this Board has lent its aid in
every way possible.
The following meteorological data for
the year are taken from the records of the
U. S. Weather Bureau, Department of
Agriculture, at Tampa, Fla.: Mean tem-
perature, 71.5 degrees; highest, 95 de-
grees, occurred June 4th; lowest, 35 de-
grees, occurred December 29; number of
days on which temperature reached above
90 degrees, 45; freezing temperature was
not experienced during the year. Total
rainfall, 44.80 inches; greatest amount of
rain in any one month was in August,
9.29 inches, and the least in April, 0.66
inches; the average number of days per
month in which so much as .01 of an inch
of rain fell was 9. The sun shone 3,064


recreation, and they are to be supple-
mented with gymnasiums ad theatres,
schools and the like. The ultimate result
will be the establishment of a "home feel-
ing" among those people, their full satis-
faction with their surroundings and be-
longings in Tamps and their complete
and permanent identification with us in
all the qualities and functions of eitisen-
ship. To say that this condition is ear-
nestly wished for amd will be duly ap-
preciated, when it fully and finally ar-
rives, by every one is needlessly wasting
words.
During the year there has been thrown
open to the use of the public a commod-
ious and elegant building for the transac-
tion of business with the representatives
of the government. It occupies a conven-
ient and commanding position, its appear-
ance is creditable in the highest degree, it
is perfectly arranged, and is in short the


Tampa River Front and Street Scenes.


for the year is 5,000-making 40,000 peo-
ple in the city and suburbs.
Within the past few days the Rivers and
Harbors Committee of Congress has framed
a bill in which an item provides for the
construction of a channel in Hillshorough
Bay to a depth of twenty feet. It is be-
lieved the bill will pass at this session
but if it fails, the fact is settled that


Hiblaoro County Court House.


hours out of a possible 4,453, or 69 per
cent of sunshine during the year. The
highest wind velocity of any five minute
period during the year was 33 miles per
hour, from the northeast, October Id.
There were 145 clear days, 164 partly
cloudy days and 57 cloudy days. The av-
erage relative humidity was 79 per cent.
These figures compare favorably with
those of any locality in the world for the
conservation and promotion of health,
and as permissive of outdoor activity
without danger.
One of the most important and valua-
ble additions which have been made to
the city during the past year-one which
is worthy of special mention and com-
mendation--is the virtual completion of
two sanitoria by the Spanish-speaking peo
pie, one by the Centro Espanol and tl.e
other by the Centro-Asturianos societies.
Their combined cost will exceed one huIn-
dred thousand dollars. and when fully
equipped they will be entirely up-to-date
in all their appointments and give Tampn
rank in this particular with the largest
cities in the country. It is also well under-
stood that these institutions are but the
beginning of plans for a complete minis-
tration to the peculiar wants of our Latin
people in the line of social amusement and


acme of architectural and utilitarian de-
sign. Its cost was $365,000, and it is su-
perior in all essential respects to any gov-
ernment building in the Southern States.
I may be pardoned for mentioning the
fact that the excellence of the structure
and the good fortune of Tamps in pos-
sessing it are largely due to the labors
and influence of our indefatigable repre-
sentative in Congress.
All intelligent persons can easily ascer-
tain for themselves from this report and
the comparisons made therein that the
progress of Tampa has been continuous
for years in growing proportion, and that
it bids fair to continue until it becomes
the second of all cities of the Gulf. An
argument on the subject would prolong
this report to a tedious length, and it is
therefore dismissed until the secretary
is able to issue a publication which he
holies to do at no distant date.

COMMISSARY CHECKS
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

ldustrial RecOrl Ge.


IF YOU ARE PROGRzSS881V ADVERTISE IN THE RECORD.









12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


W.1 FVLLLE


F. D. JACKSON


W. W. CARM.E


W. R. FULLER & CO.


WHOLESALE




Groceries, Fertilizers and Building Material


MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS


Ibb Wh* w0 tuo st Tampa, Fla., U. S.A.


WAREHOUSES s
SeeLbord Air LUn Railwr y.
Atlantic Coast Line Railway.


PACKERSS.
FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,


Cable Addre.
"FLLER"
Economy 1 Robison Code.


Specialty. RUBEROID ROOFING.

Thirteen years record for Durability and Efficiency.


u a m s e O I $ O g . g someusmgs tes sellssmeauui


The Cooperage Company, Jacksonville.

The Cooperage Company of Jackson- and the finished product unsurpassed.
ville, organized by those who are inter. The following buildings are to be con-
eated in the manufacture and disposition structed: Cooper shop, 100x210 feet, with
of naval stores, has commenced the erec- warehouse wing 65x100 feet, two stories
tion in Jacksonville of a plant which will h'gh. Height from grade to crown of
represent an outlay of over $75,000, and roof, 48 feet, contains engine room, 20 feet
will have the largest capacity of any plant by 20 feet. and toolroom, 16x20 feet.
Engine room to have 175-horse power en-
-- -g.ine, dynamos, etc. There is to be an out-
side covered platform 12 feet wide and
S212 feet long, and one at end 65 feet long.
-. The lower portion 210xl00 feet, to be useI
as a cooper shop, while tile balance ol,
Sthe first floor and the entire second floor
. to be used as a storage room for barrels.
which will be moved from the first floor
to the second floor with an improved ele-
ator. The storage capacity of this build-
ing will be over 20,000 barrels. In addi-
tion to this storage room, barrels will Ix
i made and stored during the dull season
at the various handshops throughout Geor-
gia and Florida, and thereby guarantee-
ing an ample supply of thoroughly seas
oned barrels on hand at all times.
Thile building will be equipped with i
full line of the most complete machinery
J. C. LITTL, for the manufacture of both tight and
Sslack ba:rels. such as spiritss of turpentine
et The Cooperage Company. l arre's. barrels for cottoneed oil. sirup
I'arrels. fish barrels. potato barrels and
rOi'4r^-wV^O I kin !red packages. Improved conveyors
of its kind in the South. This plant is lo- wi'l be placed at each machine, conveying
cated on the Seaboard Air Line Railway, the sawdu-t and shavings to a fire-proof
immediately west of the naval stores rounm in the engine house. Furnaces will
yard, having 11 1-2 acres of ground, with he fed direct f:om this conveyor, thereby
a frontage of 975 feet, with private double- avoiilding handling tile fuel.
end hidingg running entire length of lot, In addition to the albove, a full line of
giving facilities for handling raw material veneering and crate machinery will be


E. H. MOTE,
General Manager The Cooperage Company.
put in for manufacturing lettuce baskets,
bean baskets, tomato carriers, peach car-
riers and all kinds of fruit and vegetable
packages.
Tie dry kilns to be constructed in con-
nection with this plant are to be in keep-
ing with tlhe general, complete and serv-
'ceable plans of the large plant. The di-
lnension's atre to be 45x104 feet; total
height. 24 feet: to be of brick, with gravel
,oof. It is to be built in two compart-
.eIl-. to be operated singly or together,
the Standard dry kiln process to be in-
stalled. Thls building will be fitted with
-tcel tracks. which receive the loaded
trucks, which are transferred to trucks
running to the cooper shops. The kilns
to be erected at this plant are the most
coinplete tlat could be procured.
The boiler house will be 40x06 feet, all


brick; total height, 24 feet, with steel
trusses and metal roof, containing a bat-
tery of four 80-horsepower boilers. The
five-foot steel smokestack running to the
height of 75 feet from the ground.
The stave mill is to be a heavy frame
construction, open below; dimensions to
be 60x75 feet; total height, 36 feet; con
tains an engine room 18x19 feet, with 75-
horsepower engine. In this room will be
located the machines for sawing staves
and heading, both for tight and slack bar-
rels. These saws will cut into staves and
heading large quantities of bolts and logs
that will be shipped in by the carload.
In this room will also be located a veneer-
ing machine for cutting all kinds of crate
material. All of the machinery will be
of the very latest pattern.
In connection with this mill will be
a yard of sufficient size for storing several
million staves and pieces of heading, that
same may be thoroughly seasoned. In
order to make the best barrel, it is ab-
solutely necessary that the stock should
remain on the yard, and be air-dried at
least three months before putting into the
package. It is the Cooperage Company's
intention to furnish the operator with the
best barrel on the market and with the
facilities they have for keeping several
months' supply of material cut ahead,
there is every reason why they will be
able to turn out a barrel that will give
satisfaction, especially in view of the
fact that the closest attention will be paid
to the culling of the material and putting
the barrel together.
One superintendent's house, containing
six rooms, three mechanic's houses, con-
taining four rooms, and twelve mechanics'
houses containing three rooms, will be
erected. These houses will be supplied with


AM3 TOU A IUDMUlCA TO THE RECOD








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


C. H. BARNES,
Secretary and Treaurer The Cooperage
Company.

electric lights from the company's plants
on the ground.
A six-inch artesian well has been put
down on the premises, so as to insure an
ample supply of water at all times.
A water tank is to be erected on tihe
most improved steel frame, 75 feet from
the ground, 20,000 gallons capacity. A
standard system of pipes will run through
all parts of the building and grounds,
thereby reducing the rate of insurance.
The plant when completed, including
cost of building and machinery and other
improvements, will represent an outlay of
$75,000 or more, and is considered by dis-
interested parties who have seen the plans
to be the most complete plant of its kind
in the Southern country. This is in addi-
tion to the money invested in timber,
which will reach $50,000. The employees
necessary to operate this plant will be
over two hundred, the greater number of
which will be located in Jacksonville. The
capacity of the plant will be 1,000 barrels
per day, and other packages in proportion,
thereby guaranteeing parties who use bar-
rels and packages a supply at all times.
No expense will be spared to turn out the
very best package on the market, and by
the excellent arrangement of the building
the cost of handling and manufacturing
the material into packages will be reduced
to a minimum.
In addition to making barrels by ma-
chinery, the Cooperage Company owns and
controls at the present time ten hand
cooper shops. These shops are located over
Georgia and Florida, and supply the tur-
pentine operators with barrels in Alabama,
Georgia and Florida, reaching all points
via rail or water, equalizing freights with
any shops in the above territory.
The operators will remember that there
has frequently been ascarcity of barrels,
causing them annoyance and loss, and, in
addition, high prices were threatened in
the beginning of this season. Then, too, a
very inferior grade of barrels were sold.
causing great loss on account of broken
staves, poor material and bad workman-
ship.
In addition to this plan. the company is
looking for a location in (Georgia or Ala-
hama to erect another up-to-date barrel
plant. A central location is being sought.
so as .to reach the New Orleans, Mobile,
Atlanta, Savannah and Charleston mar-
kets.
This company owns large tracts of tim-
ber lands, and will manufacture the mate-
rial from the tree. They have already two


stave mills in the woods, cutting white
oak staves and heading. The capacity of
these is 9,000 staves each per day, and the
heading machines the same, making a
daily output of 18,000 staves and the same
of heading. They have cut and stacked in
the woods at this time stock representing
an investment in these materials alone of
over $50,000. These staves and heading
will be sent to the Jacksonville plant, put
through the dry kiln, and manufactured
into high-grade spirit barrels. In addition
to the stave mills now in operation, the
Cooperage Company will soon erect in the
woods another mill of the same capacity
as those mentioned above. The stave and
heading mill at the plant, in addition to
the three above mentioned, will give a
capacity of about 36,000 staves per day,
and the same number of pieces of heading.
In addition to tracts of timber that the
company already own, they are having in-
vestigated large tracts of white oak in
Alabama and Tennessee.
The organization of the Cooperage Com-
pany was brought about as a matter of
necessity and protection, one of the main
objects being to keep the operators sup-
plied with a good quality of barrels at all
times and at a fair price. As stated be-
fore, there had been a great deal of
trouble in securing barrels, and some of
those purchased were of inferior quality;
this had not only resulted in a loss to the
industry, but in a great and general an-
noyance. Those who are interested in
this company are the Consolidated Naval
Stores Company, the West-Flynn-Harris
Co., and the Barnes & Jessup Co., all of
whom are dealers in naval stores, and are
thoroughly acquainted with the trade and
the business in which this company has
engaged.
The capital stock of the Cooperage Com-
pany is $100,000, and the officers are J. C.
Little, secretary and treasurer of the Con-
solidated Naval Stores Company, presi
dent; John E. Harris, of the West-Flynn-
Harris Co., vice-president; C. H. Barnes,
president of Barnes & Jessup Company,
secretary and treasurer; E. H. Mote, for-
merly president of the Leesburg Cooperage
and Manufacturing Company, general
manager.
Board of Directors.
J. C. Little, W. J. Kelly.
John E. Harris, W. C. Powell,
C. H. Barnes, W. F. Coachman.
J. W. West.
The Cooperage Company may be set
Continued on Page 25.


CHARLES TEMPLE,
Author of the Article on Tampa in To-
Day's Record.
TME DRCO=D Is T= OVUW'V OGEAT TRAD JOURNAL


H


n



C)















I'
8
W







g















I.
10









14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


How the City of Tampa Has Grown.
The following complete report of Secre-
tary Calhoun, of the Tampa Board of
Trade, read at tile annual meeting of that T H
body, and given to the world, bristles
with facts and figures of a year's growth
-which cannot fail to arouse in the hearts
of all citizens of Tampa sincere congrat-
ulationi over the achievements of the past
and earnest allibiti o for greater acoml
plishnilnt.s ni the future.
When it is consider.red that lie increases
ill thile v.ariolls itellm- o"f lblu ile'" reo:cidedl
for the pst yer ae a y based on the ligures i
for the year 1903, whicli was the inost
reniarkalile year in the business advance
of Tamipa. the present figures become more i
significant than they would e otherwise. I
Every citizen of Tampa should read thel i
report carefully and should sendl out copies i
of it to their friends in other cities and 1
sections. in order that they may under-
stand how Tampa is maintaining its stead.
and rapid progress and becoming a bigger
and better city ever year that passes.
Customs Collections.
For 19-1M ................... 1.501,18!.73
For 1903. ................... 1.318,531.58S
Increase 114 per cent.) ........ 182,li58.15
Internal Revenue.
Collections 194 ............... .:96..252.67
collectt 'on- I!HE3 .............. .. 10,06(H. 44
Increase 417 per cent.) ...... S(i.1. 123
Postoffice.


Receipts 1904 .................$60,267.11
Receipts 1!903 ................ 47.597.1i
increase li24 per cent) ........ 12,6(i9.95
Cigar Industry.
Output 1904 ................. .196,961,000
Output 1903 ................. 167,631,000
Increase (17 per cent) ......... 29,330,000
Workmen employed .......... 8,700
Wages paid 1904 ............ .$ 6,084,000
Value of Product 1904 ........ $13,713,800
Banking.
Deposits (Dec. 31) ............ $3,506,872
(Increase of 10 per cent.)


