<%BANNER%>
Weekly industrial record
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00106
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: January 27, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00106
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text






For the Week Ending January 27, 1905.


W- WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Limber and Masufacturlg Initerests.

*VOW 1 A raW s2 10. a r ee acutre Coinmt el toae rf psite 4rtOers' AsseteaM a -s Ys l a3M Iar frams det sAt. HlOM abt, as ammf al
'.: es as as 6earl ranse Am ore amGeral as A ds~e. Ware. fr. ast eS. as wae *@* adsel rgan of a rlrmmnm Opera ser....-
I'" Ad dd Apgro t U, 19.3. as the 21 IrM r Maw W Iosael fC a e Cafs Mrew s Ca- sed a- .s sor ,s WI
As.oc at.. fmrse Orga 40 Ut o S(utheesarw Stae ereAsrs --teifu.


I '


JACKSONVILUE. FLA.


ATLANTA, GA.


SAVAPNUAN GA.


3 A YEWR.


C;~ n Phntms Agr


Southern Interstate Cotton Conven-
New Orleas, without a dissent-
Wednesday, declared in favor of
t reduction in acreage and an
n aetil i' commercial fertilizer
that action up with the adop-
S gprebhenive plan to secure the
of ever farmer, big and little,
e' b Jlt. An overwhelming ma-
the delegates were present when
Srvwasaeived ad acted upon.
of the afternoon session
ut er Meavria, of South Caro-
ing the imes of national pro-
Sth cotton growers, saying
the cotton planter had
to the doctrine of free raw
A reference to President
d friedlines to the South pro-
Sfavorable demonstration a the
me the audience.
ieuteant-Governor Jester, of
the committee on holding and
the balance of the present crop.
a report setting forth that each
local section seems amply able
Its present holdings. The com-
.imJ ved that the cotton now in
of the producer should remain
dlrua or be stored in local ware-
giptected against weather and ire,
that the banks and commission
a willingness to aid in mar-
lbe balance of the erop so as to
la 4ch any disposition to rush in
1. ly and break the market. Be-
expressed that 25 per cent. redue-
J hereage and 25 per cent. reduction
will solve the cotton prob-

llr the convention had voted an in-
to Captain Richard P. Hobaon
H. Jenkins of Texas waP
to read the report of tie com-
ea the acreage which the eonven-
Oted to be of paramount im-

".~1 a ort fodows:
A' '; t Hon. Harvie Jordan, chairman
SCotton Growers' Convent'on;
committee on acreage and the
eellhier, do recommend that acre-
, plBisd in cotton in 1906 shall be 25
M kless than in 1904, and that there
e a reduction of 25 per cent in
p" of comimereial fertilizers in grow-

'*i "rfadmmensr the following plan for
lla ll ushment of id reduction:
-Sl--That the vice-president of this
tlem for each State shall all
a a parma interested in cotton
~a t13h L day of February, 190, in the
Sast of each county not already
anW the plan hereimater at out,
lta nesting there hall be elected a
1~*b m ad a lol chairman


D 1c Aasked to sign the following agreement:
toe 1 ReU ,UC g 'We, the undersigned farnme or Jand
owners, living in School Dstrict, Best or
for each school district or other small po Preeinct No. -, county of tate
litical subdivision of the county. of hereby.pledge ourselves to re-
"Second-That there shall be held in duce the acreage planted by us in cotton.
each school district or other small politi- and to reduce our comuamptim of fertilizer
cal subdivision of the county on the 18th in growing cotton, a showing by the
day of February, 1906, at 1 o'clock p. m., statements set opposite our names.'
a meeting of all itsea of said district Fourth-That maid committee o acre-
or other small political subdivision who age and members shall immediately a-
are interested in the growing of cotton, vass said district sad ask all farmers aad
which meeting shall elect a committee of land owner in mad district who do not
three on acreage and membership. attend said meeting to sign said pledge.
"Third-At said preeiet meeting the and sid committee shall return said
farmers and land owners present shall be pledge to the chairman of aid precinct.


CAPTAIN H TIT, O T TOMN, GA.

President of the Georgia interstate Sawmill Association, "ad a leading lumberman
and turpeat'ne operator. Largely interested in the recent
organisation of the Georgia and Florida Sawmill
Company, which company acquired the mag-
ailent electric plant of the Drew
anr.ee at eat eof *OoW


Fifth--Said precinct chairmena la
preserve said pledge, and they shal imme-
diately report to the county haisrmn
showing the total number of eres pleated
in cotton in said preeant in 1906, ad the
total number to be pleated in 19W, the
total amount of fertilizer ued in growing
cotton in aid preinct, and the total
amount to be used is aid prednet in aid
year.
"Sixth-The county chairman sbha im-
mediately forward to the tte vice-preli-
dent of their respetive States, a written
statement showing the total numb of
acres planted in eottob in their respeive
counties ti 196 and the total amoet to
be planted in 13, and shall make a I k
report as to the fertilbur used sa to be
ued in said year.
"Seventh-The riee-prmdent of each
State shall immediately upon receiving the
reports of the county chairman forward
to the president of this asoladi a m-
port showing the number of ars planted
in eottao in i :' 8tate in the yar 1M0,
and the amovat of fertiiHar ued i add
vear la growing eotto and the amount
of cotton to be planted and fertiller to
be used in 190
"Eighth-The preidet. of this mmri-
tion upon rsee'ving thee reports aB a ha-
mediately talmiate the same and eed a
copy thereof to the mcnty chairman in the
liforent eottoa States and Territories.
"Ninth-If any enouty not already or-
aned should fail to aoraia, he vi e
president of the State in which said s -
ty is situated shall ease aid county to
be organized as herein provided, and if say
precinct souid fail to organic the com-
ty chairman of the county in whieb eah
precint is situated shall aue ash pre-
einct to be organized as herein provided.
"Tenth-It shall be the further duty of
the officer of this aoeiatio to report
the name aad addresses of such persos
who refuse to sign the agreement to re-
due acreage for 1M0, together with the
number of asres of eottoa planted by sueh
persmM in 1904, and the number of acres
that they will plat in 10M and to make
a like report as to fertilizer "

GOING TO BIRMINGAM.

panrt that a so-wila xtems- M W IM
abater lnniiatlw.
According to a dispatch from Wayrors,
O Mr. George Doe Wadley, vice-prei-
dent and general manager of the Atlanti
& Birmingham Railway, has anmoueaed
that step will be taken immediately to
build the projected etomnlo from Me-
taum= Ga. to MirDv h Ala asuL
Smiles. I


rrc\r


-- --


*-.."if -o


Xft IL NL*4.






3 T 3M WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL OORD.
** ** **Q********&e**eAu M***Aw **w*****4*****<* M*--* **--***************>*@@*


C. L. ROGERS. PasmuDar.


W A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, Vwcx-Passrnays


,C. H. HODGSON, sc, sad Taas'a.


DIOLECT OlS C.B. Roger, W. A. Gallsher, A. Champlain H. A. McaeIera and J. A. Cnufoed, JacmksmviUes
: B. F. Bullard, Tampa; 0. M. Covingtoa, Paesacola.


1


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Mala Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches la Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah. Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
geoeery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported ;rocerles, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Coasist d oe aThre.Story Baildlae, 70x200; ee two-story beildlag. 50x390; eoe oe.story blildais, 80x250,
maklag the largest space of ay Compamy of the aind ln the Sowth.
0


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branch Tampa. la.., Penswcola. FlN., and Savsnneh. Ga.
em annwwaa ae nwitw a wa ~m


CONSOLIDATED









, THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


8


,, -EUR


New Southestern Corpetions.
The Citizens' Bank of Gloater, capital!
0256000, is being organized at Gloster,
Miss, by business men of that city.
The Bank of Lyon, Miss, has been in-
corporated with 5,000 capital by B. K
Babe, W. P. Holland, M. S Parks and
other.
The Columbian Savings Bank of Co-
lumbiana, Ala., capital 625,000, has been
incorporated by W. B. Browne and asso-
edates.
The London Loan & Trumt Co, of Bir-
mingham, Ala., capital $3000 has been in-
eorporated by J. C. Narramore and asso-
erates.
The Citizens' Bank of West Point, Miss.,
capital $50,000, has been incorporated by
M. P. Freuell, J. P. Unger, D. A. Meek
and others.
The Bank of Montros, Jasper county.
Mississippi, has been chartered, with $15,-
000 capital. The incorporators are M. L.
Burton, F. W. Scarborough and others.
The Bank of Elko, Houston county, Ga.,
capital 25,000, has been granted a char-
ter. The ineorporators are W. E. Means.
J. D. Marshall and R. L. Wilson.
The Bank of Leslie, to be located at
Lesl'e, Sumter county, Ga., capital $25,-
000, ha applied for a charter. The incor-
porators are A. S. Morgan, J. E. Renew
and E. L Wilson.
The Lineville National Bank of Line-
ville, Ala., capital $25,000, has been ap-
proved. The offers are W. D. Haynes,
president; W. H. McKleroy, vice-president:
J. H. Ingram, cashier.
The Commercial National Bank of Go-
iad, Texas, has been organized, with $30,-
000 capital. The ofieers are J. C. Burns.
president; Henry Shaper, vice-president,
and C. L Benghard, cashier.
The officers of the Bank of Marabville.
reeetly chartered at Marahville, N. C., with
$10000 capital, are J. H. Lee, president;
M K. Lee, vice-president; J. A. Williams,
of Wingate, eash;er.
A new State bank with $100,000 capital,
75,000 paid in, has been incorporated at
Gulfport, Mis., by J. R. Hill, F. B. Hewes.
J. P. Pratt, J. F. Stuard, Judge Kim-
brough, J. L Ballinger and S. P. Moor-

It is reported that efforts are being
made to organize a mutual insurance com-
pany at Savannah, Ga., with $100.000 cap-
Ital T. M Cunningham, Jr., of the law
frm of Lawton & Cuan'ngham, is one of
the promoters.
The Irwin Bank, located at Tunica,
Tunica county, Mississippi, capital $50.-
000, has been incorporated by R. C. Irwin,
Mrs. A. E. Irwin, Mrs. George F. Abbey.
Mrs. Ethel Leatherman, Mrs. Marie Man-
gum and W. H Powell.
The Farmers' Bank of Nashville, Ga.,
capital 62.000, has been chartered by D.
C. Ashley of Lowndes county and J. D.
Lovett, J. P. Knight, R. A. Hendricks and
P. H. Askew, all of Be-rien county, in
which Nashville is situated.
The 3. P. Edwards Real Estate & Loan
Co., with $4.000 capital, has filed articles
of incorporation to do business at Birming-
ham, Ala. The inorporators are Baxter
Ritteberry, J. P. Edwards and C. C. Rit-
tenberry, all of Birmnngham.
The Farmers and Merchant-' Bank of
Lake City, S C., capital 25.000, has been
granted a commission. The petitioners
are B. W. Jones, H. H. Singletary and
others. Mr. J. 8. MeClam will probably
be president and either B. M. Clement or
B. W. -Joet Jr., -ashier.
1Th oe.ge of the Cherokee Building


and Loan Association, whie recently be-
gn bus nes at Gaffney, C., with $50,000
capital, are Dr. C. A. Jffries, president;
D. C. Ros, viee-president; W. H. Good-
ing secretary and treasurer; directors, C.
A. Jeffries, D. C. Ros, W. W. Thomasu W
H. Gooding, J. A. Will, J. F. Fincken
and Ed H. DeCamp.
The Citizens' Bank of Elba, Coffee coun-
ty, Alabama, capital 0000,00 has been in-
corporsted by J. M. Garrett, aB W. Page.
Nettie Wilkerson, J. D. Lee, E. Wise, W
L. Gaston, P. D. Blue, M. 8. Carmiehael.
B. H. Nixon, N.N Rowe, J. 8. Windham.
E. M. Buck, J. B. Simmons, W. Boyd,
.T. H. Wilkerson, W. HE Caston, J. E. Hen-
leron, L. A. Boyd and V. B. C. Farris.
The Greenville Bank of Tatall Coun
ty, Ga., capital $30,000, ha been granted
& charter. The petitioners are L J. De-
Loach, W. C. Perkin, J. L. Mcean, W.
F. Durranee, H. E. PrvisJ. H. Durrance.
B. J. Woodcock, W. N. Rogers, Jesse W.
Durranre, J. F. Easterling, D. E. Weathers.
H. C. Dubberly. H. J. Banks, R. C. Dub-
herly, D. M. Bradley and E. C. Collins, all
-f Tatnall county.
The Ravings Bank & Trust Co. has been
organized at New Decatur, Ala., w..ii
e25,000 capital. Business is expected to
begin about March 1 in the Casa Granda
Block on Second Avenue. The directors
are Dr. W. B. Watson, E C. Payne, Sudge
W. H. Simpson, K. H. Allison, Dr. J. A.
Hill, Sam Blackwell, all of New Decatur,
and others of Kentucky; officers, Dr. B
W. Watson, of New Deeatur, president;
E. H. Allison, of New Deatur, viee-pres-
ident; G. L. Bowles, of Kentucky, cashier.

South Carolina Rock.
The committee of the South Carolina
legislature appointed to investigate the
feasibility of establishing a State ferti-
lizer factory, In a report submitted last
week finds that the consensus of opinion
is that there is a sufficient quantity of
phosphate rock for the needs of the State
for some years, but that the difficulties
and cost of mining it make it impossible
to give any accurate or even approximate
estimate of the value of the rock. The
quantity of fertil-'er consumed by the
farmers of the State is about 400,000 tonu
a year, and the amount of phosphate rock
required as a basis for this fertilizer would
be in the neighborhood of 00,000 tons
The committee was hampered in its in-
vestigation by the abaenee of funds nee-
eesary to secure full information. It saug-
,psts that the cost of manufacturing the
fertilizer depends to a large extent upon
the price at which the phosphate rock
should be obtained. And expressing a
readiness to resume its duties, ft says-
"Whereas the cost of the plant as esti-
mated provides for the contingency of
manufacturing ammoniated and other
m:xed goods, it munt be borne in mind
that in the event of undertaking their pro-
duction that the cost of crude ammon-
iates and potash salts at current prices
would materially add to the amount of
money required for the conduct of this
business. In so much as the land roc
area of this State is almost entirely in the
hands of a few parties, the State's eon
tinued possession of the mar'ne deposits
and its latent power to utilize the same
mieht serve as a valuable potential re-
rtrietion on any tendency of these par-
ties to exact exorbitant price for their
products."
iuz inca = amm1


NUBIAN TEA or the Lwr ad KMy

BENEDICTA A m..a*i for w-

CUBAN RELIEF Cm cra.p m a

CUBAN OIL lkfZd eale fcote
A supply of these mediela is what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for pcem and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,




THE ARAGON
JACOVm.a. FLA.
NOW OPEN
Under new manansemnt. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
elading new eletrie elevator aid oar
own electric light plant.
i H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.


HOTEL ROSELAND -Sct Sec-,-A
g5.Clm TOWNmi d faey 11M
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Ever~ comfort ad mumeat. Ueelled eulad Northern eookhm SPl ats. ea eseto
weekly ; 0 to m dally. AmWnrle pV. IUustrated booket 0are Crta to entrie farm
pl otelgronad. Hedqaarters for naval stores m ,lasberse. sttle growersan G
Coventlon deatses A. E. KOLM. Peopmeom.


Windsor Hotel

lJaekam.st M ai
FlMaMs LWaret ad Mt

Year-Round Hotel.
DODGE L CULLNSX .
oum 5.i ft mwuhn


GRAND VIEW HOTEL} .OA N PLAN
O2.00 PER DAY UP
SSPEOIAL WEEKLY AT-


ST. GEORGE HOTEL) uR PLA
MRS. a0O. W. BROOK. PlIOpmTrre .

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.

Anthracite, Steam and Blackrmith Coi, LA-. C Britek Paints.
Foot Hogan St.. Jacksmoville, Fla.
W. J. L'ENGL, J. W. WAD., a. a. U aG
Presidem. Vie*-PmmL 8e' am ahM


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE. ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS. LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited,
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.
Ganna sms 3maLa


.









4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Alabama.
Albrtvill--Maerantile.- The Albert
ville Mercantile Co. has been incorporated
with $5,000 capital by T. B. McNaron
and others.
Birmingham-Stove Works. Reports
state that John McLean & Son have pur-
chased the plant of the Eureka Foundry
& Machine Co, which will be converted
into stoe works and operated. An addi-
tional bualdlng will be erected and new
machinery stalled. About 20,000 will
be invested.
Birmingham-Pipe Foundry.-The Dim-
miek Pipe Co. will large its plant, in-
creaasing capacity by 100 tons daily.
Birmingham-Iron Furnace.-It is stated
that the Tutweller Coal, Coke & Iron Co.
ha begun the construction of its pro-
ped additional blast furnace, to have a
daily capacity of 200 toe and be built and
equipped after the most approved and
modern ideas in furnae work. The cost
is reported an to be about $M0,000, and a
onalideable amount will be expended to
develop dditimona mining properties to
supply raw material
BrUgapert-Bottlong Works.- Captain
MazxkM wll estaMbli bottling works.
MahIaery has been ordered
Greavil-Supply Company. R. B
Smythe, Mrs. M. F. Smythe and Mrs. Em-
ma MeQueen have incorporated the Ala-
barm Suply Co., with $S3000 capital.
Motgomery-Mattresa Futory-P. M.
Addiho and T. A. Holtselaw, of Meridian.
Mta., will oearga the Montgomery Mat-
trees Co. for the manufacture of mat-
tresea. A building has been secured at
0eS North Court Street, which will be
equipped for a daily capacity of from
0 to 100.
Haelgreen-as Pipe Line.-The New
York-Alabama Oil Co. Is reported as eon-
templating the laying of a pipe line to
conveying natural as from its wells in
Haselareen to Huntsville, a distance of
13 mies: estimated eoat 40000.
Hunt"ll-Kntting Mill.-The Roww
Knitting Co. will eret an additional build-
ine in whieh to install machinery which
has already been purchased. The capaefty
w'l be tnreased about 50 per cent.: pres-
ent equipment. a5, cotton spindles, 3S
knitting machines. eta.
Moble-Brik Works.-Moble Brick Co.
has been incorporated, with $50.000 capi-
tal. BSdev Lwenastein is president; James
T. Dumman. vke--res'dent, and J. L Tay-
lor. reretary-treasurer.
Obstphe--Creamery.- It is renwrted
that B. Onmore contemplates establish-
ing creamery.
River Falls-Mercantfle-nncorporated:
River Falls Merantile Co., with 810000
capital by J. H. Tainson and assoeates.
Uniontnwn-Waterworks and Electrie
Liht Plant.-The eity will build a new
and larIwr waterworks and electric light
pint at a more convenient nloat:on on the
railroad. chanina tde electric system from
di-e*t to alternating current. Professor
Dumntnn. rofessor of civil and mechanical
enaineerina of the State Polytechnic In-
stitute, Auburn, Ala., has made prel:m-
imarv surveys. As soon as resort is sub-
m-'ted the neessary maehinery. etc.. will
be purchased; Thomas Hudson, city clerk.

FloriMa.
Aanka-Waterwarks.- Apopka Water
SULight Ca. Is arranging for the intall-.
tMca of usba w r pb1*


Citrus County Phosphate Plant. -
Thomas Sexton, of Ocala, Fla., it is report-
ed, will erect phosphate plant in Citrus
County.
Carrabelle-Lumber Company.-Inaorpo
rated: The Hayes Lumber Co, with $75,-
100 capital, by William C. Vareen, William
H. Smith and W. A. Hayes.
Chipley-Electric Light Plant.-Grace-
ville Electric Light & Water Co., Grace-
.ille, Fla., has secured franchise to ope-
rate electric light plant, and construction
will shortly beg-n.
Delray-Cannery-The Planters' Pack-
ing & Preserving Co. will be organized to
operate the cannery reported last week as
to be established under the management
of H. E. Morgan, 1710 Caroline Street.
Baltimore, Md. A building 60x135 feet.
of corrugated iron, will be erected antd
equipped for a capacity of 20,000 to 30,000
cans.


