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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00105
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: January 20, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00105
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text


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For the Week Ending Janu.ry 20 905. -.





WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECO D.


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and ManufacturlsA Isterests.

depdS ISept. aIte. 1 T cr ee ctite C mmee e rargen.te paters*a' Associati as ts It active auf t M*rarm s& a de pt. ef. t, a n Ajemeal c a
idmi as ant l Ormi i s lats gmaeral AmCti AdM- Sest. stL a, u. tas l rm te hs daram . tes 'apma .
AderU Art Na rOS as t aY1f me W ea ftM at er-StaS t Came a.ewer ts". s nirsid o tie ser i-
ieass am aMctl rasI e O sofMe Seute Sta st Sw0eear'. ia0-mb .

vL 1. NO. a. JACKSONVILLE. FLA. ATLANTA, OA. SAVANNAH, A. $3 A YEAR


The Nat~o~nl Caod Roads Co1v'ntOflon


S. Th National Good Roads Convention is
jia enslon in Jacksoville this week as
a ReBeord goes to press. Among the
prominent ma in attendance are Senator
Martin Dodge, director of the Bureau of
Good Boads Inquiries, Washington; Gen-
eral Neson A. Miles, of Massachusetts,
Senator Latimer of South Carolina, Sena-
jor MeCreary of Kentucky, Congresaman-
A let lark of Florida, art many others.
io-President anad National Organizer A.
Man is presiding.
SAt the National Good Roads Conven-
n In this city this week oe of the ad-
vm of welcome was delivered by Cap-
, taa C. X Garner, president of the Jack-
mville Boad of Trade, aad it makes
-a tLr*le paper that we give it in
i below:
S"It is an easy task to follow his honor,
te mayor, on such occasion as this. Af-
r he has delivered an address of welcome
jch as you have listened to, I could very
ell make my address in one sentence of a
lew words by telling you that I fully in-
jorse the sentiments so eloquently ex-
praaed by the mayor. Consequently, I
dall not trespass on your time or patience
but a very few minutes. In behalf of the
board of Trade I desire to extend to you
m and all, a most hearty and sincere wel-
come. We are highly appreciative of the
aet that you selected our city as the
Bes to hoMl this convention. I wish
Congratulate President Moore and the
er of the National Good Boads Asso-
ia. upon the amne s that has at-
nda their eata in the pa"t The grat-
f sad at aks of the Ameu an people
S e dae them for their unselh work in
this glorious cause. I trust the achieve-
ments for the years to come may evre
urpass what has been accomplished in
the past. No eitien of this republic has
worked harder in behalf of good roads
than Senator Mann, our great apostle and
your organizer. He has thrown a wonder-
ful eath sm into his effort. He tells
me conmdentially, however, that he ex-
pects to do a great deal more in the fu-
ture than in the past; that he has been
laboring to overcome his natural timidity,
4lffidene ad especially his reticence, and
he thinks he is getting these under con-
trol
"At the last session of the Legislature
an act providing that all moneys now in
the Iternal Improvement Fund, and all
the lands granted to the State of Florida
by the United Statm known as a swamp
and overowed act for internal improve.
meat, all th se moeys and all these lands
S by thin at, wre mt aside for the build-
b "a a m mii me, of rad.raaes in the


State of Florida. I understand that Sen-
ator Mann was the father and author of
this bill, and it was feared by the mem-
bers of the Legislature that he would fnd
something else laying around loose to go
with this appropriation. Every speaker
of the House for a number of years when
they have gone up to the capitol, and
after having notice Senator Mann present,
declared the House ready for business
without any further formalities. Every
patriotic citizen of Florida wishes that his
usefulness may continue for many years
to come, or at least until he State is well
covered with good roads, but we do hope
that he will have enough land for neces-
sary agricultural purposes.


Dodge saAd Spm Com.i*m*nted.
"We are especially gratiled to have the
representatives of the Good Roads De-
partment of the Federal Goernment with
us on this occasion, and I wish to extend
to Senator Dodge and CoL Spoon a moat
cordial welcome in behalf of this board.
We are appreciative of the value of their
services to the people of the United Statee,
and especially in what they are doing for
us at this time. It is my judgment that
no department of thi government is doing
more good, accompliahig a greater work,
than is the Good Roads Department. I
believe in proportion to the amount of
money expended the people of our country
get greater benefit ad mee practical re-
sults from the Department of Good Boads
Bureau than from any other deprtmat.
Their work is of a very practical charae-


MAYOR GKRON M. NOLAN, OF JACKU1YVI m
He has welcomed more conventions of an industrial character since his term of
office than any other chief executive of a municipality in the Southeast. Sinee
Christmas past he has welcomed the National Educational Asoedatin, the South-
uatern Stock Growers' Amoeatio and the NatiomI Good Bonds AmoelatbM


ter. They Srst And the very best material
that can be obtained at the lowest emt
and I believe it their purpose to always
me local material; ad in tMhr klr-
garte. object lemon road building the
show the people just how the wrOk shou
be done, and what kind of madehery it I
necessary to se, aad it ms very re-
markable, indeed, in view of the et that
thin department iha beea in exintam. mo
long and hais alwhraystood ready to r
out information, examine erisi aWA
make scientie tests of the valie of te
material for road building prpoe that
so many emmmirta have gem alead
without thi informati, anrdl a rm
even in our own State, hundreds of 'thi-
ande of dollars have been a d, beth la
the selection e material saM mi ny.
The t toght that oenred to tLh
members of the good roads minmlee o
our Bard of Trade wa to gt in tom
with this departmmet d goverame, and
I know it was a act of wisdom O tle
part to do o, and that under th intelW
gent superision of Seator DoBg ad hs
able assistants, we hall make no mistMa
in this county in the seleetio of our mate-
rial or in the methods of enstarnti.,
and it i very gratifying to me to note that
so many county commissioner a other
eitizems of our State who amr directly
tereted in the contruction of god rl
are present, and will see the praetiel
working of the good roads rlitery,
and will become more familiar with th
value and metods of thi depautmnt
government.
"nla a io I wl m y that I atr
your deliberations may be prodat of
great good, aad that your stay in r ty
may be pleanaut, ad when you rt to
your homes in tha vario portia of i MS
country, you wil Wt you pl ma
recollections at Jae&Boevifl ita people
and of the Board of Trade."

New Celmy Lands In Dipt
Valdoets, Ga., Jan. 1i-The new colony
town of St. George, in Chariton coaty,
bids fair to become involved in a law nuit
which has already beem Sed. Mr. G. C.
Daughtry old the olony company 4d40
aeres of land. Sine that time it dWmelo
that six ad a half acres of the lot she
sold is claimed by another party. It in
heated in the heart of the new town, ad
will be very valuable, as the town is bi
rapidly settled.
There is another 100 aeres of land on
the suburbs also cimed by another
party. The colaoy company will ra Mrs.
Daughtry anad try to force her to perfeet
the titles. -It is understood ehe esimme he
told the byers that there were other
claimatas to them two small tract, and
having me pat thim ea Apo ah thind
that her respoasiblty has ausd The
ease prIss to be iof m lner.





2 THB WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL E OOID.
-------------------.I-----------IIIII- I----------------- -- -- ---


e. L. ROGER PUsmrNTr.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, VIcE-PswDsWms


PC. H. HODGOON, -c, sad Tuas'a


DILECTOILS C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. LMfehdra and J. A. COmafort, d Jasssoville;
t B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Penscol.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Mail Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa. Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grooery Company
of Jteksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf' Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensaoola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.
m


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


C lestt f me ThreeStory aslIMdlg, 70x200; oee two-story bldllag. 5Ox39fO mn ame.stery abldlag, 80x20,
maklmg the largest space of amy Compauy of the kiw I tthe Seth.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
BrEnches Tampa, Fla., Pensacola. Fla., and Savannrh. Ga.


Ta c wILL wOr DOLLAS TO TO Te--T Wm-----------------
TEn RUC:OE WILL 133 WORTH DOLLARS TO YOU 3V= WWL







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 8
] - . . . . .I


IAWMILL 1M I MEIT.

Mmtly Sesisi f the Georgia later-
State Th Week.
The eorgia Interstate Sawmill Asocia-
tion met at the Board of Trade rooms
Jackesoville, Tuesday, January 17, in reg-
ular hi-mouthly session, H. I. Tift presid-
ing, and g. C. Harrell, secretary. There
was a good attendance of members.
The meeting was a most interesting one,
sad many prominent and important ques-
Stion came up for discussion, some of
which wee put over until the next meet-
ing. The most important thing done was
the adoption of the rules of inspection, as
agreed upon by the various committees
representing several Northern associations
at Savannah a short time since. The rules
will be known as the interstate rules of
1906, sad will go into effect on February
1 next.
A resolution was adopted requesting the
committee that has the prosecution of the
railroads for non-equipment of standards
to sead out a notice to each member to
send in his expense, at the rate of $1.0
per ear, to that committee, with a view
to having suits instituted against the rail-
roads in test cases.
The increase in freight rates of from
1 cent to three cents per hundred pounds,
which go into force on the 15th instant,
came up for protest, and a committee was
appointed to go to Tallahassee and lay the
lumbermen's side of the matter before the
Railroad Commission. This committee
consisted of Mesrs. Weyer and Conrad,
they to name a third.
An advance was made in most of the
articles in the lumber schedule, running
from $1 to $2 per thousand feet, and a
committe-Memrs. Tift, Harrell, Betta.
Paul and West-were authorized to es-
tablish a tariff of prices under the new
rules operative until the next meeting.
The meeting adjourned to meet in Val-
dosta, Ga., on february 21.

CarabDens so o
Carrabelle has a boom on-wants cor-
respondence with cotton mill owners who
desire to move their coarse mills to the
coast of the Gulf of Mexico. We will
make big inducement and if you aid
us will pay you well for your work.
W. IE LAWRENCE,
Acting President Board of Trade.
Carrabelle, Fla., January 16, 1906.

Diu eM Safe and Lock C.
No explanation is required by us to our
subscribers in introducing the Diebold
Safe and Lock Co. to their notice. They
are, of course, wanted everywhere, and
the qualities of their safes and locks in
resisting not only the terrible ravages of
the most destructive fires, but also what is
equally important nowadays, the terrible
ravages of the most destructive thieves,
is daily dembastrated by one or the other
and we take a little pride in mentioning
the fact that the "Diebold" were the only
safes that were absolutely fireproof in
the Jacksonville fire, May 3, 1901. Their
chief works are at Canton, Ohio, and
their branch office, tore and show rooms
are to be found at 104 Main Street, in
our city, and that John S. Franz has
charge of the latter is a popitiev proof
that the fullest enquiries will be met, and
all information readily given


The Caneo Ce
The Cannon Co., manufacturers of bar-
rels, of Quitman, Ga., with plants at Quit-
man, Ga., Cairo, Ga., and Monticello, Fla.,
is one of the evidences of industrial en-
terprise and success that has developed
the Southeast to such a remarkable ex-
tent.
The basis of this business was founded
by Mr. H. G. Cannon about twelve years
ago on his farm near Cairo, Ga. Cypress
syrup barrels only were made and these
from hand rived staves. The business
prospered and in a few years it was
moved to Cairo and a shop built.
This proved a good move as it put the
business on the railroad and in touch with
the world. It was carried on there for
some years, and in 1901 was consolidated
with other plants at Quitman and Meigs,
Ga. At its incorporation the company had
$7,000 capital stock, all paid in in cash.
This capital has since been increased to
$15,000, and again last year to $20,000,
and will be increased again at the annual
meeting the latter part of January.
Since its incorporation the company has
acquired valuable timber tracts in Flor-
ida and has built two mills which are now
working up this timber into material for
its cooperage shops.
The company's production of syrup bar-
rels has increased enormously from year
to year, and is now probably the greatest
of any concern in the country in this
line.
The last few years the company has
devoted a great deal of time and attention
to other branches of the cooperage indus-
try and is now making a specialty of tur-
pentine and dip barrels.
The company attributes its success
mainly to its policy of hiring only white
coopers and these the very best to be had
in America.
With them they have been able to turn
out a superior package and this reputation
has brought them a great deal of business.
The company has never seen fit to make
its production with machinery, still it has
been able to meet competition and if at any
time its field is incroached upon to such
an extent as to make it felt, the company
is fully able to equip itself with machin-
ery. This has never been done, for the
company has always considered that qual-
ity should be the first aim in turning out
tight packages and has believed that the
highest quality could best be had from
expert white men rather than from the
best machines.

J. D. Weed & Co.
In a letter from J. D. Weed & Co., of
Savannah, Ithe well known dealers in
hardware and turpentine tools, the irm
says:
"We appreciate the business that is
coming from our customers in the State of
Florida. We are still carrying a large
line of turpentine tools, hoop iron, etc.,
used in that line, as well as a large line
of hardware and mill supplies, perhaps
one of the largest stocks carried in the
South and are ready at all times to fill
orders promptly."
This is one of the South's most reliable
firms and the Record takes pleasure in
commending it to all of its readers.

Messrs. Aycock & Williamson have re-
cently purchased the large and fine tur-
pentine properties which were owned by
Messrs. Cook & Story, of Pollard, Ala..
Mr. J. Carl Williamson will have charge
of this place.


NUBIAN TEA rr t.u. mL.. m a

BENEDICTA A -medis r w*-

CUBAN RELIEF F C. "cr.t m-W

CUBAN OIL A a. t --..sNie s Cte, BOrA
A supply of these medicine is what every family mnds to
insure good health.
*Write for pries and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,
amtkeoatt Te.emoe. 4



THE ARAGON
J*CKsoimjuc. ruL
NOW OPEN*
Under new maawmmnst. ThorleIy
renovated and repaired throughout, im-
cluding new eleetrie elevator aad our
own elctrie light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.



HOTEL ROSELAND S"ss
mSWAU Tes-i asit 10id
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Every comfort and amuseimen. Unexcelled enui~e Northam k -n* b l Suani s, t.. tol
weekly; to a daly, Ameriea plan. Iustrate booklet mn afld. eNat to estrh f
hotel around. Headquarters for naval Stores me. 1iabersent *sa aow ss Ga
conentioa delegates A. K. KKNOLM. Pae-esma.



Windsor hotel

Jasdialislf Fka1%"i
lMrni s LNS a@w

Year-Round Hotel.
DOID S. CULLE"S,


THE- AINmRoiAN PLAN
GRAND VIEW HOTEL 2.o PER DAY UP
s *PeIL waSKLY AT-

-- TILE *UROPAN PLAN
ST. GEORGE HOTEL( em U. 7. m

MRS. QEO. W. BROOK, PROPMIETare.

Whem Yem Are ie M Jame sle It Atk-a


WOLFE'S EUROPEAN HOTEL.
cwrer -rg ame an sOreS.
Bates Wo. e and Sm.00 per a tv, hrst (la Restaranst i Comoetlcam JL M. WL T. MC m r
W. J. L'ENGLE, J. W. WADE., .. I0G. RI
PrMedent. Vioe-Pramit. os'e am r


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PBNSACOLA, PLA.


NOW OtLEAANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


1= 1111n=1 U MIu nGA& U*TEA JE*LMA&









4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


M. COnre Paper.
The subject tha I have been asked to
speak' o is mo of muea wide possibilities
that I feel very deeply my inability to do
jettce to the matter before me. When,
however, I stop to consider the vast im-
postanes of the future of the meat busi-
am t this body of men, I am constrained
to fee that it is my duty, even in my
humble wy, to do what I can to explain
to you a few of the more important points
as they occur to me. Without good cattle
good sheep and good hogs, there can be no
future to the meat bsineas, in the sense
in which we are interested. We are all
vitally interested in the proposition of
growing ive toek that will bring a good
market price. My entire business life-
some twenty-one year--has been spent in
the picking business, and I do not claim
to be well enough versed in live stock rais-
ing to talk intelligently to you men of
experience in that particular line.
I have gained some practical knowledge
from actual experience in handling Geor-
gia ad Florida acatle during the past year,
and shall endeavor, to the best of my abil-
fty, to give you the benefit of that expe-
rience as appli to my subject-the fu-
tan of the mat baplr-aad outside of
that IX dal. aply ti ni to the meat
feature of the discussion.

You am plolbly aware of the fact that
some few Jacksonville citizens have asso-
ciated theismehle together for the purpose
of ereting a slaughtering plant in this
city. It is now in course of construction,
and we will be delighted to have the mem-
bers of the Cattle Growers Association pay
us a visit to see how a small but up-to-
date packing plant is erected. Pardon us
for saying so, but we feel that the estab-
lishment of a plant of this nature will be
of direct benefit to you men who are in the
cattle growing business. Can you afford
to be cattle growers simply to be growers
of common grass cattle? You and I and
each and every one of us are striving to
make our investments so that we will get
good returns on the money invested.
Will you do it by raising range cattle? I
am sue we wi ll agree on the answer.
No. Yn wll not I hail from the West,
where a few years ago the children of
the day, who were the young men and
young women of the morrow, were taught
from infaey that the star of empire shone
brightest in the land of the West. A few
year ago I east my lot with the South.
Here I expect to live, here I expect to die,
and I thank the great God from whom all
blessings Sow that the star of empire is
no longer eonaned the West. A bright
halcyon light shows clearly in our South-
ern skies, and the young men and young
women of to-day re impressed forcibly
from all aides with the fact that some of
the brightest pages in the history of our
glorious land are being written every day
in recording the material advancement of
the South.
The question hat should very naturally
present itself to s is, What are we doing
to strengthen that material advancement?
Are we leaving as a heritage to our chil-
deana pag in atL hiory of the century


that will show that our part has been
properly done?
Live at Home.
Have you men ever stopped to think of
the vast amount of meat that the large
packers of the West ship annually into the
South? We are a part of the great hog-
consuming section of the United States.
The immense traffic in beef, both dressed
and in the can, in the Southern States
can best be judged by the vast number of
distributing agencies established by West-
ern packers throughout the South. You
are all familiar with the fact that these
agencies are located in every town of any
importance in the South, doing what? Dis-
tributing the products of the West. Are
we doing our duty to ourselves in not de-
veloping our own resources? The time is
now at hand when we must develop the
cattle industry. Haw can it be done?
Let me cite you an instance of a tran-
saction that came directly under my no-
tice:
A Practical Illustration.
We contracted with a very responsible
colored man in Alachua County. in July.
1904, for 175 head of cattle for delivery
luring December and January. The party
with whom we contracted paid $13.50 per
head for most of the cattle. He put them
into his prairie pasture and kept then,
there until September. He then put them
in his cornfield, let them eat beggarweed
grass and shucks, and finally turned them
into a velvet bean field, and secured from
us when they were ready for market a
fraction over $17 per head f. o. b. his ship-
ping point. Now, if you will figure 175
head at $13.50 per head, you will find
that he paid $2,362. He sold the same cat
tie to us at slightly over $3,000, meaning a
profit to him of $700, or 29 per cent gross.
Now, I would ask you gentlemen present
if you are aware of very many lines o!
businesss that will pay a gross profit of
29 per cent. I think this little transac
tion is well worthy of consideration. Her
this man bought range cattle, fed them and
took care of them, and in a few months
nade $700 gross. Surely the feeding ex-
enses deducted would leave him a hand-
some net profit.
A Sigaifiaat Later.
We recently purchased some sixty-five
or seventy head from our worthy president,
Mr. S. H. Gaitekill, and in the correspond-
ence that developed between us in our en-
deavors to consummate the purchase, Mr.
Gaitskill wrote in one of his communica-
tions as follows: "Will you make a differ-
ence in grass cattle and corn-fed or vel-
vet bean fed cattle? The Chicago market
runs from 3 to 7 cents, and some below
3 cents, but they can't get all of the 7-cent
cattle that they want. Now, where is the
:)rofit in my feeding for you if you have
ao trade that wants and will pay for feed-
ing? Are you going to tell the Florida
feeder that you cannot pay more for a
steer that is ripe, and made so by corn,
than you will for a half-ripe steer? If
this is to be your position, there is but
poor encouragement to the feeder, and
no inducement is held out to the cattle
men to make better catle. I am hoping


Important Papers Road


At tho Lot Doy's Sessin of the Sotlwumoan Sbo* Giomwes'
First Annal Convention.
+~~1-NNYYI CC d uIr


you are ready to advocate better blood, a
cry you hear every day in Chicago, but
unless you can show something better than
talk it will have poor results. Can you
say, will you say, that you will pay for
good beef if the cattle men will produce itt
If you can ay. this, say it quickly aad
say it with a strong, loud voice, that every
cattle man in the State may hear you"
Will Pay Better Prices.
In giving you the above, I have quoted
from his letter, and I am here now to ay
to you as he requests, with a strong, loud
voice, that we will pay a better price for
corn-fed and velvet bean-fed cattle. I am
here to say to you that the packer will,
the packer can and the packer must pay
you better prices for well-fed and well-
bred beef cattle; and I can may to you
further that those who are interested as
stockholders in the Florida Packing Com-
pany would know that their money was
invested very poorly if they did not feel
fully confident that the cattle and hog
growers of this section of the country
would feed and breed live stock that would
be worth infinitely more than the common
stock that is offered so freely to-day, and
right here, I wish to compliment Mr. Gait-
skill on having delivered to us the best
steers that we have purchased in Florida.
They were well fed, and dressed out a
fraction over 51 per cent. It was my
pleasure to visit Mr. Gaitakill at McIntosh,
where I saw his cattle and observed his
method of feeding, and I want to say to
you gentlemen that, notwithstanding my
limited knowledge of the feeding propo-
sition, that if all the members of this as-
sociation would feed as he does, if they
would teach their neighbors to do so, it
would be a very short time when we would
realize that we were attaining the very
object for which this organition was
formed. Every-thing about Mr. Gaitskill's
place indicated to me that he is in the
cattle feeding business in the proper way.
He had a machine for cutting corn shucks,
and made a special food which I am sure
he will be very glad to tell you all about.
And, gentlemen, the food was placed about
his pasture in an inviting way. It made
me feel that he took as much pleasure
in giving his cattle good clean food, as we
all delight in giving to our children. I
wish to emphasize the fact that we secured
from him the very beat cattle that we
ever purchased in Florida.
Packer Must Pay.
Can the packer pay a better price for
good cattle? This is a question you should
consider fully. If he cannot, then your
efforts must of necessity be in vain. Hav-
ing handled and dealt in dressed cattle
for many years, I am, I believe, in a posi-
tion to reiterate what I have already said,
and that is, that the packer can, will and
must pay you more for well-bred, well-
fattened stock. Men well posted in the
dressed beef business will tell you that
this year is remarkable in the fact that
the West is producing practically no med-
ium grade. The packers are able to secure
either very poor or the best quality. Those
who have fattened have gone into it to
-et only the best they could produce. You
see the results. In Chicago last week, top
cattle brought as high as six ents, while
the average price of good beef cattle wea
$4.60. Whether or not we can ever hope
to raise cattle that will compare favorably
with these high-grade Western cattle is a
question n to be determined later on. The
point I wish to make, however, in mention-
ing the prices paid by the Western packers
is that you can get more money for your


THE RECORD IS TH 80SUTI'S GREAT TRADE JOURNAL.


well-bred and wel-fed stoek.
The serub cattle ca be brought up to a
standard that will make them ompsti-
tors of the Western cattle consumed in
Florida and the South. We need notbihg
more to demonstrate that to our entire
satisfaction than to consider fully the ex-
ample given to us by Mr. Z. Chambli
of Oeal. I shall not attempt to speak on
this matter at any great length, became
my friend, Mr. Chambliss, will tel you all
about it. I do, however, want to eall
your attention to the fact that he has
produced by ordinary methods of eeding,
without any real special effort, a beef eat
tle which weighed 00 pounds on foot,
dressed out 416 pounds--a average of 1
per cent. All of this done and the animal
one year and seven days old. We slauglt-
ered the animal for him, and I am hen to
say to you that it is a splendid piece
of beef. It grades above the average of
beef being shipped here from Fort Worth
by the packers, and is at once a direct
competitor of the Western product. 1
maintain that every true friend of Florida
owes to Mr. Chambliss a debt of gratitude
for the work of education that he is ear-
rying on.
Diascmused Baby eef.
A discussion of the baby beef on exhi-
bition followed. Mr. Coaroy explained
that the packing home was not completed,
and that the beef had been butchered ac-
cording to the old method. He aimed
that had the beef been chilled properly
it would present meeh better appeara ,
and would be in better shape in every way.
He said that while it was not up to the
New England standard, it was ahead of
the average beef shipped here from Fort
Worth.
CL C. P. Goodyear Spe.
Co. C. P. Goodyear, of Brunswick, spoke
on the market for meat and meat prod-
ucts and market possibilities. Colonel
Goodyear prefaced hi address with a
timely suggestion to the citizens of Jack-
sonville, stating that while the Board of
Trade entertained elaborately, there were
few citizens of Jacksonville who encour-
aged the movement with their presence.
He continued his address as follows:
"At the meeting of your asoestion last
year, I made some eowinFrier-- of the
Southern States, embracing the pine belt,
in ownership of Jive stock with the banner
live stock State, Iowa, showing the pos-
sibilities in these States.
"Iowa, owning ,000 per square mile of
territory; Alabama, Georgia and Florida
should, to equal her per square mile of
territory, have an ownership of live stock
of $850,000,000.
"The eight banner States of the Union
in ownership of live stock have a average
per square mile of $*,000; sad Georgia,
Alabam and Florida, to equal that aver-
age, should have an ownership of $*40,-
000,000 in live stock.
"Alabama, Georgia and Florida own but
$8,000,000 worth of live stock.
"It was clearly shown by speakers at
your convention last year, that these
Southeastern States have infnite advan-
tages over Iowa in forage plants, in short
period of feeding in winter, in les need of
shelter, in shorter period of fattening,
in lower percentage of losses by death
from all eaes. The cattle of these three
State do not die of drouth in summer
or blizzard in winter, as on the great
ranges of the Far West.
"The testimony in your convention last
year was also coin i that improve-
ment in sime and quaityy breeding "up
the native stock tirea y praticabl










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


The statistia of population and in-
cease of meat producing animals, both for
the United States and for the world, show
clearly that population increases in far
greater ratio than the increase of meat-
producing animals, ad this has been true
for a log period of years.
"It is further clearly shown that the
consumption per capital of meat and meat-
produets increases with prosperity. The
people will have meat if they can find
money to buy it.
"The increase in manufactures of all
kUn in these three States i rapidly build-
ing up great centers of population, creat-
in larger home markets.
"eW shall go into the business on a
large seale because we can add weight to
a beef at not exceeding 3 cents per pound,
against the Westerner's cents per pound.
"The saving of freights in supplying
our intsrm-nu-te home markets is another
vital en-L4arptirm
"What of our facilities for supplying the
remainder of the country? We are as
near Chicago an the cate ranges of the
far West. The Eastern markets-New
York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore-we
an supply by choice of water or rail
routes.
"The foreign markets-Liverpool, Lon-
don, Astrdam, Bremen, Havre, Barce-
loaa, indeed the United Kingdom and all
of Europe-are they not at our docks,
demanding evary pound of meat and meat
products we can spare
"The South in the past twenty-four
year has been the sene of a vast devel-
opmet, unequalled in any section of
the United States; its statistics a ro-
mance of progress, yet this progress is
but the infancy of a vast development for
the next twenty-four years, which will
command the admiration of the civilized
world
"If the eight southern States which em-
brace the pine belt section, exclusive of
Texas, should go into mea production
upon the sale per square mi of Iowa,
the eas realized yearly would far exceed
the m00M0M for which the cotton crop
sold in 190.
"When the South supplies her home mar-
ket with meat and meat products and
ips a nrplus abroad, she will have ef-
feetted an eonaomic revolution. While
she is doing it, she is attracting white
men ad solving the problem of the races
in the only way it will ever be solved.
"With earnest development of this great
and attractive industry, and the industries
it will foster, I believe it will make the
South in the next forty years richer in
her farm lands by not less than $,000,000,-
000, and in her yearly output of cash
products of not less than $1,00,000,000."
Prefemer Comar on Feel.
Profesor C. M. Connor of the University
of Florida spoke in reference to feed for
stock.
In reference to the silo, he said he had
by practical methods demonstrated that
the silo was a success in Florida, and he
strongly recommended it as the best prac-
tical method of feeding stock.
He referred to the prairie grass, com-
mon in South Florida, and said his ex-
periments with the grass had demonstrat-
ed that it was a rapid grower and would
maxe excellent feed. Mexican June corn
was advocated as the best plant for hold-
ing up the velvet bean. He said that his
experiments demonstrated that it required
a pull of ffty-six pounds to pull over a
stalk of June corn, while only six pounds
were required to pull over a stalk of or-
dinary corn. He advocated the planting


of June corn to hold up the velvet bean,
and demonstrated the importance of hold-
ing up the bean vines until late in the
fall, so as to give feed to the stock.
He called attention to the fact that
stock should not be taken off the range
and fed with rich food without gradually
working up to it.
Professor Connor in conclusion urged
that the stock growers take a few hours
at each session for the study of the situ-
ation as to hogs and sheeo, claiming that
they, too, were important in connection
with the movement to enhance the grow-
ing of good stock. He also urged that a
careful study of conditions, feed, etc., be
made, and wanted the assistance of the
association in securing an appropriation
at the next session of the Legislature for
carrying out a study on this line at the
experiment station.
The account of the studies conducted at
the experiment station was given with
a great deal of interest, and was of great
value to those present.
Southern Grasses
Southern Grasses for Cattle was a sub-
ject well discussed by Professor C. M.
Tracy, of Washington, who is a special
agent of the United States Department of
Agriculture. Mr. Tracy stated that he
came here more to learn than to give in-
formation, but that the department would
study the question in Florida and other
States in the Southern section with ac-
tivity.
Mr. Welch em Baby Beef
Irving H. Welch read a carefully pre-
pared paper on Baby Beef, as follows:
Baby beef consists of finished beef at
twenty-four months old, or under this age.
To produce it simply means pushing the
calf from start to maturity-finish.
To accomplish this successfully, it is ab-
solutely essential in the first place to have
well-bred animals of the best type, such
as Angus, Herefords and Shorthorns. The
two first mentioned of these breeds have
proven to be the best for baby beef,
though it is agreed by a vast majority of
stockmen that the more cross of Short-
horn there is in the foundation stock, the
better the results.
The pith of this subject is that formerly
the cattle bred were coarse, slab-sided,
big-bellied animals, that required full
growth almost before they reached a con-
dition in which they would yield a fair
proportion of meats on choice cuts-ten-
derloin, sirloin, porterhouse, etc. As the
population of the country increased, free
ranges were cut down, and land in the
feeding country became too vauable for
grazing, scientific breeders .took hold of
the matter, not only for altering the con-
formation and character of the rough cat-
tle to make them produce more of the
high-priced meat and to produce it at as
young an age as possible-the idea being
to make the animal dress out more high-
priced cuts than formerly and to take on
its growth and fat at as young an age as
possible. The reasons for these efforts
are manifest in all published experiments
in dressing common and high grade cattle.
In this connection, I want to urge most
earnestly every stockgrower to obtaiif and
read the farmers' bulletins issued by the
Department of Agriculture, particular ly
No. 143, Conformation of Beef and Dairy
Cattle, prepared by Prof. A. M. Soule, of
Tennessee, which illustrates very clearly
the evolution of the native cattle to the
type desired for profit. The bulletins b)
the agricultural colleges of the South will
also be very instructive, and the beginner


in stock business can save much valuable
time by taking advantage of the informa-
tion derived from the experiments of pro-
gressive men.
An Ideal Breelig Greud.
The territory covered by our Southeast-
ern Stock Association is an ideal breeding
ground, and should be producing the calves
for Northern feeders to make the baby
beef of the world. It is perfect nonsense
to say we can't raise better cattle than
we do, because States with like climates
and forage conditions have demonstrated
that we can. All that is necessary is to go
at the business right, and do it now, and
success is assured. We have object lemons
in our own State of Florida, and I leave to
such progressive citizens a Messrs. Chain-
bliss, Gaitskill, Anderson, Holcomb, Skip-
per, et al., to impress upon your minds
how easily you can achieve success, and
will confine my remarks to the topic as-
signed me.
The desirability of quick returns from
two-year-old fat cattle rather than from
four-year-olds, is easily figured out, in ad-
dition to the fact that the meat from a
young animal must in the nature of things
be more tender than that from older ani-
mals. If an animal produces 1200 pounds
of meat in two years, the proportional
amount per year is 600 pounds, whereas,
if he only produces an average of 533
pounds per year, or sixty-seven pounds
per year in favor of the young animal,
which has also eaten proportionately less
food, the amount he will eat in the third
year being considerably greater than in his
first and second years.
Experiments have given us some valua-
ble statistics as to comparative cost of
feeding baby beef and aged cattle. Good
authorities say that 9 pounds of grain
ration will make 2 1-4 pounds of baby beef
and it takes 28 pounds to make 3 pounds
of two or three-year-old beef.
In addition to this, there is the interest
on the amount invested for a year longer
and the risk of loss.
Without good breeding cattle will not
take on a finish at an early age. Then it
is necessary to feed liberally from the be-
ginning. One advantage is that it takes
relatively so much less to make beef on a
yearling than a two-year-old. To illus-
trate: Mr. L. H. Kerrick, of Bloomington,
Ill., had the second prize bunch of year-
ling Angus steers at the recent internat-
ional. I don't recollect the exact sale price
reported, but the two-year-olds outsold
the yearlings between 50e. and 75c. Not-
withstanding this, Mr. Kerrick said that
the yearlings had made him decidedly the
most money.
What Time Has Acc-mplihd
Years of time and money by the thous-
ands have been spent to get a class of
cattle that could be matured under two
years, and it has been accomplished. They
have been developed, and we can profit
by this experience, if we only will. Two
years ago we fed on one of our Dakota
ranches a carload of heifer calves that
were mixed Shorthorns and Herefords. At
the age of fourteen months and seven days
they averaged 858 pounds, and sold fop,
4:85 per cwt.. which made a nice profit.
Early frost caught our corn that year, too,
so that it was not the best of feed. These
calves were dropped in April, and ran in
pasture until September, when they were
nut on corn and fed until the following
Tune, when they were sold. Of the twen
y-six head, all did well except one, which
iad a "yellow streak" in her! likely, and
took to growing instead of fattening.


