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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00104
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: January 13, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00104
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text




For the Week F-iding January 13, 1905.


14, FA, 1 m
*rI i hO
L.. 6. Uaartmant of Agrciezdtra.


WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturlag Interests.

Ad.Hd 1et. IaS. ae, ar Me Ewmctfr. Cmtto ns et fUrPwoil si erators'* Admsesato U a s ItS. mce md *rum.. .. a" dt Wmet. I#a. 9e, Am ma~ CG
wml, a as am ast aes AUe it the Gemeral Assocatlen. Admeted Sept. I ts N tas9 as the ir alm n oturmatet mersato Apmtwmimn .
Adse Arm sISM, IAar, emcs eras r w e. If er-sef. Came rew'er Asmcinel. roder to ,A ftoe er Sg m
*A. ctrlem. MAma MSmt et Le St m thoAmT Stec Grewer's AsMsolmi.

V If f MJAC NVILLL rU. ATLANTA. GA. AANNAH. GA. $3 A YEA&
an I -"


National Good Roads Association.

Organization, Conventions, Objects.


the public roadway is vastly improved. No man can
answer why this most important and extensively traveled
highway, and upon which all other forms of modern
transportation must successfully depend, has been so
shamefully neglected unless he admits his total indif-
ference and failure of his duty to the Public Road.
The farmers of Missouri, Arkansas, Tennessee, Texas,
Oklahoma and Kansas, or of any other State or Territory,
will never obtain the most exalted and most enviable po-
sition among all occupations and can never hope for the
dawn of independence and higher civilization, of which
so much has been written and spoken, until they organize,
legislate, appropriate more taxes and construct in each
county an extensive system of modern roads which can
be traveled conveniently and at all seasons of the year.
The first step to this end is to abolish the inadequate,


W. H. MOORE,
MPreiet fteaaml 0oo=4 Roao& A--octmtlom.

W E earnestly appeal to the tax-payers, the law makers
and to all other persons who have traveled the mud
roads leading to the country school house or the sacred
church, or who have hammered the weary horses, mules
or oxen dragging through mud, slush and snow the prod-
ucts of the land to the nearest town, market or railroad
station, to join with the "National Good Roads Associa-
tion" and the "Office of Public Road Inquiries" of the
United States Government in bringing about better pri-
mary conditions of transportation. All who live in the
country or in cities or towns and who drive or walk over
the public roads realize that no substantial improvements
have been made, excepting in a few States and localities,
within the last twenty-five or fifty years.
Each year the State is increasing in population and
wealth; social and commercial conditions are growing
better; schools and colleges have increased in numbers
and accordingly broadened their spheres of practical
education. Factories to convert raw material and all
substantial products of the farm into staple articles are
distributed cooyenietly in the leading agricultural
centers. Every other method of transportation excepting


fruitless existing conditions. They have been tried for
years and years, and the proof of their utter failure is
that thousands and millions of dollars have been ap-
propriated for permanent road betterment and yet we
are compelled to drive or walk over the same old mud
roads.


" "





t THB WEBKLY INDTUWMIAL NOORD. __
mM Mtttt Iftf T----------f ------------- T----T
e. L. XeOGRa Pasmxmz. W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, Vxca-PaUesmium. .0. H. HODG6OO, Mc, sad Tnass'&
DIRECTOILS a 0. B. Boger, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. MeNsehesn and J. A. COsefoad, to Jmadisele;
B. F. DBllard, Tampa; 0. M. Covington, Penescals.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY CO.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Maina Offce and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches la Tampa, Peasacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Waval Store Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pesseola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can he reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


cmsalt el ee Thre-Stery Dasldla, 70x200; owe two-story lstitlld. 0xz390 me we-story hMallstd 80x2Oz
masklg the largest sace o a my Compay of the n te SI te th.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.

BrEnches Tampa. Fle., Pensamcola. Fla., end Sevmnna.h. Gs.
TH 3KKCOtD VIU. = Wa H Dow A0 TO TOO avrr 3wm .








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 3

A__% & t^i -v-g* --- -- w


It is estimated that Missouri is expending annually be-
tween $x,6oooo,o o and $2,ooo,ooo.oo. Illinois appro-
priates about $3,ooo,ooo.oo annually for the public roads.
The reports of all other States make a similar showing.
It is a crime against all the better interests of these great
commonwealths that so much money should be appro-
priated without rendering more satisfactory returns.


Good oRads Agitation.
The successful campaigning of the National Good
Roads Association, and all kindred organizations has
within recent years created a deep and wide-spread senti-
ment among the American people that great social and
commercial burdens are unjustly permitted to continue
from year to year against the predominating and faith-
ful population engaged in farming.

National and International Conventions.
The convening of people in convention to consider and
improve any arbitrary custom or usage of a civil, social,
political or ecclesiastical character is laudable and should
render good service to the State.
This Association has held more than three hundred
Good Roads Conventions, distributed a vast amount of
literature and organized many local Associations. It was
organized for the specific purpose of agitating and uniting
all interests for Good Roads.
In 1903 the officials of the Louisiana Purchase Expo-
sition; the St. Louis Manufacturers Association; the
Business Men's League; the Merchants Exchange; the
Railroads; the Press, and many other interests and indi-
viduals united with us in holding the National and In-


H. HUTTn,
T- -anr Natioal Goo.d .Ra AlmNaktit.
Preddot Third Natltema Bak St. ILo


County Courts, Road Supervisors, Com-
missloners.
All road supervisors, Judges of County Courts and
others who administer public affairs and who distribute
the road funds owe it as a duty to themselves and to
their constituents that their communities should obtain
more profitable results. We believe it is the purpose and
intention of public officials to render honest and com-
petent service. The main reasons there are not better
roads are, Ist: lack of necessary funds, and 2nd: the ab-
sence of intelligent system and economy.

Road Taxes Should be Paid in Cash
Not Labor.
No State or Territory should continue the old unprofit-
able and deceptive method of allowing tax-payers to
contribute so many days labor as an off-set to the pay-
ment of legitimate taxes in cash. It might be wise to.
utilize the labor upon the public reads of those who
have no visible means of support or who are not in a
position to pay cash taxes.


MARTIN DODGE,
Member of Exzcutitv Boaud
NaUoaal Good Boads Assocaton.
Dbator Off. Pub. d. Inq.. U. Io Go.,
Wahlcto. D. C.
international Good Roads Convention in St. Louis, April
27th to 29th inclusive. It was one of the largest and
most representative industrial meetings which ever met
for any purpose in this country. Delegates were present


;. T=B wNOCD u WB WUwa GREAT TRAMB JOURNAL








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

uS ia usse ---- 809888""


from thirty-two states and five foreign Governments.
The Convention was honored with the presence of many
distinguished men including Hon. Wm. J. Bryan, Gen-
eral Nelson A. Miles; Hon. A. C. Latimer, U. S. Senator
South Carolina; the Governors of many States; leading
Railroad Officials, and the President of the United States,
Hon. Theodore Roosevelt. Some of the able speeches
delivered will be found in this publication.


RUasLL HARINGa,
Member ot eutive Board
National Good Roads As.oclatn.
President Pere Maruette System.
Vice-Pres. Cincinnati, H amlton & 1ayton system.
Cincinnatl. Onto.

The proceedings of the 1903 Convention has been
published in bulletin form by the "Office of Public Road
Inquiries," Washington, D. C., and distributed by the
thousand in this and foreign countries.
A special committee was appointed to prepare bills
and urge their enactment in each State Legislature and
in the Federal Congress.
The successful Convention of 1903 brought to the sup-
port of the Good Roads cause the most distinguished
statesmen and lawmakers of this and other countries.
The press hearalded the issue as the most pronounced
problem with which the United States must reckon in
copnection with domestic progress and future trade ex-
pansion. It was stated that this country is not pro-
ducing more than one-fourth of its combined possibilities,
and its agricultural, mineral and timbered products will
never be placed in fair competition with all the world'"
markets until the roads are made more accessible.


Convention. 1904.
The work of 19o3 culminated in a larger convention
this year. Of the hundreds of conventions held in con-
nection with the Louisiana Purchase Exposition perhaps
none will ultimately produce more substantial results
than the National and International Good Roads Con-
vention. It was a most representative delegation of men
and women from thirty-eight states, four territories and
ten foreign governments. The Hon. John Hay, Secre-
tary of State, Washington, D. C., invited all civilized
countries to participate. The proceedings will be most
valuable road history. The addresses of Hon. James
Wilson, Secretary of Agriculture (who came as a spec-
ial representative of the Government and President
Roosevelt); Governor Dockery, of Missouri; Hon. David
R. Francis; Goverhor Nahum J. Batchelder, of New
Hampshire; Hon. A. W. Campbell, special representative
of England and Canada; Captain Heliher Bernhardt, of
the Royal Staff of Highways and Public Works of
Sweden, and the speeches and papers of many other
notables will be published for free distribution by Hon.
Martin Dodge, Director of "the Office of Public Road
Inquiries."
Model Road a m Streets.
A part of the program of the great Convention of
May i6th-21st was the construction, in the Model City
























COL. ELUOTT DURAD,
Member of zeeutive Boam
Natlomal Good Roads Ao-n tlto.
National l mness Lague. Chaso.
of the World's Fair, of the famous model roads and
streets to be seen by the millions of visitors who at-


I I a M 18968 8 a I aTZ I I I Is I IrM 0 Ito I ISO @I- I I I II II I s$$ 5C*0ii I 11411@080111-H90
0=Z. PMU AMD an PRODUCT&*







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5

liu ---m---- s I* IeIsss8s8mIIh-i068 .om...hh. se- --h iiiI ISelssi hm8,8m866600


tend the greatest World's Exposition and combined
arena of Universal Education that has been organized
aince the dawn of civilization. It is the first time any
of the International Expositions has given special
attention to the subject of modern road and street
construction, sewage and drainage.


Govesnmaent Ce-Opesrtlon.
The "Office of Public Road Inquiries," Agricultural
Department, U. S. Government, is co-operating with
the National Good Roads Association, and all other
associations and committees, in urging organization for
better roads.
This office was created by congress in 1893. The
able director, Hon. Martin Dodge, and his assistant,
Hon. M. O. Eldridge, with a corps of Division road
experts, giving attention to all States, have done a
most practical work by presenting every phase of
road construction in illustrated bulletins andscircu-
lars which are sent free upon request from any tax-
payer, and in the construction of object lesson roads.
The science of teaching communities how roads should
he graded, drained, crowned and surfaced requires
special engineers and road builders. Every road su-
pervisor, commissioner, county judge or contractor who
desires special information about building any kind of
road can have same from Mr. Dodge's office. There is no
excuse for ignorance on this subject when such valu-
able knowledge can be obtained without cost by drop-
ping a postal card or letter to the "Office Public Road
Inquiries," Washington, D. C. It is the duty of
farmers, all road officials, commercial organizations


ALERT BLAIR,
Member of Executive Boar
National Good Reads Amoioatloc
Genaml Attorne Anercan Brake Co.,


Hon. R. W. Meeker, of New Jersey, who has super-
vised the construction of hundreds of miles of those
well-known State-Aid roads, superintended, for the
National Good Roads Association, the street and road
construction in the Model City.
The larger manufacturers of road and street ma-
chinery furnished, free of cost to the National Good
Roads Association, all modern machinery for con-
structing these streets and roads. There were in-
cluded in this list the J. I. Case Threshing Machine
Company, Racine, Wisconsin, traction engines; the
Austin-Western Co., Limited, Chicago, Illinois, road
graders; the Kelly-Springfield Road Roller Co., Spring-
field, Ohio, steam rollers; the Indiana Road Machine
Company, Fort Wayne, Indiana, and the Studebaker
Bros. Mfg. Co., South Bend, Ind.
Every method of road making, as exemplified by the
photographs in these pages, are on exhibition in the
Model City. All visitors, and especially the mayors
and councils of cities, engineers, boards of public im-
provements, road supervisors and farmers should in-
spect those object lesson roads.


I -


S-O-.. A. L. MAtf,
General Orguar at the National Good Road. A& i .
and people of cities to appeal by petition to their re-
spective members of congress in urging liberal ap-
propriation for the support of the office of road in-
quiries. Object lesson roads should be built in many
sections of each and all States annually.


a I a a a I I a* Asa aaa A a A1 asA aAsal a 1660 milA a a a AaAaAAaA a aaA a A I88 80066iiiamlll







6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


NUBIAN TEA For the Liver an Kidneys
BENEDICTA A meiine fk wmon
CUBAN RELIEF Fo, croi C .m d Di-
CUBAN OIL A liniment unequaled tr Cu s mrs..
Bruisesad M Rheumtisn.
A supply of these medicines ia what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for pries and booklets.
Spencer Medicine Company,



THE ARAGON
JACKSONVIL.LE IA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.
-
D Ideal Lecatie a leasutifel St. Johnis
River Sedlect .esMit Sectl A
HOTEL ROSELAND i5S R
lghClss Terst and Faiy Ne
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
vmy Omaort asd maWmmet. Unezcelled cuisine, Northern cooking. Spedia rate, 810 to 818
w y; to daily, Am lea plan. mistrated booklet mailed. Car gin to ostrich arm
phoelI grosni. Headquarters for naval stores men, lumbermen, cattle growers ad Good
GeOoetion delegstes A. 0. EKHOLM. PnoMitrron.


Windsor Hotel
Jaeksew~s rIeast ai
rIrlMas LiarLgt id met

Year-Round Hotel.
DODGE & CULLENS,
Owmrea am freistemr


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Staamer Shipments a Speciaty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.

C. MIL MSm, Pres. J. I SlAW, Vil-P-Pre. MLP JESUP,. fs.-Trem
BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.
Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
StrteUy a Prodeers' Company. Gaes,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
eiveries at Jakseve. Pensacla, Fernandina and Savanmah
Cereede. Soflted. JACKSONVILLE FLA.


FOR SALE.
50,000 seres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
Fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
Mll. ~S1. er aere. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years. or san
be preaa. On of the best opportunities in the State.
C. BUCKMAN, O r.e r. v,.w m


__"--E



Falstaff Restaurant
For Ladies ad G
Breakfast a la carte. Lmaebs 12 to 2:30, 0e. Table dhote
dinner, 6 to p. 756 Otm aon behalf sdlL After theta
B lunehas apie:ty.
25 MAIN STREET,
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.

1 -
uumsuuammasmsm88u8m8s semmmasamammhuS S01* 0
*irir irstatesii eelii ~ i irc -


MA.L w1T. fPr.e


T. IL MedAEnl. Wle-ftea.


MM STRsM. m Tree.


SOUTHERN STATES LAID & TIMBER COMPANY.
0Ve M. WEai.EL Me 1 ger.

Florida Timber, Grazing &

Agricultural Lands.


401-404 AW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA


*e)huabehSISU'CIIUSI68S~~(I66~I)()) gggsusIugaasussu
II Is see$$ lgoo Ul~lll ISI III IUI16 4 iiuiiuislsoss m 1,.
W. I. BUGKVlY. W. EL xsnvm G.0.L WANUJUPN.
BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.

URGE TRACT$ OF TIIPENTINE All MILL LANIS,
Raos 1-23, "Fast NaaiI BR A*DAWus.
:TAMPA, : i FRIDAY.
m iII iii i3ii so BaselessIUII II -I@ Is@IsOI --- -----
GYPRESS 9TANES


Are Best br Zvery Test
tas Is 1m W m a1. ai e nm
mad 1oinosz.w www 1 I0c1wo
ai So mai te dbM seleca.at o af sdt
var ow prinm& 'We Imw Wasinembm
eutim aenad at a-1 2 terr udba
due'sb o Unk we NO hak O IO NA boa
km f c-ift and j ae km
G. M. DA&VIS 41 SON


* PALATKA. rFO3IDA


BETTELINI'S SPECIALITY
I wI mad hr a ursegali an I IsO
Few full quesb Linsein COtri Imnybsoek Re ar 2 sd leern .. Zve
*us Bottles
I wIlm so" Lw ha e"aW et ft=nu 000,0 X d"e4 jW GQ111fis1 Wed-
~n fe ANNE" C"06 2e00 an. Peaeh Brandy ra sad AsaeY
WbWey. Ol and a anh"atan 'ecW N %.- lSM aboew' fer .. S
One battle of sy oftheb .............................. ...................mfs0ss
0e1r botes ed to e do tedowlag 00fernis Whos.: dhuoW Pea just.
Catawba, II
lusle bftle.a
~w butm 1090 010, W y. so a
mnle botLesam
Five bottle. DM s KiM so
Mssle bo~s. am
Bulk 1e1de oft an Usnt& 1081l1P.5mm a aOPPINOMs. AN WInts of
Nquas In 3 tebum Ls *A to 6. t. e. b. JlmSya.
r. BETTELINI, W. May St., oa UNION DPep, Fil


AM YOU A 80eMnp i TO = 53311=111?