Georgia.
Atlanta-Real Estate. Cauto Valley
Land Co. has been incorporated, with $150,-
100 capital, by Norman H. Davis and
dharles Phillips.
Atlanta-Construction Company.-Char-
tered: Dale-Wilson Company, with $25,
100 capital, by George E. Dale, Homer
Wilson and L Wilson.
Atlanta-Distillery.- Chartered: Car-
roll-Reid Distilling Co., with $25,000 capi-
tal, by E. H. Carroll, M. M. Reid and E. F.
S'ms to operate a distillery.
Cataula-Steam Sawmill.-It is reported
that Dr. W. R. Bryant has purchased a
tract of timber land near Catania and will
-rect steam sawmill.
Cedartown-Iron ore Mines.- Reports
state that the Lacey-Buck Iron Co., of
Birmingham, Ala., has purchased a large
tract of ore property near Cedartown, and
will arrange at once for its extensive de-
velopment. R. H. Marchman will be sup-
-rintendent at the mines.
Columbus-Candy Factory.-S. T. Whita-
'er is reported as having purchased the
nach'nery and equipment of the Whitaker
Candy Co., and to organize $30,000 corn-
any to operate candy factory. As soon
t site is secured building will be erected.
Dallas--Knitting Mill-Will K Spinks.
I. N. Moore, J. W. Hay, F. A. Hay and,
V. A. Foster will incorporate a company
o establish the knitting mill referred to
ist week. Capital will probably be $5000
"o other details decided.
Decatur-Cotton-thread Mill-The Geor-
-'a Cordage Mills has been organized anl
stalled 2,000 spindles, etc., for manufac-
'uring cotton thread rope and twine. C.
1. Candler is president.
Dublin-Sewerage System.-City has en-
aged Arthur Pew, C. E., Temple Court,
'tlanta, Ga., to prepare plans for int-
rovements to sewerage system prev-
usly reported, and for which $18,000 is
available.
E.eambia- Land and Manufactur'ng
ompany.-Eseambia Land & Manufar-
ring Co. has been organized with $200.-
10 capital. H. L. Covington is president;
'. M. Covington is vice-president, and J.
'. Saunders, secretary.
Fort Myers--Ice Plant Improvements.-
leminole Power & Ice Co., it is reported,
vill enlarge plant by the installation of
0-ton ice machine.
Graeaville-Cotton-seed-oil Mill and Fer-
ilizer Faetory-Graeaville Eleetrie Light
& Water Co. will eret a cotton-sed oil


The Industal News of the Week,


nill and fertilizer factory next season
Homoeassa-Fish Company.- William-
ish Co has been incorporated with $6,000
capital by Jacob Brown, J. J. Will!sma and
Abe Brown, to deal in fish, etc.
kewnan-Cigar Faetory.-D T. Man-
get A Co. win establish cigar factory;
building has been secured and machinery
ourchased. Brown Reese will be super-
intendent.
Penfleld-Knitting Mill.-The Penfleld
Hosiery Mills will add new knitting ma-
chinery and a dyehouse equipment. It is
reported the machinery haa been contract-
ed for.
Plant City-Waterworks.-S. E. Mays,
Jr., has applied for franchise to operate
waterworks.
Savannah-Wood Distillation Plants.-
E. C. Hemmer and Henry Sundhe-mer have
formed the E. C. Hemmer Company, to es-
tablih plants for the production of wood
spirits of turpentine and other by-products
of pine.
Seville-Mercantile.-J. M. Wilcox and
associates have incorporated the Wilcox
Mercantile Co., with $12,000 capital.
Savannah-Drug Company.-Chartered:
The A. L Ford Drug Company, by A. L
Ford, J. H. Strouss, and F. B. Durham;
capital $5,000 to $ ,00.
Tifton-Fertilier Factory.-. N. Pool,
R. E. Dinsmore, of Tifton, W. S Cobb,
and J. M. Bryee, of Canton, Ga., have or-
ganized the Tifton Fortiliser Co., with
$10,000 capital and privilege of increasing
to $50,000 to erect and operate fertilizer
factory.
Tallapooaa- Public Improvements. -
City will vote February 14 on the issu-
ance of $20.000 bonds for public improve-
ments; $10,000 to be used for the erection
of plectrie light plant and $10,000 for
mua cipal building and improvements to
se age system. Address The Mayor.
Loccoa Waterworks. City contem
plates the construction of waterworks
Address The Mayor.
Univeter-Mattress Factory- Cherokee
Mattress Manufacturing Co. has been or
ganized to manufacture cotton mattresses
pillows, etc. Ben F. Berry is manager and
W. Felton Scoggins, superintendent.
Washington-Waterworks-Philadelphia
Wrecking & Contract'ng Co., 123 West
Saratoga Street, Baltimore, Md., has con-
tract at $29,035, reported last week, for
improvements and extensions to water-
works. A 1,500,000 gallon reservoir and a
complete pumping plant will be erected.
Wayeross-Sawmill.-J. Campbell is re-
ported as erecting sawmill with a daily
capacity of 10,000 feet of lumber.
Wayeross-Dye Soap Factory.-M. R
Churchill is reported as to remove dye
soap factory from Atlanta, Ga, to Way
cross and organize stock company to ope-
rate it.
Waynesboro-Electre Light Plant.-J
LLinter has received contract for lighting
the city, and will establish electric light
plant. Machinery has been purchased.


New Securities
Chattanooga, Tenn.-It is now report
ed that in addition to the $126,000 of
bonds recently referred to, for schools and
parks, authority will also be asked to
issue $100,000 of city hall bonds and $125,-
000 of street and sewer bonds. A. M
Chamblias is mayor.
Milledgeville, Ga.-An eleet'on is soon
to be held to decide the question of issuing
$20,000 of 5 per ent sewer bonds C. L.
Moore is elerk.


ANVIL RYE
' Guaranteed 4
gallon, 0.


years old. y the
4 full art .T
= pmupa


CLIFFOkD RYT
By the gallon, *.1 4 fua quart


OLD xENRTUCE CORl
Guaranteed 8 year old. By the
gallon, $3.00. 4 full quart, U
Ezee PrepadiL
3LD POINTER CLUB CORN
Guaranteed 4 year old. By the
gallon, 2e.0. 4 full quarts, $
Zrem Pread
We handle all the leading brand of
Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the mar-
ket and will save you from tS per ant
to 50 per cent on your purchases. ed
for price list and catalogue. Mailed fre
apon application.

Th Attmyef&FtaU(rCA,
o5--5o-Sa-5i* Fourth street,
MACON GEORGIA.




This Spa.e Rewrved for


Gus Muller & Co.





Liquor Merchants

Proprietor


Jacksuilh Bhtling Wfrks

...Aunt...


ACME BEER



tre you reAldng yowr a ep
.- m .rr wea (foea o rw.nMin
Ie She flag. he Whe mu Wiq*
afwt4t oftbs"


TI= 2CORD 1S T=E SOVUTS GEA, TRAME JOURNAL


The Oldest Whiskey


House in Georgia.

(EtUaMl d in 1g86.)
















3LD SHARPS WILLIAMS
Guaranteed 8 year od. By the
gallon, $3.00. 4 full qrt am

GE0. J. COLEMAN RYT
Guaranteed 6 years old. By the
gallon, 5.75. 4 full quarts.
MXPs r1101









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


Amad raaI Progre n Goverment For-
et Wrk.
One of the f-st to ehamp'on the caus
of forest preservation in turs country wa.
Dr. Franklin B. Hough, who, in the dayL
following the Civil War, by means of lee
tures anl writings, advocated the cart
and conservative ue of our woodland re-
sourees. In 1875 Dr. Hough was appointed
an agent in the U. S. Department of Agri-
eultuie, to gather and publish acts about
the forets and forestry. In 1883 N. H.
Egleston succeeded to that office. The
next to assume this leadership was Dr. B.
B. Fernow, a graduate of the Forest Acad-
emy of Munden, and of the Universty o0
Koiigsberg, Germany, whose investiga
tio and reports are of great ucationa.
value. He resigned to accept the position
of director of the Cornell forest school,
and still engaged in forest re search
and as a consulting forester.
On July 1, 1898, Gifford Pinchot was ap-
pointed Forester of the Department o1
Agricuture, and under. his direction the
division of forestry has become a bureau.
It has grown from a membership of 11
to over 300, and its work is more and
more assuming a form of intense prac-
ticability, while its strong influence fox
the perpetuation of our forest interests
now permatea every part of the country.
Every step in the bureau of forestry, un-
der its present administration, has been
toward blending the theory of proper for-
emt management with the varied need&
and cowlitioas of different regions, and
only such methods are recommended a-
have been found to be financially practi-
able. The policy of o-operation with in-
dividuals and corporate interests has been
singularly successful, and the connection
of the bureau in an advisory capacity with
the administration of the forest reserve-
has bean largely instrumental in creating
a feeling of increased friendliness toward
forestry on the part of the lumbermen,
stockme and miners throughout the West.
Forest work now carried on in coopera-
tion between the federal and state gov
ernments is rich in results, in the forms
tio of State forest departments, the
creation of sound forest sentiment, and
the enactment and enforcement of ade
quate forest laws. With the assistance ot
the bureau of forestry, large lumber con
aers in every part of the country an
now more generally practising scientific
forestry, and thus giving examples of con
servat've forest management. The plant-
in of timberbelts to protect river bank-
in food tCme and to shelter framsteads.
stock, orchards and rope from cold and
wind has been shown to be a good invest
meat. The bureau has begun to plant
to suitable trees large areas of barren re
serve lad in Nebraska, Colorado and
California.
One striking achievement of the bu-
reau of forestry was the discovery and
introduction of the cup-and-gutter system
of turpentin'ng. This great improvement
over the destructive system of boxing
has already increased the value of the
naval stores to the South nearly 40 per
cent., and proa ises, because of its less
injurious effdet upon the long-leaf pine, to
perpetuate the industry. New methods
of handling, sawing, seasoning and preserv-
ing wood have reduced timber waste and
decay, and brought about the substitution
of more plentiful timbers for those of
growing scarcity and greater cost.
5 Mr. Pinchot was born at Simsbury,
Conn., August 11, 1865, but spent much
of his boyhood at Milford, a charming
little village a northeast Pennsylvania.


Here in a commanding situation overlook-
ng the valley and the beautiful village is
Grey Towers, the estate of his father, J.
W. Pinchot, and the summer home of the
Yale Forest School and other important
educational interests dealing with the
forest.
After graduating from Phillips Exeter
academy and Yale university, Mr. P!nchot
studied forestry at Nancy, France, follow-
ed by field study in the Alps and Vosges
and in the city forest of Zurich. He was
the first young American to adopt forestry
us a profession, and his installation in
1892 of forest management on the estate
if George W. Vanderbilt, at Biltmore, N.
2., was the first example of the practice
if forestry on a large cale in the United
States. Subsequently he was engaged a
Consulting forester in New York city,
-onsulting forester for New Jervey, and
a member of the committee from the Nat-
ional Academy of Sciences, appointed at
the request of the secretary of the interior
to give advice concerning the treatment
if government timber lands.
In the fall of 180 Mr. Pnehot went to
the Phillippines to make a report and rec-
ommendations on the forest policy of the
islands at the request of Governor Taft,
Secretary Root and the President. As a
member of the Committee on the Public
Lands, in company with Hon. W. A. Rich-
ards, Commissioner of the General Land
Office, and F. H. Newell, Chief of the
Reclamation Service, Mr. Pinehot has
even more thoroughly familiarized him-
self with the questions that concern the
vast pubFe lands of the United States.
Mr. Pinehot is the president of the So-
-iety of American Foresters, a scientific
body which holds weekly meetings to dis-
cuss technical forest problems. He isalso
a director of the American Forestry As-
soeiation, an organinaton of persons from
nearly every State and territory, under
whose auspices the American Forest Con-
Iress was held at Washington, January
2 to
Prominent among Mr. Pinchot's writ-
"ns is "A Primer of Forestry. Part I.-


The Forest." Part I of this book deals
with "Practical Forestry," and will ap-
near in January.

Agricultural Products by Comparison.
In his annual report for the year 1904
the secretary of agriculture gives figures
and draws conclusions which are as inter-
esting as eloquent. One paragraph in the
report furnishes an abundance of food
for thought. He says:
"An occupation that has produced such
an unthinkable value as one aggregating
nearly $5,000,0000,00 within a year may
be better measured by some comparisons.
All of the gold mines of the entire world
have not produced since Columbus dis-
covered America a greater value of gold
than the farmers of this country have
produced in wealth in two years; the
1904 product is over six times the amount
if the capital stock of all national banks;
;t comes within three-fourths of a billion
lollars of equalling the value of manufac-
tures of 1900, less the cost of materials
used; it is twice the sum of our exports
and imports for a year,
The estimate of the value of farm
products for 1904 places the amount at
4,9000,000,000, after excluding the value
of farm crops fed to live stock in order
,o avoid duplication of values. A simi-
'ar estimate made for 1903 gives $4.480,-
'00.000, and the census total for 1890 is
$3,742,000000.
THIu 3man WElLL = WORTH DO


)II I I I I $tO$ a IOIOg i t t It I I I I a l M I I I I0IIII IOg 0806


THE DIAMOND



SWines, Liquors and Cigars.
Sole Adents feor th famous. A. C. Beer. lse s e -"Wlhldme Zne Mi-
o* em Wam We omur esee an randutu pe mnsp by mu fNE momm0m a wM"wus
- Creme de o Creme, bottle .... .-00o Diamod Brand, bottle ........ 1.0
t (Ih. .- "1i a d i m. m Heart Brad, bottle .......... ..7
SC. C. C. Brand, bottle ........ 1.0 Spade Brand, bottle ........... .A8
Z Club Brand, bottle ........... 1IS Premium Brand, bottle ........ JO

MYERSON CO..
*O as 07 Wrest Ga Ph. sme M I.71
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


A. &. PENEETO
PrrmMs


W. IL 4801m0
Vb"e pres.


AIL LAUEI3 W. W. gSrIMP ,
"a.. Nour. A Tromesra


5he W. 1. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers


D. L YNU.


102 01 s0ay05 E a sSreet, lealasof n


DNM.CWIL


WAU&IWM


I J. A. Craig (SD Bro.

0 239 W. B y Strot EVERETT BOCK.

E Leaders in Men's and aBoys' Fine Cloth-
0 ing and Up-to-Date Furnishins.

SAgents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.
W#WW#WWWiei w t -i**s,3 **# 99W 19999 99


The Bond & Bours Co.
WeOLESALE ftL TAIL


HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints, Oils and Glass,
Stoves. Tinware, Country- Holloware.

SWuST AY STREET JaCEonville. Fla.


Cable Address. Florida


Standard Naval Stores

Company.

DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN

ROSIN

AND TURPENTINE.

JacKsonville. Fla.

*--------' if--I----~ A---'-Y U '-W~fWW W









8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Pitch -Pine Market Conditions on the Gulf

Th Gulf Coast Reeord's review for the 1,8000 pieces and the city mills mad
past week: 2500 pieces. No sales were reported a
it Market Coaditions. the arrivals were on contract. This ap
mber-Tonnage is in limited demand, lies ao to the cut of the city milh
TimberTonnge is in limited demand, several contracts of 10,000 pieces and oval
but rates are Arm on the basis of 80 at are pending. Manufacturers control ta
U, one or two ports of discharge. The situation, but the future of the market
fixture are: Btr. Rosa Lea, 1817, Gulf to depends entirely upon the cut. Presen
Holland and e. c. U. K., 82-6, Feb.-March; indications are that there will be no in
tr. Arrosmoor, 1721, Gulf to London, 80 cream. Stocks remain a lat reported.
Feb, Logs.-The rivers and streams will b
River Plate.-or tonnage the demand cleaned up by the recent fresheta. Log
s better, several fixtures have been made ers a working day and night getting ou
wita secrecy in eah cae a to term- the logs and the Gulf mills will have i
made. The fixtures are: Str. Kiora,.22, steady supply for some tim. The Pea
Gulf to River Plate p. t, Feb., Londes- River mills will receive a full supply, while
burgh, 1966, Gulfport to Bueno Ayre, 200,000 will arrive at Panagoula. Th
p. t.; str. Leader (new)---, tons, Gulf- mills are jubilant at the prospect of i
port to Montevideo, at or about 95, Feb.; full run just now on the eve of a revive
str. Oceanie, 1400, Gulf to Rosario, p. t., of business. It is to be noted that th
Jany.; bk Christiane, 919, Gulfport to large number of arrivals has adl no effee
Buenos Ayres, p. t.; bk Pehr Ugland, 1230, whatever upon the market, and values arx
ane; ship Etrella, 13, same; ship Er- as high to-day a during the famine
rol, 134, Pesasola to Rio, p. t., bk Ves- Even the mills who own land are buying
ta Molad, 1160, Paugoula to Roario, freely thus saving their own timber stand
1030; bk Alexander Lawrence, 1131, Gulf ing for the not very distant day whet
to Rosario, M10J0; bk Oaklands, 894, Pen- yellow pine is to be a scarce commodity
meoil to Buaeuo Ayres, .50, option Ro- Mobile will receive about 20,000 on thi
ario, 10 rise. During the week 2,000 came inti
Mexico-Busines is quite active, but Mobile on the market and 00 arrive
the regular lines are earriyng the bulk of o the mills.
the material The fixtures are: Sch Hewn-Stocks on the Gulf are increase
Starke, 19, Moss Point to Vera Cru 'ng at some points, but the demand con
7.0% (W. Denny & Co.). There is about ainus urgent. Shipper are buying ever
10,00,000 feet lumber and tie booked at available foot. Some fine stock is be:nj
the mills at Texas ports. accumulated at Gulfport, Miss, where the
West ledis-Rates are weak, with an Yellow Pine Export Co., has 1,00 pieces
abundance of tonnage offering, $450 has he arrivals at Mobile were 100 pieces, 91
been accepted to north side. This plethora -ubie feet average, which sold at 18c
of tonnage is due to the enormous inte- he market i firm and desirable stock ih
rior demand wh:eh is drawing lumber froi lificult to secure.
the ports. Certain large manufacturer Prime-Demand is improving and ship
who are also shippers, had from 6 to 1 ,ers are contracting heavily, whenever pos
ooa axed, which they are nideav- ible. Some of the mills are deeldnina
ring to rren-arter, even if at a los 0 on contract while other are hold
Should these shippers loe $1 on the .ng at $. The cut continue small.
freight, they would, as manufacturers Heartfae Flooing.-Shipper, are con
make 2 by sending the output interior nracting wherever possible and there is
The above is the only plausible reason ery little stock to be had. The demand
be given for the wretched condition' ol for Ix6 is good at 20 to $ 1.
Cuban freghts. Cuba will take more lum River Plate.-Demand is good and buy-
ber this year than ever before, but she wil ers indicate an advance for reasonably
pay more for it. The fixtures are: h luck delivery. The mills have all of thi
Beeie Parker, W, Jacksonville to Fort usiness that they can handle and, with
de France, .687 1-2; Ih. Auice J. Crab the present brisk demand from all diree-
tree, 326, Mobile to Cardenas, 6.25; sch tions 13 for River Plate schedules is not
Olive, 127, Mobile to Puerto Padre, 8.75 at all improbable. This, however, rests
Pitch Pin Market Cnditiona. with the shippers. The whole of Latin
Sawn Timber.-The market retains it* Ameriea is enjoying a period of prosperity
buoyancy and high values have not stim- never before experienced. Labor troubles
ulated the cut. Indeed, some of the bit in the River Plate country are not yet
mills, cutting sawn to a large extent, arn settled and this fact causes a feeling of
inclined to discontinue cutting sawn alto uneertainty among buyers. Indicat-ons
gather, if the interior demand continues are that these troubles will soon end.
and the indieat'ons are that this demand Railroad work of all kinds will be heavy
will not only continue, but that it wiL 'his year. The mills on the Gulf are run-
rapidly inerse. The numerous log com ning regularly and while the cut will in-
ing down are going into lumber and ye rease, the excess will be turned to other
the demand is unsatfied. The foreign lireetions unless River Plate values ad-
markets are improving, but a further im- vance promptly.
provement is necessary to divert the cut Cross-Ties.-Demand from all directions
of the pitch pine mills to the Gulf. Sev- is brisk. Values have advanced 2 a thou-
gral contracts are pending at 18c., but sand above those obtaining 60 days ago.
manufacturers are reluctant to contract Large inquiries are coming from the East.
This evidences no advance abroad and 9ne came in during the week for 3,500,000
it is pereptible, however slow it may be. eet, New York delivery. The inquiry re
The outward movement is small, and ship. cently sent out from Europe for 10,000,-
pers are inclined to hold off until late 000 feet has not yet been placed. For-
spring as it is impossible to figure out a eign buyers have not yet grasped the fact
profit on present offers. The Gulf mills of the sharp advance on the Gulf.
are ending ready ale for all products of Foreign.--mith & Tyrer'e eireular for
the pine log and prices offered are uch December, says: "The past year is not a
that even 18. is no inducement to cut pleasant retrospect to most of the opera-
mwn timber. The arrivals at Mobile were tore, in wood good, on both ides of the


w


C




a
L
B
L


e



a
a
e
I




B

V






















a










I


T. U. "gCemNY Weeren


aMM= STM. Tres.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.