The Ressn Given.
You may raise the question, why do
not all feed baby beef? The answer should
appeal to every member of the Southeast-
ern Stock Growers' Association. It is be-
eaue the high-priced land in the feed-
inging section of the United State will
not permit every breeder to raie his
calves, and he has to depend upon the
Southern breeders for feeders, and has to
take our common serub stock, which will
not fatten until they have arrived at ma-
turity, anywhere from three to lix yms
old.
Too much annot be said for ful-bbod
animal, nor for baby beef, though we ea't
export the letter as cheaply a we ea
the larger animal. It is noticeable, how-
ever, that our English friends are taking
lighter.weight cattle every year, and woeud
prefer our baby beef could we afford to
send it to them.
Beef is what people eat, and that is
what they want. They do not want bone.
If you ar going to have something to
sell, raise the kind that people want, sat
in doing so you will program ad pOa-
per, not yourself alone, but your country
and State mad nation.



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THE RECORD WILL BE WORTH DOLLARS TO YOU EVERY WEEL









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Testing of Turpentne and Linseed (

Mac has been written about the test- just touches the bottom of the cup.
lag of these two important painting mate- blowpipe is connected with the gas
rial in the text-books and journals de- a small flame about the-sise of a pe
voted to paints and painting, but still ranged. The heating of the oil is
there is something wanting, says the Oil proceeded with when the tempei
S and Colourman's Journal, judging from reaches 300 degrees F., the blowpipe
the fact that the editor of this journal is brought close to the surface of t
often get queries as to simple methods of for a moment, and then taken away.
testing for purity. The question which is repeated at about every five di
always arises is, Has the painter the rise in temperature until a flash of
proper means of making the tests? It is passes over the surface of the oil
no use gaming any tests unless the would- the flame is brought close to it; the
be tester will go to the trouble and ex- perature at which this happens is
pese of providing the necessary means the flash point. With pure linseed
of carrying them out. Now generally good quality this will not be less tha
nothing very elaborate will be needed, but degrees F., although occasionally a
a artasi minimum amount of appliances sample may flash slightly lower. If
should be provided, and, given these, very eral oil be present the flash point wi
little di ualty will be experienced in carry- be higher than 420 degrees F., and m
iN oat the tests that will be described, down to 360 degrees F., according t
Thbs, tests will be about the simplest character of the oil used. If rosin
that me well be used to determine the present the flash point will n9t e
purity or otherwise of a given sample of 330 degrees F., but will usually be 1
turpentine or linseed oil There are many If an oil like rape or cotton seed be
oth tets that can be used, but some ent the flash point may range from
of thee are rather delicate, and requirP to 500 degrees F.
more skill i making than the oil user Saponification Test.-Linseed oi
would be likely to possess. Many of those common with other fatty oils, when 1
who have written an this subject seem with a solution of caustic potash
to have had the unlucky knack of describ- caustic soda, undergoes saponificatii
ing these tests to the exclusion of some is made into soap. This makes a co
others mare easily carried out and equally ient test for the purity of a saml
reliable linseed oil and its freedom from mi
Linsed Oil. and rosin oils. There is required to
Specifle Gravity.-Thi is a most import- out this test a solution of 28 grami
ant test as regards ols in general, and not pure caustic potash in 1 litre of m
at all diflalt to carry out. All that is lated spirit (rectified spirit of wine '
required is a small chemical balance, set be better), a standard solution of
of weights, ad a 25 gramme gravity hot- phuric acid containing exactly 49 gral
tie. The bottle ia first of all carefully per litre, a wide mouth flash fitted %
washed out with a little methylated spirit, cork and long wide glass tube, a
S than with other, then dried and weighed bath, Bunsen burner, 25 c.., pipette,
on the balhane The oil to be tested is rette, and a test solution of p
thea tested as to its tbmperature by meana phthalein in alcohol. The test is c
of a thesoeter, aad then heated or out as follows: 25 .c. of the alce
cooled until it stands at 0 degrees F., potash solution are placed in the
which is the standard temperature at and after the long glass tube has
which tihe spedi gravity of all oils is inserted, boiled on the water batl
taken. The bottle is now quite filled with 20 min., then a little cold water is a
the oil, taking care to avoid air bubbles, and a few drops of the phenol phtt
the topper inserted, and the outside wiped solution added; a strong red colour
S dry. Next it is weighed, and so the be produced. The burette is filled
weight of oil required to fill the bottle at the standard solution of sulphuric
0 degree F. ascertained This weight is This is now dropped into the flask,
mow divided by 25; the result is the spe- constant stirring, until the red colou
ci;e gravity of the oil. Take as an ex- appears. The amount of acid solution
ample: is noted; this is called the blank
Weight of bottle aad oil .... 39.064 g. The amount usually is about 11 c.c.
Weight of bottle ............15.780 grs. the flask is carefully cleaned out
-wiped dry and is weighed, and ex
Weight of oil ................. 2.284 grs. 2 grammes of the linseed oil weighed
S38 divided by 25 equals 0.93136. it. 25 e.c. of the alcoholic potash sob
The specific gravity of genuine linseed is measured in, the long glass tubi
oils ranges from 0.90 to 0.935, varying in tached, and the whole heated for 20
different kinds; any oil below 0.930 or utes on the water bath, shaking at i
above 0.7 may be looked on with sus- vals. Wtaer is next added; note th
picion, and should be subjected to further the oil be pure fatty oil, the mixture
test be clear, but if there be any miner
Flash Point.-Thi is a test that is neg- rosin oil present it will be cloudy and
leeted by most writers, but it is one that, bid. Phenol phthalein solution is add4
being easy to carry out, is worth applying, before, and standard acid from the bur
for it will eartainly determine adulteration until the red colour disappears. NotU
with mineral and rosin oils. There are re- amount of acid solution used. The
quired a small enamelled cup, holding ference between this amount and
about 2 to 3 oas., a stand for same, a used in the blank test is a measure ol
Bunse burner, a thermometer registering amount of alkali required to saponify
to 000 degrees F., and a blowpipe which oil. The following calculations have t
serves as a gas jet, having a flame about made:
the si of a pa. The cup is put on the Volume of acid for blank test ...
stand, and about. half-flled with the oil Volume of acid for oil test .......
to be tested. The thermometer is fixed so
that the bulb is completely covered by Volume of acid used ..............
the oil. TIhe Bunse burner is lit and the
aie of the lame so adjusted that its tip 6.8 multiplied by 0.066 equals 0.38(


h ITHE
The
and

now
tue Falstaff Restaurant
flame
eil Fo Ladies ad Gentlenwn
This
agrees
flame Breakfast a Is emte. Lunebon 12 to 2:30, 5s. Table d'hote
when dinner, 6 to 9 p. 7e. Oysters on half shelL After theater
tem- lunces a specialty.
called
oil of 25 MAIN STREET,
,n 500
poor JAKSONVILLE FLRIDA
min-
ll not
ay go
o the i
hil hell IIIIIIUU*iSOSIlllIS5l(l*llllllllll8*l**161 ,


PEARL WO0. PrV.


T. I. 1198SARTIFY, Vse-Pru


iNAS11 6=3101 f*M


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.

V0ms WnC, M or.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


SJACKSONVILLE, FLA.


'ith a IIIIIIIIIIIIIIi II IIIIe I IIII IIIIIIIIIIIIII, I,
water i
a bu- *
henol : W. H. BnOKWlT. W. B. 1HD1:3Mo. .. WA. u. '.
rried
ohoe BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.
flask,
been
for LARGE TRACTS OF TURPEITIIE AID MILL LAIS. I
added.
alein Rooms 1-.23, FIrst Natle0u l DBa BAWliEg.
will TAMPA, *: : FLORIDA.
with '
acid. *liIlaIIlllSlISSiISIlialtIII S lll I llSlllllOllll
with

used
edis-t CYPBEtSS TANKS
Stes Are Beat by Evoy Test


CYW rime w the e0s otbeatmomaoa
letter thenmy OWtht woo&, Aull en suctis Am
thee otber voo&, is ihpepim to adgh s
Wel and how for ae usot Semyl. lCONAt
se we amr.te. aot the seeat vm: u. m
a So sc ire the le ist seltls ot the modes
vry low swd. We Save loer beidiwguls for
10 tb= & qui2te, Of IS seaMY Me boftv MMl
SMomeo bae ae bmal betSt awinl km in gn.
Send for cWAtch and prcS.
G. M. DAVIS f SON
PALATKHA. FLOLIDIA


BETTMLINI' SPECIALTY.
I w se be imn weawD. the I Is I :
Four full arts LUOela Couty. luanybrook Ry or 31 BaHn By .. U40
td Bottles ...... U
I will msd four te qmrts f merw Caorn. Mewewo Ro e a.olem We-
tne .^ Hoafad Oi ToM Oa. Peok Bra Pemt a" HMomy
Winkey. aft and Manattmn CoohI*- -y ao the aho efr ........ A(U
Os bottle of any Of tho above ..... .......................... ................ ..
our bottlem I the foloww Cufarni Winea: grry PFt, Maro.
Catawba "A0


Ive betles D.a MAlt s.o
lacdt bottles mI
Bulk goods oa a klnda. bda Pr2e ap-plimtiM. Ar kinds of
lUquone ino gs f .M to I, L o. b. Jakrsmvil.
F. BETTELINI, W. Bay St.O Wpp Unde Dept, JauksatMi Fl


AM YOU 4 saInuina ze m0


I








THE WME]Y INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


0.0 multiplied by 100 divided by 2
equa ISiL
The oil required 19.0 per cent. of caus-
tie pota1h to saponify it. Good pure lin-
seed oil take 1& to 19 per cent. Take
a different oil:
Votame of asid for black test ...... 10.9
Vohm of aed for ol test ........ 4.3

Vole of oil used ................ U4

.4 multiplied by 0.06B equals 0358.
0.358 multiplied by 100 divided by 2
equals 17.98.
Thi sample took only 17.9 per cent.
of caustic potash, and was adulterateil
By multiplying the percentage by 100
sad dividing by 19 the amount of adul-
teratim ea be approximately ascertained.
In the above ease the 17.9 represents
9.2 per cent of linseed oil The above
three tests will sufee to determine the
purity or otherwise of a sample of lin-
seed oiL No adulterator can tamper with
his product without chaagng one or more
of the above points, and none of these
tets are difealt to carry out. They ap-
ply also to boiled leased oils, with this
dieresee, that the specie gravity of good
well boiled oil ran@s from O.40 to 0.945,
the fah point from 490 degree F. up-
wards, and the aspoiastion test from
1&8 to 1.75 per ent. of caustic potawh.
The addition of mineral oil reduces a
these points, that of resin oil ineresass
the gravity, but radues the other two
points. The addition of cotton or rape
ol0 rednees the gravity sand usually the


flash pont, but does not much alter the
caustic potash test
Turpetin.
Speciie Graity.-In the same way as lin-
seed oil. The range is from 0.80 to 0.867,
with very little difference between Russian,
French and American. Flash point, 97
to 100 degrees F.
Boiling Point.-Proeure a 4-os. stoppered
retort, thermometer ranging to 400 de-
grees F., Liebig's condenser, 100 ee. meas-
ure. Fit the thermometer with a cork or
rubber tube into the retort, so that the
bulb reaches nearly to the bottom. Ar-
range the retort and Liebig's condenser
together; best place the retort in small
pan. Measure into the retort 100 .c. of
the turpentine, and, after Axing in posi-
tion, heat up with the Bunsen burner;
note the boiling point. In the ease of
American and French turpentines this
will be 310 degrees F, in that of Russian,
325 degrees F., and it should not alter
more than 5 to 8 degrees during the period
of test. When the temperature reaches
340 degrees F., the experiment may be
stopped and the quantity of turpentine
distilled over measured. In a good tur-
pentine this will reach 97 .c., in the ease
of wood turpentine 92 to 94 cc. If the
turpentine is adulterated with rosin spirit
or petroleum oil, very much less, and the
boiling will start lower. In the case of
benoline or petroleum naphtha, much
will come over below 212 degrees F. These
three tests are quite sufficient to determine
the purity of any sample of turpentine.


SMERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

0 Still Boilers and Puaps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
g JOcksonvlle. Fla.



Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.

Anthracite, team and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. C aent, Br~ k, Piaat.
Foot Hoan St., Jacksonvile, Fla.


Cummer Lumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES end CRATES.

e* *s*e*eoese* se**0 eo* Os*Os es ei tl s -fgt-_ ea-e*:*-


U,

*


Dr, Herty Returns to the Lecture Room.


Standard Clothing Company


Dr. Ch. H Herty, who for four years
has been closely associated with the tur-
pentine producing interests, has accepted
the cair of Cemistry in the University
of North Caolina at chapel Hill, and will
enter upon the duties of that position in
July.
Dr. Herty is the originator of the "Herty
cup" and the system of turpentining that
bears his name. That he has been of
great service to the industry, no well in-
formed operator will deny.
It was six years ago when Dr. Herty was
studyinK in Germany that he began to
think of the destructive methods em-
ployed by operators in the cutting of
boxes, looking at it from a standpoint of
forest preservation, and be determined to
make some experiments in the pine belt
on his own accord upon his return to
Ameria. At that time Dr. Herty was a
member of the faetuly of the University of
Georgia. The first summer after his re-
turn to America, therefore, he took up
some experimental work in South Georgia,
applying scientifle method and the most
minute calculations to his experiments.
The Bureau of Forestry, United States
Department of Agriculture, became inter-
ested and the results were that his ex-
perimmets, am far as made, were successful


Joseph D. Christie.
It is good to not the exceptional prog-
res achieved by some of Jacksonville's
foremost young men of business, among
who m we are indeed proud to bring to
the notice of our subscribers the name of
Joseph D. Christie, business agent, room
303 Dyal-Upehurh Building.
Joseph D. Christie is a thorough young
man of business, a pioneer in, the handling


even beyond his expectations and to fur-
ther push the work and to show its dis-
position to father any movement for for-
est protection, at the same time abetting
the great turpentine producing interests,
Dr. Herty was employed by the Depart-
ment as an expert, he reaegned from the
University and the "Herty System" was
made public and encouraged. It has grown
in favor ever since.
As soon as Dr. Herty felt that the
Government had completed its experiments
along the lines that he was directly in-
terested in, he resigned from the Govern-
ment service. At this time the Herty cup
and gutter system was becoming more
popular every day and now one immense
plant, the Chattanooga Pottery Co., is
devoted exclusively to manufacturing the
Herty cups.
Dr. Herty was offered the Chair of
Chemistry in the University of North
Carolina a year ago, but at that time
declined because he did not feel that his
work in the turpentine belt had been com-
pleted. Now, however, the system is thor-
oughly inaugurated and having aceom-
plished the great work that he started
out to accomplish, he returns again to
the lecture room, and to the test tubes
and liquids of the laboratory. North Caro-
lina is to be congratulated.


of businesses and business property in
this city and State, and we advise all
those in the near future who may be de-
sirous of learning some prices and informa-
tion to at once make application to him.

Mr. A. Sessoms, one of the leading and
most well known naval stores operators
in the business was in the city las Wed-
nesday.


.0



7, 17


ne rrice


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND W RNmISNECS,
and 19 West Bay Street, t- Jhsiif r Fal Md. T
Stetson and Hawe Hat. Seeil AtttUe Gitr to Ran. Orkr
)-ilisilll~r~liilil+@ l Oi~l~ilili~l~l~e~eO:O:O:O


R. TOLAR.


J. H. HART. T. WBACLY.
(Established 1172.)


S. TOLAR, de


TOLAR. HART 4 CO.,
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.

Commission Merchants
end Jobbers of NAeml Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


JOSBPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRNNSON


J. D. WEED Z CO.,
SAVAMNAH. C"OGL4GA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OP

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Batting, Etc.


Read the Record Adv't's.


TE REC309 18 219EN "A"r r RZLUJN


I








9 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
ll -l


Lumber and Naval Stores Situation at New Orleans W ."."


J. A. L CASONf,
Vfce-preweng


SCO. J. sCoVLI
SM, aM V1 .


A special from New Orleans regarding
the lumber and naval stores situation and
gmral ews of the industries, follows:
New (Orilus.-The demand for yellow
pine is surpassing all erpec*tigon- North,
south, east and west the orders are comin
in aad the call is for everything from
hevy framing material and bridge tim-
bers to delicate mouldings and panes for
Interior fish.
President J. Sutherland, of the Buth-
erlaid-laes Company, says: "There has
been idrabe improvement on lumber
and swn timber. The interior demand is
exeptioasly good ad while European
bayers have not yet come up to Amerian
parity, considerable business has been
booked or shipment in thi year. Our
judgme- t is that the export demand will
steadily improve
The exrt shipment of lumber and
staves at s time is considerably re-
striated by the movement of cotton and
grain. This is the usual situation at this
season of the year.
The demand for oak lumber continues
good ah Or gum and cottonwood. The
latter has held its own very well during
the past year. Stocks an light and high
pries are anticipated for this year.
The markets are active, with a good de-
mad.
All during the past year the demand
was meptioany god for plain awn
white oak. There has also been consider-
able dmanm for quartenLawn. Plain oak
i is h aMd, will bring higher prices this
year tham h
ied and tpelo gum has been in fair
demmd ad prices are well matained
for the him gradM of stock.
Poplar is yet somewhat neglected, ow-
ig to the heavy toks in Europe. The
dm d fr this lumber will hardly im-
pro e until th foreign stocks are greatly
a I
U tis ae weather keeps up all win-
ter the prise of lumber will not advance
a it will f bad weather should set in.
The ights 4 froaty and the days in the
main a delightful, with just enough rain-
fall to keep the roads from being dusty
an disagreeble. It is ideal weather for
the maufsature of lumber and shingles.
and whn the yards are well stacked and
it is eay to t it to the market, the
prices are much lower than when bad
weather curtails the output and the roads
prevent its devery.
Th eypress -nf-aurrrs issued a new
list Jan. 1. This list, however, does not
show say enges from the former list, but
wa issued to bear date of this year. It
now looks as though the advance that was
promised at oe time will not take place
at the January meeting.
The eypre market is very quiet and
has ben for the pst two or three weeks.
The order are not only few in number,
but the miles are not burdened with in-
quiris. The lumber dealers are not ax-
ioas to place their order until after stock
taking. The cypress smalemen did not
start out until this week.
Cypress shingei are not as much in
demand as they were in the fall and early
winter, yet quite a number of orders are
coming in. The miles already have orders
enough to take up all the shingles that
will be on hand for the next forty-five
days. It is expected by that time that
, o,' I1 volume of business will be coming
in.


D. 0. Dunn, of Lake Charles, has closed
a deal for 60,000,00 feet of cypress in the
Laeatine swamps, a few miles east of lake
Charles. Mr. Dunn will put in new saw
and shingle mills and develop that section
as rapidly as possible.
The jury at Alexandra awarded W. T.
Parker $5,000 for the death of his son,
which occurred at the Crowell & Spencer
Lumber company's mill. The damages
asked by the parents was $10,000.
Warren & Gee's planer, dry kiln and
lumber yard at Mt. Olive, Miss., was burn-
ed recently, entailing a los of $36000;
partly insured.
The following forest enterprises have
been chartered in Mississippi:
The Oliver-MeAvoy Timber Company,
domiciled at Bay Springs, in Jasper count
ty, with an authorized capital of $60,000,
and with William Oliver and Jim McAvoy
incorporators
The Gulf Turpentine company, domiciled
at Gulfport, Harrison county, with a cap-
ital stocn of 20,000, and with J. P. Payne,
A. H. Powell and others ineorporators.
A movement is on foot among the rail-
roads with gulf coast terminals to induce
as far as possible all the white emigrants
they can to settle along their lines. This
will ai measure solve the labor problem,
for not all will want to engage in farming.
Another hope of the solution of the
vexed question of labor is the reduction
in the cotton acreage. Last year when
cotton sold from 10 to 20 cents a pound
it behooved those who had available land
to put it in cotton. Fancy prices were
paid for inferior hands and the result has
been that the production is so great that
the planter will come out on the wrong
side of the ledger. These dle hand that
will not be in the cotton fields again this
spring and summer will go. a long way in
helping the mills keep up with the orders.
All the pine miles now are running on
full time and some are going to set in
soon to work nights. This is deplored by
the more conservative, but when the mills
have been running whenever the "Missis-
sippi coon" saw fit to lend a hand, it
makes the mill owners hungry to catch up
with some of the orders or to supply a part
of the demand.
The yearly exports of lumber and naval
stores from Gulfport, Miss., were: Lum-
ber and timber, 245,2138 feet, board
measure. The yearly exports for 1903
were 105,849,000 feet, making a gain this
year of 139,364,829, an increase that sur-
passed both the years 190 and 1903 com-
bined.
The naval stores amounted to 92,726
barrels rosin and 225,480 gallons turpen-
tine.

Sea all Wer for Prntg fer the
tarpentin ad commia tades to the
Bamerd esk to itwe a prompt hwly.

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Bst In the VorM.
For delrrd prices write,
Cypress Tak Ce.. M .eal

KNABE & EMER.SON

PIANOS.
send for Pricee ad Terms.
JAS. A. ABRAMS.
I 1ai Sihlm. BIrd of TreneIw.


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURiRS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand F ctorioes
8th Street R. R. CromnI.


JACKSONVILLE.


FLORIDA


...NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA., U. 5. A.


JOHN a. YOUNG,
Predmat


J. P. WILLIAMK.s
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. AL.ORD,


C. 8
P.L 81
J-. 1
J. B


A. D. COVINGrON,
Vies-PresMemt.

I. ELIS. a i. BUOLLARD
UTHERLAND. W. C. POWHEL
PADGrrT. WAIraR BAY,
YOUNG. A. D. OOVINGTON.


L L KATTON,


.. a cxmrw,
J. B. CRmmIiOw
0. DMN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and ar
conveniently situated at the terminals of the 8. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRrIT BITHER OF THB AOVE FOR PARTICULARS.

0* 0'* *0''*00'0**e 0e o*0 00 .0ge o0.: 0: *

SJ. S. Schofield's Sons Company,

^^ Ae* Iteeetealiurters *fw

.; Distillers Pumping
I ;Outfit
No pn oplete without ee
II Hddheofthom n a Goog,
SPlorIda, Albam, Mi ale- ippi' d
Solath Csa.li. Write us for pe-
a la anm pries. We ao msnaesre N
ugh Eines, blurs aWd NA
j*^Gr Grfa Mad&"mry,
t* a well carry a tall and complete
MW MI n--- s P-e
*b aer TMes, tE
S Advise your wants.
I8; Macon, -Georgia..

Mb*****o** ****1*** fo- *T****** *et*e**:se *:*e


John R. You. J. W. Motte, CB. Pa r, Jmes MeMt W.W. Wilder,
PreMd t. Voo-res VioePres. Vie-Prs See. A Trea.



John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


Naval Stores Factors. Wholesale Grocers.

* Savs~uansh Brunswick, Ga.
,,11 S 4 4i 11 0.0sIII SISSII o ooIooo oo o m> o


VE .WaR AV~ 1111R111 T- L0 -M r







?R3'~'fI 'WU~~Y ThD~JST~I.IAL RBOIDCS.


The etre property of the Georga Car
am Manuahetriud C pny, bankrupts,
has been ordmed id by Judge A. H. Mc-
Dill, .rea ree in beakruptey. The prop-
ety e it of 1 asres of land, all the
Imdidiang, meesn ry aad other appurte-
amms a the plant, valued approximately
at UQAs The order put the entire bui-
mu et the ale la the hamdi of the trus-
tee t"he avanmah Tus Oompsay, sub-
jet to the approval of the referee and the
bankrupty court. If a private ale is de-
termn ed em, bids muat be in the hand of
the tiat by F brury 1. They will be
opened on that day, adl if ay Is suffid-
eay high to meet the approval of the
trustee, the ale will be consummated; but
if o am is atbdaetory, then the prop-
rty I to e maid at public ouatiy March
. It is possible that a number of local
eapitalib will make a bid an the property
wit a view ofd emotnuing the work of car
buigdg $a this fay.

MU1010 sawaB M N Orisai.
Eattimburg Mia., January 3.-The
luher and awmill me heated on the
Guf & Ship Islkid, New Orleans North-
meae Mobi, Jackson & Kanas City,
and M0-iisippi Otral railroads, about
mevety-ve in amber, held meeting in
this ety tday. J. F. Wder was made
ehairma aan J n. tevemn secretary. The
mesug was aned for the purpose of
tai atps 'toward a permanent orgai-
matio rvi wi w he effected before they
adjourn. T ame of the orgunisatin
will he t Misbdppi umberma's Asmo-
dlatie. It wl have headquarters at Hat-
U-l T- -inmast preerideat and
meeretary hero at yet bee decided upon,
but wil be aeem eanere the meeting


comes to a close. A ommitte eompoed
of MiUord Parker, J. H. Platt and J. E.
Barber, was appointed to draft a schedule
of prices to be adopted by the aseociaion,
and they are discussing and adopting a
seale of prices which they think will be
beneficial to sawmill men and lumbermen
connected with the association.
To Utilie Sawmill Waste.
A company, capitalized at 00,Q00W, with
$100,000 paid in, has been organized at
Hattiesburg, Miss., for the purpose of
manufacturing into merchantable products
the waste material of sawmills, such as
sawdust, slabs, etc. This is first ground
up and distilled, making wood alcohol; it
is then compressed under powerful hy-
draulic pressure into blocks or bricks and
retorted, from which wood turpentine, tar
and rosin oil, etc, are obtained, and the
retorted blocks'or bricks are turned out of
the retort in the form of the best quality
of charoal.
It has been demonstrated that the yel-
low pine shavings from the planing mills
and the slabs, and, in fact, all the young
pine, makes excellent paper pulp. The
paper mill at Orange Tex., has demon-
strated not only this fact, but that it
can be made and sold on the market with
profit at a price below what it costs the
eastern mills to manufacture wood pulp.
Southern Lumber nufturer Nest at
New Orleans.
The fifteenth annual meeting of the
Southern Lumber Manufacturers' Associa-
tion will occur at New Orleans, Ia., Jan-
uary 24 and 25, with headquarters at the
New St. Charles Hotel In the event of
the convention not completing its business
at the close of the second day the meeting


will be continued during the th. Fll
particulars as to railroad rates and hitel
accommodation can be msecred from See-
retary George K. Smith, St. I~us, Mo.

New York State Retailess to eet atl-
bany.
The annual convention of the Retail
Lumber Dealers' Asociatioa of the State
of New York will be held on the first Wed-
nesday in February (February f) at Al-
bany, that city having received the larg-
est number of votes. Plans have not as
yet been perfected am to the ,qte4-immu-t
features, but that there will be something
good forthcoming on that seore goes with-
out saying.



Trade Checks
FOR THE

COMM8AI 81 Ml88.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

ldustrial Record Ge.
Jackaouvie, iFa.


This Spae served for


Gus Muller & Co.



Liquor Merchants



JuklcuvMll htt Wffb

...Ageuta...

ACME BEER




ZINO NAILS

Turpentine Cups
Approved by .Dr. Herty. Made of a
stronE but soft eight metal. They are
ihe r maes whish will not injury
saw when left in the tes.
Snu MmIl Oo.
arS Patmpat mow Vasr A. .
Also Hesadqurt for Galvanised and
Tinned Nail, Boat Na, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Et Slating and Booing
Nail, later Tool, Copper Nall and
Taeks.


----------------- ----


The


Cooperage Company


Manufacturers of High Grade


Western White Oak Spirit Barrels



Capital $100.000.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located..


OPFICER S4


J. C. LITTLE, President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager.


JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-Preident
C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurr.


DIRECTORS:


L. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST,
W. P. COACHMAN.


W. J. KELLY


Ii '%'"%%WJ%%%%%%%%%%%%wool=@%~ s LIM
m.21z16 rcm Jmeean ~ll~CInm









--,~IWI ________________ -


Review of Navat Stores for a Week


rdiey's reak in arkit.
Savannah, Ga, Jan. 20, 190.-A big
break in the spirits of turpentine market
ame to-day (Friday) u the result of the
cumulative effet of the weakness that
has been in evidence for the last several
days and which, though the price held
ite level, caused the tone to weaken from
frm to steady, to dull and there to remain
with no bids for supplies, and, because of
the vry light reeps no pressure to
selL ie market opened dul at 631-2
cents, without sales, and at the close had
dropped to 511-2 cents, a\ whier it was
quoted frm. The new level was made
on a sale of 86 casks, the total for the
day. Receipts 450 easkr, and shipments


irts fee the Week at Savanah.
Price Repts Sales Exp. 1903
Maon., Jan. 16 15 60 160 it oi U
Tum, Jen. 17 i i a i 1A i 24
Wed., Jan.,18 % 6556 0 0I u
Thr., Jau 19.--oliday in naval stores
market.

ain fer the Week at Savannah.
onday, Jan. 160. Last Year.
WW ........... 6.15 4A.0
WG .......... 5.0o 410
N ............ 4.75 3
M .............. 4.50 3.90
K........... 4 3,16
1 .............. 3.40 3.10
H ............ .. 3.10 I 2
G.............. 2..87% 2.90
S...... ...... 2.75 2.70
z .. .. .. .. ... 2.70 286
D .......... .... 0 2.0
ABC ............ 50 2.50
Receipts, 1,800, sales 1,95, exports 1,984

Tusday,'Ja. 17.-Rosin sm; receipts
3244 ss1,573; shipments 638 Quote
ABC, S66; D, A.L0. E, $2.65@*.70; F,
$S.72 1-2e.&77 1-2; G, 28 @ .90; Hl,
&3.10; 1, *3.46; M, $50; N, $4.75; WG,
5.0S; WW, l.15.

Wednesday, Jan. 18.-Rosin firm; re-
eeip, A1,28; sales, 3,06; shipments, 1,851.
Quaot: A, B, C, ".56; D, 8.00o; E, *2.70;
.F, *.75; G, 2.0; H, $.15; I, $3.50; K.,
*4. o4.0; N, $.76. WU, t.00; WW,
pl&

Thmrnday, Jan. .-Holida, in naval
store market.
ravanm h Raval Stos Statement.
spirits. Rosin.
tok April 1 ........... ANM 44AM
Receipts Ja. 17 ......... 55 6 1,286
Receipts previously ......16861 549,30
Total ..............17411 565,14
Exports Jan. 17 ............... 1,851
Expots previously ......142,388 518,129
Total ...............142,88 52,980
Stock. Jan. 17 ........... 323 75,162
Stock. previously ........ 10,706 86,29

Turpe tie at Lodon.
1904 1903 1902 1901
Stock, De. 31 21,500* 27,294 37,662 40,445
Frenh and American.
DeL in 1904 90,300* 87,707 87,810 86,617
PrieeDee. 31 37-9 43-101-2 40- 27-41-2
Feb-AUil 37-9 44-3 40-3 27-41-2
Sav. Dee. 30 491-2 61-4 521-4 36-4
*N. B.-The figures for 1904 are our es-
timate.
Reported by James Watt & Son.
Telar, Hart & Ca's Review.
New York, Jan. 17, 1905.
The Industrial Record, Jacksonville, Fla.
Spirits Turpentine-There has been a
fair demand during past week, and as
stock here is light, market readily res-
ponded to higher prices South. Stock,
1,07 barrels. We quote Machines, 57c.
Rosin-The demand is about sufficient
to absorb receipts with about a steady
market for all grades. We quote BC,
*2.0; D, S3.00; E. $3.10; F, $3.20; 0,


$3.25 to s3.30; H, .40; I, 3.8; K, $ ;
M, $4.90; N, $*.90; W, 6 .49; WW, *6di
TOLAR, HART & CO.
Baily & f.emermuys DBarw.
New York, January 18, 1906.
Spirits Turputine-Stock, 86 barrels.
The market during the entire week ba
shown an advancing tendency in sympathy
with the Southern markets, but sales hbre
only been moderate
Thursday, Jan. 12-W5%e.
Friday, Jan. 13-55% . m.; 5f p. m.
Saturday, Jan. 14-66ta.
Monday, Jan. 16-65c.
Tuesday, Jan. 17-67e.
Wednesday, Jan. 18-67e. askle but
tone weak.
Raoin-Stock, 25,00 barrels.
The tona of this market, i- steady for
all grades, business has been fair.
AC, a2.871/; D, f2. 5; E, *3.0,6to $3.10;
F, &10 to WJS1; G, $3.15 tf $49B, I
$8.40 to $3.45; I, $3.7' to 3.n7 *.S4
to re4A; M, AMs to 04.90; N, Aeo We,
$.30 to 5.35; WW, *5.50 to 5.56.
A Year's Bsinsm at Bruswick.
Brunrawiel Ga.-The rmeeh4* et tht* ea
ports and exports for Doeasebin a the
year 1904 as given below make a credita-
ble showing. Although the values show
a slight decrease for December ad for the
year 1904 a against 1908, this- eaw be
readily a eouted for by the loen pnr;e
of lumber and cotton fore 1904 as thera
were 12,393 bales more shipped in 1904
than in 1903.
Foreign Exports for Daembr-, I9L-
Foreis export for Deeabersow ae
crease as against tie mua math ot 109,
of $182,246. This is accounted for fpas
the fact that the prices of cotton were so
much lower during Dlkembe ab. l8 tot
'in the same month of 1905.
The foreign shipmenta far December,
1904, are as follows: 34.50 bales of cot-
ton; 3,585 tons phosphate rock; 7,700 bar-
rels resinek 10 ha bmr I tpureautie *
304,000 feet lumber; 370000 feet timber;
566,000 shingles; 1000 laths; 9,00 feet
ash and oak; 14,4 ceasties; 1,00 pick-
ets; 101-2. tos mermuandise, lsai g.-
total valu of 1,463,5i8
5,41 barrMs roin; s,850 bage tur-
The domektie shipments for DVembw,
oysters; 400,00 shingles; 229,070 eroa
ties. ,000 bales straw; 480 cases cedar;
1904, are as follows. 4,300 balJe eatolu
pentine; 9,O A4 fne4 lunmp ag 0-e1e0
1,560 bale sh etng,; 5100* l fee
piling; 41 tons merchandise, hvin a total
value of. 9759,01. Foreig .and domtic
imports for Doswemab valbro at t
(855,6iM0.
cotton; 7 tons cottomeed; 60 bales nh-
ters; 35,446 tons phosphat rock; 3,00
tons pig iron; 104,180 barrels rosin; 25,
300 barrels turpentine; 2,722,000 feet
lumber; 10,187,000 feet tnimb e 1 f
gum; 1,000 feet mahogangi al bS.-
gles; 21,000 lath; 34000 feet ask and
ash; 105,000 pieces wood for orange boxes;
45,017 erossties; M26 bqs. ox sheq*; 45
Foreign Exp=er fec. J90-1lMMnheik
cases turpentine and tar; 41 tone shuttle
blocks; 1,000 pickets; 54 1-2 tons merchan-
dise of 7tal vali of $l41i0.
Domestic Exports for Year.-26,032 bales
cotton; 770 bales yagn; 50 br lisEters;
391 bales wool: 94,00 barels rosin; 34,-
100 barrels turpentine; 116346,000 feet
lumber; 447,000 feet timber; 350 cases oys-
ters; 6,63350 shingles; 130,000 laths; 21,-
000 feet ash and oak; 2,85,100 erastlss
50 bales deer tongue; 6,200 bales straw;
4.320 cases cedar; 22,04 balsa saheting;
500 barrels cottonseed oil; 433,978 lineal
feet piling; 680'tea mmrhandise, amount-
ing in value to $8,258,109.
Foreign and domestic imports for 1904
valued at 12,087,94.
Recapitulation for 1904:
Foreign exports for 1904 ....$ 84 714
Domestic exports for 190 .... 8,58,109
For. and Dom. Ia. for 1904-... .1.08 0 94
Total ...................... 8rgi


SAY ATMA N4VAL, SIOS WORD PO 10AWd AuM TWO.