"







THE WEEKLY Inu trrAL RECOR D.


THE


COVINGTON


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.



SHOES -
Sholesale: DRY OODS.
Dn"Y CwOODS*3


"'Success


For Our Customers is Success For Us."


ABSTRACTS
Title u" Tax Ampet, 1, ta.,
ofa ta t i Bn part of FlriMd ud
Both Geori, prepmed for owmn and
if-Liag pprcn. O ~onreadenee


REALTY TITLE AiD TRUST CO.
law zimpna BMg., Jacakomvle, me.

Sam'l P. Holmes & Co.

Graim Wi Prin ila

NEW YK 1TTiON EXCHANGE
CIMUWCA MRA OF TRADE
DIrm prira wires to al uexhage..
Leml stoek and beon a penalty.
I- rbi a" a1Uewoi ftlck
THE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.

twmllp-r hm Ma. 1 La 9S tort
afsases do mM W ans w--- d- e a m.-
aies mans =&moe = f Mete to rs
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May 7 ........
May 1........
Jun T........
JuM 10........
June 16........
July 10........
July 7 ........
July 14 ........
Mly O ........
Au.4 ........
Aug. 1 ........
Aug. 18 ........


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WHOLESe DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Don't forget your subscription to the Record.
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8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The fledta Diates Recently Appoiate
by the Grmer.
governor Jeings appointed the follow-
iag del te, to present Florida at the
Interstate Sugarcane Growers' third an-
anvl convention, to assemble in Montgom-
ery, Al, January 25, and continue in
session for three days:
Aladmu County-ML J. Beekham, W. M.
Blite, J. L. Townsend, J. I. Zetrouer,
C. w. MeQues.*


Bradford County-F. A. Andrew, J. G.
Alvares, N. T. King, H. H Hodges, John
Iangfd.
Bake County-. C. Borbett, C. T. Bar-
ber, Daniel Man, B. L Morgan, Wile3
Hieka
Columbia County-A. B. Moore, T. J
8ummerall, Jef D. Browne, F. N. Puckett,
Arthur Markham.
ZmifMi County.-H. C. Clopton, Hin
man and Hekekr, Thomas J. Davison, Thos.
Freemin, F. C. Bmant
Dad County-F. C. Arthur, C. W. Lee,
T. J. Peters, J. J. Holly, B. J. Blackman.
uval County-C. P. Winton, M. J.
Brown, D. Jaks, L M. Wilkinson, Mr.
tnduey.
Madii. County-J. J. Harrol, L C.
Wiao. Theodore Randa, W F. Sulli-
van, R. i. hidmso.
LOa County-L T. asney, T. P. Strick-
land, C. Smith, William Roberts, D. F.

Lee County-Taylor Frierson, J. E. Ban-
eom, George torter, D.. Hiers, H. S.

Marion Conty--. R. Peters, J. C.
Mathews, M. Payne, J. Burr, M. H.

Man-e County-N. H. Abel, Josiah
Gate John Parrish, John W. Jackson, C.
L Ber...
TName-J. T. Goodbread, H. Jones,
T. J. Wingate, B. J. Higgiabotham, C. T.
Stewart.
Loey Commu-J. J. Mixm, L. Priest,
SN Mi. istruak John Preseott, Walker.
Lahe Co1aty-Dr. D H. Bosenburg, A.
B L.oajoy, 0. X Cliffrd, J. C. Buss, S. H.
Baylar.
Polk O(l ty-B. F. Blunt, K. O. Varn,
K O e, J. W. Cotton, D. C. Lan-
easutr.
Jasom Counlty-J. D. Rus, L H. King,
X B. O lliday, E. T. Diekinson, Thoe
B. IMdm.
lafayette County-John W. Day, Wil-
Usam Perry, J. X Duama, Joseph Fletcher,
C. S Wethwrby.
Jeasona County-Daniel Lingo, B. A.
Mrris L. N. Marrs, W. W. Carroll, H. A.
Barrows.
Hflitbr County-A. N. Littleieid, P.
B. Co3in, IM P. Jackion, A. Murphy, R.

Citrsa County--D A. Look, S. D. Moon,
M l. Zellanel, J. T. Lathan, Daniel Rooks.
Clay County--(ear Silcox, W. E. Baker,
L. F. Thomas, M. W. Lee, M. M. Spark-
man.
Gadbdsa-L B. Edwards, A. L Wilson,
8. J. Davis J. Danell, J. C. J. Shep-
hard.
Franklin County--. M. Yent, R. F.
Yent, R. Tucker, D. H. Brown, George M.
Van Hera.
Hamiltoa County-F. W. Williamson,
N. S. Witehall, H M. Lee, George C. Hut-
ehison, J. P. MeAlpin.
range County-George T. Russell, W.
H. Fow, Arthur Fuller, B. B. Else, W.
K. Martin.


Hernando--E C. Hale, N. A. Skimmer,
T. D. Graham, W. A. Fulton, W. M. Rut-
ledge.
DeSoto County-Colonel T. J. Watkins,
Dr. C. H. Smith, Frank Haren, Jesse B.
Sandlin, C. J. Carlton.
Putnam--J. IH Harp, J. C. Grimley, Da-
vid Oakes, W. B. Campbell, Dr. George
Walton.
Santa Rosa-Dallas Peadon, Sr., D. E.
McDaniel, A. B. Prann, C. H. Simpson, A.
W. Stuart.
Pasco-W. A. Doorney, L. D. Bigger, W.
A. Lang, Tony Skinner, Gip T. Ayer.
Volusia County-A. T. Pattillo, G. P.
Healy, Scott Hatchins, D. P. Smith, W.
H. MeBride.
Suwannee-J. M. Brown, J. J. Corbett,
John V. Brown, 8. M. Martin, T. W.
Adams.
Wakula--H. C. Rehwinkel, J. J. Pierce,
Galveston Durrance, Joseph Allen, John
C. Hodge.
Onceola-C. ling, W. L. Van Dusel,
T. Simmons, C. W. Ward, J. C. Enis.
Sumter-W. L. Arnow, C. W. Towns, W.
J. Wicker, J. &. Gamble, C. O. C. Beville.
Taylor-W. P. Strickland, A. J. Wright,
C. B. Enfleld, F. 8. Jackson, J. C English.
Holmes--J. 8. Coleman, John Neel, Dan
Hughes, James Richardson, S. Mat-
thews.
Walton-W. B. Parris, B. W. Storm, A.
M. Laird, D. K. McQuarrie.
Washington-A. B. Wells, J. A. Simms
A. G. Chandler, G. A. Danley, J. R. Curley.

Wayeross, Ga., January 3, 1905.
We agree that the prospects of the year
1906 look exceedingly bright. We find
ourselves full up with orders, and inqui-
ries coming in daily. We will turn out
this week five 60,000 lb. capacity fiat ars
for the Aripeka Sawmills, of Atlanta, and
ten 60,000-lb. capacity flat ears for the
Stuart Lumber Company, of Brinson, and
we are just getting well started on fve
hundred 0,000-b. capacity ventilated box
cars for the Central of Georgia Railway.
SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MBG CO.,
By Raoul.


"Railtroad MakiM Ceedeam"
Not only have the railroads east of the
Mississippi river agreed to allow 500
pounds tare on account of the equipment
of flat cars loaded with lumber, but in a
number of isolated instances, says the
Southern Lumber Journal, it is reported
that carrying rates have been cut down
two cents on the same commodity.
Whether this means studied avoidance of
any appearance of agreement is not dei-
nitely known, but the incident is suges-
tive of possibly further concessions in the
same direction. In such a case it would
not be surprising to see the roads acting
with apparent independence of each other.
One of the points relied upon in the com-
plaint now pending in the two-enet ad-
vance cases before the Interstate Com-
merce Commission is that of a sort of con-
spiracy, the roads, it is presumed, will
hereafter be more careful to coneal. At
all events, the eoneession relating to flat-
car equipment and the restoration of
lower rates referred to, would seem to in-
dicate a disposition to "tote fair" where
lumber is concerned. If this inference is
correct that fact would be welcome news
to the lumbermen of the South, and the
Journal hopes that coming events will
confirm it.


. T. e.gr,. J. A. 4L CAiWo., wo. J. y,4c0 ,
prses 8@1. BIsm 80frr"0.

Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTUREBM OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Factories.
8th Street R. R. C ,roein.


JACKSONVILLE.


FLORIDA


..NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH. GA., U. S. A.


JOHN a. YOUNa.
Presiet.


J. P. WIXIxUA.a.
0. W. SAUSBY.
s. A. ALLOwD,


A. D. COVINGTON.
The~mdimL
V166-peddea


c.a. u. L.
P. L- BUTIHBLAND.
J. B PADOZTT.
J. R. YOUNG.


B. r. BULARD
W. 0. POWULL
WATI=I RAY.
A-. AD6 Vnni'ro.


L1. WL AYTON,
seretry sa" Tlrer.


J. B. cUUTT
G .'. DIM,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L OONOLY.


Our taaks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the ternminals of the 8. A. L. and A.L L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been reviod.
WRr fM BM R OP THE AWOVB MP PARTnCULA




J. S. Schofield's Sons Com any,
**O,0*,. :*tO-O gt*$O***oeO OOoOeOe.O te e:a*SO
t ------ -$**to

^ Distiller's Pumping*
S Outfit
* No plant eemplet without oa.
^ ^ Huadowd r ,,,a ,- .i.,,- r,,.. o
SNlorida, sonMippi am
^^ ,, Soath wois WrieelmilEt m-
* r


S Graf MaiMhry,
** u uwealU y fall and omplte" *
--soakL ---



Advise your Wants.

A Macon, - Georgia.-
* eW* a1t e s Iwseem"so tees 8 a1~ loeew
rtotOoto~rr~,oto~ortrtootlor ~ oOOor~ooOOo~O


Jos Rt. Yoas. J. W. M B. Paker, Jama Mea W. W. Wi ar,
P, rlMeat. VibePre VieoPrea. VOiePres. nSee rei



John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.

* SavrnRIh Q tBrunawick, Ga.
miatm****Iiun 8 u hmuimnums |ium ih


wl w=2 *aMYM -








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


- T m .maLu.a z OF COOPERATION.
Bearhead, la., Jan. 11, 1906.
Mr. J. A. EHollmoa, Jacksonville, Fla.:
Dar 8ir: I have seen in the Industrial
Record my name mentioned as an opera-
tor giving 2 events per box. I paid 1 1-2e.
up to Christms, while Mr. T. M. McCon-
nalk Messrs. Richardson & Thorp, E. P.
Rose, W. J. Dais & Co. were all paying
2 cents, all of them from two to nine
miles of me, and I was forced to pay it
or lose my labor. If they had held to
1 1-2ic, should not have paid it. They all
paid Se. up to Christmas and I paid 1 1-2c.
I know that it is not right to pay such
prbes but I was forced to compete with
my neighbors to hold my labor, or it
looked that way. Yours truly,
J. J. M'DANIEL.

The above illustrates the necessity of
operation, and the need for a rigid ad-
herenee to the al of the Turpentine Op-
erators Association. Had all of the ope-
ratos in this -eigborhood stood firmly
by thka or and one-half cent price, they
they would ha saved a great deal of
moey, gotten better service, and left
labor coditimns in a more satisfactory


The Speneer Medicine Co., proprietors of
Planters' "Old Time" Remedies, and one
of or regular advertisers, requests us to
thank theirvarious customers in Florida,
Georgia and Alabama for the liberal pat-
ronagl showm this company in the year
just eled; and, with best wishes for their
continad prosperity, to solicit their future
orders.
This compay's unique trade mark (the
frank, honest, good-natured old Planter)


is indicative of the treatment accorded
by the present management to its eusto-
mers. The company claims to have the
best line of family medicines, and adver.
ties its Big 4 regularly in this paper.
We respectfully direct attention to their
advertisement elsewhere in this issue.

New Firm Formed to Handle Pine Prod-
ncts.
The E. C. Hemmer Company is the
name of a new company just formed to en-
gage in the pine products business. It
's composed of Mr. E. C. Hemmer, of ie
American-German Construction Company,
and Mr. Henry Sundheimer.
Both thee gentlemen are graduated
chemists at Heidelberg University, and
Mr. Hemmer is the discoverer and owner
of processes that he has been using for
some time in the production of wood spir-
its of turpentine and other by-products of
the pine, and is now operating a plant at
Arlington, Ga., and expects to build and
remodel some nine others.

Inspectle Bureas Abelished
Reference has been made in former is-
sues to the bureaus of inspection estab-
lished at Savannah, Brunswick, Fernandi-
na and Jacksonville by the Georgia Inter-
state Sawmill Association, as that body
through its members does a large busi-
ness at all those ports. At the last meet-
ing of the association, held at Valdosta
on December 13, it was decided to abolish
these bureaus. While they were very
much appreciated, they cost too much. In
their stead the association determined to
have two men, Capt. W. B. Chaplin, of this
place, and P. 8. Williams, of Brunswick,
to look after the association's interests,
at the four ports, Capt. Chaplin taking


charge of Jackonville and Fernandina,
and Mr. Williams of the other two ports.
They will conane themselves to the in-
terests of the association's membership
only.

SOM IMPORTANT FLORIDA FEAT-
UBRES
In Conectin with the aeed Rads Move-
meat
It is difficult to select section of the
State where the people are not alive to
the importance of this long delayed work.
If any still doubt the importance of
Good Roads, they can be convinced by
learning the history of the movement
and what it has done for the people in
Marion, Orange, Hillsborough, Dade and
other counties, where the most miles of
hard surfaced roads have been built.
They are the prosperous counties of the
State and one and all agree that Good
Roads has made them rich. As we go to
press our sister county of Nassau enters
the list with the announcement that her
county commissioners have decided to
make a hard-surfaced road from her splen-
did Beach to the Duval County line to
meet the road now being built
It would be hard to imagine a more
beautiful city than this will soon make of
Fernandina as a resort.
Looking to the South we ind St. Johns
ready to join Duval on the Beach, so what
seemed a dream just a little while ago,
is a reality. The people are awake, know
what they need and in a business way
are bound to have it.
The news comes of building on this
line at Ormond-Daytons Beach coming
north to meet us and we are reminded
that we are not moving as rapidly as we
should.


This Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.




Liquor Merchants

Proprietors


JlkMsUl Bllttk Wius

...Agent...


ACME BEER




ZINC NAILS


Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the a wiML which will not injure
saws when left in the trees.
0Jmaa NaUl 0o.
a"e PW4 S& NOw wVOkp N. ye
Also Heflqalrers for Galvanised and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Eta, Slating and RoofinK
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nai ad
Taeks.


SThe Cooperage Company


Manufacturers of High Grade


I Western White Oak Spirit Barrels



Capital $100,000.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

I Orders sent direct to us will receive prmpt and careful attention.
e are now prepared to f urnish barrels from six shps a dvantageously Icated. |


OPPICERS:,


J. C. LITTLE, President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager.


JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


bIIWRCTOFRS:


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


C. H. BARNES,


J. W. WEST,


W. J. KELLY


W. F. COACHMAN.


"we33m. svc=3 LM SUCCUL








10 - VIUMU WU maY JZIvtj1xI4L BU0R .


J. L Pmanos,. Amiom S. UUa. ArIsm r. Pfar
Psmeita Vess-p om. Ci.

The Metrcalile Exchange Bank,
JArSONY1LLE LORIDA.
CspOML Sm200.O00. Swplu.s $100,000
STATE DEPOSITAILY.
Gemi maklU. me Paid em- Sving Deosm Safe felCio Bomes. .O per Year.


Rcvoew of Natal Stores for a Week


Spirit for tLw Week at Savanah. .


Prim Repts Sale Exp. 1903


M ., Ja. I 111 7 64
Tues., Jan. 10 j Nh 4 3 7 21 1 4
Wed, Jan. 11 181 196 0 64
Thur, Jan. 12 176 919 166
Fri., Jan. 13 % 105 0 64

zowssh sgw ma t.

tock Apri 1 ........... M,74 44M8
Receipt Jan. 12 ...... 176 2,042
eeipts previously...... 167,1 536,65
Total ............173,32 585,51

Reports Jan. 1 ........ 4 N 1,478
Export previously ......141,047 513,48
Total ............... 141,213 146 0
Stock Jan. 12 .......... 32,719 68,89
Stock previaly ........ 14,2 86,714

ruad tfor the Wa ft OMSANA
Molr, Ji 9. Lnt Year.
WW .. .. .... .. .156 4.
W .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .m0 L.1

K ...... .. ..... .. 4.05 3.05

S.......... .... 2.&0 2.70
I .............. 2o 200
F........ .... .80 2.70
E........ .. .... .. 3.75 .65
D............. e2.65 o
ABC 20........ .... .6 2.50
Recepts, 2,181, sales 1076, export 2,572.

