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 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: February 3, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00107
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text


I IBRARY 13 '-A.
. .... m. -*









CORD




Fi,.hY iAVALh ToRES, .


ID0rUSTRIA FIdASIAh

G) iEWPAPEk



THE NEXT ISSUE:
I% the next issue of the Industrial Record
our Mr. Charles Temple, traveling corres-
pondent, will present a graphic ilustrated
story of that progressive Flrida city, Tampa.
Few cities in this country have made the
remarkable progress commercially, indus-
trially, educationally and socially that
Tampa has made. It is the exponent of
enterprise in all that word conveys, and Mr.
Temple wil write of it in a most graphic
and entertaining manner.
In the next issue of the Industrial Record,
too, wi appear illustrated articles relaing
to some of the largest industrial and finan-
cial corporations in Florida. These iustra-
tions will represent groups of some of the
State's ablest financiers and captains of
industry. The next issue of the Record w.
be especially large and attractive, and in
addition to the Record's already large sub-
scription list, covering the industrial South-
east almost tke the dw, several thousand
extra copies will be issued.
WATCH FOR. IT.



JAKSONVILLE, FLA. ATLANTA, GA. SAVANNAH GA.
j!




.I ' ~EPm~ ------------------ - -- - -- - -POI ~
ntlet, W. C. POWEIL; Viee PsdMel, who wit the Preldatt, eonitute the DireaTy VA Bwad of Mrnm, W. F. ODArMyA, X 7. IBUT
LARD, H. L COVINGTON, H. A. MeEACHEN, JOHN 1LYOUNG, J. A. cRANfWO, I) H. MeMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDEB, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HIKND BON.


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES

.. COMPANY..


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA, FLA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.


The Consolidated is


Purely


a Cooperative Company.


Its
The


Interests are identical with those of the Producers.


Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.

YARDS AT JACKSONVILLE, SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA AND PENSACOLA

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.
W^WW Wi- -- --------


I


.0m


Is












WEEKLY


INDtSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO THE NAVAL STORES, LMUMIR AND MANUFACTURING irN k ib.


vhChI~ciCCupirp k Tuse pa ACo. AswdaiApa 27. 3OJQ~ OlQ~d Orincube lr.Sw, Cam GrowersP? basd by Gsr~SastiS Aad~imu a~i ~pSaujlarSa;r Am-;..


Question of Free Alcohol for the Industries.


The question of removing the tax from
alcohol for industrial purposes is creating
considerable discussion now, not only in
Congressional circles, but particularly
among the paint and varnish trades.
On January 8, 1904, a bill (H. R. 9302)
was introduced by Representative Boutell
in the National House of Representatives.
The bill, which was referred to the Com-
mittee of Ways and Means and ordered
printed, reads as follows:
A BILL
To Provide for Untaxed Denaturized Al-
cohol for Industrial Purposes.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House
of Representatives of the United States of
America, in Congress Assembled, That dis-
tilled spirits of an alcoholic strength of
noc less than one hundred and sixtey per
centum proof, as defined by sections thir-
ty-two and forty-nine of the Revised Stat-
utes of the United States, may, when ren-
dered unfit for drinking purposes or for
use as a beverage, be removed from dis
.~ rIry warehouses free of tax under such
regulations as the Commissioner of Inter-
nal Revenue, with the approval of the Sec-
retary of the Treasury shall prescribe;
Provided, That sulphuric ether, wood al-
cohol, methylic alcohol, wood naptha, or
other substances approved by the Commis-
sioner of Internal Revenue and the Secre-
tary of the Treasury, shall be mixed with
such distilled spirits so as to render the
same unit for drinking purposes or for
use as a beverage.
Sec. 2. That distilled spirits, before be-
ing removed from distillery warehouses
free of tax under the provisions of this
Act, shall be marked or branded as the
Commissioner of Internal Revenue, with
the approval of the Secretary of the Treas-
ury, shall prescribe, and shall have affixed
to each cask or package an engraved stamp
indicating that such distilled spirits have
been rendered unfit for drinking purposes
or for use as a beverage, said stamps to
be provided and furnished by the several
collectors, as in the case of other stamps.
and to be charged to them and accounted
for in like manner; and for the expense
attending the providing and affixing of
such stamps ten cents for each stamp
shall be paid to the collector of the dis-
trict on making the entry for such re-
moval.
Sec. 3. That any person who shall rec-
tify or purify distilled spirits which have
been removed from distillery warehouses
free of tax under the provisions of this
Act, by removing or separating the sul-
phuric ether, wood alcohol, methylic alco-
hol, wood naptha, or other substances from
such distilled spirits by any process what-
ever, shall, on conviction, be subject to a
fine of not less than five hundred dollars
nor more than five thousand dollars and
be imprisoned not less than six months
nor more than three years.
Sec. 4. That distilled spirits removed
free of tax from distillery warehouses un-
der the provisions of this Act shall not
be stored or deposited on any premises
in which the business of a distiller, recti-
fier, wholesale liquor dealer or retail liquor


dealer, is carried on, or on any premises
connected therewith by any private or in-
ternal communication. And every dis-
tiller, rectifier, wholesale liquor dealer and
retail liquor dealer, who shall store or de-
posit, or cause to be stored or deposited,
such distilled spirits on the premises in
which such business is carried on, after
such distilled spirits have been removed
from distillery warehouses, shall, on con-
viction, be fined not less than two hundred
dollars nor more than one thousand dol-
lars and imprisoned for not less than six
months nor more than two years.
The Committee of Manufacturers formed

to assist in securing cheaper alcohol for
industrial purposes, through its chairman,
Henry Dalley, 27 William Street, New
York, on November 9 last, addressed to a
large number of those interested a circular
letter as follows:
New York, Nov. 9, 1904.
Dear Sir: We enclose a brief statement
of the many advantages to American in-
dustries and labor which would result from
the enactment of legislation removing the
tax from alcohol rendered unfit for bev-
erage purposes, thus placing our manufac-
turers on an equality, in so far as this
important material is concerned, with
those of foreign countries. We also en-
close copy of the Boutell bill (H..R. 9302).
providing for a system of untaxed denat-
urized alcohol, which is now pending in
Congress.
We would ask your special attention to
the quotations on page 6 from the annual
report for 1904 of the Council of the So-
ciety of Chemical industry, and from a re-
cent article by Dr. H. Schweitzer, Secre-
tary of the American Section of that So-
ciety, which show clearly the great im-
portance of the proposed legislation.
Since this is a matter of direct interest
to a large number of industries, and as
the indirect results would be of great ben-
efit to ur manufacturers and workers in
general, we would ask you to send this
pamphlet to your Representative in Con-
gress, with a letter asking him to give
his influence in support of the Boutell bill
when Congress convenes in December.
We would also suggest that, if practica-
ble, you should take this matter up person-
ally with the Representative, or candidates
for Reperesentative, for your District, ex-
plaining its importance to the manufac-
turing industries of the country, and urg-
ing them to give it their support.
We will be indebted to you for any sug-
gestions that you may be able to send
us as to the best methods of furthering
this movement.
If you will advise us that you are in-
terested in this subject. we will be pleased
to send you additional literature showing
the great importance of the proposed leg-
islation to our manufacturing industries.
In reference to this same hill the Nat-
ional Paint, Oil and Varnish Association.
at its convention in November adopted the
following resolution:
Whereas, It is understood that an ef-
fort is to be made at the coming session


of Congress to pass a law providing for
tax free grain alcohol for use in the arts,
and
Whereas, Tax free grain alcohol for use
in the arts would undoubtedly be in the
form known as methylated spirit, or a
combination of grain alcohol and of a wood
alcohol so rank in quality that the mix-
ture would not be acceptable to the trade,
and the price would not be much lower
than the present market figure of wood
alcohol, and
Whereas, The enforcement of such a
law would necessarily have to be sur-
rounded by restrictions and governmental
inspection that would be obnoxious to
the consumer and difficult to comply with.
Therefore, be it
Resolved, That the National Convention
of the Oil, Paint and Vhrnish Association,
held at Buffalo. October 11, 12 and 13, 1904.
hereby protests against the passage of
any bill providing for tax free grain al-
cohol for use in the arts.
Resolved, That a copy of this resolution
be forwarded by the Secretary of this
organization to the honorable Secretary
of the United States Treasury, to the hon-
orable Chairman of the Ways and Means
Committee of the House of Representa-
tives, to the honorable Chairman of tue
Finance Committee of the United States
Senate, and to the honorable Commissioner
of Internal Revenue.
The National Board of Trade, on the
other hand, at its convention held in Wash-
ington on January 20, 22, 1904, unanimous-
ly adopted the following resolutions:
Whereas, Alcohol is a necessary material
in the manufacture of many important
articles of commerce; and
Whereas, An important group of Ameri-
can industries has thus far been dwarfed
by the lack of free alcohol in the arts and
manufactures, and for the ostensible rea-
son that it was difficult for our revenue
authorities to prevent its use otherwise
than for these purposes; and
Whereas, Competing nations, notably
Germany, France and England, find no
difficulty in prescribing and enforcing reg-
'ilations to prevent such use;
Resolved, That in the opinion of the Nat-
ional Board of Trade it is the duty of
Congress and our revenue authorities to
afford our manufacturers equal facilities
in this respect with those of competing
nations, and at the same time benefit our
agricultural interests by affording an in-
creased use for our greatest cereal crop.
We therefore favor the passage of the bill
introduced by Representative Boutell, H.
R. 9302.
Commenting on the above, Drugs, Oils
and Paints, of Philadelphia, has the fo!-
lowing:
"The objection of the paint trade to
tax free alcohol is readily understood:
Cheap alcohol means cheap spirit var-
nishes, which may be produced anywhere
by anyone, without special plant or appli-
ances. This would, in the opinion of the
trade, involve the destruction of the in-
dustry of varnish-making in all the cheaper
grades, and throw the existing plants into
a fierce competitive warfare for the finer
grades of oil and gum varnishes. The re-
sult, it is thought, would be disastrous


for the trade concerned, since the large
plants are now kept running on the cheaper
grades, and the better grades form a
minor part of the output.
"The recent high prices for rosins, ben-
zine and turpentine, which are not likely
to be materially reduced, must give food
for thought to all varnish makers, and
bring them to realize the fact that de-
creased consumption must inevitably re-
sult from these conditions.
"But even with the facilities offered by
tax-free alcohol, we seriously doubt wheth-
er the business would drift to any serious
extent out of the control of the existing
plants. Probably the most serious conse-
quence to thme would be the necessity
of adapting themselves to the use of new
new materials and new methods. At any
rate, free alcohol would to a great extent
free them from the control of the several
"trusts," "combines" and "associations"
at whose mercy they now so completely
stand. Furthermore, increased consump-
tion of some gums, like shellac, not now
extensively used. would involve decreased
consumption and consequently lower costs
for some high grade fossil gums like Kauri,
which are constantly growing scarcer and
dearer; decreased consumption of rosins,
benzine and turpentine would involve
cheaper figures for these products, etc. On
the whole, therefore, we are inclined to
believe the varnish makers in error when
they so strenuously oppose the freedom
of manufacturing alcohol.
"Outside this single industry, however,
the benefits to be derived from cheap al-
cohol, properly safe-guarded and restrict-
ed to its legitimate use, are universal and
incalculably great. Alcohol can be pro-
duced in practically limitless quantities
and be sold at a profit for fifteen cents
a gallon, and at that rate it would be
available, not only in manufactures now
excluded by our tax, but as a universal
-ource of heat, light and power.
"The importance of this last mentioned
fact dwarfs into insignificance all other
considerations. Industries based on fixed -
supplies or deposits of a special material,
like pertoleum, anthracite coal, long leaf
pine forests, fossil gums, etc., always run
the risk of eventual extinction by the ex-
haustion of the source of supply. The in-
dustries based on the sperm whale fish-
eries and the cloang of various factories
dependent on local supplies of natural gas
are familiar instances.
"But an industry that is founded on the
products of agriculture cannot fail, be-
cause of depletion of the source of supply:
the supply may fluctuate and consump-
tion may temporarily utrun production,
but the remedy is always at hand.
"This question of free alcohol thus ao-
sumes a vast importance from the point of
view of national economies, and we cannot
believe that individual interest will con-
tinue to prevail against the greater gen-
eral interest. Therefore, if it be, as it
seems to us, inevitable that alcohol for
use in the arts and industries will be
eventually relieved from the burden of
prohibitive taxation, it behooves those
whose interests will uffer from the re-
moval of this tax to prepare themselves iu
advance against the results.








4- THE WEEKLY INDU8TRL~L RE(~,'OED.


Southern Lumber Manufacturers' Convention,


The fifteenth annual meeting of the
Southern Lumber Manufacturers' Associa-
tion was held in New Orleans last week
with the largest and most representative
assemblage in the history of the organi-
ation.
Following the address of President Long,
Secretary Smith submitted his report, as
follows:
Secretary Bith's Report.
Reports of officers were delivered in
proper order, the first considered being
the report of Seeretary George K. Smith:
The year just closed has been a notable
one in our association, as marked progress
can be shown in every department.
Member i
Our membership one year ago was 183.
New members have been added steadily at
the rate of 4 each month, with a total
of 49; 8 members have resigned, 5 have
been dropped and 2 have retired from bus-
inas, making a total loss of 15 members
and a net gain of 34. Our present mem-
bership is 217, representing 190 mills.
The plan of having our inspectors visit
nonmembers has worked well and produced


Number
Reporting.
Missouri ....................... 15
Arkansas ........................ 214
Texas ......................... 198
Louisiana ...................... 289
Mississippi ..................... 138
Alabama ........................ 107
Ga.-F a. ......................... 56
Totals ..........................
Average number reporting, 169.


good results and will be continued during
1905. Each member has been furnished
with a list of manufacturers not now mem-
bers with a request that individual effort
be made to increase our present list. It
is believed most effective work can be
done in this way and we hope to pass the
250 mark before our next annual meeting.
Curtailment.
On account of a steady increase in stocks
for six months it was found necessary t,
take steps to make less lumber. This was
done in June and from July 1 to January
1 70 per cent of the members reduced tl ir
production 33 1-3 iwr cent. with the fol-
lowing results:
Voluntary. Involuntary.
July .............. 106,599,831 37,537,275
August ........... 73,320,058 36,916,442
September ......... 75,649,184 31,787,855.
October .......... 63.380,684 35,776,151
November ......... 59344,683 26,2-(3,070
December ......... 74,106,062 18,149,011
Totals ........457,400,502 186,429,8&2s
Total curtailment, 6 mos. ..643,830,330
In order that it wiay be known in what
States the curtailment was made we sub-
mit the following:


Actual
Cut.
46,267,305
167,414,302
192,410,375
362,026,906
105,288,664
73,559.151
39,653,516
986,620,219


Average when
running regularly
61,900,000
304,498,667
313,037,003
581,123,354
170,364,437
130,989,044
68,538,044
1,630,450.549


Curtail-
ment.
15,632,695
137,084,365
120,096,448
219.096,448
65,075,773
57.429,893
28,884,529
643,830,330


Production and Consumption in i9o4.
By persistent effort during the year we have increased the number of mills re-
porting cut, shipments and stock on hand, and corrected many estimates, with the
following results for 1903:


8S
Mis
Ark
Tex
lou
Mis
Ala
Ga.