"PANTHER" BRAND PAINTS


NOTE:--et wash Im 1e water
-inw


Building.
Permiits issued i19H4 ............. 501
Permits issued 190M ............ 458
Cost 1904 ..................... $tii2,0100
Cost 1903 ...................... .$402,000
Business Licenses.
Number (ity issued 1904 ........ 1.274


Office and Salesrooms 206 Zack Street.


\uml:;er City issued 1903 ........
Increa-e (28 per cent.) .........
Amount City 1904 ..............$
Amount City 1903 .............
Increase (23 per cent) ..........
Number County issued 1904 ....

(Increase of 10 per eest.)


992
282
30,859
24,145
0,714
1,188


Ocean shipp
Vessels clearing 1904 ............. 854
Vessels clearing 1903 ............. 094
Increase (23 per cent) .......... 100
Tonnages 1904 .....................794,447
Tonnage 1903 ................... 51,93
Increase (40 per cent.) .......... 02,501
River Sippiag
Tonnage 1904 ....................321,000
(Increase of 35 per cent.)
Street Raiway.
Passengers 1904 ..............6,278,451
Passengers 1903 ................5,46,073
Increase (15 per cent.) .......... 854,378
Telephones.
In use 1904 .................... 3,84
In use 1903 .................... 2,913
Increase (33 per cent) ............ 981
Phosphate
Tons exported 1904 ........... 459,780
Tons exported 1903 ............ 370,794
Value 1904 ................... $2,551,994
Value 190i ................... $2,410,101
Cattle.
Exports 11904 ................. $100,594
Fisah.
Pounds Exported 1904 .......... 3,789,094
Value .......................... $127,100
(Increase 20 per cent in volume and 25
per cent in value.)



Turpentine Operators.
We ca'l your especial attention to our
prices as pul lished in this i sue, and as-
sure you that we appreciate the damage
to your interest by the recent freeze and
wll help you to the extent of this cut in
prices, which leaves us only a living. The
rumor that we are going out of business
is false and is being quietly circulated by
people who would injure us. We are here
to stay. Yours truly,
THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
Per J. P. Council.


THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


Review of Naval Stores for a Week. SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903-04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Price Repts Sales Exp. 1904


Mon., Feb.
Tues., Feb.
Wed., Feb.
Thur., Feb.


0
7
8
9


t %| 3 I 40 128 I4
13 100 347 64
2 81 115 0 64
1 52% 141 106 52 64


Rels for the Week at Savamah.
Monday, Feb. 6. Last Year.
WW .. .......... .15 3.75
WG ............ 6.00 3.45
N ............ 4.75 3.35
M ............ 4.50 3.30
K .... ....... 4.0 3.25
I .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3.50 3.20
H .. ........ 3.15 2.85
G .. ....... .... 286 2.85
F ...... ........ 2.70 2.80
E .. ............ 265 2.75
D ............ 2.0 2.70
ABC .... ...... 2.60 2.70
Receipts 858, sales 0, exports 1,680.

Tuesday, Feb. 7.-BRoin firm; receipts
1,8L; sales StU; shipments 960. Quota-
tons: A, B, C, W.55; U, .657 1-2; F, i2.6W;
U, $2.821-2; 11, r.15; 1, W3.0; K, 4.0ob;
M, $4.50; N, $4.76; WG, 5.00; WW, 45.1b.

Wednesday, Feb. &.-Bosin firm; re-
ceipts, 1526; sales, 1,713; atupments, 1,248.
Quote: A, B, C, $265; U, 42.57 1-2; E,
$2.i0@$e.tl3 1-2; F, $2.66; U, 2.i5(@2.8&
1-2; t, $3.15; 1, 3.50; K, $4.05; M, t4.W0;
N, $4.75; WG, $5; WW, $5.15.

Thursday, Feb. 9.-Rosin firm; receipts
1,278; sales 1,192; shipments 2,535. Quo-
tations: A. B. C, $285oa 2.57 1-2; D, S.5
1-2; E, $2.60@$2.2 1-2; F, $2.65(g*2.6
1-2; G, $275(4J.80; H, $3.10; 1, 3.50; K,
4.06; M, $4.50; N, $4.75; WG, $5.00; WW,
15.15.

Savanaah aval Store Statement.
Spirits. Bosin.
Stock April 1 ........... .,496 44,50
Receipts Feb. 8 .......... 141 1,278
Receipts previously ......171,065 578,992

Total ............... 177,61 624,820

Exports Feb. 8 ........... 52 2,53
Exports previously ......156,631 548,467
Total ..............156683 551,002

Stock Feb. 8 ............ 21,008 73,818
Stock previously ........ 7,753 102,946

Baley & Meatgomey's Review.
New York, February 8, 1905.
Spirits Turpentine-tock 779 barrels.
Market during the week has been very
dull but steady all the week. This was
partly owing to the condition of the
streets and harbor from snow and ice.
No business being done except in a small
jobbing way.
Thursday, Feb. 2-55c. asked.
Friday, Feb. 3-55c. asked.
Saturday, Feb. 4-55c. asked.
Monday, Feb. 6-66c. asked.
Tuesday, Feb. 7-66c. asked.
Wednesday, Feb. 8-55 l-2e. asked.
Rosin-Stock, 23,700 barrels.
This market has also been quiet for the
same reason as stated above. Business has
been quiet.
AC, $2.87 1-2; graded, D, $2.95; E, $3.00
to $3.05; F, $3.05 to $3.10; G, $3.15 to
$3.20; H, $3.40 to $3.45; I, $3.80; K, $4.35
to 4.40; M, $4.75 to $4.80; N, $5.00 to
$5.05; WG, 5.5 to $5.30; WW, $5.40 to
$5.45.

New Naval Stores Co.
Another great company has been organ-
ized for the purpose of taking a hand in
the development of Florida. It is the
Hodges, O'Hara & Russell Company, with
a capital stock of $400,000. The incor-
porators of the company are F. 8. Hodges,
H. A. Hodges, F. J. O'Hara and F. G. Rus-
sell.
The general character of the business as


Receipts
Spirits, casks ................ .........
Rosin. bbls. .............................
Total .... .. ........... ................
Exports
Spirits casks .......... .... ........... .
Rosins, bbls ..... ........................
Foreign
Spirits, casks. .. ......... . .. .. .
Rosins, bbis .... .....................
New York
Spirits, casks.............................
Rosins, bbs. ............ . ...
Sundries
Spirits, casks. .........................
Rosins,bbls. ............ ...........


1903-04 1902-031


198,647
650,988
844,585

188,398
762,270

98,8384
838,171

35,658
87,853

59,351
826.746


1901-02


292 496, 814,846
940,507 1,071,446
1,238,038 1,385,780

296,430 814,876
975,428 62,687

206,109 217,446
504,178 585,042

42,765 63,797
138,121 129,059

87,556 48,633
387,784 898,586


outlined in the application for a charter is
to manufacture and deal in naval stores,
timber and real estate and all business in
common with those mentioned.
The company is to have headquarters in
Jacksonville with the following officers:
Henry A. Hodges, president; F. G. Rus-
sell, vice-president; F. J. O'Hara, secre-
tary and treasurer and general manager.
All these gentlemen are residents of Jack-
sonville, with the exception of F. J.
O'Hara, whose residence is given as Buf-
falo Bluff.

Knight & Wal Co.
Tampa is the recognized center of mer-
cantile activity and no interest has at
tained such a remarkable degree of devel-
opment as the hardware business, and
prominent among her most active, enter-
prising and successful houses engaged in
this line of trade is that of Knight & Wail
Co., located od the corner of Lafayetee and
Tampa Streets. Messrs. Knight & Wall
are one of the oldest firms in the city and
are highly esteemed in commercial circles
for their enterprise and sound, well-bal-
anced judgment, together with their me-
thodical and straightforward system of
doing business. This establishment makes
a specialty of guns and sporting goods,
doors, sash, blinds, paints, oils and glass
and are the special agents for various
manufacturing firms among whom may be
found the Erie City Iron Works, Amer
can Pulley Co., DeLoach Mills, Canton
Pump Co., and many others too numerous
to mention here, but which will be found
on the advertising columns, and we would
desire to mention that at Havana, Cub, .
they have also a branch of their business.
most Americans making it a bureau of in-
formation, catering there very largely to
the sugar and tobacco plantations, and are
agents of the State for Cuba, Porto Rico,
John Derre Plow Co.
Such businesses do much to encourage and
build up the reputation of a community
from an industrial standpoint and make
for the community in which they are lo-
cated a name in the industrial marts of a
new and rejuvenated South. Again, they
bring work to Tampa which might have
been taken elsewhere. We cannot conclude
these remarks without mentioning the
name of Mr. Bashford, to whom we ar-
indebted for these particulars and great
courtesy when visiting their magnificent
warehouse.


THOSE. G. HUTCHINSON
FEULLW AEUcAN ASSOCIATION OF
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
Resm 7, Beard of Trade Bldg.
P 3es 312 JACKSONVILE. fL


ZINC NAILS


Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the 4 ia-M which % ill not injury
saws when left in the trees.

Slem NMail Co.
MT PAMPI 8t. NOw rY.P*, Y
Also Headqearter for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Et Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.


and Rosins for Three Years.
1903-0. Crop 190-03
Spirits. Rosia.
Mo,1W7 1,AN 113,68
3,15 3,007 11835
660,91 270,670 940,07 31
18427 68,947 7 44,106
50,80 18,29 79,272 2
133,1 33,103 108,033
closed 3,38 32,148
44,14 10,07 46,M
205,982 38,275 1981,6 1
653,10 91,976 376,211 7
elomed 13,56 4, 1

,M00,36 571,090 2,184,818 M


Crop 1901-4
Spirits. Resin
16,M51 II.44
3,004 13,270
13,068 1,071,44A
r9,0 28t,16
1,050 ,573
1,038 4,336
8,177 47A@7
8458 5,515,
17,786 15416
'o,06 245,166
.5a24 51,779

3,492 ,212,413


mports of Turpentine to U. I.


The following table is compiled by James Watt & Son, of london, from the
ofcial returns. For convenience of comparison we have turned cwts int,. barrels
-320 cwt. equal 100 barrels.
1897 166 1899 1900 1901 1908 1900
From U. S., bbls. .... 162,652 173,785 149,375 174,445 193,428 16,122 143&1
From France, bbls.... 161 24 517 2,283 869 1,66 4,630
From other countries.. 1,494 878 60 140 63 904 51

1654,01 174,07 149,942 177,56 194,341 157,6 148,97
From Russia .......... 2,816 4,188 4,998 8,21 6,61 8,711 17,06

Total Barrels .. 167,2 178,000 154,940 186,090 201,20 106393 10,592
Thus the import of Russian Turpeatine (or Wood Spirit) in 1903 was double
that of 1902, and over six times as much as in 1807. It is interesting to see how
this import fluctuates with the price of American Turpentine.
Percentage of Import of Russian ..1.79 2.33 3.22 4.57 3.41 .4 10.56
Av. Price Amer. Turp. i Im L doa .t1- 24- 34-1 36-4 37-1 33-1 4d-*

COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITSAT SAVANNAH FOR FIVE YEAR&


April 1 ..................
April 8 ..................
April 16 ...................
April 22 ..................
April 29 ...................
May 6 ................*...
May 13 ...................
May 20 ....................
May 27 ...................
June 3 .................. ..
June 10 .......... .........
June 17 ..................
June 24 ..................
July 1 .... ..............
July 8 ...................
July 15 ........... .. ... ....
July 22 ..................
July 28 ...................
Aug. 4 .......... ........
Aug. 12 ..................
Aug. 19 ...................
Aug. 26 ...................
Sept. 2 ....................
Sept. 9 ...................
Sept. 16 ..................
Sept. 23 ...................
Sept. 30 ..................
Oct. 7 ....................
Oct. 14 ....................
Oct. 21 ...................
Oct. 28 ...................
Nov. 4 .......... ..........
Nov. 11 ...................
Nov. 25 ..................
Nov. 25.................
De .2 ....................
Dec. 9 ............ ...... .
Dec. 16 ...................
Dec. 23 ...................
Dec. 30 ................... .
Jan. 6 .................... .


1904-06
ND
63
54%

5466

54%
53%

542%
62%

52%
563
52%
52%
53%
53%
52%
53%4

64%
54%
52%

52%
52%
52%
52
52%
511/2
50%
50
50
48%
36%
47%
48-%/
501/4
491%
50


1903-04
ND
50
49%
47
45
45
47 %
47%
49
45%
46
4e'
41%
47Y,
47%
48
491/

52
52
55@%
54
54%
56%
57
55
57
55%
56%
55%
56
56%
56
56
56
56
56%
656%
56%
57%


1908-03 1901-08
45 34
42% 32
42% 32%
43 31%-32
42%-43 32
43 32
45 31%
45 32Y,
45% 32%
47% 32
48% 33%/-%
47/% 34%V
46% 33%
45% 34%
44%/ 34%
44 33
43% 32%
43% 34
44% 33
44% 34
44% 34
45 33%
44% 34%
46 34
46% 33%
47% 34
50 34%
51% 35
53% 35%
49 35%
52 35
50 35%
51 35
50% 35
51 35%
50% 35%
51% 35%
52 36%
52% 36%1/
04 37%


1900-01
53%
63%
46
47%
47
48
49
49
46
44%
43%

42%
44y%
43

42
43%
344%
38

39%
34
35%
36%
37
37
37%
401/
401
40
41
40
39
39
38%
37%
35
35
37


The recadpt of spirt are la than 1902-03 by 98849 cause, and do rsins, 289569 barrels


Crops of Spirits
Orop
Spirits.
Wilmington...... ....l ,11
Charleston.......... 2,40
Savannah......... ..178418
Brunswick.......... 55,003
Mobile.. ...... ...... 1215
New Orleans.......... 3,017
Carrabell...... ......elosed
Georgetown......... 7,516
Pesaeola.. ...... ..42554
Ja. & Feradia.. .... 187,210
Tamps .... ..........elosed

Total....... ......636,916









16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

^-i- -*-******* *--------*f ------------


W. W. CARNES, Pres.


W. C. THOMAS, Manager.


C. T. DUDLEY, Sec. a Treas.


Tampae Hardware Co.