Tuesday, J n. M -tosiW frm reipt
%s,; ialea, t,4A5 s i mem. 90f. Quote:
A, B and C a5 .I D a-s.; F, $2.76; F,
O.75; G,$2.s; H,&.; *asM; K, .0 06;
M, r4 ; N, 6.75; window glass, (6; wa-
ter white, &1

Wednesday, Jan. 11.-Roain firm; re-
ecpt, 1843; sale, ,931; shipments, 1,221.
Quote: A, B, C. 2.50; D, $2.55i .00; E,
2.M@54.70; r .70@.70 2.1-2; G, .85
4590; U,3f&We89 ; I0 1B3 K,45.6;
M, *4.0; N, *17B; WO, O5 WW, $5.15.

-'huday, Jan. 1L.-oaia rm; receipts,
2,OM; males, 1,704; shipments 1,478.
Quite: A, B, C, $6; D, $2.6; E, $2.70:
F, $*275; G, 2.0; H, $3.10; I, $3.40; K,


$4.05; M, *4.50; N, $4.75; WG, $5.001 WW,
*o 1e


T . .
Friday, Jan. 13.-Rosin firm; receipts
3,84; sales 2,026; shipments 185. Quote:
A B C, $50; D, $20;; E, $2.65$2.70;
F, V.70402.72 1-2; G, $287@2.87 1-2; H.
$3.05; II, $3.40; K, $4.05; M, $4.50; N,
$4.75; WG, $5.00; WW, $5.15.


Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Review.
New York, Jan. 11, 1905.
Spirits Turpentine-Business continues
fair considering the season of the year,
with price gradually hardening in sympa-
thy with higher prices in primary markets.
Stock, 805 barrels. We quote: Machines,
55 cents.
Rosin-While there is no marked in-
crease in activity, all grades are being
quietly disposed of. We quote: BC, O.90;
D, $2.5; E, $3.00 to $3.05; F, $3.10 to
$3.15; G, $3.20; H, $325; I, $.70; F,
$4.35; M, $4.90; N, $5.10; WG, 5.25; WW,
6.50. TOLAR, HART & 00.


Bailey & Montgamry's Review.
New York, Jan. 11, 1905.
Spirits Turpentine-Stock, 805 barrels.
Market during the week has been a tri-
fle more active, sales' moderate on a stead-
ily advancing market.
Thursday, Jan. 5-3%e.
Friday, Jan. 6--6S e.
Saturday, Jan. 7-54c.
Monday, Jan. 9--4c.
Tuesday, Jan. 10-54%e.
Wadmeday, Jan. 11--6c. asked.
Roin-27,400 barrels.
This market has been more active also,
and sales have been good of the low and
medium grades; we quote all grades
steady.
Ac $2.87 1-2; grade, D, ($3.00; $3.0
to $8.10; F, $3.10 to $345; G, $3.15 to
$.20; H, $3.30 to $3:35; I, $3.70 to $3.75;
K, $4.35 to .40; M, $4.80 to $4.8; N,
$5.10 to $5.15; WG, $.35 to $5.40; WW,
$5.50 to $6.5.

We mare peaed to notice the enormous
trade that is, being done by one of the
largest iron works firms in Georgia. We
allude, of course, to the ombard Iron
Works and Supply Co., Augusta, Ga.

Sadu yew i enters fr me la-e
dea. Th t aun point cmmis-
-r1 du. thn all td piling hsm.
in ti Ismth embimL


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 190344 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


1908-04 1902-03 1 1901-02
198,647 292 496 814,846
6o ,968 940,071,071,440
844586 1,238038 1,385,786

188,398 296,430 814,876
762,270 975,428 63,687

98,884 206,109 217,446
888,171 504,178 585,042

35,658 42,765 63,797
87,853 138,121 129,059

59.351 87,556 48,633
826.746 387,784 898.586


Thanu'b4 mcthaa seam IMh- 96849 ca and of tdoh, 289,5AM bha


Wants a Turpentine Place.
Boston, Ga., Jan. 9, 1905.
Industrial Record Publising Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla:
Gents-Can you give me any informa-
tion concerning a good turpentine frm
for sale or can be bought. Wanting to
buy at once. Any information will b-
gladly accepted. J. B. LANCASTER.


Anyone Wlhliefn
a limited about of Mer oups to be
delivered fvI JuauT tan effiaMy J
mod a laes w Y 10. euw uit
of Viekme patet by wratu--
E. L VINERS.
TI& ".


Crop of Spi*it and Ro fDr Thit Yeara.
ep 19-44. CPr 181
SSpirits. Roin. Ill c ab. 4
Wlmoi.st... .. .. ....111 MIM i 1I IIJS
C rest .. ...... 2, 3,1 3,0 117 11
Savannah...... .. ..17 41 6 270370 26 6 81
*rhuwek .. .. ...... 1,M le= 64T7 46,4 1
Mok3f .. .. ....... ISAU Aa lA tM
Now Orlean.......... 1AT 1,1 3316, Ml4om
Chrab.l.. .. .. .......ased med S3b 1 I314
r .. .. ow .T.. S,1 44,14 1411 4M
PaSeOlS.. .. .... 44 MA85M ms 111 3
Ja & Fardiah.. .... I ,10 MA, 91,M Wr 5 Ul
TamlM .... .. ........ eMd do estd -A 1
T"es ...... ...........gs U A u at Mas Ae a


aM40
wj~w i~n

-~"'
W,53


1,166 Ili
6A66 35,93

'- -WA


Imports at Turpetine to U. I.
The following tabla i compiled by Jamse Watt & Sd., ad jamd es
official retun. or eoaTveiee of empariwam we hkae ime w le- IaN 0i
-320 ewt. equal mo hunle.
Iu7 lo 1- M1 u 1 M M-
From U. S., bble. .... 12,5u 3 173,7171 7A 17407 74 8 U060 3
From Pruame, bhas.... 101 M 17 Ml M M"
From father eoutrims. 1,4 53 6 M so

FIM 174,3 100,0 177,96 UtMU JIMA M1 W
From Ruassia .......... U CJm .M 41W1 M l IJU 1
Total Barrels .. 151,11 17TMS 159640 18M M M5M3 1 IMAM
Thus the iport t ia Turpoetine (or Wed 8pitm) Is MWil -36 dm g
that of 19 0, and over aiz times as mk as in 17M. It iJo utrl g tona bew
this import fuetuate with the prime of Am rim Torpowto.
Percentage of Import uf uiani ..1.79 3 4.57 I.41 3L 10I
Av. Priem Amer. =urp iN L&mi ..0.-6 3-6 3-I -4 W1 4 "


COMPARAT!V2 PEKUS OF BPIPIS AT YAMI33A mf ftft iS,


April 1 ....................
April 8 ..................
April ....................
April ..................
April 1 ...................
May 1 ..................
May 1 ...................
May 2 ...................
Juay ...................
Jue 10 ...................
June 1 .................
June 17 ..................
June ..................
July 8 ...................
July 8 ...................
July 15 ...................
July 22 ....................
July 8 ...................
Aug. 4 ...................
Aug. 1 ...................
Aug. 19 ......................
oAu. 2 ...................
Sept. ...................
Sept. s ....................
Sept. 26 ...................
Sept. .......................
ept. 0 ..................
Oct. 1 ....................
Oct. 14 ..................
Oct. 2 ....................
Oct. 28 ...................
Nov. 4 ..................
Nov. 11 ....... ... . .. ..
Nov. 18.................
DeNov. 25.....................
Dec. 9 .....................
Dec. 10 ...................
Dec. 23 ...................
Dec. 30 ....................
Jan. 6 .....................


ND

0%
6%
aw
54%
Ms
64%
54
a3%
a%
a2%
a
U6%
62%
U%
53%

a%
6%
54%
549j
52%



52%
61%
52%
52%

51%
50"
50
48%
36%
47%
48-%
50%
49%
50


U1906-"
ND

s4
43%
47
45
47%
47%


45%
47%
47% '
47%

40%


4%
62



56%
57
55
57
55%
56%
55%
56
56%
56
56
56
56
s6%

56%
56%
57%
60%


U
45




45

%
47%

47%


44 34%
43% 3





4% 34%
61% 36%
47% 36%

49 35%
51% 36
50 36%

61 35
50% 35
51 35%
60% 35%
51% 35%
52 39%
52% 36%
54 37%


lo.




I4?

45
46
61%
43%
42%
WA


43
a4



26



37
37%
40%o
0%
4a
41
40
390
a

38%
37%
a5
36
37


H. N. LEIGH
aOM 4, MStEE KaiB"M

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT AND STENOGRAPHER

BOOKS OPENED, CLOSED AND KEPT.
TERMS $10.00 A MONTH UP.


TM We 4& TM OF OUR Ao DYeISNNS Y0mE 103


Cob YS ..,................ ..........i


bbIL .................................




bbbMl ...... ...... ..................
NCW Ywhr
emim r ............ ..................
bbb........ .
Sundlies
= Cabs.b
bbb-.........


----- ---


. .


f ......






THE WREMY INDUSTRIAL RBO0D. 1
I n ...


inzt~ In47.


CHAEu R PERPETUAL


TWO AND A HALF MILLIONS
..... .. I IJ" "


' 0


$2,500,000XX)


NEW BUSINESS WAS WRITTEN BY THE


Penn Mutual Life Insurance


OF PHILADELPHIA, PA.


IN FLORIDA IN 1904


These figures show the popularity of this Grand Old Ccmpan.g
Iae,. limited Life, Endowment, Convertible Term, Gold Bonds and Annuity
Policies written,


S10,000
$10,000
$10,000
$10,OOO


at age
at age
at age
at age
at age


25 costs only S114.50 per year.
30 costs only $126.00 per year.
35 costs only $141.50 per year.
40 costs only $161.50 per year.
f5 costs only S199.00 per year.


These figures alone are worth considering to the man who Is looking for Life Insurance.
The policy Is most liberal. Without Any restrictions from date of Issue as to travel.
resiMece or occupation.
We will be glad to have you send us your age and will take pleasure Is telling you
what It will cost you, and any other Information you may desire.
An Inquiry from you is Invited and imposes no obligation upon you whatever.


ACOSTA (L BAHL, State Agents
Suite 401.2.3 Dyal.Upchurch Bldg. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


No other Company In Florida Issues this contract, so don't go to others for the good
pelats. i It. Naturally, they are not telling them.
By the way, there are no "others just as good."
mAZD T= ADS mmIrM WA.









12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL R.ECORID.
JAMES A. OLALOMOM.
ErMel me d avardyr.
Pxutah4d Ew rrsy ly.
summ.a (o b 3 -)...a5r, A "
-Tter P.nm e ad bIef Pfasta."
AK essmmudintleas eshou be a&deer
ThI Inilutrie.l Record Comnpany.
JaLcksonvillU Fla.
Bommoo a" saumibse Ofosee at
Aim. 1 SvannaLh. Ga.
Entered it the Postofe at Jahcmoaville,
Fla., as seond-elas matter.
do d by the Exeaetive Cmmitte of
t ini'pstw Opatw Aas oatn .
September 1, 193, its elusive odal
organ. Adopted in aal convention
epteber a th orn ale of the
ml Aocitio~.
Adopted April 27th, 14 S th oealal
Irgu of the Inteastate Oa Growers' As-
loetioa. Adopted ept. 11, lM, the
Dily o4wl ora of the T. 0. A.
commanded to lumber people by spedl
esolati adopted by the Georgia Sawmll


COPr rox ADVERTISING.
AdvrtNig ery (cham efr new ad-
vetireets) sheM eah a s Tlesay
ertang to isre laertie in the teme a
the am week.

THV RECORD'S ORiCx&S
The publihing plat and the mais se-
fes of the Idutrial Recrd PubaiU i
Co. are located at e. xx South Hegan
Strat, Jachdnuvi, Fa.i the rwy heart
f the et turphtine a yadew pi e
indiSrie Brnch OMce1 Savannah, GA ,
and Attlata, Ga.

NOTICK TO PATRON&
An payments for adverting in the Ia-
dustrial Record and subcriptias thereto
muat be mad direct to the home oece
Sin Jackanville. Agents are at allowed
to mae cdlecttes under any circum-
stance. Billa for advertising and sub-
seriptioas are eat out from the home
o0ce, when d and all remittances mst
he mad direct t this compa y.
ITduatril Reod Publishing Co.


EXCELLENT SUGGESTION .
Morriston, Fla., Jan. 11, 1906.
Mr. J. A. Hollomon, Jacksonville, Fla.:
Dear Sir: In the last issue of the
Record we noticed a copy of a labor con-
tract law that you are going to introduce
before the next General Assembly. We
hope you can succeed in getting this a
law, for we need it now. We also would
be glad to see a law that would force
these negro women to earn an honorable
living. They live in adultery, run from
camp to camp and bring the dreaded dis-
ease that causes lots of men that would
work to do nothing. This class of ne-
groes have no regard for the laws of God
or man. The negroes look to the white
man for assistance, just as a child looks
to its father; and furthermore it is a dis-
grace to civilization to have this class of
people before our pure, honorable women.
Hundreds of negro women in Florida to-
day dress in the height of fashion and
have plenty at all times, but do not get
it in an honest way. It is a shame for
the lawmakers to let such violations of
the law of God and man be continued.
We do not need missionaries to do this.
We only need a law and it enforced. Lots
of people who want servants, cannot get
themthem for love nor money, for they can


live without work, and you will agree with
us it is not right and should be stopped.
We would be glad to hve your opinion
on the matter.
WEKIVA NAVAL STORES CO.,
W. E. MeArthur, Manager.

THE GOOD ROADS MOVEMKMT.
The Record gives considerable space this
week to a history of the National Good
Roads Association and the work of the
organization; also the program of the
approaching national convention which is
to be held in Jacksonville on the 19-21, of
January, inclusive. The Record is in
hearty sympathy with the work for good
roads. Every movement of this kind looks
to the better development of the section
in which it begins. Good roads are in-
dustrial developers, civilizers and educa-
tora.

ELNCOURAGLD.
The Record has received so many letters
from its friends regarding the text of
the contract labor bill it will seek to have
enacted in Florida thatwe feel that we
shall have every encouragement when the
time comes for presenting this measure.
The need for such a law is so imperative
that we feel that the demand for it will
be almost unanimous.

M. COVINGTON'8 nEW JOB.
The election of A. D. oCvington, of
Quincy, Fla., to the presidency of the
Hillman-Sutherland Co., the largest naval
stores producing company in the United
States, is a worthy tribute to Mr. Coving-
ton's ability as an operator. He is thor-
oughly practical in every department of
the business, has been a successful pro-
ducer on a large sale for a number of
years, and is a business man of the high-
est sense of honor and integrity. The
Hillman-Sutherland Co. is a remarkably
successful corporation; managed by men of
recognized ability.