Mis
Ark
Tex
Lou
Misa
Ala
Ga.-


No.
ttate--- mills.
souri ........................ 7
aimsa- ....................... 6
as ........................... 85
isiana ...................... 104
sisaippi ...................... 84
bama ........................ 00
-Fli. ......................... 15
Totals ....................... 425
No.
tates- rept'g.
souri ........................ 7
nsas ...................... 73
as ....................... . 36
iia1na ....................... 105
sissippi ..................... 8a
bama ........................ 61
Fla. ......................... 15,
Totals .................... 432


Cut
1903.
202,296,266
788,945,610
1,119,069,426
1,435,698,774
930,853,520
510,423,022
249,714,420
5,237,001,638
Cut
1904
204,867285
821,609,615
1.101,604.180
1,457,702,311
905,585,406
505,404.283
240,081,225
5,36,944,30


Shipped
1903.
183,063,704
759,934.818
1,092,073,558
1,409,994,482
887,080,387
480,693.889
237,860,504
5,050,701,342
Shipped
1904.
206,883,524
816,843,101
1,121.437.092
1,472,955,891
911,524.217
507,977,412
242,216,021
5,279,834,858


Stock
Jan. 1, 1904.
67,427,389
242,661,939
254,081,202
388,335,542
154,575394
74,546,907
27,455,031
1,209,083,404
Stock
Jan. 1, 1905.
64,980,045
241,880,416
232,544,84.
363,697,137
151,629,473
09,473,625
27,115,564
1,151,321,103


The difference of 58,000,000 less on hand than a year ago would be 83,000,000
if the stock on hand at nine new mills did not appear in the totals for January 1,
1905.
Clearing House.
The clearing house reports sounded the first note of warning of accumulating
stocks and this department is now recognized as the barometer of yellow pine
values, foretelling change and indicating the advisability of correcting conditions
which it reveals. The average number reporting has increased about 10 per cent.
We should have 300 reports and expect to have them very soon. A summary of the
twelve months is:


Month-


January .......... ........................
February ......................... ..
March .................................
A pril ................... ..............
M ay ...................................
June ...................... ...........
July ...................................
August ...............................
Septem ber .............................
October .............................
November ........................... ..
December .......................... .
Totals ............................
Net increase during 1903 ...........
Average number reporting, 203.


No.
Reporting.
202
214
203
188
201
190
190
221
193
211
222
230


1903 1903
Shipments. Cut.
255,034,568 256,620,589
222,301,80) 214,124,086
237,635,232 220,355,870
274,841,332 265,005.073
291.711,003 287,391,024
260,898,510 271351,459
257,937.637 269,666.767
270,018,216 266,130,122
243,304.960 262,789.438
273,780.790 292,736,927
241,504.527 251,999 365
233.999,945 242,952,8519
3.062,968,529 3,101,123,770
........... .. 38,155,250


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

10Still Boilers and Pump.s.
: SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
* Jacksonville. Fla.
I* IuIui hgiO II Ii aa 8eal I tal I II ogeoit iari)sis*i*

WILLIAM A. SOURS JAMES O. DARBY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THE OLaMT ATinAs U ORAu a.i ME TIK STATE.

Hay, Grain, Feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Supes, lour.
Grits, Meal and fertilizers.

OUR MOTTO: Promt Shilmet. Reu-lre needs. CatmoMs re
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Cummer Ltimher Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.




SStandard Clothing Company


One Price


I ~ A 0


One Price


* FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
s17 ad 19 West Bay Street, Jacksovu, Fkrs.
Stetson aad Hawes Hats. Speelal Attention Glven to MaUl Ordrs.
d'laa(naea*aa,,.,asa*a.,Ol*a1u.I .u.,*fuimauiaIIs


R. TOLAR.


. H. HART. T. H. BLAOCLY.
(Established 1872.)


J. R. TOLAR, Ja


TOLAR. HART & CO..
100 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


J. D. WEED & CO.,
BAVAMMAH. GEORGCIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battin, Etc,


THE RECORD WILL BE WORTH DOLLARS TO YOU EVERY WEK.


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON


4-


THE WEEKLLY INDUSTRBIAL REVOOD.







THE Wiaft INDUSTRIAL BRECOD. 5


Rel
inuary ........................
February .....................
M arch ...........................
Jun...........................
July ...........................
August .....................
September ...................
August .......... ......
September ..................
vetober ....................
November . .. .. . .. .. .. . .
December ..................... ..
Totals ..... . ..........
Net increase in stocks, 45,833,7


No.
porting.
203
228
219
241
241
224
248
245
211
215
210
220
223
39 feet.


Shipments
1904.
227,094,566
255,990,024
279,123,487
304,520,122
308,730,221
255,391,051
282,863,993
300,140,134
270,965,700
289,65,576
299,660,005
300,000,000
3,373,844,879


Cut 1904.
231,521,943
287,580,022
300,559,338
316,070,984
312,469,797
264,250,824
252,080,30
271,728,030
250,717,579
274,779,159
281,144,158
285,000,000
3,327,911,140


Increase of
Stock.
4,427,377
31,598,998
21,435,851
11,550,862
3,739,576
8,859,773
*30,783,687
*28,412,104
*20,248,121
*14,586,417
*18.515,847
*15,000,000


*Tle last six months showed decreases.


Values During 1904.
The steady accumulation of stocks dur-
ing the first six months of this year had
a depressing effect on values and during
July heavy concessions were made. When
the Clearing House reports began to show
reductions in stocks an improvement in
values was noted and by October 15 much
of the lost ground had been regained. The
broken condition of stocks and the in-
creased demand for upper grades caused
a meeting of the committee on values to
be held January 10, at which advances
were made on many items on left hand
side of list. With the present outlook and
conservative production values should be
much more stable than during 1-904.
Fiaaces.
Our increased membership has brought
increased revenue, as will be shown by
the treasurer's report. We have increased
our expenditures by supplying the deficit
in the world's fair fund and in advertising.
Had we not been called on from these two
sources we could have passed one monthly
assessment, as we did in 1903.
A Hew Feature.
For the present year it has been de-
cided to furnish each member with the
Credit Rating Book of the National Lum-
ber Manufacturers' Association, without
any increase in the rate of assessment.
This is one of the most important moves


ever made in association work and it is be-
lieved it will tend to materially increase
our membership when the great benefit
shall be fully realized.
Other Departments.
The work of other departments will be
covered by Assistant Secretary Goodnow
and Chief Inspector Warren. The com-
mittee on world's fair exhibit will make a
final report setting forth the remarkable
results accomplished. With our present
working force and the benefits derived
during 1904 we enter upon the nineteenth
year of our existence with better pros-
pects than ever before of extending our
influence and largely increasing our mem-
bership.
The earnest support of all manufactu-
rers of yellow pine is solicited and the
same interest and untiring assistance re-
quested from the members which has been
given during 1904.
By unanimous vote the present execu-
tive officers were re-elected, these con-
sisting of R. A. Long, president; John L.
Kaul, vice-president; A. J. Neimeyer, treas-
urer. New directors were elected as fol-
lows: Missssisippi, J. H. Hinton; Arkansas,
H. H. Foster; Alabama, D. L. Moore; Mis-
souri, J. B. White; Louisiana, J. W. North;
Georgia, H. M. Graham; Florida. J. C.
Anderson. F. H. Farwell succeeded Sam
Park as vice-president for Texas; the other
vice-presidents remained unchanged. -


Report of Cotton Ginned to January 16th.


Washington, Feb. 1.-The census report
of cotton ginned to January 16, in 695
counties, shows 9,717,693 bales, counting
half bales as round bales, compared with
7,168,381 bales in the same counties last
year. The quantity ginned in these coun-
ties between December 13 and January 16
is 494,954 running bales. To December 13,
1904, the remaining number of unreported
counties had ginned 2,748,738, counting
round bales as half bales. Four hundred
and seventy-seven ginneries refused to re-
port. The quantity previously returned
by these has been brought forward in this
report without addition. The total num-
ber brought forward is 134,111 running
bales.
In the counties so far reporting, the to-
tal running bales ginned prior to January
16, 1905, were 9,808,000, including 180,675
round bales for the crop of 1904, and total
running bales for 1904 for the counties
reporting up to January 16, 1904. were
7.419,690, including 502,018 round bales for
the crop of 1903. The total active gin-
neries in operation prior to January 16,
1905, in the counties so far reporting, num-


her 24,671, against 24,602 for the counties
reporting to the same date in 1904. The
total active ginners for 1904 prior to Jan-
uary 16, "for all counties," which is the
complete report for that date, were 30,-
171, and tlhe total cotton ginned from this
final number of ginneries prior to January
16, 1904, aggregated 9,859,277.
The total number of counties from which
ginning was reported last season is 812.
The report by States, in counties re-
ported to date for operations prior to
January 16 last, follows:
Alabama, 1,273,713 running bales ginned.
Arkansas, 743,444 bales.
Florida, 62,024 bales.
Georgia, 1,856,406 bales.
Indian Territory, 244,548 bales.
Louisiana, 907,880 bales.
Kentucky, 1,882 bales.
Mississippi. 1,080,037 bales.
Missouri, 42.776 bales.
North Carolina, 530,643 bales.
Tennessee, 244,061 bales.
Texas, 1,532,777 bales.
Virginia, 15,938 bales.
Oklahoma, 127,387 bales.
South Carolina, 1,144,14 bales.


P ri n tin g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
9IACKSONVILLE. PIA.
CAPITAL S3-0000 SURPUS and UNVIDE V PROPHS $3 0
We issue Time Certificate of Deposit, which draw lterest t ta rate tre s C t per
asUr. If held ninety days or longer. Take adhtaruge ti aU r let ywi srtav he err
o-etMlg for yo. Prtioulr attention paid to Out-ot-Town acute. enddeot by



"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and-Western Dry Balt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINOAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Herbert A. Ford, Geo. H. Ford, F. L. Watas,
President. Vice-Pres. Cashier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITAL, o60,000.00.
DIRECTORS: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicited.


llg* l lllllllgl Iselsll eselllllllll lelll gIIgIg lllug


= The Wire Virgin Gum Co.,
SIs now ready to give you all the information you may want comeuiag th
* way we are now gathering virgin gum from high boxes. By the ae of a
O tin lip put up close to the chipping and so arranged to eause the gum to
Strike wire and follow same down to the box, not striking the face of the
tree. Wire is fastened on by two small nails, one just above the lip sad
Sthe other at upper edge of the oldbox, and stretched tight so as to keep
gum from dripping off, thereby making virgin gum and more of it. Ther
.are many benefits and big pay where parties can get a good many high boes.
SFor further information write to
* THE WIRE VIRGIN GUM CO.. TIFTON. GA.
1'1 i l ll 1111 1118$8 Be 11l1186611 181 88 g loom 1688


The West-Raley-Rannle Company.

114 W. Forsytk Street, Jacksoville, rlu.
A. N. WEST, Pres. X. West. Vitc-Pres. W.. lansf, VJic-Presf M.. V. abre, Sec. a Frers.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and cansell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

ee*****o*ee***e>*-*a*. *...--. -**** .


M. A. BRIGGS, President.
H. C. BRIGGS. Ist Vice-President.


HOMEB BROWN, iod Vie-Pleiist.
J. C. MoDONALD, See'y and Trss.


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

i VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-


RIXFORD AXES.

They are the BEST. Others imitate but none du-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the flnet
temper, hold the keenest edge, cut better and last longer
Than any other axe.
S W This has all been proved by years of actual use.
SScd as your orders.

SW. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE COMPANY,
Val-.t., Gcrsis.I
enuea;,9~8 weMeWM n*WWww w wesse


WUX W3M= ADTZI I u2 31300M







6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


8TOCKGROWERS MEET.

An Itere-ting Coavention Held in Tampa
this Week
Tampa, Fla., Feb. 2.-Monday morning
at 10:30 o'clock the Southeastern Stock-
growers' Association convened in annual
session at the Tampa Bay Casino, but ow-
ing to the non-arrival of a number of
delegates the meeting adjourned until 2:30
o'clock p. m., when it was resumed in the
music room of the Tampa Bay Hotel, where
an interesting session was held.
Mayor F. A. Salomonson delivered a
very cordial address of welcome, telling
the cattlemen to take the town and make
themselves at home and happy. Presi-
dent W. R. Fuller followed the Mayor,
with an address welcoming the association
in behalf of the Board of Trade. A. M.
Williams, of Miakka, delivered a very ap-
propriate response for the delegates.
President S. H. Gaitskill gave the con-
vention a very interesting address.
Vice-President G. Murphy, of Braiden-
town, followed the president with a talk
on My Impressions on the Object of the
Association, full of wit and originality.
Thomas J. L. Brown made an extended
address, The Value of Conventions to Such
Associations as the tSock Growers. He
was greeted with a storm of applause when
he arose to speak, and was applauded
throughout the delivery of his splendid ad-
dress. A number of delegates gave brief
talks on topics of especial interest to the
association. Among them, W. E. Embry.
of Dade City, W. A. Lightfoot, of Bartow,
Z. C. Chambliss, of Ocala, and J. M. Lee,
of Kissimmee.
-A resolution was unanimously adopted
expressing the thanks of the association
to Mayor Salomonson, W. R. Fuller and
Thomas J. L. Brown, for their cordial ad-
dresses and aid to the association, and to
the papers of Tampa and Floridia for their
liberal notices of the convention. An in-
vitation was accepted to attend the meet-
and reception of the Tampa Board of
Trade.
The following delegates were in attend-
ance:
S. H. Gaitskill, of Melntosh; G. Murphy,
of Braidentown; Irving H. Welch, of Jack-
sonville; U. A. Lightsey, of Bartow; J. E.
Gaitskill, of McIntosh; J. M. Lee, J. W.
Miller, of Kissimmee; J. Saunders, of Mait-
land; Walter Bass, Sr., of Kissimmee; R.
E. L Turner, F. B. Turner, of Parrish; J.
S. Hancock, J. B. Wilson, of Sarasota; Z.
C. Chambliss, Hugo Russell, Mr. Whit-
worth, of Ocala; J. F. Alderman, of Balm;
M. F. Miselle, of Pine Level; W. W. Clark,
C. C. Wilson, E. E. Skipper, J. G. Boyd, of
Bartow; C. E. Garner, Edwin Brobston,
J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville; George
Riggin, John Campbell, George B. Wallace,
A. B. Murphy, Wilson Wright, of Braiden-
town; C. H. Davis, of Manatee; A. M.
Wilson, W. A. Rauls, of Miakka; W. H.
Towers, of Fort Myers; W. F. White, of
Clearwater, W. E. Embry, of Dade City;
W. H. Hooker, of Arcadia; J. B. Moody, of
Tampa; George R. Mobley, of Webster:
H. J. Moody, of Riverview, George W.
Clark.


Hardwood Men in Convention.
The third annual meeting of the Hard-
wood Manufacturers' Association was held
in Nashville, Tenn.. last week. About
130 delegates attended. The banquet was
enjoyable. The executive committee re-
elected Lewis Doster, of Columbus. 0.. as
secretary.