Wholesale Hardware


Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies[


Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks and Pullers on hand. *

TAMPA, FLORIDA. M





The Consonliated Compan;es and the Men Who Manage Them,


In this issue the Record presents a pic-
ture of the front elevation of the mag-
nificent seven-story building being erected
on East Bay Street, Jacksonville, by the
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., also the
warehouses, wharves, etc., in connection
with the same which will be used by the
Consolidated Grocery Company. This will
be the largest building in Jacksonville, and
one of the finest. In this issue also the
Record presents for the first time a com-
plete group picture of the officers and di-
rectors of the Consolidated Companies,
who were re-elected at the annual meet-
ing held in Jacksonville last month.
The only changes in the group since the
organization of the company two years
ago are the additions of W. J. Hillman and
R. B. Powell to the Board of Directors.
It may be interesting at this juncture to
refer briefly to these well-known business
men individually:

Mr. W. C. Powell, the president of the
Consolidated Naval Stores Company, is a
North Carolinian, who was prominent in
the business and educational circles of
that State before he moved into the tur-
pentine fields of South Georgia sixteen
years ago. Fourteen years ago he con-
ceived the idea of a co-operative factorage
business, in which all the operators, who
were stockholders, could share in the reve-
nues, giving them the enjoyment of reve-
nues not only from the production, but
from the marketing of their products.
On this basis the Savannah Naval Stores
Company was organized, which was suc-
ceeded, on a larger and broader scale, by
the Southern. The success of these two
corporations was phenomenal. With a cap-
ital stock that never averaged more than
$300,000 the companies paid over a mil-
lion dollars in dividends alone in the twelve
years of their existence. Mr. Powell has
always held the operator first in heart.
He is in thorough sympathy with them.
He is a man of quick perceptions and great
organizing and executive strength.
Mr. Powell is now a resident of Jackson-
ville and is closely identified with a num-
ber of industrial and financial institutions.
He is a director of the Atlantic National
Bank and director of the West-Flynn-Har-
ris Company, naval stores factors.

Mr. W. F. Coachman, vice-president, is
a native Floridian, who was trained in the
railroad service. He has been one of the
most successful business men in Florida
due to his remarkable executive ability
and his fidelity to the confidences im-


THE CONSOLIDATED BUILDING.





_-- --_-_ J- _-
^^ Bfl WW,-'cy'*A r ,."


'71




-rF
t H-
zzI4~~14- zV


The main building is 70 feet by 105 feet, seven stories high. The front is In-
diana and Oolitic Limestone. The sides are lead colored Cocina Brick. The first
floor will be occupied as offices by the Consolidated Grocery Co. and the four top
floors by the Consolidated Naval Stores Co., the Cooperage Co., the Chattanooga
Pottery Co., the Consolidated Land Co., and other allied companies, and there will
be a few offices for rent.
The building will have marble, iron and brass stairs and will have two passen-
ger elevators and one freight elevator. The floors in all the halls and corridors will
be Tennessee marble tiles and the wainscoting in all the halls will 'be Georgia
marble. There will be elaborate cornices, beams and pilasters in the hallways, giv-
ing them a rich and attractive appearance. The windows will all have metal frames
and wire glass, affording the best possible protection against fire. There will also
be a standpipe and automatic sprinklers throughout the building. A huge pine
burr, about seven feet high surmounts the structure, emblematic of the naval stores
industry.
In the rear of the seven-story building is a three-story warehouse, provided with
ample fire protection, 75x90 feet, and a wharf and one-story warehouse in the
rear 105x400 feet, these to be used by the Consolidated Grocery Co., as shown by
cut elsewhere.
THE RECORD IS THE SOUTH'S GREAT TRADE JOURNAL.


posed in him. He is a man of great busi-
ness ability, coupled with good judgment,
and when the two are linked there is never
a failure. Mr. Coachman was the first man
to undertake the handling of naval stores
in Jacksonville, and did so when many old
factors in Savannah told him it would be
impossible for him to succeed. The Florida
Naval Stores and Commission Company
was a great success from its very begin-
ning. Mr. Coachman and Mr. H. A. Mc-
Eachern, who was until the formation of
the Consolidated the vice-president and
general manager of the Mutual Naval
Stores Company, have done more in de-
veloping the naval stores interests in Jack-
sonville than any other persons. The city
of Jacksonville owes much to these gen-
tlemen.
Mr. Coachman is identified with several
large enterprises. He is president of the
Florida Bank and Trust Co., with a capital
stock of $1,000,000, the largest in Florida.
He is president of the Consolidated Land
Company and a director in various corpo-
rations.

Mr. H. A. McEachern, vice-president, is
another native North Carolinian, who came
to the turpentine woods from the school-
room. He came for his health, and he has
made both health and wealth. Mr. Me-
achern enjoys a large acquaintance with
operators, and is in as close touch with
them as any man in the business. He or-
ganized, with Mr. A. S. MeMillan, since
deceased, the Mutual Naval Stores Com-
pany, of this city, a very successful faec
torage house from the beginning. It was
based on the same cooperative lines as the
Southern, and the present Consolidated.
Mr. McEaehern was vice-president and
general manager. He is a man of keen
business judgment, true to his friends
and faithful in the discharge of his obli-
gations. He is prominent in a number
of large corporations and is a director of
the Florida Bank and Trust Co.

Mr. H. L. Covington, vice-president, is
a native North Carolinian also. He was
formerly one of the largest and most suc-
cessful operators South Georgia ever had.
He was the outside manager for the Down-
ing Company for several years, and was
next to Mr. Downing in making that com-
pany such a great success. Mr. Covington
was the first man to establish a factorage
concern in Florida, which was at Carra-
belle. It afterwards developed into the
Gulf Naval Stores Company at Pensacola,
with branches at Carrabelle and Tampa.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


WE SELL THE EARTI


-11


OfLCES,
REAL ESTATE P 203-204 American National

LOANS.AGL TON & rR CBa ilding,
LOANS.TAMPA, RORDA.


He is now in charge of the Consolidated
Naval Stores Company's business at Pen-
sacola. Mr. Covington is an unusually
strong business man, and has been a most
influential developer of the industry. He
is also a prominent banker.

Mr. B. F. Bullard, vice-president, is an-
other North Carolinian, and one of the
most successful men in the industry. He
operated in the woods for a number of
years very successfully. He joined Mr.
Powell in the organization of the Savan-
nah Naval Stores Company, and the tw.o
have worked continuously in harness t.-
gether in the co-operative factorage busi-
ness in Savannah since. He is one of the
best known naval stores men, both as an
operator and factor in the business to-day.
He has extensive interests throughout
Georgia and Florida, and is active in their
management. His keen business judgment
is always felt to good effect, and his great
success has demonstrated his strong exec-
utive force.

Mr. John R. Young, vice-president, is a
Lownes County, Georgian, and another
most successful factor. After leaving the
University of Georgia he operated for a
year or two and then began to travel for
Peacock, Hunt & Co., and subsequently
organized the factorage firm of Ellis, Holt
& Co. On the death of Mr. Holt, he be-
came the manager of the Ellis-Young Com-
pany, and is now the head of the John B.
Young Co. Mr. Young is a man of bil
heart and fine business capacity. He is
one of the most popular men in the indu.-
try. He has large business investments.
is president of the National Export and
Tank Company, president of the Gulf
Transportation Company at Cedar Key
and a prominent banker.

Mr. J. A. Cranford, vice-president, is
another Lowndes County Georgian, and
an unusually good business man. He ope-
rated for a number of years in the woods
successfully, and his interests became so
extensive that he decided to go into the
factorage business and handle his own
product and that of others he could get,
and seven or eight years ago he organized
the Cranford-Henderson Company, which
did a most satisfactory business at Sa-
vannah for a number of years. About
five years ago he merged this business into
the Gulf Naval Stores Company, and be-
came general manager of the Tampa house.
His efforts have always been successful.
He is one of the best posted timber men
in the business, and looks particularly
after that branch of the business for the
Consolidated.

Mr. C. B. Rogers, who is at the head of
the grocery branch, is another North Caro-
linian. He made a great success in the
retail grocery business in Cedar Key, and
afterwards moved to Jacksonville and or-
ganised the C. B. Rogers Company, which
S has been one of the most successful firms
ever established. He is not only prominent
in business affairs, but in polities as well,
and has represented Duval County in the
State Senate. Mr. Rogers is in active
OCetlnued os Pade 21


Officers and Directors of the Consolidated Land Co;


i. W. F. Coachman, President. 2. J. A. Cranford. 3. J. C. Little. 4. B. Wilson 5B.. F. Bullard. 6. H. L Cov-
ington 7. A. McEachern. 8. W. C. Powell. 9. C. B. Rogers. 1o. C. Downing. xx. D. H. McMilla.
The Consolidated Land Company is one of the auxiliary companies of the Consolidated Naval Stores Company. The
stockholders are the same. The company has extensive holdings in timber lands throughout Florida and they are offered to
operators at reasonable prices. In addition to timber lands, the company owns considerable grazing and prairie lands.
Individual references to the officers and directors of this company, with one exception, are made in the article concerning the
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., which appears elsewhere. Mr. Wilson, the secretary and treasurer of the company, the ex-
ception in question, is one of the most experienced real estate and timber land men in the State. He brought to the
company a ripe training which is not only of advantage to the company, but to the operator who may become a customer.
Readers of the Record are requested to give attention to the full page advertisement appearing elsewhere in to-day's issue.


DOwrT FAIL TO 9ETOB T3 RECORD TO ADVERTIU3R









18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
JAM A. KOLLOMON.
jbin ad Manager.
Prbioeh Every.grrNMty.
ti o(Domesti). -.8.3.0 Fl Annum
(Foreign) .... 8.10


-The rPine A"de Productsots.


AN oM-M-uataeM shOeN bo aMe
The Induwtrial R.cord Company.
J1.cklonville Fla.

aemes Ed eraland ueuno ess ffle o at
Atlanta. Ga. 1 Savannth. Ga.

entered at the Postofie at Jacksornville,
Fhe., s seond-elas matter.

Ad~o d by &the Exm tive Committe of
tbe T U Operators' Asrais"m .
Septeber I, 10, as itb oxeladin ve i l
rma. Adoptl d n annual convention
Beptbw 11 the arga als of the
al eoolatloL
Adoted Ail 7th, 1903, as the official
xw a of th tertate 0a O Growers' AS-
oedtion. Adopted Sp. 11, 190, a the
mly 09ai1 orgun of the T. O. A.
ow amm e to lumber people by spedal
ewoittos adopted by the Georia Sawill


CO"I FOR ADVERTISING.
Advrtaiug copy (dh w e r nw ad-
vert n t) should reach u Tuemlay
momang to h rt iartire in the em of
the e woek.

THw RECORD'S OFIICS.
The pmlih poIt a the main o-
fMte of the Indutrial Recerd Pubhahing
C. are located at l. x Soutk Hoasu
Street, Jacknei, Fla, in the very hart
ae the geat twrptife a-d ydelow Pi
endutrim. Bunch ece, Savunnah, G,
and Atlata, Ga.

NOTICE TO PATRONS.
Altl pymeta fer advertsing the In-
dutdial Reord and msbacription thereto
mut be made direct to the home office
in Jackaosfle. Aguts are ot allowed
to akhe coectilel uder any circum-
atance Bi. for adverteing Uad sb-
criptioe are met out frm the home
emce, whom de, ad all remittance mast
be mad direct to this comply.
Batdsttlal Pubtishing Co.

"TAMPA-WHAT IT I"
Acting upon orders received from our
editor and manager, Mr. James Hollomon,
I have these past ten days visited the
beautiful city of Tampa, and collected
from every possible source the accompany-
ing authentic facts and information con-
cerning this most lovely and progressive
city of the South, and it is the general
belief that although between Tampa and
Jacksonville there would ever exist a keen
rivalry, it would always be on the most
friendly basis, producing such object les-
sons of the greatest value to each city,
which if accepted by either would in no
small degree largely help their progress
and future development. In conclusion, I
should be unworthy of the great kindness
received from all were I to omit mention-
ing in particular the valuable assistance
and courtesy received alike from Mayor
F. A. Salomanson, President Fuller, Sec-
retary Calhoun, of the Board of Trade,
and President T. J. L. Brown, of the South
Florida Fair Association.
Respectfully yours,
CHARLES TEMPLE,
Travelling Correspondent.


The Florida Bank and Trust Company

With One Million Dollars Capital.


WITH DUE CREDIT.
The Record returns its thanks to Hon.
W. F. Stovall, editor of that progressive
morning paper, the Tampa Tribune, for
use of several of the illustrations used to-
day in the Tampa article. Mr. Stovall
is one of the most successful newspaper
men in the State and is much admired by
his brethren of the press throughout the
State.

THE CUP SYSTEM.
In a letter to the Record from James
Watt & Son, of London, England, enclos-
ing pictures of cups on trees, the firm
writes:
"We think these pictures, showing the
French or "Cup" System of tapping the
pines, may interest you.
"The superiority of this method to that
of 'boxing' is so obvious that we are glad
to know that it is, at last, being adopted
in the United States. By the new method
the trees can be tapped for 40 years, in-
stead of 4, and yield far more spirits of
turpentine and pale rosin all the time,
than when 'boxed.'"

APPRECIATED.
Jacksonville, Fla., Feb. 6, 1905.
Industrial Record Publishing Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.:
Gentlemen-We desire to compliment
you upon the new cover in which the In-
dustrial Record of 3d inst. makes its ap-
pearance. We are glad to note the evident
purpose and intelligent effort to make the
Record a worthy exponent of the best
interests of industrial enterprises in this
part of the country.
Very truly,
REALTY TITLE & TRUST CO.
By Carrol D. Judson, Secretary.

AN IMPORTANT COMBINATION.

Development of the Great Southern Piano
House of Ludden-Campbell-Smith.
For nearly thirty-five years the names
of Wm. Ludden, J. A. Bates and A. B.
Campbell have been household words in
the State of Florida. From the organiza-
tion of the Southern Music House and
the Florida Music House in 1870, the above
gentlemen took the lead in the southern
music trade, and by their liberal and fair
methods built up a trade far in advance
of any of its kind.
In the year 1901 Mr. Ludden and Mr.
Bates withdrew from all connection with
the Savannah, Ga., branch of their busi-
ness and in company with Mr. A. B. Camp-
bell and Mr. Jaspersen Smith, for years
the treasurer of their house, formed the
well known Ludden-Campbell-Smith Co.,
with headquarters at Jacksonville, and
branches at all important points in Flor-
ida. This house not only does an immense
business in pianos and organs of standard
makes, but has the largest Southern stock
of sheet music and musical merchandise,
handling everything from a jews' harp to
a pipe organ. All who wish to deal with
the originators of the above great indus-
try should be careful to address the Lud-
den-Campbell-Smith Co., which will gladly
correspond and send free catalogues and
information to all its friends.
Among the well know operators whom
we have sold pianos to are the following:
W. J. Hillman, Consolidated Naval
Stores Co.; Mr. W. C. Powell, president
Consolidated Naval Stores Co.; Mr. P. L.
Sutherland; Mr. M. O. Overstreet, Mr. R.
J. Bishop and many others, to numerous
to mention.