WORKING TOGETHER.
The following is from the Savannah
Cotton Trade Journal:

The naval stores producer needs no pro-
teftor. Wtih all that is being written in
his behalf, he is probably the most inde-
pendent and successful of anybody en-
gaged in American industry. The sue-
cess of the thrifty among them has been
little less than phenomenal, for in this
reference we are talking of the men who a
few years .ago walked the woods with
their sleeves to their arm pits.
The naval stores operators of a few
years ago are now railroad and bank pres-
idents, directors of corporations, large in-
vestors and promoters. Some have retired
on the fortunes their industry ad hard
sense have brought them.
J. P. Williams drove a team and clerked
in a country store on scant wages before
coming into possession of his present vast
fortune.
Bernice F. Bullard was an operator once.
still controls turpentine places and before
falling heir to his present share of this
world's chattels, trod the humbler walks
of life.
J. W. Hunt ranks with the most signal
successes in the naval stores business, and
some years ago retired, now residing in
Washington City.,
John R. Young has risen to the top rung
of the ladder, now heading the company


Southeastern Stockgrowus Meet

Here in First Annual Cova ntion-


The Southeastern Stock Growers' Asso-
ciation convened in this city last Wednes-
day. While it was not sucesaful from
a standpoint of numbers, it brought to-
gether the students of stoekgrowing in
this State and a part of Georgia, and will
result in great benefit from a publication
of the papers read.
The convention was called to order by
President Gaitkill, who referred to thl
small attendance and urged that activity
and interest take the place of numbers
He introduced Mayor Nolan, who delivered
the address of welcome.
Mayor Nolan demonstrated his knowl-
edge of stock-breeding in Florida. He
knew the very kind of heifer which would
perish on pine straw and sawgrass, and
gave a scientific treatise on the kind of
stock Florida desired, and an analysis of
the velvet bean and cottonseed to demon-
strate what could be grown in this State
for stock. He knew all about stock grow-
ing and how to welcome a convention of
this kind. He was eloquent in referring

that bears his name. He is among the
ablest and best informed, and certainly
the most progressive factor in the busi-
ness.
These are a ad l few-a few-of
the signal successes, whose names would
make a list columns long.
The factorage business appears from
all time to have been one to which ope-
rators rose. It is their natural heritage.
After getting the practical end of it, he
entered the factorage branch, in which
the opportunities are better. The promo-
tion is natural and proper.
The factor is a graduate of the forest,
and as such is a great help to the opera-
tor from the vast experience he brings into
the business. Is one trained in such a
manner not superior and more acceptable
to the operator in handling his products
than one less skilled in the industry?
Operators labor r u a misconeeption
when they suppose the factor's interest
are not identical with their own. Every
conceivable motive, liberal or selish, ex-
ists for kindling the factor's eagerness for
the operator's success. Factors wani big
shipments, then the highest market prices.
The operator has borrowed, and the factor
wants him to pay out. The quicker toe
better, and the sooner the nearer indepen-
dence he gets.
Don't get dissatisfied with your factor
because somebody tells you he is making
money, wearing diamonds, or driving auto-
mobiles. This only signifies a good fac-
tor. If he isn't doing this, he's no good.
To befriend the operator, the factor doesn't
have to seek the poor's house. They are
successful, and successful people should be
the operator's choice.
Efforts to divorce the relation of fac-
tors and producers must prove futile. The
largest companies, past and present, to
handle the operator's output, are owned
and controlled by the operators them-
selves. In fact the operators are abso-
lutely bossing the Ameriean naval stores
industry now-but, of course, not the lit-
tle operators. Since the first pine was
boxed the factor and operator have worked
together, and they sustain mutual and
pleasant relations a terrife jar alone can
rupture.


to the resources of Florida from every
point of view.
Hon. B. E. Men, Secretary of Agri-
culture of Florida, was to have responded
to the welcome address, but his coming
was prevented by sieknes in his family.
In his stead President Gaitakifl intro-
duced Hao. R. E. Rase, State Chemist,
who made the proper exmea for Mr. M&-
Li and referred to the great important
of the convention and its relation to the
State and to Jacksoville
Captain Garner, president of the Jack-
sonville Board of Trade, bade the stock-
growers welcome, assuring them that they
would always be welcome in JacksonvlM l
CoL C. P. Goodyear, of Brnawiek, Ga..
responded to Captain Garner' welcome.
Oololel Goodyear is a eloquent speaker,
and made an Ioqent address. He said
little about stoekgrowing, but a great deal
in reference to the industrial advancement
of th South.
President S. Gaitskill then read his
annual address as follow :
P.dh Address.
"Members of the Southeastern Stock
Growers' Assoeiatio: Less tha a year
ago we met in this city to study the sit-
nation of the live stock industry of this
State. As a result of this meeting, we
have this association. In this short time
good results have been accomplished. Not
quite all that would be wished, but a good
beginning has been made. Since thena
several carloads of purebred cattle have
been brought to the State and a lively
interest is now felt in the introduction of
good blood. I think I ea safely my the
work of this association has helped this
growing desire for good blood. Wile this
has been a trying year on our assoca-
tion, I hope the need of our existence bas
been demonstrated and that the organi-
tion will not only be maintained, but
strengthened.
"na our infany we were askd to me
our efforts to pt a stop to fece-cutti
and other unlawful depredations en the
live stock industry, ad bring the ofeaders
to justice. This was a new line of work
for your members, but they did not shirk
their duty. As a result of our labors,
we have secured ten indictments from the
Brevard County grand jury, and some ur-
rests have been made in Oseola County.
These eases will be tried at the next reg-a
lar terms of court in thee counties, ad
we have every reason to believe that con-
vietions will be secured. The wrk ad
expense necessary to secure these results
hav been greater than was anticipated,
but it is hoped the demands made upon
the organization will be fully ad cheer-
fully met. I lay before the asoeiation an
itemized statement of money spent, that
every member may examine it sad see how
and for what purpose this money was
spent. Total expenses paid to December
6, 1904, amount to $1,13100; the greater
part of this money was used in getting
evidence. I made four trips to Kimim-
mee and one to Titusville.
"In addition to this expenditure e owe
Hon. W. L Palmer of Orlando for his ser-
vices. No positive arrangement was made
with Mr. Palmer as to what his fee should
be, but he assured me that he would give
due weight to the fact that we were
young-as an asoeiation-man were en-
gaged in a work that we hoped would r.


PATRONIZZ RooDm A3Y FOR SAUUVACWTDALUIUS.










THE WEIKLY luMuisUlAL BRCORD. 13




THE CHRISTIE GROOVER D0m co,

WHOLESALE DRUGGBITS.
MM- RaW 9 a rr a M w ra Yi. .dig.MM FlO L m.


suit in great good to the State. In ad-
dition to what Mr. George W. Hopkins
has paid Mr. P. Vans Agnew, I feel that
we owe him a small fee. I have asked
Mr. Vans Agnew to be at this meeting and
be prepared to give you a full statement
of the work done; that you may more
fully understand conditions, both past and
present, and.the amount of work that has
been done.
"In addition to the money compensation
that Mr. Vans Agnew may receive, I feel
that this association owes him a vote of
thanks-he has been untiring in his efforts,
not only in the prosecution for these
offenses, but in every possible way to
further the interests of our organization.
"Our efforts to convict these offenders
ar being closely watched by cattlemen all
over the State, and there seems to be a
fear that we won't meet with entire sue-
cess. I find this fear is, to a degree, based
on their belief that we will not be able
to ind juries that will convict, no matter
how plain the evidence may be, but I have
more faith in the eitisem of our State, and
believe we will get verdicts according
to the evidence we lay before tlhm.
"I believe the world is growing better
and education is improving our citizen-
ship. And the people that for years past
have felt that they had a perfect right to
the use of the uninlosed grazing lands
have begun to realize that what belongs
to them they have perfect right to use as
they please, and that they must accord
the same rights and privileges to others,
and I feel that it will be but a few years
until the men who now object to fenced
pastures will be advocating fences.
"I am quite satisfied that the end of the
open range is near. This will be pushed
forward by the demand for better beef. I
am convinced that our cattle will soon
quit going to Cuba, because Cuba will have
enough to supply her demands from her
own production. Then what will we do
with our range steer? He is not good
enough to be shippel North, and our own
people are demanding better beef than the
range steer will make. There is but one
remedy-that is, make a better steer. I
would not say this did not I feel confi-
dent of our ability to .make the better
steer; but to do this we must have fenced
pastures. That is the only possible way
to control the feed supply. But with
fences overstocking of grarng lands cn
be prevented and a better steer Will be
produced, even without better blood. But
with better grass add better blood, and
good results will follow rapidly. I feel
that division of the labor in beef-making
is fast coming to us. On the large areas
of grazing lands will be established breed-
ing herds. The effort will be to make
good calves-but the calf must leave the
breeding or grasng grounds by the time
it is a year old, and be sent North, where
more concentrated feeds can be had; and
that calf made into beef in the two-year-
old form. I do not mean that of necessity
these calves must leave the State-the
ounties of Marion. Alaehua and many of
the counties in the northern and western
part of the State will gladly take the
alves from the breeding grounds, if you
will ake a good calf, and pay good
prices fa them. ]Hva the ma northern


and western States will gladly take your
calves at good prices, as they are now
doing for Texas-if you will make the
kind of calf they want. And I know
you can make a satisfactory calf if you
will try.
"Many experiments are being made with
the different grasses and grains in differ-
ent parts of the State. Some satisfac-
tory promises of success can now be seen.
I am merely calling your attention to
the possible calf and the feeds for it,
wanting you to get your minds leaning
toward these things-simply preparing you
for the full discussion of these questions
that we expect to have during this meet-
ing. I know there are men here that
'know whereof they speak,' and they are
prepared to tell you of the possible calf
and how it can be made, and the market
for it. You will be told of the grasses and
grains that the State can produce and
when given to this calf will be manufac-
tured into beef-and beef of a kind and
quality that does not need to seek a mar-
ket, the markets of the world are hunting
for high quality beef. All we have to do
is make the beef; we need not trouble
ourselves about a market if we make the
kind of beef demanded. And I am fully
convinced that we can do this if we try."
Talk on Good Roal.
The president having concluded his ad-
dress, State Organizer Mann of the Nat-
ional Good Roads Association, made a
brief address, in which he referred to the
advantages of good road building in this
State.
Mr. Mann, however, based his appeal
for good roads upon the advantage it would
be to have automobile roads reaching from
Jacksonville to Ormond and a chain con-
necting Atlantic Beach and Amelia Beach
with this prospective road. He drew a
pretty picture of automobiles speeding
along laden with tourists.
Mr. Chamblis spoke briefly and re-
ferred to his object in bringing the ex-
hibit of live stock to Jacksonville. He said
that what he had on exhibition was. not
what the people of Florida hoped to gain,
but was a demonstration of what had
been accomplished in a brief time.
Afternoon S in.
When the convention met in the after-
noon session there were only a few pres-
ent. Secretary J. A. Hollomon read a
number of letters of excuse from some
of the leading members of the association.
setting forth their reasons for not attend-
ing the convention.
Z. C. Chamblim, of Oeala, read the fol-
lowing paper on Improved Breeds:
"Prior to the discovery of America
there were no cattle in the Western Hem-
isphere. A bull and three heifers were
brought to Plymouth by the ship Charity
in 1624. Legislation made their slaugh-
ter punishable by death, so they multi-
plied rapidly. This ship sailed from a
Devonshire port, and it is likely that these
cattle were unimproved Devos. After-
ward the colonies reveI cattle from
Denmark, New Netherlands and Holland;
some of them escaped, established them-
selves in favorable environments, and, re-
verting to a common type, with perhaps
some mixture of buffalo blood, they be-


came the wild cattle of our Western
plains. It was not until the year 1760
that the historical period of pure-bred
beef cattle began. It is claimed, however,
that the type of cattle from which Short-
horns descended, existed on the Yorkshire
estates of the earles and dukes of North-
umberland for a period of 00 years before
this date. During this time no herd books
had been established, and blood lines were
known only by word of mouth and sundry
traditions. Coates' Herd Book of Short-
horn Pedigrees was the first record to be
published, and that in the year 182, or
about sixty years after the written rec-
ords were begun. This first volume of the
English herd book was made from mem-
oranda of cows showing great excellence
and variation from the common type, so
that in time any animal not tracing to this
foundation stock, could get no place on
its pages. With the way made plain by
Mr. Coates and Shorthorns, record books
were later started for the cattle which
are now the three other principal beef
breeders, namely, Herefords, Aberdeen,,
Angus and Galloways. In the development
of these four breeds, it is fortunate that;
there was opposition, for the battle be-
tween them resulted in much good to all
of them. A common object-the produe-
tion of beef, was in view, but had it not
been for the rivalry in filling the demand
of a common standard of the beef type,
some of the breeders might have been
ruined by putting pedigrees, fashion and
taste, ahead of utility, dollars and cents.
"The first point observed in an ideal:
animal is his form. It should approxi-
mate the rectangular; the body compact,
broad and deep; the head broad and well
filled between the eyes, short from the;
eyes to the mouth, the latter wide, with'
wide, well-opened nostrils; the whole head
lean cut, and well set on a moderately
short neck; the shoulders sloping, chest
wide, ribe well sprung and compactly
covered with flesh. Along the back the
most valuable meat is found, and here
should be the greatest width and depth of
flesh. The hips and rump wide and well
covered to the tail head; 'the fesh of the
hindquarters carried well down to the
hocks; legs short, straight and set well
outside the body; a coarse, fleshy bead
'and thick meaty throat indicate low qual-
fty. The skin should be moderately loose.
thick and covered with a plentiful growth
of hair. This description applies to the
beef steer.
"Passing from the general beef type, we
will briefly examine the breeds.
Shortherns are ravrit.
"As previously mentioned, this breed
was the first to be pedigreed in England
and they are yet the favorites there, for
they not only make beef for the Smithfleld
markets, but outnumber ersies in Eng-
lish dairies.
"Likewise, they were the first improved
cattle introduced in America. Having been
used for many years on the wild ranges of
the West, the other breed coming later
gained popularity by use on eows already
widened, reined and made good milers.
by previous infusion of the Shorthorn
blood. They are also the heaviest of the
beet breeds, mature bule in show form


often weighing ,700 pounds, and cows
2,00 pounds. These weights are extreme,
ad without high quality are objection-
able. Their color is more variable than
any breed-it may be red or white or a
mixture of these. Roan is the one color
never produced, except by blood of this
breed. The horn is short, curved forward,
and often downward. In the bull, a eret-
ed neck, showing great sexual power and
prepotency; backs wide and long. The
hindquarter is its special treveteristle,
having the reputation of carrying the best
of any breed, the line of the thigh being
nearly straight from tall head down. The
weak points of the Shorthorns are a ten-
dency to long legs and undue prominence
of hip bones. These weaknesses are over-
come by their fine milking qualities.
"The Scotch sort developed by Crulk-
shank, Marr and Duthie, which are short-
legged and blocky, with great scale and
substance, are early maturers. The won-
derful adaptability of the breed, and ts
value in crossing with every other, has
made it so popular that there are now
150,000 registered Shorthorns in the Uni-
ted States.

"In weight they are about the equal of
Shorthorns. The extreme weights to which
Shorthorns frequently attain are rare, but,
generally speaking, there is practically no
difference. Hereford color is always red
with white face, and usually top of the
neck, dewlap, belly, feet and brush of
tail This arrangement is not absolute.
Their ears are usually red or, spotted,
with sometimes spots on the face, but
this is objectionable, except perhaps around
the eyes. Time was when their faces
were gray. Occasionally a white or spot-
ted calf is dropped which is known to be
pure, but they are likely to bring on dts-
cussion among breeders. In form Here-
fords are close to the ground, broad and
stylish; they have god eonstitut a,
heavy backs and loi; smooth over hook
bones, and carry a tremendous amount
of flesh of fine quality. It is sometimes
claimed that they lack scale sad size, but
both thee defects hae been greatly im-
proved during the past twenty-fie years.
As a breed, they are s e nerally dis-
tributed than brthoers, there being ia
the United States at present about 70,0

-"These cattle are al solid black in color
and have no horns, eve srs not being
dmissible. They follow in the extreme
the barrel shape, so much sought in the
beef type-low set, compact, symmetrical.
Their heads ae characteristic of the high
quality behind them, and are surmounted
by a high poll, which they use with great
effect in Aghting. They do not attain the
weight of the Shorthorns and Hereforda,
but are strong, prepotent and get about
75 per cent. of polled calves from horned
cows. The milking quality of this breed
has been neglected, but they are, everthe-
less, becoming popular, and there ame now
about 40000 in the UniTed tates.
Gsleway.
"Many people mistake these for the A.-
gus, as they are s mch alike; they are
very similar in farm, dolor and bhrnale-
ass,e but their origin is ditareat, and the


TM ROOMD 13 TM OM3AMO3 IM TAX=










14 THE I WENLT IJ[NPU8'tXJL&1 RUCOB).


hair .' tbe aOslory i long, wavy or
bsggy, and their hMes are used to make
robes mee the buald became extent.
The bulls ae good deborners, they make
god feedme, but betig adapted to hig
altitudes ad very old weather, they will
O Jlw alf j Snk)y oithid in Florida.
"n makg the forgoing descriptions
I have med Informatio obtained from
aYgt ot pr winning speimens, from
a- r- ets in the Breeder's Gaaette,
sa ftr aUbttk No. 3, laseed by the
bWgan atd animal inutry of the United
Stlt Dqpmwtert of Agriculture, entit-
le, A msima Brede of Beef Cattle. It
would bewW for every man owning cattle
to wArD for the buladt,which may be
oai-AM by abritag D. Samhon,
Ches f D reiau, Washliton, D. C.
"M.- Wlit tdl e sid that in order
to si i blds.' as breeder must know
wLat fit o a sml he wants to buy or
brbe If bUihig let him much rather
put hiis Mn ons good animal, than
to *o three ltnfeitr oes. In seleetingi
a -tWi he sheM caoud*:
-J. Idivldual exellece
oodme tof sire and dam.