Diamond Yield of South Africa.
The diamond yield of South Africa,
which began with $2,500 in 1867 and reach-
ed $18,000,000 in 1888, was $240,50000 last
year.
The report of the Royal Commisin on
the coal supplies of the United Kingdom
calculates the available resources of the
proved coal fields at 100,000,000,000 tons,
which at the present increasing rate of
output will last about 450 years. The
commissioners anticipate that, owing to
physical considerations. the rate of tile
increase of the outpiit will soon be slower
and will be followed by a period of sta-
tionary output and then by a gradual de-
cline. which will prolong the duration of
the resources. The report also says that
it is interesting to note that while the
output of the United Kingdom has little
more than doubled since 1870, the output
of Germany hias increased fourfold and
that of the United States tenfold. The
competition of American coal thus far has
only affected Great Britain's distant mar-
kets, but fears are expressed that the
American production will eventually out
strip the local demands and necessitate
America establishing a large coal export
trade in order to dispose of her surplus.
The following tabulated statement.
taken from the Connellsville (Pa.) Cou-
rier. shows the total number of ovens at
the close of each year, the annual output,
average price and gross revenue of the
region from 1900 to date:
Total Tons Average Gross
ovens shipped price. revenue
1900 .. 20,954 10,166,234 $2.70 $27,448,832
1901 .. 21,575 12,60,940 1.95 24,589,400
1902 .. 26.329 14,138,740 2.37 33,508,714
1903 .. 28,002 13,345.230 3.00 40,035,690
1904 .. 29,119 12,427,468 1.75 21,748,069
The year closed with daily average ship-
ments of 1,864 cars, which was fifty-six
ears a day short of the average shipments
during November.
"There are gems and gold in Ethiopia,"
writes Robert P. Skinner, in the World's
Work. "The gems we saw were found
scattered over the desert wastes, washed
down from the mountains above. Gold is
hidden away in the mountains in quan-
tities which can be estimated by no ex-
isting data. Even now the annual pro-
duction of gold by methods as old as
Moses, amounts probably to $500,000. As
for copper, iron and the ordinary metals.
their extraction is merely a question of
finding facilities for shipment and, prob-
ably more important still, a market capa-
ble of absorbing them. Petroleum has
been discovered in large quantities, but
the emperor is currently believed to regard
as the most import of Abyssinian activities
the cultivation of his fertile table lands.
The coal-mine owners of Prussia on
Thursday decided to inform the govern-
ment that they would accept any judgment
a parliamentary commission might ren-
der. after an inquiry into the grievances
of the miners; also, that they would im-
mediately remove the grievances if they
were found to exist.
Consul J. F. Monahan, at Chemitz, Ger-
many, reports: "From the following fig-
ures it will be seen that Germany's great-
est efforts are brought to bear on the
commercial fleet, and that the country has
hopes of becoming the greatest carriyng
oower in the world. In 1903 Germany
built 507 ships of 277,055 registered tons.
against 333 of 208,835 registered tons in
1898. Of these 507 vessels, 12 were for the
navy; 294, of 248,562 registered tons, were


THE




Falstaff Restaurant

For Ladies and Gentlemen.


SBreakfast a la carte. Luncheon 12 to 2:30, 50e. Table d'hote
dinner, 6 to 9 p. m., 75c. Oysters on half shell. After theater
lunches a specialty.

25 MAIN STREET,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.




ieimll ~ r~llalnlllimlililiiliiimi iillllll


PEARL WIGHT. Pre.


T. n. M-cARTHY, VIs-Pore.


MAURIS STEN. Treas.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.

IRVING i. WELC. Manager.



florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


III Ig gI IIIII III t IIIIIIIg II IIII III II I 1 tSI IIII II


SW. H. BECKWITH. W. B. HENDESON. G. C. WARBBN.

SBECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.
*

: LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE AND MILL LANDS.,
*
0 RoomSs 1-2-3, First Natlonal Bauk BsildiMg.
.TAMPA, : FLORIDA.
-


CYPILESS TANKS

Are Best by Every Test
Cypre withstand the effects of heat and ore
better than any other wood, shrink- and swells l
Sthanoner woodi, Is iperious toacids,boe paint
well and lasts for age without decaying. Located
as w are, right in the great cylreo forests, we are
able to secure the bet selectim of the wood sdat
very low prices. We have ceea building tanks for
more than a quarter of a century and body aet
that no tans are better built or will last longer.
Send ,r catalog and prices.
G. M. DAVIS e SON
PALATE A, FLORIDA



BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will send by express. prepaid, the following:
Four full quarts Lincoln County, Bunnybrook Rye or Big Hor Rye .. UN
Single Bottles ................................................................. I
I will send four full quarts of Sonmr,' Corn, Melwood Rye, Golden Wed-
ding Rye, Holland Gin. Ton; Gin, Peach Brandy. Peach and Hoey
Whiskey. Gin and anhattan Cocktails-any of the above for........ $0
One bottle of any of the above ..................................................... 1.00
rour bottles of the following California Wine: Sherry. Port. Musat.
('atawba ...........................................................................
Single bottles ........................................ .....................
Four bottles Wilson Whiskey. cased......................................... 0I.
Single bottles ................ ........................................... L
Five bottles Dufy'a Malt ....................... ............... am
Single bottles ............................................ ......................
Bulk goods of all kinds. Special Prices on application. All kinds
liquors in jugs from i L to ,L. f. o. b. Jadioamlls.


for the commercial fleet; 201, of 28,493 reg- f. BETTELINI W Bay St. opp. Ualen Depot, Jacksenville, Fla
AR TOU A SrUCr TO THE RECORD?








THE WE19ELY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


The Oldest Whiskey

House in Georgia.
(Established In i881.)


OLD SHARPE WILLIAMS
Guaranteed 8 years old. By the
gallon, $3.00. 4 full quarts, $3.50
Express Prepaid.
GE0. J. COLEMAW RYE
Guaranteed 6 years old. By the
gallon, $2.75. 4 full quarts, $3.00
-xprm Prepaid.


ANVIL RYT
Guaranteed 4
gallon, $2.5&


years old. By the
4 full quarts, $2.75.
Exprea Prepaid.


CLIFFORD RYE
By the gallon, *.26. 4 full quarts
4.50.
xpress Prepaid.
OLD KEINTUCKY CORN
Guaranteed 8 years old. By the
gallon, $3.00. 4 full quart, 3.25.
prem Prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN
Guaranteed 4 yean old. By the
gallon, 2.50. 4 full quarts, *2.75
Ezpre Prepaid
We handle all the leading brands of
Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the mar-
ket and will save you from 25 per cent
to 50 per cent on your purchases. Send
for price list and catalogue. Mailed free
upon application.

Tho AIayr& Flh LiporG Co.
So5-so5-sro-sis lFearth Stret,
MACON GEORGIA.



This Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.




Liquor Merchants

Proprietors


Jacs ille Bottli Works

... Agen ...


ACME BEER




me Ister- li ekme. osts e t eirif
sum ommes


istered tons, were for the river and canal
fleet. Tie increase in the tonnage of the
connimercial fleet of more than 100,000 reg-
istered tons in 1903 is a matter of consid-
erable pride. This development is bound
to continue, for German foreign commerce
i's ever on the increase. Of this number
of ships Germany built fifty-six, of 20,-
406 registered tons, for other countries,
while she in turn had thirty-three vessels,
of 37,038 registered tons, built in foreign
doeks. Although conditions at present in
the German industrial world are very de-
pressed. still it is claimed that the num-
ber of ships in course of construction
is not less than in 1903.

Southern Supply Dealers to Meet in Sa-
vannah April 26-28.
The executive committee ot the Southern
Supply and Machinery Dealers' associa-
tion held a meeting at New Orleans on toe
lutlh and 17th and made arrangements for
the annual convention of the St.uthetn
Supply and Machinery Dealers' associa
tion, which is to take place April ?Z, 26,
27 and 28, 190a, at the DeSoto koli l, Sa-
vannah, Ga.
The executive committee has appointed
Mr. Denny, of the Georgia Supply Com-
pany, Savannah, Ga., as chairman of the
entertainment committee, and Mr. Disos-
%\ay, of the Cotton States Belting andl
Supply Company, Atlanta, Ga., as chair-
mian of the transportation committee.
Favorable rates have been made with the
DeSoto Hotel, and the program that has
been adopted will not only be exceedingly
interesting to every manufacturer in the
United States and to every supply dealer,
but will also be enjoyed by all who take
part in said convention.
The executive committee extend an in-
vitation to all supply dealers to be pres-
ent, and also to the representatives of
the different manufacturers with whom
the supply dealers do business.
Indications are that this will be the
'uost enjoyable and most largely attend-
el convention that has ever been held by
this association.

The Augusta Convention.
The bi-monthly meeting of the Yellow
Pine Sash, Door and Blind Association
w\as held in Anugusta, Ga., Jan. 11, ad-
journing to meet in Charlotte, X. C., March
15.
The association has a membership of
about twenty-five lumber firms, located
from North Carolina to Texas. At the
meeting the following new members were
elected: The Bagdad Sash Factory, Bag-
dad, Fla.; tile Sawyer & Austin Co., Pine
Bluff, Ark.; Carolina Manufacturing Co.,
Charlotte, N. C.; the Columbia Lumber
and Manufacturing Co., Clumbia, S. C.,
and the Morgan Wod and Iron Works,
Spartanburg, S. C., each of which were
represented.
Officers elected for the year were: 1).
Wodwsorth, of Atlanta, president: .1. D.
Wood. of Atlanta. secretary. The direc-
tors are: C. B. Harmon, of Anug.msta,
chairman: .1. H. Scruggs, of Birminghlam;
0. 1'. Willingham, of Macon; F. .1. I)udleiy,
of Columbus; William I. Otis, of ('Colum-
bia; J. A. Fore, of Charlotte, and ,I hn
Itendell, of Pine Bluff, Ark.

It is estimated that the shipments ci;
phosphate rock in 1I04 from thle Maul y
County fields in Tennessee agregated 333,-
000 tons, valued at $1,15(i,011, and that the
yield in the State was 525,000 tons, valued
at $2,621,250.


NUBIAN TEA or the Liver ind KNdey

BENEDICTA A ..ins f.r or w-
CUBAN RELIEF r cr."Ps a Dl

CUBAN OIL A li..lent ueueald fr Cuts, B.rs
Bruies mnd RLematsmL
A supply of these medicines is what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for pnces and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,
CLttameega TOJeWee



THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILU.L FLA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.

Ideal Lcatile as eastlid St. Joins
HOTEL ROSELAND- Te'"et ail- A
SirhImass Teorist ad Family ietal
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Every comfort and amusement. Unexcelled eline, Northern eoodkng. Special rates, $10 to i1
weekly; 62 to 83 daily, American plan. Illustrated booklet mailed. Car going to ostrich farm
passes hotel grounds. Headquarters for naval stores men, lumbermen, cattle growers and Good
Roads Convention delegates A. 0. EKHOLM. Plop arvom.


S- Windsor hotel
.



SYear-Round Hotel.
SP DODGE & CULLENS,
-owmera -a PrsrWiaer.

GAMERICRAN PLAN
GRAND VIEW HOTEL $2.00 PER DAY UP
SPICIAL WEEKLY MATIr


ST. GEORGE HOTEL) 6.7--Al1.N
MRS. EO0. W. BROOK. PmOPmaTIame.

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Palnte.
Foot Hogan St. Jacksonville, Fla.

W. J. L'ENGLE, J. W. WADE, E O. HUGOBS,
President. Vice-Preldest. See'y adTrea


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


YES mEOR 1 Tim 8U9 GINs OA? TEADI JOURNAL









8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week. SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903 .4 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.*


Spirits for the Week at Satanah.
Price Repts Sales Exp. 1904
Mon., Jan. 30 1521/ 185 32 330 62/.
Tues., Jan. 31 52 177 107 114 621/
Wed., Feb. 1 52 8 100 5 62
Thur., Feb. 2 52% 42 75 185 621/2


Reia for the Week at Savannah.
Monday, Jan. 30. Last Year.
WW ............ 5.15 4.35
WG .......... 5.00 3.95
N .......... ..... 4.75 3.70
M ................4.50 3.65
K ............. 4.05 3.35
I ...... ........ 3.50 3.30
H ............. 3.12/% 3.05
G .............. ..2.90 3.00
F ................ 2.75 2.90
E .... ....... 2.70 2.85
D .. .. .. .. .. .. 2.65 2.80
ABC .... ........ 2.60 2.80
Receipts, 1,290, sales 3,221, exports, 1,300.

Tuesday, Jan. 31.-Rosin firm; receipts.
845; ales, 1,423; shipments, 763. Quote:
A, B and C, $2.60; D, $2.67 1-2; E, $2.62@'
$2.70; F, 2.87 1-2@$2.75; G, $2.82 1-2@
$2.90; H, 3.121-2; I, $3.50; K, $4.05; M.
4.50; N, $4.75; window glass, water white,
$5.15.
Wednesday, Feb. 1.-Rosin firm; re-
ceipts, 1,360; sales, 2,852; shipments, 1,350.
Quote, A, B, C, $2.55@$2.60; D,$2.60.5$2.62
1-2; E, $2.6 1-2@$2.67 1-2; F, $2.67 1-2@
$2.75; G, $2.851-2@2.92 1-2; H, $3.15; I.
$3.50; K, $4.05; M, $4.50; N, $4.75; WG,
$5; WW, $5.15.
Thursday, Feb. 2.-Rosin firm; receipts,
362; sales, 2,09; shipments, 2,51. Quote:
A, B, C, $2.55@$2.0; D, $2.60; E, $2.62 1-2
@02.65; F, $2.67 1-2; G, $2.82 1-2; H, $3.15;
I, $3.50; K, $4.05; M, $4.50; N, $4.75; WG.
$5; WW, $5.15.
Savaaah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 ........... 6,495 44,550
Receipts Feb. 2 ......... 42 362
Receipts previously .....170,578 571,314
Total .............. 177,115 616,226

Exports Feb. 2 ......... 185 2,561
Exports previously ......154,746 540,957
Total ...............154,931 543,518
Stock Feb. 2 ............ 22,184 72,708
Stock previously ........ 9,833 94,922

Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Review.
New York, Jan. 31, 1905.
Spirits Turpentine-The market has
been very quiet during the past week.
Large buyers holding aloof, with the small
orders checked on account snow storm.
Stock, 1,150 barrels. We quote Machines.
55 1-2 etas.
Rosin-While there have been some sales
of low grades, they have not been sufficient
to absorb receipts. Mediums and pales
dull. We quote:
BC, $2.90; D, $3.00; E, $3.05; F, $3.15;
G, $3.20 to $3.25; H, $3.45 to $3.55; I,
$3.85; K, $4.40; M, $4.85; N, $5.10; WG,
$5.35; WW, $5.55.
TOLAR, HART & CO.

Bass for Naval Stores Statistics.
A wholesale lumber dealer in Georgia
asks:
"In making up statistics for naval stores
please advise how many pounds of rosin
and number of gallons of turpentine you
figured."
The basis upon which all figures of na-
val stores are compiled is 280 pounds of
robin per barrel, and 50 gallons of turpen-
tine. The barrels of rosin vary greatly.
but the price is based on 280 pounds, and,
of course, the exports and other statistical
information are based on the same quan-
tity. Turpentine barrels do not vary so
greatly, and as the average is 50 gallons,
that amount is taken as the quantity per
barrel.