The Florida Bank and Trust Co., capi-
tal one million dollars. began business in
Jacksonville on the 5th of January, 1905.
It bought out the business of the Mercan-
tile Exchange Bank, one of the most suc-
cessful financial institutions in the State,
and is now conducting business in the
beautiful marble front banking house at
the northeast corner of Forsyth and Laura
Streets, built in 1901-02 and formerly
owned by the Mercantile Exchange bank.
The Florida Bank and Trust Co. is the
largest banking house in the State, and
when it was organized, the stock was over-
subscribed fully half a million dollars.
The officers and directors of the bank
are as follows:
Officer.
Walter F. Coachman, President.
William S. Jennings, Vice-President and
General Counsel.
Arthur F. Perry, Vice-President.
W. Albert Redding, Cashier and Secre-
tary.
Francis P. Fleming, Jr., Trust Officer.
Executive Committee.
Walter F. Coachman, William S. Jen-
nings, Arthur F. Perry, Thomas V. Porter,
Charles E. Garner, Charles B. Rogers, Hugh
A. McEachern, Daniel T. Gerow.
Directors
George W. Allen, president First Nat-
ional Bank, Key West, Florida.
Charles H. Brown, president First Nat-
ional Bank, Live Oak, Florida.
Frank E. Bond, cashier Volusia County
Bank, DeLand, and Merchants Bank, Day-
tona, Florida.
William M. Brown, president Fort Dal-
las National Bank and president Bank of
Bay Biscayne, Miami, Florida.
C. W. Bartleson, president of the C. W.
Bartleson Co., wholesale grocers, Jackson-
ville, Florida.
W. F. Coachman, president of the com-
pany; president of the Consolidated Land
Company, and vice-president Consolidated
Naval Stores Company, Jacksonville, Flor-
ida.
A. D. Covington, president Hillman-Suth-
erland Company, and manufacturer naval
stores, Quancy, Fla.
Raymond Cay, manufacturer naval
stores, Jacksonville.
J. H. Crosby, president Greenleaf &
Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Florida.
John G. Christopher, machinery and mill
supplies, Jacksonville, Fla.
H. L. Covington, president American
National Bank and vice-president Consoli-
dated Naval Stores Co., Pensacola, Florida.
John H. Carter, president First Nat-
ional Bank, Quincy.
C. A. Carson, president State Bank of
Kissimmee, Kissimmee, Florida.
Albert Carlton, president Carlton &
Carlton, bankers, Wauchula, Florida, and
vice-president First National Bank, Ar-
cadia, Florida.
C. Downing, president National Bank of
Brunswick and president The Downing
Company, Brunswick, Ga.
John T. Dismnukes, president First Nat-
ional Bank, St. Augustine, Florida.
Frank H. Fee, president Bank of Fort
Pierce. Fort Pierce, Florida.
F. P. Forster, cashier First National
Bank, Sanford.
W. R. Fuller, president Tampa Board of
Trade, wholesale grocer, Tampa, Florida.


L A. Fraleigh, vice-president First Nat-
ional Bank, Madison, Florida.
James M. Graham, president First Nat-
ional Bank, Gainesville, Florida.
C. E. Garner, president Jacksonville
Board of Trade and president Independent
Line of Steamers, Jacksonville, Florida.
D. T. Gerow, postmaster, Jacksonville,
Florida, and manager Standard Oil Co.,
Jacksonville, Florida.
S. B. Hubbard, Jr., vice-president The
S. B. Hubbard Company, Jacksonville,
Florida.
A. M. Ives, president Julington Naval
Stores Company, City Treasurer, Jack-
sonville, Florida.
W. S. Jennings, vice-president of the
company, Jacksonville, Florida.
J. F. Lewis, president Citizens' Bank,
Valdosta, Ga.
J. C. Little, president The Cooperage
Company, secretary and treasurer Consoli-
dated Naval Stores Company, Jacksonville,
Florida.
W. S. MeClelland, president McClelland,
Hubbs & Isted, bankers, Eustis, Florida.
H. A. McEachern, vice-president Consol-
idated Naval Stores Company and treas-
urer Turpentine Operators' Association,
Jacksonville, Florida.
D. H. MeMillan, vice-president Consoli-
dated Naval Stores Company, Jacksonville,
Florida.
W. H. Milton, cashier First National
Bank, Marianna, Fla., and president First
National Bank, DeFuniak Springs, Flor-
ida.
James I. Munoz, general merchandise
broker, Jacksonville, Florida.
T. V. Porter, capitalist, Jacksonville,
Florida.
J. P. Taliaferro, United States Senator,
Jacksonville.
James Pritchard, president Indian River
State Bank, Titusville, Florida.
George M. Parker, general merchandise
broker, Jacksonville, Florida.
Arthur F. Perry, vice-president of the
company, Jacksonville, Fla.
C. B. Rogers, president Consolidated
Grocery Company, and vice-president Con-
solidated Naval Stores Company, Jack-
sonville, Florida.
Chas. E. Smith, vice-preesident Smith,
Richardson & Conroy, Jacksonville, Fla.
Telfair Stockton, real estate, Jackson-
ville, Florida.
P. L. Sutherland, president Bank of
Green Cove Springs, and vice-president
Hillman-Sutherland Company, Green Cove
Springs, Florida.
G. W. Saxon, president Capital City
Bank, Apalachicola and Tallahassee, Flor-
ida.
Lorenzo A. Wilson, president Wilson &
Toomer Fertilizer Company, Jacksonville,
Florida.
At the time of the organization, the
Florida Daily Times-Union had the fol-
lowing to say of the men who are at

Wei\nted
We will pay 25 cents apiece
for copies of the Weekly In-
dustrial Record of the follow-
ing dates:
January 31,1903: March 15,1908; April
24. 1903; May 1, 1908; May 29, 1908; Feb-
ruary 7, 1903.
Office of the Industria.l Record.
JaLckonville. FrL.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 19



THE CHRISTIE GROOVER Rou co.,


WHOLESALE DRUSIB TS.


~-EWT v AT A w iinAin 17.


- W -m FLOAM&


OFFICERS OF THE FLORIDA BANK AND TRUST CO.


men in Florida, with particular ability
for the line of work assigned to him in
the management of this great banking
house.
Shortly before the organization of this
banking institution was perfected, Mr. W.
F. Coachman, the president, who was the
moving factor in the organization, author-
ized the following interview:
"The Florida Bank and Trust Company
will be the result of an era of unusual
prosperity and development in Florida and
Jacksonville. The business requirements
of the times, in my judgment, demand
a large bank with ample capital to facili-
tate the rapid commercial and industrial
developments of the big interests that are
now here and will come when we have
deep water. Again, every man of large
business interests has realized for many
months the great need of a trust company
in Jacksonville. That is always one of the
essentials to a large and progressive city.
The surety feature, on the other hand,
will keep thousands of dollars annually
in Florida for investment that are now
sent out of the State by virtue of the


fact that there are no home bonding com-
panies.
"I am deeply gratified with the general
favor with which this proposition is being
received among business people."
Having large resources, conservative
management and a representative Board of
Directors, and being equipped with un-
excelled facilities for the transaction of
all branches of legitimate banking and
trust business, the Florida Bank & Trust
Company solicits the accounts and busi-
ness of corporations, firms and individ-
uals as well as out-of-town banks, prom-
ising the utmost liberality of terms con-
sistent with prudent business methods.
The company acts as trustee, transfer
agent, registrar, and fiscal agent for cor-
porations, cities, counties and States. Ex-
ecutes all that large class of trusts usu-
ally reposed in individuals such as execu-
tor, administrator, curator, guardian, re-
ceiver, trustee under will or appointment
of court.
The company is arranging to greatly
increase the size of its present building
to meet the demands upon ft in the con-
duct of its large business.


I. W. Coachman, Presidet. a. W.
3. A. Perry, Vice-Presideat. 4. W.
5.. P. Fleming,


the head of this great institution:
"In considering the possible success of
any great enterprise there are two basic
points to be considered-first, the necessity
for its establishment; second, its manage-
ment. The men who are behind the
Florida Bank and Trust Company assure
its success.
"Walter F. Caochman, president, is one
of the best known business men in Flor-
ida. He is vice-president and one of the
executive committee of the Consolidated
Naval Stores Company, president of the
Consolidated Land Company, and identi-
fied as official and stockholder in a half-
dozen more of the largest business inter-
ests in Jacksonville. He organized the
first naval stores factorage business ever
established in Jacksonville, the Florida
Naval Stores and Commission Company,
which paid perhaps the largest dividends
ever paid by any corporation in the city
to that time. His name is a synonym for
business integrity, and it is fortunate
that an institution of this magnitude has
for its president so able and conservative
a business man and one who is held in
such confidence by all the people.
"Governor W. S. Jennings, vice-pres-
ident and counsel, with especial
charge of the trust and surety depart-
ment of the business, is more peculiarly
fitted, perhaps, for that position than
any man in Florida. His wide acquain-
tance with public men and bonded officials
throughout Florida, his keen business judg-
ment, so ably shown on many occasions
as Governor, when the State's interests


S. Jennings Vice-President and CoNsL e
A. Redding Cashier and Secretary.
Jr., Trust Ofcer.


were at stake, his ability as a lawyer and
counselor, are all features well recognized,
which at once establish for him qualifica-
tions unequalled for the particular posi-
tion.
"Arthur F. Perry, vice-president, with
specific charge of the banking department,
is one of the most prominent young busi-
ness men in Jacksonville, and goes to the
institution with a banking experience of
several years to his credit. He has been
cashier of the Mercantile Exchange Bank
for years, and a safer and more conserva-
tive banker and yet one with more per-
sonal friends, cannot be found in Florida.
Mr. Perry has been wonderfully success-
ful in his private business interests, and
it was his intention to permanently retire
from the banking business at the close of
last year. Realizing, however, the great
opportunities ahead for this institution.
he decided to identify himself with the
same."
W. A. Redding, cashier, is a banker of
long experience and recognized ability. He
was for a number of years identified with
the Jacksonville National Bank in a res-
ponsible capacity and goes to the Florida
Bank and Trust Co. not only with the ex-
perience of years to his credit, but with
hosts of friends who have long recognized
his worth as a banker and general busi-
ness man.
F. P. Fleming, Jr., trust officer, is a son
of Ex-Governor Fleming and a member
of the well known firm of Fleming &
Fleming, lawyers. Mr. Fleming is one of
the ablest young lawyers and business


The HillmaneSutherland Company,

and the Men Who Manage It

The picture below shows the offers of fact that it has paid ten per cent cash
the largest firm of naval stores producers dividends on the stock besides creating a
in the world. The capital stock of the large surplus. The corporation owns an
Hillman-Sutherland Co. is $500,000, and enormous quantity of valuable timber
the corporation operates twenty-five places lands and in the entire operations is in-
in the manufacture of turpentine and eluded a line of steamers, owned by the
rosin. That the corporation is and has company, large sawmills, timber roads, etc.
been most ably managed is shown by the The officers of the company are among the


i. A. D. Coingta, PrideLt. P. L. Sutherl Vice-Predeit a Geaeral
Manager. 3. D. H. L Minln, Second Vice-Preset. 4. H. A.
Mcarchmn, Treasurer. 9. A. F. Pry, Secnmtay.


1kNPftP4W MWWAr AmwAw mrK =wAm Amr.







20 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
*I I II ll 9066** #4 1 ******# 11* 111114111t***1 *010 111 1# 1 **m#11111111111 llOas esl I $ Base s MAS a a


B. F. BULLARD. President.


L. J. COOPER., Vice-Pres. and General Manager.


BERNICE K. BULLARD. Secretary.


The Hillsborough Grocery Co.


Wholesale Grocers



Provisions, Grain, Feed Stuffs.

TAMPA. FLORIDA.

k We Solicit a General Store, Mills. Phosphate and Turpentine Trade.


r[a liuiaui 1116 llii a1a1ii 1ei1 aii~u. mmcimamameem.m,.i.m


UIsl III III 1macmmm m11111111111111111]


most prominent naval stores men in the
pine belt. Capt. W. J. Hillman, who was
one of the organizers and the first presi-
dent, voluntarily retired a few weeks ago,
desiring to be relieved from active busi-
ness care, and in looking around for a
successor, the directors unanimously chose
Mr. A. D. Covington, who has for years
been one of the largest operators in West
Florida. No wiser choice could have been
made. Mr. Covington is one of a family
of successful turpentine men and has been
most successful in all of his operations.
He is thoroughly experienced in every fea-
ture of the producing business, a most
careful handler of labor and a most able
and conservative business man. Mr. Cov-
ington is president of the Turpentine Ope-
rators' Association.
The vice-president and general manager
Mr. P. L Sutherland, is one of the ablest
and most successful young business men
in Florida. He is a native Georgian and
has beenin the naval stores business only
five years. In that time he has a series
of most successful operations to his credit,
and his business ability and physical ener-
gy has placed him actively in a number
of industrial and financial enterprises. He
is president of the Bank of Green Cove
Springs, director of the Florida Bank and
Trust Co., president of the Florida Daily
Sun, and a stockholder and director in a
number of other large and influential bus-
iness organizations. Mr. Sutherland* in ad-
dition to his business ability, is one of
Florida's most talented young speakers
and is frequently in demand in that ca-
pacity.
The other officers of the company are
D. H. McMillan, second vice-president, H.
A. McEachern, treasurer, and A. F. Perry,
secretary. References to all of these gen-
tlemen are made elsewhere in to-day's
Record, Messrs. McMillan and McEachern
being officials of the Consolidated Com-
panies, and Mr. Perry, vice-president of
the Florida Bank and Trust Co.