"4. Whetethe ull selected is strong
where the ows t be mated are defielent.
". Tht his dam should have been a
l pilker ad ood broede.
'. Attentioni ai good management
are a h dly mmeary; never pamper
and neer starve.
"7. StLck to y*r godm animals in bad
thibI thei ae'*plesome to look at, and


A q*Wl diemlar of the paper fol-
lowed Mr. Rooe wanted to hear some
4I-p In- n tlernce to what -ind of
tta- as better dnptad to the florida
mrr, and which vas the preferable breed
to erap wfth the Florida cows.
psseid st citskll spoke for some time.
He clim4 that mo interested party could
ihe a fair and impartial answer to the
qa- tion as to whieh was the bet cow.
eosqm he aiM, pReferred Shorthorns and
otbhe wO prefer other reeds. He ad-
vised sated..Pw.-. to ake the breed of
their hIdWnai choice, and take good care.
Ina As-mI .the saberl situation an
hnW00n .i ,er. Mr. G. Murphy of
Besraltm ,6 claimed that the common
farmer was the worst eemy the general
stock idustyr knew. He also claimed
atk i a- ripetl ia itry was als
Ia ie ]e aestanded that there
was W mwy a he'mIMe. in cattle on
*the 7e3. He argei that If a man in-
vested 10000 ti 1900 head f cattle, after
a year's ta be would id a loss. But
he expected and hoped for a beneficial
change in the future by the cultivation of
better graseb for stock by fencing. He
gave his experee as a butcher, and
aid tat these who bought beef would
aot buy the ra-gefed Florida cow, and
tat there must be an Improvement upon
the serb cow. Mr. Murphy threw a great
del of originality into the character of
-4i3- rki which impressed what be had
Supon his hears.
r. Muphy wasted legislation to either
fore the man wit a potato patch to fence
it or copel te stock growers to fence
their cattle. O ar he other, he said,
must be doeM. In dling he asked way
it was th1f the man from the North, t e
West aad tip AtB never invested Ia eat-

tie r 6Uhw on htes san
thiey mdl wrow nthg a time lad to


save their lives; but they appeared to
have too much seme to invest in scrub at-
tle.
In answer to a question as to grasses,
Mr. Murphy contended that what was
known as lake grass was the best, and
that it was the grass for mitch cows, an
well as beef cattle.
Mr. George W. Hopkins, of Michigan,
spoke adivsedly of the cattle indirtry.
He believed that Florids was a good teld
for cattle, and that with the proper meth-
ods this is destined to be a great stock-
rowing State. He has had experien in
Florida, and gave the convention the val-
ue of his experience with certain methods.
He spoke of the poor Florida soil, and ex-
pressed the belief that the best land in
Florida was under water. He believed
that the digging of ditches would be a
great thing for the State. Mr. Hopkins
is the gentleman who is main an effort
to drain Lake Washington.
There were other short talks before an
| adjournment was reached at 5 o'clock.
Previous to the meeting of the conven-
tion Z. C. ehambli had on exhibition in
front of the Board of Trade building.
three head of young cattle from his Pal-
metto Stock Farm.
One was a thoroughbred Shorthorn bull,
another a thoroughbred heifer of the same
breed, and a three-quarter bred Shorthorn
steer. The animal were only a little
over a year old, but their weight com-
pared favorably with that of the Florida
3-year-old. The three were magnificent
specimens and the stock-growers took a
decided interest in them.
The steer was butchered Wedneeday
by the Florida Packing Company and the
beef was placed on exhibition Thursday.
Thralay's Prceei&af
Some very interesting papers were read
during the sessions held Thursday. The
following papers will be published later in
the Industrial Record:
"The Packing Industry," by Mr. F. P.
Qonroy.
"Baby Beef," by Mr. Irving Welch.
S"Southern Gradee," by Hon. C. M.
Tracey, of Washington.
"Feed for Stock," by Prof. C. M. Con-
ner, of the University of Florida, LAke
City.
Invitation from Brunwice
Colonel Goodyear extended an invitation
to the convention to meet at some future
time in Brunswick. He wanted a meet-
ing in Georgia, and another in Alabama.
J A. Hollomon spoke in favor of the
suggestion of Colonel Goodyear. He spoke
of the efforts made to create interest in
Southeast Georgia, and of the interest in
the growing of good stoek. He thought
that the selection of the next annual meet-
ing should be deferred, pending invita-
tions from other towns in the section of
country embraced by the association. He
favored Brunswick, but suggested that the
selection of a place for the next meeting
be referred to the executive committee,
and that the committee consider invita-
tions from other cities.
President Gaitskill expressed the
thought that the association had been
too narrow in considering the territory.
He referred to the fact that the mem-
bers of Florida had not been looking
abroad. This, he said, was the result of
enthusiasm and not of seolshaess.
On motion of Captain Rose the sug-
gestions outlined by J. A. Hollomon were
adopted by tle convention.
Mr. Irving H. Welch read the report of
the committee on reeolttr os, as follow* :


TMireft we"kTo AIt ~ VW Ima


Comlta emuintaes.
, "Whereas, An adjrned meeting of tis
association will convne in Tampa, Fa.,
on the first ay ad February, for the pnr-
pose of e vdaring y ad a m a for
the betterment of the iudnstry, the
strengthening of Ute orgoalenthb for the
mutual protection of its members, aad for
such other buaras a my be dAemed
expedient,
"Resolved, that eah member of this or-
ganisation is hereby instructed to se his
undivided iinuuee in promoting the msn-
eess of the Tamp meeting, and to assist
in having as many cattle growers and in-
terested parties present on that oesas-
ion as possible, whether members of this
association or not, it being understood
that this shall be an open stock growers'
meeting for the general good of the cause.
BDard sf Tra-d T ksl
"Resolved, that the Southeastern Stock
Growers' Association in annual convention
assembled in the Board of Trade auditori-
um, Jaeksouville, Fl., do most sincerely
appreciate the courtesy and hpitality of
the Board of Trade in again donating the
use of its commiodios auditorium for the
sessions of this association, and hereby de-
sire to express our grateful thanks for the
same; and also to thank the entertainment
committee of the Board of Trade for the
very pleasant automobile ride and other
courtesies so heartily extended.
Bouuet fr Osiakit l
"Resolved, That we do most sincerely
thank President Gaitskill for hfs unselish,
wise, energetic, able and prduent manage-
ment of the business of this association
during the past year, and hereby pledge
him our earnest support in the continua-
tion of his work.
To Mr. C -mblis.
"Resolved, That this association feels it-
self under greatest obligation to Mr. Z.
C. Chambliss, of Marion County for the
splendid object lesson he has presented in
bringing to this meeting young animals
bowing the superiority of pure-bred ovel
native stock, and also a grade yearling
steer which ha been slaughtered, and dem-
onstrates clearly the possibilities of pro-
duction of a superior quality of beef in
Florida, and we desire to express our
thanks to Mr. ChambiHs for his intelli-
'ent efforts for the betterment of the live-
stock industry in the State.
Thanks to sps ars.
"Resolved, That our thanks are due to
he distinguished speakers who have con-
tributed their own instructive and inspir-
ing paper which have been listened to
with profound interest, and which must be
productive of great good, and we commend
these articles to the careful study of ev-
erybody interested in the industrial de-
velopment of Florida.
"Resolved, That this association ex-
oresses its hearty thanks to the press for
its serivees in assisting the association
in advertising the time and place of meet-
ing, and to the Times-Union for its com-
prehensive and accurate report of the
proceedings of this convention."
Eletti- f OetsE.
.The election of offers for the ensuing
vear was next in order, and the nominst-
ing committee made the following report:
President-. Gtskill, of Melntosh.
Vice-Preidedt-G. Mu phy, of Braiea-
town.
Secrtary-I. . W db of Jacksonville.
Treasurer-U. A. LJghtsey, of Bartow.


AMVIL RYI
Guaranteed 4
gallon, 2J.


year old. y the
4 full quarts, OL


CLIFFORD RYT
By the gallon, L 4 ful quart


OLD zmTuCir CORN
Guaranteed 8 years old. By the
gallon, $3.00. 4 full luarts $M

OLD POINTER CLUB CORN
Guaranteed 4 year old. By the
gallon, p50. 4 full quart. S,75

We handle all the lIsdiag brands
Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in their m
ket and will save you from S pe sead
to 50 per cent on your purchases. led
for price lt and atalogue. Mailed
upon application.

TiAlyIS&FhitL.rCsL
So6-sol-sIo-si Fourth Stret,
MACON GEORGIA.

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Bet in tbe We4d.
For delivered Oies web
Cyrews T-h Ce.. N8MuJAf

KNABE & EMEL.SON

PIANOS.
Sad is Pas a.d Terms
JA.s A. ABRANS.
Ael 2&mL aIs ofVnd Igfla&


Mr. Welch positively declined for ld-
nem reaons and nominated J A. ido-
mon.
President Gaitkill stated that he had
made up his mind to decline to serve the
asoeiation in the capacity of premddUnt
bt snee he was urged to accept the po-
sition for another year, he would do so
Mr. Hollomo again declined re-dlte
as secretary and moved the adoption d
the report of the committee. The motm
was put by Captain Bose ad u ama mai y
prevailed.
The convention theu adjoure to mrt
in Tamps blsrury 14.


The Oldest Whiskey


House In Georgia.
(EdablNsed In dS.)


OLD 8ARPS WILLIAMS
Guaranteed 8 years od. By tlw
gallon, *.L0 4 ftl srts, ag.

GO. J. COLEMAN R T
Guanteed 6 yar old. By the
gallon, p.75. 4 full quarta, Sw
ZZPMM P"Pel











SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY
Wayeross, Oa.
MANUPAOTUMNIS OFP

Freight and Caboose Cars,
Brass and Oray Iron astieUs.

CAPACITY: TEN CARa~Pt3RDY.


tag. o4baet magaSl* iw.le W1t A -
tl~lillm ill,'!lll IMoowN


112 WEST FORSYTH ST. BELL PHONE NO. 592
HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY
A. J. HEDILICK. Manaeor. Formerly of *Hodrek A Aley

0i wB tr shUesad aio g
atrm L eei >ZMBM= p ropey Mar =iTavestment.
MONEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVLSTOILS.



Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Adrtrismlnts WAbe seruted As ra aspartmen at at A sWewdagMateas:
Por oner wOeek, elas a e.
roor two wooe a coseatUse.
or thee weeks. Sm t a Iae.
For tour weeks., oest a ime.
Nine worse of ordinary lenth uake o Mae.
ariT csUt a- two Ins.
No l I except te headlogs eabe admitted.
a-lttum to afopea tie. ordea. No tr u fr eol r
mtaldgadv mntt. Ooor lurt be in thi ost* nt l.0cm usE 1t
undie to Moanur lin 'aW iy ir


W sted.
To buy a stat-ioes itr-el lo-ae ls
a in WI pay ts r2ht pdi for
th rit p N. o lat wood pesr u
appy. A. ottway, Box laoy,

PeaiMa Wasted.
A asitia stiller, very best referenee
lahd Addreu 8. F. Johnson, Mur-
phy. Fla. 4t

Fr SaIe.
Small turpentine location. Can work
about ten or twelve rops with about
four hundred aeres round timber already
secured. Also one thousand acres b
box timber secured. Plenty of round tim-
ber available to still for four or Bve
e cutting. Address T. M. Kelly,
Btck, Ala tf
AhL tf
Am you reading yer pap, or ame-
m l If not a saeriar to ths ns-
e, M-d t' y ur am today, wit $3.0,
rth o oad oameeriptis for me year.


Posltle Wasted.
Position a oodaman, Gorgia or Flor-
iids. Have fai)y. UCn giv rertso.
H. V. Jeffords, Bloon, Ga.

Wasted.
A distiler. We wuat a goo obr
man with family, to ra the srtB iamth
season. Oan give etedy s emle t
through the winter. Nm Oudeedy brt
frst-M ma with good lriim. AA-
dres F. & W, Jo bo, P. tt

Turpeatlae Men.
Buy a Blekslse GasCol Pnie 0t-
ft for your till No. 1 N ett I pin Ma
gallons pr hour at a eost of d and
Started i J. P.

Wasted.
A commissary man who is competent
to keep books. Must be sober, reliable,
industrious. Refereaces required.
Address- H. A. HODGES,
1833 Main St, Jacksonville, Fla.


McMURRAY & BAK(ezR,


I Va~ulsim.Ai swayo.
Iin.0 ub" Wood san Aem tslre we save a &~s. pm,..
w t~ rCInI" WIM N11. Ywamdn s %aWW a ZI.'*
Cie W heaamboaasWorldanbad- MOM


JACKSONVLMLE, FLA.


J.osPh D. C risUe, Bas, u*t A5nt
Rmo o m a. "3 .,4Io -w r,
TeIheaeno.455.
I you want to locate Ia florld und eatemplate gi.e tit ba it -a
help you. If you have a busine to sell, list same ith m.














Wbolesale DriEs I CosmiasmrySplls
we aollet the Tint. and *I T P mwAbe *t u a n es
anything the drug *l].. mk 41d ii y
money. Mail orders anx give prompt atsI

D. G.- MTHKrANrP% P ALRM= A. lWMIWAPL LI UL N.



Pin Prtoduct -Cowi

Fayettevlle. N. C.
fpirita of TurpenuMeb 00 st Tar. Creeote. Tar.
Prets 2ereasm. TMIm or sielLm eism sdmd.
No dPeasr rom Ore. Peat meteod empltot a ssen t:SeaU tWe W -M 6
thr tuformUatLo. wutt A Mired Matmsh. umeri o- ma ill C.

i ~ ~ "W0 i>Mniii miii im o>------
Weald a TWpA V. ^_"W 10OW

Throw your eyes for a minute oa the following
locations: 4,400 acres round timber-4 years
lease 16 crops 4th year; 5 crops 3id year
boxes; 1 crop 2nd year boxes. $27,400-A
PICKUP. Or, 7,200 acres, of which 3,000 acres
in round timber; 5 crops 1st year boxes; 63
crops 2nd year boxes; 7% crops 3rd *ad 4th
year boxes. *26,000-A SNAP.


am IL re W.FeMG ^ C O
----BROBSTON, FE-- G&- -O.

Ia ...... f..I..


IF YOU AR PROGRR88VU, ADVERTISE IN THE RECORD.








16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BBCOR).


THE

Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville.
WUITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
Caal sa urpls ............................... 45o,0000aa
=- *a.= .............. =....... . ....... = o,--o
In addition to our reFlar bakin biness, we maintain a Savings Dept-
meat, mder govermaent supervision, paying interest quarterly.
We have for rent Safe Deposit Boxes in burglar and fireproof vaults at rea-
sonab rates, by mouth or year.

C. H. HARGRAVES CO..

WHOLESALE GROCERS
Grain. Hay. Feed
Spoeell attention to Turplntine and Sawmill Men*' Requiroamnts
A FLORIDA riM rOR Frs-OWDIAgr S
514-51516-5 -520-522-524-526 EAST BAY s j L .
Jacksonville, Fla.
GEORIA INITE-STATE SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
lin-la Caomtwi PIdo List for Memhatable Rules Io Adepte at WTift
e. Qor, Julyis, go+.
Feet Fret I Fest beet I Fet Feet FVt Fe Fee t Feat
SEIZB MA 21-2 340 l3.] -0 4146 4J4-541 651. 5 40 61-J
1 fUo to X0lo... vi8i '9l SMt0aW3s s&0o0sete6e "-3V Uw0 0b6490
%sx10 to 10 .... '1.0 1&50 130 14.00 1650 17 30 20.0 .00 S 35.-00
8%xlo to It10.... 5 13.00 1M.00 10 16.50 1860 21.00 40 .00 37.00
1 4l2 to 2x12.... 14.00 10 1&.50 1.00 21.00 24.00 32.0W JM 3o00 40.00
2%x1s to x12. ... I.O la 13. 0 14la 1 laU6 0 1.00 24t O s oo0 3 43.00
10%xl to I1212.... 1350 14.00 1560 17.0 19.50 .50 30o0 J u0 4o00
1 x14 to 3t.... 1.. 19.00 oo 00 2 .00 24oo .0 7.0 3.0 37.00 44.0 67.
3%4x14 to 1214... 14.0 164 0 13&00 20.50 22.00 .0 800 320 40.00 .00
12%x14 to 144.... 15.60 17.00 19.00 21.00 23.00 3300 30.00 34.0 4.00 66.00
1 xls to 4x... Sa. M .0V 94M 0 27.0 31.00 34.0 3&0 42.0 M t0 0.M
4%xl to 12O.... u19.O .M00 25.50 2A.0 1 30 631 0 43.00 o.00
12%x:1 to 10l416.4.. 13.0 0.50 23.00 26.50 30.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 50.00 0.00
2 xlO to 18.... So.0 6.0 30 31.0 3500 00 3.00 43.00 48.0 0.00 7&.00
6%x1 to 14x18.... r1.00 00 200 9.00 33.00 37.00 4100 41.0 00 I7.00 0.00
14%x18 to 10r .... 2o 04.00 M .00, 38.00 34.00 38O 4L00 4&M 000.00 74.00


Trns: -Met Cash.
P & are F. 0. 3L Cure Savsnask 11runswick, lernauita and Jackoulevo


-3.
At k mSuisq of the.Goiga Interstate
Baw Mill Asocation, held at Jacksoaville,
Fl., Marh 1 16, the following Clasi
oestS and &RUl for I ectOb of Yela
low Pino were 0c1ally adopted, effective
July 1, 1304:
saisetnad -4 sptls. of Yedalw
wo al )RaW-AH lumber mat be
sound, won sanufatured, fan to im amd
saw batted; free from unound, loose and
hollow knhta wem ad knot hols;
thron shako r round hakes that
show the surfa; auare dge, unle-
othrwi sapeeled. A through Oak* is
hereby deodad to be thr or e-Meted
from aide to ide or edg edg or id
to edg. In the mesremaent of dreaed
lumber th width sad theknass of the
lumber befem dreaming mat be taken;
L-he ta m inhe thishall be measured
as, ee ine .