OVISSML U WM "@new.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE.


JACKSON VILE, FLA.


ui.s6 uauuu11uuuu IuII@Io#*II Is Isuuuse 8 111
004 I I iuss I$$ I sia aell usI mu$ I 16#46 ....u.st .u me


W. H. BCOKWITE.


W. B. HENDESON.


G.. WARREN.


BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.


LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE AID MILL LANDS,


TAMPA,


RoWs 1.2-3, First NMtml i Bas Biid lg.
Z : J : FLORIDA.


CYPRESS TANKS
Are Belt by Every Test
CIrpma wl d.h the eects at hea
hent t y otea aher wcod. sihriks a swells lc
than otrtt wrd ood.is erviawonaacif.b, dspait
weUlandlasf wsras witt dccaytg. Loa red
ma w are, right inthe reatt r e a foel, wear
ale to secrete best seleonm at the woo and at
very low pice. We hive bee, ildblg tanks for
ore tLan a quarter of a century and be diy asemt
tat a tanks are better bit olU lat loeL.

G. M. DAVIS 4L SON
PALATIA fLORlIDA

===
BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I wo sad by ezpreM prpa. the faoowing:
rear funll ut Ismaoln County, unnybrook y or Big Horn R .. s.O
a e Bottle ................................................
I w111 sed tour fll quarts of Uosmr' Corn, Melwood Rye. Golden Wd-
t Ry HRe ollr Ton. Okn. Peac Brandy. Peach and Honey
Whiskey. Gin and Manhattan Cocktaff ny of the above tor........ IL
One bottl fay of the Tbo .............................. ................ ......f 8
Muur bottles o the folnowl Calfornia Win.: lberry. PoIrt Mumeat
C(atawL ............... .L11
nlle baotte mea.
Four botles Wl WhiaLrkey. e... ea ......
Nagil bottle .... V.9
PIv bottle Duty' Malt ............. SL
Sm*le bottles ......................................... t.1
Bulk lad of al knd. peelal Prt ee a ppleatis. All knd of
Iama rs ai s ftrm 8j to .104 f. L. b. JaekavoflI.
. BETTtLINI. W Bay St. Opp. Uilen Depot. Jacksdel lle, Fla


AM TM A BMWUN= 20 in==11


THE




Falstaff Restaurant

For Ladies and Gentl.mcr.


Breakfast a s carte. Luncheon 12 to 2:30, 50. Table d'hote
dinner, 6 to p. ., 75e. Oysters on half shel. After theater
lunches a spealty.

25 MAIN STREET,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

aaIagagIciii riimii iiriiriirimiiiii

I I 8 98S S8B 48888IBS888888088SS


M PAL WNW ftes








THU WEEKLY Ibt. -iJIlAL RECORD.


Atahe ti but it has passed over without
any severe disaaser, ad a ha proved Uete
than wa at oa tUme expeci. Tin oumt-
look tar the coming year a brighteami
sad it is to be hoped that the favorite
indcatiom will develop advantageously.
Pich pes is much former and wul probe-
bly impove much more in value." Btocks
of aw tUmber at Liverpool, Birkenheu
and Garston for last oath were 732000
eu. ft.; ame month, 1903. 861,000 e. ft.;
190, 60J0 eu. ft.; Hewn, 1904, 161i00I
e. ft.; 1903, 108000 eu ft.; 190, 204.00
e. ft. Lumber, 1904, 3,000 e. ft..
1903. 31J000 au. ft.; 1906. 397.000 eu. ft.
The improved conditions abroad are now
reacted an the Gulf.
Cuba.-Valum are stiffenig. There ex-
ltts a decided seareity of 12 inch boards
on the Gulf. We are informed that eer-
tain ippers are forced to pay $16 for
lota of 13 tch stock to All out cargoes.
Cuba is prosperous and more lumber wiv
be imported thin year than ever before,
Cubua export are increase, the sugai
crop having increased in value from $19,
00o0o in 180I to ,42o00000 i 190s.
Cuban prmperity will be reflected on the
Gulf, primipally in lmber and machin
Cry-


Paeeagoula, Mim.-AIl of the streams
in thi seetion are riing and the mills are
reaming operation. In addition to the
old plants, the new m'Us of J. T. Whit,
& Co., and of the Dantalr Lumber Co..
will tart up Monday. The Dantler Lum-
ber Co. has about 8,000Io feet of 8outr.
American loading, aad the orders of thiu
oneern amount in the aggregate to 156,
000,0. The Nor. bk. Veatre Moland
1150 tons, will load a eargo of 850,000 feet
for Buenos Ayres, at Denny & Co.'-
O'Leary mill at Mom Point. This i the
rlaret sailing vesel that has yet a
cened the Pascagoula River. The Mom.
Point mill wll will receive 20,00 logs on th
present rise. All of the mills will rut
full capacity and the shipments will frcn
this time on show a healthy increase. Tht
Pascagoula Commercial Club has issued .1
statement of the commerce of the port fo
the year ending December 31. Th's state
meat shows large shipments of woo.
goods. The total tonnage cleared wa.
223,51. Foreign shipments were 149,603.
888 feet; domestic, 81,00,886 feet, making,
a total of 231,217,772 feet, which is as,
excellent showing.
Interior. The momentous question just
now is whether or not the enormous dt
mand will continue. All indications arn
tha t t will, unless production should bl
increased by the building of mills and b.
night running. An immense amount ot
business is now held back by buyers wh,
are unable to meet present values. Th
various roads are placing from 7,000 t(
10,000 ears a week. Consumption in the
South is enormous. The demand wa'
never so great As an illustration: Caml
& Hintoa, Lmberton, M'au., had 600,000
feet lumber ready at New Orleans for ex-
port when an interior buyer came along
and offered a price which inuuced the
owners to divert the entire lot. The dt-
mand is also more varied than at any
time in the history of the trade, and
calls for the entire cut. Much interest is
manifested in the approemnag meeting of
the Southern Lumber Manufacturers' As-
sociation which will be held at New Or-
leans January 24-2.
Among the Mills.-The mills on the Gul
are all running and the business offering
far exeeede the eat. When accepting or-


den the mills have to take into Couider-
auu the approachilg "rauy eeasu" It
. uwre Lan pruust e that as raimm dur
g february w ulprevent a tuu cut. vau-
ume i some lies are yet low, but there
is a perceptible stifleunsg even in these,
and if the cut be not increased a further
stilaeing i probably. The mills at Mo-
oie are running but the output is not
arge and the bulk of the sh-pments art
coming from the out-of-town mill. Thet
tMrcure Lumber Co., Wagar, Ala, is load-
ng the eeh. Edw. W. Murdoek, 1216, fut
iuenoe Ayree, with 1,00,000 feet for W.
&8. Hakina A Sons, Boeton. The bulk ot
the cut at Mobile at the moment, is sawn
timber on contract.
Total Export*-1l641,17 feet lumber,
4,179,268 feet awn timber, 3,078 cubie
feet bewn, 3,863,67 feet eroeties, 16,000
feet piling, 28 bundle door and auh.
Same week last year-23,3,80 feet
lumber, 7,038,9 feet sawn timber, 29,-
005 'cubic feet hewn, 6,831,968 feet cros-
ties, 63 bundles door and blinds, 1 mast,
20,000 laths.


Yadkin Dam Contracted For.
Regarding the plans for developing the
power of the Yadkin River at the Nar-
rows, near Salisbury, N. C, the Whitney
Company being the projector of the en-
terprise, it is now stated by dispatches
that the company has awarded contract
to Mesars. D. A. Gillespie & Co., of New
York city for the construction of the dan
and canal, the amount involved being
about $1,700,000, and two years' time be
mng required to complete the work. As
ias been previously announced, the Whit
new company expects to develop about
16,000 horse power, which will be trans-
.nitted by electricity for the operation ol
'arious manufacturing and minig indus-
tries in North Carolina. The dam is to bx
100 feet long, 68 feet wide, 38 feet high
end cost (00,000. When the entire plant
s completed it is reported that 65,000,
100 will be invested. E. B. C. Hambley
-f Salisbury is president of the Whitne
company and F. L Stephenson, of Me. ar;
iVhitney & Stephenson, bankers, Pitts
iurg, Pa., is secretary.' New York capital
sts are also interested in the project.

New Corporationa
The Southern Adjustment & Bond'n.
'o has been incorporated at Louisvill
(y., with $25,000 capital. The incorpora
ore art C. O. Tiee, Ben C. Weaver, Jr.
W. M. Smith, V. M. Lewis and E. F. Blank
Snsh'p.
The Bank of Newton County, located
it Cov'ngton. Ga., has been chartered witl
31,000 capitaL The incorporators are T
C. Swann, J. R. Stephenson, T. A. Perry
and .A. B. Sims, of Covington; G. C
Adams and Capers Dickson of Oxford.


South Georgia Enterprise.
The Sales-Davia Company, of Albany.
,;a,. recently bought 10,000 acres of eav.
Somber and the half interest in two tur
entine plants. It is said $75,000 was th,
-onsideration.
The timber and turpentine stills are sit
uated near St Andrews Bay, Fla., ami
argue aawmlla and tram roads will now be
tonstrueted. The tram roads will be built
to the bay where all the products of the
:nills and stills will be shipped by boat
to the markets. The new railroad thai
s now being built from Chipley, Fla., t,
At. Andrews will traverse a portion of the
timber land.


._uU u III Il sult ulI uI I II | |1|161 15'1511131.3 Iu11 I
SMERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

0 Still Boilers and Pumps.
: SHIP BUILDING snd REPAIRING.
SJsckonvil,. Ia.


WILLIAM A. BOURS dJAmes AUST


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
TIE LuEST ESTAMU MEB AM AM AI O S ME i TSTA .

Rty, Grain, Feed. Grda
Seeds POltry 3Su1les, Fltur.
rits, Meal and Fertilizes.

OSI MOTTO: fPret s 1D111atI. s Se i11 Catals ree.
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE FLA.


*Cummer Luimher Co.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES end CRATES.


SStandard Clothing Company



SOne rrice One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOIHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 end 19 West Bay Street. Jackso vle, ForiMd.
terss and Hawes Hatl. M 8tSpeal Atplale Griven t I all Orders


R. TOLAR.


J.4.. HART.


p


qwvo" vlO 1 4 *LW 90 4 &W P.w


T. H. SLACHLV.


a. .. TOLAR, J


(EKtablished lr3.)

TOLAR. HART & CO..
180 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.

Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange Orders executed for Cotton Futures


IOdEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANwA. GEOR.GIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

rurpentine Tools, Clue, Battions, Etc.


2= =GSnW U ?ms@OwAv,,e WIAN.


*0** --0 AD*&*aO*" a* 0-b-0 a








THE WREKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


NAVAL STORES DEPARTMENT.


MAKING A RECORD.

Janury Naval tee Jfirpents at Fr.

Taking the austomhouse rating of 280
poumdi to the barrel, during the Art if.-
faen days of January there was loaded
and cleared from the port of Fernandina
about M0,00 barrels of naval store In
the "round" or actual barrel, which runs
from 50 to 50 pounds, the precie num-
ber is 3le
The three barks now loading will take
about 15OO round barrel. Beside this,
the teamer Cematie is expected ths
week or nxt, and her cargoes run from
14,000 to 16000 round barrels.
It has not been ascertained whether
thee will h any eargoe this month
beside thee, but these alone will run
the total naval store shipments for the
month up to 61,00 or 02K0 round bar-
reakl
In lumber the shipments have not come
up to expectations, falling very short in
fact, only about 31-2 million feet going
out the st half of the month. There is
a large amount of lumber on hand and
arriving, and there are a large number
of charters, mo that the activity in lum-
ber during the last half of the month
and ia the month of February may be
expected to greatly increase.
Of the 1000 tons of phosphate booked
for thin month, not a pound has been
loaded yt, but the Steamer Zeeburg and
either the Jupiter or Usher are daily ex-
pected. Two other steamers, names not
aseetaled, are expected this month, to
take the balance of the amount.
Sch. Warren Adams arrived Saturday
with 90 te coal, consigned to the Sea-
boad.
The Seb. Savannah discharged 100 tons
of Mr. Morrow's cargo of hay at Crandall;
the remaliag 115 ton is stored in the
Seaboard' warehouse.

Jeha Teug t t e Operatoer
The Sohn Young Co., of Savannah,
Ga, ltaed the following wie and very
timely advice to its customers during the
present week:
"In answer to frequent inquiries, we
beg to advise that there has been no trad-
ing so far in Turpentae for summer deliv-
ery, eommoaly called futures. Dealers are
holding back, seemingly under the impres-
sion that there will be an increase in the
box eat, an a co emquent increase in the
crop of 190 over that of 1904, which
would indicte lower values unless there
is a corresponding increase in consump-
tive requirements. While we know that
the conditions of the producer justify a-
high values for this erop as he received
for the last one, and are constantly work
ing to this ed, we-must acknowledge th,
ond-tiom of trade that will result from
a big crop, and espeet price to be in ace
eordance therewith. We therefore urg
our friends to use cae and caution ii.
pitching their plans ad in preparing fos
the sson's work. Avoid cutting boxe-
in saepings or in timber that will not
turn out a full yield, avoid contracting foi
rude turpentine at higher prices than yom
will be able to pay, avoid extravagance
in management and in general expendi
ture. Spot prices suffered a decline this
week, wh:eh we think was not justifet'
by the true eoaditions of trade, and we
hope for some reaction next week.


Polk County Sub. Meet.
The Polk County (Fla.) Sub-Associa-
tion of Turpentine Operators held its regu-
lar monthly meeting in Bartow Thursday,
January 12.
The meeting was well attended and
much important business of the associa-
tion was transacted. Mr. A. P. Malloy
presided in the absence of President Till-
man, and Mr. J. G. Boyd was the acting
secretary.
A matter thoroughly discussed at the
meeting was the action of some operators
of the State raising the price of cutting
boxes from one and one-half cents to
two cents each.
Such increase in wages was deplored
as being demoralizing to the turpentine
industry, and in the eval talks upon
subject it was shown that this increase
would mean more difficulty in solving the
labor problem, which is ever harassing
to the turpentine operator.
In itself the additional money paid for
this work was of no great importance,
but the evil results of the increase were
to be found in the effect upon the elaq of
of labor employed.
At the present sale of wages it is im-
possible to keep the box cutters steadily
at work, and no form of argument can
prevail upon them to return to their la-
bors after a payday while they have any
money in their posession. It is obvious,
therefore, that increasing their pay would
only tend toward a more shiftless condi-
tion of affairs.
In accordance with that belief the as-
sociation adopted a resolution condemning
the increase and a committee was appoint-
ed to protest against such action on the
part of other operators.
At this meeting the association adopted
the following wage scale: 65 cents a
1,000 for chipping and 45 cents a barrel
for dipping.
The next meeting of the association will
be held in the court house at Bartow on
Thursday, February 9.

Duty a Lumber and Naval Stores.
Meredith, Fla., Jan. 5.-Editor American
Lumberman: Please give me the duties
charged by the United States on lumber,
rosin and spirits of turpentine imported
into this country. F. C. M'EACHIN.
[Schedule D of the tariff act of July 24,
1807, known as the Dingley tariff, which is
still in force except as modified in some of
its terms by treasury department de-
cisions, gives as in the dut'able list the
following: Timber, hewn, sided or squared,
used for spars or in building wharves, 1
cent aecubic foot; sawed boards, planks,
leals and other lumber of whitewood, syca-
more and basswood, $1 a thousand feet:
iawed lumber not specially provided for
in th:s act, $2 a thousand feet. Where
lumber of any sort shall be planed or
Snished is levied in addition to the rates
Otherwise provided 50 cents a thousand
'eet board measure for each side so planed
r finished; if planed on one side and
tongued and grooved, $1 a thousand feet:
if planed on two sides and tongued and
Trooved, $150 a thousand feet. In con-
iection with this provision for duty on
awed lumber is the soealled "retaliator
lause," reading as follows:
"Provided, that if any country or de
tendency shall impose an export dut.
,pon saw logs, round unmanufactured tim


W. T. aILCY, J.. CAIRW.* -- 7 N J. Cwft.- 1-. ---
wreme.- Vclrwfe-ef.. Sec. tees.

Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTIURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Fr ctories.
8th Street R. R. Crowing.


JACKSONVILLE.


rLORIDA


...NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH. GA., U. S. A.


JoHN La YOUNO,


1. P. WXILLAM.
C. W. SAUSSY.
I. A. ALFORD,


C.
P.L. 8
J-B
J.B.


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-Premeat. S
M1BCTORS:
I. ELLJS. B. BUTLLARD
UTHERLAND. W. C. POWELL
PADGlTT. WALTER RAY,
YOUNG. A. D. COVINGTON.


L L. KAYTON,
lretary sd Tramme.

J. R. CHEiNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the 8. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.


J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,

Headqumters fr

SDistiller's Pumping
e nOutfit.
No plant omplee without one.
I II Hundred of them in e in Georgia,
Flor-d Alabama. Mimismippi and
SSonth Carolia Write u for p-ruou-
Slars ana pries. We also manufacture
4 Engin.es, Bllers and igh I
jI G.rad MaiaeMry,
s well u arry a full and complete
----toko--
SI; Mill Supplies, Pipe.
II klie.r Tes, [tco.
SAdvise your wants.
S. Macon,- Georgia.
S. -, A teem s i t fr
S* a* ft T ek We*t ftr Irpste ster Pwree
e8s8 8#8#*06 t8o*$*$ 8 8 8, 0 8 8 0 8,8 808,

John R. Youn. J. WMott. C. B. Prker, James McNatt. W Wilder.
Prmnt. Vioe-prea Vite-Prs. Vle-Pre Bee. & Tresm.



John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


0 Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers..