THOSE. G. HUTCHINSON
FELLOW AMEMC ASI U CII TM
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
Rosi 7, Board of Trade Bld.
Pheme 312 JACKSONVILLE. FL


ZINC NAILS
fm

Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
atrone but soft light metal. They are
the oml y Wt which will not injury
saws when left in the trees.

slem Nail Co.
S73 PWl St. nor rwrdh, N. r.
Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc., Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.


Receipts
Spiits, ............... .. .... ..... -
Rcoins bb,.. .......... ............ ..
Total .................................
Exports
Spirits cao ................... ..........
Roins, bbs .................. ......... ..
Foreign
Spirits, camk..... ......................
Roans, bbbs...........................
New York
Spirits, c .................. ............
Rosin, bbLs.................................
Sundriaes
Spiritsasks. .......... ..............
Rosin, bbls. ........... .. .........


1908-04 1902-03 1


198,047
650,988
844,585

188,398
752,270

98,884
888,171

35,658
87,853

59,351
826.746


292 496
940,507
1,238,038

296,430
975.428

206,109
504,178

42,765
138,121

87,556
387,784


1901-02


814,846
1,071,440
1,385,786

814,876
62,687

217,446
585,042

53,797
129,059

48,633
898,586


Tennessee and Alabama Retailers.
It is announced that the Retail Lum-
ber Dealers' Association of Tennessee and
Alabama will hold its semi-annual meeting
in Chattanoga next August. Officers elect-
ed at the recent meeting in Birmingham
are:
President-Richard Randolph.
Vice-President--Charles C. Heidt.
Secretary and Treasurer-W. E. Wailes,
of Birmingham.
Board of Directors-W. J. Wallace, Nor-
vall & Wallace, Nashville, Tenn.; W. L.
Murphy, Murphy & Co., Knoxville, Tenn.;
W. P. McBroom, Lookout Planing Mills,
Chattanoga, Tenn.; J. A. Stone, Stone &
Huling Co., Bristol, Tenn.; .'. J. Jordan.
J. P. Jordan & Co., Memphis, Tenn.; A. M.
Booth, Huntsville, Ala.; E. C. Payne, New
Decatur, Ala.; F. J. Sheppard, Sheppard
Lumber Co., Ensley, Ala., and C. W. Frick
hofler. A. J. Krebs & Co., Birmingham, Ala.


State Industrial Notes.
Miami-Telephone System. Reports
-tate that H. C. udge and associates have
applied for franchise to construct and ope-
rate telephone system.
Apopka-Waterworks.- Apopka Water
& Light Co. is arranging for the installa-
tion of waterworks plant.
Carrabelle-Lumber Company.-Incorpo
rated: The Hayes Lumber Co., with $75,-
000 capital, by William C. Vareen, William
H. Smith and W. A. Hayes.
Chipley-Electric Light Plant.--race-
ville Electric Light & Water Co., Grace-
ville, Fla., has secured franchise to ope-
rate electric light plant, and construction
will shortly begin.
Escambia- Land and Manufacturing
Company.-Escambia Land & Manufae-
turing Co. has been organized with $200.-
000 capital. H. L. Covington is president;
C. M. Covington is vice-president, and J.
R. Saunders, secretary.
Graceville-Cotton-seed-oil Mill and Fer-
tilizer Factory-Graceville Electric Light
& Water Co. will erect a cotton-seed oil
mill and fertilizer factory next season.
Homosassa-Fish Company.- Williams
Fish Co. has been incorporated with $6,000
capital by Jacob Brown, J. J. Williams and
Abe Brown, to deal in fish, etc.

Send al orders for printing for the tur-
pentine ad commissary trades to the
Record ofce to insure prompt delivery.


Crop of Spirits
Spirits.
WilSmimgto...... ....16511
Charlesto.. .... ..... SA
Savaansh........ ..IT166
Brunwiek .. ........ ss,1
Mobile.. .............. 12tU
Now Orleas........ .. 3A017
Crrabaell...... ......losed
Georgetown....... 7,5I
Pensaeola.. .. .... .. 4,aM
Jax. Pradins.. .... Itl
Tampa .... ..........eloded

Totab ...... ......5U6J5


and Rains fr Thir Years
1001-O3 Coep 13=-6 Crhop 13-f
Rosin,. Spirits. R .. Sprite. RMd
SAW 1 1M lMM 1M1 1L4u
314 3,007 11,86 3,04 u137
,A 270,670 940 313,06 1,71,44
13 7 68^947 44,1J 76,6 33,3
580%e 18,3M 79X7 31, 8"73
1331 33,103 106,033 21,0 9,33
dosad 3,34 J,148 ,177 47A73
44,314 10r7 4daM5 u 5M ,
on 31,375 IMm 37,7 14m,36
M- ,lo 91,976 3785,11 76~4 f45,AM
alead 13,5 4066 5,4 51,7S7

U5MM 671,0 2,14,818 563,4M ,13


Imperta d Turpentim to U. I
The following table is omiled by James Watt & Son, of London, from the
official returns. For oanveniene of omparison we have turned cwts intl. arrel
-320 cwt. equal 100 barrel.
187 1- 180 1900 19 1901 1
From U. 8., bbl. .... IMBB 173,7 149,376 174,44 109,41 16,11 1M43A
From Frane, bbl.... 161 4 517 2,23 86 1,6IA 4,M
From other aontries.. 1,404 78 M0 3 o3 U 0 61*
156M3 174,9K 14,342 177,5 149,361 1S7, 14,37
From Rumi .......... S.,S 4,1 4,8 8,51 ,3M1 ,711 17,
Total Bgrk .. U17,1M 179 Ist4, 186,M0 01,20 186,363 16,50
Thus the import of Rusai-a Turpentia (or Wood Spirit) in 1903 was double
that of 1902, and over six time as mu as in 1897. It is interesting to am how
this import luetoate with the price of American Turpentine.
Percentage of Impot of RB i ..179 3.3 3.2 4.7 3.41 5.36 1IM
Av. Prie AmTer. Trp. i Lea .314 944- 34-1 M-4 7.1 M-1 41-

COMPARATIXV PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVANMAH FOR FIVE YEARS.


April 1 ..................
April 8 ..... ..
April 16 ..................
April 2 ............. .....
April 9 ..................
May 6 ...................
May 13 ....................
May 20 ....................
May 27 ...................
June 3 ..... ... ............
June 10 .....................
June 17 ..................
June 24 ..................
July 1 .... ..............
July 8 ...................
July 15 ....................
July 22 ................. .
July 28 ....................
Aug. 4 ..................
Aug. 12 .................
Aug. 19 ...................
Aug. 6 ...................
Sept. 2 ....................
Sept. 9 ........... *......
Sept. 16 ...................
Sept. 23 ..................
Sept. 30 ..................
Oct. 7 ...................
Oct. 14 ....................
Oct. 21 ..................
Oct. 28 ...................
Nov. 4 ....................
Nov. 11 .................
Nov. 18 ................*
Nov. 25 ..................
Dec. 2 ................ ...
Dec. 9 ...................
Dec. 16 ...................
Dec. 23 ...................
Dec. 30 ....................
Jan. 6 .....................


1304-45
ND
53
5s4
54%
53%
54%
64%
52%
dt
5%
U%

a%
62%
U%
53%
52%
53%
t%
94%


48%
52%
62
52%

56%
56

47%
48-%
50%
49%
50


1903-04
ND
s0
49%
47
46
45
47%
47%
49
45%
46
0%
47%
47%
47%
48
49%
50@ %
49%
52
55@
54
54%
56%
57
55
57
55%
56%
55%
56
56%
56
56
56
56%
%,
66%
56%
67%


1901-0
46
43%
42%
43
42%-U
43
45
45
46%
.45%
47%
48%
47%
45%
43%
44%
44
43%
43%
44%
44%
44%



47%
50

51
53%
49
562
51
50%
51
50%
51%
52
52%
54


190103
34
32
32%1
31%-32
32
32
31%
32%
33
32%
32
33%-%
34%
33%
34%
34%
33
32%
34
34
34

33%
34%




35%
35%

35
35%
35%
35
35%
36%
35%
36%
36%
37%


1900-01


47%
46%
47
48
49
49
46
44%
43%
42%
43%
43%
43

39%



36%
37
37
37/,

40%
40%
40
41
40
39
39
38%
37%
35
35
37


TIB RECORD IS THE "OPRlATOUF UUW.IANl


--^'- -~o


The receipts of 1h ame Ise than 190243 by 9849 cas, and of roasins, 289,569 bars













Alabama.
Anniston-Pipe Works.-The United
States Cast Iron Pipe & foundry Co. it
preparing to put in operation its sixth pit,
which was constructed at the time the
plait was first established, but has never
been operated. Two large electric cranes
will be erected for handling the heavy
flasks and 36 and 24-inch piping that will
be made. This pit has a capacity of 60
tons daily.
Birmingham--Cotton Gin and Oil Mill
Machinery.-Brantley Manufacturing Co..
reported incorporated several months ago,
with $100,000 capital to manufacture cot-
ton gin, cottonseed-oil mill machinery, etc.,
has let contract for the construction of
buildings in North Birmingham to the 1i.
A. Stockmar Construction Co.


Montgomery--Mattress Factory.-P. %M.
Addison and T. A. Holtzclaw, of Meridian,
Miss., will organize the Montgomery Mat
tress Co., for the manufacture of mat-
tresses. A building has been secured at
625 North Court Street, which will be
equipped for a daily capacity of from
50 to 100.
Uniontown-Waterworks and Electric
Light Plant.-The city will build a new
and larger waterworks and electric light
plant at a more convenient location on the
railroad, changing the electric system from
direct to alternating current. Professor
Dunston, professor of civil and mechanical
engineering of the State Polytechnic In-
stitute, Auburn, Ala., has made prelim-
inary surveys. As soon as report is sub-
mitted the necessary machinery, etc., will
be purchased; Thomas Hudson, city clerk.


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


The Tndmstal News of the Week.


Birmingham-Iron Furnace and Steel
Plant.-The Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron
Co. has completed the repairs which have gi
been in progress on its furnace, costing Augusta-Street-paving.-City contem-
about $75,000, and will blow in the plant plates paving Jackson street from Broad
this week. Daily capacity will be from to Walker with vitrified brick at a cost of
200 to 250 tons of iron. It is reported $18,000; R. E. Allen, mayor.
that the company will build a steel plant Blakely-lce Factory.-A company has
this year, and while no definite announce been organized with A. M. McLaurin, pres-
ments have been made, it is known that id-nt. to build and operate ice factory.
the establishment of such an industry is Columbus-Candy Factory.- Columbus
a part of the company's plans for devel- Candy Co. has been incorporated, with an
hoping its properties in the Birmingham authorized capital of $100,000, by Ben T.
district. From $1,500,000 to $2,500,000 Brooks, S. T. Whitaker, Z. A. Brooks, S.
will be expended. J. C. Maben is presi- K. Dimon, T. W. Bates and W. W. Lock-
dent. Mr. Maben telegraphs the Manufac- hart. Mr. Whitaker was reported last
turers' Record that the report is absolutely week as having purchased the entire equip-
false as far as the present, at least, is mnunt of the Whitaker Candy Co., and to
concerned. organize company to operate candy fac-
Birmingham Iron-furnace Improve- tory.
menta.-Tutwiler Coal, Coke & Iron Co. Columbus-Canneries, etc.-George H.
contemplates the construction of an addi- Ford Co. has incorporated, with $50,000
tional stove and making some ordinary re- capital, and privilege of increasing to $500,-
pairs and renewals to its iron furnace at 000, for the purpose of growing fruit and
Vanderbilt. vegetables, establishing canneries, etc.; in-
Birmingham-Coal-mining.-The Pratt- corporators, Hamlin W. Ford, W. Cecil
Cahaba Coal Co. has been incorporated, Neill of Columbus, J. T. Checkley, of Au-
with $20,000 capital, for the development gusta, Ga., and associates.
of coal lands. W. H. Staton is president; Decatur Waterworks and Sewerage
E. S. Garrett, vice-president, and S. J. System.-City contemplates issuing bonds
Garrett, secretary-treasurer. for the construction of waterworks and
Birmingham-Realty Company. .1. H. sewerage system. Address The Mayor.
Laumer, L. Laumer, J. E. Bennevt, H. E. Macon-Directory Company.-W. L. Ful-
Bennett, James L. Davidson and A. Wy- ler, W. E. Berry and J. A. Berry have or-
man have incorporated the Southern Real- ganibed the (eorgia City and County Di-
ty Co., with $30,000 capital. rectory Co.. with $10,000 capital, and privi-
Ensley-Coal Mine.-It is reported that leg of increasing to $20,000.
the Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Co. is Penfield-Knitting Mill.-The Pentield
arranging for the opening of a coal mine Knitting Mills has purchased dyeing plant
near Ensley, and the moet improved ma- and 24 knitting machines for its enlarge-
chinery is being installed; general office, ments referred to last week.
Birmingham, Ala.; New York office, 100 Rochelle-Mercantile.- Farmers' Supply
Broadway. Co. has been incorporated, with $10,000
Gregory (P. O. Yates)-Gold Mining.- calptal, by J. S. Crummey and others.
The Tallapoosa Mining Co. is developing* Arrangements are being made for the erec-
the gold mines in Tallapoosa county re- tion of building.
ported last week. Wm. Hood is president Savannah-Drug Company.-Incorporat-
of the company, and W. A. Hood, secre- ed: Red Cross Pharmacy, with $5.00 capi-
tary-treasurer and general manager. tal, and privilege of increasing to $25,000.
Greenville Supply Company.-R. B. by A. L. Ford, J. H. Strouss and F. B. Dur-
Smythe, Mrs. M. F. Smythe and Mrs. Em- ham.
ma McQueen have incorporated the Ala- Warwick-Cotton Gin.-John F. Wise
bana Supply Co., with $3,000 capital. will erect two-story building 30x60 feet,
Mobile-Creosote Paving Works.-Dis- covered with iron, and equip with a four-
patches state that the Republic Chemical gin outfit, replacing structure reported
Creosote Co. contemplates the establish- burned last week.
ment of a $1,000,000 plant for the manu- Waycross-Soap Works.-Imperial S.ap
facture of creosoted wooden pavement. Co. has been organized with J. E. T. II w-
Mobile-Veneer Works.- Incorporated: den, president; eorge W. Dean, vice-presi-
Underwood Veneer Co., with $40,000 capi- dent; M. R. Churchill, secretary and gen-
tal. J. A. Underwood, of Wausau, Wis., eral manager and D. W. Lott, treasurer, to
is president; W. A. Underwod, of Chicago, operate soap factory. Mr. Churchill was
Il., vice-president, and R. S. Bacon, of reported last week as to remve dye-soap
Mobile, secretary-treasurer. works from Atlanta, Ga., to Waycross.


JOHN R. YOUNG.
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-Pre~ident.
DIRECTORS:


C. S. ELLIS
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J- B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


B . BULLARD
W. C. POWELL
WALTER RAY,
A. D. OOVINGTON.


L L KAYTON,
leretary and Trem"r.

J. B CHRBNUT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and ae
conveniently situated at the terminals of the 8. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.