Scc~~~L r~~c1908 11900-M L nf;47 t;.M'iU~O~~0
Rbxiw~ Ud,, O0,US 94 Q01.7J440
TOW-a1. 1.2its 11.38CM
EErorb
wonkb com_ ... 1W.3ftL 29f6tt V4=_
hh~a.* 75222.0975-40 GW*PU.

New W~S44.....7 ..7.............. .... 1K 0k,1709. 5
MA&,.............................. =SJ71 81,617 4 5 1

Sd 6w m ................... ......... i


IlirCor.s . ............ AMsI 0 w 1f




WmCe .901f -d FAA flu.-Ya
94*I ........... .. .. .... i*A11 nun mft71


3m m.m --_ -LSW1 10
..... .... UA =I =D0
Xbdb... .. RAW TSA 390M. I-


PM" .. ........'a SLOW no
-LDLIL . d i ek -- -1 I~lb
r~ ~ -~L ...ri .I~ .
:.5 -- uw pr -J
-h eea elr tinplhlsU.
,.... s.. .,,' t 1" 44 160lo SAM




offow so sna priapo we how 1 aICL~rY

~c~t"~~5 ~ -
-0l -I -2
u~1MW =1 1=_ A* -- 11MI
lqroft RMW hw -, Wi & .7
km. to M u "S _V

Ie '...,....... 4AM MW 4AW 111011P.- 6AW_ Ad
- 3m mo 110 M
Thus the lpuet of Mana Turpenti (or Wed ?l1k) is IM8 wen 6mobl
that of low a esr a ~s times as am as in 167. It is*iitmoe sem hbw
Pc1a"In Turpsatins.
this import itm w the -i 4 Ansm inpe
411g ci m .LIS L 4M 31 % *


Y-r&m r MOW Ar; uAa. 10 JPEA V


Apr 1 ................*..
Aa_ 3 .................


Maj Ll.; ......".' -'." "''.
May 7 ...............
am s ...................

Jm 137...............
a I ................
f1 3............. ....
May g. ...................


8i. 1 .................
Am .........*..* *..* *


Aet. 1 ...................
rWp .................
o at 14.................* *



NV.* a ...................
Nov. 4 ..................
Nv. 1 ...................

1 1 ................
Out ...................

0De. 2 ...................
Nto. 24 ...................
,No. .....................
We. 1. ....................
Wav. ..................







Dec. 2 ....................
se. i .a....................
oe. 1 ........... .........
Dee. 23 ....................
DM. I ....................

JM ,.......,.,..........


3D





tU,


n1%
10%




WAA
n1%
53%



52
0
all

81%





so
sol
81%
36%
p.




41%
43%
so-


ND

46.

V
44%


47%
45%
45
49%
%
IVA







47%
U7%
66%
43%
as,
63%




be
SO
17%
5?C
55~~
57
55%

55%
81
56





596
U'C
55%L


l% UI






61% %
43


4s% a%









so %
a% U
0% m
44 34%




W U%

1% 3%


u% 8%
51 35


51 5
50% 25
51% 5%

5. 37%,


481-

47%
48%
I
43



42%

Xl%
WA

0T%
40%
40%






43


39
311%
X7%
43%
43%


U





U
8%1
37%
5s
Ur
3:j


rn-v P- m m









f Y 0mU~5M T3OO5D. II
-' F U -


'caiut4 t ftee Is4.
The ew mills bift in the United Stat
in 1904 re a gratifying rejection of the
prosperity thi country i now enjoying.
AtlNough thk period of twelve months
preceded a -r"e ial yar, y ar mi,
were ereted, only 14 per cent. le tan
in 190I ad mane thA in ay year frozn
1807 to 18w iUlusive, with the exception
of 1900. A larger proportion of -ew m
comntrutio is found in the knitting
bImmr k thsm in previous -yea, -bt with
this.e .wp the w skills -re well dis-
tributed amsg the different branebh. The.
"deemI a4 ll frn m laslt yer's ucos
is due ,to 4be hbnegek in the cotton,
woolen and ilk braneehe m-aeell.ue

IhrwCstt8 Wills in
South- No. Spidl. iams,
......... .

Aatma. .......... 1 11,000 4
.......... .



-fnTin.. ........ 2 ..... ....
oarywi ....... ..... ....





New or ...... ...... I ...
Nowuybl ........ ...... 1
Tm.a T ......... 1



'Ix ns .......... ...... .

Totals ......... 654721,186
e io t ds in ot ill .......on-
Machuietta".'.... 5 6114 600


New H imphitre ... 1...i ... .
New Jr y........ 1 5






"1,184 spindles in the North. Only two
oNew Yk .a ...i.... 1 piles,
Rhee i d ...... ...... 24

The lrth liadt being otto w mill con-


me miNt with r m ifor a hserie of years
opinwsd hoe iard within mills at d
1,1rd topindae a i n the North. Only two


:of 4 aorhe mlms year wrnte, stpiled in
the o Sthlra tay bei wai 16 per cent
A omparieon of the northern and south-
e pl rematruetei for a t erihe of years


howig tha t iteey of thing indu try 190



,eoem m ite his mr o limits. In view
od to dicatt a decah te. teo indusorth-
try h ee. Tplirtype r drnt. o the nt few
*-lh. for the h.4 year wee tIntalled in


a North ai toareadjstmnt of vpe ent
active ity Of mill eotrion is odl, nearly
W per aest ate credited to Uhe (arotlm,
growing the temnhd b of the industry to
'eoon- tnt hlwtLnna rw limits. In view

fr the i.a**la whi th cotton du-
try been placed during the t few
y(ar owing to a readjustment of values
1h activity in mill emmtruction i conclusive
-oof >ae sound bai upoa which the
American cottan industry reats.

New England- 1904 1008 190 1901


12
New Jrsey ...... 1
Pennsylvania.....
--4
Westm State-
('alioena ........ 1
llnauis ........... 1


Southern State--
Virhgind......... 1
1
Total ...........
45 46 53
The woola iedtry n a -h -hows a de-
ampae inase.. daer of new Mill as com-
-n v" the preeding .our, there being
4arko-dan -* 490,4 compare withsx
five Ih 1w. Of thee new woolen r*i
twenty-three, or more than half of the
total inuaber, e oun in the Sttue ofd
nir n rili The sBoth is a ugigibi.
f dter In woolen aUd nbtim,
only on* being reported. as that from
Viinia,


Of the-111 newlyl kittig mlls buit in
1904, seventy or noaar two-thi-u are
found in the Middle Batea seven in Main
and the remainder are divided about ea=l-
ly between the West and SBoth. Ti
is aa industry which has also had to con-
tend with very trying conditions during
the last year, in view of which the ex-
tensive construction of new mls com a
a gratifying surprise.
New NIting Mll.
Now Lsadl .i-i- is" 19w 11- l,00
Maine ............. 1
Masachusetta ..... 6
7
ANidle .ates-
New York ........ 26
New Jersey ...... 4
Pennsylania .....
Delaware .........
-TO
SWesen -SIate.-

Idaho ............ 1
Dllinoh ........... 2
Michigan ......... 4
Minnesota ........ 1
,Ohio ............. 1
-Utih ............ 2
-Wisemsin ........ 4
-U6
Southern Stateu-
Alabama ......... 1
Miissiippi ....... 1
North Crolina .. 8
South Carolina ... 6
Tennessee ........ 1
Texas ........... 1
Virginia ......... 1
-r
Totals...........- -
-il 106 93 N
The new silk mill construction for 1904
is no exception to the general rule of on-
centration in New Jersey and Pennsylvan-
ia, these two States claiming thirty-nine
of the forty-nine mills. For a number of
years the United States has been the
largest consumer of raw ilk in the world
and the steady growth indicated by this
year's report indiates that we shall re-
tain this enviable pre-eminence.
The details regarding the building of,
miscellaneous milk are shown in the table.
There has been a notileable activity in
the construction df linen mills. The other
mills are for thd manufacture of spedal
fabrics or for carrying on options ae-
cessory to the main ranches of the tex-
tile industry.
In the lit df lroj6ted mills we and
an additional evidence of the conadence
prevailing in business ireles. In 1904,
-forty-two -new mils were ojeted as
compared with 4ity--idlht in 1M. Ae-
;tul mill eostriMeadn i mA sreau an
indication, of prosperity as is the record
of mills projecteLd. after a new mill is
wll under way opeenitie amost dell be
diseonstinued and for this'reao mew mi
are often Somplited una~ saverse md-
ness codnditions. It is 'diffMet with te1
projection of new ederpsem. A&dveanty
immediately puts an end to pla for
new business enterprises and for this rea-
eoan the reaee in the nuahier -of -mills
projeded in 104 as compared with S e
Meord -of -1003 i a very signifilant -fa
ture of pormet enemditiom.--textile World
Record.
--~ LL --

The shipment from the port of 'Ba-
vannah for the sesaon beginning July to
January 7 have been as follows:

foreign ........ s1i e 4 3)s01,
Baltimore .. . .11,M,73 4, 9,JS
Philadelphia ... .5,215,5990 0
wew York .. .. .. ,1i IIJpaW
omoat.n.. ...... ..- I
Other Ports .... .. mo4 lel M


SMcMILLAN BROS.,


Florida Copper Works.


Trpeantine 'Stlls
e *aerd AMA Wers
;OU -W& tabe in -ri for &
Kne e onesw. Peaft- 410 em-
or wi-s mf 1
w dther .d ,a l w mei:
AWRATIUE, MU. SA 0Mi 6.

u- "- -Iu m


East Coast Lumber Co.

ROIUH AND DRaMMD

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Stroer Shipmanets a Spcaty.

WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.

C.ILUNeS, fre. J.. 6 WW. VINe-PNF. RALPI JEssUP, 8.-TrN-

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.
fperters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
rIo, a Prei. Campany. OM.al6
wOme" -J m if W tk G Owume
Vkl Wl i- t 'LC--- e V al FeruWIn mud Smmmi
Cm-of eMt-lp e tU.Mflf tm.L JACKU1i M F WLL



FOR SALE.
50fo0 aeres timber land in Western rForid. Tract will ct one hundred and
Infty million feet mercholtable lumber. Has been turpentined and mady for the
-SOIl, WTOU aem. ill near the tiber caa be leased for term of year or ma
*eb a Ome u f 6e beet eopporttiities In the State.

C. BUCKM ANV 1 "h m5vl:Io, FI.F1:
eaaavfa .....


W. RUNT. Preetma
P.U Pasosom, Is V. P-


J. .. HA SS Ild V. Pr, IL U RICSmua SO& 7001M
W. .1. KMIT. 311 V. P. M.3 WuzajAm Aom 5eely-ftes.


acec-lumt & West company,

snadr or w I } 20 Bay Street, E. savemmn G. -I
Wost Ndk.eL -Jm-- L 1b,1- Isl

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are mriaety atorm Our interest and the producers' l mutual. We
awr take to .tOeonm, aw a- we Intaketetd in any eaompany that buys sirtts
Turpentine and reMda.)

WHOLESALE GROCERS,

fay, Graln and Heavy Harness.
CoopIM Weo-S aIval Stores lwarWr Our Speedty
--BOLE AGENTS FORB--
lM Gdelebrated alIN urpeatine Axes Iad WIIsen &O GOlMs'
aPI mdelpll Wag, rm
Naval Stores leelveW at Savanna Ga., Id Jackslamnve
so s m i rFlo,


-ad -IL e1-a~









IU THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RBOORD.
I I


INDVSTRIAL RECORD.
JAGME A. 30HWO1NM0
D1e61r a-" P

Puinanke N*W F9111 nu
Smimuspema Asj-r


-Th Pe s. a" A m paiitsft


A nemmunisatUns ebMl be eaiud
Thase nladusriJ i ord Company.
J cuMoovlio, ria.
hewoneb Ubesal a"d uIrnhaem Oefoe at
AdMen Ga. a eAsarnh. Ga.
watered a the Poetase at jasbhenwals
Fl., a uesrmnd-elu s mtr.

he ishhe feiten r t ad
tbMef = Oprateri' A.n. *

-sf e 1 a i mtM W Wam o uai
ral. A i m amal esrties

Adalr An il tha, I a the ffail
Nwmgaf the I 'toCte &- G Mrw A1-
sealatirn. Adpte t 11, leMf, Ma m
may *eaal epa elit T. 0. A.
toean.ed is ember poeph by spqeal
reableie adopted by On Georga UwMMM
A...sd s9s .



vatbwem af) dhl eea u Tu ay
make to imre m -lmt he th iem



Spuisi g plant an" the nma ab -







WOTI TO PATRONS.
Am i Ilthe g r sinW a Put lar -
C stEie teeste ast N. crip 1 th 0Eso
tbeet, Jadvc e, ik s, He the Very hert
mu th breat tpedinet t ytam el e
islustries. arech emc. Savannah, Ga.,
a" Aatare e.t ao

MOTIC TO PATROS.
AI psymenta ftw advertising i the In-
luhei Ramet man =nicrlptie thereto
not be mae iret to tho he e 1e
i Jamrovie. Agnts are net allowed
to maie edeltie- under any dImm-
saMMo. BIh for a rtug ud ub-
Eriptirss are mst eot from the benme
kMb whm ds, adu aI remittuan e must
be mae dinet to thi t compy.
laustrial Reh PFliHdhig Co.


TO HELP COTTON GROWERS.
Acting upon the recommendation of the
Department of Agriculture and the cotton
growing interest, Congress proposes to
make liberal appropriation for the destrue-
tion of the boll weevil and other disease
of' otton.
This information came out this week
when Repreentative Brantley, of Geor-
gia, appeared before the Committee on
Agriculture to urge an appropriation for
the emp.rimental farm at Blackshear, Ga.
This experimental farm was established
about a year ago at the instance of Mr.
Braatley, principally to study the diseases
of cotton. It has been conducted with
marked saueess under the direction of W.
A. Ortop of the Department of Agricul-
ture. Mr. Brantley was assured by the
committee that provision would be made
i nthe bill for the continuance of the
work at the Blackshear farm, and at the
same time he was informed that the com-
mittee intends to ask for a liberal ap-
propriation with which to fight the boll
weevil and all other diseases of cotton in
the cotton growing states.
Mr. Brantley says this will be grati-
fying information to the cotton growers
throughout the South.


THE T. O. A. AND THE OUTPUT.
The Savannah Naval Stores Review some
time ago charged that mome ocaal of the
Turpentine Operators' AssoNition were
preparing to increase their output. The
Record secured signed statements from
every officer and from every member of the
Executive Committee of the Association
declaring the charge untrue. Eah indi-
vidual member declared that he would not
increase his own output during the com-
ing year. This completely nailed the
Review's charges as untrue. These men
are among the leading operators in the
Southeast. They are men whose Integ-
rity is beyond question by reasonable peo-
ple, and yet the Review followed up the
original charge by reiterating it, and de-
claring that the "Record" could not be be-
lieved, etc., ec.-- lot of child's play that
men of intelligence can readily understand.
The Record did not content itself with
its own assertion, but proved its assertion
by the men named in the charge, whose
veracity admits of no doubt. Now the
Review, so we are informed, will make the
direct charge this week that A. D. Coving-
ton, president of the Turpentine Operators'
Association, and a large producer, is cut-
ting more crops than last year. This is
absolutely untrue. Mr. Covington on his
four places cut twenty-eight crops last
year and this year will cut eighteen .crops
on the same places, a reduction of ten
crops. This means both boxes and cups.
These are all of Mr. Covington's places.
He is a stockholder, however, in the Hill-
man-Sutherland Co., a corporation operat-
ing several places and this company will
materially reduce its output. It is a de-
mand of courtesy that in making any spe-
eife charge against Mr. Covington, as the
Review contemplates, it will give Mr. Cov-
ington the opportunity of a statement in
the same issue. The Record is familiar
with Mr. Oovington's operations and if
the Review publishes any statement from
him we are eonident that he will state
therein the fgures above named, which we
know to be correct.
It can be seen at a glance, therefore,
that the Review has been caught in a de-
liberate attempt to deceive, in its over-
flowing animosity toward the Turpentine
Operator Association in partiular and
producers in general. When confronted
with indisputable evidence of the falseness
of its charges it keep. up the nagging,
hoping to wiggle out with the least punish-
ment possible. We are not now setting
up this paper as an example of veracity
for we do not give a snap for anything
that the Review may ay about us, but
when men of Covington'standing make
statements in print it is foolhardy for
even the Review to try to disprove them.
The Record reiterates its former asser-
tion: The officers and committeemen of
the Turpentine Operators' Association are
holding down their output for another
year individually and collectively, and in
advising others to do so they know the
disaster that overproduction will mean,
and are endeavoring to cheek the tide in
that direction for the benefit of the en-
tire operating interests.


Quarantine on Cattle.
The Department of Agriculture has is-
sued regulations establishing on Feb. 1
next a federal quarantine against a large
part of the South and parts of other
State to prevent the spread of Splenetic,
or Southern fever, among cattle.
The quarantine lines are largely the
same as last year. The quarantined ter-


ritory embraea tihetern part of North
Carolina, all of So& Carolina, I.nlil
Territory, AlabS m, Misissippi and Lot-
isians; that'part of Virginia below the
James River and running to the nort-
east corner of Bedford County; all f
Georgia but Union, Towns and Rabun
counties; all of Arkansas except the two
northern tiers of counties which are left
outside the quarantine during the rest
of the quarantine period; part of Ten-
nessee and Oklahoma; most of Texas,
except the panhandle and the lower part
of California.
The quarantine is declared to be in
force until Nov. 1, but this date i subject
to change.


Among the Operatora.
Messrs. D. T. Williamson & Co, of Gri-
ham, FIa., have sold their large turpentine
interests located at that place to Mr. L. H.
Dickins.

Mr. A. B. Shaw, a prominent naval
stores manufacturer of Ward City, la.,
has disposed of his large interests t that
place to Mesr. J. MeK. Alford & Co.
The consideration for this property was
about $8,000.

Judge T. C. Morgan and Mr. JnO. D.
Morgan, of Ellabelle, Ga, spent several
days last week the guests of their brother,
Mr. A. M Morgan Mr. Morgan is large
naval stores operator of Benton, Fla., and
a prominent man in his section of the
State.

Mr. J. O. Evans, beaker, naval stores
operator and dealer in all kinds of tim-
ber products, was among the prominent
business men in the city this week from
Lake City.

Mr. T. C. Hall, of Oala, Fla., was in
Jacksonville this week in attendance to
the annual meeting of the board of di-
rectors of the Consolidated Naval Stares
Co., which was held in this city Tuesday
and Wednesday.

Capt. W. J. Hilman, a prominent ope-
rator of Live Oak. was registered at the
Aragon this week.

Capt. John B. Young, president of the
John IR Young Company, of Savannah,
was among the leading factors in the city
this week.

Mr. C. Downing, president of the Downa-
ing Company, of Brunwick, Ga., was in
Jacksonville several days this week, at-
tending the second annual meeting of the
stockholders of the Consolidated Naval
Stores Co.

Mr. C. M. Covington, who has charge of
the Pensacola branch of the Consolidated
interests was in the city several days
this week attending their second annual
meeting.

Mr. H. E. Pritchett, a prominent opera-
tor, both in Georgia and Florida, was in
the city last Wednesday.

Mr. T. W. Davis, of Argyle, Ga., was
in the city one day this week attending
to business matters

Mr. W. Carrmway, one of the best
known operators in the State, was in
Jacksonville la Wedansdy.


PALTU111 NIG ECORD .i 1M.IOU u &FI D WMMOK


Mt. W. C. Jackson a of m- ove
Spring was here lat Tuedn.

Mr. Ball, of Lake City, who is eased
in the naval stores business with Mr.
J. O. Evans, of that plae, was in the ity
last Moday.

Mr. A C. Darig, of Darlingto, F
wa registered at the Dval for several
days this week.

Mr. L. Sweet, a leading Oparaer o
Douas, Ga, was here lt Tueaay.

Mr. J. W. Ward Jr, of Floral Cty, was
registered at the Aragon Ws es y.

Mr.J. MaCaW.e a prominent naval
stores man of Tampa, w among the
operators in th eity this wek.

Mr. George W. Desa. of Wayeres, Ga.,
spent last Thursday in the ity.

Mr. G. W. Van, of Wayeroe, al Mr.
J. W. Ca.llaha, BainMide, Ga. wer
among the lading operator their
section registered at the Arags thi wee.

Messrs. C. W. Deei and K. L Wi ,
of Baxley, Ga., spat vreral dy i
Jacksonill this week.

Mr. R. D. Medlin, of Williste h., wa
in Jacksoeville last Taueday an Wed-
needay. Mr. Medlin was ao mpaid by
his wife.

Mr. John C. Powell, inspector at naval
stores for the port aof Frmeadine, wo
pleasant visitor in th city this wsk

Mr. J. C. Joiner, a leading operator a
Beuton, Fla, was in the ecty Wednesy.

Mr. S. K Kenasa, of Mddleur, 1i,
was in the city lest Wednesday on mat-
trs of business.

SMr. B. IL Bond, a pronmtee mil jum,
of lake Helen, va., wes a guest al the
Windsor, one day this week

Among the prominent arivrls in the
city yesterday, were Mr. and Mrs. L I,
Meggs, of Orange Springs, Fa. Mr. MIgg
is quite an etenive turpentie apntr.

Mr. H. L Covtngton, a promndent naval
stores factor and operator, aof Pasala,
Fla., was in the city thi week.

Mr. B. F. Bullard, of SrvasrnM ws
aong the naval stores fato in .Jack-
onville this week attending tDe msoa
annual meeting of the Cooidatd Naval
stores Co.

Mr. B. Powell vie-pride of the
Consolidated Naval Store CO., with oMes
in Savannah, Ga., was among the premi-
neat factors in the city this week.

Mr. J. M. Wet, a prominent timber ma
from Valdosta, was a guest at th ASrag
last Thursday.


Opetor Tsel G.
The Operators' Tool Co. has bee orgaa-
iaed and application made for letters pat-
ent. The company is now manufacturing
at Green Cove Springs, Fi., but aote-
plate enlarging its factory and possibly
moving to Jacksonville. Mr. HMry Priteh-
ett, the well known operator ol MdeRe,
Ga, is the presdt.















e CHRISTIE GROOVER ow -

WHOLESALE DRUOBISTS.


-.mvviinA-iwrr in F


---- ne II


Second Annual Meeting of Consolidated Companies


The annual meeting of the stockholders
of the Cosolidated Naval Stores Co.,
which company also owns the Consolidated
Grocery Co. and the Consolidated Land
Co, and a controlling interest in the Chat-
tanooga Pottery Co, and The Cooperage
Company, was held in Jacksonville Wed-
neaday evening in the Board of Trade
auditorium. The consolidated companies
are owned by turpentine producers and
the meeting brought together a large num-
ber of prominent operators from Florida
sad Georgia. At the meeting President
W. C. Pwell presided, and there was a
large majority of the stock of the com-
pany represented by the stockholders in
attendance. J. C. Little, secretary and
treasurer of the company, was secretary
of the meeting.
President Powell read his annual re-
port and reports were made by C. B.
Ropers, president of the Consolidated Gro-
eery Company; W. F. Caoehman, president
of the Consolidated land Company; John
Henaderso, president of the Chattanooga
Pottery Company; ad J. C. Little, prei-
dent of the Cooperage Company.
The entire board of directors of the Con-
solidated Naval Stores Company was re-
elected, as follows: W. C. Powell, W. F.
Coeahman, B . Bllard, H. L. Covington,
C. B. Rogers, H. A. MeEachern, C. Down-
ing, J. A. Cranford, D. LH McMillan, John
B. Young, J. Saunders, R. B. Powell,
W. J. Billman.
A cash dividend of 10 per cent upon
the capital stock of the company was de-
elared. This is a similar dividend to the
rst annual dividend. The company is
capitalized at $2,500,000, so it will be seen
that the dividend will amount to M250,000,
which will be distributed in cash among
the operators in proportion to their hold-
ings on the 1st of February.
The offers of the company during the
past year have been as follows:
Prsident-W. C. Powell
Vioe-Presidents-W. F. Coachman, B. F.
Bullard, H. L. ovington, H. A. MeEachern,
J. A. Cranford, D. H. McMillan, J. R.
Sauders and .L B. Powel.
Secretary and treasurer-J. C. Little.
At a meeting of the newly elected Board
of Director held in President Powell's
office Thursday morning, January 19th, the
same officers were re-elected, as was also
the old executive committee. The officers
of all of the other companies owned and
controlled by the Consolidated Naval
Stores Co. were reflected. The presidents
of these companies are as follows: Con-
solidated Grocery Co., C. B. Rogers; Con-
solidated land Co, W. F. Coachman; The
Chattanooga Pottery Co., John Henderson;
The Cooperage Co., J. C. Little.
In this connection, it may be well to re-
view in a few words the conditions among
operators before and since the organization
of the Consolidated Company. In the first
place the company has made those opera-
tors who are stockholders, their own fac-
tors. It is purely a cooperative business
organisation and represents such an ag-
gregtion of interests, so large in the
total, that it has aecek arily wieed a


powerful intuence in market conditions.
The prices of rosin and turpentine have
been better since the organization of the
Consolidated than ever before. Labor con-
ditions have been better. The interests
in the woods and at the factorage houses
being identical there have been better and
more satisfactory shipping, marketing and
selling conditions. The fact that the com-
pany has its organized branches for the
land, grocery, barrel and cup trades, has
made the general supply conditions more
satisfactory. The further fact that the
operators are themselves the owners of
these various branches of business, prac-
tically controlling their product from the
time it enters the till until it reaches the
consumer, has demonarated the value of
systematic organization sad cooperation


Southern Supply and Ma ery Dealers
Association.
Through the Knoxville office of the
Southern Supply and Machinery Dealers'
Association, the following list of the offi-
cers, standing committees, active and hon-
orary members, together with the policy
of the association, are given:
The list of honorary members who have
been admitted to the association since the
Old Point Comfort convention in April
will be read with much interest. The list
is a representative one, embracing manu-
facturers of practncally every line going
to make up the supply and machinery bus-
iness. The large list of honorary, as well
as of active members, speaks in no uncer-
tain tons of the popularity and success
of the Southern Supply and Machinery
Dealers' Association:

Policy of the Southern Supply and Machin-
ery Dealers' Association, Adopted at
the New Orleans Convention, April 8-10,
1903.
"The object of this association shall be
the promotion of more friendly business re-
lations and mutual confidence and good
will with each other, and with the manu-
facturers; and to encourage and promote
the commercial interest of the supply and
machinery dealers in the South in every
way possible; and to assist the manu-
facturers in deciding who are legitimate
dealers in supplies and machinery, and
who are entitled to prices as such; and to
discourage the manufacturers from deal-
ing direct with the consumers, but if any
manufacturer finds it necessary to deal
direct with the consumer in order to intro-
duce and create a demand for his goods, he
will invoice said goods through some deal-
er in the territory where the goods are
sold."
Resolution adopted at Old. Point Comfort
Convention, April 12-14, 1904:
"Believing that the best interests of
the association may be subserved by giv-
ing the manufacturers official recogni-
tion, we recommend that an honorary
membership list shall be adopted to which
manufacturers who are in accord with the
policy of our association shall be eligible,
snd who may be elected to membership


as an honorary member upon application
properly made out and pre ted to the
executive committee of the amociation
for their approval; aid honorary member
shall not be liable for membership fee, am-
nual dues, and shall not be entitled to at-
tend any executive enilons of the aso-
eiations."

President, Peter Blow, Knoxvile,
Tenn., Southern Brass and Iron Company.
First vice-preideat, W. H. Kettig, Bir-
mingham, Ala. Milr &- Kattig company.
Second vicepresMeat C. H. Brigg, Dal-
las, Tex., Briggs-Weaver Machinery Co.
Secretary-treaurer, C. B. Carter, Knox-
ville, Teun
Executive Committee-George V. Deany,
Savannah, Ga., Georgia Supply Co.; George
A. Smith, Richmond, Va., Smith-Courtney
Co.; Edward L Stream, New Orleans, la.,
Gibbeu & Stream; Joh C. Doyle, Nash-
ville Machine Co.
a8taskllg em.mntess.
Manuf.#ma4r' Committee-John G.
Christopher, ehairmaa, Jacksoaville, Fla.;
A. D. Schofleld, Mao, Ga, J. S Seho-
field's Sons Co.; C. B. Jenkins, Chrleston,
S. C., Cameron & Barkley Co.
Grievance Committee-Thoma 0G. Hy-
man, chairman, Newborn, N. C., Hymas
Supply Co.; W. B Melhee, Jaekson, Tem.,
Southern Engine and Boilr Works Co.;
William Wilmot, New Orleas, La., Wood-
ward, Wight & Co.
Transportation Committe--J. J. Diaos-
may, chairman, Atlatta, Ga., Ctton States
Belting and Supply Co.; Thomas S.
Bowles, Norfolk, Va., Henry W &ak Co;
E A. Peden, Houston, Tex., Peden Iron
and Steel Co.

Discussig Price a Lumber.
A special from Norfolk, Va., ays:
Representatives of about twenty mill
connected with the North Coellna Pine
Association met in one of the asembly
rooms of the Montiello hotel here and
discussed at some length the status of
the lumber trade, which it was stated at
the eonelusion of the meeting i very satis-
factory.
No change in the recent seale of prices
'adopted Nov. 16, was made, though ft
was said that the eoaditions really justi-
led a deviation from those prevailing.
Reports submitted showed that the trade
is unusually brisk for this time of year,
the demand being largely over that of the
same month last year, with probabilities
favoring a continuance of an active mar-
ket. For three months weather condi-
tions have been favorable to both the pro-
ducer and consumer of pine lumber. ver
since June these conditions have prevailed,
and, it is stated, that nalea the present
state of the weather, which i decidedly
adverse to production, eoatinues, thereby
decreasing the supply, there will be little
or no change in the status of the trade.
The next meeting of the Pine Assoia-
tion will be held in this city Feb. 9, 105.
Capt. John L. Roper, president of the
association, presid at the meeting, with
John R. Walker, secretary. The mem-
bers present were: L J. Camp, of arank-
lin, Va. E. M. Wiley, of New York; J. B.
Blades and T. W. Tlmrant a leabeth


-=soe uIs I= 'oiRMOu 21AARM'


City, N. C.; John A. Wilkiaon, of Adla-
ton, I. 0.; eor. T. lT I. of W-b& -
ton, N. C.; W. F. Harrison, of Baltimore;
J. G. McNeil, of Garysbur, N. C.; L B.
Blades, of Newborn, N. C.; H. H. Gbso,
representing the American lumbersmse, of
Chicago; 8. W. Whitehead, representing
the Southern Lumber Journal, of Wl-
adngton, N. C.; .L 8. Cuoa, George W.
Jons, J. T. Deal sd W. F. Tilghnma, of
Norfolk.

ITO BW OFFImmC

An hterping Firm that -sb*tandaly
ows Faith i Jac mvls.
Brobeton, Fendig & Co, the enterprisig
real estate rm of Jacksonville, a., sad
Brunswiek, Ga., have moved into their
elegant new olesa next to the Araom
Hotel on Forsyth Street. The rm ee-
eupie the entire lower oor of the Bo
Building the suite belag divided into r-
cepton room, reading and plat roo, pri-
vate ofies, etc., making a most magnil-
ent arrangement, like f thefor e oe-
ience of patrons ad members of tihe rm
and clerks. Brotaton, Feadig & C moved
to Jacksonville from Brunswik, where
they sueeessfully conducted a business that
reasep out Into an parts of the Sontk
Their Florida s u beeme so a ia
from that point that the irm found it
neeemary to open an oiee mre directly
in touch with the Florida territoy ad
the Jacksonville office was sstishelaL.
Since that time Brobeato, Fndig & Co.
enterprise has been fet and appreciated
in almost every industrial movement that
has been made. Colonl Edwin Brobetoe,
the head of the nrm, is now os of Jack-
sonvilles most progressive citima He is
naturally a developer--a emerge, tire-
less worker for the ciy and seedti in
which be lives-end hi influeae i sready
felt in the industrial, fianeal and soel
circles of this community. It is sd m
as Brobton that make a kity and his
every persona characteristic ataly v-
brates in the workings of his Arm. Mr.
Fedig, the junior member of the frm, in
at the head of the Brunswick oie bet Is
frequently a visitor to the ity. He isr- -
arded as an exceptional authority en real
estate values, and is a m of great
pers-nal popularity.