SavI.nuH "SL Brunswick. G-..
------------------ n i i


ber, stave bolts, shingle bolts or heading,


VZ= 11WS1 Asiymmaim"Ok 1911211 21 2110










TBKWXZELY 14DOAkl flt2COfD.


bolts exported to the United State, or
d.ii-ri-tiug charge upon boom sticUks
eha:a used by American citisen in tow
ig logs the amount of such export dutj
tax or other charge, as the ase may bi
shall be added as an additional duty t
the duties imposed upon the article men
tioned in this paragraph when imported
from such country or dependency."
The above eaue was designed to pre
veat the imposition by Cansa of an ex
port duty upon logs, ete. Canada, how
ever, avoided its applieaton, in large
part, by simply refusing to allow the ex
portation of saw ogs cut from crowl
lands. n some ases, however, as in puim
wood, dA;-rianiwtion in the stumpage due
or royalty is made by giving a rebate o
part of the duea in cae the wood should
be I-**f-et-,d into pulp in Canada
This custom has been declared by Unite
States customs offiials as equivalent tA
an export duty and the amount of the
rJ i. ti- has been charged as
duty against .."portetion of pulp wooc
so discriminated against which otherwia
would be free.
Paving posts, railroad ties and electric
poles are charged 20 per cent. ad valorem
Bundled kindling wood is charged i
duty of .3 per cent per bundle, according
to aim.
The duty on sawed cabinet woods, sucl
a cedar, lsaewood, mahogany, roaewood
ete., is 1I per eet. ad valorem; on ve.
uers, 20 per cnt ad valorem.
The duty on lapboards is $1.50 a thous
and; on lath S2 eats a thousand pieces,
an pickets, palags and staves 10 per eant
ad valorem; on shingles, 30 center a thous-
and.
The above are the principal items mn-
tim of whish will no doubt sufficientl)
wer the inquiry of our correspondent
as to the lumber duty. On the free list,
however, are log and round unanufac-
tured lumber, Includig pulpwood, handle
and hagle bolt, etc, and cabinet wood.
of foreign growth.
In regard to resin, the crede product
is admitted free into thi country, but it
other tha crude it is charged 1-4 ent a
pound plus 10 per cet. ad valorem.
If in small blocks for violin bows, the
hargeh is 20 per ent ad valorem.
spirit of turpetine is admitted free.]
-Edisor.

Heavy Lumber Sipment.
Shipments of lumber from the port of
Jacksonville have held up fairly well this
month, and a there are several vessel
loading that will elear before the end
of the month, the record for January bids
fair to equal that of any month since
lis May, when the shipments exceeded
90000000 feet.
So far this month the shipments amount
to 14,811M,8 feet, of which 12,084,790 feet
were shipped oastwia and 2,787,079 feet
were shipped to foreign ports.
Last year the total shipments for Jan
wary amounted to 15,587,246 feet, which
is lms than one million feet in exces.
of the shipments for twenty-Ave days
during the present month.
The shipments by water of pine tree
products during the present month have
been 27,00 eresties, 48,8 bundles of
shingles and 1,010 barrels of naval stores.
Since the first of January 0,00 rates
of fruit and vegetables have been shipped
from Jacksonville on the Clyde Linm
seaers in addition to the heavy ship-
munt by rail. The vast majority of the
shipment of fruit and .vegetables have
been ausagsw


THE ATLANTIC NATIONAL.

A Phenomenal Increase ia Basess 4dang
the Year o904.
The Record is in receipt of a condensed
statement of the condition of the Atlantic
National Bank of Jacksonville, at the
close of business January 11, 190. It
makes such a magnificent showing that
we take pleasure in publishing same be-
low:
Resources.
Loans and Discounts ........$1,819,64.88
Overdrafts ................. ,110.2
Vaults and Fixtures ........ 15,000.00
U. S. Bonds ................ .19,000.00
County and City Bond..... 129,797.50
Due from U. 8. Treasurer.... 11,0000
Cash and due from other banks 915,60400

Total ............... 3,211,77.18
Liabilities.
Capital Stock Paid in.......$ 30,000.00
Surplus .................... 50,000.00
Undivided Profits .......... 4100695
Circulation ................. 3000.00
Deposits ................... 2,40,251.23
Dividends uncalled for ...... 21.00

Total .............. .3,211,767.18


D:vidends paid since organisation, Aug. 1,
1903, $31,500.00.
The deposits of this bank on January
11, 1904, were $1,431,886.40 and on Jan-
uary 11, 1906, $2,540,251.23, an increase in
one year of over eleven hundred thousand
dollars.
The Atlantic National Bank has the
largest capital of any national bank in
the State of Florida. It is moat conserva-
tively and ably managed. Edward W.
Lane, the president, is one of the South's
safest, and at the same time, moat pro-
gressive bankers.
The Cycle ef Cotton.
It is hard for cotton manufacturers to
see the bright side of things when the
trade is demoralized to its present ex-
tent. Following hard upon an ere of short
cotton supply, high prices and disastrous
bull manipulation, comes a season of boun-
tiful raw material, if reports be correct,
a great drop in price and the moat per-
sistent bear campaign ever known. Many
mills are heavily stocked with cotton that
coat from ten cents down. English anad
Continental mills, particularly, were heavy
buyers at the top of the season' market
so far. Many mills in the South con-
tracted for a season's supply, if reports
are to be believed. Others lived from hand
to mouth, waiting for the turn of the
tide. Excessive speculation has made cot-
ton manufacturing a hazardous occupa-
tion to an extent.
The cotton planter and the majority
of cotton spinners were perfectly willing
to do business together on a nine to ten
cent basis. The speculator, who neither
toils nor spins, was dissatisfed with a
steady market, and he now has his inn-ngs.
Every factor in the trade, sooner or later,
has his opportunity, his heyday of money-
making. When the speculator flourishes
the legitimate trade is in hard lines.
It is a long established and well under-
stood economic law that trade moves in
cycles, and there is nothing in its nature
which renders the cotton industry exempt.
High raw material, prosperous producers,
manufacturing on a narrow margin; low
cotton, poverty stricken farmers, tempo-
rary depression, prosperous manufacturers.
many new mills. Thus it goes In the
cotton trade. No one factor has things his
own way all the tie.


I IieoiUUieiSSIeOioiioifc.ii.iil.iilii..i.I......
McMILLAN BROS.,

Slorida Copper Works.
I Maamfaturers of

STurpentine Stills
a ni enral Mea t Walrkers.
- Old still takes in eeh age f or
new ones. Patehing through the eonw -
try a specialty. Ordle by mail or
Sor wire will receive prompt attentirm,
o at either of the lowwoelg works:
rAYETTEVILE, C. S AVANMIA. OA.
*MOML, ALA. C ULX. fJL
ii t t I aIa ubail mIIslls ma l 89 mgi so1 I sn I BIomI



East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steaer Shipments a peclaty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


C. BARNES, Pros J. S"W, ie-Pra RA. U lJESUP, Soa.-Troa

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.
Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Stretly a Preducers Cempay. GSae
Grades mi WeiLts Girauteed.
Deliveries at JaI~ S-ovi Pensacela. enladla am Sava-mal
Cerrespede Sl~tKe JACKSO. JACIO E FLA.


FOR SALE.
SO000 asres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut ona hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill. 8 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years or ean
be purehaed. One of the best opportunities in tke Stat.

C. BUCKMAN, O"r.klle. 'r .

W. BUNT. President J. a. "BARI. 9 V. PIee L nL. Kcmurmi. Se. & Tres.
P. L Psa&co. is V. P W. J. K.sLT., 3 V. P. D. W Wam m eeo'r-Treee.

Peacock-Hunt & Wet Company,

General Offices: Z o B Street, S. Ga.
West BNudIng. Jm aOivlaf, fia.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are stritly Factao Our Interees and the producer' is mutual We
never take to count, nor are we inseresd in any company that bys spirit
Turpentine aad roai.)

WHOLESALE GROCERS,

Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stres ardware Our Specialty
-SOLE AGENTS FOR--
The Cebrated Unon Turpentine Axes and Wmilsn & Gbidb'


Naval Stres Received at Savannah. Ga.. and JaSksnvUle
and Fersmmdina, Fi.











o10 T R WELKT iwumai WWa0"- -


Review of Naval Stores for a Week. sAu NVA SR S RECORD O
"~ ~~JC iqBlUYBZiM.


Spirit fr the Week at Svanah.
Price cepts Sale= Exp. 1904


kun., .Jan. zi i0 60 28 1
Tues., Jan. 24 I~ 14 O 162
Wed., Jan. 25 230 0
Thur., Jan. 26 1186 2 20


Red* fr the Week at Savannah.
Monday, Jma. 23 Last Year.
WW .......... 6.I6 450
WG .......... .... 6.0 4.10
N .... .......... 4.7 3,6
M ............ 4.50 3J.90
S.... .. .. .. .. 4.06 3O.
I ............ .. 3.0 3.30
H .............. 3.15 316
0 ...... .... .. .. 2.90 2.90
F .... .. .... .... .75 2.86
E ..2......... 2.70 2.86
D ....... .. .. .. 2% 2.75
ABC ............ 2.55 2.75
Receipts, 22,2 sales 2718, exports 207.

Tuesday, Jan. 24--Rosin firm; receipts
2,i j 1,n 44; astpmaent ~at. Quote:
A AS U, W.a6o; U, *1.u; a., .i-i2l-Z; *,
k, *to ; A, *6.0; t., 4.46; WU, 06.00;
WW, l.i16.

Wednesday, Jan. 2-Rosin firm; re-
eeipta, Ibou,; aies, notung; shpmeans,
ou. quote: A, s t, i.b; D, ar.ti; k,
8.75; r. .80; S2X6, 11, 43X.U; 1, l50a ;
k, **UAO; iu, 3460; b, C4.io; wanduw giakc,
6; water white, C16.

Thursday, Jan. 6.-Rosin firm; re-
ee:pts lb,; saIes, 1,i84; shipments 6,037.
Quote: A. BU,A V0,.t; 1>, ).uo; N., $A.b,
Y1 6; OM U 3. 6; 11, 1-0g;i 4 63.; 1i.,
4.o; ,t. .40; N, L4.iS; window gWls,
56; water white, 6.15.

Sava-nh Naval Store Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 ........... 0,44a 44,Au
h satpta Jaa. 26 ........ .11 1,be
heeipts previously ......1,S40 6s2,a0
Total ................176,151 608,19
Exports Jan. 2 ........ 260 960
Export previously ......152,819 534,0t01
Total ...............153,079 535,611
Stock Jan. 2 ............. 23,072 72,8
Stock previously ........ 10,338 92,17

Toer, Hart & C.'s Review.
Spirits Turpentine-During past week
eon-iderable business wax done trom 65 1-?
to 561-2 cents. Just as consumers were
begIning to get interested, Savannah
broke 2 cents a galon, which had the
efeet of frightening them away again.
Stock a133 barred. We quoLte machines,
5 to 551-2 eenta.
Rosi--We do not hear of much busi-
nes past week. All g-ades are dull and
quotations to a certain extent nominal.
We quote BC, kJO; D, $.9 to $3.00; E,
xJ.0; F, $3.16; G, $3.0; H, $335; I,
3.80; K, $4.40; M, 4.90; N, $5.15; WG,
$50 to 6.35; WW, $.50 to $.65.
TOLAR, HART a CO.

Among the Opraton.
Dr. C. Herty was in the city for seve-
ral days this week.

Mr. 0. A. McLeod, a prominent naval
stores manufacturer of Quincy, Fla., was
here to-day.

Mr. C. A. Langford, of Blountatown, Fla.
was in Jacksonville yesterday.

Mr. W. W. Brown, of Orange Park,
Fla., was registered at the Aragon Hotel
this week.


Mr. R. L. Farrell, a popular turpentine
operator in thi State, spent several days
m the city this week


ZINC NAIL


Turpentine Cup
Approved by Dr. Hearty. Made
stroms but soft light metal. The
the sW --mk which will not i
saws when left in the tree.

Sl., NAmll C


SW ImAW *& pMWtrAtesOkA
Alao Iadqute- for Oalvaniae
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, pikes.
Iron Rods. Eta, UatiOg and a
Nails, Slaters Too, Coppe Nal
T-a.


S



of a
ly are
injury


P0.
gI .

dand
tound



or 01


W. S. Edwards, one of the largest manu-
facturers of naval stores nl the Green
Cove Spings section, was in Jacksonville
last Wednesday.

Mr. J. S. Smith, of Waller, Fla., was in
the city this week attending to business.

Mr. Wileozson, of the Walkill Turpen-
tine Co., of Walkill, Fa., was in the city
yesterday.

Mr. H. Pritehett, a prominent naval
stores operator and banker of MeRae, Ga.,
is in the city to-day.

Mr. A O. Frink, of Manville, Fla, was
here yesterday.

Mr. R. Mattox, of West Tocoi, Fla.,
was in the city several days this week.

Mr. P. L. Sutherland will return to the
city next Monday from a business trip to
points in Georgia.

Mr. S. A. Walker, a leading operator of
Tarver, Ga., was here to-day.

Mr. W. 8. Allen was in the city to-day.

Aamecatie Meetigs.
February 7 and &-Michigan Lumber
Dealers' Association; either Detroit or
Grand Rapida.
February 14-New Jersey Lumbermen's
Protective Association, Newark; James M.
Reilly, secretary. Newark, N. J.
February secondd week)-Lumber Deal-
ers' Association of Connecticut (place un-
decided); Louis A. Mansfield, secretary,
New Haven, Conn.
February (third week)-Maasachusetts
Retail Lumber Dalers' Association (place
undecided); Marus L. Foster, secretary,
Worcester, Mass.
March l-Retail Lumbermen's Associa-
tion of Philadelphia; Charles P. Maule,
secretary.
March 1 and 2-National Wholesale
Lumber Dealers Association, Philadelphia,
Pa.; E. F. Perry, secretary, 66 Broadway,
New York City. >
March 2-North Carolina Pine Associa-
tion, Norfolk, Va.; John R. Walker, sec-
retary, Norfolk, Va.
April (date i.mnnoun.ed) Lumber-
men's Association of Texas; Carl F. Drake,
secretary, Austin, Tex.
Retail Lumber Dealers' Association of
Mississippi and Louisiana, W. G. Harlow,
secretary, Vicksburg, Miss., first Tuesday
in April.
May 18-National Hardwood Lumber
Asoe:ation, Buffalo, N. Y.; A. R. Vin-
nedge, secretary, 134 Monroe Street, Chi-
cago, 1ll.


COMFAR.A21v5 iRM OF WUJnXS UA 8VANAR 103 FIVM TRA


April 1 ....................
April .8..................
April ISU ...................
April U ..................
April ...................
May ....................
May 13 ....................
May 20 ....................
May 27 ...................
June 3 ....................
June 10 ..................
June 17 ..................
June 4 ..................
July 1 ..................
July 8 ...................
July 1 ....................
July 2 ....................
July 28 ....................
Aug. 4 ...................
Au. 11 ...................
Aug. 1 ...................
Aug. 3 ..................
upt. I ...................
pt ...................
pt. 1 ...................
Sept 23 ....................
Set. ....................
Nct. 7 ....................
Nct. 14 ...................
Nct. 21 ...................
Oct. i ...................
Nov. 4........ ........
Nov. 11 ...................
Nov. 1 .................
Nov. 25 .................
Dee. 2 ....................
Dee. 0 ....................
Dee. 1 .................
eeL. U ............. .
Dee. 30.................
Jan. .........-.....
12 ADXAYl v u1


18.4-"
ND



52%
a4%
a4%
U
a5%
55











54%
so
so
548
~54

3r6%
36%

53
36C
53%
52%(
55%
36
53%
54
54%
36%A
36%
36



I1%W
U~l


NI)

47
4116
47%
47%
45
45%
47%
47%
*
47%
43


40%

47"





U-
7%
Un
f54
54
36%-
57
66j
57Z


45

43
46
45
46%
45%

47%
S8
44%

43%
44%


44




61%
0%



44



sGe
50
- : v
4.
36L
50
.3C
56%b



u-3


IM-0

nl
U

32%
39


rU



31%




atL
K5%
34~







35%
34%
U%






a*-
35

34A
P6 P
34
34C


sit

43%
47%
40%
40
43.
43%
43t
0*
44%2
4 _


48

U%
n
5%
26
p
U7
37%



41
40
n
a


37j4
5-j


Rckipts 100-04 1908-08 [ 101o-f4
Spirit cab........................... 198,647 M 496 814,846
Roain. bMbs........................ ...... 60,908 040, 0m,071,440
Totl .................................. 844,g s1,2 3 1,886,s78
Ripmt
Spirit cbask............................ 188.308 296,430 14,876
s................................... 752,270 975.428 62,8T

cSi ...... ............... .... 98.884 206,100 217,449
Rosm bas ........ ..................... W88,171 504,178 666,404
New Yek
SpVrNacab .............................. 85,68 42,766 68,9
bRo.sb ............................. 87,863 188,121 129000
Suindris
Spirh, c .. ........................ 50.361 87,556 48,6
Rein bus. ............................ 86.74a 887.784 38M8.
Thae m.ip a.f apso&l I tk ma as I9O b*y. caa. b 4 a a, am .e ia.b

Cap od Spiries md Rioi for Tbmh Yen.
0" I4L Oep 1.0 C np =40
11pirits. Itmsi. Spirit. Reeh Spir" ibob
Wmhnlties.. .. .. ....II1 amg 14M 11 1WO i nU M46
arlestem.. ........ .M JIJM S3, 1iS1
Sava-meb.. .. .. .. ..176l,413 63M W4W *045O 2134,4 IRIAge
lrmishk.. ........ L63 134, o47 lA,1M 19 265
MeMie.. .. .. .. ...... 1W 13.3 3,m3A S1AN uJ l
New Orems.......... agn7 11.1a a Ua,1e m*GA sM,3
CCarrakbeI.. .. .. ......-m elMil S3N 3.143 f177 4Mg
erea.. .. .. ... 7,1 46,14 3"3 4^W w A4M 1 M01
pm l.. .. .... ... 6SM 3 133mi UWA n. 7,= WJ IMum
Jan. & Iai.an... .... IRPt d MIA, 91,N 74 t61 1A3 3a3a
Tamp .... .. ........aal a 1do= I36 4,al UaM aWN

Total...... ......5,1U &W 633 .36 571,I631 fiw U W Lal


Imu ed Tuppetin to U. K.
The fllwifg t"aL is Osampl by James Watt Sem, el lMaie., f the
ofitia r ures. Fer eavemism s of epariassa we have treated iwa i. taml
-3O aw. e ual ml barnila.
W Im I=N 16l 11 1no 13
From U. a., abl. .... 1U5A ,173 14,ar5 114"a nai U14A &4at&t
From Fras, bbs.... 11 21 "17 SAN a #4A
From other euatris.. 1,W4 5w a U 53 M5

166M 174,W 140.m9 1.77w 18,31 N 7A 14M M
From RiUNd ........... 315 4Us 48JM 6U A1 2 11 10
Total aral .. 157,13 t173, 15,6l 13AgW Salim lM3 100 1B0
Thus the imprtf 1 asia T rpenMpe (or Weod al itr) i 190 was dpu
that of 10m, aad over six times as muec as in 1M7. ts is iateretag to am how
this import auetust with the pri e. Ameries Turpomtias.
Pereatage o Impser of lsin ..1.7.9 .3 83 47 3.41 18 M
Av. Prius Am. Top. is La" ..114 9 3, 34 *.1 3-.1 404