Eagleteo & Price.
There is no doubt but that the name
of one of our most energetic and progrei-
sive firms in the real estate business is
now very frequently heard in all busi-
ness quarters, and for that matter, at
home also. We allude with great pleas-
ure to the firm of Eagleton & Price, whose
offices are to be found at rooms 203-201,
American National Bank building. They
sell the earth, they state, and there can
be no question, judging by the business'
they do, that such is in reality the case.
Their lists of city property, turpentine and


sawmill locations, orange groves, farming
lands, and not forgetting their loan depart-
ment, is a very large one, and should you
want to buy any kind of property, in any
part of Florida, you will profit by calling
on or writing to them, and the best re-
sults may be anticipated. There can be no
question of the stability of this rising
firm. Mr. Eagleton has splendid business
ability, being many years at Ocala, and
Mr. Price, being the manager for F. P.
Collier & Son, New York, and travelling
many years for them, knows the lands
well, and gaining that practical experience
so essential to success and this we feel
sure is the case when we consider how
splendidly both are equipped with that
true judgment, quick perception, and last,
but not least, that uniform courtesy to all
whom they may come in contact with.



Florida


Electric Co.

Coltractig Elctrical Eglimers
Sell and Install Complete Electric Light
and Power Plants, Telephone Ex-
changes. Wholesale Electric
Supplies
Jacksonville, Fl.


Brick Machine

Wanted.
WANTED-Small steam power clay
brick-making machine in good condition.
Address-
BR.ICK MACHINE,
Care hlautrl Reserd, Jacksone e Fla.



Trade Checks
FOR THE

COMMISSARY mII1SS.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.


Cable Address. Florida


Standard Naval Stores

Company.

DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN

:, ROSIN

SAND TURPENTINE.
Jacksonville. Fla.
---- v V- - - -

THE

Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville.
UNITED STATUS DEPOSITORY.
Capital and Suph .............................. $ 4s5, oo.
Depoita ...................... .... .......... .z,goooo.oo
In addition to our regular banking business, we maintain a Savings Depart-
ment, under government supervision, paying interest quarterly.
We have for rent Safe Deposit Boxes in burglar and fireproof vaults at rea-
sonable rates, by month or year.

C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO..

WHOLESALE GROCERS
Grain, Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirement.
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514- 516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY SIKLL
Jacksonville. Fla.


...THE...

COUNCIL TOOL CO.
WANANISH. N. C.
Say. boys. we are ared ef wrMU-be camptVhr trying to etice
r skd kbr a eit i i rider that they my lears hw to make
od TelTs, Peace k moee abe dir taLn Froperity, a OWN
GOES TIE PICE.


Prices on solme#s oos em appllcaston.
Jan. 24. 190. J. P. COUNCIL.


112 WEST FORSYTH ST.


Black Joe ad Standard
Hacks.
5.O0 a doze .
DIaumd Edge Macks,
S. 00 a dozes.
Bsle Use Macks,
97.00 a dozen.
For Pallers add SOc a doea,
Nme bet marthoest ski a
best material used.


BELL PHONE NO. 592


HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY
A. J. HEDRICK. Manager. t Formerly of Hedrick L Raley
Sole agency for RBverside and adjoining property on easy terms. (The choice residence portion
of the city.) Improved and unimproved property in former burnt district, Springfield, LaVia and
other suburbs. Choice business property and Investments.
MONEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTORS.


TUE 33COUD IS Te5'@OERATONU 3UIJAUCE.


I









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 21


^taitPftP~t~ECPDLPftaa~SldM^ 't*1Et 158't'^*1 I *^i^^***


The average buyer knows less about the real merits of a musical
iatrunm t thi abut almost aay other thing. The purchase of a
pim is t as the investment is comparatively large aad
suadly me hut eace ia lie-time. YOUR BEST INT EEST lies is
deakg with experts of the highest reputation whose may years
experience euamles the to select intrumets BEST SUITED to
FlorM clhate-


W. LUtIEN. J. A. SATES.
A. B. CAMSELL JASPERSON SMITH
Since 1870 the leaders and best known names
in the Southern music trade. Through their
efforts over 100.000 instruments have
been placed in Southern
homes.
NOW CONNECTED ONLY WITH


Large corps of expert tuers ad repairers. Best facilities for
packig, sterig and shippag.
Skeet Music, looks Vius, Gtars. Talhg Machbes. Regia
Music exes. Everything kIow to mskic at lowest N. Y. prices-
All popular sheet music at e-e.luf price.
Free Catalogues.


LUDDEN-CAMPBELL-SMITH CO.


18 West Bay Street.


PIANOS. ORGANS.


Jackioinville, Florida.


Address as 0ve If you wish to deal with the
LEADING MUSIC HOUSE OF THE SOUTH


Remember, The Only Laddea, The Only Bates.
LUDDEN-CAMPBELL-SMITH CO.


Continued from page IT.
charge of all the grocery branches of the
Consolidated Grocery Company. He is a
man of great personal popularity, mag
nifcent business judgment, and his suc-
cess in managing large affairs demonstrates
his executive ability.


Mr. D. H. MeMillan, vice-president, is
from Robertson County, North Carolina.
He is thoroughly learned in the turpentine
business. He operated for some fifteen
years, and was extremely successful. He
was one of the incorporators of the Mutual
Naval Stores Company, living then at
Altoona, and after the death of his broth-
er he was elected president of the Mutual.
He is a safe and conservative operator
and factor, and is extremely popular with
the masses of operators. As one of the
managers of the Consolidated, he is of
great use to that company. Mr. McMillan


is a man of big heart, strong force of
character and good judgment. He is prom-
inently identified with a number of cor-
porations, and is a director in the Florida
Bank & Trust Co.
Mr. C. M. Covington, vice-president, is
also a North Carolinian. He was formerly
with the Downing Company in charge of
their grocery business, and from there
went to Carrabelle and was in charge of
the offices of the Gulf Naval Stores Com-
pany there, and afterwards became secre-
tary-treasurer of the Gulf at Pensacola.
He is an exceptionally fine office man. He


is now assistant secretary and treasurer of
the Consolidated Naval Stores Company
and manager of the grocery branch at
Pensacola of the Consolidated Grocery
Company. He is a very conservative bus-
iness man, careful and capable, wih hosts
of friends and a most successful business
record.


Mr. J. R. Saunders, vice-president, of
Pensacola, is a North Carolinian. He ope-
rated the mill and turpentine business in
Georgia for many years. Afterwards he
became interested in the management
of a large guano manufacturing company
at Valdosta, and afterwards bought large
bodies of timber in West Florida and or-
ganized the West Coast Naval Stores Com-
pany, and was president until that com-
pany went into the Consolidated. He is
yet in the transportation and mill busi-
ness, as well as in the banking and real
estate business. He is a very successful
business man, quick in perception, safe in
judgment, and with good executive ability.
Mr. E. A. Champlain, vice-president of
the Consolidated Grocery Company, is one
of the hardest working men in the busi-
ness. He has be.n one of the potent fac-
tors in building up the large and successful
business of the C. B. Rogers Company,


and knows the grocery business thorough
ly from start to finish. Mr. Champlain
enjoys great popularity with and outside
of the trade. He is a most painstaking
and conservative office man, with a judg-
ment that is almost faultless, and a most
remarkable ability in executive work.
Mr. W. A. Gallaher, vice-president of
the Consolidated Grocery Company, is a
Georgian, born in the grocery business.
Some years ago he was one of the organ-
izers of the Macon Grocery Company,
which had a phenomenal success. After-
wards he sold his interests there and
bought stock with the Ellis-Young Com-
pany at Savannah, and was elected vice-
president and manager of the grocery de-
partment, which conveniently fitted him
for the turpentine trade of Florida, which
he afterwards held. Four years and a


Continued on page 24,


The Consolidated Naval Stores Co. Building, Showing Warehouse and Wharves to be uoed by the Consolidated Grocery Co.


IF YOU ARE PROGRUSSIV8 E ADVERTISE IN THE RECORD.


%hII~1SJIS 1IILCEe)xJIIwSSX~E3E+ 55Sq%1+ES+5Edji







22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


uuuuuuuuuuu,,uu)u1w1uuu~euu~uuuuuuuum


COCA
Delicious.
R.efreashng,
413-415 HarrIson Street.
PNONE i


111668181#184111


COLA
Exhilarating.
Invlgorating.
TAMPA, FLA.
Is.


SIDNEY B. SHARPE. Manager.


McMURRAY & BAKER,
COIN by aid
w ill end i Ipnliu e HrllS. nfln "d
We sue s.seva her ua-edee pieasre ani bume reasm v m e~3e
Idabes, whb harue sad horse ftrallal we have a mehby L e Prms
as" em Ia iteek with a. T rpendae wa sa sad lra sssasart. De'@
fo st we ma beat e wored amad-emade bsresa.
lIT I BIER, 401 10 413 E. BIT SI.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


a. a. PrOWE, CaAS. C. IARWIS.
Preasiet. VIce.Presleant and treasurer.
DIRECTORS:
a. R. Pewell Chas. 6. larris, D. McMZllam, P. I. Satherland,
THE


MENRY ASMrLY,
Secretary.
R. V. Corvintom.


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Cerrf West ay ad ai sse. Sb.
Jacksmuville, florida.


Wholesale Drugs I Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices on
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and can save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.

Joseph D. Christie, Business Agent
eemi 303 SyaI-Uplepre.t Iuiags. Jacksenve, ri.
Teleboneo 455.
If you want to locate in Florida and contemplate going into business, let me
help you. If you have a business to sell, list same with me.


I es orul tr tla PVrONl r

Wwnf Ah# Saw Mill Tlihrf
10.000 Acres Saw Timber ....... ................ $2.50 to $5.00
40.000 AM ...... ......
50000 ........... .... per Acre.
26.000 Acres Virgin Timber...............
20o00o ...... $2.50 to $6.00
10.000 ........per Acre.
192.000 . .....................
ABmOe fON ew DMeI ffOe
BROBSTON. FENDIG & CO.

ri f oo** WWI"


Tampa Coca Cola Bottling Co.


M. A. BRIGGS, President.
H. C. BRIGGS, 1st Vice-President.


HOMEB BDOWN. 2fd ViePsreiLsat.
J. C. MoDONALD, See'y sad Thm


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.
VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-

SRIXFORD AXES.
Shey are the BEST. Others imitate but none du-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the finest
temper, hold the keenest edge. cut better and last longer
than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual use.
e Sead us your orders.
g W. H. BRIG66S HARDWARE COMPANY,
SVaidetam, GeergI.
9i~,W~ 9***gee" --C--------------------


STHE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
SJACKSONVILLE. FLA.
CAPITAL s30o000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PRORTS S300,
* We issue Time Certificates of Deposit, which draw latereut t the rate t thr er cast pe
Sma., if held ninety days or longer, Take advratage f t~ s and krt year sarimus e e
s sometUha fo.r yo ar attention paid to ut-of-Town aooouats. sead depoIt by

"Kingan's Reliable."
Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and.Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price.. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotatiods-
thispaper.
KINQAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Herbert A. Ford, Geo. H. Ford, P. L. Watws.
President. Vice-Pras. Cashier.
The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CA PI TA L, *0,000.00.
DIRECTons: R. L. Anderson, R. 8. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Mn Solicited.



= The Wire Virgin Gum Co.,
Is now ready to give you all the information you may want eomeering the
way we are now gathering virgin gum from high boxes. By the us of a
Stin lip put up doe to the shipping and so ranged to cause the gum to
strike wire and follow same down to the box, not striking the face of the
Street. Wire is fastened on by two small nails, one jut above the lip and
the other at upper edge of the oldbox, and strethed tight so as to keep
gum from dripping off, thereby making virgin gum and more of it. There
are many benefits and big pay where parties can get a good many high boxes.
SFor further information write to
THE WIRE VIRGIN GUM CO., TIFTON. GA.


The West-Raley-Rannie Company.
114 I. Forsyth Street, Jacksomvllle, Fla.
4. 5. WEST. rres. E. ,e-res. West. Asaie VricWe.-Pr. M. V .. Sec. a. rems.

We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.
4aAAAAAAAA~f1@@^666666 **e****-6 M "MM MM











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OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS OF THE C CONSOLIDATED COMPANIES.
i. W. C. Powel, President. W. F. Coachman, Vice-President and President Conolidated Land Co. 3. H. A. McEachern, Vice-Presideat. D. H McMilr ,
VicPresieLt. 5. J. A. Cranford, Vice-President. 6. B. F. Bullard, Vice-Presilent. 7. John R. Young Vice-President. C. M. Covington, Director Consolidated
Groery Co. 9. C. Downing Vice-President. lo. J. R. Saunders, Vice-Preaident. zz. C. B. Rogers, President Consolidated Grocery Company. s1. H. L Covingta,
Vke-Preidaet. z3. & A. Champlain, V ice-President Consolidated Grocery Co. z4. W. J. Hillman, Director. z5. R. B. Powell, Assitant Secretary and Treasure
and Director. x. J. C. Little, Secretary and Treasurer and President Cooperage Co. 17. John Henderson, Auditor and President Chattanooga Pottery Co. 1. W.
A. Galaher, Vice-Preid t Consolidated Grocery Co.


IC
:~C~L~



rthi;.~









24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.






J. M. MARTINEZ

MANUFACTURERS Or



CLEAR HAVANA CIGARS

TAMPA. FLORIDA



JI -smt-Note: My Leading Clear Havana Brand is NORMA MARTINEZ


XS~Clf~SC<1T

Continued from Page 21.
half ago the Florida Grocery Company was
organized, and he was made the vice-presi-
dent and general manager, which also had
a remarkable success. Mr. Gallaher is an
unusually fine business man; his ventures
are always large and always phenomenally
successful. He is manager of the Tampa
branch.

Mr. C. Downing, vice-president, is one
of the most successful and at the same
time one of the most popular men in the
naval stores business. He was the or-
iginator of the factorage business at
Brunswick, and does now one of the larg-
est factorage businesses in Georgia. For
years his company was C. Downing, Jr.,
& Co., and afterwards it was made a stock
company, with Mr. Downing president.
He has large business interests all over
Georgia. He is largely interested in the
Patterson-Downing Company, of New
York, and is president of the First Nat-
ional Bank of Brunswick. He is an ex-
tremely able business man.

Captain W. J. Hillman, director, is one
of the largest and most successful naval
stores producers in Florida. He has been
particularly engaged with the producing
end of the business, and has been most
prominently identified with the organiza-
tion of the turpentine operators. He was.
until his voluntary retirement, president
of the Hillman-Sutherland Co., the largest
firm of naval stores producers in the
world. He is one of the wealthiest men
in Florida, and one of the State's most
benevolent men as well.

One of the youngest men identified in
an official capacity with the Consolidated
companies is R. B. Powell, director and
assistant secretary and treasurer. Mr.
Powell is a son of President Powell and
a native of North Carolina. He is one of
the brainiest young men identified to-day
with the industrial progress of the South-
east, and is popular in business and social
circles. Mr. Powell is one in charge of
the Savannah branch of the Consolidated
Company.