Wayeres' aap Works.
Waycross, Ga., Jan. 19.-The Imperial
Soap Company, which was restly organ-
ied here, will begin operation in about
two weeks. The machinery is to be moved
to Wayeroas from Atlanta, and the gen-
eral manager of the company, Mr. Church-
ill, has gone to Atlanta to see about its
removal. The stockholders of the com-
pany have elected the following ofere:
J. E. T. Bowden, president; George W.
Dean, vice-president; Mr. Churchill, see-
retary and general manager; 1a W. Iott,
treasurer.

INes, e 7- Menme bow" aw
tsualngs of Tuo ane aInm Ise-
vems o nw I a me M wne um
to 3mr m a r efe r &aI. AdMe
mb me emae a "m


NRLAX raffamm


u1


7M Vi 11C DMUBITRUL aIMMUrtI









14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL 'RECOOD.


iUJOW AKOi'mmITIOW.

et at tlhellks l the JsthemL t Work-
Jig ea Fui Time.
So far as known practically all of the
milk 11-the Boutheast ar working on full
tim. ere were a few of them compelle
to shut down for a few days between
Christmas and New Years day, but all of
them are at work and are sawing with
orders ahad. There ha been some trouble
in ering laborers at some of the mills,
a edition which is always with the man
afaeturers of the yellow pine belt at this
masn ad the year. But the trouble this
year has not been a great as it was a
year go, and the .manufaetrers are not
meeting with the trouble they generally
have in keeping their mills in operation.
So far as the movement of lumber to
the market is covered, it is brisk. There
will be immense shipments this month,
ad -j Iglg from what has already gon
forwl .-sI from the charters wfich
have bee made, the custom house will
show a gain in the number of feet shipped
from this port over ast month. All of
the dealers are making an efort to have
their orders played promptly at this time,
.for they claim that it is easier to secure
chaters than it was a few weeks ago.
The Clyde Line at Jacksonville is hand-
ig more lumber than it did some time
ago, and is taking on large cargoes of
lumber at this port on every trip. The
heavy trame on the railroads peculiar to
the holiday season is over, and it is easier
to get the lumber to the seaboard. Cars
are mowe plentiful, and the congestion of
the various railroad yards in Jacksonville
and Savann has been relieved to a great
extent. This is a season of the year when
the railroad companies an handle lumber
with mre assuranmes of quick transpor-
tatol thm they a at any other season
in this Ste. The orange shipments are
nut large as they re earlier in the
sesan .la there ae better facilities on
every Trod for the sawnmis than ever.

Ale*.lmeas Om ,sesOsS Mre Lais.
The Algr-ullivan lamber company of
Thith has puredwh d our sres of yel-
low pine a In Albanma for a consider-,
athm di about @eIr& This company
now ow ea acres in Alabama, al
of which Ias loted in F anaba, Monroe.
Ka sk aid Baldwin counties. These ar
in the other gop of counties in the
StaIe wad the headquarters of operation
is at Ceury, ie. The company runi
two s and a standrd-gsge railroad
faor transerting the e. The product
of the two mm k Iss sold ahed for the next
five = is It better priee than havel
eve ham ew

1Wh .h we Futlmw Motes.
eharlnsto, S. C, is shipping by water
with greater frequency than ever before
fertilizers for point on the Gulf coast.
bDring December ,807 tons of phos-
phate reek were ohipped through Savan-
nah, Ga., to Bremen, Genoa, Hamburg and
Venice. .
.Faeta and figures prove to the Chronicle!
of Mt. Plesant, Tenn., that 1904 was the
busiest year in that phosphate field, and
give reason to -believe that 1905 will be
eve m lpemspmu.
Its A reported .tht another .railway line
4iP 4o he .built ,tihm M iekwm Meounty.
Temneee, for the -dvelopment of valu-
able pholibate dopoelp ;A .ow reached


by the Nashville, Chattaooga & St. Louis
Railway.
In an address to Southern farmers re-
garding the reduction of acreage, Mr. Mar-
tin V. Calvin, of Augusta, Ga., advocates
Increasing the yield per acre by a liberal
and intelligent use of fertilizers. He
would not have the farmer be penny wise
and pound foolish, and therefore encour-
ages a wise and openhanded use of fer-
tilizer rich in plant food not only for cot-
ton, but for corn, cane, oats, sweet po-
tatoes and other crops.

The Drews Sell Mill and Lands.
One of the largest sawmill and timber
leals in the history of Florida took place
last Saturday when H. H. Tift, J. Lee En-
sign, of Tifton, Ga., and J. H. and W. C.
Powell, of Perry, Fla., bought the large
electric sawmill owned by the Drew Broth-
ers at Luraville, near Live Oak, and 65,000
acres of land. The amount paid for this
property is $400,000.
The Drew Brothers are sons of the late
ex-Governor George F. Drew, who died at
his home in this city a few years ago.
They have through their enterprise accu-
mulated valuable properties in Florida, the
mill and land above mentioned being
among the same. The mill will in future
be operated under the name of the Georgia
and Florida Saw Mill Company. It is one
of the biggest and best paying plants in
the South. The new purchasers are
leased with their deal and say that they
have secured a bargain notwithstanding
the large amount of money paid for the
property.
The location of the mill is Luraville,
about twelve miles south of Live Oak, and
is connected with the A. C. L. Railway at
Live Oak by a railroad built by the Drew
Brothers.

Interesting Facts as to Alabama Timber.
The Bureau of Forestry of the Agricul-
tural Department presents in Circular No.
32 many facts and figures gleaned in Ala-
bama relative to Alabama timber. The
circular inquestion relates to the mechani-
cal properties of various commercial tim-
bers. Timbers were cut in this State,
and carried to Purdue University, at Laf-
ayette, Ind., where they were tested.
The Red Gum of this State was very
thoroughly tested, and it was found to
have a fiber stress at elastic limit from
about 4,000 pounds per square inch in
n timber to 7,000 pounds in dry tim-
hber. The logs were taken from the Ten-
uemee River bottoms at Hollywood, Ala.,
and they were sawed and tested in every
desirable way. It is not only a strong
wood, but the factory tests showed that
it could be steamed and bent, and would
take a good finish. It is adapted to use in
vehicle factories. It ranks below Hickory,
but still it is a valuable wood. It will
stand a strain up to 15265 pounds per
square inch, as against 20,60 pounds in
Hickory. The modulus of rupture in long
leaf Pine is 10,090 pounds per square inch;
of Loblolly Pine, about 5,000 pounds.
The Red Gum lacks a straight-grained
trunk. It is cross-grained. This has to
be taken into consideration. The Bureau
of Forestry concludes that Red Gum is
available for local uses in building mate-
rial. such as joists, sills and common
frames. When the supply of Pine is ma-
terially lessened Bed Gum will come into
wider use, unless, the clear wide eats from
1ep4 Gum to% become too valuable because
-f fetFr uses.


THE NATAL. SANK OF IACWIS IE
JACKSONVILLE. PLA.
CAPIAL S3c0000 U, fMU ad UNM VDED PROFITS S30
We ie TiLme "e? o 'fA*" *VM dmw .st at f tet t rwue gra
anua. If held ninety days or arss. T!9aIV mamt rea a-ur- sa ftr
somettaar Uys. Pye -ar*imron aeaga-s< sar 4- 5 b->5ea


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THz BEST ON EAR .
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Mets. Orders filled at lowemt ar-
ket price. Your patronage i respectfully solicited. Se quotation-
thispaper.
KINUAN & CO., Ltd., BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, PLA.

Herbert A. Ford, G0e. I. Fee, P.. Wates
President. Vice-Pas. Caelr.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITAL, *60.000.00.
DIBROTonM: L. Anderson, B. & Rall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christia, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accouns of TmRtnme OperAtors and Saw MUl Men SkUdte.


>m n. uh111 ui ,u hh11s a musn i>ima ilihiu

B The Wire Virgin Gum Co,
Is now ready to give you all the information you may want r the
way we are now gathering virgin gum from high boxes By the of a
o tin lip put up clao to the chipping and so arranged to eame the Sm to
strike wire and follow same down to the box, not striking the fae of Nto
tree. Wire is fastened on by two small nails, oe just above the lip .Ad
the other at upper edge of the oldbox, and strtehd tight so as to keep
gum from dripping off, thereby making virgin gum and more of it. Thi
are many beamits and big pay where parties can get a good may high beh.
For further information write to
THE WIRE VIRGIN GUM CO.. TIFTON. GA.
$i o s eII I I I***" Is g1II II Igot$ I 410


The WestrRaley-Rannle Company.

114 UW. Forsyth Street, JackMsWvlle rfi.
A. N. WZS. Pres. C. R. West. rlc.s. W. X. As YJ8res. NI. V. Rafty, Bv. grm.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

rr THE WIRE VIRGIN GUM CO.. TIFTON.er GA


.I A. BRIGGS. PreseLt.
H.. B. BIGG, Ist VicePrenleaLt


HOMR BROWNN. Viend Trles.
J. 0. MoDONALD, See'y as Trels.


iW, H, Briggs Hardware Co.

* VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-

|RIXFORD AXES.

1r They a re e BESr. Others imitate but none du-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the lnest
Steeper, hold the keenest edge. cut better and last longer
* than any other axe.
a This has all been proved by years of actual use.
1 Seed as your orders.

SW.s H. BRIGGS HARDWARE COMPANY,

Mauqi~ w- ~,la- 8 r----- --- -0--


I=E &Umi"IJLU)D -SIL 4EM E WORMD.











For the Week Ending Janry 2i4905*





WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL REC .


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturlng Interests.

Aiu astf. aim 1SM. ar te aacnt,. Cema-ues atf the rrwmeU pepreerM' &Materts u its j acife s Wctsl rmea. eam Ai ei a im. SM#. Ae A eaOrn Ce
msma m a an a s ea aw Aer os Merad Aaattem. Ade" Sept. I at I. a" tae ak a el Orman of tae rarp offpaisms A. ls dap-s irer avrg sMA. a. tue -Nt M rG of r toe mtier-State CGame rewea' aaaeesiea. eaer r see M -ser
la..OA.. OMIcW eus af Sutheastea Stoc* Oreer*'. i -astia.

VL i. 10 3. JACKSONVILLE, LA. ATLANTA, GA. SAVANNAH, OA. $3 A YEAR.
* *-- '


The Natioal Good Roads Conavwtion-


Thi Natioial Good Roads Convention is
jm s iomin in Jacksoaville this week as
S eO Beeord goes to prea. Among the
prominent men in attendance are Senator
Martin Dodge, director of the Bureau of
Good Boads Inquiries, Washington; Gen-
eral Nelon A. Miles, of Massachusetts,
emator Ltimer of South Carolina, Sena-
tor MeCreary of Kentucky, Congressman-
iet ark of Florid, and many others.
.iee-Preaideat and National Organier A.
i Maan is presiding.
SAt the National Good Roads Conven-
S.n in this city this week oe of the ad-
ses of welcome wau delivered by Cap-
-.. ta CL. K Garner, president of the Jack-
'" mville Board of Trade, ad it makes
ar a a le paper that we give it in
below:
S"It is a easy task to follow his honor,
the mayrL a sech oeeasions as &s Af-
ter he has delivered an address of welcome
jp as you have listened to, I could very
ell make my address in one sentence of a
lew words by tellin you that I fully in-
orse the sntimenti so eloquently ex-
prwssed by the mayor. Consequently, I
dall not trespass on your time or patience
but a very few minutes. In behalf of the
board of Trade I desire to extend to you
oe and all, a most hearty and sincere wel-
ome. We are highly appreciative of the
jact that you selected our city as the
re e to hold this convention. I wish
congratulate President Moore and the
Seers of the National Good Boads Asso-
tion upon samcess that has at-
mioded their s ts in the past The grat-
Pude and tpluk of the Ameican people
re due them for their unmelh work in
thi glorious cause. I trust the achieve-
ments for the year. to come may even
uarpeas what has been accomplished in
the past. No itisen of this republic has
worked harder in behalf of good road
thn Senator Mann, our great apostle and
your organizer. He has thrown a wonder-
ful tthnsie into his effort. He tells
me cotndentially, however, that he ex-
peeta to do a great deal more in the fu-
ture than in the past; that he has been
laboring to oveneome his natural timidity,
diffdenes ad especially his reticence, and
he thinks he is getting these under con-
troL
"At the last session of the Legislature
an act providing that all moneys now in
the Internal Improvement Fund, and all
the lands granted to the State of Florida
by the United States, known as a swamp
end overflowed act for internal improve,
S met, all thee moay and all theme lads
Ib this act, were et aside for the build-
leg WAd lmainei of hastdweads in the


State of Florida. I understand that Sen-
ator Mann was the father and author of
this bill, and it was feared by the mem-
bers of the Legislature that he would find
something else laying around loose to go
with this appropriation. Every speaker
of the House for a number of years when
they have gone up to the capitol, and
after having notice Senator Mann present,
declared the House ready for business
without any further formalities. Every
patriotic citizen of Florida wishes that his
usefulness may continue for many years
to come, or at least until he State is well
covered with good roads, but we do hope
that he will have enough land for neies-
sary agricultural purposes.


Dodge and Spaim CamplimateL
"We are especially gratified to have the
representatives of the Good Roads De-
partment of the Federal Governmet with
us on this occasion, and I wish to extend
to Senator Dodge and CoL Spoon a most
cordial welcome in behalf of this board.
We are appreciative of the value of their
services to the people of the United States,
and especially in what they are doing for
us at this time. It is my judgment that
no department of thi government is doing
more good, accomplishig a greater work,
than is the Good Roads Department. I
believe in proportion b the amount of
money expended the people of our country
get greater benelts and more practical re-
sults from the Department of Good Roads
Bureau than from any other department.
Their work is of a very practical ehare-


MAYOR G0300 ML. NOLAN, 0O JACSUOUVILLL
He has welcomed more conventions of an industrial character sines his term of
office than any other chief executive of a municipality in the Boutheast Since
Christmas past he has welcomed the National Educational Asacoation, the Bouth-
astern Stock Growers Aeoedthim and the Nationm Good Boeds Asaaoation.


.


see!J


ter. They first find the very beat material
that can be obtained at the loweat set,
and I believe it i their purpee to always
use local materi and in third kinder-
garte object leso road building th
show the people just how e work shou
be done, and what kind of mchi-nry it i
necessary to use, ad it s very re
markable indeed, in view of the fa tht
this department has beam in existeam uso
1mg and has alwhaystood ready to giv
out information, e -amine m eri and
make scientile tests of the value ea ti
material for uoad building prp that
o many om itiea have B aheLad
without this information, ad a rnlt,
even in our own State, hundreds of ihe-
ands of dollars have been uated, beth in
the seleetik et materials and ma nry.
The arst thought that o rred to the
members of the good reds committee of
our Board of Trade was to gt in touh
with this department dE govrumet, and
I know it was an aet of wisdom a their
part to do so, and that under the it
gent supervision of Semtor Dodg ead s
able assistants, we shall make no mieta e
in this county i the seletio of ur mate-
rial or in the method of eontrtiia
and it is very gratifying to me to noes that
so many county comi0siImars ad other
cities of our State who are directly -
terted in the eMatruetin of good n
are present, and will se the prastial
working of the good raeds ehl-ery,
and will become more familiar with the
value and methods of thi department of
government.
"In eomluion I will my that I tr
your deliberstiom may be predetvhe of
great good, ald that your tay in o as
may be pleasant, and when you retn to
your home in the vario portion of t
country, you wll ary with you p-aat
recollectious of Jaedamvi its people
and of the Board of Trado.

New Celeny lands In Di
Valdost, Ga., Jan. 1--Th new oloy
town of St. Geoge, in Charltom eouty,
bids fair to become involved in a law sut,
which has already beem Aed. Mrs. G. C.
Daughtry soM the colony company 4,~
acres of land. Siace that time it develop
that six ad a half aeres of the lot e ,
sold is claimed by another party. It lo
cated in the heart of the new town, and
will be very valuable, as the tows is being
rapidly settled.
There is another 100 ares of aId m
the suburbs also laime by another
party. The colmy company will me Mrs.
Daughtry and try to forest her to perfast
the titles. -It is derstood she elam she
told the buyer that there were other
claimants to these two small traet, ad
having so put them o tee, she thinte
that her respelbHIty habs sads The
m femies to Ie of mach ideraL






2 TEH WEEKLY NMJuaralA&L UMOOBD.
---------- ------------------------*--------
be -rI W @sor4rkl 13 0461 01 -- ------ -- - --.- - -


C. a. aXOGRU,


PRusIDM N. W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, VIcx-PajxswmWS. "0. H. HODG8ON, ac,
DIRLECTOI.S C. B. Roger, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain. H. A. cebeaa n and J. A. Ormafond of. JakspBvlle;
t B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensaeola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Pla., with Branches in Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grooery Company
of JAtksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Penssools; the
Fgroery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.



Will handle everything In Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.
*


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


CGesIet e Fm ree-Story BuildIsa, 70x200; one two-story bildlag. Ox300; sme oe.stery hiandfl dOzx28
maklag the largest space o amy Company dt the AM i the Seuth.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola. Fai., and Sa.vnn1h. Ga.

T-------H -----CD wI W---s o ------------------ ---------- ------------- -------------
2= mucoin WILL DR WoRT DoL=AMr TO yOU uMr Vami


aad TaAs'u.


r

r
r
I
r
I








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 8
a , .. ... . ... - --


SWMILL MKX M ET.

etUy Semim at the Georia later-
State Thi Week.
The Georgia Interstate Sawmill Associ-
tion met at the Board of Trade rooms
Jacksoville, Tuesday, January 17, in reg-
ular bi-monthly session, H. H. Tift presid-
ing, ad .L C. Harell, secretary. There
was a good attendance of members.
The meeting was a most interesting one,
and many prominent and important ques-
tions came up for discussion, some of
which were put over until the next meet-
ing. The most important thing done was
tle adoption of the rules of inspection, as
agreed upon by the various committees
representing several Northern associations
at Savannah a short time since. The rules
will be known as the interstate rules of
1905, and will go into effect on February
I newt.
A resolution was adopted requesting the
committee that has the prosecution of the
railroads for non-equipment of standards
to send out a notice to each member to
send in his expense, at the rate of $1.50
per ear, to that committee, with a view
to having suits instituted against the rail-
roads in test eases.
The increase in freight rates of from
1 cent to three cents per hundred pounds,
which go into force on the 15th instant,
eame up for protest, and a committee was
appointed to go to Tallahassee and lay the
lumbermen's side of the matter before the
Railroad Commission. This committee
comnisted of Mesrs. Weyer and Conrad,
they to name a third.
An advance was made in most of the
articles in the lumber schedule, running
from $1 to $ per thousand feet, and a
committee-Mesrs. Tift, Harrell, Betts.
Paul and West-were authorized to es-
tablis a tariff of prices under the new
rules, operative until the next meeting.
The meeting adjourned to meet in Val-
dosta, Ga., on february 21.

Carrabeled Beao
Carrabelle has a boom on-wants cor-
respondence with cotton mill owners who
desire to move their coarse mills to the
coast of the Gulf of Mexico. We will
make big inducements and if you aid
us will pay you well for your work.
W. H. LAWRENCE,
Acting President Board of Trade.
Carrabelle, Fla., January 16, 1906.

Diebel Safe and Lock Co.
No explanation is required by us to our
subscribers in introducing the Diebold
Safe and Lock Co. to their notice. They
are, of course, wanted everywhere, and
the qualities of their safes and locks in
resisting not only the terrible ravages of
the most destructive fires, but also what is
equally important nowadays, the terrible
ravages of the most destructive thieves,
is daily demonstrated by one or the other
and we take a little pride in mentioning
the fact that the "Diebold" were the only
safes that were abeohitely fireproof in
the Jacksonville fire, May 3, 1901. Their
chief works are at Canton, Ohio, and
their branch office, tore and show rooms
are to be found at 104 Main Street, in
our city, and that John 8. Franz has
charge of the latter is a poeitiev proof
that the fullest inquiries will be met, and
all infrmatio readily given.


Th Cannon CO
The Cannon Co., manufacturers of bar-
rels, of Quitman, Ga., with plants at Quit-
man, Ga., Cairo, Ga., and Monticello, Fla.,
is one of the evidences of industrial en-
terprise and success that has developed
the Southeast to such a remarkable ex-
tent.
The basis of this business was founded
by Mr. H. G. Cannon about twelve years
ago on his farm near Cairo, Ga. Cypress
syrup barrels only were made and these
from hand rived staves. The business
prospered and in a few years it was
moved to Cairo and a shop built.
This proved a good move as it put the
business on the railroad and in touch with
the world. It was carried on there for
some years, and in 1901 was consolidated
with other plants at Quitman and Meigs,
Ga. At its incorporation the company had
$7,000 capital stock, all paid in in cash.
This capital has since been increased to
$15,000, and again last year to $20,000,
and will be increased again at the annual
meeting the latter part of January.
Since its incorporation the company has
acquired valuable timber tracts in Flor-
ida and has built two mills which are now
working up this timber into material for
its cooperage shops.
The company's production of syrup bar-
rels has increased enormously from year
to year, and is now probably the greatest
of any concern in the country in this
line.
The last few years the company has
devoted a great deal of time and attention
to other branches of the cooperage indus-
try and is now making a specialty of tur-
pentine and dip barrels.
The company attributes its success
mainly to its policy of hiring only white
coopers and these the very best to be had
in America.
With them they have been able to turn
out a superior package and this reputation
has brought them a great deal of business.
The company has never seen fit to make
its production with machinery, still it has
been able to meet competition and if at any
time its field is ineroached upon to such
an extent as to make it felt, the company
is fully able to equip itself with machin-
ery. This has never been done, for the
company has always considered that qual-
ity should be the first aim in turning out
tight packages and has believed that the
highest quality could best be had from
expert white men rather than from the
best machines.

J. D. Weed & Co.
In a letter from J. D. Weed & Co., of
Savannah, Ithe well knorn dealers in
hardware and turpentine tools, the frm
sgys:
"We appreciate the business that is
coming from our customers in the State of
Florida. We are still carrying a large
line of turpentine tools, hoop iron, etc.,
used in that line, as well as a large line
of hardware and mill supplies, perhaps
one of the largest stocks carried in the
South and are ready at all times to fill
orders promptly."
This is one of the South's most reliable
firms and the Record takes pleasure in
commending it to all of its readers.

Messrs. Aycock & Williamson have re-
cently purchased the large and fine tur-
pentine properties which were owned by
Messrs. Cook & Story, of Pollard, Ala..
Mr. J. Carl Williamson will have charge
of this place.


T= uECOM M; ia 89s GRIT 22M JOURNAL


NUBIAN TEA rfr ... uwir umes

BENEDICTA A a- e fr w-

CUBAN R.ELIEF r. cr. .m a".

CUBAN OIL "a^t S.Sf .eCtUl"
A supply of thee mediin is what every family needs to
insure good health.
-Write for pnees and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,
that9m1a. Temeess.



THE ARAGON
JACIWOILUY rLA.
NOW OPEN
Under new *'r-memit. Thor ohly
renovated and repaired throughout, -
eluding new eletri elevator mad our
own crie ~ht plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.



HOTEL ROSELAND Sd"lI
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Every comfort and amusemat. UnexeUlled msine, Northm eoookI SU. pmdl mates. I to
weekly; U to I daily, America la-. lmutmated boaet iss a. gaimg to le beess
hme hotel ds Hreadqarters tor naval stores seas. aImnbesm eatie egow usl ad ee
SConvention deleates A. 0. EKHOLM. Pmeeomrve.



Windsor Hotel

fwLua% WN=est an


Year-Round Hotel.
DOD& W CULLtM,
owum s eaf" r s.


-THE- AMIOAN PLAN

GRAND VIEW HOTEL PR DAY UP
OPEOIAL WEEKLY mATII

---TIE EUROPEAN PLAN

ST. GEORGE HOTEL m k 7Mo. Am Sim
MRS. 50O. W. BROOK. PnOPImsTlrRe.

Whon TeA Im s Y m n U s At----agn At-


WOLFE'S EUROPEAN HOTEL
rgwer Ms m A Stre I at Im .
Bates o. aIo as per dsv. utra as erant im Comsa rtie. A a WOT.L -F!
W. J. L'ENGLE, J. W. WADE. K. HEONUM,
President. Vie-Prseade. Seeyad Treas


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORJEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.









4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Important Papers Read


At thL ad Dq'u Sees io the Soutim'etn Slo* Growers'
Firs Annual Convention.
11a~- -nur-n AC~n~n - _1X1_ _I_ eeee"


M. Cearey' Paper.
The subject thao I have been asked to
speak'm is oe of suem wide possibilities
that I feel very deeply my inability to do
jutise to the matter before me. When,
however, I atop to consider the vast im-
potanes of the future of the meat busi-
aes to this body of men, I am constrained
to fed that it is my duty, even in my
hmble way, to do wha I can to explain
to you a few of the more important points
as they occur to me. Without good cattle
good sheep and good hogs, there can be no
future to the meat business, in the sense
in whih we are interested. We are all
vitally interested in the proposition of
growing live tok that will bring a good
market price. My entire business life--
some twenty-one yea has been spent in
the peking business, and I do not claim
to be well enough versed in live stock rais-
ing to talk intelligently to you men of
experience in that particulr line.
I have gained some practical knowledge
from atual experience in handling Geor-
gia and Florida cattle during the past year,
-and all endeavor, to the best of my abil-
ity, to give you the benefit of that expe-
rience as appid to my subject-the fu-
trp of the maet busq.ead outside of
that I talt awly d to the meat
feature of the discussion.
Ib Pesgt IN! I I
You are probly aware of the fact that
some few Jacksonville citizens have asso-
ciated themselvs together for the purpose
of erecting a slaughtering plant in this
city. It is now in course of construction,
and we will be delighted to have the mem-
bers of the Cattle Growers' Association pay
us a visit to see how a small but up-to-
date parking plant is reacted. Pardon us
for saying so, but we feel that the estab-
lishment of a plant of this nature will be
of direct benefit to you men who are in the
cattle growing business. Can you afford
to be cattle grower simply to be growers
of common gram cattle? You and I and
each and every one of us re striving to
make our investments so that we will get
good returns on the money invested.
Will you do it by raising range cattle? I
am sure w will all agree on the answer.
No. Yon will not I hail from the West,
where a few years ago the children of
the day, who were the young men and
young womea of the morrow, were taught
from Infaey that the star of empire shone
brightet in the land of the West. A few
year ago I east my lot with the South.
Here I expect to live, here I expect to die,
and I tank the great God from whom all
blessins flw that the star of empire is
no eager nulaned to the West. A bright
haleyon light bows clearly in our South-
ern skies, and the young men and young
women of to-day are impressed forcibly
from all sides with the fact that some of
the brightest pages in the history of our
glorious land are being written every day
in reeoding the material advancement of
the South.
The question that should very naturally
prest itself to us is, What are we doing
to strengthen that material advancement?
Are we leaving as a heritage to our ehil-
dr a pag in the hislry of the century


that will show that our part has been
properly done?
Live at Home.
Have you men ever stopped to think of
the vast amount of meat that the large
packers of the West ship annually into the
South? We are a part of the great hog-
consuming section of the United States.
The immense traffic in beef, both dressed
and in the can, in the Southern States
can best be judged by the vast number of
distributing agencies established by West-
ern packers throughout the South. You
are all familiar with the fact that these
agencies are located in every town of any
importance in the South, doing what? Dis-
tributing the products of the West. Are
we doing our duty to ourselves in not de-
veloping our own resources? The time is
now at hand when we must develop the
cattle industry. Haw can it be done?
Let me cite you an instance of a tran-
saction that came directly under my no-
tice:
A Practical Illustration.
We contracted with a very responsible
colored man in Alaehua County, in July.
1904, for 175 head of cattle for delivery
luring December and January. The party
with whom we contracted paid $13.50 per
head for most of the cattle. He put them
into his prairie pasture and kept them
there until September. He then put them
in his cornfield, let them eat beggarweed
,rass and shucks, and finally turned them
into a velvet bean feld, and secured from
us when they were ready for market a
fraction over $17 per head f. o. b. his ship-
ping point. Now, if you will figure 175
head at $13.50 per head, you will find
that he paid $2,362. He sold the same cat
tle to us at slightly over $3,000, meaning a
profit to him of $700, or 29 per cent gross.
Now, I would ask you gentlemen present
if you are aware of very many lines o!
businesss that will pay a gross profit of
20 per cent. I think this little transac
:ion is well worthy of consideration. Hen
this man bought range cattle, fed them and
took care of them, and in a few month
nade $700 gross. Surely the feeding ex-
3enses deducted would leave him a hand-
some net profit.
A Silficant Letter.
We recently purchased some sixty-five
or seventy heed from our worthy president,
Mr. S. H. Gaitakill, and in the correspond-
ence that developed between us in our en-
deavors to consummate the purchase, Mr.
Gaitskill wrote in one of his communica-
tions as follows: "Will you make a differ-
ence in grass cattle and corn-fed or vel-
vet bean fed cattle? The Chicago market
runs from 3 to 7 cents, and some below
'I cents, but they can't get all of the 7-cent
cattle that they want. Now, where is the
;>roflt in my feeding for you if you have
io trade that wants and will pay for feed-
ing? Are you going to tell the Florida
feeder that you cannot pay more for a
4teer that is ripe, and made so by corn,
than you will for a half-ripe steer? If
this is to be your position, there is but
poor encouragement to the feeder, and
no inducement is held out to the cattle
men to make better castle. I am hoping


you are ready to advocate better blood, a
cry you hear every day in Chicago, but
unles you can show something better than
talk it will have poor result. Can you
say, will you say, that you will pay for
good beef if the cattle men will produce itt
If you can ay. this, say it quickly aad
say it with a strong, load voice, that every
cattle man in the State my hear you."
Will Pay Better Price.
In giving you the above, I have quoted
from his letter, and I am here now to may
to you as he requests, with a atrongg, load
voice, that we will pay a better price for
corn-fed and velvet bean-fed cattle. I am
here to say to you that the packer will,
the packer can and the packer must pay
you better prices for well-fed and well-
bred beef cattle; and I ean say to you
further that those who are interested as
stockholders in the Florida Packing Com-
pany would know that their money was
invested very poorly if they did not feel
fully confident that the cattle and hog
growers of this section of the country
would feed and breed live stock that would
be worth infinitely more than the common
stock that is offered so freely to-day, and
right here, I wish to compliment Mr. Gait-
skill on having delivered to us the best
steers that we have purchased in Florida.
They were well fed, and dressed out a
fraction over 51 per cent. It was my
pleasure to visit Mr. Gaitkill at MIntosh,
where I saw his cattle and observed his
method of feeding, and I want to say to
you gentlemen that, notwithstanding my
limited knowledge of the feeding propo-
sition, that if all the members of this as-
sociation would feed as he does, if they
would teach their neighbors to do so, ft
would be a very short time when we would
realize that we were attainging the very
object for which this organisation was
formed. Every-thing about Mr. Gaitkill's
place indicated 'to me that he is in the
cattle feeding business in the proper way.
He had a machine for cutting corn shucks,
and made a special food which I am sure
he will be very glad to tell you all about.
And, gentlemen, the food was placed about
his pasture in an inviting way. It made
me feel that he took as much pleasure
in giving his cattle good clean food, as we
all delight in giving to our children. I
wish to emphasize the fact that we secured
from him the very best cattle that we
ever purchased in Florida.
Packer Must Pay.
Can the packer pay a better price for
good cattle? This is a question you should
consider fully. If he cannot, then your
efforts must of necessity be in vain. Hav-
ing handled and dealt in dressed cattle
for many years, I am, I believe, in a posi-
tion to reiterate what I have already said,
and that is, that the packer can, will and
must pay you more for well-bred, well-
fattened stock. Men well posted in the
dressed beef business will tell you that
this year is remarkable in the fact that
the West is producing practically no med-
ium grade. The packers are able to secure
eitherr very poor or the best quality. Those
who have fattened have gone into it to
!et only the best they could produce. You
see the results. In Chicago last week, top
cattle brought as high as six cents, while
the average price of good beef cattle wa.
$4.60. Whether or not we can ever hope
to raise cattle that will compare favorably
with these high-grade Western cattle is a
question n to be determined later on. The
point I wish to make, however, in mention-
ing the prices paid by the Western packers
is that you can get more money for your


well-bred and well-fed stock.
The serub cattle can be brought up to a
standard that will make them compti-
tors of the Western cattle conumed in
Florida and the South. We need notmbi
more to demonstrate that to our entire
satisfaction than to consider fully the a-
ample given to us by Mr. Z. C. hamblm
of Oesaa. I shall not attempt to speak on
this matter at any great length, lbe e
my friend, Mr. Chambliss, will telryou all
about it. I do, however, want to cal
your attention to the fact that he has
produced by ordinary methods of feeding,
without any real special effort, a beef at-
tie which weighed eM pounds n foot,
dressed out 416 pounds-an average of 61
per cent. All of this dome and the aamal
one year and seven days old. We slaught-
ered the animal for him, aad I am here to
say to you that it it a splendid piece
of beef. It grades above the average of
beef being shipped here from Fort Worth
by the packers, and is at once a direct
competitor of the Western product. 1
maintain that every true fried of Florida
owes to Mr. Chamblise a debt of gratitude
for the work of education that he is ear-
ring on.
Discsed Baby eOf
A discussion of the baby beef on exhi-
bition followed. Mr. Conroy explained
that the packing house was not completed,
and that the beef had been butchered as-
cording to the old method. He claimed
that had the beef bean chilled properly
it would present much better appearance,
and would be in better shape in every way.
He said that while it wan not up to the
New England standard, it was ahead of
the average beef shipped here from Fort
Worth.
Col. C. P. Goodyear Spe
Col. C. P. Goodyear, of Brunswick, spoke
on the market for meat and meat prod-
ucts and market possibilities. Colonel
Goodyear prefaced hiq address wth a
timely suggestion to the cities of Jack-
sonville, stating that while the Board of
Trade entertained elaborately, there were
few citizens of Jacksonville who eneour-
aged the movement with their presence.
He continued his address a follows:
"At the meeting of your asolation last
year, I made some cmlpenqrie- of the
Southern States, embracing the pil bef,
in ownership of ive stock with the banner
live stock State, Iowa, showing the po-
sibiities in these States.
"Iowa, owning o6,000 per square mile of


territory, have an ownership of live stock
of $80,000,000.
"The eight banner States of the Union
in ownership of live stock have aa average
per square mile of 2000; and Georgia,
Alabama and Florida, to equal that aver-
age, should have an ownership of $40,-
000,000 in live stock.
"Alabama, Georgia and Florida own but
$a2,0oo00 worth of live stock.
"It was clearly shown by speakers at
your convention last year, that these
Southeastern States have infnite advan-
tages over Iowa in forage plants, in short
period of feeding in winter, in less need of
shelter, in shorter period of fattening,
in lower percentage of losses by death
from all case. The cattle of these three
States do not die of drouth in summer
or blizzard in winter, as on the great
ranges of the Far West.
"The tetimony in your convention last
year was amlso eonvini that improve-
ment in se ad y by breeding upo
the native stock is tirely practicable.