Flooring shall embrace four and lre
carter inh in thil es by three to
i as in width. For example: 1x3,
4, and 6; 1%x4, 4, and &
Beo a a sall ambrae all thiekmee
nder om and a half inhes by seven
incs and up wide, including one and a
r mmple: %, 1, 1% and 1% iches
tk by. indA and up, wide.
santlig sll uembras n ll s from
two to leM i s in thick and two to
sixd ts in width. For example: 22,
2t&, 2-, 2t x, 3x 3, 3k k 4xn4,
4xl 4, lxi and 6xL
Plak.
Plank Sln mbrace an sis fom om
and one-half to mix inchb in thickness.
not indwding as inches by seven ineh
and up in width. For example: *'1b, 2,
!%.. 3%, 4. 4%, 6 %, h6zx ines
and up in width.


Dimension sies shall embrace all d l
8 inches and up in thiekaes by seven
inches and up in width, including six by
six. For example: 64,7 Tx7 7x, S
iand up

Stepping shall embrace on to two and
a half ine in thickness by seve inches
and up in width. For ammmpo: 1, l%,
1%, 2 and 2%x7 and up, idt
Ruon de or it a t
Rough Edil or Flitch shall em irae sU
is. one inah and upin thiek by eight
inches and up in idth, awed oa two
aides only. For exa ~le: 1, 1%, 3, 4
and p thick by eight e and upid
sawed on two sides nly.

INSPCTION.

All lumber shall be nd, amp no ob-
jectio. Wane may be allowed oe-eigth
of the width of the pae meured aems
face of wane, ex'ndug m-fourth of the
length on ane corner r its eqalvalent as
two or more scorers
Ml-arha abl4
All size under aim inches shall ow
heart entire length om sie or edge;
ie nine iohes and over hall how
heart the entire length om two opposite
sides. Wane may be allowed oe-elghth ef
the width of the piece measured are
face of wane, and extendig one-fourth of
the length of the pieeo ao om ern or
its equivalent on two or more erorm

Santling shall show heart Os two feem
the entire length; other a hall how
two-third hart entire let on two
opposite sides. On not exeedig I per
cent. of the pieces, wane may b allowed
one-eigth of the width of the pies m s-
ired acrou face of wane a exteding
one-fourth of tie length of the pies on
one corner or its equivalet oa two or
more 'ners.


McMILLAN BROS.,

florida Copper Works.


Turpentine Stills

Old still@ taeis in o*gs fot r
: new wn. uipdntzs thm--
Strya a.pedalty i i miler
or wire will rmedve prompt att.tn,
at either of thie swvail works:
r AYETTEVILL. A. C SAVANMAI. 6A.
Mlomou ALA. AuL OVVIEL rA.
I **in. ***.as. sllloagmle ase ***** 1a11 a m. .....i

RL. ALL., Pre. T C..HALL, V.P. and Mgr. L. J. Krxer, See. and Tres.

MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND
TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.
Whie Yei Am b c-sl *te A t--- P't

WOLFE'S EUROPEAN HOTEL.
Mery irde Sa Wnrests.
RatsU"e. 0Ie ma stAper sv. myt" Clm t Refsurant In Coneteon. J. KL WM. MoMsIer
WA- L M LE WER as on-
W. J. LEGL. J. W. WAD. .UGHC,
SPsredeat. Vieo-PrmdMen. Sey satuT


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBLE, ALA. PBNSACOLA, PLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
.. Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


W. Mtn". pasisi.
P. U.. PuACIOCX, le V. PF


J- I. ELAIRR 6i V. Pres. .L I. RzonInDo. See. & am.
W. J. KNILY. 3A V.-P. M E. W "LIM. Anst sejfr.wu.


Peacock-Hunt & West Company,
emeral Ofmlees: 20 Ny Street, EC SLvamun4l O&" ad
West dilaL JIaeksseav, Fla.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are srietly Factor Our interest and the producer' is mutual We
never take to count, nor ar e interest in any company that buys spirit
Turpentine d rodn)

WHOLESALE GROCERS,

Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Cgopees' T ad iNaval Stores Hardware Our Sa eatt
--BOLE AGENTS FOI -
The Celebrated Unlen Turpentlne Axes and Wisean Ghlids'
PhIadelpHla Wage.
Naval Stmrs Receved at Savawnbnal, mGa a ad Jiksanvl
-d remain, Ftm.


I YOU ALM AoD u vW, MD200 8M








THE WNMKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
im


mm


Industrial Record's Department of Information


This department conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertising patrs of this paper and no
charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, a
yo may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attentions

1m Tirn.nos..0mUaFem r nroowm e.al .ri o. W Smn. roWr "mber. FeksW a r L.ei..
DATW INDUSTRIAL RBOOGD. Jaersole Ms.
hIMe AHL RXOOD. Malm moo, Jsacsonvff, r. 1I m the t et for oltfor the puMow. o
t the okt for the fo0owt Pref.er in Stte of Plege pUt m- Wn-mnicaUo
with responohn prts" am i m me oiter Iformation.

steme N*el whm so mea ob seeured.





InSDWAi x MBOOm Jasehmovroe, oo moa
PIe advise the mdOeeglrnm regarding a good looatioa in (iatte or .eekon of
taeo) for In the market fe
tegener with ft tafoMrma about labor eoaditlUm. taxe, tuasMroatom faeelitle
leeal earaemeI eta
P _Pltease ve me iformaonm as to bet plaes to by. atse.



s Vyem Wesr to Se nammami? Ar YTo T10" ef Sema?

INDU-eTIAL mUo JaMnomvtle, at INDUSTRIAL REOORD, Jadmomvflle. Ma.
mave Or oal the fewt can you *give y itmformao as to the reliablty of t fellowlaE fEm or oerpors
tdo
Remarks
asa yes soges a przebemer?



Ye Weat to E0e "o a M1m? -a t. ea
DATI
DAT D
I DUSMarLA Oc leJlanrte, ra. *m INDUSTRIAL RPO1O JaMksrvlle, la.
Wan a man to a te pos of Wara a poaitamn
with me f.eowimg ml. imenws B eer to the tolow
aaa-U
Cn o0 EES M a I Can you amb I

I .


CLIP THIS COUPON !
TO ALL READERS OF TH RECORD
VWhe yeV a ea-wraing an ed.fti..mnt iro1m the a luiam of this par, whether you ae making anm l y p incgi a Olmmsm 'E th o psM
bel d adash t t e the Item. It wlU py you.
Uca-


COUPON.
Your adve ime t was seen in ta o Indm efal eoo ed, issue d tV l
manso

The IMDUSTRIAL RXCOOD of Jaeksonvie, Is., and Savanuah. GL. i the Soth's great
weekly trade Journa.


.The Record taken a personal inter est in every Reader and

Advertiserand in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.

no .m wW",, ZA n Znm


.3-







is ERWEKL IDUSRIL ECRD


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
AOCKSONVILLE. PLA.
CAAL S3 OmOO SURPLUS ad UMNIVID)ED PROFTS S300M
We H %am Om C ate Depolt. wMI traw nteest at of r =at 5 aftr
1W-- I1dtraro. o Ntr 1.6jtsaaM(aWfirnri rf


"Kingan's Reliable."
Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry alt Meat. Orders filled at lowet mar-
ket pris. Your patronage is respectfully olicted. See quotations-
thipaper.
KINOAN & CO.. Ltd., B. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
e.


Tahet A. Pent,
President.
The Central


O**. H. Pond,
Vice-Pres.
National


P. L. Watoam,
Cashier.
lank of Ocala


OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITAL, $50,000.00.
Dnaeoma: B. L. Anderson .& Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
MeKay, Geo. H. Ford. Hetbert A. Ford.
Acaunta o Turmutmn Operato and Saw Mill Men Slicited.

ng*ggun11lug i* *ll lllgg gg g

The Wire Virgin Gum Co.,
I anw ready to gireou all the information you may want meo ng the
WIY wW are w gWthet g virgin gum from high boxes By the mu of a
tie liup pt aup elq to th etippi and so arranged to aue the gum to
strike wire and follow mm down to the box, not striking the faee of the
tree. Wire is fastemed am by two small nails, one t above the lip ad
St other at ppr edg of the oldbox, and stretched tight so a to keep.
gum ham from i off, thereby making virgin gum and more of it. There
are may best ad bg pay where parties can get a good many high boxes.
lo ther fmatio write to
S THE WIRE VIRGIN GUM CO.. TIFTON. GA.
a mlel lam s a0 0 0 itm *m*m ****l I

The WestsRaley-RannIe Company.
114 W. wrayth Street, Jacksovlle, Fla.
A. n. W E. ftrs. Z. Wet. rVice-Pre. .. I. R. f Vicef-Pr. X. V. les", Sec. u Tr"ss.

We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.
mmpuuu4~-lmumlmul u~mmI....l....e...e~a~*~Ot


AL A. EiJG. Predlent.
IL0 C ooL aI Visme-Preniest.


HOMER BBOWN, 2nd Vice-Presdent.
J..C. MDONALD, See'y ad Treas.


W, H. Briggs Hardware Co.
VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-

RIXFORD AXES.
rey are the BEST. Others imitate but none do-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the finest
temper, hold the keenest edge. out better and last longer *
than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual me.
Seed as yowr orders.
W. I. BR16GS HARDWARE COMPANY,
Valesl Geergis.
-_------- -


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.

Boilermaking and Repairing
g Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
SJscklonville, Fla.
******88s800sass808 s aI100 ssI0 I o**** dies ** 88

Fuel and Building Material.
The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, aa and Blacksmith Coalme, Comes, C at ek, PBri
Foot Hogan St, Jacksonvile, Fla.

Cummer Lumher Co.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES and CRATES.
**tat**************************ndard Cloth*******e
i Standard Clothing Company I


One Price


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
v7 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacoavle, ReiLe.
8temoa and Nawes Hats. Speelal Attenite Otwe teo all Ordrs.


5000 50065 5e5 ~sO S5 S 55 5 5S 5 5


9 59 09 09 9 09 9 59 9890 59 5


- m -


R, TOLAR.


. H. HART. T. H. BLAOHLY.
(EUtablished 1872.)


4. TO.LA, Ja


TOLAR., HART & CO.,
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.

Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
IAberal Advances o Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton.. Members of Nw
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Ftares.


JOSBPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. 1 KENK


J. D. WEED I CO.,
SAVAEIIAU.-GMORLIA.
Wholesale Hardware,
Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, G1ue, Battlis, Etc.

Read the Record Adv't's.


2M3 00 15 = T0133.RAZOUI"0BLh


THRC WEIMY nMDUSTMAL 2 310ORD.


18











TH WEUMMY 1jjr4JnJBMAL RHOORD. 1


Buyers' Directory

These ailverare in this hemss 1f
yea wes ss7tib lbc dwnah thi
shus"" at end Write to th km apo-
-r tlri The Namd -ru~
~)~ .. I M R N g aat e
a -rft ""Pam


ReAlty MAt and 1ut Cs.





0000" hak11 (N, 1k.
NinMMO 12nk, JaalaNvll, Flk.
Natio Ban off Ja kwavar
-OI AND cHAS.
Comm Iumber o Jf afesvlk, Uk.


Vm110 Dim OapNy i Thq, Jaibsa-

CAMI
mIsb Atlua nti t a & Nmmimatuu Ci,
CLOTHH&
Br4. J. A. Jedmnvilkls 1M.
006. A, Jaebaomyi% Fl.
Sbka~rd Clofthn CIL. Jackesvilie, P16
CW0TjxI-WW(WwsAVIU
Kahn, VrF at@ & CoL, Jaakenvile, Fl.

.ah AyNow York City.
LIem, K. W.Ne York Otft.
Tour art &1, U 5w York at.
CORVEYAJcING.
- 2r0lt T"a *a Trot M



Fkl
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jumas, Jadmisswle 1k

DRY 6OOUS.WRAY lItr
Vovboo n Min JeckasaiL, 1koo

jmk&: - - ~ n

Owls a of. no., Jaibsrne, 1k.
RINGERM
Lombard Lrm Wrks & a 0y An-
mario-Stersm Co., jasns=fk Jim
Uelosids Samn 0o. J. is, Sees., Ga.
-uia Ga.
FGVXDRIES
Murby T. Jdamrr11%yu
ihll Ji nvilla, Na
IlwalSm CID. J. K. Mass Ga.

semtras lad & s"94y O.. TMm, Jac-


GEII vuuwmuwm*

rtu~adr CIeotrn Co.Jbackilk, 1k.
r~~~ CLN RHNI a LrP I




= A ., A.wa ekilla.Fl
Ok. N., Jeuwoill% Fla, a
QMOK C111.J ddomvw AI
tYZQDL. BL. Jackasawik, PAL
SHunt & Wst 0o., Saransab, as.
ow P L F, xr amh,6 Ce.


WARDWARL.
Saird & 09., L R., Ja~skalshvil1% 1%6
004 ~aW. i.,YlausiasaG.


Nai&a Hadware Co, OmaNa V%.
Tampa Hardware o., 'Talam Ik.
w e a o., J. D., as8 ah Ga.
T Hr" =1
MeMurray & Bakr, Jacksomvfl, 1i.
Thomasr W. B. Gaieovillea,
HATS.
i d Bro., J. A. Jaaouvill Fah
Co., H. A., Jasaovill* Fl6
Standard nothing Co., Jakmsails, 1.
HOTELL
Arag The, Jakaovlls, aJM.
Hol Bahold, N w York City.
IRON WORK
Lombard Iroa Works a Supply o., An-
MImil-oSt, CIO., Jaekmmvill4 lr.
MrpT, TJ, JacksonvilU
'sa M Ba Oa, J. B., Mama, Ga.

Ohemaest &rby O, Jackna villa Mm.
Hem A& Sla.r, Jaia ovia, Fla.
UIQUOR.
Bettelini, I., Jakoarvill, ai
SBha a Co., hab., Jasksaonila, 1*.
lHamn Bros., Jackaorlld, la.
Altmayer & Flatan Lquor Co., Macon, Ga.
MKAICimmX
Spmar xNdicas o., Cwhatta a, Tt n..
Southern M.mnf*oturi CO., Ja aill,
k.
Fla.
MAPS.

MACNBIN WORKS.

Murphy, T, Jackaavill, h.
ae,'a Bar Co., J. ., Msem, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR auurAhbIs PRO-
B8S
ShoeUd's Sos Co., J. ., Maeom, Ga.
MEAT&
Kaad &O C0., Jadwkrvifll, l.L
MTAL RKBaL
Baker, A., Bramwiek, Ga.
MuMllan Bro., BSava.h, Ga.
MILL SUPPIE.a
Briggs Hardware Co, W. H., Valdostsa Ga
Marion Hardware CO 00a1, k.
SchoaMld' BSar C., J. ., Mamm, G&.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fl
MULES AND ORSES.
Thomas, W. ., GainaTvlls, la.
MAIL. -
Balm Nail CO, New York City.
XAVAL STORES.
Bara.Ju-mp CO, The, Jacsarvill, FI.
Consolidated Naval Stone 0O), Jackass-
vil* Fi1.
Ellio-Youag O., The, Sarvanah, Ga.
lnualpamdot Naval S0ies a"d Ezprt CO,
JackaTrnifls, 1la.
Psmoak, Hunt a wst o0., Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stores O., Jacksoaills,
Fla.
UAio Naval Stores o., Mobila, Al a.
PAINTS
Bond & Bours Co., JacksaoVille, f.
PZCANS.
GriMing Broa. O., Th, Jacksoaville, ia.
PHOSPHATE SUPPULIB.
Bri. Hardware 0, W. H, Vae.osta, Ga.
Campbhel, J. F., Oeals, f1a.
Tampa Hardware Oa, Tampa, Fl.
Maria Hardwa 06, OMaS k.

Gilbert, Fred E., Jaekaoville, FP.
Merrill-Btevem O, Jackaorville, Ml.
Seholeld's BoaS O., J. S., MaeoN, Ga.
White-Bsaksme Mfg. Co., Birainghl.

TANK 8TORAGKL
Natioels Task a Export O., Savanash,
GW6
REAL ESTATM.
Beakwith, Headermon & Warren, Tmpa,
Fla.
Brobston, Feadig a Co., Jackonvill, Fla.
Buekniaa, C, Jacksoaville, Fi.
irader, W. W., Ja.kmoaille, lIe.
LMisgtol a BOrs, J. K, OrM,. a.


MORTGAGES. RENT.