Tft 3 V*9XCT LRUMiz REO0b. 11


The adMidte of the rie-planting in
dumtry in the South at the present time is
not satisfactory, the selling price of rico
being at or below the cost of production
Production has largely increased dur-
ing the last few years, while the consump
tion has not correspondingly increased
One of the most potent reasons for the
lack of increase seems to be that the
knowledge of how to cook rice for use as
a staple article of food exists only in the
south, whie in all other parts of thi,
vast country the only known use for ric
is In puddings or some other sweet dish
requiring only a limited supply. It b
true that the rice-growers have made a
live and earnest effort to show all parts
of this country how to properly cook rice
by means of their rice kithens at the
recent exhi'btions at Buffalo, Charleston
and St. Lous. All that these rice kitchen,
have aseomplished, however, is to demon-
trate that rice when properly cooked is
a mt palatable and nutritious staple ar-
tiu of food. Few, if any, of those who
enjoyed their lunch or dinner of rice at
the rice kitchens (even if they were shown
how it was cooked) were able, after they
returned home, to reproduce at their own
table what they had enjoyed so much at
the rie kitchen, and after one or two
unumees ful attempts abandoned the ef-
fort, and now only use rice in puddings
and other awet dishes as they formerly
did. It would therefore seem that if the
use of rice is ever to become general in
this country as a staple article of food
it must be put into the hands of the
consumer in a satisfactorily-cooked shape.
The necessity in millions of homes
throughout this country that one of the
family do the cooking, due to the ex-
pense and difficulties of keeping a ser-
vast, has enormously increased the use
of cooked and canned foods of all kinds.
such as partly cooked cereals, soups, poul-
try, game, meats, Ash, baked beans, vege-
tables, plum pudding and many others.
making the modern housekeeper entirely
independent of a trained cook.
Figures of the yearly consumption of
all of these looked and canned foods are
not available, but the following, which
seem to be authentic, will give some idea
of their general use:
Salmon ................ 206,400,000 tins.
Sweet cor ............ 260.000,000 tins
Tomatoes .............. 250,000,000 tins.
Pes. .................. 72,000,000 tins.
Soups .................. 30,0,000 tins
The enormous ierease in the use of
banned Boton baked Beans is shown by
the fact that they are sold all over the
Southland to-day wherever canned goods
are on sale. Some years ago it was not
peasible to get Boston bade beans prop-
erly cooked outside of the New England
States. The conditions were exactly sim-
ilar to those now existing as to a want
of knowledge of how to cook rice, when
some enterprising cannig people con-
eelved the idea of putting Boston baked,
beaus Oa the market in tin cans and
properly prepared and cooked, which
would enable everyone in all parts of our
entry to enjoy a dish of Boston baked
beans in their own home. The extent to
whieh the public has ava:led itself of this
opportunity is demonstrated by the gen-
eral u of Boston baked beans in hotels,
ie=dmt ats, railroad dining ears and mil-
lh o wer W. e eem o rite


extend the cosumptina of Bostaf baked
eans to all section of this country idi-
cates that a similar effort on behalf of
rice may prove equally successful.
There are many most palatable forms
of preparing and cooking rice known to
the Southern people, such as rice and
chicken, rice and ham, rice and currie,
)ilau rice, rice and peas and many others
which the people from other parts of our
country enjoy very much when via'ting
,he South, and which they would be de-
lighted to have at their homes if it was
made possible for them to do so by put-
'ing it up in tina. It would alo in this
ihape provide a most satisfactory United
States army ration.
Of course, great care must be used in
seeing that a first-clas article only is
,ut on the market. By Arat-clas it is
not intended to convey the idea that only
the very nest grades of whole rice should
'e used, but that the cooking, seasoning
and preparation should be such a to pro-
luce a palatable and inviting article of
food, which when once introduced would
ell on its merits.
There would be no difficulty in seur-
ing skilled labor for the proper cooking
and preparing of rice in all its known
forms, as almost everyone in the South
posasees the neessary knowledge to do
it properly; but the question of putting
:t in cans and having it retains its qual-
ity, flavor, etc., when it reaches the table,
's one that will no doubt require careful
investigation and experiment by able can-
ning experts, and may require much time
ind expense to obtain satifaetory re-
ults.
The very excellent organization of the
rice interests that have so successfully ex-
oloited the rice kitchens at the several
recent exhibitions may possibly take up
thi, matter and work it out to a success-
ful conclusion.-George B. Edwards in
Manufacturers' Record.

Sugarcae Growers Elect Ocers.
Montgomery, Ala., Jan. 26.-The annual
-onvention of the Interstate Sugareane
Growers' Association adjourned to-night
after the adoption of resolutions and the
election of officers.
Invitations for holding the next annual
convention were received from Pensacola,
Fla., Wayerom, Ga., Mobile, Ala., and Tal
lahassee, Fla. The place and timh for
the convention will be decided by the ex-
ecutive committee. The following offi-
'era were re-elected.
D. G. Purse, Savannah, Ga, president;
H. L Ross, Tallahassee, Fla., vice-presi-
lent; T. W. Martin, Savannah, Ga., secre-
tary.
Resolutions were adopted recommending
to the Secretary of Agriculture the adop-
tion of a standard of consistency and col-
or of sirup for the trade; petitioning Con-
reess not to reduce the tariff on molasses,
sirup or sugar; memorializing the Senate
to pass the Hepburn pure-food bill, now
pending; petitioning the Legislature of the
States represented in the convention to
adopt pure food measures.
The principal address of the day was de-
livered by Dr. H. W. Wiley, chief of the
bureau of chemistry of the United States
Department of Agriculture.


THE NATIONAL BANK-OF JACKSONVILLE
dAOWKOVILLK, PLA.
CAPFrAL S30 OO -SURPLUS aol UL0VIDM G OTS S30I0000
We lise Time Certifale of Depoit. which draw IstMart at te rate three pr cpasr
a.si, f held niaseday ora loser. Take adrv a ta mam is e ret year -**aJu
smetafng Mr yee. PasUmir sUtio paem to OutAof-Tow aecoun si. aedin d by



"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST oN EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINOAN & CO., Ltd., H. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Herbert A. Ford, Oeo . Ford, F. L. Watme,
President. Vice-Prre Cahier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITAL, *60.000.00.
DIRcrosn: R. L. Anderon, R.8. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
MeKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentie Operators and Saw Mll Men Solicitd.

1l11 Cill B 18 I11lm ilI irII i 0111 ll e11 il*3 1*5i


The Wire Virgin Gum Co.,
Is now ready to give you all the information you may want eonaernig tbo
way we are now gathering virgin gum from high boxes. By the use of a
tin lip put up ose to the chipping and so arranged to cause the gum to
strike wire and follow ame down to the box, not striking the face of the
tree. Wire is fastened o by two small nails, one just above the lip and
the other at upper edge of the oldbo, and stretched tight so as to kep
gum from dripping of, thereby making virgin gum and more of it. There
are many benefit and big pay where parties can get a good many high boxes.
For further Information write to
THE WIRE VIRGIN GUM CO.. TIFTON. GA.


The West.Raley-Rannle Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, Fl.
A. N. ear, res. X e.t, nrice-Fres. Ir. r aeis, rim-r. m. r. .assuky S rres.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

ge**-ggggg*g gam,********ggg** ***** gg **,^******* ag


M. A. BRIGGS. PreLdeat.
H. C. BRIGOS, I"s Vica-Pnrvdjet.


HOMr BROWN. ad VioePrluddem
J. C. MeDONALJ,1 See8y ad Tres.


W, H, Briggs Hardware Co,

, VALDOSTA. GA.


Sole Southern Agent for-,.

RIXFORD AXES.


roej
plicate.
temper.
than an


This
THOSE. G. HUTCHINSON j Sel
FKLW AUMCA ANI0AT118 OF I
PUBLIC 'ACCOUNTANTS we
Rossi 7. slei of Truks WI&g
Phase ZUS jA (soiLLwwEI nA -------- ------U s
'~liZG~br~~iu'~~f ~ ~la


y are Mte BEST. Others imitate but nono do-
They are made of the best steel, have the flutet
hold the keenest edge, cut better and last longer a
y other axe.
a has all been proved by years of actual use.
Id as your orders.

H. BR166S HARDWARE COMPANY,
SValdsta Gserf.
011111011 ---- -------------o


W W W W W W V . V W W V W V V V V V V W V


Ww -












THE wTHU W ly uuYJ2 AL RJU*CORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECOR.D.
JAM S A. *OILOMON.
1ems sa ManaMer.
Plbihild Every Frid-,.
(ii.. -mn u.83 40 PerB ABnnam
seamm m Fson rign).... ao ".
TK* Pm* aned Its Pro csa.-

T lIdrsatMlrdl lRcord Company.
Jnvckaouifla, F-.
aU se EdB*caal and *uens es OrB0ee at
riara. G. a savaantha, Ga.
Nteed atthe Poatole at Jakaoilla,
Sl, as em e i-da matter.

Adopted by the Executive Oo.mitta of
t ur ti penti rate As ociatiu.
September 12. I8. aa its exeluive official
rn.i Aopted in aaunal convetio
September i, th aln abI of the
geeral Association.
Adopted April 27th, 19, as th official
wn of the Interstate Cam Grower' Asa-
Meilato. AdIopted Sep. 11, I8 as the
Mly lerial organ of the T. 0. A.
Comma dd to lumber people by special
esolutie adopted by thbe Geo Sawmill


COPY POR ADVERTISI .
Advertiing esp (changes or aw ad-
vertmentas) shea reach as Taesday
masb to lasa ia.rtio in. the br


THE RECORD'S OFFICES
The publishing ipant and th main of-
ees of te laldutrial Ra Publishin
CA. ae located at N.a 1 Seath Hogan
Street, Jadasevill, Fla., in the very hMrt
of the great turpatime and yfllw pin
imNdtriws Dianc a oc, Savannah, Ga,
SAtlanta, Ga.

NOTICE TO PATRONS.
An payments fr advertising in the In-
dtstrial Reaed a sabecriptons thereto
mat be made direct to the home office
in Jackenville. Agents are not allowed
to maik collectium under any circum-
tat a Bils for advertising and sub-
aeriptis are at out from the home
aues, wh ame, ad ad ll emittances must
be made direct to thi company.
Industrial Rcrd Publishing Co.


THE CROP REPORT OF z90.
Having just received this report, we
find some items that seem likely to be of
general interest.
Thus the acreage of corn is given at
nearly 981-4 million acres, the yield al-
most 21-2 billion dollars, worth on the
farm, 1 billion 87 1-2 million dollars. This
gives a yield for the whole country of
lea than 261-2 bushels per acre, with a
cash value of less than $12.00.
Potatoes, a little over 3 million acres.
with a total yield of a little less than
333 million bushels, worth on the farm a
little less than 151 million dollars.
The moat striking item of all is the
hay. A fration less than 40 million acres
yielded only about 001-2 million tons of
hay, worth on the farm less than 530
million dollar. An average of very little
more than a ton and a half per acre.
worth a fraction les than 8-dollars and
72 cents per ton.


Mr. D. H. McMillan, of the Consolidated
Naval Stores Co., left last Monday for
Cuba, accompanied by his two little boys.
Mr. McMillan expects to make quite an
extended trip through the island and will
ra n abo0 t the tenth or at month.


COTTON SCHEmES AND SCTWMr .
From Meridian, Mississippi, emanates
the Witherspoon plan for controlling the
price of cotton inauch way as to secure
for the farmer profitable production and
for the spinner ample cotton and steady
price. On paper the plan is an excellent
one, and is the most Utopian product
of recent cotton d'sussion.
Briefly, the plan provides an organi-
zation with a capital of $11000,000 in
shares of $100 each, which may be paid
in cotton at $50 the bale. Cotton is to
be bought when below ten cents in open
market-at ten cents to the farmer from
the organization. No cotton shall be sold
for less than eleven cents nor shall the
organization hold for a hIgher price than
that. In other words, the organization
shall do business upon a margin of one
cent the pound to the full extent of its
capitaL This is the gist of the plan
which comes from Meridian.
Organization after organization ha
sprung up among cotton planters these
many years. Farmers' alliances, farmers'
unions, secret orders and what not have
been in the limelight for a time, but not
one of them gained wide vogue or great
strength commercially. Cotton planters
may be organized for political purposes,
but a business organization has never yet
succeeded among them. The average cot-
ton planter is no business man, else he
had long ago quit so precarious a method
of securing a livelihood.
While organizing to control the crop
why not carry the idea a bit further and
prepare to manufacture it here? Let the
Witherspoon planned include the mills
in this section in their scheme and supply
these mills with cotton at three cents the
pound less than is charged other milk
not so fortunately situated. Stipulate
that the profits thus made are to be put
"nto new spindles and looms until the
production of cotton goods co'ncide. This
task is but little more difficult than the
one now confronting the Meridian opti-
'nists.
The trouble with the Witherspoon plan
is that it is too good. On a rising mar-
ket, every stockholder would be wiring to
headquarters to amend that eleva cent.
selling proviso.


Orange Trees Are Little Damaged.
As cheerful Information to offset the
reports of damage to vegetables because
of the cold wave, came the reports last
night from all of the orange-producing
Actions of the State that the trees were
-lot materially damaged.
In fact, the conditions were such that
the trees in the Florida orange belt couli
have withstood a greater cold than the
-ne of yesterday morning. While the
thermometer went down to 20 degrees in
iome of the orange groves in the central'
-art of the peninsula, it did not damage
the trees to any great extent. Fruit
however, was badly damaged, but there
vas little on the trees.
In the Manatee section, Orange County
and the Indian river section, there was
-onsiderable fruit remaining on the trees
It this late season of the year, and it is
feared that much of it is lost. During the
nast week the shipments of fruit from the
Indian river section and from Orange
-ounty and Manatee have been heavy, and
it is believed that the amount of fruit
lost will not be as heavy as some are
inclinedd to believe.
That the cold damaged vegetation to a
considerable extent is evident from the


reports of the extent of tie old. All
parts of the Stat have been affected, but
in moat sections the farmers ar in a po-
sition to recover to a great extent, and to
get to market ahead of those further
north. Hot bedo were not damaged to
any great extent, and there will be a
great many tomato plants set out as
soon as the weather moderates.
A great many false, reports were circu-
lated yesterday in reference to the extend
of the cold, and some alarming and dam-
aging statements were sent out, and even
published in Jacksonville. One of the
statements published in Jacksonville, and
with page headlines, was to the effect that
the weather of yesterday morning was the
coldest Florida had experienced in nine
teen years, while as a matter of fact the
thermometer did not go as low by 10 de-
grees in Jacksonville, as it did in 1809.
only six years ago, and not nearly as
low as it went when the orange trees
were killed during the winter of 1804-5
Reports from all parts of the State are
to the effect that there has been consider-
able damage, but the damage is only to
tender plants, and will not affect the
citrus fruit trees to any great extent.
Reports indicate that there has been
but little damage to the lettuce crop in
any of the lettuce producing sections. In
the Gainesville section their has been'some
damagee to lettuce and other crops, but
there the farmer are better provided with
protection for winter crop& tha n iany
other part of the State, and are in a posi-
tion to save the bulk of their crop. In
fact, the Gaineville seet'on has suffered
less than any other part of the State, and
will ship heavily of lettuce from this
time on.

River and Harbor Bml is Framed.
Washington, Jan. 26.-The House com-
mittee on rivers and harbors to-day
"-reed on a b'll providing for river and
harbor work. The bill carries an aggregate
-tpropriation of 17..001.875, and author-
ises expenditures for continuing contract.
etgregating $1.6734.657. From the total
-f cash annromrfated. is to be deducted
*be sum of $,186M942. the unexpended bal
since of the appropriation carried in the
-mergency act of last year. Only a few
new projects are provided for. The follow-
ing shows the sums appropriated for pla e
named where the item amounts to f25.00
or more. also the expenditures authorized
"or continuing contracts. where made:
Virsinia-Norfolk harbor and its ap-
nroaches. 40.000: Cne Charles City har-
'or. $25.000; Yo-k River, Oreoquan and
carter creeks, Mattanoni and Pamunker
-iver R.000;: RBawnhannock river, $40,-
Wn: .James river, 8150000.
North Carol'a-Beaufort harbor. 347.-
q00; Nenue and Trent rivers. g30.000:
'ane Pear river at and below Wihninston
41I.0o0, and for continuing contracts.
4300.000.
Routh Carolina-Charleston harbor, $52.-
q00; Santee, Wateree and Congaree rivers
.nd Esthe-ville-Minim creek canal. also
Ilversion of unexpende4 balance of a5,-
000 for lock and dam, 415.000.
Georria-Savannah harbor. 375.000. and
for continuing contreats, *210.00; Com-
-rrland Sound. Georsia and Flor'da. 00-
100: inside water route between Savannah
qnd Fernandina, Fla., $41.000; Chaftahno-
-hee river, below Columbus, Ga., *7501-0.
Florida-Key West harbor, $10.000:
Hillsboro Bay, $100-00, and for eontin-
ning eontraets, $34J630; Pensaeala ha-.
bor, 100,000: St. Johns River, 4100 00.
and for continuing contracts, 300,780;


st. Johs River at Orane Mia. yHit
25,000; Crystal, Andote, BSuwanas ad
Withlaeooneh rivers, $0000; removing
water hyae' th from Florida waters, 5,-
000; Apolemi-ol. bay, $30M,
Alabama-Mobile harbor, 00000; Mo-
bile bar, $0,000; Alabama river, $100000;
Black Warrior, Warrior and Tombigbee
river, $10000, and for continuing con-
tracts, $781,48.
Mississippi-Horn Island pass (eoadi-
tioal), 40,480; Paseaguola river, $I0,-
000; Yazoo, Tallahatehe, Cold Water and
Big Sunflower rivers, and Tehuls lake,
$105,000.
Louisians-Calesse river, $,000; Bay.
ou Plaquemine, Grand River and Pigoa
bayou, 5,000, and for continuing con-
tracts, $100,000; removing water hyacinth
from Louisiana and Texas, 40,000; Red
River, Louis-'a, Arkansas, Texas aad In-
dian Territory (of which $100000 is above
Fulton), 0,000.
Tennessee Cumberland river above
Nashville, including construction of loek
and dam No. 21, $84000, and for continn-
ing contracts, 6 ;00,00 Tennemee river
above Chattanooga, $50,000; Tenaaae
River, Chattanooga to Rivertm, 215,000
and for continuing contracts, 200,00;
Tennessee River, lock at Seotts Point, $1,-
000, and for continuing contracts, $40,-
000; Tennessee River, below Riverton, 30,-
000.

Partial Rapert of Cette Ginm L
Washington, Jan. 96.-In compliance
with the request of the Cotton Growers
convention now in session at New Orleans
the ensus bureau to-day issued the fol-
'owing preliminary report on cotton gin-
ning:
Two hundred and fifteen counties out
of 812 showing cotton gnned to January
16, report 3.004,476 running bales this
vear, against 2,49,178 in same counties
st the same date last year.
Counting round as half bales, the num-
'er is 3,084,551 this year, against 1,M,-
217 last year. The counties returned
have reported 201,520 bales ginned to Jan-
*lary 161, 0, in excess of the quantity
returnedd as ginned by them to December
13, 1904.
The State distribution is as follows:
Alabama, 25 counties, 52.316 bales; Ar-
kansas, 15 counties, 146,806 bales; Florida,
9 counties, 33,510 bales; Georgia, 45 eou-
ties, 574,918 bales; Indian Territory, 2
counties 29.056 bales; Louisiana, 13 coun-
,'es, 233.15bales; Mississippi, 14 counties,
A14.856 bales; North Carolina, 27 counties,
47.903 bales; Oklahoma, 2 counties, 16.-
184 bales; South Carolina, 19 counties,
65,825 bales; Tennessee, 14 counties, 111,-
167 bales; Texas, 24 coutles, 387,135
whales; Missouri and Virgin, 8 eountiea,
46,100 bales. In these counties, 214 gin-
ners have refused reports, and the quantity
nrevioualy returned by them has been
brought forward for the's report witMhrt
any addition.
Loren I. Gre & Co.
Lorn H. Green & Co, Fire Ae'dent
and Plate Glass Insurance Agents, located
rooms 9 snd 10 Park Building, celebrated
'their tenth anniversary on January rsat
if this year. They are leaders in their
line and represent some of the largest
companies in the world, namely: Preferred
Aeeident Insurance Co., New York Plate
Glass Insurance Co., German Alliace In-
surance Co, Globe & Rutgers Fire Iasu-
ranee Co., Atlas Assurance Co, Norwich
Union Fire Inuranee Co., Milwaukee Me-
chanles Insurane Co., ad Amerlesa -_
trial napruaee o ... .


IPATROKUR 33003 ADvxwLm& I= S w4&R DrALIUM








TER___ WI KLY IND TRIAL RM CD.




Ti CHRISTIE GROOVER onw .,

WHOLESALE DRUOOISTS.


. 08-wr P iiAT NEAm SAV TMMM A11mAY.