Mr. John Henderson, auditor for tihe
two consolidated companies, is one of the
best accountants in this country. He is a
man of great ability and unquestioned
honesty. He was formerly a nmelnl'r of
tle firm of Cranford, Henderson & Co.,
and afterwards became assistant loanager
of the Gulf Naval Stores branch at Tanm-


pa. Mr. Henderson is also president of
the Chattanooga Pottery Co.


Mr. J. C. Little, secretary-treasurer of
the Consolidated Naval Stores Company,
is a Floridian. He was trained in rail-
road service and afterward was assistant
cashier of the Bank of Live Oak. He was
afterwards cashier for West, Wiggs &
Co., at Savannah, and when the Florida
Naval Stores and Commission Company
was organized he became assistant treas-
urer of that company, and also assisted
in the management. He is well fitted for
the position he now holds, and is a safe,
reliable young business man. Mr. Little
is president of the Cooperage Co., and a
director of the Florida Bank & Trust Co.
The Consolidated Naval Stores Co. owns
the Consolidated Grocery Co. and the Con-
solidated Land Co. The success of the
business has been all that could be ex-
pected. At this time the company is mail-
ing out checks for a 10 per cent cash divi-
dend for 1904, declared at the recent an-
nual meeting. A similar cash dividend was
paid a year ago. Besides this a large
amount has been placed in reserve. The
general offices of the Consolidated com-
panies are in Jacksonville. The Consol-
idated Naval Stores Company is the largest
naval stores factorage house in the world;
the Consolidated Grocery Company is the
largest wholesale grocery house in the
Southern States. The first has a capitali-
zation of $2500,000 paid in; the latter a
paid in capital stock of $500,000. Mr. W.
C. Powell, formerly the president of the
-Southern Naval Stores Company of Sa-
vannah, is president of the Consolidated
Naval Stores Company. Mr. C. B. Rogers,
formerly president of the C. B. Rogers
Company, wholesale grocers, of Jackson-
ville, is president of the Consolidated Gro-
cery Company. The Consolidated Naval
Stores Company is a merger of the South-
ern Naval Stores Company, Savannah, the
Florida Naval Stores and Commission Com-
."any, of Jacksonville. the Mutual Naval
Stores Co., Jacksonville, the Gulf Naval
Stores Co., of Pensacola and Tampa, the
WVest Coast Naval Stores Company, of
Pensacola. the Florida business of the
Downing Company, of Brunswick. and the
Florida busines- of the Ellis-Young Com-
pany of Savannah. The Consolidated Gro-
cery Company is a nlerger of the C. B.
Rogers Company. the Florida Grocery Com-
pany and the grocery departments of the
various companies forming the (onsdli-
dated Naval Stores Company.


Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advertisemets Wle ale Inserted Am rT s Departmut rt the F aewg Rafta:
For oneweek, oents a Use.
For two weeks, 35 oeata lime.
For threeweeks, aests a line.
For our weeks, eents a e.
Nine words of ordinary length mke one ae.
leading coats as two lies.
No display except the heading can be admitted.
Remittances to company the order. No extra charge for eopies of paper
containing advertisement. COpy meet be in this ofce not later than Thundmy
morningg to secure inertion in Friday's paper.


Positlio Wasted.
A position as stiller, very best reference
furnished. Address S. F. Johnson, Mur-
phy. Fla. 4t

Woodsua Wated.
Woodsman who is strictly sober and
capable of controlling and keeping labor.
Address, The Callahan-Colwell Co., Prid-
gen, Fla. 2t

For Sale.
4,000 acres sawmill timber for sale.
Water or rail transportation; a bargain.
Address Box 32, Pomona, Fla. 4t

For Sale.
Small turpentine location. Can work
about ten or twelve crops with about
four hundred acres round timber already
secured. Also one thousand acres back
box timber secured. Plenty of round tim-
ber available to still for four or five
years' cutting. Address T. M. Kelly,
Black, Ala. tf

Turpeatle Mee.
Buy a Blakeal- Gmohne Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. 1 outft pumps. %M
gallons per hour at a esat of 3 ents sad
requires no attention while
Started in one minute. J. P. a ,
Oeala. Fla.

Wanted.
A distiller. We want a good, sober
man with family, to run the still another
season. Can give steady employment
through the winter. None need apply but
first-class man with good references. Ad-
dress F. & W., Jonesboro, Fla. tf


STOP


PAYING


RENT!


Wasted.
To buy a irst-elas turpentie loeatio
in Florida. Wnll pay the right prim for
the right place. No at woods pla eMud
apply. A. A. Ptteway, Boz M0 Iay,
.Mar lh. tf

Wanted.
A good woodsman that can still or over-
look stilling wanted. Seven crops of vir-
gin boxes around the still. Gaulden,
Chaires & Co., Oldtown, Fla.

Help Swpplied.
Naval stores men can secure help by ap-
plying to the City Employment Bureau,
840 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
Wested6
Manager turpentine place tine e ing of
twelve crops virgin boxes, location flat
lands, eight miles from Apalaehieola. Ad-
dress Hays & Oven, Apalachicola, Fla.

Wanted.
Position by experienced bookkeeper and
commissary man with lumber or naval
stores firm. Best of references. W. J. S.,
care Industrial Record, Jacksonville, Fla.

Wanted.
A woodsman, to commence work at once.
Must be sober and able to furnish labor
to work or ride. Will pay the right price
to the right man. L. S. Petteway & Co.,
Gabriella, Fla. 2t

Wasted.
A first-class distiller with small family
must be able to furnish good reference.
L. 8. Petteway & Co., Gabriella, Fla. 2t


You have been paying rent for years. What have you to show
for it. Why not own your own home and buy same with the money
you are now spending every month for rent? You can do so and
have a long time in which to repay the loan and we only charge
5 per cent simple interest. Try the plan offered by
!eStandard Guaranty & Trust Co.
Of Wasih tenO D. C.
(Incorporated)
W. W. SHEPPARD. State Agt..
122 Stekt-4u Md if. JACKISOSWVLE. FLA


WR=T T2= RCORD 10210M 3FM ANY =1OU_"U 3


---- -~-~-








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 25

# g88 o8g8ol I 8a8 8I $s88888 oloOstos te II 1 l* **** 1 oSt8088 800 0 |8808 08880 loses8 t888o888$III8808 s800 08 0088I


Ludden & Bates Southern Music House

Exclusive Agents for the "MATHUSHEK," KNABE, CHICKhKIRNG, WEBR and other
High-Grade Pianos. Be sure of the name and where made, as that is all you have to
insure getting the original, and we'll know-" MATHUSHEK," NEW HAVEN, CONN.
Also handle the celebrated ESTEY, CROWN, FARRAND and LUDDEN & BATES
SOrgans, From the cheapest that is good to the best that is made. Write for prices and terms.


Ludden & Bates, Tampa, Fla.


- W. C Gaither, State Agent


~uuuauadm..a uguumausuuueausauas m,,. ,u., mmaueeeemgmuuummsumueuss ,)gmg,,ug


Anyone Wishing
a limited amount of paper cupe to be
delivered from January 10 toFebruary 10,
and as late as March 10 can get them
of Vickera patent by writing-
E. L. VICKERS,
TITTON, GEORGIA.


Continued from page 13.
THE COOPEKLAGE COMPANY.
down as a Florida enterprise, with head-
quarters in Jacksonville. It is to be one
of the largest as well as one of the most
important industries in the State, and
aside from employing a large number of
hands, and distributing sums of money
weekly in this city, it is to bring Jackson-
ville in closer touch with other industries
and with an excellent class of people in
all parts of the State, Georgia, Alabama
and 'Mississippi.
The location of the plant is a most ex-
cellent one, and as will be seen by the
plans named for the buildings and fixtures
that the plant is excellently equipped in
every way.
It will be noticed that, in order to fur-
nish the operator with a high-grade barrel.
made of first-class material, thoroughly
seasoned and well put together, the Coop-

BILTY I MOIITGMERY,
Commission Merchants,
Naval. Stores & Cotton
Liberal advance made agasiat p-
ments. Coniagmemtas eMited.
COTTON XCHANHGG BUILDING,
NEW YORK CITY.


-ANLCEe a.

FIRE INBURANCE--ILowt rate. Ia-
ren H. Green & Co9 a ud 10 Park Bgd..
Jacksonville. Fla. ae.


erage Company has made heavy invest-
ments, as indicated above, which it is
quite certain that the parties using bar-
rels will highly appreciate. The price of
barrels for another season will be made
as low as consistent with all that is best
to make a first-class package.
The far-seeing operator would do well


Presait a j Genral Mnsr:
W. W. CARES


not to contract for or engage barrels for
another season until they have interview-
ed or communicated with the Cooperage
Company of Jacksonville, which will be
prepared to furnish the operators in uiss-
issippi, Alabama, Georgia and Florida
with a first-class package at a satisfactory
price.


* a


Suwanee Spring


Ginger


Ale


Bottled from the famnou Suwanee Spring
water. Cures PI"~-~ri n Indigstion
and Kidney Trouble. The mos re,
freshing, natural, sparkling, Ginger Ale
known. Bottled and sold by the Lie
Oak Bottling Works, Live Oak, Fla.
For sale by GCo.widurd Grocery Co
Jacksonville, and RL Purse Sons & Co.
Savannah Ga.


c %%scE%%MS%% M


ERNEST KREMER


TAMPA FOUNDRY


and MACHINE CO.

MACHINE and BOILER MAKERS and
REPAIRERS. BRASS and IRON
FOUNDERS. TAMPA, FLORIDA
WW<<

Searotr s ald Trussmer:
A. K. MRi


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY


Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURER* OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,
Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located in the heat of the Lumber District gives es advan-
tage of chest material at lowest eeat.


THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.






26 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


LLLLLLLLLLL A L A A L LL LALL AL A Ar a


t. 1 45 a i i i t 1111 5t t1 11 t1 1i1t-14 -- -1 1: iT t 1 Ut I a I !t I I I A a,5 11 "#A -t a a a A A -AD


The



Cooperaege



Company


(I


CAPITAL
$100,000
*"*^Igj^


4.




c4.

444
<4.




4.




+


S
$


$
4.
4.
e *






+,




4.
!*










4.

4.





















4.

,.




4.
4.











4










+
+
+
+

+
*
+

4.
44


4.
*4.
4.





4.
4.
+
jw


Manufacturers of High-Grade


Western White Oak


Spirit Barrels


Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful
attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops
advantageously located.


J. C. LITTLE. President
E. H. MOTE. General Manager


J. C. LITTLE


JOHN E. HARRIS
W. C. POWELL


OFFICERS
John E. HARRIS. Vice-President
C. H. BARNES. Secretary and Treasurer
DIRECTORS


C. H. BARNES


J. W. WEST


W..J. KELLY


Wi F. COACHMAN

s, ,sl r r t t i , t s


a a a a a a S-- --- a a a S a -a ---


St-IT-l 1 5 1F F 55515-1TT-I I U1s1 6T I4 5T -I -IT-If I I TI-!t 1 I I IV
TEB RECORD I8 THE SOUTTHS GRBAT TRADE JOURNAL.


Jacksonville, F0la.


:T::tT 'In T WUtT 1-T 11TTftW:i


~-~--


ctb







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 27
mA ASSSSS S aWak I hA ASWA e SM ASSSHS45% W SM


W. F. COACHMAN,
President,

W. F. Coachman
C. Downing,


J. A. CRANEORD, J. C. LITTLE,
Vice-President. Treasurer.
DIRECTORS:
W. C. Powell, B. F. Bullard, C. B. Rogers,
H. A. McEachern, J. A. Cranford,


S. B. WISON,
Secretary.

H. L Covington,
D. H. McMillan.


Consolidated Land Co.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA,


Has For Sale Approximately


TWO MILLION ACRES



VIRGIN PINE TIMBER


AND SOME VERY FINE PASTURE AND FARMING LANDS,


Much of this timber is very fine for turpen,

pentine purposes, and can be divided into
Locations to suit Turpentine Operators, and
will be sold at reasonable prices,


=m RE TRooOm 3AT"-am mm& & "
ft


- - - - - - - -- - : -


--~~~~~~~~---~----~~


rV V V V V -V .vv








28 IMS 'WXNKY JDU Iui lAL KECOUD.


President,
J.. 8. CRAFT.


yryry-r-~Lu~rc~u-Y-~--2 :Y-u-ramuu: uum-y-y~r~ruuu~


Vice-President and Manager,
H. BOMFORD.
Director and Secretary A. W. PRICE.


Directors.
P. ). WALLU
A- W. PRICE.


The H. Bomford Plumbing and Supply Company

107-113 LAFAYETTE Si Kt u. TAMPA. FLA. PHONE 278


CONTRACTORS FOR

HIGH-GRADE SANITARY PLUMBING
STEAM HEATING. ETC.
MILL SUPPLIES AND PUMPS.


AGENTS FOR J. B. COLT & CO.


86I01 emma011 48II 5 Il u AuIm smi > I


McMILLAN BROS.,

florida Copper Works.
Nmmatsrers of

Turpentine Stills
a eumeral etl Workers.
Old still taken in change for
new ones. Patchg through the cou-
try a penalty. Order by mail or
or wire will receive prompt attention, *
at either of the lowworig works:
rAYETTEVILLE.N. C. SAVANNAH. GA. 0
MaeLE, ALA. JACKSOVILLE, FLA. s




East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Steamer Shipments a Speclaty.
WATEITOWN, FLORIDA.


C. ILM. ACRES. Pros


J. D. SHAW, Vsee-Pr.


RALPH JESSUP, See.-Treas


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Prducers' Cempany. Guages,
Grades amd Weiglts Guaranteed.
Deiveris at Jatksonville, Pensacela, Fernandla and Savannah
CerrS aen es SeUited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.




DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ast a call. We can show yes, at correct ad mey
making prices, many papers of looe pure wlhte, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is ow desire to cndtlae being the largest
Diamoaa dealers In Jacksrvii. ead Oer specialty Is 11ne roMed-
cut gems and higi-grade Waltham and Elgin Watches.