THU RECORD IS THU 80UTH'8 GREAT TRADE JOURWAL.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


"Te statitiesi of population and in-
crase of meat producing animals, both for
the United States and for the world, show
early that population increases in far
greater ratio than the increase of meat-
producng animals, and this has been true
for a long period of years.
"It is further clearly shown that the
consumption per capital of meat and meat-
products increases with prosperity. The
people will have meat if they can find
meney to buy it.
"The increase in manufactures of all
kids in these three States is rapidly build-
ig up great centers of population, creat-
in larger home markets.
"eW shall go into the business on a
large scale because we can add weight to
a beef at not exceeding 3 cents per pound,
against the Westerner's cents per pound.
"The saving of freights in supplying
our iterFrdi-te home markets is another
vital e~on-4ertis-
"What of our facilities for supplying the
remainder of the country? We are as
nar Chicag as the eatte ranges of the
far West. The Eastern markets-New
York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore-we
an supply by choice of water or rail
routes
"The foreign market--Liverpool, Lon-
do, Amsterdam, Bremen, Havre, Baree-
loss, indeed the United Kingdom and an
of Europe-are they not at our docks,
daiding evary pound of meat and meat
products we can spare?
"The South in the past twenty-four
year has bee the scene of a vast devel-
opment, unequalled in any section of
the United states; its statistics a ro-
mane of progress, yet this progress is
but the infamy of a vast development for
the next twenty-four years, which will
command the admiration of the civilized
world.
"If the eight Southern States which em-
brace the pine belt section, exclusive of
Teas, should go into meat production
upon the scale per square mile of Iowa,
the ash realized yearly would far exceed
the P$00MMO M for which the cotton crop
sold in 190.
"When the South supplies her home mar-
ket with meat and meat products and
ship a surplus abroad, she will have ef-
feetted an economic revolution. While
she i doing it, she is attracting white
men and solving the problem of the races
in the only way it will ever be solved.
"With earnest development of this great
and attractive industry, and the industries
it will foster, I believe it will make the
South in the next forty years richer in
her farm lands by not less than 2,000,000,-
W0, and in her yearly output of cash
products of not les than $1,oo000,00000."
Prefeear Connor ea feel.
Profeamor C. M. Connr of the University
of Florida spoke in reference to feed for
stock.
In reference to the silo, he said he had
by practical methods demonstrated that
the silo was a success in Florida, and he
strongly recommended it as the best prae-
tical method of feeding stock.
He referred to the prairie grass, com-
mon in South Florida, and said his ex-
periments with the grass had demonstrat-
ed that it was a rapid grower and would
maxe excellent feed. Mexican June corn
was advocated as the best plant for hold-
ing up the velvet bean. He said that his
experiments demonstrated that it required
a pull of ffty-six pounds to pull over a
stalk of June corn, while only six pounds
were required to pull over a stalk of or-
dinary cor. He advocated the planting


of June corn to hold up the velvet bean,
and demonstrated the importance of hold-
ing up the bean vines until late in the
fall, so as to give feed to the stock.
He called attention to the fact that
stock should not be taken off the range
and fed with rich food without gradually
working up to it.
Professor Connor in conclusion urged
that the stock growers take a few hours
at each session for the study of the situ-
ation as to hogs and sheen, claiming that
they, too, were important in connection
with the movement to enhance the grow-
ing of good stock. He also urged that a
careful study of conditions, feed, etc., be
made, and wanted the assistanee of the
association in securing an appropriation
at the next session of the Legislature for
carrying out a study on this line at the
experiment station.
The account of the studies conducted at
the experiment station was given with
a great deal of interest, and was of great
value to those present.
Southern Grasses.
Southern Grasses for Cattle was a sub-
ject well discussed by Professor C. M.
Tracy, of Washington, who is a special
agent of the United States Department of
Agriculture. Mr. Tracy stated that he
came here more to learn than to give in-
formation, but that the department would
study the question in Florida and other
States in the Southern section with ac-
tivity.
Mr. Welch Baby Beef.
Irving H. Welch read a carefully pre-
pared paper on Baby Beef, as follows:
Baby beef consists of finished beef at
twenty-four months old, or under this age.
To produce it simply means pushing the
calf from start to maturity-finish.
To accomplish this successfully, it is ab-
solutely essential in the first place to have
well-bred animals of the best type, such
as Angus, Herefords and Shorthorns. The
two first mentioned of these breeds have
proven to be the best for baby beef,
though it is agreed by a vast majority of
stockmen that the more cross of Short-
horn there is in the foundation stock, the
better the results.
The pith of this subject is that formerly
the cattle bred were coarse, slab-sided,
big-bellied animals, that required full
growth almost before they reached a con-
dition in which they would yield a fair
proportion of meats on choice cuts-ten-
derloin, sirloin, porterhouse, etc. As the
population of the country increased, free
ranges were cut down, and land in the
feeding country became too valuable for
grazing, scientific breeders .took hold of
the matter, not only for altering the con-
formation and character of the rough cat-
tle to make them produce more of the
high-priced meat and to produce it at as
young an age as possible-the idea being
to make the animal dress out more high-
priced cuts than formerly and to take on
its growth and fat at as young an age as
possible. The reasons for these efforts
are manifest in all published experiments
in dressing common and high grade cattle.
In this connection, I want to urge most
earnestly every stockgrower to obtaiif and
read the farmers' bulletins issued by the
Department of Agriculture, particularly
No. 143, Conformation of Beef and Dairy
Cattle, prepared by Prof. A. M. Soule, of
Tennessee, which illustrates very clearly
the evolution of the native cattle to the
type desired for profit. The bulletins b)
the agricultural colleges of the South will
also be very instructive, and the beginner


in stock business can save much valuable


time by taking advantage of the informa-
tion derived from the experiments of pro-
gressive men.
An Ideal Breedig Greoud
The territory covered by our Southeast-
ern Stock Association i an deal breeding
ground, and should be producing the calves
for Northern feeders to make the baby
beef of the world. It is perfect nonsense
to say we can't raise better cattle than
we do, because States with like climates
and forage conditions have demonstrated
that we can. All that is necessary is to go
at the business right, and do it now, and
success is assured. We have object lessons
in our own State of Florida, and I leave to
such progressive citizens a Messrs. Cham-
bliss, Gaitskill, Anderson, Hocomb, Skip-
per, et al., to impress upon your minds
how easily you can achieve success, and
will confine my remarks to the topic as-
signed me.
The desirability of quick returns from
two-year-old fat cattle rather than from
four-year-olds, is easily figured out, in ad-
dition to the fact that the meat from a
young animal must in the nature of things
be more tender than that from older ani-
mals. If an animal produces 1,200 pounds
of meat in two years, the proportional
amount per year is 600 pounds, whereas,
if he only produces an average of 533
pounds per year, or sixty-seven pounds
per year in favor of the young animal,
which has also eaten proportionately less
food, the amount he will eat in the third
year being considerably greater than in his
first and second years.
Experiments have given us some valua-
ble statistics as to comparative cost of
feeding baby beef and aged cattle. Good
authorities say that 9 pounds of grain
ration will make 2 1-4 pounds of baby beef
and it takes 28 pounds to make 3 pounds
of two or three-year-old beef.
In addition to this, there is the interest
on the amount invested for a year longer
and the risk of loss.
Without good breeding cattle will not
take on a finish at an early age. Then it
is necessary to feed liberally from the be-
ginning. One advantage is that it takes
relatively so much less to make beef on a
yearling than a two-year-old. To illus-
trate: Mr. L. H. Kerrick, of Bloomington.
Ill., had the second prize bunch of year-
ling Angus steers at the recent internat-
ional. I don't recollect the exact sale price
reported, but the two-year-olds outsold
the yearlings between 50c. and 75c. Not-
withstanding this, Mr. Kerrick said that
the yearlings had made him decidedly the
most money.
What Time Has Accmaplished.
Years of time and money by the thous-
ands have been spent to get a class of
cattle that could be matured under two
years, and it has been accomplished. They
have been developed, and we can profit
by this experience, if we only will. Two
years ago we fed on one of our Dakota
ranches a carload of heifer calves that
were mixed Shorthorns and Herefords. At
the age of fourteen months and seven days
they averaged 858 pounds, and sold for
4:85 per cwt., which made a nice profit.
Early frost caught our corn that year, too,
so that it was not the best of feed. These
calves were dropped in April, and ran in
pasturee until September, when they were
>ut on corn and fed until the following
Tune, when they were sold. Of the twen-
y-six head, all did well except one, which
iad a "yellow streak" in her! likely, and
took to growing instead of fattening.


The Reaaso Given


You may raise the question, why do
not all feed baby beef The answer should
appeal to every member of the Southeast-
ern Stock Growers' Amoiation. It is be-
cause the high-priced land in the feed-
inging section of the United States will
not permit every breeder to raise his
calves, and he has to depend upon the
Southern breeders for feeders, sad has to
take our common serub stock, which will
not fatten until they have arrived at ma-
turity, anywhere from three to six yeas
old
Too much cannot be said for fall-bood
animals, nor for baby beef, though we ma't
export the latter a cheaply as we a
the larger animnl. It is nticeable, how-
ever, that our English friends are takig
lighter.weight cattle every year, and wold
prefer our baby beef could we aford to
send it to them.
Beef is what people eat, and that is
what they want. They do not want boae.
If you are going to have something to
sell, raise the kind that people want, sad
in doing so you will progrM and p -
per, not yourself alone, but your country
and State and nation.



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(ErtambOs d is aS.)


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Guaranteed yeas el. By the
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GEO. J. COL Ul RYT
Guaranteed 6 years old. By the
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Guaranteed 4
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years old. By the
fall sfu rts, .7
= Pr o .s


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OLD KENTUCKY CORN
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OLD POINTER CLUB CORN
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We handle all the leading brands of
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upon application.

ThANtmmyur&FlaiNUUprco.
So5-oS-Sio-5s Feorth Street,
MACOM GeORIA.


THE RECORD WILL BE WORTH DOLLARS TO YOU EVERY WEEI









6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Testing of Turpentie and Linseed Oil


Mmc haa been written about the test-
ig of these two important painting mate-
rial in the text-books and journals de-
voted to paints and painting, but still
there is omethin wanting, says the Oil
S and Colouran's Journal, judging from
the fact that the editor of this journal
often get queries as to simple methods of
testing for purity. The question which
always arises in, Has the painter the
proper means of making the tests? It is
no ume naming any tests unless the would-
be tester will go to the trouble and ex-
pese of providing the neesary means
of carrying them out. Now generally
nothing very elaborate will be needed, but
a certain minimum amount of appliances
should be provided, and, given these, very
little difeulty will be experienced in carry-
ing out the teats that will be described.
These tests will be about the simplest
that ca well be used to determine the
purity or otherwise of a given sample of
turpentine or linseed oil. There are many
other tests that can be used, but some
of thee are rather delicate, and require
more skill In making than the oil user
would be likely to posses. Many of those
who have written on this subject seem
to have had the unlucky knack of describ-
ing thee tests to the exclusion of some
others more eaily carried out and equally
reliable.
Lined Ol.
Spelic Gravity.-This is a most import-
ant teat as regards oils in general, and not
at all dileaft to carry out. All that is
required is a small chemical balance, set
of weights, aid a 25 gramme gravity bot-
tie. The bottle i irat of all carefully
washed out with a little methylated spirit,
then with ether, then dried and weighed
on the haler e. The oil to be tested is
then tested as to its temperature by mean
of a the1mmeter, and then heated or
cold until it stads at 60 degrees F.,
whih is the standard temperature at
which the upeeie gravity of a oils is
taken. The bottle is now quite filled with
the oil, taking care to avoid air bubbles,
the stopper inserted, and the outside wiped
S dry. Next it is weighed, and so the
weight of oil required to fill the bottle at
00 degrees F. auertained. This weight is
now divided by 25; the result is the spe-
ciSf gravity of the oil. Take as an ex-
ample:
Weight of bottle and oil ....39.064 grb.
Weight of bottle ............ 15.780 gri.

Weight of oil ....................28 grs.
SM3t divided by 25 equals 0.93136.
The specic gravity of genuine linseed
oil ranges from 0.930 to 0.35, varying in
different kinds; any oil below 0.930 or
above 0.37 may be looked on with sus-
pieion, and should be subjected to further
tests.
Flash Polat.-This is a test that is neg-
lected by mos writers, but it is one that,
being easy to carry out, is worth applying,
for it will certainly determine adulteration
with mineral ad rain oils. There are re-
quired a small enamelled cup, holding
about i to 3 oss., a stand for same, a
Bunsea burner, a thermometer registering
to 600 degrees F., and a blowpipe which
serves as a gas jet, having a flame about
the sa of a pea. The cup is put on the
stand, and about. half-filled with the oil
to be teted. The thermometer is fixed so
that the bulb is completely covered by
the oil. The Bumen burner is lit and the
anse of the bame so adjusted that its tip


just touches the bottom of the cup. The
blowpipe is connected with the gas, and
a small flame about the-size of a pea ar-
ranged. The heating of the oil is now
proceeded with when the temperature
reaches 300 degrees F., the blowpipe flame
is brought close to the surface of the oil
for a moment, and then taken away. This
is repeated at about every five degrees
rise in temperature until a flash of flame
passes over the surface of the oil when
the flame is brought close to it; the tem-
perature at which this happens is called
the flash point. With pure linseed oil of
good quality this will not be less than 500
degrees F., although occasionally a poor
sample may flash slightly lower. If min-
eral oil be present the flash point will not
be higher than 420 degrees F., and may go
down to 360 degrees F., according to the
character of the oil used. If rosin oil be
present the flash point will not exceep
330 degrees F., but will usually be lower.
If an oil like rape or cotton seed be pres-
ent the flash point may range from 475
to 500 degrees F.
Saponification Test--Linseed oil, in
common with other fatty oils, when boiled
with a solution of caustic potash or of
caustic soda, undergoes saponification or
is made into soap. This makes a conven-
ient test for the purity of a sample of
linseed oil and its freedom from mineral
and rosin oils. There is required to carry
out this test a solution of 28 grammes of
pure caustic potash in 1 litre of methy-
lated spirit (rectified spirit of wine would
be better), a standard solution of sul-
phuric acid containing exactly 49 grammes
per litre, a wide mouth flash fitted with a
cork and long wide glass tube, a water
bath, Bunsen burner, 25 cc., pipette, a bu-
rette, and a test solution of phenol
phthalein in alcohol. The test is carried
out as follows: 25 cc. of the alcoholic
potash solution are placed in the flask,
and after the long glass tube has been
inserted, boiled on the water bath for
20 min., then a little cold water is added,
and a few drops of the phenol phthalein
solution added; a- strong red colour will
be produced. The burette is filled with
the standard solution of sulphuric acid.
This is now dropped into the flask, with
constant stirring, until the red colour dis-
appears. The amount of acid solution used
is noted; this is called the blank test
The amount usually is about 11 c.c. Next
the flask is carefully cleaned out and
wiped dry and is weighed, and exactly
2 grammes of the linseed oil weighed into
it. 25 e.c. of the alcoholic potash solution
is measured in, the long glass tube at-
tached, and the whole heated for 20 min-
utes on the water bath, baking at inter-
vals. Wtaer is next added; note that if
the oil be pure fatty oil, the mixture will
be clear, but if there be any mineral or
rosin oil present it will be cloudy and tur-
bid. Phenol phthalein solution is added as
before, and standard acid from the burette,
until the red colour disappears. Note the
amount of acid solution used. The dif-
ference between this amount and that
used in the blank test is a measure of the
amount of alkali required to saponify the
oil. The following calculations have to be
made:
Volume of acid for blank test ....11.4
Volume of acid for oil test ........ 4.1

Volume of acid used .............. 6.8

6.8 multiplied by 0.066 equals 0.3808.


-THE




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rour (un ata Lastein Cmoty, Um.aybroek Rye or bes Horn Bye. 6.
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Ftour bottles ai th tfei(twlg CdUtruiw W=ne0 : o0fr. Pert. Idcytg
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MB ,e botti-saer I.
oulr litls ueti nIa sa m, my ah a B1 a N1 .. md.as
n i bottl e ....... Ie
wa ef tour tna .arts f smes omCa W arweet Rye Gof wee-
R nye hau 4 at Tm alm, Pese Baura, Puse sed Rem
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One botue y of th above .........ae.... .......................................m
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aoloe bottles M
mSend for mtt b and m"
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AM You A suDaCE T0 t=r a mos


III









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 'T


080 multiplied by 100 divided by 2
equals 19.
The oil required 19.0M per cent. of caus-
tie potash to saponify it. Good pure lin-
seed oil takes 1.5 to 19 per cent. Take
a d remat oil:
Vohme o ad for blank test ......10.9
VOa i e acid for oil test ........ 4.

Volume of oil used ................ .4

6.4 multiplied by 0.0A equals 03584.
0eg84 multiplied by 100 divided by 2
equals 17.9L
This sample took only 1792 per cent.
of caustic potash, and was adulterateO
By multiplying the percentage by 100
and dividing by 19 the amount of adul-
teration ean be approximately ascertained.
In the above ease the 17.92 represents
943 per cent. of linsed oil. The above
three tests will suffie to determine the
purity or otherwise of a sample of lin-
eed oil. No adulterator can tamper with
is product without changing one or more
of the above points, and none of these
tests are dime lt to carry out. They ap-
ply also to boiled ihased oils, with this
diteroe, that 'the speciie gravity o good
well boiled oil rangm from O.940 to 0.946,
the Mash point from 490 degrees F. up-
wards, and the saponieation test from
183 to 1.75 per cent. of caustic potash.
The addition of mineral oil redne a
these points, that of rsin oil nereases
the gravity, but radnees the other two
points The addition of cotton or rape
oils rednes the gravity and usually the


flash pont, but does not much alter the
caustic potash test.
Turpentn .
Specific Graity.-In the same way as lin-
seed oil. The range is from 0.82 to 0.867,
with very little difference between Rusian,
French and American. Flash point, 97
to 100 degrees F.
Boiling Point.-Procure a 4-os. stoppered
retort, thermometer ranging to 400 de-
grees F., Liebig's condenser, 100 e. meas-
ure. Fit the thermometer with a cork or
rubber tube into the retort, so that the
bulb reached nearly to the bottom. Ar-
range the retort and Liebig's condenser
together; best place the retort in small
pan. Measure into the retort 100 cc. of
the turpentine, and, after fixing in posi-
tion, heat up with the Bunsen burner;
note the boiling point. In the case of
American and French turpentines this
will be 310 degrees F, in that of Russian,
325 degrees F, and it should not alter
more than 5 to 8 degrees during the period
of test. When the temperature reaches
340 degrees F., the experiment may be
stopped and the quantity of turpentine
distilled over measured. In a good tur-
pentine this will reach 97 c.c., in the case
of wood turpentine 92 to 94 c.. If the
turpentine is adulterated with rosin spirit
or petroleum oil, very much less, and the
boiling *will start lower. In the case of
besoline or petroleum naphtha, much
will come over below 212 degrees F. These
three tests are quite sufiient to determine
the purity of any sample of turpentine.


Dr. Herty Returns to the Lecture Room.


u-,, l I - -ill l- -:::--::-
MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


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ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES and CRATES.



SStandard Clothing Company I


Dr. Cas. Herty, who for four years
has been loosely associated with the tur-
pentie producing interests, has accepted
the air of Chemistry in the University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and will
enter upon the duties of that position in
July.
Dr. Herty is the origitor of the "Herty
cup" and the system of turpentining that
bears his name. That be has been of
great service to the industry, no well in-
formed operator will deny.
It was six years ago when Dr. Herty was
studying in Germany that he began to
think of the destructive methods em-
ployed by operators in the cutting of
boxes looking at it from a standpoint of'
forest preservation, and he determined to
make some experiments in the pine belt
on his own accord upon his return to
America. At that time Dr. Herty was a
member of the factuly of the University of
Georgia. The first summer after his re-
turn to Ameriea, therefore, he took up
some experimental work in South Georgia,
applying scientific method and the most
minute calculations to his experiments.
The Bureau of Forestry, United States
Department of Agriculture, became inter-
ested and the results were that his ex-
periment, as far as mde, were successful


Jeoseph D. Christie.
It is good to note the exceptional prog-
rees achieved by some of Jacksonville's
foremost young men of business, among
who m we are indeed proud to bring to
the notice of our subscribers the name of
Joseph D. Christie, business agent, room
309 Dyal-Upehurch Building.
Joseph D. Christie is a thorough young
man of business, a pioneer in. the handling


even beyond his expectations and to fur-
ther push the work and to show its dis-
position to father any movement for for-
est protection, at the same time abetting
the great turpentine producing interests,
Dr. Herty was employed by the Depart-
ment as an expert, he res-gned from the
University and the "Herty System" was
made public and encouraged. It has grown
in favor ever since.
As soon as Dr. Herty felt that the
Government had completed its experiments
along the lines that he was directly in-
terested in, he resigned from the Govern-
ment service. At this time the Herty cup
and gutter system was becoming more
popular every day and now one immense
plant, the Chattanooga Pottery Co., is
devoted exclusively to manufacturing the
Herty cups.
Dr. Herty was offered the Chair of
Chemistry in the University of North
Carolina a year ago, but at that time
declined because he did not feel that his
work in the turpentine belt had been com-
pleted. Now, however, the system is thor-
oughly inaugurated and having accom-
plished the greet work that he started
out to accomplish, he returns again to
the lecture room, and to the test tubes
and liquids of the laboratory. North Caro-
lina is to be ongratulated


of businesses and business property in
this city and State, and we advise all
those in the near future who may be de-
sirous of learning some prices and informa-
tion to at once make application to him.

Mr. A. Sessoms, one of the leading and
most well known naval stores operators
in the business was in the city las Wed-
nesday.


One Price


One Price


S FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND IPVRISMERS, ,
SI7 and 19 Wet Bay Street. *. JhIksem PlrMa.
? 0 Stetson and Hawe Hats. Special Att-ttoh m v to Ml boere.
*o*e**e*e*e*.*e*e*o*e**ee*.*e* *0*e**e0**0eoe**o:**eoo*


R. TOLAR.


PLH. HART. T. ULAmONuv.
(antabllshed 14117.)


& R. TOAUI, M


TOLAR. HART &. CO.
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.

Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
IAberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. MemubeA of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futres.


JOBEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVAN-AH. (EOEGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OP

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc,


Read the Record Adv't's.


2UE 21CO=2D = TUEIZRATORV 2ZUIANM..


I --re









8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
W.7 i y .A.&CRON UU.SOL


Lmber and Naval Stores Situation at New Orleans


A special fro New Orlsa regarding
the lmber and naval stores situation and
general nws of the industries, follows:
New Orans-The demand for yellow
plne is surpassing all expectation. North,
south, east and west the orders are coming
in and the call is for everything from
havy fr aing material and bridge tim-
bers to dlicate mouldins and panes for
interior aLish.
President J. Sutherland, of the Suth-
erland-lanes Company, says: "There has
bem asiderable improvement on lumber
and awn timber. The interior demand is
exoptioally od and while European
buyers have not yet come up to American
parity, conidderble business has been
booked tor sipment in thi yar. Our
judgment is that the export demand will
steadily improve.
The expert shipment of lumber and
staves at this time is onsiderably re-
strited by the movement of cotton and
grain. This is the usual situation at this
seaso of the year.
The daman for oak lumber continues
godi ase Sw gum sad cottonwood. The
latter has held its own very well during
the past year. Stocks a light and high
prices are anticipated for this year.
The markets ae active, with a good de-
mua
All during the past year the demand
was exeaptiosally good for plain sawn
white oak. There has also bee consider-
able dem, fir quartrwn. Plain oak,
it is bheevd, will bring higher prices this
year than lst.
*ad ad tpelo gum has been in fair
demand aad pries are well maintained
for the gher gades of stock.
Poplar is yet somewhat neglected, ow-
ing to the heavy stocks in Europe. The
dim d for this lumber will hardly im-
prov untl the foreign stocks are greatly
redaeed.
If this fne weather keeps up all win-
ter A priee of lumber will not advance
aa it will if ad weather should sat in.
The niht are frty aad the days in the
main ar delightful, with just enough rain-
fall to keep the roads from being dusty
and disgreeable. It is ideal weather for
the manufacture of lumber and shingles.
aad when the yards am well stacked and
it is easy to get it to he market, the
pries are muh lower dhan when bad
weather tail the otput and the roads
prevent its delivery.
The eypress m*f--t r issued a new
Hlt Jan. 1. This list, however, does not
show say changes from the former list, but
was imued to bear date of this year. It
now looks as though the advance that was
promised at me time will not take place
at t January meeting.
The cypress market is very quiet and
has been for the past two or three weeks.
The orders are not only few in number,
but the miles are not burdened with in-
quiries. The lumber dales are not a
ious to place their orders until after stock
taking. The cypress salesmen did not
start out until this week.
Cypres shingles are not as much in
demand as they were in the fall and early
winter, yet quite a number of orders are
coming in. The mills already have orders
enough to take up all the shingles that
will be on hand for the next forty-five
days. It is expected by that time that
P' o- I! volume of business will be coming
i.


S D. 0. Dunn, of Lake Charles, ha closed
a deal for 50,000,000 feet of cypress in the
Laeatine swamps, a few miles east of Lake
Charles. Mr. Dunn will put in new saw
and shingle mills and develop that section
as rapidly as possible.
The jury at Alexandra awarded W. T.
Parker $5,000 for the death of his son,
which occurred at the Crowell & Spencer
Lumber company's mill. The damages
asked by the parents was $10,000.
Warren & Gee's planer, dry kiln and
lumber yard at Mt. Olive, Miss., was burn-
ed recently, entailing a loss of $5,000;
partly insured.
The following forest enterprises have
been chartered in Mississippi:
The Oliver-MaAvoy Timber Company,
domiciled at Bay Springs, in Jasper oun-
ty, with an authorized capital of $50,000,
and with William Oliver and Jim McAvoy
incorporators.
The Gulf Turpentine company, domiciled
at Gulfport, Harrison county, with a cap-
ital stocn of 20,000, and with J. P. Payne,
A. H. Powell and others incorporators.
A movement is on foot among the rail-
roads with gulf coast terminals to induce
as far as possible all the white emigrants
they can to settle along their lin This
will in& measure solve the labor problem,
for not all will want to engage in farming.
Another hope of the solution of the
vexed question of labor is the reduction
in the cotton acreage. Last year when
cotton sold from 10 to 20 cents a pound
it behooved those who had available land
to put it in cotton. Fancy prices were
paid for inferior heads and the result has
been that the production is so great that
the planter will come out on the wrong
side of the ledger. These idle hands that
will not be in the cotton fields again this
spring and summer will go. a long way in
helping the mills keep up with the orders.
All the pine mils now are running on
full time and some are going to set in
soon to work nights. This is deplored by
the more conservative, but when the mills
have been running whenever the "Missis-
sippi coon" saw fit to lend a hand, it
makes the mill owners hungry to catch up
with some of the orders or to supply a par
of the demand.
The yearly exports of lumber and naval
stores from Gulfport, Miss., were: Lum-
ber and timber, 245,213,280 feet, board
measure. The yearly exports for 1903
were 106,849,000 feet, making a gain this
year of 139,364,829, an increase that sur-
passed both the years 1900 and 1903 com-
bined.
The naval stores amounted to 92,726
barrels rosin and 22,480 gallons turpen-
tine.

ead aln Wen for A fnti o r t
tupatine a mmed oma tade to at
baneet deA to imre a rompt d6hry.

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Bet in the Worl.
er deliverd pri write,
Cypress TM CL.. Mebs.Ala

KNABE & EMER.SON

PIANOS.


slend fo Prsaion dJ Twrs.
JAS. A. ABRAMS.
M Al SerMl. asd ro Trae sns.


W. T. fIL, J. eL CASONa, .o. cr-L.,
Preulmr. VIce-Preeut, Sec. mt v.

Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTnURER OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand F&ctories.
8th Street R. R. Croaing.
JACKSONVILLE. FLOR.IDA



NATIONAL ...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH. GA., U. S. A.


JoHN nL YoUNO,
President


J. P. WLLU.JAM.
C. W. SAUB8Y.
8. A. ALFMOD,


c.8
P. L S
J.-B
J..IL


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vloe-Predaet.

I. EaS. J. BU.LLARD
UTHELLAND. W. C. POWELL.
PADGJrT. WALTER RAY,
YOUNG. A. D. OOVINGTO.


L. L KAYTON,
Seetary Tremwar.

J. a. caMu-S
G. W. DMUN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the 8. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVB FOR PARTICULAR.




J. S. Schofild's Sons Company,

9@o@.@*@*@t* @a aea-ter

I Distiller's Pumpingi
Outfit.
SNo plant complete without ea.
Hd Hundreds of them in use inaGn
miwodea Alam*.m peim ippi-
S Garadel WMriteYoa p-


aswon Grads Mackhm y,
eAll aWU ry ftull Od oeaple
0 ^ MW Supples. Pipe,
Boer Tubes, MEtrs







John R. YouM. W. Motte, c. B. Parker, Jiams McNatt, W. W. Wider,
Psrideet. VIce-Pres. Vie-Pres. Vice-Pres. Bee. a Trea.
John R. Young Co.,






Commission

Merchants.


SNaval Stores Factors. Wholesale Grocers.


Savovapa~h d Brunswick. Go.
sell sees )IuIIsIIISIuuIcIIsuIIealuss asee"


w .W W mImE 2W -







-T I' -M.Ll- WEEY Uwub-rz&L RCOED. 9
_ I- -iota 010001 1111I...


* rty OGte Wl lL
e entire property of the Georgia Cr
and V-r*-fi-4f Oaopy, b ankrupts,
has been ordered old by Judge A H. Me-
naal, referee in bankruptcy. The prop-
ty siste of 81 ares of land, all the
buIl ^ua, menery and other appurte-
manses of the pilat, valued approximately
at Na The order puts the entire busi-
es of the male in the haads of the trus-
te, the avamnh Trust Company, sub-
jet to te approval of the refeee and the
bankrupty court If a private sale is de-
termind a, bWds muet be in the hands of
the tree by February 1. They will be
operated oa tat day, and if y is suffii-
anty high to meet the approval of the
trustee, the sale will be consummated; but
if am I satifatry, then the prop-
erty is to be mid at public outry March
T. It is possible that a number of local
spltalits wil make a bid on the property
with a view of eoatinuing the work of car
biuing In this 4TVy.

M..I. hs. mNn Organse.
attiisurg, Miss, January 3.-The
bluse and sawaill men coated on the
oWG &a ip Island, New Orlean & North-
easI %, MobWa, Jackson & Kansas City,
and M sii Oatral railroads, about
se rty-ve i number, h ad n meting in
this city to-day. J. F. Wilder was made
eama and J. H. Itemveva mseetary. The
meUng| was aied for the purpose of
tae steps 'toward a permanent rgani-
satirO whiek will be effected before they
adjourna The muMn oef ternati
wil be t Mbmlappi Luberma's AUo-
atioe. It wfl have headquarters at Hat-
-tissmrg. ien t president and
semetary have ao yet been decided upon,
bt wll be sasme b re the. meeting


comes to a lose. A committee composed
of Milford Parker, J. H. Platt and J. E.
Barber, was appointed to draft a schedule
of prices to be adopted by the assoiiation,
and they are discussing and adopting a
scale of prices which they think will be
beneficial to sawmill men and lumbermen
connected with the association.
To Utilise Sawmill Waste.
A company, capitalized at 300$00, with
$100,000 paid in, has been organized at
Hattiesburg, Miss., for the purpose of
manufacturing into merchantable products
the waste material of sawmills, such as
sawdust, slabs, etc. This s first ground
up and distilled, making wood alcohol; it
is then compressed under powerful by-
draulic pressure into blocks or bricks and
retorted, from which wood turpentine, tar
and rosin oil, etc, are obtained, and the
retorted blocks'or bricks are turned out of
the retort in the form of the best quality
of charcoal.
It has been demonstrated that the yel-
low pine shavings from the planing mills
and the slabs, and, in fact, all the young
pine, makes excellent paper pulp. The
paper mill at Orange Tex., has demon-
strated not only this fact, but that it
can be made and sold on the market with
profit at a price below what it costs the
eastern mills to manufacture wood pulp.
Southern Lumber w-af*.st.ii Meet at
New Orleans
The fifteenth annual meeting of the
Southern Lumber Manufacturers' Associa-
tion will. occur at New Orleans, La., Jan-
uary 24 and 25, with headquarters at the
New St. Charles Hotel. In the event of
the convention not completing its business
at the close of the second day the meeting


will be continued during the 9h. Fell
particulars as to railroad rates ad hotel
accommodations can b secured from Sec-
retary George Smith, St. Iws, Mo.

New York State Retailel to Mest at Al-
bany.
The annual convention of the Retail
Lumber Dealers' Associaton of the State
of New York will be held on the first Wed-
nesday in February (February 1) at Al-
bany, that city having received the larg-
est number of votes. Plau have not as
yet been perfected as to the m.te-inuit
features, but that there will be something
good forthcoming on that sore goes with-
out saying.



Trade Checks
FOB THE

CIMIWIMRT KIIES.

THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Imeistrial ReMcr. Ge.
Jacksaolls, me.


This Spae Bmerved for


Gus Muller & Co.



Liquor Merchants

Proprietors



..Afiesa...


ACME BEER




ZINC NAILS

Turpentine Cups
Approved by .Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
St She m: which win not injury
saw whn left in the trees.

rS PS te nw Vw*'e, o .
Also feadqsm r for Galvanmid and
Tinned Nail, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Eta., Slating and flying
Nails, Slatm Tools Copper Nals and
Tasks.