J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,

a41
D tHeadquarters fr

SDistiller's Pumping
*Outfit.
SNo plant complete without o
SHundreds of them in au in Georgia, T
SFlorida, Alabama, Midisippi aad
SSouth Carolina. Write us for p
46 las and prices. We als manature
6 Engines, Bellers *l nm K
Grade Mascblery,
as well as carry a full and complete
1 -----t--- l
Mill Supples, Pipe,
*; Beler Tubes, Ete. ;
4! Advise your wants.
-. Macon, - Georia.
a "a"g prcit of al
~ e Me of Tmk Wes fLtr Tlrwe tle s eWra Prw
-* -a*************************************


John R. Young. J. W. Motte, C. B. Parker, James MeNat, W. W. Wilder,
President. Vice-Pres. Vice-Pres. Vice-Preas. Se. A Tress.



iJohn R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.
4.P __ __ _
S&Savmannah 4 Brunswick. Ge.
8 l l1 r4 4 l l 8i il ll nl ii .................


THE gICORD CIECULATrS ALL OVER THU WOULD.


W. T. RILEY, J. A. 6. CARSOMN, WO. J. aCOVE/.
President. VIce-PresMeM. SecM. Aw Trea.


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Factories.
8th Street R. R. Crossing.
JACKSONVILLE. N FLORIDA



... NATIONAL ...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH. GA. U. 5. A.









10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL R.ECORD.
JAMU A. HOLLOMON.
Eder ad Mnaer.
PIuhUthed rEvy eriday.
B (DoLfmea).-.83 .O Per Annum,
g na(roreign).... $G0 .
"The Pine and It Produta."
AM eemindmt-i- ashaM be eiire
The Indu vtrie. Record Company.
Jacksonville. Fla.
aemh EdMetral ad Bumieas Offlose at
Adtnt. Ga. k s vanna h Ga.
Entered at the PoMtoaf at JaakDonville
Fla., as meoml-dam matter.

Adopted by the xeezutie Ommlttme of
the Tupenti Operator, AmI l.aM ,
eptsmber 1, 190, a its exilaivew ofikal
oras. Adopted In annual esaveotio
September i, as the orgua ao of the
pe Amloeiatiob.
Adopted April th, 190, as the oflcial
r1n of th Int tate se Grower' An-
loeltion. Adopted St 11, 190, as the
mly od al orga of tm T. O. A.
Conmlmdd to number pope by apeial
reolutiom adopted by the Goorgi 8wm
AsMnoiationf.

COPYT OR ADVERTISING.
Advertisig cWpy (dcpng or new ad-
vetirm-ta) souuM rach us Tuesday
muanim to imur tnsertisn the U i-e of
the m- weaL

THI RECORD'S OFFICES
The publilag lant an the main at-
fces f the Industrial Recr PublHasng
Co. are located at la. x South Hogan
Steat, Jacaeanvlle la., in the very heart
of the great trpetie an yellow pim
tIdustriM. Bruaah eMces, Savannah, Ga.,
ad Atlanta, Ga.

NOTICE TO PATRONS.
AU payments for advertising in the In-
dutril Red and subacriptos thereto
mut be made direct to the home office
ti Jacksonville. Agent are not allowed
to make colectiem under any circum-
tance. Bil@ for advertising sad sub-
criptima are eat out from the home
eMs, whean ue, and all remittances must
be mad duIrect to this company.
Ildtrial Record Pabliahia Co.

ARGUMENT FOR CO-OPERATION.
The Record takes the following extract
from the address of President Long, of
the Southern Lumber Manufacturers' As-
sociation, and publishes it in the hope
that those turpentine operators who are
not members or supporters of the Turpen-
tine Operators' Association may be profit-
ed by it:
"Those of you who have supported thi,.
association and especially those who sup-
ported the curtail movement must feel
proud to know that you have been a party
to a transaction that means so much t.i
this great industry, and especially when
it has been accomplished in the face >f
the statements made by substantial busi-
ness men that such a movement could not
effect results worthy of consideration. To
me our ability to bring so large a number
of minds together to such an extent as to
work to the same end is of more satisfac-
tion than the money thus far obtained by
this action, for it overthrows the idea i
often expressed that there are too many i
different interests involved to affect prices
when the manufacturing capacity, or sup-
ply, is in excess of the demands of the i
trade. In this advanced age we are dis-
gusted with the man who uses the woden I
plow because his father did, or other an- e


cient tools or practices for the same rea-
son, and yet we find substantial, success-
ful business men of to-day who refuse to
believe that certain business disturbances
can be avoided because experiences of the
past have been to the end that such could
not be accomplished. I believe that with
experience we learn, develop and grow;
that the financiers of this country to-day,
under like conditions, would be able to
avoid the majority of the panics of the
years gone by. I believe that the workings
of this curtail movement will give us
more confidence in ourselves, more confi-
dence in each other, and should we, as we
will, reach a condition some time in the
future where our supply will exceed the
demand this experience will prove of im-
mense value, and preparatory to such a
condition, I would recommend that a com-
mittee consisting of two from each dis-
trict covered by this association be ap-
pointed and made a permanent committee
on curtailment, in whose hands shall be
lodged the power to restrict the output
when in their opinion conditions so de-
mand. Of course, this committee could
control only that portion of the member-
ship of this association giving consent to
such control.
"To those of you who have supported
neither the association nor the curtail
movement, can you review these figures
and facts carefully without conscientiously
feeling that you are receiving benefits to
which you are not entitled? I do not be-
lieve it the desire or intent of any of
our fellow manufacturers, or at least any
great percentage of them, to prosper to
so great an extent as these figures would
indicate at the expense of their fellows,
and so I shall be surprised if the result
of this one effort alone does not bring
into our association a number of manufac-
turers who have never heretofore support-
ed, by money, by influence or otherwise.
this association."
This applies with equal force to the
turpentine conditions as relating to th.i
Turpentine Operators' Association to-day.

DELAY IN CLYATT DECISION.
Advice to the Record from Washington
are to the effect that no decision in the
Clyatt peonage case may be expected for
three weeks, the Supreme Court having
adjourned Tuesday for that time without
having rendered the decision. The decis-
ion was confidently expected Tuesday,
with the regular batch handed down on
that day and the delay would indicate
that the court is giving the peonage case
the most careful consideration and also
that the judges are evidently finding diffi-
culty in reaching a decision. The case of
Senator Burton, of Kansas, which was ar-
gued after the peonage case, has already
been decided by the court, and a decision
has also been handed down in the beef
trust cases, which were argued by Attor-
ney General Moody since the peonage cases
were argued.
There is a deep interest throughout
the South in the Clyatt case. for it is con-
sidered a test case for about three hun-
dred other similar prosecutions now pend-
ng on the Supreme Court's decision.

LUMBER CONDITIONS.
The attention of Record readers who are
interested in the manufacture of lumber
s called to the report of proceedings else
where of the Southern Lumber Manufac-
turers' Association in annual convention
n New Orleans; especially is attention
called to the analytical report of the sec- c
etary. The trend of conditions as they
exist point toward a greater prosperity.


ROSIN IN8IPCTION.
The directors of the Savannah Board of
Trade have so amended the rule govern-
ing inspection of rosins that in future in-
stead of inspectors examining 5 per cent.
of bottom heads of K and above, they will
examine bottom heads of 5 per cent. of
all grades of rosin. The rule is intended
to eliminate false packing. It has had
this effect on the pales, but as some in-
stances of false packing of lower grades
have come to light, it was deemed a good
measure to extend the inspection to all
grades. The rule as amended will become
effective in ten days.

M'EACHERN ON THE HEARTY CUP.
Mr. H. A. McEachern, vice-president of
the Consolidated Naval Stores Co., was
seen by a Record reporter and asked for
an expression relative to the Herty cup
since the freeze. Mr. McEachern said: "It
is fortunate that this test has come at
this time. If we had gone on for a year
or two more without a freeze and the
lesson it brings, it would have been a
calamity when it did come. Now we have
learned the lesson and all we have to do
is to heed it. The operator must learn
to take care of his cups as he does his
other valuables. The man who leaves his
water pipes full of water during a freez-
ing night finds them bursted next day and
if he is a prudent man, he will not take
the risk, but prepare beforehand. Just so
the operator must prepare for freezes.
Cups should all be taken down by Decem-
ber 15th each season and left down till
February 15th. Then the danger would
be over. It would not cost much to take
them down, nor put them up, nor would
the dripping during the two months
amount to much of anything. The sooner
we learn to appreciate our property so that
we will properly care for it the better off
we will be. It is a hardship on a few
operators, but in the long run it is a bless-
ing, and especially if we will all improve
the lesson. The cup system is here to
stay and will not be set back on account
of the recent freeze to any appreciable
extent."

ABOUT THE TWO CENT PRICE.
DeFuniak Springs, Fla., Jan. 30, 1906.
Editor Industrial Record:
In a recent number of the Record there
is a communication from Mr. J. J. MeDan-
iel, of Bear Head, Fla., which is all right
as far as it goes, but he does not tell why
we were forced to give two cents for cut-
ting boxes, and makes it appear that we
started this exorbitant price, which is not
true.
The Alford Bros. Co. (Inc.), of Chipley,
Fla., the strongest firm of operators in
West Florida, are the ones who first com-
menced to pay two cents for cutting and
we were forced to give as much as they
did, or lose some of our best hands.
I am sure that the gentlemen who com-
pose this firm must have thought they had
good reasons for giving two cents or they
would not have done so.
There is no such firm as Richardson &
Thorp, or T. M. McConnell, as both of
these firms were merged into the Walton
Land and Timber Co.
You will put the above in the proper
shape and publish it so as to set us right
with our friends. t
I am very much pleased with the In-
lustrial Record and think it and the Asso-
iation have done much good in our busi-
ness. Very truly,
D. E. RICHARDSON.


The Scope of the Trade Joural.
Besides many other important services
which can be rendered to business men
by well-conducted and well-supported trade
journals, they offer -some special advan-
tages as means of finding out new custo-
mers. The advantages may be classified as
follows:
A trade journal of a high grade obtains
a reputation as an advertising medium
so peculiarly its own that outside parties
habitually resort to its pages for the pur-
pose of keeping posted about the intro-
duction of novelties, or ascertaining
whether any recent improvement, which
could be used with advantage in their bus-
iness, has been introduced. That sort of
information could scarcely be obtained
from any general publication.
The trade journal is not ephemeral, like
the daily sheet, which is rarely preserved
beyond the date of its issue, and of which
back numbers are difficult to find in the
homes of its patrons. The trade journal
is filed for further reference by many of
its subscribers with as much care and reg-
ularity as a receipted bill; thus, an ad-
vertisement which, in any daily paper,
soon loses its use, is likely to attract at-
tention again at some later moment, and
so become the means of a succession of
orders being gained.
The trade journal usually prints in each
edition a classified list of advertisements
and an alphabetical index of advertisers,
and thus supplies easy access to every es-
sential detail, and saves a painful search
through page after page for a business
announcement of the desired sort.
The trade journal represents, in a par-
ticular degree, community of inter-related
and sympathetic interests, bounded by cer-
tain industrial limitations, and is specially
devoted to a particular range of inquiry
and discussion, so that the advertiser can
readily determine beforehand, with reason-
able certainty, the class of reader to whom
he will appeal through his advertisement.
The trade journal has for its subscri-
bers and readers an exceptionally intelli-
gent class of persons--men who have abil-
ty as well as culture, experience besides
education, energy as well as sound judg-
ment; so it reaches persons open to con-
sider, in the right spirit, fresh ideas, new
projects, original inventions, useful im-
provements, and radical innovations. The
trade journal, circulating among such sub-
scribers and readers, traverses a rich field
of potential purchasers.
The trade journal, on account of the
special services it renders, sometimes may
furnish a direct approach to capable pur-
chasers, nearly every one of whom needs
the article advertised, and thus it is much
cheaper and far more effective as an pd-
vertising medium than any which appeals
to an indiscriminate mass of general read-
ers, such as do the daily papers.-London
Oil and Colourman's Journal.

West Florida Operators to Meet.
DeFuniak Springs, Fla., Jan. 30, 1905.
Dear Sir: The turpentine operators of
West Florida, between River Junction, Pen-
sacola, Florala and St. Andrews Bay ar3
requested to meet at DeFuniak Springs,
Fla., at 12 o'clock noon, February 18th, for
the purpose of discussing the turpentine
interests of the territory represented, and
o regulate the prices of chipping, dipping,
4tc. Meeting to be held at Court House.
D. E. RICHARDSON,
E. P. ROSE,
T. M. M'OONNELL,
E. W. THORP.


PATROUIZZ RECORD ADVaimafimm FOR SATIWACmT TPELNM9









T I WMLY INDUSTRIAL RUCOD. 11




TIE CHRISTIE GROOVER DIM GC,

WHOLESALE DRUOGGITS.


-i v -- -- -r -r -U1 Y I IY


- N"FSI


Lumber shipments from the port of Jack-
sonville during the month of January
amounted to more than eighteen and a half
million feet, according to the customhouse
record of the shipments by vessel to coast-
wise and foreign ports.
While the shipments are not as great as
for one or two months during the early
part of last year, they are nearly three
million feet greater than during January,
1904, and nearly a million and a half feet
greater than during December, 1904.
A feature that is worthy of special note
is the fact that the month is the record
month for lumber shipments to foreign
ports. It is also the record month for the
clearances of vessels to foreign ports.
The record shows that during the month
of January, 1905, the total shipment of
lumber and crossties to coastwise ports of
the United States amounted to 15,069,480
feet. The shipments to foreign ports
amounted to 3,461,763 feet. The shipments
were divided as follows:
Yellow pine, coastwise, board measure,
10,727,480 feet; croesties, coastwise, board
measure, 1,448,000 feet; cypress lumber,
board measure, 2,894,000; yellow pine, for-
eign, board measure, 3,461,763. Total ship-
ment 18,531,243.
The other shipments from Jacksonville
by vessels to coastwise ports during the
month were as follows:
Naval stores, 26,540 barrels; shingles,
53,925 bundles; railroad crossties, 36,200;
clay, 4,075 sacks; sponges, 120 bales; ci-
gars, 50 cases; doors and sash, one car-
load and 450 packages; fruit and vege-
tables, 61,465 packages; sundries, 45,486
packages.
The shipments to foreign ports consisted
of 3,461,763 feet of lumber, 29,500 shingles,
1,300 bundles of orange box shooks and 600
packages of miscellaneous merchandise,
such as flour, sugar, oil, grain, etc. The
total value of the shipments to foreign
ports was $59,864.27.
During January, 1904, the foreign ship-
ments of lumber amounted to 2,830,965
feet, and the total value of foreign exports
was $44,737.
During the month the freight received by
vessels from coastwise ports was as fol-
lows: Flour, 2,620 barrels; sugar, 2,240
barrels; bacon, 2,485 boxes; potatoes, 19,-
890 barrels; grain, 9,080 sacks; boots and
shoes, 15,400 cases; coal, 1,500 tons; oil,
1,600 barrels; petroleum, 900 barrels; fer-
tilisers, 2,075 tons; ammonia salts, 300
sacks; steel rails, 519 tons; sundries, 105,-
545 packages.
The freights received from foreign ports
during the month consisted of 1,750 tons of
kainit in bulk; 14,000 sacks of fertilizer
material; 1,117,600 kilos iron pyrites, con-
taining 50 per cent sulphur; 2,511 gallons
of brandied cherries, 2,762 bunches of ba-
nanas; 12,300 cocoanuts and about 100 mis-
cellaneous packages. The total value of
the foreign imports during the month was
$63,364.22. During January, 1904, the to-
tal value of the foreign imports was $15,-
489. This shows a handsome increase in
the foreign business as compared with the
same moath last year.