_L-&LY mmWY


Met Peculiar Railway in the World-
That to Key Weat
One of the most peculiar roadbeds in the
world is about to be built in Florida. The
Florida East Coast Railway Company is
about to build an extension of its line
from its southern terminus, Miami to
Key West, one hundred and thirty-six
miles. This extension will be both unique
in its conception and novel in its proposed
construction. The Flctida East Coast
Railroad, as is well known, is the personal
property of Henry M. Flagler, and is lo-
cated on the eastern rim of the State of
Florida, where it is for the greater part
of its length in sight of the waters of the
Atlantic Ocean.
Mr. Flagler has for some time been anx-
ious to reach a nearer point to Havana
with his railroad, and to this end had a
survey made from Miami across the un-
explored portions of Florida to Cape Sa
ble. After this survey was made he de
cided that this line was not feasible, andi
he, therefore, made a survey along the
coast and the keys to Key West.
Mr. Flagler now proposes to build an
extension south from Miami across to
Key Largo, on the neck of land separat-
ing Baines Sound from Blackwater Sound.
and running thence along Key Largo
Long Key, Upper and Lower Mattecumbe
and other keys to Key West.
These Florida keys are coral ridges
most of them containing a lake in the
center and covered with a thin soil ant
luxuriant vegetation. Some are scarcely
above high water mark, and are only a
mangrove thicket Others are inhabited
and cultivated, and some contain wells or
springs of fresh water. Outside these keys
runs the Flor'da reef, another coral reef
that does not reach the surface of the
water. Between them is the Hawk Chan-
nel, which is used by medium sized ves-
sels.
Most of the channels connecting the in-
side passage with Hawk Channel are
small and shallow. As these keys are
exposed to the full fury of the tropical
storms, the work will involve a large
amount of filling on the coral rock foun-
dation.
Approximately thirty-five miles of the
line wll 'be over water and the balance
over keys partly rock and partly sub-
merged.
Most of the keys are destitute of soil.
and the only material available near by
for filling is found in the bars and shoals
of pulverized se shell formed near the
keys. An examination of the coast chart
shows that the building of a road with
grade eight feet above mean low tide would
require 40,000 cubic yards of mater al per
mila
At present there are three parties in the
field locating this line. They are in charge
of J. C. Meredith, engineer of construction,
whose headquarters are at Miami, Fla.
From the terminus at Key West, it is
proposed to run boats to Havana, e'ghty-
five miles. It is proposed to build those
flrry- boats-arge enough to carry freight
trains.-Weat Palm Beah News.


"Is It a Swindle?"
The following is from The Ohio Farmer:
A reader at Salineville, Ohio, sends us
a letter which was sent to him by a
neighbor. This letter states that the wri-
ter is getting $6 a week for writing 10
letter per day to acquaintances and others.
Enclosed with the letter is a printed
circular from an advertising company at
Newark, N. J., in which they offer $6 a
week for writing 10 letters a day. To get
the position, one must order 100 Wine
strawberry plants, the regular price of
phich is $3, but the company very gen-
erously says: "Send us $2.50 and keep
the 50 cents to pay your first week's post-
age bill." Upon the receipt of the order
and the $2.50 the company will send
blanks and then you can go to work writ-
ing letters, to induce others to order $2.50
worth of Wine strawberries and thus se-
cure a position earning $1 a day for writ-
ing 10 letters. It is stipulated in the com-
pany's offer, however, that they must get
not less than six applications per week
from the letters written by each person
employed. That would be $15 a week for
the Newark firm, out of which it pays
$6, leaving $9 profit, if the strawberries
are never sent out, and good enough profit
if they are sent. The sale of the straw-
berry, however, seems to be a secondary
matter. The thing of most importance is
the $2.50 to secunre a position at $6 a
week, and the employment of an army
-f letter writers, each of whom is to in-
luce 6 others each week to send the $2.50.
Our Salineville reader asks, "Is it a swin-
lie?" We leave it to our readers to decide.

The Cotton Movement.
In his review of the first four months
of the year, Col. Henry G. Hester, secre-
tary of the New Orleans Cotton Exchange.
showed that during the first four months
of the present season the amount of cot-
ton brought into sight was 8,011,404 bales,
an increase over the same period last sea-
-on of 1,079.282 bales. The exports were
4,316,864 bales, an increase of 571,206 bales.
and the takings were 1,169,455 bales, an
increase of 120,339 by Northern spinners,
and 913,230 bales, an increase of 80,010
bales, by Southern spinners. S'nce the
1st of January there has been some mod-
ifications in the movement. Up to Jan-
uary 13, the amount brought into sight
during 135 days of the season was 8,456,-
550 bales, an increase of 1,001,358; the
exports were 4.708,596 bales, an increase
of 559,373, and the takings by Northern
spinners 1,274.026 bales, an increase of 39,-
943, and by Southern spinners 1,003,342
bales, an increase of 90,122. These figures
indicate a slackening in the amount
brought into sight, in exports and in the
takings by Northern mills, and it may
be that there is direct connection between
the comparative halting in the movement
into sight and the slackening in exports
and in the movement to Northern mills.

Mr. W. C. Jackson, a leading naval
stores operator of Green Cove Springs.
has been spending a week at Ormond and
Daytona, where he went to witness the
automobile races.


USES OF IlFERIOR WOOD&.

The Bureau of Forestry D remtrates
the Value of Woos ne Generally
Considered frior.
When there was an abundant supply of
the best quality of timber it was the habit
of lumbermen to neglect all but the beat
species. For instance, in Indiana amn
Ohio the white oak trees were cut and
the red oaks were left. In the South only
a few years ago the gum, which is now of
considerable commercial importance, wa
left to rot in the woods. On the Pacifec
coast the western hemlock was not con-
sidered worth transporting from the for-
est to the mill. In consequence the sup-
ply of high class timbers has been se-
riously depleted, and the character of the
forest has been changed by the reproduc-
tion of the inferior species which were left
in possession; while the lumberman has
had to extend his operations over a large
area in order to secure the necessary
amount of timber. If these inferior spe-
cies can be cut and marketed at a profit,
it will be possible in the future to lumber
with far less detriment to the forest, and
at the same time the available supply of
timber will be greatly increased.
The current unfavorable opinions con-
cerning these so-called inferior species are
largely matters of tradition, which inves-
tigation proves was unwarranted. Indeed,
in some cases, lumber such as gum and
sap pine is exported from this country and
held in high esteem abroad. Our engineers
and architects, as a rule, consider sap-
wood weaker and much less fit for strue-
tural use than heartwood. Of course in
the matter of durability of unpreserved
timber under severe conditions of expos-
ire, there is no question but that heart-
wood is very much to be preferred to
-apwood. But for use indoors sapwood
timbers are abundantly strong. Carriage
manufacturers know that the strongest
and most resilient wood for spokes, shafts.
is rapid grown sapling hickory. It has
lately been discovered that fast grown
second growth red oak, so far as strength
's concerned, is fully equal to white oak.
Much work remains to be done to bring
out the facts underlying the practicability
of a more extensive use of inferior tim-
bers, and to disseminate information as to
the relative advantages of first and second
growth timbers and the value of such
woods as western hemlock and loblolly
nine, which are of increasing importance
in the national supply of structural tim-
ber. The timber tests which the Bureau
of Forestry is making are bringing the
facts concerning these matters before the
users of timber.
The introduction of western hemlock to
the market as a building material has
met w-th many obstacles. Tbe hemlock
of the East is far inferior to tie Western
species as a building wood, and the pre-
iudice existing against the Eastern spe-
cies is unjustly extended to that of the
West. The latter is a hard, straight, and
t-ven-grained wood, nearly white in color.
:t does not split readily and is light and
tough. These characteristic peculiarly fit
it for manufacture into boxes. It is also
a superior wood for al inside nisflt a


it takes a high polish and has eeelleat
wearing qualities. It ean be rapidly kil
dried at high temperature without In.
jury. Meehaarlen tast havy ahown it to
possess about 70 per eMt of the strnath
of red fr and to he suited for al except
the heaviest structural dimsnd-s Isr
quantities of this timber wa new old
under other names than its ow.n There i
no just cause for the prejudice whish an-
cessitatea this deception, and Wetern
hemlock should be handled under its right
name.
Another tree which has been dir-
inated against is the loblly pie. This
is a tree of a wide range of distribution
and Bureau tests have shown that, uder
proper conditions of growth, it eam furnish
wood of great structural merit. It, too,
is sold under ftitioa names, whe it
should be sold on it mrits. The prin-
cipal obejetion to it is that it ina a lly
sapwood and decays rapidly when ea
posed. But it is of open grain sad can be
very successfully treated with prmv-
tives, which should entirely eliminate this
ejection. Many of the called inferior
timbers can be more thoroughly and se-
cessfully treated with preservatives tha
can the more solid timbers. Happily, this
is in a marked degree the ease with the
abundant loblolly pine, and this tree is
certain to come into general and appre-
elated use.
Another phase of this work is in can-
nection with the packing box industry.
Very few people appreciate the amount
of lumber that goes into the manufacture
of packing boxes. Formerly the as of
boxes for different purpaes, was based ea
the strength of white pine, which uad
to be the standard material employed.
With the seareity of white pine and its
increased price, gum, cottonwood, lobaUy
pine, and other woods have eme into *e
for boxes. In many cases these wood are
much heavier than white pine, so that
there is an added expense for freight be-
cause of the extra weight of the boxes.
It becomes, then, an Important matter
to ascertain to what extent the thieaness
of boxboards commonly used eas he,e-
dueed without lesn'ng the strength of
the box below the necessary requirent.
The Bureau of Forestry, in co-operation
with the North Caroli Pine Amsee.c
tion, is about to take up this problem, and
by actual experiment with boxes of dif-
ferent sies and of various kids of lmsher
to determine the ett to wt'eh the
prevailing thi lcknese of boards ean .be
diminished.


Big Timber Dsa
Valdosta, Ga., Jan. 9--J. D. Rounds,
who was manager of the Bufalo Yellow
Pine Company, has cosed a trade with
D. F. Aldriteh, of New York, for 11,00
acres of timber near Haylow, nineteen
miles from here. The Buffalo mill was
destroyed by fire several mouths ago sad
has never been rebuilt. The timber leads
which the company owned were very val-
uable. It is undetood that the new pur-
chaser will build a new sawmill and shin-
gle mill i a sart while. Mr. RouN a
left this afternoon for Now .ork, wher
be wMil *aide (a fatuT. -


.- 'UM i 820U 0 M '2 %&AX RELMOM


"







i--- -S THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPrN
Wayeross, Ga.
MANUFAOTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,
Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located in the heart tof the Lumber Distrit gives o b aveam-
tage of eheleet materials at lowest east.

WEST FORSYT ST. BELL PHONE NO. 592 Jph Christie Business A nt
tEDR.ICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY Joseph D Business
A. J. MuEDrCL Magmor. % Formerly of Hedrick a Raley om 33 *l-UlcbwB kMhimL JaskiamI, &.
Telephone 4 &
set agu- T lmiosI se sJloain wropert> oa eay terms. (Te oholoo resdeaoe portion
at t iama aiSproe, pory form er burnt district, Sprlngaeld. LYV La and If you want to locate ia Florida and contemplate going into busine, let w
*llhOi ierty Irestmaent. -help you. If you have a business to sell, list same with me.
NOIEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTORS.
i i.. n


Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

w- -- I o W--ft- i rF Dep-frtm-nt at t-H feio- Rates:
to w. 3oeentsa sie.
oir Wo woae.l 3S oeanta line.
fr thrmee wMe. aaoe a alia.
*frou-r we. .. Ieea.m a ime.
NlM words of ordinary lemth make MM Uie.
-HMla oumtn a two Use.
No41e ezoept lhe keadils can be admitted.
in astam eto aomempay the order. No extra chare for copie of ppr
ad it i CuOt. Cpy must be ia this oace not later thau Th=mdy
r secug to aaine iLtsI Friday's paper.


~1.,t",. wa.ed.
A peatle as stiller, very beet reference
turwma d. Address F. Johnon, Mur-
ply. H.M 4t
YWesdnMu Wamted.
.*-Wodlmu who is strictly sober and
bl oef strolling d keeping labor.
Addr, The CWla -Colwe Co, Prid-
on. ia. ft
Fo Sale.
4- 4 a00 es mwmll timber for sale.
Water or ai trvmporttio ; a bargain.
Addrs BDo 32. Pomona, Fl. 4t
Wrated.
A dlsDer. We want a good, sober
m- with fuMa y, to ru tae till other
oCn grae steady employeut
trouh t wintr. N e od appy but
dntw 1. with ade refer- Ad-
dress F. a&w, 1= M tf


For Sale.
Small turpentine location. Can work
about ten or twelve crop with about
four hundred acres round timber already
secured. Also one thousand acres back
box timber secured. Plenty of round tim-
ber available to till for four or five
years' cutting. Address T. M. Kelly,
Black, Ala. tf
Trrpemtaie Men.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out
It for your tilL No. 1 outfit pumlpa o.
gallm per our at a eat of 3 o-to asl
requires am attention while running
Started in one minute. J. P. Campbel,
Oraln. FIa
Wuated.
To by a first-clau turpentle location
in Florida Will pay the right price for
the right place. No flat woods place ned
ppl A. Petteway, Box s, Laroy,
Marion Co., FIa. tr ,


a-


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES
W re Ay a a caM. We can show yo", at correct sad moaey
arig p'ces. uam papeOrs of loose pure white, perfect
DiAM@S. It Is oe desire to costlse behng the Irlgest
Wiesor' Mdeaers to Jacksesvfile, sad M specialty Is Hie reoud-
c and high gde Waltham and Elig Watches.

CE 1 D nalM L G Watches, Jewelry,


P lnting Send your order to the Industrial
SRecord. Prompt and satisfactory
service g 4eed --- outh Hogan St.; Jacksonville, Fla.
itr rest ass suneorarrA


S. I. POWZEL. GCAS. .. ARAUS. anER ASE IrY
PrMesdent. VYle-PresHt nud rrassar. Secraery.
aliteCroS:
8. 9. FPwell CAM- 6.. arrIa, &a . cMIa. P. &. Sa. wer a. r4. Cr. oraM.

THE


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
CaIe If West Bar ad Madainr Sth
Jackseunvile, forla.


Wholesale Drugs I Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be rad to quote price on
anything i the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty amd can gve you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.


W'efeld a Tw amia.'lN P-r _in -
Ba or l eIutwst to rYte
Throw your eyes for a minute on the following
a locations: 4,000 acres round timber-4 years
lease 16 crops 4th year; 5 crops 3rd year
* boxes; 14 crop 2nd year boxes. $27,400-A
PICKUP. Or, 7,200 acres, of which 3,000 acres
in round timber; 5 crops 1st year boxes; 6%
crops 2nd year boxes; 734 crops 3rd and 4th
Year boxes. $26,000-A SNAP.


I BROBSTON. FENDIG & CO.
S le W. F~r a. .raeemem Fk.



McMURRAY & BAKER,


o0W MilI lulfe ilille Hui IbertyI Stas
Wmeae a h eesdei sayAe
Improbe. whlps. harm asad horse tfranlhla we have a abb mon PFret
and goods in touch with al. Turpetine wages an har ae a speellty. 't
forget we can beat the world a Lhand-made har
Im M a I1, 4 13Ln a.
JACKSONVILLE, -W&A.
*AIi&a r IeN t 3cou.







Tf" U WRULY fr bibiw RUAT COU. is
- - - --.- - -
mosessai';;;ol~oaaa stage I lose (IIIII estate 0 of oM ofsets 1140,681 log sells ------------------------------- ------


..... rOR THE ..


COMMISSARY BUSINESS


The Industrial Record manufactures
more of them than all the printing
and office supply houses in the South
combined. Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose, to


The Industrial Record Company

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


-
.4


V


*3J3'' tUJ't@M M 11111iuuia444 *$mIiI III.S *IP iuamamuuiu-------- ------ euun1pOe4


DX.D T"Z AMD = 2= 9 WI


TRADE CHECKS


:


r rrr-~rr









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


THE

Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville.
NiTED STATS DEPOSITORY.
Capital awfts .............................. 4s5ooooo
.D ****........ ................. ......... IoAn 0o
In addition to eo m ar e banking business, we maintain a Savings Depart-
ment, under government supervision, pay ng interest quarterly.
We have for ren- Safe Deposit Boes in burglar and fireproof vaults at rea-
sonablb ratea by month or year.


C. H. HARGRAVES CO..

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain. Hay. Feed
jSpealo attiatle to Turpetine and Sawmill Men's Requirmesnts
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FU OPIDIANS.
514 516 -518- 520- 522- 524 526 EAST BAY St tIKr LI
Jacksonville, Fla.

I3AM IUTZR-TATE SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
tm la h Cstwih Ples UList fer Meruuatable Rules o904. Adepte at Tiftea
_eergia, Julyis, 1904


Feet Fet [ Fet
B OUI U1 1-S26 -30


keet Feet Feetl Feet) Feet Feet Feet
31-351 3-401 41-41 4-601 61-6 06-401 1-6


I xIl to 3-1l... IPF V L-3 5414M 1&0Il& o8o 05 30tM6032.0t40.00
2%x1 to bKl .... 13.6 12J4 1350 14.00 15.60 17.60 20.00 23.00 28.00 35.00
SxlO to 1ale.... IlA 13.00 14.00 16.50 10.50 18.60 1.00 24.00 8.00 37.00
1 xl to Sat.... 14.A 15.5 1l50 18.00 21.00 24.00 80 .M 38.0 49.00
%zxl to l 1 .... 13.6 13.50 14.0 16.60 1850 21.0' 24.0 2&60 34.00 43.00
13%xI Itl .... 13.5 1400 1500 17.0 19.50 22.00 25.0 30.00 360 46.00
1 14 to 314.... It 1M 0.00 22.00 24.50 27.50 32.01) 37.00 44.00 .00
3%xl4 to 13x14.... 14.5 160 18.00 20.50 22.00 24.00 28.00 3250 40.00 62.00
133x14 to 14x14.... 156& 17.00 21.00 23.00 2.00 30.00 34.0 42.00 65.00
1 1 o 4 1.... 24. O 27.O 31.00 34.00 38.00 4250 6.01 66.00
4%x41 to I3l4.... IS.M 6 0 25.00 25.50 29.00 31.00 35.00 3.50 4800 a6.00
%xl to Ita14.... I.M M. 2.00 26.50 30.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 50.00 2.00
2 xl to 4xI .... 4." 2.M 3R8.M 31.50 35.0 .00 43.00 49.00 0 79.00
%1xli to 14x1 .... S1 O M .0 .00 29.00 33.00 37.0 41.00 45.00 67.00 09.00
14%zl, to Itl1.... 2.48 4M 7.00A, 3000o 34.00 3.00 42.00 4& 00 .00 74.00
Term : Met Cau
Ples ave O. L Cas Savannash, Brunr wick, ernuandina sad Jacksbavills


orTICL
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Asoeiation, held at Jacksonville,
ala., March 15, Ilti, the following Classi-
Ldetion and Rules for Inspection of Yel-
low Pine were officially adopted, effective
July 1, 1904:
Cl tion ad nspection of Yellow
Pine Lumber.
General Rules-All lumber must be
sound, well manufactured, full to size and
saw butted; free from unsound, louse and
hollow knots, worn and knot holes;
through shakes, or round shakes that
show on the surface; square edge, unless
otherwise specified. A through shake ii
hereby defined to be through or connected
from side to side, or edge to dge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken;
less than one inch thick shall be measured
as one inch.

CLASSIFICATION.
Flooring.
Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: 1x3,
4, and 6; lyjx3 4, and 6.
Boards.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
inches and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %, I, 1/ and 1%, inches
thick by 7 inches and up, wide.
Scantingm
Scantling shall embrace all size from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2
2x3, 2x4, 2x5, 2x6, 3x3, 3x4, U3x, 3x6, 44,
4x5, 4x6, 65x and 5x6.
Plank.
Plank shall embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness.
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: lyV, 2,
2V, 3, 3Y,, 4, 4, 5, 6%., 6%x7 inch-
and up in width.


The Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade


Western White Oak Spirit Barrels



Capital $100,000.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.