---------------


The


Cooperage Company


Manufacturers of High Grade


Western White Oak Spirit Barrels



Capital $1000000.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located..


O PPICERSZ


J. C. LITTLE, President.
X. H. MOTE, General Manager.


JOHN E. RARRIS, Vie-President.
C. H. BABNES, Secretary and Treasurr.


DIRECTORS:


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


C. H. BARNES,


J. W. WEST,


W. J. KELLY


W. F. COACHMAN.


-----1------ -~----- ~ u ~~`~MII1JM~~~,I\~~Ml\h-1
- - - - - - -










evew of Naval Sores a Wee

Review of Naval Stores for Week on =s AL XF cAME PM 03B AM TWO
^^B^^t^^ --nB.I; k*


IrIey' Break ain spirit
Savanna, Ga, sJa. 20, 1905.-A big
break in the spirits of turpentine market
aine to-day (Friday) a the result of the
cumulative efect of the weakness that
has been in evidence for the last several
'days ad which, though the price held
its level, mused the tone to weaken from
Am to steady, to dull and there to remain
with sn bids for supplies, and, because of
the vry light receipts; no pressure to
elL Te market opened dul at 631-2
cets, without sales, and at the close had
dropped to 511-2 cents, ag which it was
uMted firm. The new level was made
on a sale of 85 casks, the total for the
day. Receipts 450 asks, and shipments
I'ma

Spirit f the Week at SaWvambh
Price Repts Bales Exp. 103s
Aon., Jan. 1d ib3%Y 16t 1 150 1 Oi7 JI
TuLs., Jan. 17 a 62 I lot 234 6
Wed, Jan.,18 66 55 0 0.66
Thr., J 19.-olidy in naval stores
market.

aea fte the Week at Savanua
MAnday, Jan. 1. Last Year.
WW .. ......... 6.15 40
WG ........ .. 5.09 410
N .............. 4.75 3.
M .............. 450 3.90
K ............ 4J 3.15
1 .............. 3.40 310
H ...... ........ 3.10 2.
G............. 2.87% 2.90
F ............ 275 2.70
a ... ......... 2.70 6
D ...... ........ s.60 20
ABC .... .. ... 2.5 2.0
Receipts, 1,899, sales 1,965. exports 1,84.

Tuessdy,'Jan 17.-Rosai frm; receipts
3.244 I573; shipmats 38. Quote
ABC, L.55; AD, N.&0. e, 2.65 2.70; F,
2.78 1-2e0O.77 1-2; G, 6.85@L&90; H,
3.10; I, $3.4; M, $450; N, *4.75; WG,
<.6Si WW, 5.1&.
Wednesday, Jan. 18- osin firm; re-
eeipt, 1,20 ; sales, 3,00; shipments, 1,851.
Quot: A, B, .C, .5; D, 6.00; E, $2.70;
F., 4.75; G, .90; H, p3.1; I, $3.50; K.,
40M6 .*4.0 N, .76. WU, Sp.00; WW,

Thrasday, Jan. I.--Holida in naval
store market.
Byuah Naval Steres Statement.
Spirits. Rosie.
btok April 1 ........... sAM 4460
Receipts Jan. 17 ......... 55 1,286
Receipts previously ......168,361 5930
Total ............... 174,11 5Bl144
Exports Jan. 17 ............... 1,861
EMpoats previously ......14,388 518,129
Total ...............142,388 529,980
Stoek Jan. 17 ......... 32,52 75,160
Stoke. previously ........ 10,705 86,12

Turpentine at Loaeos.
1904 1903 1902 1901
Stock, De. 31 21,500 27,294 37,652 40,445
Frena and American.
DeL In 1904 90,30* 87,707 87,810 86,617
Prie Dee. 31 37-9 43-101-2 40- 27-41-2
Feb-Aril 37-9 44-3 40-3 27-41-2
Sav. e 30 491-2 561-4 521-4 36-4
N. B-The figures for 1904 are our es-
timate.
Reported by James Watt & Son.
Tolar, Hart & Co's Review.
New York, Jan. 17, 1906.
The Industrial Record, Jacksonville, Fla.
Spirits Turpentine-There has been a
fair demand during past week, and as
stock here is light, market readily res-
ponded to higher prices South. Stock,
1,027 barrels. We quote Mahines, 57c.
Rosin-The demand is about sufficient
to absorb receipts with about a steady
Market for all grades. We quote BC,
6o90; D, S.00; ,E 3.10; F, $3.0; 0,


$3.25 to $3.30; H, 8.40; I;, 3M.; K, St.1;
M, $4.90; N, $6.20S WO, 6.4; WW, 61BSW
TOLAR, HART & CO.

Baily & -ealgamerpPs BRview.
New York, January 18, 1906.
Spirits Turpatine-Stock, 89 barrels.
The market during the entire week has
shown an advancing tendey i sympathy
with the Southern malets, but aes hare
only been inoderate
Thursday, Jan. 12-I6%e.
Friday, Jan 1-l %c. a. am.; 5e. p. m.
Saturday, Jan. 14-56et
Monday, Jan. 16-66%.
Tuesday, Jan. 17-67e.
Wednesday, Jan. 18-57e. asked. but
tone weak.
Rosin-Stock, 25,200 barrels.
The tone of this market tl steay for
all grades, business has been fair.
AC, Dn87%; D, WP.; E, 3.0.to P.10;
P, &.10 to 6.1; G, $3.15 to $146 1.
$8.40 to $3.45; $3.70 to $3.7 K, 4.W5
to 4AAQ; HM. SI to 4.o90; Mia, WS,
6.30 to $5.35; WW, 5.50 to 6S.6.
A Years Buswne at Barursik.
Brunawie, Ga--The rOsoor- am 4 the ia
ports sad exports for Dsanp emom the
year 1904 as given below make a credita-
ble showing. Although the values show
a slight decrease for December and for the
year 1904 as agaimet 190, ths- ema be
readily amcouted for by the ~ lw 1rjip
of lumber and eotto foar 190, s tmhe
were 12,393 bales more shipped in 1904
than in 1903.
Foreign Exports for December, 19.'-
Foreign exports for Desmbet show a-d
orease as against the soae. math at 199,
of $18,245. This is accounted for ftm
the fact that the prices of cotton were so
much lower daring MDeembesm at 9I thn
'in the same month of 1908.
The foreign shipment fa'. December,
1904, are as follows: 34,A00 baes of cot-
ton; 3,586 ton phosphate rock; 7,700 bar-
rels resin. 1;0 I bamrre turpenEiaM s-
304,000 feet lumber; 370,000 feet timber;
566,000 shingle*; 1,00 laths; 9,000 feet
ash and oak; 14,4a9 wsties; 1,00 pick-
etas 11-2. tos merchandise, having& k
total valu of ,4J53,56
5,4 barrels roasi 9850 barel, tur-
The domestic shatants for Dbeimbek,
oysters; 400,000 shingles; 229,070 croms
ties. 2,000 bales straw; 480 cases cedar;
1904, are as follows; 4,00 ba les 0ton
pentine; 9,04"iA9 fs4e lunk1p Io 0 -
1,560 bales sBhe ,tg; 0007 li l feet'
piling; 41 tons merchandise, having a total
value of. $759,01. Foreign. and domaltie
imports for Deeslow, IWK, valtl s at4
cotton; 7 tons cottoamed; 50 bales In-
ters; 35,446 tons phosphate rock; 3800
tons pig iron; 104,180 barrels roain; 2,
300 barrels turpentine; 2,722,000 feet
lumber; 10,187,000 feet timsbg. l*tO Oe,
gum; 1,000 feet mahoang lil etb
glee; 21,000 laths; 34,00 feet oak and
ash; 105,000 pieces wood for orange boxes;
45,017 crosties; 82 bl bbs x sheelp; 45
Foreign Expect fc. 190i-124l alba .
cases turpentine and tar; 41 tons shuttle
blocks; 1,000 pickets; 541-2 tons merchan-
dise of total vslw of $17414~i6.
Domestic Exports for Year.--2,03 bales
ootton4 770 bale yarn; 50 bale liters;
391 bales wool: 94,08 berels rosa; 34,-
160 barrels turpentine; 116,46,000 feet
lumber; 447,000 feet timber; 350 cases oys-
ters; 6,835,350 shingles; 130,000 laths; 21,-
000 feet ash and oak; 2386,100 croistis
50 bales deer tongue; 6200 bales straw;
4.320 cases cedar; 22,0 balso sheeting;
500 barrels cottonseed oil; 433,978 lineal
feet piling; 680tans mradise, amount-
ing in value to $8,268,100.
Foreign and domestic imports for. 1904
valued at $12,07,994.
Recapitulation for 1904:
Foreign exports for 1904 ....$ 8471 A M
Domestic exports for 190 ..,. 88.,099
For. and Dom. I f-er 1996 ... .I MO,90 4
Total ..................... 8g 7,". M


.Iik b~ ,........... ... ................



sh. .s ..... ............ .... .....



N*r **Yor .* -* *
Sp einbe ...... ...................
S---4L -- -.-.-===========::
= = ==n================


199AW292 49( 314545



MAW 2964M' 214MG.
7524" 975.428o W6.M

MOK *41109lo' 21,1,446
U38171 504M1,8 IM MAU2

SAMO5 4S,7M M5 M
87.8 133,v1i 21 1X

59.31 37,M.' W;op
USM746 387754 1eMW


ilk -- "1qu an ibs don SION br M9 aW -sg u. 21MAW boo
Glo etkthf and ftsin t Those YOM,


.. .... ... *AM. low MAN I
MKINOWr .. SAM W 1L FQ aW Uw MP
--A MW60 u9. SIM 2
aw MV- swo -MM1RsII
no MA MA "U
r~~~ --~ 3e~~~J -1or

9.11 oft Tj 4AM Now~t5
Nin.. .. .... .I. M"W A84nLow. now



ja a NLV isa'. 6W W slam low nowl ~.WH

..... Y.. diet IAM MA MM& no
- .a ia; *. 4W


.. -.. .. ..... AMOW SANOM IPAM191was MORM MA
.d- b -
towis. sews*& hir JMMMP' Wa# AJlms.of l0, M.j to
ioa1 row-n&M ;y v I ad swgpqisse we how *nod -a~ I
14M.# OWL 14
PaaM lw -w Mi M M
Fp Mts UM. Ia U =1hIt'
W




lftw 1"61M IMAM UWAM M= meow mom-
4 4NML

Thus the impot ol Rusia Turpnine (or. Weed Iphiti) in 1IM was double.
that of 1low ~a" ovr da tiessa mark am 1n9l7. R his' i, to esn bow
thbis mport uansteow wit the -CI 41 AimnTp.
b ad210111101 el ..LI3 IL~45 34a &AN *A
AftW "4Mz(*Up %NWI40 norU 32" rpl~ W43 1 A
PMMap. nami;SMMD os o


A G I ....................
AlM ...................

ri 3 ...................
May 7...................
1i3l 1 .......,,...-.
=J .................
Jay 1 ...................
Jes 3..................





a 13........::.....:...
1. ................
Al s4 .................

Jul. i ....... ...
uo.W ..................

Net. 12 ....................
Amt.ot ...................

O at. ..................
upt. 1s ...................
o .g 11 ....................
ov6 4..................
r .. .................
Ot. 8 ...................
Dept 1 ..................
Oc 12 ..................
N ....................
ov. 1 ...................
De. 1& ............... ....
sm. 21 ..................
Dec. .....................
... .............. .....
DO 16 .........I.........
Di. 23 ....................
D e. 30 ....................
o,l k....................


IK96
31D





U,

a%
96%
a

50%
LA
U'








53%
53
a,"
900

36%
41%
4.-n
M0%
len
00A


ND

en
47
4f%
45


ma
46


46%
47"
47%
47%
470A
43

413"

SO



574
606%
n
M,
M4%

so
56
Ua~



57G
55%
64n,


46 84
enI UQ


a%43
43 U
0L
45% UnA
47 30L-




43% 1MR
en 34%




aw
46 r3

so 34%
46% 3%A

51% 35
51 35


53% 30%
00 30%A

51 3
00%4 30



* 3%

W4 37%,


uwa
19"%




49
46

43%
43%
42
44%


435
a

SU
37%
340



40%
40


415

20%,
37







87%
n
40


41
40
30

30:


2= SMIAMq oWO


. -- -- IL


r~-- MMMM I L









QIW~d ,JdBY 'ftw~o~smML 35003Dr. Hn


INI Til-Eromnj for S98.
The new mills bIt in the United State
in 104 are a gatiying reflection of the
prosperity thi country is now enjoying.
Although this period of twelve mouths
preceded a iresilntial year, 200 mis,
were erected, only 14 per cent. less than
in 1903, and mom thea is any year frozn
1897 to 19M iarulve, with the exception
of 100. A larger proportion of ew mll
coastruetion is found in the knitting
hbeshk *A in iprevimus year, -bnt with
this .e l tie n w w-ills are well dis-
tribted among the difereat branch. The.
deaii *ofI 4 m lls from blt year's ecoro
is dne -to the Wktag in the -sttoa,
woolen and silk branches;mt -n neu
andm ithng miasear am lereas
Wew'Cetta Wnls hilae
South- No. Spiada. Leaoms
Alabama .......... 1 11 4


-Vii a i .......... 2 ...... ...
aTotaL ......... to710,000


M at ........ ..... ....

nMa lmh setta .... 7 l.t,1 lAil0
Nea,-a ........ ......


Viergiia ........ I .... *-
Totals ......... 1s6,4872 368
eorth-
Massachtusettsh e mls hving 1 6 o


mennsyw a.ia...... ......
E n ......: ..... .4
Totals ........ 22 61,18 98
The South Iasads ia eottson ill con-
sawtio t with 36 mills having 155472
spindils, emopared with 22 mills and
61,184 spindles in the North. Only two
of 41h arthen mills ea iniaed spindles,
th other twenty being weaving ills.
A comparison of the northern and south-
em mil asmtrutimo for a series of years
hwws that tkre is nothing in the 1904
record to indicate a deeademee in the north-
era industry. Thirty .per cent. of the new
.*adls forthe lest year were 4italled in
the North as c aeed with 16 per cent
in 1900. Of the southern spindles, nearly
80 per cent are credited to the Caroinas,
showing the tena ey of the industry to
,mea-utewithanmars ow limits. In view
of the diafRetim which the cotton indus-
try has een .placed during the last few
rs owing to a readjustment of values
, f awi mateIl ma keht, the continued
activity in mill asestaetion is conclusive
pr f Aof e sound basis upon which the
Ameriea eottoe industry rests.
aew We11es MNOM 4
New Englaud- 1904 1903 190 1901
Maine ............

-- 8
1
New Jersey ...... 1
Pennsylvania ..... 23
*Wester0 States
caufraimi ........ 1
rLoous ........... I
Oftoib ............. 2
Dregea ........... 3
Wiscnsin ........ 1


1
Totals ........... -
-45 -0 4 53
The wooS italstry :ass howss a de-
aCmps in de Amaber of new ill as s om-
-a a w the p.eesdilg year, there being
-etj'-do is 1904 a4 easprd with sixty-
five in l1M. Of these pow woolen ills.
twenty-hree, or more 'thal half of the;
total mumbter, m found in the State of;
alhJ 'The Souath -is a 'ugibg
wnster in w wa"lem l amastbuetb,
only cu hbig report. Sd that from
Virgbda.


..... F


SMcMILLAN BROS.


Sflorida 'Copper Works. I


Of the 111 new kaitting ills built in
1904, sevaty or atnc two-tbihF are
found in the Middle B&tesasem in Maiae
and the remainder re divided about equal-
ly between the West amd South. Th-'
is an industry which has aso bad to mn-
tend with very trying comditios during
the last year, is view of which the ex-
tensive construction of new mills comes a
a gratifying surprise.
New Kaitta -Mil-
New M marsd- 1a- t -I9 13M .1I
Maine ............. 1
Massebusetts ..... 6
7
Mianfe .8tbes
New York ........ 26
New Jersey ...... 4
Pennaylvaia ..... S
Delaware .........
-TO
daho ............ 1
Idaho.............1


Ohioi ..... ...... 1
TUtah ............ 2
'Wisetin ........ 4

Alabama ......... 1
'Mississippi ....... 1
South Carolina ... -6
Tennessee ........ 1
Texas............ 1
Virginia ......... I
otals ...........
nI 1056 ae
The new silk mill construction for 1904
i no exception to the general rule of con-
centration in New Jersey and Pennsylvan-
ia, these two State claiming thirty-nine
of the forty-nine mills. For a number of
years the United States has been the
largest consumer of raw silk in the world
and the steady growth indicated by this
year's report indicate that we shall re-
tain this enviable pre-eminence.
The details regarding the building of
miscellaneous mills are shown in the table.
There has been a noticeable activity in
the construction of linen mills The other
mills are for 'the maifacture of special
fabrics or for carrying am operations ae-
cesory to the main breaches of the tex.
tile industry.
In the list df psrlmoted mills we find
an additional evidence df the nadence
prevailing in business eireles. In 1904,
forty-two new mills were projected a
compared with ahlt*y- dht in lf3. Ae-
tual mill etmastrnduei a tt a e as na
indication of prosperity as is the reeord
of mills projected. After a new mill is
wdi under way opeUti- eanoot well be
diseo2tiuued aand for tis'ruion new fla
are ofteh -tomplted umlr sakrese dbmi-
aess edaditoas. 'It 4s iA efeut With the
projection cif new eIerpres. Adversity
immediately puts an end to plans fdr
new business enterprise and for this rea-
-so the nreae in 'the maber of milla
projeieCd -in W04 as compared with -Ithe
meeord of -106 'ia a very signisat ltm-
ture of prsmmt eodlitlmU.---extil Worhl
Record.


The shipments from the port of 'Sa-
vannah for the amoalinig July 1 to
January 7 have been as follows:

Foreign ...... .. 2,39tM4 3),01,On
Baltimore ...... Il a6B,73 4,100e1
Philadelphia ..... 5,215,600 6,840,344
'ew York ...... --- 0,u0 I11\=3 i'
odte .. .... --- 7 IO- -
Other Ports .... U4rl 1M--


East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRIMMD

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
86mr Shipmunts a Spe ty.

WATLRLTOWN, FLORIDA.

It.- MILE t. SmW VlsW-PrM. MRLP JESSP, $SM-Tem

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.
corwters of Pure Turpedithes and Rosins
itrIeh a Pouerr' Comummy. OM.e,
ewe" m0l We t m Omiimd.
4d0ivlm .-it 0mh10suvi1, P10101e0m0 Fermslom mud SmmUmhM


rcn ftme. ml


JAd.Kmhiii I FMLI


POR SALE.
SSOjO acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
Rfty million feet merchntable lumber. Ha been turpentined and eedy for the
tfl. a er aem M1l mear the tiniber can be leased for term of years or ean
be'pImI- -. O ed tf beat opportunities in the 8tate.
C. 8U KMAN" A-'*
...


W. HRIU. Pwesim
L.7 PwocKa. us V.P


J. a- anAm. S V. PrOL .L U RWMoU68 & See1. a
W. J. KuLL. 3a V. D. wnLra. Amt Seely-'Tomss.


Peatck-Umt & West CompaIy,

rmrml nmIle I My Stret, 1E. wSavmoil m iM
West muNduo JasMi e ,vLE. r&.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We Sar smrioty Paetrs Our interest and the producers' is mutual. We
erw take to secson, mor e we intoseested n any company that bays sprita
Tarpeatine and resin.)

WHOLESALE GROCERS,

flay, Grain and leavy Harness.
Cepa glMM tval Strems hardware Our SpafW t
--OLE AGENTS FOR-
SGcdsebratd U i ITurptMne Axes and Wilsn & GMMs'
PhUadeIua Wafg..

Naval Stres r dctel at Savima, Ga, a*l JacdLI- ie
a"d FeiammIHam, Fl.,


A- I sn&A ma ages, k


Old stills tab e n s-or
aw ones. Patfingst the enm-
try a apedalty. d by mail or
or wire wil retve pr t t
.'t either ua -Le e b.:
'WAWtiaLHE, L C.
gMagJL AUL


IFum m










12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BECOBD.
^-- i 1 I I. -- -I


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
JANU A. OLWOM1OX.


BJMWIr -' 4M-- --- ~rs
rEdAm an pld ~ e .
ub~bmlbe Ewesy FrIday.

_T e Pft.e mad so P BoA".

AM eommaestems sM be &d&Nso
Tbh Ibtdustrtl IL ord Compemy.
JkAeml vioU. Fla.
immadk doame mu d A" O-ffo a*
AI~ass Ga. JS ameanMr. Ga.




UW"==atfaM Oprtors AimiftM-.
lt- ., t t M-e d i M*



-rl Ammoaiatla.
Ao Ap il Tth, 1M, au tas aodt
qwpm altthto Oa mi Q sW rJS-
wu 1 a the I as iste Oue Om e l Alu-
MsEtiLm. Adojpte 11b 1 as the
ely ed lel ega O dt T. O0 A.
Tei-n.sid te lumber ptp h by e dmi
me tie ao by t GeI a mof-





sinM f tho ineo ae i the =ua
the week.

TUE RECORD'S OFNICES
The pnbbIsh plnt ad the mai a-
ae 41 the indatmW n eeril Pabhing
Co. oe pleated at N. uethl H-In
aoet, J.mwme, Fl. in the V ery heart
of the great turpati ad yA w pein
inietrisa. Bmnck oese, Savannah, Go"
ad Atlanta, G.

OTICE TO PATRON&
Al paymabt fr avirtlUa ih the Ia-
dutrial d remsr a td o criptie thereto
met be made iret to the hem 6 eae
je JMa enve. Apgnts an ast amlowe
to mais eadotim uder any cirem-
tanse. llM far advertig and eb-
actirptl ae seat eat frm the home
meae wh de and an remittances mut
be mae dirt to thio company.
laA tril RacerT Pub mhain C&.


TO HELP COTTON GROWERS.
Acting upon the recommendation of the
Department of Agriculture and the cotton
growing Interests, Congres proposes to
make liberal appropriation for the destrue-
tion of the boll weevil and other diseases
of'eottom.
This information came out this week
when Representative Brantley, of Geor-
gia, appeared before the Committee on
Agriculture to urge an appropriation for
the experimental farm at Blackshear, Ga.
This experimental farm was established
about a year ago at the instance of Mr.
Brantley, principally to study the diseases
of cotton. It has been conducted with
marked suecess under the direction of W.
A. Ortoj of the Department of Agricul-
ture. Mr. Brantley was assured by the
committee that provision would be made
i nthe bill for the continuance of the
work at the Blackshear farm, and at the
same time he was informed that the com-
mittee intends to ask for a liberal ap-
Fropriati o with which to oght the boll
;eevil and all other diseases of cotton in
the cotton growing states.
Mr. Brantley says this will be grati-
fying information to the cotton growers
throughout the South.


THR T. 0. A. AND THE OUTPUT.
The Savannah Naval Stores Review soe
time ago charged that some oaciale of the
Turpentine Operators' Asociation were
preparing to increase their output. The
Record secured signed statements from
every officer and from every member of the
Executive Committee of the Association
declaring the charge untrue. Each indi-
vidual member declared that he would not
increase his own output during the com-
ing year. This completely nailed the
Review's charges as untrue. These men
are among the leading operators in the
Southeast. They are men whose Integ-
rity is beyond question by reasonable peo-
ple, and yet the Review followed up the
original charge by reiterating it, and de-
claring that the "Record" could not be be-
lieved, etc., etc.-a lot of child's play that
men of intelligence can readily understand.
The Record did not content itself with
its own assertion, but proved its assertion
by the men named in the charge, whose
veracity admits of no doubt. Now the
Review, so we are informed, will make the
direct charge this week that A. D. Coving-
ton, president of the Turpentine Operators'
Association, and a large producer, is cut-
ting more erops than last year. This is
absolutely untrue. Mr. Covington on his
four places cut twenty-eight erops last
year and this year will cut eighteen .rops
on the same places, a reduction of ten
crop. This means both boxes and cups.
These are all of Mr. Covington's places.
He is a stockholder, however, in the Hill-
man-Sutherland Co., a corporation operat-
ing several places and this company will
materially reduce its output. It is a de-
mand of courtesy that in making any spe-
cife charge against Mr. Covington, as the
Review contemplates, it will give Mr. Cov-
ington the opportunity of a statement in
the same issue. The Record is familiar
with Mr. Covington's operations and if
the Review publishes any statement from
him we are confident that he will state
therein the figures above named, which we
know to be correct.
It can be een at a glance, therefore,
that the Review has been caught in a de-
liberate attempt to deceive, in its over-
flowing animosity toward the Turpentine
Operators' Asociation in particular and
producers in general. When confronted
with indisputable evidence of the falseness
of its charges it keeps up the nagging,
hoping to wiggle out with the least punib-
ment possible. We are not now setting
up this paper as an example of veracity
for we do not give a snap for anything
that the Review may say about us, but
when men of Covingon's standing make
statement in print it is foolhardy for
even the Review to try to disprove them.
The Record reiterates its former asser-
tion: The offers and committeemen of
the Turpentine Operators' Association are
holding down their output for another
year individually and collectively, and in
advising others to do so they know the
disaster that overproduction will mean,
and are endeavoring to check the tide in
that direction for the benefit of the en-
tire operating interests.


Qurantine an Cattle.
The Department of Agriculture has is-
sued regulations establishing on Feb. 1
next a federal quarantine against a large
part of the South and parts of other
State to prevent the spread of Splenetic,
or Southern fever, among cattle.
The quarantine lines are largely the
same as last year. The quarantiaed ter-


ritory mnbraMe te artse part of North
Carolina, al at B h CarUlina Indioa
Territory, Alabama, Missisasippi and Lo*-
isiana; that part of Virginia below the
James River ad ruling to the nort-
east corner of Bedford County; all of
Georgia but Union, Towns and Babun
counties; all of Arkansas except th two
northern tiers of counties which are left
outside the quarantine during the rest
of the quarantine period; part of Ten-
nessee and Oklahoma; most of Texas,
except the panhandle ad the lower part
of California.
The quarantine is declared to be in
force until Nov. 1, but this date i subject
to change.


Among tha Operatbra
Messrs. D. T. Williamson & Co., of GrQ-
ham, Fla., have sold their large turpentine
interests located at that place to Mr. B. .L
Dikins.

Mr. A. B. Shaw, a prominent naval
stores manufacturer of Ward City, FmL,
has disposed of his large interests at that
place to Mesa. J. MeK. Alford & Co
The consideration for this property was
about $8,00.

Judge T. C. Morgan and Mr. Jno. D.
Morgan, of Ellarele, Ga., spent several
days last week the guests of their brother,
Mr. A. M Morgan. Mr. Morgan is a large
naval stores operator of Benton, Fla., and
a prominent man in his section of the
State.

Mr. J. O. Evans, banker, naval stores
operator and dealer in all kinds of tim-
ber products, was among the prominent
business men in the city this week from
Lake City.

Mr. T. C. Hl, of Oeala, Fla., was in
Jacksonville this week in attendance to
the annual meeting of the board of di-
rectors of the Consolidated Naval Store
Co., which was held in this city Tuesday
and Wednesday.

Capt. W. J. Hilnman, a prominent ope-
rator of Live Oak. was registered at the
Aragon this week.

Capt. John IB Young president of the
John R. Young Company, of Savannah,
was among the leading factors in the city
this week.

Mr. C. Downing, president of the Down-
ing Company, of BruBwick, Ga., was in
Jacksonville several days this week, at-
tending the second annual meeting of the
stockholders of the Consolidated Naval
Stores Co.

Mr. C. M. Covington, who has charge of
the Pensacola branch of the Cosolidated
interests was in the city several days
this week attending their second annual
meeting.

Mr. H. E. Pritchett, a prominent opera-
tor, both in Georgia and Florida, was in
the city last Wednesday.

Mr. T. W. Davis, of Argyle, G., was
in the city one day this week attending
to business matters

Mr. W. Carraway, one of the best
known operators in the State, was in
Jacksonville lat Wedasday.


Mr. W. C. Jackam, of Ga s Cve
Springs, was re lat Tuedy.

Mr. Bal, of Lke City, who is sage
in the naval stores bminres with Mr.
J. 0. Evan6, of that place, was the eaty
last Monday.

Mr. A. C. Darig, of Dalngton,
was registered at the Duval for aevral
days this wek.

Mr. F. L Sweet, a leading operator a
ol, OGa, was here laat Tuesay.

Mr. J. W. Ward, Jr, of Fnloral (y,was
registered at the Aragmo Wededay.

Mr. J. T. MeOaila a prominent aval
stores man of Tampa, was among the
operators in the ctty this weak.

Mr. George W. Dee, of Wayeeea, a.,
spent a Thursdy in the ty.

Mr. G. W. Var, of Waymcres, ma Mr.
J. W. Callahan, of Bainwiridg, Ga, wer
among the leading o trB h therk
eetion registered at the Araga thi wek.

Meers. C W. Deem ad L. Win,
of Baxley, Ga, spent eeral dapy ih
Jacksonville tis week.

Mr. R. D. Media, of Wimlisto, jM, wa
in Jackmvoflle lst Tusday sad We-
nesday. Mr. Medlin was amampUamd by
his wife.

Mr. Job Powell, spaetor of nasal
stores for the port of Fermdin, wun a
pleasant visitor in the cty te week.

Mr. J. C. Joiner, a lading operator et
Beaton, Fl., was in th elty Wednmday.

Mr. S. N. Kanun, of MuMdlbm l.,
wa in the city at Wedneday as mat-
ters of business.

Mr. B. M. Bond, a prominat mll man,
of Lake Heles, Fa, was a guest at the
Windsor, oe day thi wak.

Among the prominent arrival i the
city yesterday, were Mr. and Mrs. L
Meggs, of Orange springs, Fla. Mr. MNeg
is quite an exteaive turpentine aopuor.

Mr. H. L Covington, a prominent mval
stores factor and operator, of Peanmah,
Fla., was in the city this wek.

Mr. B. F. Bullard, of Savanna, was
song the naval stores fats ih Jack-
sonville this week attending te sec nd
annual meeting of the CoAnodated Naval
Store Co.

Mr. R. B. Powell. vie-praida of the
Cosolidated Naval Store Co, with oead
in Savannah, Ga., was among the premi-
neat factors in the eity ti week.

Mr. J. M. West, a prominent timber ma
from Valdosta, was a guest of the Amra
last Thursday.


0-nta-> Tedl OI
T~~para Tor CT oo t a C p-
The Operstors' Tool Co. has bem erpa-
d and d application made for letters pat-
ent. The company is now maafater1
at Green Cove Springs, F., but ontsr-
plate enlarging its factory and possibly
moving to Jacksoville. Mr. Heary PrtA-
ett, the well known operator of Meae,
Ga., is the pridaet.


IPAT O ADUM NOR amW .w1AIn









THU WUUILY IDMUBSTRL BDoOND.


18


m CHRISTIE GROOVER ona 0

WHOLESALE DRUBOISTS.


-... m-


Second Annual Meeting of Consolidated Companies


The annual meeting of the stockholders
of the Cosolidated Naval Stores Co.,
which company also owns the Consolidated
Grocery Co. and the Consolidated Land
Co, and a controlling interest in the Chat-
tanoogs Pottery Co., and The Cooperage
Company, was held in Jacksonville Wed-
neday evening in the Board of Trade
auditorium. The consolidated companies
are owned by turpentine producers and
the meeting brought together a large num-
ber of prominent operators from Florida
and Georga. At the meeting President
W. C. Powell presided, and there was a
large majority of the stock of the com-
pay represented by the stockholders in
attendance. J. C. Little, secretary and
treasurer of the company, was secretary
of the meeting.
President Powell read his annual re-
port and reports were made by C. B.
Ropers, president of the Consolidated Gro-
eery Company; W. F. Caochman, president
of the Consolidated Land Company; John
Henderson, president of the Chattanooga
Pottery Company; and J. C. Little, presi-
dent of the Cooperage Company.
The enti board of director of the Con-
solidatd Naval Stores Company was re-
eleted, as follows: W. C. Powell, W. F.
Ooaehman, B. F. Bullard, EL L. Covington,
C. B. Rogers, EL A. MeEaehern, C. Down-
ing, J. A. Cranford, D. EL McMillan, John
R. Young, J. IL Saunders, IL B. Powell,
W. J. HilihnMa
A cash dividend of 10 per cent upon
the capital stock of the company was de-
clared. This is a similar dividend to the
first annual dividend. The company is
capitalised at *200,000, so it will be seen
that the dividend will amount to $250,000,
which will be distributed in cash among
the operators in proportion to their hold-
ings on the 1st of February.
The officers of the company during the
past year have been as follows:
Pmarident-W. C. Powell.
Vice-President--W. F. Coachman, B. F.
Bullard, .L L. Covington, H. A. MeEmBhern,
J. A. Cranford, D. H. MeMilan, J. R.
Saunders and IL B Powell.
Secretary and treasurer-J. C. Little.
At a meeting of the newly elected Board
of Directors held in President Powell's
ofiee Thursday morning, January 19th, the
same offers were re-elected, as was also
the old executive committee. The offers
of all of the other companies owned and
noatrolled by the Consolidated Naval
Store Co. were reelected. The presidents
of these companies are as follows: Con-
solidated Grocery Co., C. B. Rogers; Con-
solidated Land Co., W. F. Coachman; The
Chattanooga Pottery Co., John Henderson;
The Cooperage Co., J. C. Little.
In this connection, it may be well to re-
view in a few words the conditions among
operators before and since the organization
of the Consolidated Company. In the first
place the company has made those opera-
tors who are stockholders, their own fac-
tors. It is purely a cooperative business
organization and represented such an ag-
gregation of interests, so large in the
total, that it has necessrily wicied a


powerful influence in market conditions.
The prices of rosin and turpentine have
been better since the organization of the
Consolidated than ever before. Labor con-
ditions have been better. The interests
in the woods and at the factorage houses
being identical there have been better and
more satisfactory shipping, marketing and
selling conditions. The fact that the com-
pany has its organized branches for the
land, grocery, barrel and cup trades, has
made the general supply conditions more
satisfactory. The further fact that the
operators are themselves the owners of
these various branches of business, prac-
tically controlling their product from the
time it enters the till until it reaches the
consumer, has demonstrated the value of
systematic organization and eooperationt


Southern Supply and Machinery Dealer'

Through the Knoxville office of the
Southern Supply and Machinery Dealers'
Association, the following list of the offi-
cers. standing committees, active and hon-
orary members, together with the policy
of the association, are given:
The list of honorary members who have
been admitted to the association sines the
Old Point Comfort convention in April
will be read with muc interest. The list
is a representative one, embracing manu-
facturers of practnally every line going
to make up the supply and machinery bus-
iness. The large list of honorary, as well
as of active members, speaks in no uncer-
tain tone of the popularity and success
of the Southern Supply and Machinery
Dealers' Association:

Policy of the Southern Supply and Machin-
ery Dealers' Association, Adopted at
the New Orleans Convention, April 8-10,
1903.
"The object of this association shall be
the promotion of more friendly business re-
lations and mutual confidence and good
will with each other, and with the manu-
facturers; and to encourage and promote
the commercial interest of the supply and
machinery dealers in the South in every
way possible; and to assist the manu-
facturers in deciding who are legitimate
dealers in supplies and machinery, and
who are entitled to pries as such; and to
discourage the manufacturers from deal-
ing direct with the consumers, but if any
manufacturer finds it necessary to deal
direct with the consumer in order to intro-
duce and create a demand for his goods, he
will invoice said goods through some deal-
er in the territory where the goods are
sold."
Resolution adopted at Old. Point Comfort
Convention, April 12-14, 1904:
"Believing that the best interests of
the association may be subserved by giv-
ing the manufacturers official recogni-
tion, we recommend that an honorary
membership list shall be adopted to which
manufacturers who are in accord with the
policy of our association shall be eligible,
and who may be elected to membership


as an honorary member upon application
properly made out and preasated to the
executive committee of the saocation
for their approval; aid honorary member
shall not be liable for mmberip fee, an-
nual dues, and shall not be entitled to at-
tend any executive selous of the asso-
ciations."