The record of vessels entering and clear-
ing, coastwise and foreign, during the
month shows that 51 vessels entered and
60 vessels cleared. Of these 39 entered
from coastwise ports and 12 entered from
foreign ports, and 43 cleared for coastwise
ports and 17 cleared for foreign ports.
The coastwise vessels entering were 26
steamers, 10 sailing vessels and 3 barges.
Two of the steamers were foreign regis-
tered vessels from coastwise ports and one
was a foreign bulit steam yacht now under
American register. The total tonnage of
the vessels entering from coastwise ports
was 59,706 tons and they employed 1,328
men.
Of the vessels entering from foreign
ports two were steamers and 10 were sail-
in vessels. The total tonnage of foreign
vessels entering was 5,338 tons, and they
employed 110 men. Three of the vessels
came from Cuba; 5 from the British West
Indies; 1 from the French West Indies;
1 from France, 1 from Germany and 1
from Wales.
The coastwise vessels clearing were 27
steamers, 13 sailing vessels and 3 barges.
Four of the steamers were foreign regis-
tered. The total tonnage of the vessels
clearing coastwise was 64,711, and they
employed 1,376 men.
Of the vessels clearing for foreign ports
one was a steam yacht and 16 were sailing
vessels. The total tonnage of the ves-
sels clearing foreign was 4,584, and they
employed 137 men.
A comparison of the business of the port
for January, 1905, and January, 1904,
shows the following:
January, 1905: Total vessels crossing the
bar, 111; total tonnage, 134,239; total men
employed, 2,951.
January, 1904: Total vessels crossing the
bar, 99; total tonnage, 117,464; total men
employed, 2,618.
The greatest increase, however, was
made in the foreign business. During
January, 1904, 7 vessels, employing 62 men
and having an aggregate tonnage of 2,580
entered from foreign ports, while in Jan-
uary, 1905, 12 vessels, employing 110 men
and having an aggregate of 5,338 tons,
entered port.
During January, 1904, 12 vessels of 3,-
928 tons, and employing 99 men, sailed
for foreign ports, while during January,
1905, 17 vessels, of 4,584 tons, and employ-
ing 137 men, sailed for foreign ports.
These figures show that the business
of the port is increasing since the work
of deepening the channel to the sea has
been under way, and show what may be
expected in the future when the work of
securing a 24-foot channel from Jackson-
ville to the sea is completed.

Downing Company Meeting.
The annual meeting of the stockholder-
and directors of the Downing Company
was held in Brunswick last week. The
following directors were elected: C. Down-
ing, C. S. Tait and J. J. Conoley, of Bruns-
wick; E. A. Buck, of Tifton, W. C. Green,
of Moultrie, and H. L. Covington, of Pen-
sacola. The board of directors declared a


acksonvill Port Figurs for January


10 per cent. dividend. They also re-elect-
ed the following officers: C. Downing,
Brunswick, president; R. W. Paterson,
New York, vice-president; J. J. Conoley,
Brunswick, secretary.


COTTON MILL MEH MEET.

Agree to Stop Enticing Hands from Each
Other.
Thomasville, Ga., Feb. 1.-Representa-
tives of the cotton mills of South Georgia
met here this afternoon in convention
in response to the call of W. S. Spain of
the mills at Quitman. Four mills, those
of Pelham, Quitman, Valdosta and Fitz-
gerald, were represented in person and
several others by proxy. The object of
the meeting was to discuss certain abuses
which have sprung up in the mills in the
last few years. Chief attention was paid
to the question of one mill enticing labor
from another. Agreement to stop this
practice was decided upon by the meeting.
A circular letter advocating this will be
sent to mills not represented in the meet-
ing, and unanimous action is hoped for.


Figures of Florida's Commerce.
From a history of Florida compiled by
Mr. Henry S. Elliott and issued by the De-
partment of Agriculture, a wonderful in-
crease in the commerce of the State is
noted. The commerce through Florida
ports in 1903 far surpassed anything in
the history of the State. During the year
there was shipped from the State by ocean-
going freight, 572,408,003 feet of lumber,
valued at $8,329,683; 2,118,815 feet of tim-
ber, valued at $5,118,815; 10,553,115 gallons
spirits turpentine valued at $5,285,252;
naval stores valued at $5,616,211; 197,830,-
000 cigars valued at $13,834,100; fish and
oysters worth $246,785; 79,669 head of
cattle valued at $1,236,028; other miscel-
laneous exports valued at $11,284,773, mak-
ing a total of ocean going commerce of
$85,773,403.
In the same year there were exported
by rail and river transportation, 1,978,000
packages of vegetables having a value of
$2,249,000; oranges, 1,300,000 boxes at a
value of $2,600,000 and 35,000 boxes of
other citrus fruits worth $165,000; cotton
of both kinds, 58,000 bales at a value of
$2,900,000; phosphate, 187,000 tons, value
$1,496,000; lumber, 95,000,000 feet, value
$950,000; tobacco, Florida grown, 1,950,000
pounds, value $773,500; fish and oysters
to the value of $885,000; 2,450 carloads
of melons worth $250,000; 2,200,000 quarts
of strawberries, worth $450,000; peaches
and pears worth $240,000; and over 8,000,-
000 pineapples worth $970,000; over 325,-
000 pounds of wool, worth $55,300; or a
total of overland exports of $13,983,860.
The total exports thus foot up to $70,603,-
716 for the year 1903, and the total com-
merce for the year was $99,757,263.

Pensacola, Alabama & Western.
The Pensacola, Alabama & Western
Railway Co. has been incorporated in Ala-
bama. The company proposes to build
from Pensacola to Memphis. The head-
quarters will be at Brewton, Ala. From


?BE RDJAgILITY OF OQU ADVERTIBNRS VOVCNN NO&


I ~ - AV AMIMI mayff rMW AM ANUET.


Pensacola the line will enter Alabama at
a point on the boundary of Escambia coun-
ty, and will run northwest, leaving the
State at a point on the boundary of Pick-
ens county. The incorporators are J. E.
Stillman, W. S. Keyser, T. C. Watson, J. J.
Sullivan and Daniel Gillies.

Savanah Lumber Market.
Exports of lumber and crossties from
Savannah for the season beginning July
1, as posted at the Board of Trade:
Lumber. Steam. Sail.
Month of January .. 5,620,708 2,935,760
Since July 1 ......46,131,028 40,245,039
Where Shipped-
Foreign ............ 2,294,444 3,621,005
Baltimore .......... 12,524,847 4,309,882
Philadelphia ........ 5,714,85 7,339,576
New York ........23,099,962 12,715,007
Boston ............. 1,038,304 1,167206
Other ports ........ 809,830 11,033,161


Barrel Factory to Begin Work April I.
The Southern Barrel Co., whose plant is
located five miles east of Thomasville, Ga.,
have completed their mill building and
have started the construction of a ware-
house and cooper shop. Machinery is pur-
chased. They expect to begin operations
by April 1, and will have a capacity of
from 500 to 800 barrels per day, using
yellow pine principally. Their staves will
be cylinder sawn, with a Gerlach Special
26-inch by 53-inch machine. James Me
Kinnon and L. L. Pfister, both of Thomas-
ville, Ga., are the owners.


Presidetial Inauguration Ceremoea,
Washington, D. C, March 4, 90go5
For the above occasion round trip tickets
will be sold by the Atlantic Coast Line
from all points to Washington and return
at one fare plus twenty-five cents, and
for military companies and brass bands in
uniform, twenty (20) or more on one party
ticket, one cent per mile per capital in
each direction.
These tickets will be sold March Ist,
2nd and 3d, 1905, returning tickets must
be validated in Washington not later than
March 8th, 1905, and return trip started on
date of validation, except that upon pay-
ment of one ($1.00) dollar and by depos-
iting ticket with special agent in Wash-
inton not later than 8:00 p. m. of March
8th, 1905, extension can be arranged until
march 18th.
This is an opportunity that none should
miss. The attractions of Washington are
more numerous than any other city in
America and one could spend an entire sea-
son sight-seeing without ever tiring of
the sights.
Make Pullman reservations or get full
information from any Atlantic Coast Line
agent, or write-
FRANK C. BOYLSTON,
District Passenger Agent, 138 WVest Bay
Street, Jacksonville, Fla.


8ml us yew m ~a faemmmziy
checks e 3e md p Ma mu emmin -
sry chdi tba aN tfh prltimg mm
in the otk egbt ~.






12 1fl3 WUNKLY INJAJSixTAL KUOOZD.


Semi anU wes for rtatSdg f tr
turpthe -sat im-r trans to th
Reced eas to im a prompt deliary.
CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Bat in the Vorkd.
For delivered prices writ,
CyMpre Tak Co.. MeMtAl,

KNABE & EMERSON
PIANOS.
Smd le Ptoses amd Terms.
JAS. A. ABRAMS.
mI akie. st ed on Trade dhN.

TE CANNON COMPANY


BARRELS
Am TuE
STANDARD
OF THE
WORLD


Use no Other

Pats caeeVietly located.
Home Office, OUITMAN, GA.
& A.


Lie i IN M IMS I.
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES. BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilimr, Oil and le Ma-
chinery, da Supplie and Repair.
CAPACITY FOR 100 HAND
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting, Pulley, Hangers, LUathr
Rubber Beltig and Hom, Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Stl Bridges
Steam Pum Feed Water Heater an
Boiutng .G
AUGUSTA. GA.

Whiskies, Gins,
Rums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Bye
Whiskies
(Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 asd 819 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILL, FLA.


H ROSONIN.Pre. GAHJ.LLXAD. Ouaer .-.-...-...lu u..41- 0.....h........h..... .... ..o*-
W. B. OWEN. Vice-P e. *
Commercial Bank, THE DIAMOND
State Depository.
Balncam: Oesat. rta.. Lke aM o. rah l. a
Jacksonville, -- -Florida
S i:Wines, Liquors and Cigars
Anyone Wishing i ot.e fa.uA. .A .. a ... .. C. .. le e
Sefa Water.: We usarmatee all Brandput up by s- fullaeu surn as m lw s
a limited amount of paper cups to be 0
delivered from January 10 toFebrary 10, Creme de la Creme, bottle .... $2.00 Diamond Brand, bottle ........ 1.00
and as late as Mareh 10 can get them [i 'rn1rmm:dfT ... 'r *f ] Heart Brand, bottle .......... .75
of Vickers patent by writing- C. C. Brand, bottle ........ .50 Spade Brand, bottle ........... .
E. L VICKERS, ; Club Brand, bottle ........... 1.25 Premium Brand, bottle ........ J0
rr""o .o : MYERSON CO.,

KIRK & JONES I ,"o,.'JW,,aF.:L. PA.hrlU.
KIRK & JON 0 JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


DRUGGISTS.
107 f. WAY ST.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. PLA.
FIRE INBURANCI-L-w-t rate. Lo-
rn H. Green & Co., 9 sad 10 Pwt Bb3.
Jacksomvlle, ha.


TuS~msleummmmuuuahsuulmu11111(1 *UUSIUSSSSUUUIIUIIUUUUUS


A. S. ENSLEJZi
Presalidt


w. S. JOHNS
Vies Fr


JAI LASETUF. W. W. TMhPUMM
Gem Woner. estL Troee s


5he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,

Wholesale Grocers


D. FR&vr
T. W. WIfa"


uILY MONIGOMIRY,
Commission Merchants,
Naevl Stores & Cotton
Liberal sada msae sgaaint idd
nmet cmesisMtas edtML
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
ZEW YORK CITY.
WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS
MENTION THE RcCORD.


402 404 406 405 EstBay Stret Jeeiaes e. ra.
DECTOt :
U.S. i,* PSrR
ft!11 WAM rum f"gM