OFFICERS:


J. C. LITTLE, President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager.


JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
S C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


DIRECTORS:


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST,
W. F. COACHMAN.


W. J. KELLY


"UZZ90 1100C111 LUIX sVCCZs


10


40Lh(((h (~~( ( (h~~~~~'


Dlmenles
Dimension sines shall embrace all sims
6 inches and up in thickness by esve
inches and up in width, including six by
six. For example: 6x6, 617, 7, 77, 7x8
and up.
Stedppin
Stepping shall embrace one to two and
a half inces in thickness by even inches
and up in width. For example: 1, 1j~
ly,, 2 and 2/yx7 and up, in width.
Rough Edj or Flitch.
Rough Edge or Flitch shall embrace an
sizes one inch and up in thickness by eight
inches and up in width, sawed on two
sides only. For example: 1, 1%, 2, 3, 4
and up thick by e-ght inches and up wide,
sawed on tuo sides only.

INSPECTION.
Standard.
All lumber shall be sound, uap no ob-
jeetion. Wane may be allowed on-eiglht
of .the width of the piece measured acros
face of wane, extending one-fourth of th
length on one corner or its equivalent ea
two or more corners.
Werehentelbf
All sizes under nine Inches hall sow
heart entire length on one side or edga
sizes nine inches and over shall show
heart the entire length on two opposite
sides. Wane may be allowed one-eighth of
the width of the piece measured aers
face of wane, and extending one-fourth o
the length of the piece on one corner or
its equivalent on two or more earnrs.
Prime.
Scantling ha!l show heart on two faes
the entire length; other sizes shall show
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 6 per
cent. of the pieces, wane may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the piece mesu-
ured across face of wane and extending
one-fourth of t',o length of the piece on
one corner or its equivalent on two er
more Irnen .









TEE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17
I~~~~~~~~L C N .... ... II


tlakln atee-Gs Tar.
The petroleum hydrocarbons employed
for earlrett'ng water gas are exposed
to temperatures at which they undergo
chemical changes, and during the subse-
quent re-cooling the heavy, condensable
constituents are condensed to form water-
gas tar, which up to the present has not
found any extensive use, but constitutes
a troublesome waste product, the large
proportion of water which it contains
rendering distillation impossible on ac-
count of the frothing it causes. The only
uses to which it an be put are the man-
ufacture of pitch on a small scale, by heat-
ing it in large open tanks and allowing the
volatile matters to escape, or consuming
it as fuel for lack of a more profitable
outlet. Seholwein, however, finds that
water-gas tar can be converted into a
valuable product, capable of numerous
applications as a solvent, differing, more-
over, from the products obtained in the
distillation of petroleum. Hence we have
here a new article, unobtainable by dis-
tillingpetroleum or ordinary industrial
forms of tar. To extract this product,
the tar In first freed from water to an
extent sufleient to enable it to be dis
tilled in retorts. Dstillation is contain
ued until the residue consists solely of
pitch, the distillate being refined with sul
phurie add and soda, after which it is re
distilled, and furnishes a clear, th'n dis-
tillate, with a faint, ethereal odour. When
the runnings commence to appear yellow
and oily they are collected separately
refined, and distilled again. The fins
product is water-white, and has the spe
cile gravity 0 80 to 0.90, as compared
with 0.01 to 0.750 in the case of light
m'neral sences. It contains no sul-
phur or phenols, boils between 100 and 24C
C, and consists of toluol, o-, m-, and
p--xyll, methylene, and traces of naph
thalene, but chiefly of hydrocarbons o1
still undetermined composition. It is sail'
to be well adapted for the preparation of
varnishe, scouring wool, and as a solvent
for aomtchoue, guma resins, etc.-Rev
Chim. Ind.
ew Laud Cmpany Organise
The West Peaseola Land Company is
the name of a new corporation which has
been formed in Pensaola for the purpo
of transacting a general real estate and
land business, and from the names of the
promoters of the company it will be one
of the strongest concerns of its kind in
the country.
Note of application for a charter
chartering the company has just been
made to Governor Broward, and will be
acted upon at an early date. Among the
stockholders are Jas. M. Muldon, J. R.
Saunders, Wi. L Keyser, Thos. C. Wat-
son, J. J. Hooton and A. C. Blount, Jr.
The offers of the corporation, until the
first election, are Jas. M. Muldon, presi-
dent, ad J. J. Hooton, secretary and
treasurer.
The capital stock of the company is
announced at 630,000, and business will
be eommemeed at an early date.
A New lorida Cypress Company.
The charter of the West Coast Cypress
Company was filed with the Governor
recently. The domicile of the company is
Fort Myers, Fa., and the main object is
to manufacture lumber, shingles, crosstiei
and all articles and products and by-
products manufactured or derived from
eypreas, pine or other kinds of timber.
Henry C. Butcher, Jr, is president; Walte
G. Langford, vice-president, and H. Rad-
elyffee Roberts, secretary and treasurer.


Cost Yellow Pine PreIdctim.
The actual ost of w-annfet-wiing lum-
ber and a comparison of the results of any
one operation with another conducted un-
der similar conditions have always been
matters of interest to the progressive
mill man, and so it seems worth while
to give a little space to a detailed state-
ment of costs covering the year's opera-
tions of a medium sized yellow pine ope-
ration in Mississippi, which has been given
to the American Lumberman with the
idea that its publication might draw out
similar statements from other operators
and thus indicate where in this particular
case, or in others, costs are excessive and
where economics might be effected. This
detailed statement is as follows:
Log cutting ......................6 .47
Log hauling to skids .............. 132
Log loading, skids to ears ........ .21
Railroad hauling, average twelve miles .48

Total logging cost .............. $2.48

Sawing .........................153
Dry kilning ....................... 1O
Planing ..................-........ 1.46
Trucking and stacking ............. .52
Car loading ......................***
Repairs ......... ... ...... ...... .13

Total manufacturing cost ...... .3.90

Interest and discount ............- .50
Proft and loss .................... .0
General expense and insurance .... 1.22
Depreciation .............. ............. .75

Total miscellaneous ............ 2.50

Stumpage ..................... ..2.00
Total cost of lumber, 1000 feet..$10.97
The section in which this operation is
-arr:ed on with the above results is one
where probably conditions are about the
average of Mississippi, the usual difficul-
ties being met according to the seasons.
with soft ground in the woods, etc., but
with a logging road built on easy grades
at fully as low a cost as the average road
of that sort. No reason exists in the
particular location why the cost should
exceed that of the average operation 01
why it should be materially less. The
timber is also probably of average char-
acter. It does not stand as heavy to the
acre as with some holdings, but will aver-
age about 9,000 feet to the acre, log scale,
which is heavier than in some other easesj
In the testimony given before the In-
terstate Commerce Commission a little
over a year ago, it was stated that the
cost of lumber turned out by the plant
of Eastman, Gardiner & Co., of Laurel,
Miss., including stumpage at $2 a thous-
and, was about $10.50 a thousand, so that
there is very little, if any, difference be-
tween the two statements, notwithstand-
ing the fact that the Eastman, Gardiner
operation is by far the larger one.
In any such examination much depends
qn the character of the business done, as
far as manufacturing proper is concerned,
but there should be no material difference
in the cost of delivering logs from the
standing tree to the mill, and the cost of
2.48 given in the foregoing statement
seems excessive. There are Mississippi
mills which year after year do this work
'or less than $2 a thousand and which
produce lumber at a total cost for logging
nanufactur'ng and loading on cars read?
e'r shipment at from $4.50 to $550 a
thousand. The statement herewith makes
it $6.47.


H aBOSONIN Preo. R. GAL.LAa Castare
w. B. owaX. VioesPres

Commercial Bank,
State Depesltry.
BAslcn: Oemao. iL.. Lake Car. alm
Jacksonvlle, ---- lorida


Anyone Wishing
a limited amount of paper aups to be
delivered from Januay 1 toFebruary 1,
and as late as Mr 10 can gt them
of Vickers patent by writing-
E. L VICKERS,
TInTON. GEOROA.


KIRK & JONES

DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY 6T.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
dACKSONVILLE. FLA.
FIRE INSURANC]K-LAowt rate. Le-
rrn U. Green & Ca, amd 0 Park BM.,
Jacksonville, Fla. Sm.


BIIY I MONTOOMRRY,
Commission Merchants,
Naval Stores & Cotton
Liberal advances made against idp
enats. Coeiigamate asdita
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILuDIG,
NEW YORK CITY.
WHEN WRITING ADVERTIIERS
MENTION THE RECORD.


J. P6 *ANAPMEAa
- ~ -01111A"FMAL


ENGINES. BOILERS.
Ootton, Saw, 'Frtililer, Oil and leam -
chiery, and Supplies and Repair
CAPACITY kFR 300 IIAND&
Machine Tools, Wood-Vorking Mac hinr),
Shafting, Pulley. Hanen, leather a-m
Rubber Belting and lloae Railroad ad
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plan and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and
Hoistin E40m
AUGUSTA. CA.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,

from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.

Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Bye
Whiskies
'ontrollers Blm's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabt Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM t CO.
517 Ad 519 West Bay Street
JACKSYVILL, "'iFA


TH PI I AJD 18T PRODUCT."


ld al r for -rte for the
turstie and =cmom trade to the
Remset eale to hre a prompt delisrsy.

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
lest in the WsaM.
For diaecd -p wells,
Cwam Taok Co.. MoeMftM

KNABE & EMERSON

PIANOS.
Sand se PVases ama Terne.
JAS. A. ABRAMS,
i lls Am as la d Tadle aslek-


E CANNON COMPANY



BARRELS

AM .M

STANDARD

UW Tll

WORLD


Use no Other

pasts ce-valmly located.
Home Office, OUITMAN, GA.
U.I A.




BUILDERS AND DEALER IN







It THE WEEKLY ItbUSltbAL RECORD.
So a Is


THE


COVINGTON


Co.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.





Wholesae SHOES -
WOlesale: DRY GOODS.


"Success


For Our Customers is Success For


ABSTRACTS
Title ad Tax Abstratea, Mapt, ec.,
of large tracts in all parts of Florida and
South Georgia, prepared for owners and
iatmdin porhaaer. Corrmpondnce
aolited.

REALTY TITLE AID TRUST CO,
law Exehag Bldg., Jacksonville, F1a.

Sam'I P. Holmes &Co.
SteUks, Bo % Ctten,
Gral amI Prevlstela

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct pr vate wire to all exchanges.
Local stuks and bonds a specialty.
fBl PbhLe sa1 Balwi. Blaoc
Int

BethunV

Apparatus.

SThe New Process.
IRtraets the spirts without destroUyn the
wood ibre. Russ out a charge In l than
twenty-for hour. Makes from twenty to
f.>rty-ve pgllons from eur o wood.
Makes pure water white spirit, free froni
the oar of tar or creoote. No chemteals
used in reailnin the sirits. Needs to be
dwtilld only once after comlia from re-
No trouble with bl-produets. the spirit
pronounced to be far the nest ever pro-
dutd and from wood Only one grade
of spirIt produroe and that thi highest
ABIOLI"TRILY NO DANOWH PROM PIRK
Rilt of Anest material by high-grade
workmen. The eesapest machine offered tI
the public.
We ehallm e compartion of output and
quality o product. We aurantee output
and quality.
The a Belt CMstctls CspaMy
p. .a lbO a RA&LmOIG C.



gO. R. I8R JR.
MAYUFACTUBER 01


BRICK.

IIlE HFI PRICE.
Capacity of Yard 800000 Per Month.

1' I. m


Co0UaR ra W z AND X=rnu= oUROMS AT SAVA""A.H "IR


W.W.


DATE
Aprin 1........
april .........
April 16........
April .........
April 2 ........
May 6........
May 13........
May 20........
Juay 2........
June 3........
June 10........
June 1 ........
July 1 ........
July 14 ........
July 8 ........
Aug. 4 ........
Aug. 12 ........
Aug. 18 ........


K


1906-0
*4.10
sle
UI


3.41a
LIS
3.M
***0
4.36
4J
4.50

4.701

4.70
4U7%
4MO
4mE%


190l-04
SAe
LJO


L4O2


3.40
3.35

3.0
**


&m

3.40
3.0

3.50
3.80
3.50


W.G.


SAG
3.75
LO
3.00
340
SAS

3.006

4.10
4151
4.12
4.40
4.40
'40
4.25
4.42%
4.36
4.37


1903-06

3.46
3.35
3.5
3.256
3.27%


3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3,20
3.30
3.30


1906-0
130



4OO
3.45
3.46
LU
*JO
3.40
3.a1
3.30


3.00
3.95o
3.2%0
4.00oo
4.O
4.08%


1MS-04

.&
3M35
LO3.
L3.
3.15
3.17%
3.25
&35
3.00
L00
3.00
S.OO
300
L.O
SLIo

a.1
115


190-0U

3.356
320
3.20
3.20
IaM

3.20
3.Zo
LOS
3.o

*SA
3.86
SAO
3.86

3.72%
3.90
3.86
7so
a.as A
3.87%


1903-04
3.40
3.20
3.16
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3-0
3.165
L96
2.90
2JO
2.90
2.95
2.05
3.05


TWO YEAR
z


1M906-

1301
3.11
116

.115
3.15
.40
3.40
3.40
3.40



&5s
3.51
3.50
36.
38.8
3.57%


1MB-04

3.O
3.00
3.00
LSA
LOO
3.10
3.10
S.86
2.86
2.86
2J.
LMI


2.865
Lo35
L2.0
2S6


1104-6

2.3


SAO

3.10
3.6
3.30
3.34
346
LU


LS


3.43

3.32%


134

Ln
LIS


3.w%
La
US
La

3L70

2.70
2.5
LIP
Ln
2.5
2.7
2.3
2.
2.33


ohn = Furchgott= Compan:
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


y.


Don't forget your subscription to the Record.
V= vxUN w DvmII 1uzIwON 5 c==oo


Vs."


- -- -- --


--








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 19


Buyers' Directory

These advertisers are in this iae. 11
you what anyr ing, look thrcug thh
elsemilad it and write to the rar ap.
ari tlhereia The Rword guuuata
Sprompt rpma.


ABSTRACTS
Realy Te d TrIt Co.

Atlantis National Bank, Jacksoarle, F
Cnamersu a Bank, Jacksonville, Fl.
Cotral National Bank, Oeal, Fla.
National Baak of Jaeksonvilla
OXZES AND CRATES,
Commer Lamber Ca., Jasnmevill, .
BRICr
Peter, GeO. I, Jr., Jacksoville, Fla.
Sothn Ful & Supply Co, The Jackson-

CARUL
Sath AtLatle Car & aunafet*urig Co.,
Wayerse, Ga.
CLOTHING.
st & Bro., J. A., Jackaoaville, Fla.
Jer CAo., IL A., Jacksuaville, Fa.
tandard Clothing Vu., Jacksonville, Fl
CLOTHRIG-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furebhott A Co, Jacksoville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Moatgomery. New York City.
Tosr, Ilat & C, New York CUty.
CONVEYAnCINO.
Realty Title and Trust Cao
COOPERAGE.
Camnno Co., The, Quitman, Ga.
Couperap Co., The. .ark-omville, Fla.
Jacka vileo CIopepe Cos Jaduksvil's,
Fla.
DRUGS
Kirk A Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUVGS-WHOLESALE.
Southern lanufaeturing Co., Jacksonville.
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALLE
Covington Co., The, Jacksoville, Fla.
Koha, Furehgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., An-
Merril-stevm Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
S ehobeir'a Su Co, J. &, Alaco, Ga.
sata, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
Murphy, T, Jarksoaville. Fla.
Sekoballa Sonl Co, J. ., Maeon, Ga.
IU L.
other Fel A Supply Co, The, Jack-
sonvills, Fla.

Getting Furniture o., Jacksonville, Fla.
GETS' FURNISHERS.
Crag A Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Ramfne Co., H. A., Jacksoville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co. Jacksuovile, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Conolidated Groeery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hargraves Co, C. H, Jacksonville, kla.
Johnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fla.
Paeoek, Hunt & West Co, Savannah, Ga.
Williams Co., J. P, Savannah. Ga.
Young Co., John R, Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furebgott & Co, Jaekson.lle, Fla.
HARDWARE.
Baird A C, L ., Jackakokvlle, F.
Boud A our Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Brigg Hardware Co.. W. H..Valdoata, Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocla. Fla.
Wed A Ca., J. D.. Savuanah. Ga.
HARNESS.
Meiurray Baker, Jakoavill, Fe.


Thomas, W. I., Gainaville, Fla.
BATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksorille, Fla.
i enlrue Co., i. A., Jaekauvalle, Fla.
stbudard CluoIin Cu., Jaclkumvi e, Fa.
HOTELS.
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Gland View, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Burtbhuld, New York City.
Roseland, Jackonville, Fla.
St. George, Jacksonville, Fla.
Windsor, Jacksonville, kla.
IRON WORK&.
Lombard Iron Works & Eupply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Btveos Co., JacksoUville, fh
Murphy, T, Jackwoville, Fla.
Sehoeld's Somn Co., J. S., Maon, Ga.
JEWELERS.
Greenleat & Crosby Co., Jackaonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jacksuuville, Fla.
lum Co. ., Cu., Jackonville, a.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
Aluller, Gus, acksoaville, Fla.
Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Maeon, Ga.
MEDICIMNS.
Spencer Medicine Co., ChaLtanooga, Tean.
Southern Mlanutacturing CL., Jackuovilie,
Fla.
MAPS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iruu uWrksa & upply Co, Au-
gusta, as.
Murupli, Jacksonville, Fla.
Schuliueldl' Susu C:., J. S., olaco, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TUPEKNTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. S, Macon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jacksonville, Fla.
IETAL WORKERS.
LUuker, M1. A., Bruuunwik, Ga.
Mcuallaun irus., b ranu al, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Uriggs hardware Co., V 11, \ aldosta, Pa.
.lariuu lurduusie Co., Ulala, kla.
acludeld's Sniu Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
arnes-Jessup Co., .le, Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidatle Naval Store* CL., Jacksnu
ville, kia.
Peacuck, Hunt & West Co, Savannah, (a.
Standard Naval btoures L., Jacksonville,
k ia.
L niu Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
Young Co., John 1., Savanhah, Ga.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bous Co., Jackonville, Fla.
PECANS.
Griffling Br.s. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. II., Valdosta, a.
Campbell, J. R., Ocala, Fa.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Suns Co., J. S., Maron, (ia.
White-Blakalee fig. Co., Hlrmihgbln.,
Ala.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co, Savannah
Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa.
Fla.
Brobston, Fendix & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Buckman CJacksonville. Fla.
Christie, J. D., Jacksonville, Fla.
Iivingston & on., .1. H.. (leala. Fl.
Southern States land and Timber O.,
Tomlinson, E. H., Jacksonvil!e, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla.
West-Ralry-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville.
Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., .arckonville, Fla.
Merrill-Steves Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
DOiT PFAI TO N0MU


SHOES-WHOLESALj
Covington C., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York Cit).
STOCK BROKERS.
Holme & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville Fla.
TAILORS.
Renfros Co., H. A.. Jacksonville, F.
TANKS.
Cypream Tank Co, Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fla.
Sehofeld's Sons Co., J. 8., Maron, na.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
TOOLS.
Council Tool Co.. The, Wananish, N. C
TuRPn arims APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jacksoevisle, jla.


The Wire Virgin Gum Co, Tifton, Ga.
TURPETIN PROCKSU
Pine Belt Comstnrcta Co T, Ralei
N. C.
mURP"aNIUs STILLS
Baker, M. A, Brunswick, Ga.
McMilla Bros., Barannah, Ga.
uRP-TtaiK STILL TUB.
Davis & So, 0. L, Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTIME VATS.
Davis & So8, G. M, Palatka, Fla.
VEHICLES
MeMurray & Baker, Jacksouville, te.
WATCHES.
Greemlef & Crosby Cao, Jacksomvills, I
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jackaonville, MF.
East Coast Lumber Co, Watertown, Fs.