President, Peter E. Blow, Knoxvile,
Tenn., Southern Brass and Iron Company.
First vice-preaident, W. H. Kettig, Bir-
mingham, Al., Miner & Kettig company.
Second vice-presidet, C. H. Brigg, Dal-
las, Tex., Briggs-Weaver Machinery Co.
Secretary-treaure, C. B. Carter, Knox-
ville, Te.
Executive Committee-4earg V. Denny,
Savannah, Ga., Georgia Spply Co.; George
A. Smith, Richmond, Va., Smith-Courtney
Co.; Edward I Stream, New Orleans, I.,
Gibbens & Stream; John C. Doyle, Nash-
ville Machine Co.
tmmannCog mmittees
Manufacturer' Committee--ohn G.
Christopher, ehirman, Jacksonvie, la.;
A. D. Scehofield, Maco, GO, J. S. Scbo-
field's Sons Co.; C. B. Jenkins, Charleston,
S. C., Cameron & Barkley Co.
Grievance Committee-Thomas G. By-
man, chairman, Newbems, N. C., Hyma
Supply Co.; W. B. Melee, Jackson, Temn.,
Southern Engine and Boiler Works Co.;
William Wilmot, New Orleans, La., Wood-
ward, Wight & Co.
Transportation Commftt--J. J. Dimso-
may, chairman, Atlanta, Ga, Cotton States
Belting and Supply Co.; Thomas S.
Bowles, Norfolk, V., Henry Walke Co.:
E A. Peden, Houston, Tex, Ped Iron
and Steel Co.

Discusnlag Prie at L r.
A special from Norfolk, Va., says:
Representatives of about twenty mills
connected with the North Carolina Pine
Association met in one of the assembly
rooms of the Monticello hotel here and
discussed at some length the state of
the lumber trade, which it was stated at
the conclusion of the meeting i very matis-
factory.
No change in the recent seale of price
'adopted Nov. 16, was made, though ft
was said that the condition really justi-
fled a deviation from those prevailing.
Reports submitted showed that the trade
is unusually brisk for this time of year,
the demand being largely over thak of the
same month last year, with probabilities
favoring a continuance of an active mar-
ket. For three months weather condi-
tions have been favorable to both the pro-
dueer and consumer of pie lumber. Ever
since June these conditions have prevailed,
and, it is stated, that unless the present
state of the weather, which is deddedly
adverse to production, continues, thereby
decreasing the supply, there will be little
or no change in the status of the trade.
The next meeting of the Plne Amsoa-
tion will be held in this city Feb. 9, 106.
Capt. John L. Roper, president of the
association, presided at the meeting, with
John R. Walker, secretary. The mem-
hers present were: J. Camp, of Flank-
lin, Va.. E. M. Wiley, e New York; J. B.
Blades and T. W. Tflgman, t MMbeth


2= u = NzMA2w 129Inaa


City, N. C.; John A. Wilkinson, of dMm-
ton, N. C.; George T. Lechr of Wasi-
ton, N. C.; W. F. Harrison, of Bltimore;
J. G. MeNel, of Garysburg N. C.; L IS
Blades, of Newbern, N. C.; H. H. Gibson,
representing the American lumbermen, of
Chicago; 8. W. Whitehead, representing
the Southern Lumber Journal, of Wil-
mington, N. C.; IL S. Cohn, George W.
Jones, J. T. Deal and W. F. Tilghman, of
Norfolk.

ITO WNW OamFI

An ZntM p g Firm that U stantialy
Shows Faith in Jacksen s.
Brobston, Fedig f Co., the enterprising
real estate firm of Jacksonville, and
Brunswik, Ga., have moved into their
elegant new offiesa next to the Arag
Hotel on Forsyth Street. The firm ae-
cupies the entire lowe or of the Holt
Building, the suite big dividd into re-
ception oom, reading and plat room, pri
vate o es, etc., making a most -agm-
ent arrangement, alike for the eovea-
ienee of patrons and members of t rm
and clerks. Brobston Fendig Co. moved
to Jacksonville from Bruns wiek where
they successfully conducted a biness that
reach out into a parts of the South.
Their Florida business became s lage
from that point that the firm fad It
necessary to open an oea more directly
in touch with the lorida territory ad
the Jacksonville oles waus established
Since tha time Brobston, Femndig & Co.s
enterprise as been fe d ad appreelted
in almost every industrial movement tat
has been made. Coloel Edwin Brobs m,
the head of the nrm, i now ne of Jack-
sonville's moat progressive eitie. He is
naturally a developer-an energeic, tire-
less worker for the city and section in
which he lives-and is influence is dy
felt in the industrial, finanal sad sod
circles of this community. It is sne b--
as Brobston that make a city and hi
every personal eharateristie actdly vi-
brates in the workings of his fr. Mr.
Feadig, the junior member of the mfi,
at t he had of the Brunswick ou, but
frequently a visitor to the ity. He s re-
arded as an exceptional authority a real
estate values, and is a mar of great
penal popularity.

Wayerew' gman Wra.
Waycross, Ga, Jain. 1-The Imperial
Soap Company, which was recently orgn-
ised here, will begin operations in aIout
two weeks. The machinery is to be moved
to Wayeross from Atlanta, and the gen-
eral manar of the company, Mr. Church-
ill, has gone to Atlanta to see about its
removal. The stockholders of the com-
pany have elected the following oicers:
J. E. T. Bowden, president; George W.
Dean, vice-president; Mr. Churchill, see-
retary and general manager; DL W. LoIt,
treasurer.



UYmen as am mnsiei a at a wam
ta bv mn al aw doms
amIs ast m WM


'-wv- viinru1wanw innair









-14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIALL 'RECORD.
I- ^ ^ - I | III I I II


.-LSoW M3W01aWT101.


g an Fel Timr
So far as known practically all of the
mills.1 -the Souteast er working on full
tie. mre were a few of them compelled
to shlu down for a few days between
Christmas and New Years day, but all of
them are at work and are sawing with
orders ahead. There has been some trouble
in searing laborers at some of the mills,
a condition which is always with the man
facturers of the yellow pine belt at this
staa of the year. But the trouble this
year has not beas a great as it was a
year ago, and the manufactures are not
meeting wfth the trouble they generally
have in keeping their mills in operation.
So far as the movement of lumber to
the market is coneerned, it is brisk. There
will be immense shipments this month,
and J-jd faro what has already gon
forwail .-- from the charters which
have bea made, the custom house will
show a gai in the number of feet shipped
frm this,port over last month. All of
the dealers are making an effort to have
their orders placed promptly at this time,
.for they elaim that it is easier to secure
charters than it was a few weeks ago.
The Clyde Line at Jacksonville is hand-
ling more lumber than it did some time
ago, and is taking on large argoes of
lumber at this port on every trip. The
heavy traef on the railroads peculiar to
the holiday season is over, and it is easier
to get the lumber to the seaboard. Cars
are Pome plentiful, and the congestion of
the various railroad yards in Jacksonville
nd Savamsh has been relieved to a great
estet. This i a season of the year when
the railroad eompaipes can handle lumber
with a e assurances of quick transpor-
tatiam tha they a at any other season
in thi Stae. The orange shipments are
net aa lap as they ma earlier in the
saea 4.a there am better facilities on
evy read. for the sawmisls than ever.

lerhlim 6-mps-aps wmerem Las.
The Alegr-Sullvan Imber Company of
'Diuth hba purchased eM00 acer of yel-
low p ie l'b l in Alabama for a consider-i
atia Ct asbot' WM&A This company
now owns 300A0 aores in Alabama, al;
of whih Is located in mcanaba, MonroeI
Kanrk and Baldwin counties. These are
in the outhe group of counties in thel
State and the headquarters of operation
is at Csetur, h.. The company runny
two mnil am a tanhudrd-gage railro4
for trasprtntg te pine. The product
of the two -mil is aod ahead for the next
aime ~he ut Z bte price than have
ever ham ss id bm.

fbeqhet. 1 Flttlber wetes.
earlostag, S. C, is shipping by water
with greater frequency than ever before
fertliern for points on the Gulf coast.
During December 807 tons of phos-
phate week were shipped through Savan-
nah, Ga., to Breen, Genoa, Hamburg and
Venie.
Facts and figures prove to the Chronicle.
of Mt. Pleasant, Tenn., that 1904 was the
busiest year in that phosphate Aeld, and
give reason to -believe that 1905 will be

Itis reported 4hat another .railway line
Jp to he -bult Ata h M icko mi county.
enneusee, 'for the development of valu-
able phosphate d"pai o t mw reached


by the Nashville, C(~ttaanoea St. Louis
Railway.
In an address to Southern farmers re-
garding the reduction of acreage, Mr. Mar-
tin V. Calvin, of Augusta, Ga., advocates
increasing the yield per acre by a liberal
and intelligent use of fertilizers. He
would not have the farmer be penny wise
and pound foolish, and therefore encour-
ages a wise and open-handed use of fer-
tilizer rich in plant food not only for cot-
ton, but for corn, cane, oats, sweet po-
tatoes and other crops.

The Drew Sell Mill ad Lands.
One of the largest sawmill and timber
leals in the history of Florida took place
last Saturday when H. H. Tift, J. Lee En-
sign, of Tifton, Ga., and J. H. and W. C.
Powell, of Perry, Fla., bought the large
electric sawmill owned by the Drew Broth-
ers at Luraville, near Live Oak, and 65,000
acres of land. The amount paid for this
property is $400,000.
The Drew Brothers are sons of the late
ex-Governor George F. Drew, who died at
his home in this city a few years ago.
They have through their enterprise accu-
mulated valuable properties in Florida, the,
mill and land above mentioned being
among the same. The mill will in future
be operated under the name of the Georgia
and Florida Saw Mill Company. It is one
of the biggest and best paying plants in
the South. The new purchasers are
leased with their deal and say that they
have secured a bargain notwithstanding
the large amount of money paid for the
property.
The location of the mill is Luraville,
about twelve miles south of Live Oak, and
is connected with the A. C. L. Railway at
Live Oak by a railroad built by the Drew
Brothers.

Intereting Facts as to Alabama Timber.
The Bureau of Forestry of the Agricul-
tural Department presents in Circular No.
32 many facts and figures gleaned in Ala-
bama relative to Alabama timber. The
circular inquestion relates to the mechani-
cal properties of various commercial tim-
bers. Timbers were cut in this State,
and carried to Purdue University, at Iaf-
ayette, Ind., where they were tested.
The Red Gum of this State was very
thoroughly tested, and it was found to
have a fiber stress at elastic limit from
about 4,000 pounds per square inch in
treen timber to 7,000 pounds in dry tim-
ber. The logs were taken from the Ten-
nemsee River bottoms at Hollywood, Ala.,
sad they were sawed and tested in every
desirable way. It is not only a strong
wood, but the factory tests nsowed that
it could be steamed and bent, and would
take a good finish. It is adapted to use in
vehicle factories. It ranks below Hickory,
but still it is a valuable wood. It will
stand a strain up to 15M265 pounds per
square inch, as against 20,066 pounds in
FHikory. The modulus of rupture in long
leaf Pine is 10,080 pounds per square inch;
of Loblolly Pine. about 5,000 pounds.
The Red Gum lacks a straight-grained
trunk. It is cross-grained. This has 'to
be taken into consideration. The Bureau
of Forestry concludes that Red Gum is
av liable for local uses in building mate-
rial. such as joists, sills and common
frame. When the supply of Pine is ma-
terially lessened Bed Gum will come into
wider use, unless, the clear wide eats from
1'aP Gum bl- hewome too valuable because
-f ftectory uses.


THE DNATIOA BNK OF IIKSOILtE
JAOKSONVILL. PLA.
CAPIAL S30mO00 LU A ad UNDVED PROS S300
We e Time s Oinelino lir.ih draw istmrea at orte prtars arstr
sanaas. if hbe ninety days or lugr. Take mhre g,~e em yw srgsesm
somethiasera. Paessutar aem on -10 L meeis a sl M


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEsu oN EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt MeSts. Order filled at lowut mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully eoliited. See quotation-
thispaper.
KINGAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, PLA.

Herbert A. Fod, GOm. H. Feed, P. L. Wat@l,
President. Vice-Pr. Cahier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITAL, $50,000.00.
DIRvCrona: R. L. Anderson, R. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. Christ ia, Geo.
SMcKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of TurpMatia Opeites and Saw Mill Mem Sldtod.

,un sehmO lm m, m mu, ,sem 11111 11131 ......... .. m. .m..


: The Wire Virgin Gum Co.,
4 Is now ready to give you all the information you may want eomeenmh the
way we e areow gatheig virgi gum from high boxes. By the i of a
n tin lip put up lose to the chipping and so arraaged to a the u t
4 strike wire and follow name down to the box, not striking the face of tih
tree. Wire is fastened on by two small nails, one just above the lip sma
w the other at upper edge of the oldbox, and stretched tight so a to keep
gum from dripping off, thereby main virgin gum and more of it. The
are many beaedta and big pay where parties an get a good many high beo.
SFor further information write to
THE WIRE VIRGIN GUM CO.. TIFTON. GA.
',suau**a*ui-m* 111 *iri @losmses 98.18168888811


The WestrRaley-Rannle Company.

114 W. Forsytk Street, JacksMIvHl, FrI.
A. N. War, Pros. S. N. WestV, rice-Pr. W. a. Aamre, rVce-r. . aeb. sec. rim.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.
-- -- -- - ---- - -- -- -- - --- --


A. A. DOGS. Pieskaeat.
a c. BRGaGS, 1st Vles-prtsiMa.


HOMES RDWN. Sod VIG&?rOlde
J. CL MoDONALD6 Se0Y a" Yrse


SW H. Briggs Hardware Co

0 VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-

MRIXFORD AXES.

SrThey ar te BEST. Others imitate but none do-
plieate. They are made of the bet steel, have the fnnst
temper, hold the keenest edge, cut better and lt lounge r
* than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual use.

S Sed rs your orders.

SH, BRIo66S NARDWARE COMPANY,
##w ##.f# ## rt.da g


I= 8m0=I)`4WU"=S -mAIL I= maD .







THE WEBEIY IuNDUS alL iKT00D. 1'


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY

Wayerosi, Ga.
MANUPAOTUnIguS OP

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Leoated In the heart tf the Lumber istrilast gves mo advasn
tale of ehleeast material at lowest east.


112 WEST FORSYTH ST.


A. J. NMWEV 341 Manmager.


BELL PHONE NO. 592


%9 rofmnerly of Hedirick f Raliy


Soel M for 9lie4 d adjoiaifg property on easy term (The choice reddenee prto
of the ity.) [l d m saa unimproved property in former burnt district. Springfeld, LaVUla and
other n iL Chaoe oiais property ilvetmentse.
MONOY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTORS.



PWanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

samerosm a m at hm sewed As TrUn falo.rmen t the fbhonlig sats:
Per aom lwoents a Ule.
Ir two 3eemntsallse.
artsr weka, 50 cents a lie.
Iar firw oeaats le.
N words of odinary length make one Uie.
Hriun coatBs a two liem.
No dslqy except the eadlae can be admitted.
emittances to oo pany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
onlal adv etima Cop t be ia this ofie not later tha Tharda
aglau tI ure lartlion i syT's paper.


mgftd.
To bay a nskla turpenU loatio
thi i py the riigt p ie fo
the right a at wad, po la nesd
applr+ f. J. I ~nmy, Box f, IL ,

Psltlon Wasted.
A p jr s tiller, very best reference
fnr Ad ddM e S. F. Johnson, Mur-
phy. N%. 4t

PFr 3ae.
mall turpentine lotion. Can work
about ten or twelve erops with about
four hundred acres roum timber already
sem ed. Also one thousand areas back
box timber eured. Plenty of round tim-
ber milable to Atl for fo or five
"i& Adrees T. M. Kelly,
H k tf


P~ait0aW Wanted.
Position as woodsman, Georgia or Flor-
iid. Have family. Can give reference.
H. V. Jeffords, Balloon, Ga. st

Wanted.
A distiller. We want a good, ober
man with family, to run the still another
season. Can give steady employment
through the winter. None need apply but
frst-lus man with good referee. Ad-
dres F. & W, Jonmboro, Fl. tf

Tkrpeatle Mea.
Boy a Bakehle Gaselime Paumping Oa-
At for y r stlL N l. 1 outat pum W0
gulbua per hour at a east of 3 ceaaladM
required o atentio while nuning
Started in one munute. J. P. Cambell,
omia. Fla.


Wanted.
Wae Ema Wated. A commissary man who is competent
Woodsman who is strictly sober and to keep books. Must be sober, reliable,
eaabe of controlling and keeping labor. industrious. References required.
Addr, The Callahea-Colwell Co., Prid- Address- H. A. HODGES,
gpa, 11. 2t 1833 Main St., Jaeksonville, Fla.


McMURRAY & BAKER,

On-I N Mr 11 RliC H0U10. &In

EagW tem1 bw om a" leane tur3Ioalue we mre a mar Mue.
a" e a f. "Of wIM G&. Taarpenm wa"n asd earmu a sadelt. en'*
bgs* we sa bsu et weld V Mand-ma.es hesem.
M M ITI 1 41 E. I I.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Joseph D. Christie, Business Aent
ftm ass by.i-&p e Us Ja.w.s rS.
Telhebne 4J5.
If you want to locate in Florida and contemplate going into business, let
help you. If you have a business to sell, list same with me.

a. R. POWELL. CHAS. G. AWMSr, fer Iam .
Presjdes. V ce-Presw et ad Freeasra. aJrary.
DIRE C VNS:
8a. .it- Prwh C. Ch lCarrs, . L faIcIIlg, L. SgthE & V. I. WtM




Southern Maiifacturhig Cl.,
C-or .- t a tY MiIm n- .
JamwnvflHe, Flrolr


Wholesale Brugs t Co nilSary SinP n
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade ad will be gWad to qua to*
anything in the drug line. We make peaked drug a sp tlaoy ~ages ae
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.


a G. McxHTHAN, P- i.
Jacksomville ItFa.


ALIR A. EEtHNrU, IVI & 1
EaiSY e NhUeJa N.kr 0.-


Pine Product CenstructiW Co,

Fayetteville N. C.
Spirits of Turpenama. 00 et Tar. Cremste. Tar. Idufer-tp*" Weed Pmsm lsaM
Painta Wood Staitna t.. sa CarmlesI. t~ f Lh tweed- m, ul
Proits ncreaad. Time t dofli lmreds. (b- Sn Cf--5 ft wdlL'
No danger from fre. Plant mcted oc-plel. adn m- teant the pasee. Vim.
there inter-atela writ- Altred aeKethan. aI o mu llewae fS N


r-- ----m-- W-P---

Throw your eyes for a minute on the following
locations: 4,000 acres round timber-4 years
Lease 16 crops 4th year; 5 crops 3rd year
boxes; 1/2 crop 2nd year boxes. $27,400-A
PICKUP. Or, 7,200 acres, of which 3,000 acres
in round timber; 5 crops 1st year boxes; 634
crops 2nd year boxes; 74 crops 3rd and 4th
2 year boxes. $26,000-A SNAP.


I BROBSTON, FENDING & CO.
L1s W. Pr*eear Awaft mame.
wwwwww wwwwww----------ww


rI YOU ARN. P__ - Iva, ADVZtTIS. IN TBI 3rCOD..


HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY









it THU WUNKLY uWUfrZsI IJORD.


othom Reni ay Camtraectie.
Athuta, Qa.-M. T. Nerton, aeeretar
of the proposed Atlanta & Carolina Bail
way, a reported as sayg that the rout
is biag surveyed and it is hoped to begin
grading this ecaing spring. This is to b
a electric line from Atlanta to Andermom
8. C., via Litho Lawrenceville, Hoeh
tom, Jeferso, Harmony Grove, Royte
and Hartwell M. Masopq is chief engineer
SAustin, Texas.-R. H. Baker, vice-presi
dent and general manager of the Trinit
& ram Valley Railway, is reported a
saying that the company expects to begin
work Noan on the projected extension, on
of which is from Cleburne to Fort Wortl
and Dalas and the other from Mexia ti
Hoauton and Beaumont, altogether about
300 mile.
Brmingham Ala.-The Seaboard Ai
Lime baa, it nrparted, completed iti
branch to Beener, ad the bf t train
over it has bem rua.
Carrio Springs, Texas.-The charter oa
the MNsces Valley, Bio Grande & Mexim
Railway of urri Springs has been film
ad approved. The company proposes to
build a lie, as heretofore described, from
Arane FPas to or near Del Rio on th
Bio Gran about 300 miles. The rout4
will be through San Patricio, Bee, Live
Oak, MeMulle, Laealle, Dimmitt, Zavalla
Maverick, Kiney and Val Verde counties
The inaorporators are W. A. Squire., Dim.
mitt county; J. C. Dennis, Bel county; Mi
C. Wll, George A. Almeras, B. N. Gra-
ham, S. D. C0mbher.i, T. J. Forgy,
Jameo B. Bobin n, Martia lavin, A. k
Merwee, Tanat county.
Guthrie, 0 T.-The Gthrie Railway Co.
has beca ianorporated to build a line from
rdmond, O. T, to Guthrie, 0. T., with
street railway lne in Edmond; total
length of lind, 0 mile. The director
ae Gam Braer and W. J. Faulkner,
Oklahoma CIty, aad J. A. Cottingham, G.
1, Grem and L N. Bradley, Guthrie.
Malhogee L T.-Coneeraing the Missou-
ri, Oklsa a & Gulf Bailway, George F.
Mor chef engineer, is reported as ay-
ing that grading is in progress from Mus-
koge southward to Dustia, 60 miles. An
iteoasim from Dustin to Denisen, Texa,
120 mile, is projected. The Muskogee
Union Ra ilway, from Muakogee to Cor-
retta, 10 miles, i part of the line, and it
Is alo proposed to buld from Oarrta
to the Mimouri boundary, 93 miles.
Preatt, Ark.-The Presaott & North-
wetera Railroad is reported to be build-
ing an extmas of eight miles from To-
ki, ArkL X. Remis is manager.
Redwatr, Tnas.-The Northeast Texas
Railway, which has four mile of line
from Redwater to the Sulphur river, is re-
ported to be building a extaso of eight
mlles fre the river to MuuW Texa. G.
Mns is president of the company, sad V.
E. Burs, secetary.

L. G-Ml ad Grand View et.He..
That e of languor aad unrest of
deapoden threaded by hope which fair
skie a"d seaahle, charming owers and
foliage q ky eat saibr by rating in
our beautiful dty isa faet over and over
again demontrated by thee in search of
health or pleasure, they having most
surely found it, but what we are moat
deiroa of doing for those contemplating
a veit to our most wonderful city is to
bring before their notice the sam e of
two hotels that will largely help support
the health and pleasure they may be in
seareh of We allude to those fne hotels,
the Grand View and SO George both being


now managed by Mr George W. Broa
F who give br undivided attention n look
Siag after each guest's individual comfor
T The one hotel being run on the Americs
n plan and the other on the European plai
Soffers abundant choice, but everything wil
, be found extremely moderate, and
. strongly recommend a vis being pai
r when coming to town.

Hews Notes.
F The next meeting of the Yellow Pin
B Sash, Door and Blind Assoation repr
n senting firms scattered from North Caro
B lin to Texas, wil be held March 16 a
h Charlotte, N. C.
D The Lumbermen's Club of Memphis
t Tenn., has elected Messrs. B. J. Darnell
president; A. N. Thompson and W. B
r Bksdale, vice-presidents, and George C
S heman, secretary and treasurer.
S December shipments of lumber from thi
Lake Charles (La.) region aggregated 15,
f 900000 feet, of which 3,4000 feet wenl
abroad. The year's lumber shipment
I agregated 185,08,000 feet.
SThe South Georgia Turpentine Associa
tion has perfected its organisation by thi
election of Messrs. S. M. Clyatt, president;
SJ. G. Cranford, secretary, and W. L. Fen
Sder, treasurer. Its next meeting will be a
SValdoata, Ga., February 15.
The B. C. Hemmer Company has bee
organized at Savannah, Ga., to mmanufae
ture wood spirits of turpentine and other
by-products of the pine. The company
Shas a plant at Arlington, Ga., and expect
to rebuild or remodel nine others.

The Cooperage C.
At a meeting of the stockholders of The
Cooperage Co., which was held in their
office in this city yesterday, the following
board of directors was elected: J. W.
Wet, Jno. Harris, W. J. Kelly, W. C.
Powell, W. F. Coachman, C. H. Barnes, E.
H. Mote, and J. C. Little.
After the election of the directors the
officers for the ensuing year were chosen
as follows: Mr. J. C. Little, president,
Mr. Jno. E. Harris, vice-president; Mr. C.
H. Iarnes, secretary and treasurer; Mr.
E. H. Mote, General Manager. The offers
and directors of this company are very
well pleased with their business for the
nine months time they have been organ-
ised, their sales amounting to over hundred
and fourteen thousand barrels. With their
new machine plant in course of erection
and the present prospects for the year
they will be able to give the operator the
very best barre that an be produced for
the money.

A Hew Lamber Ass-ciatis Orqganed a
Alabama and Teeaesae
Birmingham Ala., January .-The Ala-
bama-Tennessee Retail Lumber Dealers'
Association has been formed with Rich-
ard Randolph, president, Charles C. Heidt,
vice-president, and W. E.Waies, secretary
and treasurer. The organization will be
affiliated with the Betail Lumber Dealer's
Association throughout the country, and
by arrangements through th secretary's
bureau will affilite with the Southern
Lumber Manufacturers' Association in a
reciprocal way.
The frst annual meeting of the Retail
Lumber Dealer' Association of Alabama
and Tennessee will be held at the Hotel
Hillman on Tuesday, January 10, at 2
o'clock in the afternoon. At this meeting
there will be a free discussion on matters
of interest tb the dealers and a large at-
tendance is expected.


THE


Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville.
WlI~m Xa8iX8 DXPOTIORY.
Ci fti re aiIpa- ...............................espoa m
Caelqe k...................................... 4i o

In addition to a r ler bal buea, we matals a Saivtg Dept-
amont, unQder gov -t in.Mr, Ping intest qutarty.
We ehve for reDt ab. t Box a burger ad ifroof at rea
sonable rates, by moh or ye. -

C. H. HARGRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed
Spewal attention to Turpemnte ad Sawmill Mean' ReuirAemet
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY IasKLLI
Jcksonrville, Flr .

UOnOIwA 4ri Z SAW AKILL AmOCUIAMr
Miabmu Caetwi a Pri LiAt fet I Mdutabde Rolm -4+. Adastd at TMtes
OrgVs, J4lys, 19a1.
Fati F.MI et t jeIj' st IM I eeetI F FMt
aIZmB 1T3u1 3W 3.a 3-6360 41-` 464-EM 61-U "-6 U-06
I o to 210.... 013.513.W0461. is(Y r hW ^qm~igmyISu0S3.83nit6oaI
2Sx10 to S10.... U1S.0 1 U 14 14.00 1740 M POa W0 a5.0
8zxlO to &100.... I 1 1W.0 140J 16M60 1.50 l 31.I03U 3Uj 3J6 *M
1 xli to 2x l.... 14 16 Il&M 18.00 21.0 I tM sa M 3. MM 4I
23sx2 to 1X12.... 12 140 1&.6I 1 1.0S . 36U 3 4.0
10%xh2 to 12x13.... UiSi 17.0 I1. 33.0 D M aW 4IM6.60


I x14 to X14 .... 1eI 1.1 maI 21 4 400 Sze s0 ARM0 A. 46. m
3lx14 to IWx4 .... 14.6 176 18,6 2030 33.0 B 330LO 34.O 0M
12x14 to 14x14IT 21.00 2MO 2iMO S "1.- 42M


1 zle to tale.... Shal SSgg asagi SI.$& 81.00 36.00( atSAl
e


a


MU
SS.


14 x8 to 1l8 .... 34.3 UM 3OM 31 .0 3O.00 3.* 043A 4M1 U1. 70.
6%xl8 to 1418.... ILM 3O. W 2.O0 33.0O 37SW 4100 456 57 *0M
14%xlS8 to 18x11.... 0I0l 366 37. 30.00 343.00 M6 4W 4M% u M6 74*10


Tems: Het Cam
Pric are r. 0. Cas -Lasasmsh, Brumswk, ermun m and Jacmorwisl


NOTCIL
At a meeting of the Georgia Inerstate
Saw Mil Aosetio& held at Jacksona e,
Fla, March 1, 130, the fellqwing C(ui-
Ication sad Roles for T-e of Yl-
low Pine were eflly d I s e river
July 1, 1904:
Clas-atlam and I-reetir i YeTaew
fin Lumbe
Genral Rule--Al lumber m st be
sound, well manufaete, fll to ami and
saw butted; free frome u- nd loose and
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;
through shakes, or roud Lshak that
show aO the surface; squar edL mae
otherwise sp led. A throg shake
hereby demand to be th h or oemoaeted
from sid to ride, or ed t edig, Worid
to edge. In he measurNea of dresfed
lumber the width and thiham- of the
lumber before r be iskem;
less than =- 24h shell ie meawred
as one Ikh.

CLAFW Ft'i1

Flooring shall ebase fear sa Av
quarter inehes in thickLne by the to
a inches in width. For stale: xi,
4, 5 and 6; 1%x3, 4, 5, sad .

Boards shall e cae a0 thhi--nses
under one and a half inches by svean
inches and up wide. idselieg e and a
half inhe in thn knes by ewa in with.
For example: %, 1% and 1% ine
thck by 7 che- ad up, vide.

Sesatling shall embra aall e from,
two to te inches in thi ad two to
six inches in width. For example: f-,
23, x4, ts, rfA, x, Z4, 8 3., 4x4,
4xA, 4x, axs and IR.

Plak shall embrae al eldm from on
aad one-half to six Inchas i thickness.
not including six inae by sev inhe
and up in width. Fr -- 1s aI ,
SSd 3%u 4, 4T i
an up in width.


1 Dime-or sia -aH -si JI m
Dimension aimxeoabll mbrae. all abd
6 inches ad up n thieknses by osee
inches and up in width, insmlmig eb
si. For ex ple: fk &d, 7x,77nas
ad up.

Stepping kali aembra mto two ead
a lf in in thlekse.s by msen Lshes
ad up in width. For eaumle 11%
1%, 2 and 3%x7 and p,in width

Rough Edge or H itbch shal e-
sies aneB nch a up i& thick by L t
inches and up in width, wd
aides only. For e e: 11%, 3,, 4
ad up thick by eight aN ul p whd
sawed on two idea Only.




All lumber hall be soud, up = eo-
jation. Wan may be allowed -
of the width of the p me-s-reod ae-
face of wane, e g es-fourth eo the
length on one a ner or its eaulvalo ema
two or more marma
Merchanmmtable
All me under nae inches e-ll howr
heart entire length am am side or edei
sles nine inches and over shal hew
heart the entire l h on two ee,
ide. Wa my be allowed m-dghsI
the width of th pieee mseMa d sea s
faee of wane, Mad exte dini emo-fath
the lnh of the piece oan o ew err o
it equivalent o two or m e em.
Prim .
Scantling shall show heart e two fees
the entire length; other om sha show
two-thirds heart entire length e two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
cent, of the pleees, wan may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the pi eemeas-
ared aems face of was x ad m
one-fourth of te ua of the piee e
one corner or t equivalent O two
more rweA.