HE UC DiaioAds, Watches, Jewelry,
SL O OLA II1113ik.nSt., 338 hy, Jadkil, Fla.
%%%5%5 ......a.....aM8<% _%% %%% a%


PLUMBERS' SUPPLIES
STEAM SUPPLIES. GAS ENGINES
ACETYLENE GENERATORS AND PUMPS
GASOLINE ENGINES. BO TH STATIONARY A MARINE

N. B.-All mail orders receive our promp a .d careful attention.


GEORGIA TINTR-STATE SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
Minimum Coastwi Price List for Merchantale Rules 9o4. Adopted at Tift,
Geria, July Ir, 1904.
'eet JFeM m J e et ee kecti et t'eeti eet bc. t knot
SIZES 2f0 U 21-25 26-30 31-3650 41-41 46-6qo 61-66 60-60 01-66
1 x10 to 2W10.... 412Al"018.641 4.60 84)l1U 41.i 0064 a6 U&ht.fV2A"M' 0W
2/11xl0 to 810.... 12.00 1860 13.60 14.00 16.50 17.60 20.00 23.00 2&.00 3
8y4x10 to 100.... 12.0 13.00 14.00 15.60 16.50 18.60 21.00 0 2LO .0 37.00
I x11 to 2x12.... 14.00 16.60 1&A0 180 21.00 24.00 2.00 32. 38.00 41.
2%x12 to 10l12.... 13.00 13.60 140 160 1860 21.00 S340 2&80 3400 43.
10>/x12 to x11x2. ...0 3.60 14.00 16.60 1.0 19.50 22.00 20 30.00 360 4
1 x14 to 3x14.... 1L.00 19.00 2000 .I 24.60 27.O S32. 37.0 44.00 67.1
3yx14 to 1214.... 14.60 1.0 1.00 20.0 2.00 24.00 28.00 3280 40.00 600
2I4xI4 to 14x14.... 16.0 17.00 19.00 21.00 23.00 26.00 30.00 340 42.00 66.00
I xI0 to 410.... 20.0 22.00 240 27.60 31.00 34.0 3.&00 42.0 6.00' SM.
4%x16 to 12x16.... 19.00 20.00 22.00 25.0 29.00 31.00 36.00 30.60 48.00 6
12%4xO1 to 16x6.... 19.60 20.60 23.00 26.60 30.0 33.00 37.00 41.00 000 .0
2 x18 to W 18.... 24.60 21 260 10 3.00 39.00 43.00 49.00 8.00 79.0
6Ox18 to 14x18.... 1.00 2.00 26.00 2.00 3300 37.001 41.00 46.00 67.00 G0R.
1414xl8 to 1818.... 3.00 f2.0O 27.00 30.00 34.00 38.001 42.00 46.00 s a 74J
Term: et Cash.
Price are 0. B. Car Savannah, Brnmwick, eramndina and Jackmi vile


NOTICE.
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Association, held at Jacksoville,
Fla., March 15, 1904, the following Cluai-
fication and Rules for Ianetioa of Yel-
low Pin were oeially opted, eetivo
July 1, 1904:
Classificatti and Ipectiem of Tellow
Pine Lum.b
General Rule-All lumber must be
sound, well mmunfctn, full to vs and
saw butted; free from unsound, loaoe and
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;
through shakes, or round ahakes that
show on the surface; square edge, unless
otherwise speciled. A through shake a
hereby defined to be through or coneted
irom side to side, or edge to edge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken;
less than one inch thick shall be measured
as one inch.

CLASSIFICATION.

Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: 1x3,
4, 5 and 6; 1%x3, 4, 6, and 6.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
inches and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %, 1, 1% and 1% inches
thick by 7 inches and up, wide.
Scastling
Scantling shall embrace all sizes from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2x3, 2x4, 2x5, 2x8, 3x3, 3x, sx, 3x0, 4x4,
4x5, 4x6, 6x5 and 6xa
Plank.
Plank shall embrace all sixes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness.
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1%, 2,
2%, 3, 3%, 4 4, 4%, 5%, 5%x7 inches
and up in width.


Dimensie.
Dimension sines shall embrace all sims
6 inche and up in thickness by svmn
inches and up in width, including six by
six. For example: 8xx, d, 7x7, 7xa,
and up.

Steppin shll embrace one to two and
a half inches= in thickness by seven inLhes
and up in width. For example: 1, 1%,
1%, 2 and 2%x7 and up, in widt
Rough dge or Flitch.
Rough Edge or Flitch shall embrace all
sizes one inch and up in thickness by eight
inches and up in width, sawed on two
sides only. For example: 1, 1%, 2, 3, 4
and up thick by eight inches and up wide,
sawed on two sides only.

INSPECTION.
StanarI.
All lumber shall be sound, sap no ob-
jection. Wane may be allowed one-eighth
of the width of the piece measured aeroe
face of wane, extending one-fourth of the
length on one corner or its equivalent na
two or more corners.
tarcelptabl9e
All sies under nine inches shall show
heart entire length on one side or edge;
sizes nine inches and over shall show
heart the entire length on two opposite
sides. Wane may be allowed one-eighth of
the width of the piece measured aeroas
face of wane, and extending ope-fourth of
the length of the piece o oone corner ur
its equivalent on two or more corners.
Prime
Scantling shall show heart on two faces
the entire length; other sizes shall show
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 6 per
cent. of the pieces, wane may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the piece meax.
ured across face of wane and extending
one-fourth of the length of the pieces on
one corner or its equivalent on two or
more r 'ners.


IF YOU ARE PROGRESSIVE, ADVERTISE IN THE RECORD.


ISININdE ~ E~IS IIS&NNIIS I SI IISI 56ISN SS NI N SS YAOOW1%568616ISS








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 29
---..,L


The Oldest Whiskey

House in Georgia.
(l.essasd in smas.)


OLD SHARP WILLIAMS
Guaranteed 8 years old By the
gallon, $3.00. 4 full PIr"
GI| I. C= Prepaid-
GO0. J. COLEMAN RYE
Guaranteed 0 years old. By the
gallon, *2.75. 4 full quart., $.00
ECque Prepaid.


ANVIL RYX
Guaranteed 4
gallon, &50.
CLI tORD RYg
By the gallon,
*2.60.


year old. By the
4 full 2.75.
press Prepai.

2.25. 4 full quarts
ZZPi Prepaid.


OLD KINTUCKY CORN
Guaranteed 8 years old. By the
galln .00. 4 fu rts, .
OLD POINTr CLUB CORN
Guaranteed 4 year old. By the
gallon, $2.. 4 full quarts, .75
3=qrm Prpai.
We handle all the leading brands of
Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the mar-
ket and wil save you from 25 per cent
to 50 per cent on your purchases. Send
for price list and atalogue. Mailed free
upon application.
TheAltWMr& Flat UmrGs.
o-5ses-so-si rFourth truet,
MACOM GOORGIA.



This Spaee Reserved for

Gus Muller & Co.

WhaboesLi

Liquor Merchants

Proprietors


Jasoutl httWU Works

..Aa.. m...


ACME BEER



U *he a .* wwef-aw
Ema'o e "~dm "" ow


Se all orders for printing for the
turpentine ad cemmmainry tram te
Record *fme to iasure a prmpt delivery.
CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Best in the World.
For delivered prices write,
Cypress Teom Co. MohlsAla
H ROBSONIN.Pres. GAILLARD,. Ouser
W. B. OWEN. Viac-Pre..
Commercial Bank,
State Depsitory.
BaUCcam: Oeals. Pa.. Lake City. Fla
Jacksm nville, -- - forida

THE CANNON COMPANY


BARRELS

ARE THE

STANDARD

OF THE

WORLD


Use no Other


Plants coaveieatly located.
Home Office, OUITMAN, GA.
U.S.A.


LuM I lae I MI Cb.
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertiliser, Oil and lee Ma-
chinery, and Supplies and Repairs.
CAPACITY FOR 300 HANDS.
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machinr,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hl Leather am
Rubber Belting and HobA, mud and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps, Feed Water Heater and
Hoisting Engines.
AUOUStA. QA.

Whiskies, Gins,
Rums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM tf CO.


917 wad 519 West Bay Street. ,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
TUB aRCORD IS THJ


W. T. RILUy, J. A. 6. CAIRSON, GO. J. SCOVEL, -
President. Vce-Presdeat. SeW. Wd -Tres.

Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Factories,
8th Street R. R. Crosing.


JACKSONVILLE.


FLOWIDA


... NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH. GA.. U. S. A,


JOHN R. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.
DIRECTORS:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L. SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. I. YOUNG.


H. L. KAYTON,
Secretary and Treasurer.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. H. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.



SJ. S. Schofeld's Sons Company,

*y Headquarters for
A -Distiller's Pumping
So l Outfit. -
Hu No plant complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
S( Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
South Carolina. Write us for partio-
0 lars and prices. We also manufacture
t Engines, Bollers awd High t
Grade Maeslimry,
Jh as well as arry A full cndomplete
-----stookof-
II Mill Supplies, Pipe,
S1 Belter Tubes, Etc.
*H Advise your wants.
SW Macon, - Georgia.
o* Af Ta Wit fw TasM iit FoImr Ps
-******** ********* ***s** *-**** ****4* : ******:

John R. YounC. J. W. Motte, C. B. Parker, James McNatt, W. W. Wilder,
President Vice-Pres Vice-Pres. Vice-Pres. See. k Tress.



John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.

Savanannh dL Brunswick. Ga.

*OPZ ATOR' RXLIANMC"








0s THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BRCO D.


THE


COVINGTON


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Co.


Wholesale


SHOES -

DRY GOODS.


4" Success


For Our Customers


is Success


For Us."


ABSTRACTS
Title and Tax Abstract, Maps, et.,
of large tracts in all parts of Florida and
South Georgia, prepared for owners and
intending purchasers. Correspondence
solicited.

REALTY TITLE AND TRUST CO.
1aw Exchange Bldg., Jacksonville, Flt.


WM. D. JONES
PRESMRPTION SPECIAST

FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.
MaM orders Sellcited.


THE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
xztatit the st Without isreya the
weml -M Rus. o t a me la less thma
twenty-fer haer. Maims bee twenty to
terty-ae raises tram emrl at wee.
Mahas- p water white lit hfre rm
the oewr at ta or a resete. No ebseah
uaed tno rem the spita. Needs to be
dati only meo after eoman ro re-
tMq,.
No treMe with -preodauets the spirits
pr us oa to be far the m et ever pro-
dme& and ktm wood. Only -n grade
of l lt pgrelues" ara that the highest.
ARMOLUTLY NO DA.IMOR 3rOM FIR
vwrkmen. Th1e dapest mebae emwe di to
the pubba.
We abeage eeompule at eutpt ad
ty at p t We guarantee output
and 4111tty.
TiM nF k t C tmctiM Cupmy
P. O. am WL. RA.Im. C.


COURSE OF PALK AND MEDIUM ROSIMS AT 8AVAmNAH FOR TWO YTARKS


W.W.


DATE
pril.........
april 8.........
april 1 ........
April 2 .......
May 13 ........
May 20 ........
May 13........
June 3........
June 27........
June 13........
June 10........
June 16.
July 1 ........
July 7 ........
July 1 ........
July 28 ........
Aug. 4 ........
Aug. 12 ........
Aug. 18 ........


1904-06
*410
3.9
3.0
3.80
3.30
3.80
3.86
3.95
4.35
4.0O
4.00
4.65
4.75
4.75
4.70
4.53%
4.00
4.02%


1903-04
$3.90
10034


3460
3.40
2.42%
3.06
3.65
3.80
3.40
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.40
3.50
3.50


W.G.


$3.8
1OO05
3.75
3.00
3.10
3.50
3.50
3.55
3.66
4.056
4.10
4.15
4.5
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.25
4.42%
4.35
4.37


1003-04
$3.30
3.46
3.35
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.27%
3.35
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.30


1904-06
3A0
3.45
3.45
3.35
3.30
&30
3.30
3.40
3.85
3.865
3.06
3.90
4.0m
3.90
3.90
3.82%
4.00
4.00
4.00%
4.02%h


x
1900-06
3a3
3.35
3.16
3.156
3.15
3.17%
3.25
3.2
3.20
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
Lee
3.05
3.05
3.15
3.15


1904-06 1903-04
S.36 $3.40
3.35 3.20
3.0 3.15
3.20 3.10
3.0 3.10
3.20 3.10
3.20 3.12%
3.20 3.20
3.30 3.20
3.8 3.15
3.6 2.95
3.SA &.95
3.6 2.95
3.0 2.90
3.0 2.90
3.06 2.90
3.7% 2.9506
3.90 2.95
3.65 3.05
3.87% 3.05


1904-06 1903-04 1904-05 1906-0


$3.30
3.30
3.15
3.16
&15
3.15
3.16
3.16
3.25
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.55
3.556
3.55
3.65
3.55
3.57%


3.M0
3.00
3.00
3.00
LOO
3.00
3.8%
3.10
3.10
SlA
36
2.65
2.86
2.80
2.O0
Lao
Wa
2.96
2.95
2.95


P.95

SDW
Lao
2.80
2.80
3.00
3.00
3.00
&Oo
3.10

3.4
3.45
3.456
3.05
3.30
3.32
L30
3.30
3.32%


am.
L.o
LU
LU
.W6



uLo
&86

S.0
3.0
3.80
3.00



L80
.70
.70
265
2.6
2.70
3.80
3.80
2.80


~E5?rl~~f~~iEji- ;-_~~~ -- FI SSC%%Sm


GETTING'S


...FOR...


FURNITURE


22-30 West Bay Street

JACKSONVILLE


Send for


Catalogue


o10. i ml. R.
MANUFACTURER Of


BRICK K.


Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.

'PE M .


hrwriY. mo sw (oaong.or nor
womia muonaa to anuwo tnsowevan
"a Me foo k 6" suomm week.


Kohn = Furchgott Company.
WHOLESA DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS OiVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Do


n't forget
WH WRITING ADVERT


your subscription to the Record.
I-8. MEMTIO TH= REc"m


_____~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BECORD. 81


Buyers' Directory

Th1 advertisers are in this su. I
you want anything, look through thL
classified ut ad write to the frm ap-
pearing therein. The Record guarantee
a prompt reposse.

ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fa.
Central Natiual Beak, Oela, Fa.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATzE
Cummer Lumber C., Jacksovaille, Fa.
BRICK.
Fater, Gea. R., Jr., Jacksonville, FL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co, The, Jackson-
vill, Fla.
CARS
South Atlantic Car & Manufacturing Co.,
Wayerosa, Ga.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fl.
Renfroe Co, H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLEALE.
Koha, Furehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
CONVEYANCING.
realty Title and Trust Co.
COOPERAGE.
Cannon Co., The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonvil Coperag CO., Jacksoville
Fla.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fl.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESAT I
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fl.
Kohn Furehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Ad-
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
Sehofield'm Sos Co., J. 8., Maeon, Ga.
gusta, Ga
FERTILIZERS.
Bours & Co., Win. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
Murphy,, T., Jacksonville F.
ehofield's Sons Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
FURNITURE.
Fetting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Ranfroe Co., H A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hargraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Johnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
Bours & Co., Win. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Fuehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HARDWARE.
Baird & Co., L E., Jackskoknville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Briggs Hardware Co.. W. H.,Valdosta, Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fl.
Weed & Co., J. D.. Savannah. Ga.
HARNESS.
MeMurray A Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.