W. W.?iW" E


S'^@*ee*Qee**.*.ee*Q******o**o*o' 15 >IIW111111
~~~+~~~~~~~~~~~L~H l --- ---------~-- -- --- ---

I J. A. Craig 4(b Bro.
S239 W. say Street EVERETT BOCK.

SLeaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
Ing and Up-to-Date Furnishints.

SAgents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.
II.0004........OO**-*- *oo****** 0O **d ***.- .q--


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOzLSALE a aLETAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, RlinuAs. Paints, Oils and Glass.
Stoves. Tinware, Countrr-Holloware.


o1 WEST DAY STrEET


J6. P6 @ASIPMLA
-fo N w f%0NAFA


Jacksonville. Fla.


CIIU" L'")'~----- "" "'"""'"
Cable Addres. Florida

Standard Naval Stores

Company.
DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN

ROSIN

AND TURPENTINE.
Jacksonville. Fla.


TH RcCORD IS THE SOUTHr' GREAT TRID JOURIL.







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 18


THE

Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville.
UITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
Capital and Srupla .............................. 4 425AOOO
..p..it .......... ...... . ........ Ioooo
In addition to our regular hInking business, we maintain a Savings Depart-
ment, under government supervision, payng interest quarterly.
We have for rent Safe Deposit Boxes in burglar and fireproof vaults at rea-
sonable rates, by month or year.

C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS
Grain, Hay. Feed
Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men'o Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520- 522- 524 -526 EAST BAY STREET
Jacksonville, Fla.

GEORGIA INTER-STATZ SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
Minims Coastwia Price List for Merchantable Rules go4. Adopted at Tifton,
Georgia, July12, 19o4.
Feet Feet Feet keet I Feet I Feet I Feet Feet Feet Feet
SIZES 20& U 21-25126-30 31-351 36-401 41-146-501 51-5666 5 0 61-65
1 xlO to 2x0... .12.60413.54$14.50410.00118.00oo 20.5 23.560 26.650 32.00440.00
2%xl0 to xl .... 12.00 12i 13.560 14.00 15.50 17.60 20.00 23.00 28.00 356.00
8%x10 to lr10 .... 12.50 1300 14.00 15.501 16.50 18.50 21.00 24.00 29.00 37.00
1 xl2 to 2.... 14.00 15.50 16.50 18.001 21.00 24.00 28.00 32.50 3800 49.00
2%xl2 to 10x2.... 1.00 13.50 14.50 16.50 18.50 21.00 24.50 28.50 34.00 43.00
10%x12 to 12x2 .... 13.50 14.00 16.50 17.501 19.60 22.00 25.50 30.00 36.0 4&00
1 x14 to 3x14.... 16.00 19.00 200 22.00 24.50 27.0 32.00 37.00 44.00 67.00
3%x14 to 1214.... 14.50 10 18.00 20. 22.00.00 200 28.00 32.50 40.00 5.00
12%x14 to 14x14 ... 15.50 17.00 19.00 21.00 23.00 26.00 30.00 3450 4.00 55.00
1 xl6 to 4x16.... 200 22.00 24.50 27501 31.001 34.00 38.00 42.0 52.00 6600
4%xlI to 1216.... 19.00 20.00 22.00 25.50 29.00 31.00 35.00 39.60 48.00 9.00
12%x16 to lAxl.... 19.50 200 23.00 26.50 30.001 33.00 37.00 41.00 50.00 02.00
2 xls to x .... 24.50 25.50 28.50 31.50 35.001 39.001 43.00 49.00 62.00 79.00
6%xl8 to 14x18... 21.00 22.00 260.00 200 33.00 37.001 41.00 45.00 57.00 09.00
14%xl8 to 18x18.... 23.00 24.00 27.00 30.00 34.00 38.00 42.00 48.00 59.00 74.00
Terms: Net Caa.
Pui' are f. 0 Cars Savannah, Brunswick, Fernandina and Jackwavile.


NOTICE.
At a metin of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Assocation, held at Jacksonville,
Fla., arch 15, 1901, the following Classi-
flation and Rules for Inspection of Yel-
low Pin were officially adopted, effective
July 1, 1904:
si--aiand Iu aect of Yellow
Pieu Lumber.
General Rules-All lumber must be
sound, well vmiufmt,$wA, full to size and
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;
through shakes, or round shakes that
show on the surface; square edge, unless
otherwise specified. A through shake is
hereby deQned to be through or connected
from side to side, or edge to edge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken;
les than one inch thick shall be measured
as one inlch

CLASSIFICATION.
Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
sx inches in width. For example: 1x3,
4, 5 and 6; 1%x3, 4 and
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under ao and a half inches by seven
inehe and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %, 1, 1 and 1% inches
thick by 7 inches and up, wide.
Scastlin
Sentling shall embrace all sies from
two to ive inches in thickness and two to
sii inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2zS, 2x4, 2x5, a2x, 3x3, 3x4, 3x, 3x6, 4x4,
4U, 4x, UxS and 6x.
Plank shall embrace all sixes from one
an one-half to six inches in thickness.
no4 including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1%, 2,
91 3%, 4, 4%, 5, 6%, 5%x7 inches
=Zm.- in .-MAU


Dimenion.
Dimension sizes shall embrace all sim
6 inches and up in thickness by seven
inches and up in width, including six by
six. For example: 6x0, 617, 7x7, 7x, 8x9
and up.
Stepping.
Stepping shall embrace one to two and
a half inches in thickness by seve inches
and up in width. For example: 1 1%,
11/, 2 and 2yx7 and up, in width.
Rough Edge or Flitch.
Rough Edge or Flitch shall embrace all
sizes one inch and up in thickness by eight
inches and up in width, sawed on two
sides only. For example: 1, 1%, 2, 3, 4
and up thick by eight inches and up wide,
sawed on two sides only.

INSPECTION.
Standard.
All lumber shall be sound, sap no ob-
jection. Wane may be allowed one-eighth
of the width of the piece measured across
face of wane, extending one-fourth of the
length on one corner or its equivalent on
two or more corners.
ferelntabie.
Al sizes under nine inches shall show
heart entire length on one side or edge;
sizes nine inches and over shall show
heart the entire length on two opposite
sides. Wane may be allowed one-eighth of
the width of the piece measured aro
face of wane, and extending one-fourth of
the length of the piece on one corner or
its equivalent on two or more corners.
Prime.
Scantling sha!) show heart on two faces
the entire length; other sizes shall show
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
cent. of the pieces, wane may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the piece meas-
ured across face of wane and extending
one-fourth of tie length of the piece on
one corner or its equivalent on two or
more c ners.


iri"10 1r 1 )iiUiiUI U "lriUi t4 Ui 3UIm im I**


McMILLAN BROS.,

Florida Copper Works.
Manufaeatnrers of


Turpentine Stills
aod eseral Metal Work rs.
Old stills taken in exchange for
new ones. Patching through the coun-
try a specialty. Orders by mail or
or wire will receive prompt attention,
at either of the lowwonig works:
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.
MOBILE, ALA.


SAVANNAH. GA.
JACuIKSOrVLE. PIA.


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Speciaty.
WATERTOWN. FLORIDA.
C. H. BARNES, Press. J. D. SHAW, Vice-Pres. RALP JESSUP, Se.-Treas
BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.
Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guaes,
Grades and Welghts Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonvilfle Pensacola, Fernandina and Savannah
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FUL


FOR SALE.
50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill. $.35 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years or ean
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in the State.


Ce


BUCKMAN, Jienosroll., IP'


Jamne Stewart a. P. Hebhaed. Jr.


Real Estate
Bought, Sold and Exchanged. Mortgages and Loans Solcited.


STEWART (& CO.
Timber, Grove and Farm Lands sO ws ru0w e=


Brick Machine


Wanted.
VANTEDI)-Small steam lpwer clay
brick-making machine in good condition.
Address-
BRICK MACHINE,
Care l-dustrW aee Jakcm6W0 e fl. ji


a'


Florida


Electric Co.

Cutra EglMtral Eiim
Sell and Install Complete Electri Light
and Power Plants, Telephone Ex-
changes. Wholesale Electric
Supplies.
Jacksoeville, Fla.


IF YOU A= PMG002811SV ADYTsM IN T= 19COM.


SSCSCSCSOCSESmCSSSCI~rm~r~mJI~II~







14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


THE


COVINGTON


Co.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Wholeale : SHOES -
Oesaie: DRY GOODS.


"Success


For Our Customers


is Success


For Us."


ABSTRACTS
Title and Tax Abstracts, Maps, etc.,
of large tracts in all parts of Florida and
South Georgia, prepared for owners and
intending purchasers. Correspondence
solicited.

REALTY TITLE AND TRUST CO.
Law Exchange Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.

Sam'l P. Holmes &Co.
Stocks, Bnds, Cotten,
Grain and Provislons.

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD Of TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Be Plbok 853 Baldwin Block
THE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
xtruots tm spirts without detroying the
woed abre. Rums out a charge In les than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-Ae gallons from cue of wood.
Makes pure water white spirit. tree from
the odor of tar or creorote. No chemleals
ued In refinhs the spirits. Needs to be
distilled only once after coming from re-
tMrt.
No trouble with bl-products. the spirits
pronounced to be far the lnest ever pro-
ducd ad from wood. Only one grade
of spirits proceed and that the highest.
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGOR PROM WIRE
Built of Baet material by high-graud
worLmem. The cheapest meshane ein0d to
the pukc.
We -allna comparison ofooutput and
quality f product. We guarantee output
and quality.
The Hf Bet cusctits C.My
P. O. Box 1L RALEIGH. N. C.



GO. R. FOS JR.
MANUFACTURER OF


BRICK.


nIE IPI C.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.

'm 30.


COURSE OF PALE AND MEDIUM ROSINS AT SAVANNAH FOR TWO YEAR.
W.W. W.G. NH K


April
April
April
April
April
May
May
May
June
June
June
June
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.


DATE 1904-05
S1......... 4.10
8......... 3.95
15........ 3.80
22........ 3.80
29" ....... 3.80
6........ 3.0
13........ 3.80
20........ 3.86
27........ 3.95
3........ 4.35
10........ 4.0
16........ 4.00
23........ 4.66
1 ........ 4.75
7 ........ 4.75
14 ........ 4.70
28 ........ 4.52%
4 ........ 4.67%
12 ........ 4.60
18 ........ 4.62%


1903-04
$3.90
3.60
3.50
3.40
3.35
3.35
2.42%
3.65
3.65
3.60
3.40
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.40
3.50
3.50


1904-05
$3.80
3.76
3.60
3.60
3.60
3.50
3.50
3.55
3.66
4.05
4.10
4.16
4.25
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.25
4.42%
4.35
4.37


1903-04
$3.60
3.45
3.35
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.271,
3.35
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.30


1904-05
$3.60
3.60
3.45
3.45
3.45
3.35
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.85
3.85
3.85
3.90
4.00
3.95
3.90
3.82%
4.00
4.00
4.02%


1903-04
$350
3.35
3.25
3.15
3.165
3.15
3.17%
3.25
3.25
3.20
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.05
3.05
3.15
3.15


1904-05
$.35
3.35
3.20
*B.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.65
3.65
3A5
3.65
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.72%
3.90
3.85
3.87%


1903-04
$3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
3.20
3.15
2.95
2.95
295
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
2.956
3.05
3.05


1904-06
$330
3.30
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.25
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.55
3.55
3.55
3.50
3.66
3.55
3.57%


1903-06
S3O
$3.60
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.08%
MO%
3.10
3.10
3.05
2.86
2.85
2.85
o80
2.80
2.86
2.95
2.0
26
usJ


1904-06

Lft
3.95
LM0
380

2.80

&ao
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.10
3.26
330
3.30
3.45
3.46
3.45
3.05
3.30
330
3.32%


1905-04
11M
LU
LSo
LIS
tLo
2.8
SLO

3.00
3Le

&80
.70
2.7,
LU

.70
LSD
.BO
L80


...FOR...


FURNITURE


22-30 West Bay Street

JACKSONVILLE


Send for

Catalogue


Kohn = Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS OIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Di


don't forget your subscri
WHEI WRITIOG ADVERTISERS MENTION THE RECORD.


ption to the Record.


GETTING'S


~Fs~1s `%', IN. IN ------- ssc:1S-- vm;ffSm








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


Buyers' Directory

T advrtisers are in this issue. If
yoe wat anything look through thi
elalssiid lit and write to the firm ap-
penari thei The Record guarantees
a prompt repose.


ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
BANKS.
Atlantie National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonvile, Fa.
Central Natioal Bank, Oeala, Fa.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonvile Fa.
BRICK.
Foter, Geo. ., Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
Southern Fuel & supply Co., The, Jackson-
ville Fla.
CARS.
South Atlantie Car & Manufacturing Co.,
Wayerss, Ga.
CLOTHING.
aig t Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
B e Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Koha, Furehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Tolar, Hart Co., New York City.
CONVEYANCING.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
COOPERAGE.
Cannon Co., The, quitman, G.
Cooperage Co, The, Jacksonville, Fa.
Jacksonville ooperage Co, Jaksonville,
Fla.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jackonville Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Shofleld's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
gusta, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
onville, Fla.
FURNITURE.
Fetting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GENTS' FURNISHER&
traig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fa.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hargraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Johnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furehgott & Co., Jackson-ille, Fla.
HARDWARE.
Baird A Co., L E., Jackkoknville, FlVa
Bond & Bours Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Biga Hardware Co.. W. H..Valdosta, Ga.
Marion Hardware Co.. Ocala, Fla.
Weed Co., J. D., Savannah. Ga.
HARNESS.
McMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.


Thomas, W. RB, Gainesville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fl.
Renfroe Co., Jacksonville, F.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, F
HOTELS
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Grand View, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
Roseland, Jackonville, Fla.
St. George, Jacksonville, Fla.
Windsor, Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville. FL
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, Fla.
Blum & Co., Chau., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
Muller, Gus, Jacksonville, Fla.
Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
MAPS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fa.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. 8, Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTI E PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jacksonville Fla.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co, W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. ., Macon, Ga.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES
Barnes-Jessup Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PECANS.
Griffling Broa. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Ocala, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa,
Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fla.
Christie, .1. D., Jaeksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Ocala, Fla.
Southern States Land and Timber Co.,
Tomlinson, E. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla.
West-Raley-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville,
Fla.


Cummer Lumb
Merrill-Steven


SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAISHIPm
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKE. *
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville ,FIla
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cypress Tank Co, Mobile, Ala
Davis & Son, G. LM, Palatka, Fla.
Schofleld's Sons Co, J. 8., Maeon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., The, Waasaish, N. C.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jaeksonville, Yla.


The Wire Virgin Gum Co., Tifton, Ga.
.UinPj, anuu PROCESS.
Pine Belt Constrution Co., The, RllA,
N. C.
TuEPnli.mul STILLS.
Baker, M. A, Brunswik, Ga.
MeMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
TuXPzR L E STILL TUBS.
Davis & Son., G. L1, Palatka, Fla.
TURPsNTIE. VATS.
Davis & SBo, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
VEHICLES.
MeMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, a.
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fa
YELLOW PINE LUMBKLR
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fl.


TO The TiurpwflM Olmwraor
In the year of 1901, I out the price on Black Joe and Standard Hacks from I7 to 65 a doa-
en because they did not give the satisfaction in the new districts that were being worked
that they did in the former sections. In the season of 1904. I brought out a new tooL the Blue
Line. and offered it so as to find out from the tools returned, the best tool for the business.
Out of about Three Thousand Dozen Blue Line tools sold. less than ten dozen were returned
as defective and unsatisfactory. This lead us to put this material in all oI our tools and to
raise the price on all except Blue Line. believing that this was the best thing that we could do
for the Operators as well as ourselves. The most perfect tools, and those made by the most
skillful workmen, are selected as Blue Line and Diamond Edge; second best going into Black
Joe and Standard. If there is any dissatisfaction on account of this advance in price itis
not well founded for I fully believe that the tools will cost the operator less per crop now
than they would had I not made change. Very truly, J.P. COUNCIL.
Jan'y 30, 1905. THE COVNCIL TOOL COMPANY. Wananiseh, C.


R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KNIoaT, Sec. and Treas.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.



H A. Renfroe Co,


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at ReadywMade Prices Mail Orders Given Personal Attention
439 W. Bay Street. JACKSONVIILE, FLA.

I ti littittlilllllIllsit ti ttil 01 1 111 1 1 tillailllUlti


. J. P. WILLIAMS. President.
* T. A. JENNINGc, 2nd Vice-President.
. H. L. KAYTON, Secretary.


J. A. G. CABSON, Ist Vice-President
J F. DUsaNBrr, 3d Vice-President
D. G. White, Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

11111 STlI N Oi FNIToIs m4 3E RI mS.
Main ornie mvXnVJlamnNH, ODRoI0a.
Branch olirriees J PaN ICOL.,, FL. I Branch Groery House,
i JJcKOWVIALL1., PFL.. f COLsUMUI., Oa.


Naval Stores Prodmcers are lavited to Correspoad With Us.
" IH1 11111 11111 11111111 11 illllllllllll lllIill"

N. A. BAKER,

llavder mlm
mauubctw st tha

Baker Improved
Seemluss Turpm-

sine stills.
Write me for priem and outfits
F. O. B- any point in Georgia, lor-
Ida, Alabama or Mississippi. Al
stills sold under a guarantee.
Job work through the
country a ~i ecialty.


HIP YARDS. The Largest and Oldest Copper B n