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.

Ill W. FORYT STREET. TACSLLWe ILUA



H, A, Renfroe Coo


TAILORS Stetson Hats


Suit to Order at Ready.ade Price Mail Ordes Give Persooal Attention
439 V. Bay Street JACKSONVILLE, PLA.

Si1111|i 11111111 11 111*1 Ill llll lll ll Illa lllll lbl
J. P. WiL r Ai. PrMideat. J. A. G. OAIo. ba t -e iemlot
.i ZdF.u JY. IFEDUcYmX=UFz, t
L. Kosecrtar. D. G. Wdte, Tnamrw.


I J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

f HlvlgU 3 1 U MI W I l1 U M ih L M \

J jmCKGU@IVILU. tLlus" -.
- meane own. VarnIuMa, 0mdomO -
Wrneh Offi-< i m L Fc I .SiSS3.

: Naval Stores Ptders mre lavted to Corespead With Usa.
; l alil111111111111111111 1111ill I li IIllllll llllllli--.






kwIG Inpovd*
Senls" Tu8pumo


wriMt me for wrise and Swats
F.o a.Is. md ~ I G mo m le Rors
Ma. AilM Ia N ] ia t All


country a pecialty.
Work. in Georgia.
wo in Ge.,. 13runswick, Go
r My specialty is large warms and heavy bottoms that do no$ leak


Send your order for general printing to the Record


DOWT IL V.TO M15 211 2; R TO ADY


Soother Stat Lad am Timber Co.
JaEcksboille, r.
Wmi- Ralay-uane Oo., The, JadMk vill,
Il.
SHIP TARDS
Summer Lumber Co., Jakamvflbe, 11.
Merrmin-Stev O, JOak, a vills h.
8HOLS-WVwr. wA m
Covington Co, The, Jackason lle, la.
STZAM8IRn
Clyde Steamship o., Th, New York CIy.
STOCK xROmmRL
Holmes & Co., Hamal P., Jafsavmuflle ,1k.
TAILORi.
TArAXM
Renfroe Cm, HL A., JasIayfile 11..

Cypr Tsnk O, MaoUI, Al
Davis & Soa, G. M., Palatka, 1.
ehodold's Bora 0o., J. I., Mase, Ga
TITLES AD TAX ANSTRACT
Realty Title a d Tert 0o.
TOOLS
Christopher, John G., Jaekiavills. yI.
Council Tool Co, The, Waaisah, N. C
UWPfr S rES APPARAT2 .
Chattasoogs Pottery CO., Jackso ill Ias.
The Wire Virgin Gum Co. Tifton. Ga.


r~uE?*W pm5.n
pius Prao&mat zudlam Co, The Thy-
t#vwih, N. (.
ping Bak Qlfudi & The, alRdgk,
N. C.
Standard Tugpesrn CI. TMO New York
City.

Baker, KI A, Brum 4a.
Mschil earns., Ilva 6 Ga.
-911I 87=L TIMS
Davis & 8a.,0.6 4L, halmh, Fm,
TUWUN!ZNE ViAT
]D&Vi & 800n, 4L K., pmlatka. iM.

(irivot Typewriter Esalmoe, Jsaksiwills.


aurra Baker, Jsek]"MI, VI.
ThomasW&.H, GminY w Itk
WATCH=S
Greenleaf & Crosby CIL. JauhamvlW Mie
Hom A 5le, Jaak)Va!Vlfls. FL.
YELLOW PENR LUU3U
Cuinmr Lumber Co., Ja oBvls. M1
East Coast Lumber Co., WatOertwn JiM


19


THa WEPgLY Inu~lb~IdL B~C~OBD.







30 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
- ---


n ix~~- PC-'r zagm Ia-
wa Con 9 en ad i hitk U&
IW~eoen3116


ELY I MuI IRY,
Couimib~kAn Murchanta
Novai Store & Cotton
a .oesmmWW mseadt d
nuft --e uk sbYkL
CoTYON WCM63OR DUUNIP9,
-E TUS CWT.
Wnn WINGr ADNRI5KR8
-L TRZ k wco


KIRK & JONES
DRUGGISTS.
107 L. WAY ST.
MAIL ORDERS 80LIOITED.
JAOKSONVILL. PLA.

M. W. LARENDON,
Naval Stores
Commission Merchants.
mso, tsaUsy. -W acs,O
m Tsien mE: mr.


Whiskies, Gins,
Rums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
CemtrolUe Blum's Monogram and Syl
van By-Agent for Jnmp, caua-
a ati nd Pabet Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on app)-ation
CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 adl 819 West Bay Street.
JACKSONVILL, fLA.


Trade Checks
FORTH

lAUlWT BEIEU.
THm INDUSTRIAL BRcoRD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply house. in the South
combined.

mstrial Record Co.


H OSOMNIN. Pro& B. GAnXJI..AZD Mas
W. IL OW10N. Vlos.Prde.
Commercial Bank,
Stat Deporwy.
ZieMA; 080 0h. LFoe U N~W
JadwUul - - nerlda


THE CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
IN 619.500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our irat Barrek ho and we p..s the so
wcnt Amcan and Buopen Indpection.

Plan at MEIGS CARO, OUITMAN, GA,
and IOXXnCELLO, FLA.


Ja6 ou -i In mBau


QUITMAN, GA.

II ll 1M IMn lib.
BUILDERS AND DEALSM IN


ENGINES. BOILERS.
Cotton, saw, PFtiuir, O1 uad leo MU-
ahiry, a"d Sppl And Bapsnn.
CAPACITY FORB M HANDS
Ma dhi Too, Wood-Wtokis Machu),.
Shaping, Plleys, Heagb, Iithr am
RAbber BUlting d Ho BRilmA and
Mi Auppe a ud Toos.
PlAun ad Wtinut furnhed for P1r
Plats ad Stel BridaM.
U USA PGmA S Water Reton -d

AUGUSTA. GA.


ii sunm. um sIae sacr 6uusm------------------------


THE DIAMOND

Wines. Liquors and Cigars.
S*le Asen. oe rthe f oU Ae% C. esrrom le the Waelmn ZBnm tam.
0rm Woeer. We owra=*e an Wran.. mum... um r us son fse so.. w


Creme de Ia Creme, bottle .... &.00 Diamond Brand, bottle ........
[ ir, n Ld M** iLni e ] Heart Brand, bott .........
C. C. Brand, bottle ........ 1.4 Spade Brad, bottle ...........
Club Brand, bottle ........... 1.25 Premium Brand, bottle ........


MYERSON CO.,
1os ma r7 Woee ae S.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


.uu1uII~u~uuuuuuuuu.III.II)u


A. S. ENAZTU


VoI Pros.


ra.me


LS
.75
J.
IS


uUIUIIUU III U EU


M& LA98ETEE W. W. STUWLUE
Sew noSow. A. Turu err


Uhe W. B. JOHNSON CO..

Wholesale Grocers


WALTE AT.
T. N. SNARES.


40 0 East mv stress anbee, Ifl
SezcNE:
IL I.3 CAW V
alwamuk P&PH


-------- base SO- .----- --------- ----------

I J. A. Craig (. Bro.
S239 W. BLy Stree- EVIERETT IOCK.

g Leaders in Men's and Bors' Fine Cloth-
S ng and Up-to-Date lrrnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stok in the City.



The Bond & Bours Co.
WmOLsaLe a IUaTrA

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Rlln4s. Paints. Oils and Gleas
Stoves. Tinware, Country-Hollowarw.


SWEnT mAY Srun-r


.e ft OA1VW5
&#Oft -NN Ofi O


Jach -n rl i Flee


Cable Addr. Florida

Standard Naval Stores

Company.
DEALERS IXCLVSIVILY IN

ROSIN

AND TURPENTINE.
Jacksonvill. Fla.


-=ON"


WA UCH





THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 21
wMlt, W. La POWELL; Vi e-Preident who with the President, institute the Directory and Boud of Managers. W. F. (OACBMLAN, ] BUL-
I.ARD, L. COVINGTON, H. A. wiaArfmWMN, JOHN B.YOUNG, J. A. (CANFORD, D. H. McM L.AN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. B. SAUNDERB, C. BROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDEBRON.


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES 4

.. COMPANY..


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA, FLA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.

The Consolidated Is Purely a Cooperative Company. Its
Interests are Identical with those of the Producers. The
Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.

YARDS AT JACKSONVILLE, SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA AND PENSACOLA

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.

Ia tO DwOr ND IT uN TH RCORD WarE Ua.


-^ '








22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(Por the Regulr Retail and Commimry Trad.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 28
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 27
10" .. 284
A. C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 14

Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... 46
650-lb tub.... 5
Leaf Tin.
0-lb tin. ............. 8

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 36

Sugar
Granulated Sugar, bbls..... 6 00

Coffee
Reaction Blend Moeh and
ava, 30 -lb cans to ease,
per Ib.................. 22
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
ease,per Ib............. 22
Green Coffe good ......... 18
Green Coffee, medium ...... 11
Green coffee, ocanmon....... 10
Arbackles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages....... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 Ib pack-
ages ........... market price
Boasted, 100lb. drum...... 17
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 16

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 27
English B'faat, 10 lb.. 27
Formosa, 10 lb....... 27
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10 sise
10 Ibs to cas, per pound-.. 40

Salt
200-lb sack................ 100
100-lb sak................ 60
lee Cream, 200-lb sacks..... 100
100-lb sacks..... 60
Pocket Saltinbbls., 8-lb.... 265
4" "' 2-lb.... 2 75

Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lbtin.............. 17
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 dos to box
sifter top, per dos...... 41
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per dos......40 and 80

Corn


10 Sk
carLt aot
W.Corn,1101b, 1 29 1 80
1001b, 1 27 1 20
Mxdeorn,1101b,188 186
1001b,1 21 128


sk
1 32
1 84
146
186


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon..... 81
Oats
Uoa k Luam
Car Lot Lot Sk Lot
W.clip'd,1261b, 182
1001b, 145
White 1261b, 176
White 100b. 1 38
Mixed 1261b
l001b,
Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice..... 1 86
" fancy..... 1 8
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 6 26
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 lb sack.........6 00
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks........... 6 26
Pillsbury's Best ..... 7 60
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal ......... 7 40
'6 bbl .... ....
Flour, Bos,.............. 700
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 820
92-lb sacks........... 1 85
Grits
Grits, per barrel...........8 26
S92-lb sacks....... 1 36
Rice
Good ...................... 4
Choice..... ...... ....... 5
Fancy Head............... 6
Broken................... 2*
Canned Vegetables
Do.


Tomatoes, 8s, Chief.......
Tomatoes, 2 ........
Clayton, 3s................
Clayton, 2s ...............
Sifted Peas, 2s ...........1
Rose L. J. Peas ..........
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........ 1
Lima Beans,2s ............ 1
String Beans, 3s...........
String Beans, 2s ..........
Baked Beans, 8e..........
Baked Beans, ls...........
Corn, fancy, 2s........... 1
Born Tomatoes, 2s........
Beauty Beets, 3 ..........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ..........
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s .............
Hay
carst" o wAble to
Choice.... 1
No.l Tim. 1
No. 2 ....... ...... 1
No.1 Cl'ler 17 00 17 0 1


85
65
80
60
40
80
15
00
90
70
90
45
40


a
800
700
600
600


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2*, 2 dos
to ease, per do........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2, 2, dos
to cae, per dos........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s,-2 dos. to cae
perdo................ 1 30
Apples, 3r, 2 dos to cae, per
dos.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one dos to
ca, per dos.......... 3 00
Peaches, s, two dos to ase,
er dos ............... 1 4
Paches, 1, two dos to cas
per doz................ 190
Peaoes, pie, 2s, two dos to
cae, per do ........... 1 41
Blackberries, 2b two dos to
Sem, per dos........... 1 00
Damson two dos to ca.
per dos................
Brandy Cherries 2 per cae 8
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pil, per lb... 6
L1O.b 8
Gum drop, 0-lb pails, per
Ib.................. 7
French cream, 30-lb pails,
per Ib................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 26-lb box,
assorted, per Ib........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
Sassorted, per lb........ 6

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaohes Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 12
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
26-lb box, per Ib....... 11
Fancy Apricots 26 Ib boxes. 18
x. Choies " ...
Ev. Apples. 60-lb. boxes.....4 00
E. Apples, 5-lb. .... box.....2 0
XT. Apples, 48 1-lb. paekae4 26
X Apple, 4 226
Currants, cleaned, 8-lb. ease 60
Pruner, Calf cleaned s6-lb
box, 40-50............. 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 2-lb
box. 600............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 264b
box, 6o-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 76
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box .......... 1 70
Peanuts


Fancy, H P, per pound....
Extra H P,
Seed Peanuts, "
New Nuts
Mixed, 26-lb boxes.........
Almonds........... .....
Brazils ...................
Peaoans..................
Filberts ..................
alO nuts..................
Cotton Seed Meal


Catmosad Y"
Hulls


11
18
12
12
12
14


car So LI100
o. 8k. Lot Sk. Lt
2700
950


=3 REw3OR SAM A" INS A VAhZL


Matches
Atlantio, per gro.......... 47
Woode ware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop.........2 20
S 8 hoop ........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per dos... ....1 60
Sieves, per do. No. 18.....1 00
nested ...... 00
Bucks6,2 hop pails,per da 1 4
Scrubbing Brushes, per do.. 60
Ax Handles
Two dos crates per do .. ..1 20

WIshboards .
78 Crown Combinati.... 20
178 Blue Jay............. 00
176 Diamond Glan .........8 2
O. W. D., 17 inch, per dos 1 06
Clothes pins, fie gross to box 75
Canned Fish
Oyter Is, 2dos to ca*, per
dos. .................
Sardines, American, 100 to
ase, per as ........ 8
Sardines, 5 ar lota........ 8 0
Salmon Is, Tale 4 dos to case
per dos Alaska........ 9
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to oae,
per dos Col. iver ... 2 8
Salmon, 4 ds to case, pe do.
Beardley's Shredded Cod h 90
two dos in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy,, Sb...... 9

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
0-.lb il ............ 60
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lb to box............ 240
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 9.

KInsga's Meats.
"iard Hums, 8-10 sv ..... 133-4
"mulkbe Ha., 10-I as .... 131-3
"~ad. e Hams, 1-14 a .... 141-4
BbisW 8oUIrs, T- 914; 101-2,
"RBa i" (Uiformdi HBsu 6-8 73-4
reskfrqt se..,n asbt yr....... I1
a a. BHines, 16-1 s. ........ 8xJ-
D. B3eles, 0-22 a. ......... 81-8
D. & =tM 53 8sWav. .......... 77-8
Da 8. Ph* .................... 3-4
Bs Pta .................
Dl & B.tts .-............. 4 53
s ina ..c............. OLT&

"Strawberry" eery, 0O-Ib tubs 27
S lb tbs..., 271-
"Reaable" full erm ehese .... 131-4
Xb!es LmL
"Iisesa Purn Insf ........... mmb
"bem-Feam" OoWod ......... Um .


-240~e aorne Wes4 U ......
SaImmA 31004 1 ......
i temt A e Is ........
Pa m ta andk sa .af.
14 .........................
Vhaun lb
.I.. ..............


pa
LU
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LIA
to
LIS







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. S


T. MURPHY
JACKSONVILLE MACHINE M IRON WORKS
ENGINEER IRON AND BRASS
UNDER AND MACHINIST
leemaove, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Irae
and Brasa Castings, and meehine repairs of all kinds.
-AW -IGRIS AND BOILERS PULLEYS AND SHAFING.


Yf. Waot a Tyeshsd Lesaid?
fl Ye. West a SaME. Lecati.?
You Wmt my Kind o flrli. tsi?
SCI F Y mG.&*,n"
J. H. LIVINOSTON & SONS,
Ocala. Fridn
%a.a a aaee asetsee**eeeeemeeeaeaeeatoa a a a a 20 66666an


A for eatliary Engines, Boilers, Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden- W ft
Hntydaant and Vlves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Goods A 0M WASeIM 4M1 N
WB TMIMSi M WATER 1 VMS EIImEIT A nKECIALTI
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.