THE... Back Joe a a Srtnda

COUNCIL TOOL CO. "
DIamead Edge IRacks,
WANANISH. N. O. SD.oe a dozes.
Say. Mys.r we re redo s w ls c. lars all r t rale Us am*- d
Sskiled botr sut is dertdhat adM my lam. Iw Is mk* Blo ie e Racks,
ee Tels. rPeacs iamre be kdesa thm prerulwi, Wso WN.00 a dozen.
6*ES TUE PCE.
Eor PAllers add 5 ac a dss.
Prices e Melss Feels ea appllcatoe. rte tat U*alt skUf sa
Ja. ~e. ,Mi. P. OOU0OIL S.r wmeerral se.

R. S. HALL Pres. T C. HALL, V P. and Mgr. L. KxoJen, See. and Treaa.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.



H, A. Renfroe Co,


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at ReadyM.de Prices Mail Orders Given Personal Attention


439 W. Bay Street


JACKSONVIE, FLA.


11115111 1111 5111111 I II ill III I I I 1111 I II I I L !J I


J. P. WnLAMS Preident
T. A. JaranxI, Sad Vice-President
H L. KAYt',. Secretary.


J. 0 Cinso. Ta Vice-Prsideat
J DOusanuar.3d Viuc-Presdent
D G. While. Tra.arer.


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

E111 Oll RS II COTTON FACTORS 0 O IRIESILE GRCES.
Main Office* SAVANNAnH, OGOR01IA.
iraneb OfIress a PsnrBACOLAc LX. I k rnmeh oroery Hous.e,
JJACKSONVIL- s.tLA. I COL MSsU. GA.
SNaval Stores Producers are lavited to Correspond With Us.
SI I I I ll Il i I l l l i.l l A. BAKER, I I tll


SM. A. BAKER,


The Larget and OlMt Copper
Works In Georgia.


bventr and
Maelfcturer eI th

Baker Improved
Seemnlss Turpen-

i tr Stills.
Write a for prioea and ouelts
o. B any point In GeortisL. ier.
Id. Alabama or Mismlisppi. All
MiUsold under a guarraate.
IJob work through the
country a specialty.

Ifrunswick, Ga


W My specialty s large worms and heavy bouoros tiha do not lek.
D Tra RCOa D 20 ADvZ-AAnRBl









30 THE WEEKLY INuUSTIAL RECORD.





Industrial Record's Department of Information



This dea.tment is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers ad advertising patrs of this paper and no
charge s made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any oe or more of the blank following as
you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will ha prompt attentions

Iur Terumo.e.amlU I'.r **Hal ft" *omr "M I"ebv of A &mi. r'Or Titer. rarna or bam Lmehs.
DATM INDUSTRAL IiRDBTL 0 Jalmomal, s.
INDUSTRIAL CORD, Main (re*, JkoevbleO, t. I u1 tmI market (lrlM u ea for te puroseof
In the arktor t M ote lnow Prefern a o4r . A ) ai P I smmiAuo""M
witk raporm w piriM d s" r -e oiter iatfoumad-

Fluae aouf whre sam -a be emeo.


State pe moll the tnd of motimlary want amd whether new or seuoem-handea. DATE
oeamsm fur Terpum fwm" or rltes.r erfur Aug mdaetrhi EMurre. ror comleesiry. emes er Noiase beMopoes S wmM or Tnrp'aUm Mules
Marso Wsams, &.t
DATE
INboUSTRIA&. UCOes Ja MoB vlTe, & DA
INDUSTRIAL VOODH. JehM m.te, Iea.
Pleae advia the undered regarding a good locatdo I (a*te or Msetio o
state) for aIn he mars t
toWeter with fuU aIormtoa about labor ooadlt*Zo, tax, traort ala tfarel
loea --5Oru-nt,. ete
-Please give e a teI"foma a to ba t Iloes to bay, eta.

Stwd SI sa


Be Yer Wantto eI gomo t ? are Ye Tmmmb orf mmeaL ?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. JackMoarile, ta. INDUSTRIAL ROORD, JaekWmvfle. Ma.
aave for ust a o tefoowig Can you lde aea iformato a to the relM Ut of te* feioew!g Srm or earp
Uo.
Remkark
on, yo m" e s- a pfuremer'



be TV" West Fo EMpa am.? Be V"m Weed"s E Wmloed?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jaosmavlo. Fla. INDUSTRIAL saO o, Jemoavmi. V.
Was a taan to E the position of Want a poUtlo
wi the tfolowia reqrmenat Refer o the tfo.owl-

COyn oe suNget uom a man I Can you amin me t
lined Siged



CLIP THIS COUPON I
TO ALL READERS OP TH RECORD
a you are answering an advertisement ron the colmas o this p whether you are makg as iquy or playing an order. please ct ou the couple
hels and aach it o the Ster. It ill pay you.

COUPON.
Your sdverlshme t weas sen i as I nuserI Riece. IIneu dai e



The INDUSTRIAL RICORD of J Jacksole, N.. sad Savanask Ga. s t h South's great
weekly trade ourmal


The Record taker a personal innteiet in every Reader and

Advertiser,and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.


e w Vwma, -M wal IMaMs IAm





THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 3
]Pr.ident, W. C POWELL; Vice-Presdenta, who with the Preident. constitute the Diremory and Board of Mangerm, W. F. 0ACO MAN, B. F. BUL
LARD, H. L. COVINGTON, H. MeEACHERN, JOHN R.YOUNG, J. A CRANFORD, D. H. MeMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. SAUNDER, C. B ROGEBS; Auditor, JOHN HINDREBON.


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES
-m m ^ a mm


UOMPAN Y


. .


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA, FLA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.

The Consolidated is Purely a Cooperative Company. Its
Interests are Identical with those of the Producers. The
Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.


YARDS AT JACKSONVILLE, SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA AND PENSACOLA

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.

a W OU0r IXUDW IT IW TL RICOmD WUZB5 V


. .









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commiuary Trade.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 261
A. C. Creamery, 80 .. 27
10 .. 284
A C. Creamery,60, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Pull Cream.......... 14

Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... 6*
6)-lb tub.... 6
Leaf Tin.
"* 0-lb tin. ............ 8

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 86

Sugar
Granulated Sugar, bhls..... 6 00

Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 80 1-lb cans to case,
per Ib.................. 22
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 18
Green Coffee, medium ...... 11
Green coffee, common....... 10
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packagft....... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 Ib pack-
ages............. market price
Roasted, 100lb. drum....... 17
Ground coffee, 10-lb pail.. 16

Tea


Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 Ib.
Gunpowder, 10 lb....
English R'fast, 10 lb..
Fomopa, 10 Ib.......
Pagoda Tea. 5 and lOc size
10 Ibs to case, per pound'..

Salt
200-lh sack................ 1
10-lb sack..............
Ice Cream, 200-lh sacks.....
'" 100-1b sacks.....
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8 Ib.... 2
4 *"' "-' 2.1b.... 2

Pepper

Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin...... ........
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box
sifter top. per dox.....
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per do.......40 and
Corn

Car Lot Lot Sk
W.Corn,llOlh, 1 29 1 80 1
100lh. 1 27 120 1
Md corn,l]Olb.1 88 186 1
S 1001b.1 21 1 28 1


Nrw Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon..... 81
Oats
o sk LeAalO 1
car Lot It ask Last
W clip'd,1251b, 1 82
S 1001b, 145
White 1251b, 175
White 100lb. 138
Mixed 1261b
S 1001b,
Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash. 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice..... 1 85
fancy ..... 185
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 6 25
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 lb sack.. ...... 00
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks ........... 6 25
Pillsbury's Best ..... 7 60
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal ......... 7 40
bbl .... ....
Flour, Boss,..............7 00
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 8 20
92-lb sacks........... 1 35
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 8 25
92-lb sacks....... 1 35
Rice
Good .................... 4t
Choice ................. 5f
Fancy Head............... 6
Broken ..... ............. 2.
Canned Vegetables
Do.


Tomatoes, 8s, Chief........
T,.matoes,2s ........
00 Clayton,3s..............
50 Clayton, 2e ..............
00 Sifted Peas, 2s............1
60 Rose L. J. Peas ...........
66 Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........ 1
75 Lima Beans ,2s ...........1
String Beans. 3s..........
String Beans, 2s ..........
Baked Beans, 8s...........
Baked Beans. ls ..........
17 Corn. fancy, 2s............1
Born Tomatoes. 2s........
46 Beauty Beets. 3s..........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ...........
80 Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s ..............
Hay
,s car ots I bale a
lu4 qm
32 Choice.... 1
84 No.l Tim
46 No. 2 ....... ...... 1
86 No. Cl'ler 17 00 1750 1


85
65
80
60
40
80
15
00
90
70
90
45
40


800
700
600
A 00.


Canned FruPts
Pineapiles, sliced, 2S, 2 doz
to case, per dos........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2, 2 dos
to case, per dos........ 1 40
Cherries. 2s, 2 dos. to case
per dox................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 dos to case, per
do .................... 90
Apples, one gall, one dos to
case, per dos ........... 3 00
Peaches. 2s, two dox to ase,
per d, ............... 1 45
Peaches, 8s. two dox to case
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 45
Blackberries, 2s two dos to
ease, per dos........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two dos to case.
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 86
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 64
S 10.lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
lb................ .. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per Ib........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per Ib........ 61

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 12
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25l1h box, per lb....... 11
Fancy Apricots 26 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Cloien " "
Ev. Apple". 50-lb. boxes.....4 00
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes....2 06
Ev. Apples, 4t l-lh. packages 25
Ev. Apples. 24 2 25
Currants, cleaned, 86*lb. ase 8 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 36-lb
tl.x, 40-50............. 6..
Prnuies, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box. f0-60............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70.............. 8..
L. L. Rais-ns, 8 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box .......... 1 70
Peanuts
Fancy. H P, per pound.... 6_
Extra H P .... 6
Seed Peanuts, ..
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds................. 18
Brazils ................... 12
Pnacains.... .............. 12
Filberts................... 12
al0 nots............ ...... 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Oar IGO LewIl
ao SI .0Lot Sk. LA
Coonseed Meal 2700
Hulls 9 50


Matches
Atlantic, per gros.......... 47
Wooden ware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop.........2 0
8 hoop .....
Nest Measures, 6 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per dos...... 1 50
Sieves, per dos. No. 18......1 00
nested...... 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per dos 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per dos.. 60
Ax Handles
Two dos crates per dos.. .1 20

Washboards *
78 Crown Combination.... 2 20
178 Blue Jay ............. 00
175 Diamond Glass .........8 25
O.W. D., 17inch, perdos 1 06
Clothes pins, five gross to box 76
Canned Fish
Oysters 2dos to case, per
dos. .................. 9
Sardines, American, 100 to
ase, per cae ........ 8 26
Sardines. 5 ease lots........ 8 20
Salmon is, Tale 4 dos to cas
per dos Alaska........ 95
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to ease,
per dos Col. River .... 2 8
Salmon, 4 d to case, per do
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fsh 90
two dos in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 95


Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails..............
Sea Sides, 1&&-lb brick, 40
lbe to box.............
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb.


8 60

240
8


Khas cas Cae llM ts.
"Reliable Corned Bf, Is ......
S Cornd &B t ......
SRouat Beef, Is ........
Roat Beef, b ........
Potted su sad TOeNM
1-s .......................
SSliced Bef, !- ..
S Viemew am.... i ..
ripe ..................


elm
LU

is
136
LU
Lao


THEx REaCOm S PAC *AS A oG 5 3 VATALUb.


a


Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 ae .... 133-4
"Rel'able" Ham, 10-12 avge .... 131-2
"Reliable" Ham, 12-14 argue .... 141-4
"Reliable" Shoulders. 7- Srve .. 01-
"Rliable" California Hams, 6-8 73-4
Breakfast Baena, light ar. ...... 13
D. & Bellies, 16-18 av. ........ 83-8
D. S. Bellies, 0-22 av. ........ 81-8
D 8. Bellies, 2s-30 ar. ......... 77-
D. Plates ................... 3-4
Baron Plate ................... 7-4
D. 8. Butts .................... 53-4
Bologas Saumqag ...............
Sausma ia i.................LU
6utt sand Cules.
"Strawberry" Creamery. lb tubs 27
30-lb tubs.... 271-2
"Reliable" full cream eheee .... 131-2
Kiansc' LaL.
"Indiana" Pure Last ........... mark
bes-Foam" CompoPud ......... irh t








THEI WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


T. MURPHY
JACKSONVILLE MACHINE IRON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS

FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat. Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron
and Brass Castings. and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARINE kNINBS AND BOILERS. PULLEYS AND SHAFTING.
Apentfor Stationmry Engines. Boilers. Pumps, Feed Water Heawers and Conden-
irs. Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal P imps, How, Belting and Rubber Uoudd
1R TIHIISUHI Ul I WTER WIIK EUIPMIEIT A SPECILTT
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHAR LtSTOI Alu t;LUIULA LINES
et .u=0m-mt ,taaam t thi m M are appoited to mR a f .toews, masa
yt ICrit.-, C. both ways.
Prom We Y* T k. Prom JaekseeLrlUle sr
( *LNEW YORK ......Sunday, Jan. 22, at 5:00 am
Tuesday, Jan. 17, at 3:00 pm ....COMANCHE ......Sunday, Jan. 22, at 5:00 am
Wednesday, Jan. 18, at 3:00 pm ... .AIGONQUIN ..Monday, Jan. 23, at 6:00 am
Friday, Jan. 20, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE .... Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 7:30 am
adlay, Jan. 22, at 3:00 pm .'xMOHICAN ........Friday, Jan. 27, at 9:30 am
Tuesday, Jan. 24, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ......Sunday, Jan. 29, at 11:30 am
Wedaeday, Jan. 25, at 3:00 pm .IROQUOIS ... .Monday, Jan. 30, at 12:00 n'n
*xHURON ......Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 1:00 pm
Friday, Jan. 27, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ......Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 1:00 pm
Saturday, Jan. 28, at 3:00 pm ... .ALGONQUIN ....Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4:00 am
Tuesday, Jan. 31, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, Feb. 5, at 5:00 am
**xNEW YORK ......Monday, Feb. 6, at 5:30 am
Friday, Feb. 3, at 3:00 pm ........APACHE .... Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 7:00 am
Saturday, Feb. 4, at 3:00 pm ......IROQUOIS .... Thursday, Feb. 9, at 7:30 am
*xMOHICAN, ....Frday, Feb. 10, at 8:00 am
Tuesday, Feb. 7, at 3:00 pm .... COMANCHE ...... Sunday, Feb. 12, at 9:30 am
Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 3:00 pm ..ALGONQUIN .... Monday, Feb. 13, at 10:00 am
Friday, Feb. 10, at 3:00 pm ......ARAPAHOE ..Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 12:00 n'n
Sunday, Feb. 12, at 3:00 pm ...*xHURON ...... Friday, Feb. 17, at 1:30 pm
Tuesday, Feb. 14, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE .... Sunday, Feb. 19. at 4:30 am
Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 3:00 pm .. .IROQUOTS .... Monday, Feb. 20, at 5:00 am
*xNEW YORK .... Tuesday, Feb. 21, at 5:30 am
Friday, Feb 17: at 3:00 pm ....COMANCHE ..Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 6:30 am
Saturday, Feb. 18, at 3:00 pm ....ALGONQUIN ......Thursday, Feb. 23, at 7:30 am
Tuesday. Feb. 21. at 3:00 rm ....ARAPAHOE ....Sunday, Feb. 26. at 10:00 am
Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 3:00 pm .... !xMOHICAN .... Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 11:30 am
*--Batom via Brunswick and Charleston. xPreight only. *-Boaton via
Brunswk.
THC CLYDE NEW ENOLA VD AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Sdroeet sreerwi. twea- Jaeksoanvtille. folut and Prwvidene am&d all ast-
erm Poment. 'aillna at )s'arleslte amlb Ways.
SB.EI-WECKLY t ILI.GS.
Mrstilbelm .. ...... .......... ........... .....Prom Twli. Wharf. Bcton
Iot.. bo.. .. .............. ...... .. .. .. Pnm feto nf 'ath.rln Street.. JackacnlUi
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jarkaemavtll and mfnorCd.
MStpping at Palatka. Astor. St. Frane s. Beresford (De Land) and lntermydlat
las. mn Pt. Johns river.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
la apalnted to su1 as follows: Vaver Ja-kponvllle. undays. Tuesdays and Thurm-
dayi. g: p. m. Returning. Irave Banford. Monday. Wednesday & Fridays S~ a. m
NOuiv HROuru.I NORTHBOUND.
Rad down. I I Read up.
Leave I p. m. ....................... Jannvllle .............. .......Arrive s1 m
Lve o l m............ .....Paltka................... ... ..... |.0sve *I p. m.
Leave tA a. ............ ...........Astor........................... .Leave 10 p. m
Laave a. E.... ... ...... .. rns ........................IAve 1" p. m.
.. ... ..eresor (DeLand)........ ............. eave 12.S noes
Arrw ve8 a. am............ ........ anford......... ......... ...... Leave 9* a. m.
Ar. 10-:M a. am. ........... ......nter ris................... L.v. 10-0f a. m
OGEERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, a2s W BAY ST., JAC'VILLE.
F. M. IPON VONCEff. .TP.. Apst. Gen. Pae. Agent. 122 W. Bay St. Jacklonville, Fla.
W. o. COOPWR JR., Ical Frrt ALt., Jaer'vlle. C. P LOVELL. Aast. Sup.Jaek'tlls
FPnt Hogan Street. Jnakeonvmfln
. c. wAOKIfEr. a R. P. A., New York CLYD MTT.NI. o. P. A.. New Terb
Yw.e. a. won. WE. p. YE cO.
general M*nane GOneral Awaets.
C e-br-h Ivendlhm.- t lCate-*tlret. -Wew York.
WRITE T E REmRDm iR ,


*s4** *************e********* o******************
I You Want a Turpentine Lcatlen?
SYeu Want a Sawmdi Lacatin?
You Wat ay Kind of FlorMd Lamd?
I You MaM Business?
CmJi on or Wre tas
l J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS.
Ocala. Florida
-*-te ********* -***** --********* ******
<6%sst

Record Readers:



The job printing department
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. It is reason-
able to suppose you will get
better and more sati-factory
printing supplies-letter heads,
envelopes, commissary checks,
pay-roll reports, etc., by having
us make them.


Industrial Record Co.,
AJs-Wev, MerWl


The AM etropolsl


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is f om 12
Sto 16 hou s ahead of any other
Aj daily new-paper in Florida ..


$5.00 a Year $2.50 Six Months

Full Telegraph;c and S'ock
reports. If \ou want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropol s.


CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE rLORIOA.
6*6 JA6CK6tMN6V6I flORID MMC6






THE WEEEKL INDUSTRIAL BBCOOD.

STwo of the Patterns we show in Our Catalogue.
SPECIAL VALUES IN STERLING SILVER.
zd* es


TE Greenleaf &
"Rose" Crosby Coman*
epoes, .oo 3per stOL anb
Talf. .s.. 42.0 p i&W UbteUmfttb
Deert Fork S 13.o0 per do.
Tbe Forks, 8a3. per dos.
D ..Ont Kti. v pr do. 41 West Bay Stret
Tabl Kanir, I33.00 per o*2
Jacksonville
NO CHARGE FOR
ENGRAVING. The lu. fit rbu a p .1 ** e
sr Lea aienus. Prfmlt aumi to mel edwsin


THE
"Germania"

Deert 8pwm. @190 ypr dM .
Table fsp. b~jo per do.
Desert Fork, S6.So per es.
Table Fri, a33.o p.r
DMrt Knives, Si.o per L.
Table Kire *oo per do.
WE PAY EXPRESS
CHARGES.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings


Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.

Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for, newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc.

I tMIIiY 13E OI f ISlIMI. RIWBIIO IU 1 EIIUIIN IMHiS 1U PlWe.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES. GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT a WaNTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELVERIES PROMISED.


A Florida Enterprise.


Trv It