HIPYARDS& WorksinGeorgiar. 'runswic Ga
er Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
* Co., Jacksonville, Fla. r My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.
DON'T FAIL TO MENTION THE RECORD TO ADVERTISE


*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*







16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY
Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,
Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located In the heart et the Lumber District gives us advat-
tage of sheicest material at lowest east.


A. J. HEDILICK. Manager.


BELL PHONE NO. 592


N" Formerly of Hedrick a Raley


oe ag y for Biverside and joining property on easy term.. (The choice redence portion
of the city.) Improved and unimproved property in former burnt district, Springfield, LaVila and
other suberta. Choice business property and Investments.
MONEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTORS.


Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Adersmentfs Will he Inserted In This Department at te rollowiug rates:
For one week, 20 cents a line.
For two weeks, 35 cents a line.
For three weeks. 0 cents a line.
For four weeks, 65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No dis lay except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
cotaing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Thrsday
morning to secure insertion in rday's paper. m
Position Wasted. For Sale.
A position as stiller, very best reference Small turpentine location. Can work
furnished. Address S. F. Johnson, Mur- about ten or twelve crops with about
phy. Fla. 4t four hundred acres round timber already
secured. Also one thousand acres back
Woodsma Watted box timber secured. Plenty of round tim-
Woodsm man n whote ber available to still for four or five
Woodsman who is strictly sober and years' cutting. Address T. M. Kelly,
apable of controlling and keeping labor. Black, Ala. tf
Address, The Callahan-Colwell Co., Prid-
en, Fl. t Turpentine Men.
For Sale. Buy a Blakesle Gasoline Pumping Out-
4,000 acres sawmill timber for sale. fit for your still. No. 1 outat pumps X,0O
Water or rail transportation; a bargain, gallons per hour at a eost of 3 envs and
Address Box 32, Pomona, Fla. 4t requires no attention while rninl.
Started in one minute. J. P. Campbel,
Wanted. Ocaa. Fla
A distiller. We want a good, sober
man with family, to run the still another Wated.
season. Can give steady employment To buy a first-class turpentine location
through the winter. Nons ned apply but in Florida. Will pay the right prie for
nfrst-la- man with good reference. Ad- the right place. No flat woods place need
dress F. & W, Joneboro, Fl. tf apply. G. A. Petteway, Box 26, Leroy,
Position Wanted. Marion o., Fl
Wanted: A position by an experienced Are you reading your paper, or some-
commissary man and book-keeper with one else'. If not a subscriber to the Rec-
naval stores firm. Address W. J. S., care ord, send in your name today, with 3.00o,
Industrial Record, Jacksonville, Fla. the price of subscriptioa for oe year.



DIAMONDS AND WATCHES
We simply ask a call. We caM show you, at correct and mosey
saving prices, may papers of loose pure white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is oer desire to contlae belag the largest
S Daml ad dealers Is Jacksonville, and our specialty Is tihe roamd-
cut gems and high-grade Waltham sad ElgIs Watches.

SE 'A 0| APD Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry,
SLESS A OLH LH S11-13 Mai St., 331W.1ay, Juaksuvil, Fla.


112 WEST FORSYTH ST.


IF YOU ARE PROGRESSIVE, ADVERTISE IN THE RECORD.


HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY


Joseph D. Christie, Business Agent
emm 303 Dyal-Updcbureh Nalk. Jadcfse ml Fla.
Telephone 455.
If you want to locate in Florida and contemplate going into business, let me
help you. If you have a business to sell, list same with me.

B. R. POWELL. CrAS. MARRIS, MENRY AS LEEY
President. Vice-President ad freasurer. Secretary.
DIRECTORS:
B. M. Powell, Chs. 6. Narris, D. I. =MclNia. l L. S.therl-od, V. Coreigtoa.

TH[


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Cerr of West Bay ml Malse Sth.
Jacksonville, Florida.


Wholesale Drugs I Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices on
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and can save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.


WwMfd Turpe7 te PrpDl-eI ft
Be of lera t te Yewu
Throw your eyes for a minute on the following
locations: 4,000 acres round timber-4 years
lease 16 crops 4th year; 5 crops 3rd year
boxes; 1% crop 2nd year boxes. $27,400-A
3 PICKUP. Or, 7,200 acres, of which 3,000 acres
* in round timber; 5 crops 1st year boxes; 6 /
* crops 2nd year boxes; 7Y crops 3rd and 4th
year boxes. $26,000-A SNAP.


" BROBSTON, FENDIG & CO.



McMURRAY & BAKER,


SoW Mill nil1d lTull HilneO. H "S
II a re mJ a" s a 0 0
We are reeving l up-to-dae pIer aan ere a andLs. b1 I-nes.
Improbes whis, harM s ad hrse farni tbla, we have a My M
and goods in touch with all. Thurentine waomsn and hms a sPeef. De't
forest we can beat the world a hand-made harnes.
mUIT S KER, 401i 43 E, T .
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.







THE 'WKIY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17
7'--


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Cmmimary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published b;
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper :


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 00 lb. tubs.. 26N
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 27
S10" "' .. 281
A C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 14

Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin... 6
"' 50-lb tub.... 5f
Leaf Tin.
60-lb tin. ............. 8

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 86

Sugar
Granulated Sugar, bbls..... 6 00

Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 80 1-lb cans to case,
per Ib................. 22
Simon Pure, S0 1-lb cans to
case, per Ib............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 18
Green Coffee, medium ...... 11
Green coffee, common....... 10
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages.......market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ae ............. market price
Roasted, l00lb. drum....... 17
Ground coffee, 10-lb pail.. 16

Tea


Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 Ib.....
Gunpowder, 10 Ib....
English B'fast, 10 lb..
Formosa, 10 Ib.......
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10c size
10 Ibs to case, per pound-..

Salt
200-lb sack.............
100-lb sack...............
Ice Cream, 200lb acks.....
4" 100-lb sacks.....
Pocket Saltin bbls., 8-lb....
"' "' 2.lb....


100
50
100
50
265
275


Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin.............. 17
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 dos to box
sifter top, per dox..... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per dos ......40 and 80
Corn
o10 Sk Les 10
Car Lot Lot Sk
W.Corn,llOlb, 1 29 1 80 1 32
1001b, 1 27 120 1 84
Mxdcorn,llOlb.1 88 185 146
1001b,121 128 185


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


Car Lot
W clip'd,1251b,
S 1001b,
White 1261b,
White 0llb.
Mixed 1251b
1001b,


100 k Leuas 1
Lot Sk Lots
1 82
1 45
175
138


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice..... 1 85
fancy..... 1 85
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................. 6 25
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24lb sack.........6 00
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-b sacks............ 6 25
Pillsbury's Best .....7 50
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 7 40
" bbl ....
Flour, Boss .............. 700
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 3 20
92-lb sacks........... 1 35
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 8 25
S92-lb sacks....... 1 35

Rice
Good.................. .. 41
Choice...... ............ 65
Fancy Head.............. 6
Broken................... 21
Canned Vegetables
Doe.
Tomatoes, 8., Chief....... 85
Tomatoes, 2 ........ 65
Clayton, 3s................ 80
Clayton, 2 ............... 60
Sifted Peas, 2s ............1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s........ 1 15
Lima Beans,2s ............ 1 00
String Beans, 3. .......... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8........... 90
Baked Beans, ls........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s........... 1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets, 3s..........
Saner Kraut, 3s ........... 86
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s .............. 90
Hay
car lots 100 bae loss
lots quantity
Choice.... 18 00
No.1 Tim. 17 00
No. 2 ...... ...... 1600
No.1Cl'ler 17 00 1750 1600


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 dos
to case, per dos........ 1 0
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per do........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 dos to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two dos to ease,
per do ................ 1 45
Peaches, 8s, two dos to case
per doz ................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two dos to
case, per do............ 1 46
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per dos........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two dos to case.
per doz..............
Brandy Cherries 2. per cae 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 61
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
Ib................... 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb.... .............. 8
Sticks wrapped, 26-lb box,
assorted, per Ib........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per Ib........ 60

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 12
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 11
Fancy Apricots 25 Ib boxes. 18
Ex. Choice i' "' A"
Ev. Apples. 50-lb. boxes.....4 00
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 06
Ev. Apples, 48 l-lb. packaged 25
Ev. Apples, 24 2 25
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. case 8 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned S5-lb
bx.x, 40-50............. 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box. 0-60. ............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70........ ..... 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box ......... 1 70
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 6f
Extra H P, .... 6
Seed Peanuts, ..
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds................. 18
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Pe cans .... ............. 12
Filberts................... 12
alO nuts.................. 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 LessClO
lots Sk. Lot Sk. Lt
Cottonseed Meal 27 00
S Hulls 950


Matches
Atlantic, per groes......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop. ......2 20
8 hoop .........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per do. ...... 1 50
Sieves, per dos. No. 18......1 00
nested......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per dos 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 60
Ai Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. ..1 20

Washboards P"
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay...............8 00
176 Diamond Glass .........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per dos 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
doz. .................. 9
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 25
Sardines, 5 cae lot........ 8 20
Salmon Is, Tale 4 dos to case
per dos Alaska........ 95
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to case,
per dos Col. River ... 2 3
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per dos
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two dos in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
bs to box............... 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Klngan's Meats.
."Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge ..... 13-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avge .... 131-2
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avge .... 141-4
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7- 9avge 101-2
"Reliable" California Hams, 6-8 7 3-4
Breakfast Bacon, light av. ...... 13
D. 8. Bellies, 16-18 ar. ........ 83-8
D. 8. Bellies, 20-22 av.......... 81-8
D. Bellies, 25-30 av .......... 77-8
D. 8. Plates .................... 63-4
Bacon Plates ................... 73-4
D. 8. Butts .................... 53-4
Bologna Sausage ............... 7
Sausage in l. ................ .75T
Butter al Chie.
"Strawberry" Creamery, 0-lb tubs 27
30-lb tube.... 271-2
"Reliable" full cream cheese .... 131-2
MKpa's Lan.
"Indina" Pure Leaf ........... market.
*tes-Foam" Compound ......... mret.
Kimsa's Caml M sts.
"Reliable" Corned Beef, Is ...... $1PM
Corned Beef, 2s ...... .2
Roast Beef, Is ........ 1.S
SRoast Beef, 2s ....... La
Potted Ham and 1 sng.p
1-4s ......................... .
u Sliced Beef, I-s .. .. 1.U
Vhna amag.. I .... M
Tripe .................. L-


T=B R~CO'S SPACE HAS A DIS MO N VALUIL







18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


T. MURPHY
JACKSONVILLE MACHINE AND IRON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
S_ .Locomnouve, SCeambc-t, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron
and Bras Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARIE dNGIES AND BOILERS PULLEYS AND SHAFTING.
Agent for Stationary Engines, Boilers, Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden-
sers Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Goods
MBE TiUUMISSIU1 ll WATER WIII EfIPrEIT iA IALTY
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


The Clyde Steamship Company











NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
T ma**Me*mt 4*-a- I thia -e an appaited to aaf a feabow%, eaag
at t-, a c. both ways.
reIm New TerA, Wef r asmeemvlle 2e
( Sunday, Jan. 22, at 3:00 pm .*"xMOHICAN ........Friday, Jan. 27, at 9:30 am
Tuadsy, Jan. 4, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ......Sunday, Jan. 29, at 11:30 am
Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 3:00 pm .IROQUOIS ....Monday, Jan. 30, at 12:00 n'n
*xHURON ......Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 1:00 pm
Friday, Jan. 27, at 3:00 pm ..OOMANCHE ......Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 1:00 pm
Saturday, Jan. 2 at 3:00 pm ... .ALGONQUIN ... .Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4:00 am
Tuesday, Jan. 31, at 3:00 pm ... ARAPAHOE ...... Sunday, Feb. 5, at 5:00 am
"*xNEW YORK ......Monday, Feb. 6, at 5:30 am
Friday, Feb. 3, at 3:00 pm ........APACHE .... Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 7:00 am
Saturday, Feb. 4, at 3:00 pm ......IROQUOIS ....Thursday, Feb. 9, at 7:30 am
*xMOHICAN, ....Friday, Feb. 10, at 8:00 am
Tuesday, Feb. 7, at 3:00 pm ... .COMANCHE ...... Sunday, Feb. 12, at 9:30 am
Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 3:00 pm .ALGONQUIN .... Monday, Feb. 13, at 10:00 am
Friday, Feb. 10, at 3:00 pm ......ARAPAHOE .Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 12:00 n'n
Sundy, Feb. 12, at 3:00 pm ..***xHURON ...... Friday, Feb. 17, at 1:30 pm
Tuesday, Feb. 14, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE .... Sunday, Feb. 19, at 4:30 am
Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS .... Monday, Feb. 20, at 5:00 am
*xNEW YORK .... Tuesday, Feb. 21, at 5:30 am
Friday, Feb. 17, at 3:00 pm .... COMANCHE ..Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 6:30 am
Saturday, Feb. 18, at 3:00 pm .... ALGONQUIN ......Thursday, Feb. 23, at 7:30 am
Tuesday, Feb. 21, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE ....Sunday, Feb. 26, at 10:00 am
Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 3:00 pm .... !xMOHICAN .... Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 11:30 am
Friday, Feb. 24, at 3:00 pm ... .APA(HE .... Wednesday, Mar. 1, at 12:30 pm
Saturday, Feb. 25, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS ... Thursday, Mar. 2, at 1:00 pm
*xHURON ...... Friday, Mar. 3, at 4.00 am i
Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 3:00 pm ... .COMANCHE ....Sunday, Mar. 5, at 4:30 am
*-Boston via Brunawick and Charleston. Freight only. *-Boaton via
BruSwidr.
TME CLYD NBW ENGALAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
tr..t .r o.etwom Jhes.vUe, ost-o nd ern v ete- ar anl M.as
rs Pett. Oma sK at Charlestom atk Waym.
--IiI-WIiKLTY SAIIIB.
inutbh d...... .. .. ...... ....... ..... .. ..rrom Iawr, Wharf. Bstes
Northbad........ .. .. .. ... .. From toot of Catherine stret. Jascka vill
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jaeksovtlll sad mamtoer
Stesppha at Palatka, Astor, St. Prane a, Beretord (De Lad) and laternmeMat
lnamgs an It. Joso Oyer."
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
is appu ated to ml a fellows: Lave Jarksoaville. sunday. Tuesday sad Thau.
day, 8 p6. U. asterami, leave Naaftd. MonddaRs Wednear s & Frsy *S a. m.
IBOutliaUJUr I NORTHBOUND,
nRo down | Read up.
Lave BD :p. I ......................Ja oill ............... .... ... Arrive l a. M
LeaveM : :p. I..................... ....P..... .' ...... .aO r. p. I .
IaV S" a. ...... .................Ator................ ............. L-a-V SAO p. EL
Lve 4 a. mL...................... ............... ........ Lrve 1 p. E.L
................. ........ ..Bere ford (DeLand)....................... eIve naI neM
Antrrve a. m......... .............. anforl......... ............. Iare :* a. a.
Ar. 10:00 a. m.I ..................B1terprise.................... .(L. 10:00 a. m.


VYa Want a Sawmill L.catiln?
: Yau Want ay Kind of lerida Land?
: You Mean Business?
* CUn on or Write to
* J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS,
* Ocala. Florida
**000oee000000eo0* ,,**.***ee***ee ***e*e*e *ees lo ee .-




Record Readers:



The job printing department
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. It is reason-
able to suppose you will get
better and more satisfactory
printing supplies-letter heads,
envelopes, commissary checks,
pay-roll reports, etc., by having
us make them.

Industrial Record Co.,
.aggggvge, Rhrida.







AeM etropolisl


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida..


$5.0o a Year $2.50 Six Months


Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.


GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, zas W. BAY ST, JACK'VILLE.
F. M. IRONMONGER, JR., Asst. Gen. Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St. Jacksonville, Fla.
W. 0 H.CDOPZR. Loeal Mt. Act.. aersville C. P. LOVfLM.,l Ast. Supt..Jack'villte CAR T & IRULL P CO
Toot Hogan Street. Jacksonville.
A. C. HAeOGRTY, 0. ] P. A., New York. CLTYDM MIf F. A.. New TerI JACKSONVILL FLORIDA.
0me. ani, WN. P. CTID o. .VL
Genal Mansur. General Aents. .
cabsrreg ldlandteg. stat. street rew Tra k. XIIXXlI *X^'*r 6f
WMu T= m01CORD ioR ANY 211a1e am111