Er Tow MW 0 P Y, AS -f i2@08 M


~~~~--' ~ ~ --- ~- L


iIm


k








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


mm


Industrial Record's Department of Information


This department is conducted for the benefit of the -ub-ribrs and advertising patrs of this paper ad n
charge mde for any information supplied or e ce rendered. Fill in any o or mor of the blanks flowing, a
you may rquire, clip out and mail to this office and the same will he prompt attntia

IFr Tmr.rg..II. w Peaba. b. o. Hnaeerv I ra.b KnWi. s- ry1er. rlr.ml Wr fTs Lamd.
DATm INDUSTRIAL BKOOD. Jasmo lUe, te.
INDUSTRIAL RICORD. Mai Oee. Jaekahmvfle, Ja. I am tohe moket for das for a po of
Ia he sNat for the itoowlg Prefer In State of Pleas get m a em mukatit
with respoams bae mart ae give -s oltfr Ifa m
Remark
Pteas medt whme r eas o be saeurdoo


Stete "e fly the kiMd of meblery wanted aon whether mw or aseod-handed. DATE
tLsemmus er Treamso. samM or restersa, wor ftar A uetrlal re mrpswbe. rr commissary. @fewer w ImebaM ageUse. 8mum wr Torm es Mles
DATE r.
fDUTrIIAI, *i on JftohIllr fle,. DATK
INDURIAL ORDUSTR AL Jamme, a.l DA
PtMe advi the aendged regardia a cood loeato io (tate or metok of
a"te) for In the market or
lagethar with fn uior-mala about labor oooditdo, tazx, tremsportatio facils,
sarl marugm eta.
mema- Plesa give -m nfmation as to bem piae*O to by, ote.
Blg-4 Sinm 9

C -
Be TmS WaVt to SeM Seshiedm? Are VeYm TM Im towes"?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL AOOM, Jaekoomafle,La. INDUSTRIAL BROORD. JadshmavMle. .
ave tar oe the faowl Can you give ra lmfem-adme to ta reieMhlty of the tollowtlag armAr orpra
tioa





soe Ye. Wst to EmPma a Mm? Be Ye We sit Emplegmut?
DATE DATE
IMIFWJXAL 'B RD. JamTrilmn. Y. INDUSTRIAL MM0NE JamaelwMe. Fie.
W-asnmI to A peitiod of Weat a podaion s
*MIse l fwing lWiemn.s RearS to the Ienew

0mm yea maugeeseem a mae Cam yoe amit mfe?




CLIP THIS COUPON I!
TO AULL A 5 OF THE RECORD
VhM you a mmwanwim an b.atimMt eom the cdlmns this paper, whether you re king makiln iuy or paing an d M i, ple, scut out the enomp
Mlow and ma t at the It. It wil pay you.

COUPON.
Your advertMim was wem i tohe Indms al eIod isse dta i



The INDUSTRIAL RCORD of JabonvMule. I. aad Savansh. Ga.. i the South'n gat
weekly trade journal.


SThe Record taken a personal inte eet in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.
*OPN








18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


THE


COVINGTON


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.




Wh I I ^SHOES -
Wholesale: EYDS.
0]DRY GOODS.


" Success


For Our Customers


is Success


For Us."


ABSTRACTS
Tit ad Tax Abstract, m A F, et.,
of large tracts in all part of Florida and
South Georgia, prepared for owners and
intding purchan. Correspondence
soliited.

REALTY TITLE AND TRUST CO.
lw Exchange Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.

Sam'l P. Holmes& Co.
St M.ks tNdso Cttn,
Orala ad Prevtslis.

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wire to all exchanges.
Loeal stoks and bonds a specialty.
sn Pheao 83 Baldwla Block
THE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
tra the pa i rtwMheut deturoyag the
weeod ar ms out a esarle in sm than
twenty-ftor houri. Make from twenty to
forty-,ve n.aes from -r of wooe.
makese vs water wtste sprtm fre from
the odsr o tar or ere.eota. No rcemnemle
Us a In umg the sblbts. Needs to Ie
itmed emb e- after oromni from re-
test.
No freue wi t Y-Wreuet. the pirft"
law"a ae r weeb. mo ens grade
AUNOLU .TLY NO DA GOR rROM TIRR
m at s et =natoeria br higah-sae
wvaeaM 2%6 ehinem maeie esoew to
the pubae.
We aUssage esnman, toat tut sa
ageoo eC gre-t.. We gwirantee ***ut

Tom hMa It Crmstdact CoMpy
P p. a e I. RAMULN. 0.



10. R. N8, h.
MAfUFACTURER Of


BRI K.


Capacity of Yard 800000 Per Mouth.

'P .. a


COURBI OF PAI= AND MEDIUM NRO sD AT SAVAJAH FOR TWO TYEAR


W.W.


DATE
April ........
april 8........
April 1........
pr ........
April 33........
May 1........
May 2 ........
May 2........
May 3........
Juno 3........
June 1 ........
June 1 ........
July 1 ........
July 7 ........
July 14 ........
July 38 ........
Aug. 4 ........
Aug. 12 .......
Aug. 18 ........


K


Dot


1906-46
$410
3.5
3am
3.O
3.O
3.O
3.8
4.o
4.J
4MO
475
4.7T
4.75
4.&0
4.cg


3.50
341M
3SA
3M


3.30
3.39
3.30
3.40
38.
3.40
3SA
SAO
3aO
3Je


W.G.


194-05

3JO
3a.
3.7
3JO
ao
3M
3M
3.6
4.10
4.15
4.5
4.4
4.0
4.4
4.5
4.36
4.37


1903-04
3.46
335


3.27%
3.36
3.1
3.30
&10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10

3JO
3.0
3.30
3.ae0


1904-6
S3O
3S0
3.45
3SA
3.84
3SO
3a20
36
3.8
3.85
SAO
L40
3.6
3.90


4.OO
4*B%
4.30
4.oo%


M


3.35
3.5
3.1M
am




LIO
Us

3.5

1330
3.1
3,0
SoA
SAS
LW
3M
3.15
315


1o04-"
8.O
3.M
3A9
3M
3.30
3SA

3.20
3.6

.8O
S3J
3.7B%
3L0
3.9
3.S7%


19050-0
63.40
3JO
3.20
3.16
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.le3
3.0
3.3

2.96
2.950
2.90
2.90
2.96
995
3.06
3.0s
3.05


1904-5
a8s
3LS
3.1
3.15
3.L
3.40
3M
3.40
*AO
340
3M0

3.6
3O
3.57%


1908-04
3JO
3LM
3ee
3O

L8i
.10


LOS
LIS
L.S
.86
2S5
L95
3.5
s3.5


19U6-n

PM
at


3.0
3J

36
3SO
3.16
3L
3.0

346
3.41
3JM
3.46


aU

LIS
LIS.
L.o
3OS



26
3.-
us

L7.
.*O
35.
3.J

sua
5.5


ohn = Furchgott = Compan
SWHOEL DetALERs IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


't forget your subscrip
wems EWKTIG AMrEIIEU MEUTIo TI -a cm


y.


ition to the Record.


Co.









THE WEKKLY INDUSTRIAL ROD.1. 19


Buyers' Directory

rhea mianlm -, loct atwn *e. Is
unn a3 qt~a lea through ttb
*0~ at and write Itoa am alp-
-i OW11W Te U Aard -umnogm
a reo rmn.


AElly TIb and Tfst Ge

cog m lid U, NMvLMe% M&



Central Nation" Bunk, OANO.yia.
fta atk Jaeamimme,1k

BOMA= CRANS.
Mousr, Sea Jr, aen. adamm Us.


fteg* on. M-%, jeckass


aL&Jet i re J. a.~bo
CI&M


StanardClohin &e. Jeckecavlfle .
W eInoo wuo aA
KbIPAe Wme,. J AG., Jaebasv93%e ra.
ANN 68- OL. AL -riWH J%




B0111F & mWumno NeW York L ty.
iawmo% xYork (RIty.
TOW, Hart & O., ew York Cfty.

Reaty TWO and TrWt 30o,
COOW3RAO
Cos Go06, Ga.moo M


Dam
KBik a Joe, Jaelmville, 1k.

1100hma NMbmuEotRSu Cb, Jadmoaville,

DMY GOm .WwOv -s it
GeInhtea Ge. 1q Jeasaml 716.
Kohn, yw*wM & Cis. Jaeismvlfle, 1k.

Lambard lie Wqrks & Suppy Co., Au-
MlIfil-ftevin Geu, Jaekminvile lrbL
Sah6mMsef Sea 0e. J. SL. M416.i Ga.
gesta, Ga











II.Jadussavlfe, 1k.
Sees .01, J. S., Ness. 01a.

Seethe. Ni& amuply 00. . Jack
namI3 111.

letting en'tuDs Co., Jackssnvlfle, Fla.
anm m mu11312
ar, J.A.. Jacksosvile 1k.
LoA-aoe QJ.*mvl~fle, Pk.






St OL.~thn ILA Jaekasnville, yhL
'ouocwins i0ni wyh.u~






GeinfliadameH OIL., JacknoWifle j1k
OW n.Jash maville, 11..
Jeheemis G., W. 3. Jadmeaville, Fl.
Femook Hut & W6 Ge, Savannah, Ga.
WIafi GmSO. J. P.. ftvanau ea.
young 0o., John H.L, Savaninah, Ga.
NA2@--VNOLZBAM





Kahn, FordWo & Go., Jeebmylle, 1k.

DEW&0..L X., Jaceavlfle lb.
amd ome 0a. Tb jadeuvwris





x mvaos on., W. H.,Vauseta, Ga.
= zm~re OL. ma.


Tampa Hardware Taml r .


McMrray & Baker, Jackaobvlla, Fl.
Thomas, W. B. Gailmn Ik.
HATS.
tig & Bro, J. A., JakaMram~ le.
Reafroe Co, B. A, JteOvillU, 1b
Standard Clotheing o, Jahmoavlfl, k.
HOTELS.
Aaga., The, Jkai-vllM, 1K.
Grund View, Jacksonville, Fla
Hotel Bathd, New York CIGy.
Roseland, Jackonville, Fla.
St. George, Jacksonville, Fla.
Windsor, Jacksonville, Fla.
Wolfe's European, Jacksonville, Fa.

Lombard Ir Workl & Spply 0., Au-
ustas, O
Meril-Btv CLre JaUmKS le 1k.
Mrrp, T, Jaosonville, Fa.
lum & Cam Co., J. Sa, Masev ls.

GreMleaf &Ckosby Cos, Jakasaoville, 1k.
Hew & Show, Jaekaaile, I1k.
IQUORS,
Bettelii, F., Jackairvlle, Fa.
Bhum & CoG., Cha, Jaskevbile, 1.
Hanne Bros., JacksoTille, hk.
Muller, Gus, Jackaonville, Fla.
Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, FIU.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Maon, Ge.
MunICCEN
Spencer Medicine ok, Chattanoo, Te..
SouthernM-nnuf.ctrig C Jakovill,
Fla.
MAPS.
Realty Title and Truat Oo.
MACBra WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Oo, n-
-ut, Ga.
Murph, T., Jaaemvile, U a
Bhoald's BSoa Co., J. ., Masa, Ga
MATERIALS 10R TURPAi.alml PRO-

Sehoeld's Sons Oo, J. ., Mas, Ga.
ME-ATS.
Kiana a C., Ltd., Jakdmavil, Fk.
METAL WORKERS
Baker, A., Brunswick, Ga.
MMillam Bros., Savanah, Ga.
MILL UPPLIEa.
Brigg Hardware Co., W. H., Valdoeta, Ga.
Marion Hardware Oo., Oosa, Fka
Schofeld'is Sons J. 8., Maeo, Ga.
Tampa Hardware ., Tampa, la
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORKS.
Barne-Jemup o, The, Jaeksonville Fla.
Cosolidated Naval Stores O., Jacksn-
ville, Fla.
Ellis-Young C., The, Savaah, Ga.
Tlda-eImt Naval Stores a"d uspert a.,
Jaeksorvill, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt a Wet CO Savannak, Ga.
Stadar Naval Store Oo, Jaeksomville,
Fla.
Unioa Naval 8tor ., Mobile, Ala.
PAITS.
Bond & Bour Co., Jacksoville, Fa.
PICAS.
GriMiag Bru. C., The, Jaekd aville, Fl
PHOSPHATE 8UPPLIE.
Brigg Hardware C., W. H., Valdost, Ga.
Campbell, J. B., Oeals, 14
Tampa Hardware Co., Tamps, Fa.
Marion Hardware Oo, Oeala, 1a.
PUMPI.
Gilbert, Fred X., Jacksoville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens o., Jacikoaville, I .
ehofield's Sos Co., J. 8., Maoa, Ga.
White-Blakelee Mfg. Oo., Birmingham
Ala.
TAMN STORAGE.
National Tank a port C., Savan ,
Ga.
RZAL STATE.
Beckwith, Hederson & Warren, Tampa,
.Fota.n di e o n A
Brobston, Feudig & Co., Jackamoville, 71s.


Butman, C., Jakasomll, Ai.
Cristie, J. D., Jacksonville, a.
Iivigtao & Som, J. H., 0(N, lk.
Southern States ILad and Ttmdr O.,
Tomlinson, E. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fa.
West-rday-anM Co., The, Jakdmnvill
HIP TAJBS.
Cummer Lumbr (., Jebamile, ILk
Merri -Stevmo e, Jaedrl 1fk.

COvlagtou Co., The, Jacksovll, 1.
STXAIU PS.
Clyde Steamuuship O., The, Now Yrwk Cty.
STOCK BROLB&
Holmes a& amel P., Jemkeavile Lk
TAILO .
Renfro* Co ., AL, JadmshVID%, kf.

CypreM Tank CO., MeMlS, Ala
Davis & SBo, G. M., Palaths, M.
SehofIs d' Sons O., J. s., Mams, Ga.
TITLES AID TAX ASTrXACTa
Realty Title and Tnut Co.
TOOLS.
Coomail Tool Co., The, Wmunlh, N. C.


awal-muoaW APPARATUa
flubtuse"- nMjy 08. J&WMbsaivl e,
The Wwe V Gum Co, Tiftom, aO

Piu Proadat OuMtulei O., Tb% Fy-
etterilk, N. Ca
Plm Bet C Oustraim a T, RTa, UaW1,
N. C.
arUJsLJsAms SILLT
Baker, A., nM.Mek, ca
MeMIlan res., l-a fSX Q1.
aurma&N BIIass TUOS.
Davtis Sa., 0. M, Palatha, hk.

avis & Son., 0. M., Palata, Fn.
TTPSWarIMS
Grivot Typewriter T ,, Jkmav.l
VENECLUS
MeMurray Baker, Jakusowil, Ik.
T WH. GWjsmyhie F1.
WATCHRES
Gremleaft &6 Oaby OC., Jasmxville. Lk.
TYXLLOW PINE LURIIi.
Cummer Lamer OL, Jadsm.mafll, Fk.
East Coast laelr Ca., Watertown, Fk.


. ....
B. 8. HAL, Pros. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L.. J. Knamr, See. and Tres.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.


Ho A, Renfroe Co.


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suit to Order at ReadyAade Pries Mail Ordes Given Persooal Attntion


439 W.Bay Sk'ee


JACKSONVLLA FLA


i 1 Rill III 111a a ma1111111


J. P. WLLams. President.
T. A. Jinrm as, bad Vlcm.Preldent.
. ELKuw. 1 E. aff .


J. A. 0. CAOME, 1s Vio-Prelidnt
J. P. Dousna T,31VlcewPrnident
D. White Teasurer.


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

I 11 SIVN E IW NITNFI M ME HOIIU BK I a. 1
- asWa oafrls AVJSNvUsmM, ONOUOI. -
Sr eh a, J PlsaUICOLA, rLx. ramek Om Heoue, LL
raJnh CoriO~LCeLoKv FroLA. [co OLUM[MuUb, L.

Naval Stores Preodcers are lavited to Correspoad With Us. -
-- ll 8lllllll lllllllll lllll lllllll IIIISI S~IIII 8RIIll =











Writ Ms fo prWie sa" costs
o. Oa B. ast point in ioi~. lra-
MS Alsms or 3in All
Job work thrugh the
Wrte fo pris rS esteat



m ors.o Gg. aM runswick, Ga
Or My specialty s large worms and heavy bottles that do not lek.


Send your order for general printing to the Record


DO T IPAM, T0 Ma.N1 THE ZOSOD T0 ADYma a







20 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
n--


8 MBONMIN Proe. H. GAILLARD, OMser
w. oW k. VS-Pre,.
Commercial Bank,
State Depsltery.
ucAsCm: Olea I.. Lake O.tr. Pi
JaIelsin e, --- rida

Anyone Wishing
a limited amount of paper cups to be
delivered from Jan 10 toFebruary 10,
ad as late Marh 10 ea get them
of Vieker patent by writin--
E. L VICKERS,
TIrTON, GEmoA.

KIRK & JONES
DRUGGISTS.
107 X. BAY ST.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JdAKIONVILLE. FLA.
FImR ImBURANCw--Ltwotrtes. I-
na H. Grea & Oak. 1s Prk 1 BMg.
Jack fvile, Pih. e.


HIL I MINTOMERY,
Com1i0ion Mrchants.
Naval Stors & Cotton
Lften aosen ma aganst @W
COTTrION SaCO- a N a LP
XW TUO=K CrT.
WHi WRITIN ADVERTISERS
MEnTIO TH= RCORD


A5 0. @ANM934g
alf -_ _md E -, 011ZA I


THE


CANNON COMPANY


BARRELS
ARu THE
STANDARD
Wo THE
WORLD


Use no Other
Ma.ts c ma.tiy lfatula
Home Ofice, OUITAN,.GA.
U. A.

LiM I Inl IM I.
BUl DERB AND DRALBm IN


ENGINES. BOILERS.
Cottoa. saw, Fetnlmr, Oi aad Ir Me-
aiuery, ad SUppli. ma ReaiN.
CAPACITY FOR 21 HANBA.
Machines TooGn Wood-WatrigasrM,
hafttromin Pule1.50 to $5.
pbber Bgatin on.d Be^ EalO and
Mnl upp fr uLewi Too1
Plouu t Vernontat fn Puifr PRy
Plant anad Sto Bridm
StJm Pnmp^ r-d Water Beau" a"

AUQUSTA. OA.

Whiskies, Gins,
Rums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agenta for Jun, Cineia-
nati and Past Milwauke Beers.
Price, on application.
CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 amd 819 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Trade Checks
FOB THE

GOIMMIII MBIIiE
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.

Imustrial Record Go.


91Iuuamaumaffisse au@&oses sehhaummosmaaam


THE DIAMOND
whe.ti. 8a16006


Wines, Liquors and Cigars,
Sote A.ftU ra Whe fmaus A. e .C.es alse t.e WIelmaN lafl Nft-
Sal aWase. We iageanwe aBn E Saw a e by Semeamu a 1.ew.


Creme de ls Oreme, bottle ....
[16 .+ .,. P ] )
C. C. C. Bram, bottle ....... 1.50
C(b Brad, bottle ........... 1.


Diamond Brand, bottle ........
Heart Brnd, botLe .......... .75
Spade Brad, bottle ........... SI
Premi Brand, bottle ...... JO


MYERSON CO.,
we a WTCKsIN's 8L
JACK501MILM FLA.I


mumfummasmaammueu maammmmmmmmm


A. 6. PESLETK
PmMYI


r"oe"


sg)ug(ugggu.S)ggugssg~gS


W.U.JUS.~SLAUEE


w. IL gggagag. ga. UIgga1 r
1. w Pree. JOH MNaen.
.o B. JOHNSON


"Le.Tremerm
coot.


Wholesale Grocers


T.M. VLZMAL


414131041906-10 east Bey SWrest Almeow a.
onggxm.
%m4wic amw A 6 U-"P=


J. A. Craig Ql Bro.
239 W. BSy Street EVERETT BOCK.

Leaders in Men's and Bors' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the ity.



The Bond & Bours Co.
WMOLEsAL a IfETAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, RHi-l-s. Paints. Oils and Glass.
Stoves. Tinware. CountrT-Holloware.


so WCeST AAT ""IMt


Jacklsonvnile. ri1..


-THX PIE AND ITS PRODUCTS.


,-- ------ 000000- -
Cable Addrem. Florida

Standard Naval Stores
Company.
DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN

R.OSIN

AND TURPENTINE.
Jaclkonville, Fla.


1



4
1
1
<





THE WEEKLY INDUSrRIAL RECORD.


PR t W. O. POWELL; Vies-Preiddent, who with the P1t, eoMitate the Diretory ad Board of Managers, W. F. OAC AN, B. F. BUL-
LARD, H. COVINGTON, H. A. eReACrWamN, JOHN LRYOUNG, J.. A. CRANFORD, D H. MeMILAN, C. DOWN.
ING, J. R. SAUNDEBS C. B. BOGES; Auditor, JOHN HENDBRSON.


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES

.. COMPANY.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA, FLA,


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.

The Consolidated is Purely a Cooperative Company. Its
Interests are identical with those of the Producers. The
Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.

YARDS AT JACKSONVILLE, SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA AND PENSACOLA

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.


w Trow o"rr a f n m01 aMm va


bwrw",


I








f.2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(Far the Reular Retail and Cemmisry Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. Creamery, f0 lb. tubs.. 26*
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 27
10 " .. 28*
A C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Oream.......... 14

Lard
Compound Tin.
S 50-lb tin.... 6
50-lb tub.... f
Leaf Tin.
60-lb tin ............. 8

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 86

Sugar
granulated Sugar, bbls..... 600

Coffee
Reception Blend Moeh and
Java, 801-lb cans to case,
per lb.................. 22
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
ase, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 18
Green Coffee, medium ........ 11
Gree coffee, eop$mon....... 10
Arbunkles Roasted Coffee, 1
Ib pakages...... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ages........... market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 17
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 16

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 b..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 27
English B'fast, 10 lb.. 27
Formosa, 10 lb....... 27
Pagoda Tea, 5 and l0oosise
10 Ibs to ease, per pound-.. 40

Salt
200-1b sack................ 100
160-lb sack................ 60
Ice Cream, 200-lb sacks..... 100
100-lb sacks..... 50
Pocket Saltin bbls., 8-lb.... 266
S 4 S-lb.... 275

Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin...... ........ 17
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 dos to box
sifter top, per dos...... 46
Ground 1-16 glas pepper
boxes, per dos......40 and 80
Corn


1" Sk
Car Lot Lot
W.Corn,llOb, 1 29 1 80
1001b, 1 37 1 20
Mxd eorn,ll01b,l 8 1 8
S 1001b,1 21 1 28


sLM
Sk
1 32
1 84
146
185


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon..... 81
Oats
U100 k LesssU0
OCr XLt Lot Sk lao
W.clip'd,1251b, 1 8
1001b, 4 464
White 1251b, 1765
White 1001b. 1.38
Mixed 1251b
1001b,
Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice. .... 1 85
fancy..... 1 85
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 6 25
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 lb sack.........6 00
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks........... 6 25
Pillsbury's Bet ..... 7 50
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal ......... 740
bbl ........
Flour, Boss,.............. 00
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 320
92-lb sacks........... 1 35
Grits
Grits, per barrel..........8 26
92-lb sacks ....... 1 35
Rice
Good ...................... 44
Choice .................. 6
Fancy Head............... 6
Broke. .... ............
Canned Vegetables
Do.
Tomatoes, 8s, Chief........ 85
Tomatoes, 2 ........ 66
Clayton, 3s............... 80
Clayton, 2s ............... 60
Sifted Peas, 2s ............1 40
Rose L. J. Pes ........... 80.
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........1 15
Lima Beans,2s ............1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8e........... 90
Baked Beans, Is ............. 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets. 3m..........
Saner Kraut, 3s ........... 85
Saner Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s .............. 90
Hay
car lotw 1obe ale I
lota qutity
Choice.... 1800
No.1 Tim. 17 00
No. 2 ....... ...... 1600
No.1 Cl'ler 17 00 17 0 1600


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 dos
to ease, p dos........ 1 10
Pineapples, faney t, 2 dos
.to cas, per dos........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 dos. to case
1 30
per do................ 1 30
Apples 3m, 2dos toame, per
dos...,............. 90
Apples, one gll, one dos to
cam, per dos........... 3 00
Peahe, ,two dos to ca,
pr dos................ 1 45
Peache, 8s, two dos to cae
per dos................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two dos to
cae, per dos........... 1 46
Blackberne, 2s two dos to
came, per dos........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two dos to eam.
per dos................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 6
S 10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
lb.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
per lb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per Ib........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb.......... 6

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peachs Extra,
26-lb box, per lb....... 12
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
26-lb box, per lb....... 11
Fancy Apricots 26 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice " "
Ev. Apples. 50-lb. boxes.....4 00
Ev. Apples, 3-lb. boxe.....2 06
Er. Apples, 48 1-lb. packagea4 25
Ey. Apples, 24 2 25
Currants, cleaned, 8-lb. ease 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 95-lb
box, 40-s0............. 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box. 50-60............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 26-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, -lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box .......... 1 70
Peanuts
Fanoy, H P, per pound.... 6o
Extra H P, .... 6
Seed Peanuts, .
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ ..... 18
Brazils ................... 12
Peacans................... 12
Filberts ................. 12
al0 nuts........... ...... 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 La1sl
lota Sk. Lot Sk. Lt
Cottoseed Meal 27 00
Hulls 950


_bWa% Commad 3NL.
"Reliaul" cu BDe, I ......
meA Deh Is.
RaA ieL, s ........
em* st .. ........
14......................
s lmd Db, 1- .
e ...................


as
LU
as
.39

.3:.


-M XWOW W4A NAI A W mww, einu


Matches
Atlantic, per gro. ......... 4
Woodeiware
Cdar Pails, 2 oop......... so0
3 hoop..........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces.... 0
Twine, box1n; perAdox. .. 1 C0
Si~es, perIAo.N. 18. 0.|.. 0
" 'nested ..S 06
Buaket,2 hoop pails,per de 1 0
Scrubbing Brushes, per dos.. 8
Ax Hfndles
Two dos crates per dos.... 1 S

Washboards w.w
78 Crown Combination.....S S0
178 Blue Jay............... 00
176 Diamond Glas ........._ 2
O. W. D., 17 inch, per dos I 4
Clothe pins, five grot to box 76
Ca4ned Fish
Oyste ls, 2 dos to case, per
dos. .................. 9
Sardine, Americsa, 100 to
per ease ........ 1e
Sardines, 5 ea lots........ a 20
Salmon 1s, Tale 4 dos to cas
per dos Alaska........ 95
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to eam,
per dos Col. River ... 2 16
Salmon, 4 dz to case, pr dos
Beardley's Shredded Cod 90
two dos in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, lib...... 95

.Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-6 pail............. 650
Sea Sides, 1A2-lb brick, 40
be to box ............. 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Klngaa's Meats.
"Reliable Hams, 8-10 alg ..... 13-4
"Reliable Hue, 10-1 sTvg .... Isl-
"Beiable" ss, 12-14 age .... 141-4
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7- vige 1014-
"Reliable" (litforal Has, -8 .. -4
Breakfast Baen, light a. ...... 1
D Belles, 16-18 r. ........ 8-8
D. S. Bellie, 20-22 a r.......... 81-
D. Bellim, 2 sv. .......... 77-8
D. Plates ................... 3-4
Baeon Platm ................... -4
Ix a. Butts .................... 54
Bolesoa am ............... t
asu ian l ................ T

"Strawberry" esmiery, Cb ta 3 7
S Ib tul 7.... 1-
"Reliable" full erea ehme .... 131-

"Indiamn Pur LaS ........... m-et
Ises-Joaa. .mhaMd **......... n**







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 's

ST.- UP You Wat a Turpentie asatem?
JACKSONVILLE MACHINE ANo IRON WORKS L YV u Wt A Sawum Lecu-?
ENGINEER IRON AND BRASS I Yu Wat y Kind a r FirMl Lad?
POUNDER AND MACHINIST u Mean Bmlse?
SCa en re Wrem to
Loomotnve, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaird. Irn J H. LIVINOSTON A SONS,
and Brass Caatinga, and machine repairs of all kinds. O Uah. Florida
MARE JINGDIS AND OILERS. PULLYS AND SHAPTlFNG9. *o********oooe******** _____***eeeee**e**ee*** _-_
Agat for Stationary Engines, Boilers, Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden-
son.Hydrants and Valve, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Goods 5I WI r w1TH Wy iI
i I TMunMIa U WATER Ir L EIIFMEIT IA rFESMLT
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


The Clyde Steamship Company Record Readers:


The job printing department
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. It is reason-
able to suppose you will get
N XY YORK, C A RLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES better and more satisfactory
.-r a s a t e ti.b a S N printing supplies-letter heads,
S** * nm '. - ,t" ,. envelopes, commissary checks,
ituauy, Del 1, at:0 pm ..... AMNW E ...rid.day, DJa i, at 160!0 a.m
Tuesday Db. 2, at 3:00 p ... ."OMANCHE ..SdaY., Jn. 1, at 1;00 a pay-mOll reports, etc., by having
Wedasdat DMe. 8, at 3:00 pm .. *xHURON ....Tuesday, Jan. 3, at 4:30 a
Saturday, D. 3, at 3:0 pm. ..ABAPAHOE ...... Thursday, Ja. 5, at 4:30 amm th
Moay, Ja. 2, at 3:00 pm ...... .xNEW YORK .... Saturday, Jan. 7, at 6:00 am em.
UOIBWedmday, Jan. 4, at 3:00 pm. .APACHE ... Sunday, Jan. 8, at 6:00 am
Toay, Jan. 3, at 3:00 pm ... .IROQUO ...... Monday, Jan. 9, at 7:00 am J
Mday, Jan. 6, at 3:00 pm ..OOMANCHE ......Wednesday, Jan. 11, at 8:00 am IndUimt l Rid Co 0
tay Ja. 7, at 3:00pm ....AIAIONQUIN ..... Thursday, Jan. 12, at 9:00am a uia e Wo
IxMOHICAN ..........Friday, Jan. 13, at 9:30 am
TeMday, Jan. 10, t 3:00 pm ...... ARAPAHOE .. Sunday, Jan. 15, at 11:00 am JadUmevt, HrM1 i
*xHURON ......Tuesday, Jan. 17, at 12:00 n'n
Friday, Jan. 13, at 3:00 pm ......APACHE .. .Wednesday, Jan. 18, at 12:30 pm
saturday, Jaa 14, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS ....Thurday, Jan. 19, at 1:00 pm
*zNEW YORK ...... Sunday, Jan. 22, at 5:00 am -g%%'%g g mn %%g-'
Tueday, Jaa. 17, at 3:00 pm .... .OMANCHE ...... Sunday, Jan. 22, at 5:00 am
Wednaday, Jan. 18, at 3:00 pm .... ALGONQUIN .Monday, Jan. 23, at 6:00 am
Friday, Jan. 2, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ... .Wedneday, Jan. 25, at 7:30 am
SBudy, Jan. 2, at 3:00 pm .***MOHICAN ........Friday, Jan. 27, at 9:30 am
Tday, Jam. 14, at 3:00 pm ... .APACHE ......Sunday, Jan. 29, at 11:30 am
Wedaday, Jan. 2, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS .... Monday, Jan. 30, at 12:00 nal
xHUON ...... Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 1:00 pm Th
Friday, Jam, F2, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ..... Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 1:00pm
Saturday, Jan. 28, at 3:00 pm ....ALGONQUIN ....Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4:00 am
Tuaday, Jan. 31, at 3:00 pm .... ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, Feb. 5, at 5:00 am
*"xNEW YORK ...... Monday, Feb. 6, at 5:30 am
---Bmst via Brmawiek and Charleston. xFreight only. *-Beato via
Brnwri- Is the Paper you want. It is
me CLYDE Nw ENGLAD ND AD SOUTHERN LINEs. published daily and is from 12
wie "mSee ust" w Jetaeenevln, Bflto and PMTUevhmn -aid a l uLe-.
m .. *a*oa.Nt CIauteun. to 16 hours ahead of any other
Wr... ....... * * *'*~] ro oet of Ceerle g et paeige. daily newspaper in Florida .
CLYD ST. JOHNS RIvER LINE
Between Jaekamoemt amd sam 4m.
s-.. at Palatksa.Astor. frtranel a. Ber..ford 0D. aem a"d ttrmIsse .
-'- -O JACKSONVILLEL s $5.00 a Year $2.5o Six Months
STEAMER "CITY OP JACKSONVILLE"
in a*elitel to 1sfl as t"lo-: Leave Jacksonville. JundaTa. Tessay aad Thaus-
daa, 8: 1 m. notmnga. I-eave lano.. Monday. Wem-day A PrMaTs 8:8 a. m.
o I n .. 0l .o..e.o...J a Full Telegraphic and Stock
S ......................ja r...-........... ...... ... Ar reports. If you want to keep
L eam .l ...... .. .. ........Palath1 ........................... Leave $40 9. m.
U- 3oe. ..... .... . .............................. ........ ..... e S P posted on the news, get the
Low ,,i4 ...........- ..ran.c&r D............ La....... Ive M M1etool
a,,ntv.. a. l................. sn......c ......... ............... MNetrools.
A. 10:00 a. n .................... trpri......................Lv. 10:00 a. m.
aMNuRAL. PAWNIutR AND TICKN 1 OwICn, 2 4 W. iSy 5o., JIe* WtOse.
P. M. MIOwMOWom. JIL. A.t. GoL Pa.s Agent. Im W. Bay Bt. Jae~onvile. I I
wa. C oBrm.La, eral M. Ant. JA-ll. C. P. LOVLl. Amit. lpt..JTe'. CART& RLL PUB. W
root BHen street. Jaeknonvle.
A. c. Aem~r, . A N w York. OLTDMB IrAn 0. N. A., Xw T. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
Gunme. ma O a 1. 0 tP. MArn an_.
eeGa maser. Genemrl Ansem.
40aiiaroage -n-MiM, W state t Wro Tt. w No .,^. .8.OWIL.. -X ,
Var T=s mwac soe AT Fm uarae Dm----EN






poe
STHE WEEKLY IlDUBT lAL RECORD.


Two of the Patterns we show in our Catalogue. I
SPECIAL VALUES IN STERLING SILVER..


TME
"Rose"
a"1- %= 4K-&C
res-poosq, fSeM per ea.
D-rmt 8pla $ioo per LAs.
TabDe 8p"a4 915.o pw U&m.

Daurt Krie., a peo r Wa
Ta l KXist, Osso per &a
NO CHARGE FOR
ENGRAVING.


ONE


Greenleaf "m
Crosby Conany "Germania"


3rberrz anb


41 West Bay Stret
Jacksonvie


WI
T md lm u fi l oe pet do
HsUN Ro.D. Ps A...mS ..eTT
Write for Catalogue
HUNDRED PAGES 'ILLUSTRATING


Ttpsm ... W ar&

Dumrt Prke0, 6s.so pr aM
Tabe ftzkN 6054 pe0 -AK
Demrt Kmrke iszoa per am
Tabe Kicrk eSO Pr am


E PAY EXPRESS
CuANK


Silverware, Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Cut Glass, Clocks, etc




Half Tones-Zinc Etchings


Ilustrating and Engraving Department
OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.

Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc.

I Mif 1 K DHMn. MEM 1= mIm EIMum wI WNc.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPuLT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
* GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.