Thomas, W. ., Gainesville, Fl.
HAY AND GRAIN.
Bours & Co., Win. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, F.
SRenfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonvill, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksoaville, .
HOTELS.
Aragon, The, Jackonville Fla.
Grand View, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
Roseland, Jackonville, Fla.
St. George, Jacksonville, Fla.
Windsor, Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stevene Co., Jacksovril,
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fa.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. ,, Macon, Ga.

Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jaeksonville Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jaeksonville, F1
Blum & Co., Cha., Jacksonvile, Fla.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, la.
Muller, Gus, Jacksonville, Fla.
Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
MEDICINE.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
MAPS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Maeon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTIME PRO-
Schofield' Sona Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jacksonvill, Fla.
METAL WORKERS
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
MoMilan" Bros., Savannah, Ga
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co, W. H., Vadost, Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Sehofield's Son Co., J. S., Maoon, Ga.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barne-Jenup Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla
Standard Naval Store Co., Jacksonville,
FL.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
PAINTS.
Bond & Boura Co., Jackonville, Fa.
PECANS.
Griffling Bros. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIZS
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdoeta, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Ocala, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
Schofield's Sona Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., pirnming)am.
Ala.
TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Wannanish, N. C.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Wanannish, N. C.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa,
Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fla.
Christie, J. D., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Oeala, Fl.
Southern States Land and Timber Co.,
Tomlinson, E. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla.
West-Raley-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville,
Fla.
SEEDS
Bours & Co., Wim. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


SHOESW---wo bnAT el
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, a.
STEAMNSIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksoaille Fla.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jaeksoavill Fla.
TANKS.
Cypre-s Tank Co., MoMbi Akl
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka F1a.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. ., Macon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title uad Trmt Co.
TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., The, Wanamsh, N. C.
TUEPms ams APPARATUS
Chattanooga Pottery C., Jacksonville, la.


The Wire Virgin Gum Co., Tifton, Ga.
JL ZUMr aUsL PROC L
Pine Belt OoCmtuet n CO, TM Raisk
N. C.
TUJ[-maJiu STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Bru iek, Ga.
MeMillan Bros., Savannah, G.
LUKpinP iUi STILL TUBS.
Davi & Soa., G. M, Palatka, Fh.
auatrsam U VATS.
Davis A Son, 0. M., Palatka, Flk.

McMurray & Baker, Jaeksonville, fa.
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Croby Co., Jacksoville, M.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., JaeksLoville, i.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, F.


ST The Tape-stlae Oprmatermr
In the year of 1901, I out the price on Black Joe and Standard Haeks from t7 to 6 a don-
en because they did not give the satisfaction in the new districts that were belag worked
that they did in the former sections. In the season of 1904, I brought out a new tool the Blue
Line. and offered it so as to ind out from the tools returned, the best tool for the business.
Out of about Three Thousand Domen Blue Lie tools sold. less than ten dozen were returned
as defective and unsatisfactory. This lead us to put this material in all of our tools and to
raise the price on all except Blue Line, believing that this was the best thing that we could do
for the Operators as well as ourselves. The most perfect tools, and those made by the mot
skillful workmen, are selected as Blue Line and Diamond Edge; second best going into Back
Joe and Standard. If there is any dissatisfaction on account of this advance in price it s
not well founded for I fully believe that the tools will cost the operator lesser crop now
than they would had I not made change. Very truly, Jr. P.COVI L.
Jan'y 0, 1906. THE COUNCIL TOOL COMPANY. Wsntajlnsh N. C.


B. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KxnIoT, See. and Tress.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.



H. A. Renfroe Co.


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at ReadyMade Prices Mail Order Given Persoal Attention


439 W. Bay Shreet.


JACKSONVIKLE, FLA.


II1111 Ii LaI alaIitaaIasIv 1 1 1aEI I a 1 2 1 2 It It aII


J. P. WILlIAMS, President.
T. A. JINNINGS, 2nd Vice-President.
SH. L KAYTON, Secretary.


J. P. WILLIAMS

111ll TMR ID OM FICTlO
maanS os ofMinc (Offi e m VM .
Branch Offie.: PENSACOLa, PLa.

Naval Stores Producers are lvited



J. A. G. CAmsox, let Vie-President
J. F. DUsaliraT, 3d Vice-President
D. G. White, Treasurer.


COMPANY,:

HD MIfOLEUI [ .0fl

I Branch Grocry House,
. CorLas.mun t O s.
to Correspoad With Us.


SIl lil illlllll lllll IIII lll ll ll 1lil illI IlllI lll -



Myummor Omm
M 8*R,



Baker Improved
Seemnl Turpe


Write me for prices and estt
F. 0.B. any point In Gecrg Ir r-
da. AlabSma or MAip l. All
stils sold under guarantee.
Job work through the
Country a specialty.
The Largest and Oldest Copper
Works i oria. Brunswick Ga
O My specialty Is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not lek.


DON'T FAIL TO MENTION THE RECORD TO ADVERtISRS








32 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



Florida Bank & Trust Company

Jacksonville, Florida


State, County and City Depository.


Capital, $1,000,000.00


Walter F. Coachman
President


Officers
W. S. Jeumings
Vice-President


Arthr F. Perry
Vice-Presidet


W. Albert Redding
Secretary aud Cashier


Fracs P. Flemu, Jr.-
Trust Officer


Executive Committee


Walter F. Coachmua
Wiliam S. JemUings
Arthur F. Perry
Thomas V. Porter


Charles E. Garer
Charles L Rogers
Hugh A. McEachern
Danuid T. Gerew


George W. Alen
William M. Brown
A. D. Covington
Jao. G. Christopher
C. A. Carson
John T. Dismakes
W. R. Fuler
C. E. Garner
A. M. Ives
J. C. Little
D. H. McMillan
T. V. Porter
George M. Parker
_Charles E. Smith
G. W. Saxon


Directors

Charles Brown
C. W. Bardeso
Raymend Cay
IL L Covingtoa
Abert Cartom
Frak H. Fee
L. A. Fraleigh
D. T. Gerow
W. S. Jeuings
W. S. McClllud
W. II. Milte
J. P. Taliaterro
Arthur F. Perry
Tefair Stocktn
Lorezo A. Wiko


Frank E. Bd
W. F. Coachma
J. Cresby
Jeo H. Carter
C. Dwuiug
F. P. Forster
Jaes I Graham
S. L Mbbard, Jr.
. F. Lewis
SA. IMcEachera
Jumos L Mumz
James Pritchard
C. RLogers
P. L. Stheraud


-- I


General Banking Business.
Safe Deposit


Interest Paid on Savings Deposits.
Boxes for Rteat.


Trust Department
Authorized by law to act as executor, administrator, trustee under wis, curator,
guardian of minors or persons of unsound mind, receiver, trustee under appointment of
court and registrar, and to execute trusts of every character, guaranteelg efficdt exe-
cution in all the above capacities.


Accounts Solicited.


Correspondence Invited.


*,-I I I a- a IF IF a ---a IFI- 1 v v -t I -II'UI I 11 1 -I I I I a-444ML 4.I.44L -0-MZa 111


I' 9--9-0~--00 U- 9 I~~~IIII 9 O


THE RECORD WILL BE W NORTH DOLLARS TO YOU EVER WE
THgE KCOKD WILL BE WORTH DOLLARS TO YOU Kv-RT WKgK.


I
I


SV-v


- -- - -


-------






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BBOORD. 33
.(.4.5 l it till &*I+A+g tty444 g istttt*I+8+l+8+A+A+*A+A+11lit t ittittti ttittt+


JOHN HENDERSON, Pmeident


J. A. CRANFORD. Sacrrwy.


THE I


CHATTANOOGA POTTERY CO.


Jacksonville, Florida


Factory located Daisy, Tenn.


Prices and


all information


cheerfully furnished


Cups,


Gutters and


all


Tools


Used in the HERTY System.


Sole Manufacturers of


The Herty


Turpentine Cups


Address all Communications


THE CHATTANOOGA POTTERY CO.


JACKSONVILLE,


FLORIDA


FTTTTYTFTTTTTTITIFT++++stfff8 8 8 8 ITI144 4*


DOJNT FA TO M !NO1 THK RUCOMD TO ADV5vinim&


I


00%


I


v v v


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"""'


"""'------~~~


v v w r T.









T. MURPHY
SMJAMKSONVILLE MACHINE Aw IRON WORKS
4 ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS M


FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
oconmotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Iran
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARIB IMNGMS AND BOL.ERS. PULLYS AND SHAFTNG.
Aget for Stationary Engines, Boilers, Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden-
sw.lHydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Home, Belting and Rubber Goods
W T1UIUIIU ilUl WTER WRll EPIKIT A PEUIALTn
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.

The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
I" .amm t e=ins tM M i e ae a appeItead to mE as 0eIs esama
at l =i M&- C. bot ways.
Be- n m bt U.r). S -ILL Chae l. ad Noew Yr..es
'; ily, Jaa. 22, at 3:00 pm ."xMOHICAN ........Friday, Jan. 27, at :30 am
Tasay, Ja. ra, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ......Sunday, Jan. 2, at 11:30 am
=. edday, Jam. 25, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ....Monday, Jan. 30, at 12:00 n'n
SxHURON ......Wednesday, Feb 1, at 1:00 pm
: raI Jan. 17, at 3:00 p .OOMANCHE ...... Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 1:00 pm
S atar y, Jan. 28, at 3:00 pm ....ALGONQUIN ....Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4:00 am
S' Ily, Jan. 31, at 3:00 pm .... ARAPAHOE .... .Sunday, Feb. 6, at 6:00 am
*xNEW YORK ......Monday, Feb. 6, at 5:30 am
Sy, Feb. 3, at 3:00 pm ........APACHE .... Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 7:00 am
: atday, Feb. 4, at 3:00 pm ......IROQUOIS ... .Thursday, Feb. 9, at 7:30 am
S*xMOHICAN, ....Friday, Feb. 10, at 8:00 am
,. Tmuday, Feb. 7, at 3:00 pm ... COMANCHE ...... Sunday, Feb. 12, at 9:30 am
Wedneday, Feb. 8, at 3:00 pm .ALGONQUIN .... Monday, Feb. 13, at 10:00 am
FrMay, Feb. 10, at 3:00 pm ...... ARAPAHOE .Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 12:00 n'n
Samit, Feb. 12, at 3:00 pm .*"xHURON ...... Friday, Feb. 17, at 1:30 pm
Tmay, Feb. 14, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE .... Sunday, Feb. 19, at 4:30 am
Wedmday, Feb. 15, at 3:00 pm .... IROQUOIS .... Monday, Feb. 20, at 5:00 am
*xNEW YORK ... .Tuesday, Feb. 21, at 5:30 am
Friay, Feb. 17, at 3:00 pm ....COMANCHE ..Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 6:30 am
aturday, Feb. 18, at 3:00 pm .... .ALONQUIN ......Thursday, Feb. 23, at 7:30 am
Tmsai y, Feb. 21, at 3:00 pm .... ARAPAHOE .... Sunday, Feb. 26, at 10:00 am
Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 3:00 pm .... !xMOHICAN .... Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 11:30 am
ri day, Feb. 24, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE ... Wednesday, Mar. 1, at 12:30 pm
Batarday, Feb. 25, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS . .Thursday, Mar. 2, at 1:00 pm
*xHURON ...... Friday, Mar. 3, at 4:00 am
Tuelaay, Feb. 28, at 3:00 pm ....COMANCHE .... unday, Mar. 5, at 4:30 am
S--Boston via Brunswiek and Charleston. xFreight only. --Broton via

SiHE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Bareet Serhe Betweem Jae.mavStue Besotom amd P vtleaee aa e n a1 -
*e t ta. odaluar at Cha tleton o ** Wma.
MI-W-II- IKLT AIUAIAG
.... -..e .. .... .. .. .. .. .......... .. ....F rom Lewvi Wharf. Baut
S -.......................... ......... Pro tootf of at.. Street. J. a l-Tle.
*CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
SBetwee Jaekasavrl amind Satf4.
p gtmpi at Palath. Astor. St. Prands Bere-ord (De Lad) and lant~m la
emles M t. olsme rvSe.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
Sapplatie to msa as allows: Iarve Jacksonvile, oundays. Tuesday and Thurn.
L S. m. R Ietur am leave Sanford. Monday. Wednedays & ridays a. m.
NORTIBOLuJU.
d-B4 -. I 1a up.
La p 9. m.I ....... .............JackBonTle ..... ........... Arrtiv* 1o a. in
L s" 8:. P 1........ ....... ..t ...... ...... Isave si p.
-e m..................... Astor............. ............ Lve I s.
.ave 4 a. ........... ...... .t. Flramn.................... Leve I 9. m.
......... ......... .......... ... ..ere .rord ( ......................... x..L e 1.
Arl.ve: a. m ......................anf.prise.... ... .. I ve 1 a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m .................. naterpri se.................... Lv. 10:00 a. m.


you Wal a Turpss Los~- 9

F Vt. Wad a Smw.uw Los~~m
You Want mny KW oflari La
Y e. Mom. Br~uslss
I se er Writ, i
J. H. LIVINOSTON A SON*,
Oc Fhed


:eeeeeeeiuesss~eeu..,uueu umueseseesJ~~,-~ ~uc.


Record Readers:


The job printing department
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. It is reason-
able to suppose you will get
better and more satisfactory
printing supplies--letter heads,
envelopes, commissary checks,
pay-roll reports, etc., by having
us make them.


Industrial Record Co.,
JMcafMe. ed


Ihge lM etropolis.


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida..


$500 a Year $2.50 Six Months


Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.


GEL RAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, iac W. BAY ST, JACK'VILLL.
F. M. IRONMONGER, JR.. Asst. Gen. Pals. Agent, 122 W. Bay St. Jacksonville, Fla. T
W. 000PIR. O R., Loeal PFrt. Act., Jack'vlll. P. LOV l.. Anst. ISpt..Jack'vilte CAR
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonvile.
A. C. HAG RTY. L. P. A., New Yort. CLY TD ILNE 0. F. A.. New TYer JACKi
'UM 4. Man3, Wm. P. CLaTI a o.
General Manager. Geseal AOmtis
eelu- Bulnding. State tree. Tt. gw YW L MM M
SW 3 T lw a03 AgNT W 1 -


JSSELL PUB. O.
VLLE. LMO .


me..u.n......


* r r **A-*