The Clyde Steamship Company Record Readers:


The job printing department
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. It is reason-
able to suppose you will get
NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES better and more satisfactory
"L 4. .A E a Ja 8fi,, aeft Asir printing supplies-letter heads,
O-. m, I, """"" "" "" '" envelopes, commissary checks,
t-lt, Iae. f3, at 3:00 pe ... .ALGONQUIN ... .Priday, ea 30 at 10:30 amelopes, commissary checks,
Tue3y, a. -, at 3:00 pm ....COMANCHE ..unday, Jan. 1, at 12:0 a pay-roll reports, etc.,by having
Weda.ia De. 8, at 3:00 pm . **URON .... Tuesday, Jan. 3, at 4:30 am
gwday, & 31, at 3:00 p ..ARAP~ OE ......Thursday, Jan. 5, at 4:30 am m
Jaa. %, at 3:00 pm ...... *xNEW YORK .... Saturday, Jan. 7, at 5:00 am us make them.
oesmra J J1a. at 3:00 pm. .6AKPAOHE ... Sunday, Jan. 8, at 6:00 am
Tusay J at 3:00 pm .. .IROQUOI ......Monday, Jan. 9, at 7:00 amd C
prida, Jan. 1, at 3:00 pm .COMANCHE ...... .Wednesday, Jan. 11, at 8:00 am
BstdsIy, Ja. 7, at 3:00 pm .... AIGONQUIN ..... Thursday, Jan. 12, at 9:00 am s
IMOHICAN .......... Friday, Jan. 13, at 9:30 am
T day, Jan. 105 at 3:00 pm ..... ARAPAHOE ... Sunday, Jan. 15, at 11:00 am Jadmwemy, Rim.
*xHURON ...... Tuesday, Jan. 17, at 12:00 n'n
Wia y, Jan. 13, at 3:00 pa ..... PACHE ....Wednesday, Jan. 18, at 12:30 pm
aturs, JL. 14, at :00 pm ....IOQUOIS ...Thurday, Jan. 19, at 1:00 pm
*xNEW YORK ......Sunday, Jan. 22, at 5:00 am ,
Tumy, Ja. 17, at 3:00 pm ... OMANCHE ..... .unday, Jan. 22, at 5:00 am
Wesaoday, Jan. 18, at 3:00 pm ... .AIGONQUIN .. Monday, Jan. 23, at 6:00 am
yrilsy, JaL. at 3:00 pm .-ARAPAHOE ....Wedneday, Jan. 5, at 7:30 am
mis'b, Jua. 216 at 3:00 pm .. IHICN .:CJ:Wudaya a 1:3 N aval Stores M market
Tu'iy, Jan2 at 3:00 p ...APACHE ...... .Mnday, Jan. 29, at 1:30 am
Way- Jan. at 3:00 pm ..IOQUOIS .... Monday, Jan. 30, and toct 12:00 report
xHUON ......ednesday, Feb 1, at 1:00 pm
i~fy, Jan. W, at 3:00 pm ..-OMANCHE ...... Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 1:00 pm
atjday, Jan. s, at 3:00 pm ... .ALGONQUIN ....Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4:00 amPIhd Dly In Tim
Taisy, Jam. 31, at 3:00 pm .. .ARAPAHOE ...... Sunday, Feb. 5, at 5:00 am
*xNEW YORK ...... Monday, Feb. 6, at 5:30 am
-bOt via Br naiwlek sad Charleston. xFreight only. *-Boston via
yIE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
novena serm s W*. Nws. v es u-s Vrerv e a" an ame Jacksom lle M etropo is
e W- esek emus atlre, Carest ema h Wve wrm
um-wM= lla S enab Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
^ ......................... .'.. '~."n tu. t sl.S ..ek am.s daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
wee.... .... ...... nemnvt Jd sfs.e
St.-g_ at ta, A.st.r.. LPrae. Bersfr (De a sad atermea $5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.
n-anmm a r. -m -,rB
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
-..ent t-sa a aa w: leave Jakaontile Bnday. Tuesay sat Thsas- DIG PsIZ a :*
I, s i. am et srn. leave tmaftrd. Monday. Wednresdays a& rUa *:0 a. m.BIG PR I
-'M -'.....................a... ............... ...... ..... M M A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposition, to
A as tW I ..... ...... .... ......... Leae I" P.
M :as-.::::::: ..... .... "....::. "s S: Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Lasi I ......... S % 1 U p. f
..... ..... ..-'.'........ ... ao .......... ..... jo. Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
4 .....:....Etapise......... .......... ...... 16:00 1a 2.
As. 10:40i:V ............C...a...... rtr. 000 LIn scription contest. Write for particulars.
s. I:O an -.......mn. w.. or. ow n .., s. .an ,.:O m.
W. & .a rML. oseVt. A Jask'wllle. M. P. LOVEMSr.,, AmUL f15pt.,n&
~ Hewns treet, Jaaeonvme.
Al. CL T. R M .. orkw OLDI 1 LNI 0. p. A.. New Te I
gno. 4,a aB. WML. P.OL A 00.
*Nl M.a00r. oa.iral a- Jachsonvlle, Florida.
Ob-aeugh fli, 9 State Ir. ew Tok.m
WKXXX THX -00D Wtto ANT Yrr nrviAnw mAn





N4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
-- -- -- --- ---.- - - -r r -. -


STwo of the Pattern we show in our Catalogue.
SPECIAL VALUES IN STERLING SILVER.
we8 anm


THE
"Rose"
Teapoos, f."o par do.
mart 8poou, z6.oo per do.
able Spsma, 63. per ols.
Tiabit Fok, oo per .
Deset Knie, Sn.a o per des.
Table Fiver, saoo per de

NO CHARGE FOR
ENGRAVING.


Greenleaf 6
Crosby Compay

3etotler anb
bi unfti

41 West Bay Street
Jacksonville
Th ISsMt a" amd et su he s rt 6
somem ea Pe.mp i. abto semm


THE
"Germania"
T'a*ms a par m.
Dert Sposu, $iSo pw s.
Table Spes, as.So pwr IM.
Dfeurt Farb*, ft".o pe AM.
Table lark, fseo w la.
Dmsrt Kmive, oo pe dlm.
Tale lMves, 6uo. pm Ge.
WE PAY EXPRESS
CHARGES.


Write for Catalogue
ONE HUNDRED PAGES ILLUSTRATING


SSilverware, Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Cut Glass, Clocks, etc.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings


Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF -

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc.

I ll IITY S i Mef EMM D (iU EWE i Ii 9MlS U ICIRIS.
IN WRamNG OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST ExPUCT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT a WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


' I






Supplement to the
im Year it, ,r,
WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
National Good Roads Association Hand Book and Program for the Jacksonville, Fla., Convention, January 19-21, 1905.
VOL 10. NO. 2. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ATLANTA, GA. SAVANNAH, GA. JANUARY 13, 1905.
.- Me,-vv


---- 3; i







2 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WE EKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Weekly Industrial Record
The leading trade foumral soth of Baimore. Throughly in touch
with every movement for the Indtrial Commercial and Educa-
tional Development of the great Southet. Official organ of the
Turpentine Operators Amocation; Offica oran of th Inter-
State Cane Grower' Asocation; the exponent of the lumber n-
dustry-in tact, the one great paper read and re-read by businh
people garally in the South Atlantic and Gul Stat.
Subscription price $3 a year. SubScibe now.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville. Fla.


+ DELAND


SA CITY IN THE PINE VOODS. | THE AT
+


+ PAVED STREETS, ELECTRIC L
S.WATER WORKS, TELEPHONE
SAND
. CITY COMFORTS.



4 3TETZSON UNIVERSITY, Finest Public


+ FOR BOOKLET AND CIRCULARS. ADD

+ C. D. LANDIS. SILAS
+ Secret.ry Business Men's League.
t


A- 1- 4 -t t *t.-i4 iS- _t _<5__ -__ 5. t- A


S -~ w X XX a w a w a a 19 jF


HIENS OF FLORIDA.


GHT,
E,


Iheool n lthe St&&,


RESS


SB. WRIGHT,
Secretary Board Trade.


+.




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+
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+

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+
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~;'tl;~-~;'8-;t;;C-a"C-8~fs~~~~--2 b`lf ~~- f~- -t 9 tP 34 f'IZ-r24~t-~:t~%~9 ~ .~T~t'C'~Ed~"Fb~~CCZ--j~;Z-. ;e-~-z; f;F;Jt-~C'a"~--C;;~-~ ;~;te~C; P









SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 3

yBEi i------a--------------


National Good Roads


Association.


Organization,


Conventions,


Objects.


the public roadway is vastly improved. No man can
answer why this most important and extensively traveled
highway, and upon which all other forms of modern
transportation must successfully depend, has been so
shamefully neglected unless he admits his total indif-
ference and failure of his duty to the Public Road.
The farmers of Missouri, Arkansas, Tennessee, Texas,
Oklahoma and Kansas, or of any other State or Territory,
will never obtain the most exalted and most enviable po-
sition among all occupations and can never hope for the
dawn of independence and higher civilization, of which
so much has been written and spoken, until they organize,
legislate, appropriate more taxes and construct in each
county an extensive system of modem roads which can
be traveled conveniently and at all seasons of the year.
The first step to this end is to abolish the inadequate,


W. H. MOORE,
President National Good Roads Association.


W E earnestly appeal to the tax-payers, the law makers
and to all other persons who have traveled the mud
roads leading to the country school house or the sacred
church, or who have hammered the weary horses, mules
or oxen dragging through mud, slush and snow the prod-
ucts of the land to the nearest town, market or railroad
station, to join with the "National Good Roads Associa-
tion" and the "Office of Public Road Inquiries" of the
United States Government in bringing about better pri-
mary conditions of transportation. All who live in the
country or in cities or towns and who drive or walk over
the public roads realize that no substantial improvements
have been made, excepting in a few States and localities,
within the last twenty-five or fifty years.
Each year the State is increasing in population and
wealth; social and commercial conditions are growing
better; schools and colleges have increased in numbers
and accordingly broadened their spheres of practical
education. Factories to convert raw material and all
substantial products of the farm into staple articles are
distributed conveniently in the leading agricultural
centers. Every other method of transportation excepting


R. W. RICHARDSON,
Secretary National Good Roads
Assocition.
fruitless existing conditions. They have been tried for
years and years, and the proof of their utter failure is
that thousands and millions of dollars have been ap-
propriated for permanent road betterment and yet we
are compelled to drive or walk over the same old mud
roads.


;~Es~i~rrrrrr~scscsC3fJEsCsfsCsCr~C~?fJ








4 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

41188110sal I laa Iee Illllll s ie11481 111s1 > |111s ee1sal s1ssu llllll Ilhllll


It is estimated that Missouri is expending annually be-
tween $i,6oo,ooo.oo and $2,ooo,ooo.oo. Illinois appro-
priates about $3,oo0,o00.0o annually for the public roads.
The reports of all other States make a similar showing.
It is a crime against all the better interests of these great
commonwealths that so much money should be appro-
priated without rendering more satisfactory returns.


Good Roads Agitation.
The successful campaigning of the National Good
Roads Association, and all kindred organizations has
within recent years created a deep and wide-spread senti-
ment among the American people that great social and
commercial burdens are unjustly permitted to continue
from year to year against the predominating and faith-
ful population engaged in farming.

National and International Conventions.
The convening of people in convention to consider and
improve any arbitrary custom or usage of a civil, social,
political or ecclesiastical character is laudable and should
render good service to the State.
This Association has held more than three hundred
Good Roads Conventions, distributed a vast amount of
literature and organized many local Associations. It was
organized for the specific purpose of agitating and uniting
all interests for Good Roads.
In 1903 the officials of the Louisiana Purchasqpxpo-
sition; the St. Louis Manufacturers Association; the
Business Men's League; the Merchants Exchange; the
Railroads; the Press, and many other interests and indi-
viduals united with us in holding the National and In-


C. H. HUTTIO,
Treasurer National Good Roads Associatio.
President Third National Bank. St. Louis.


County Courts, Road Supervisors, Com-
missioners.
All road supervisors, Judges of County Courts and
others who administer public affairs and who distribute
the road funds owe it as a duty to themselves and to
their constituents that their communities should obtain
more profitable results. We believe it is the purpose and
intention of public officials to render honest and com-
petent service. The main reasons there are not better
roads are, ist: lack of necessary funds, and 2nd: the ab-
sence of intelligent system and economy.

Road Taxes Should be Paid in Cash
Not Labor.
No State or Territory should continue the old unprofit-
able and deceptive method of allowing tax-payers to
contribute so many days labor as an off-set to the pay-
ment of legitimate taxes in cash. It might be wise to
utilize the labor upon the public roads of those who
have no visible means of support or who are not in a
position to pay cash taxes.


MARTIN DODGE,
Member of Executive Board
National Good Roads A oelatio.
Director Off. Pub. Rd. Inq.. U. Gov.,
Washbinton, D. C.
ternational Good Roads Convention in St. Louis, April
27th to 29th inclusive. It was one of the largest and
most representative industrial meetings which ever met
for any purpose in this country. Delegates were present


iguueaa.uuuueui~eeIII~amaIaaaaaeia .aaa..aeemaaaaumauuuuaauuuuuuuuuuuu~uuuuuuub


1111(~(1~~11)11~111)~+~I~~~~SllllltClt~~









SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


from thirty-two states and five foreign Governments.
The Convention was honored with the presence of many
distinguished men including Hon. Wm. J. Bryan, Gen-
eral Nelson A. Miles; Hon. A. C. Latimer, U. S. Senator
South Carolina; the Governors of many States; leading
Railroad Officials, and the President of the United States,
Hon. Theodore Roosevelt. Some of the able speeches
delivered will be found in this publication.


RUSSLL HARDING,
Member of Executive Board
National Good Roads Association.
President Pere Marquette System.
Vice-Pres. Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton System.
Cincinnati. Ohio.

The proceedings of the 1903 Convention has been
published in bulletin form by the "Office of Public Road
Inquiries," Washington, D. C., and distributed by the
thousand in this and foreign countries.
A special committee was appointed to prepare bills
and urge their enactment in each State Legislature and
in the Federal Congress.
The successful Convention of 1903 brought to the sup-
port of the Good Roads cause the most distinguished
statesmen and lawmakers of this and other countries.
The press hearalded the issue as the most pronounced
problem with which the United States must reckon in
connection with domestic progress and future trade ex-
pansion. It was stated that this country is not pro-
ducing more than one-fourth of its combined possibilities,
and its agricultural, mineral and timbered products will
never be placed in fair competition with all the world's
markets until the roads are made more accessible.


Convention, 1904.
The work of 1903 culminated in a larger convention
this year. Of the hundreds of conventions held in con-
nection with the Louisiana Purchase Exposition perhaps
none will ultimately produce more substantial results
than the National and International Good Roads Con-
vention. It was a most representative delegation of men
and women from thirty-eight states, four territories and
ten foreign governments. The Hon. John Hay, Secre-
tary of State, Washington, D. C., invited all civilized
countries to participate. The proceedings will be most
valuable road history. The addresses of Hon. James
Wilson, Secretary of Agriculture, (who came as a spec-
ial representative of the Government and President
Roosevelt); Governor Dockery, of Missouri; Hon. David
R. Francis; Governor Nahum J. Batchelder, of New
Hampshire; Hon. A. W. Campbell, special representative
of England and Canada; Captain Helmer Bernhardt, of
the Royal Staff of Highways and Public Works of
Sweden, and the speeches and papers of many other
notables will be published for free distribution by Hon.
Martin Dodge, Director of "the Office of Public Road
Inquiries."
Model Roads and Streets.
A part of the program of the great Convention of
May I6th-2Ist was the construction, in the Model City


COL. BLLIOTT DURAND,
Member of Executive Board
National Good Roads Association.
National Business League, Chicago.
of the World's Fair, of the famous model roads and
streets to be seen by the millions of visitors who at-


_..._ ILI


-- -- -- -- m l o tt IIItI aI III t $ II III III o $#toII IAI I# II II Is ll91 199 11I


.









6 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

0t oO********l Mi so $ ##1 to a 161#41*6 I as to 11#41111## a i a asks a steel I I s o* to $ O O M s so .8 .***


tend the greatest World's Exposition and combined
arena of Universal Education that has been organized
since the dawn of civilization. It is the first time any
of the International Expositions has given special
attention to the subject of modern road and street
construction, sewage and drainage.


ALBERT BLAIR,
Member of Executive Board
National Good Roads Association.
General Attorney, American Brake Co.,
St. Louis.


Hon. R. W. Meeker, of New Jersey, who has super-
vised the construction of hundreds of miles of those
well-known State-Aid roads, superintended, for the
National Good Roads Association, the street and road
construction in the Model City.
The larger manufacturers of road and street ma-
chinery furnished, free of cost to the National Good
Roads Association, all modern machinery for con-
structing these streets and roads. There were in-
cluded in this list the J. I. Case Threshing Machine
Company, Racine, Wisconsin, traction engines; the
Austin-Western Co., Limited, Chicago, Illinois, road
graders; the Kelly-Springfield Road Roller Co., Spring-
field, Ohio, steam rollers; the Indiana Road Machine
Company, Fort Wayne, Indiana, and the Studebaker
Bros. Mfg. Co., South Bend, Ind.
Every method of road making, as exemplified by the
photographs in these pages, are on exhibition in the
Model City. All visitors, and especially the mayors
and councils of cities, engineers, boards of public im-
provements, road supervisors and farmers should in-
spect those object lesson roads.


Government Co-Operation.
The "Office of Public Road Inquiries," Agricultural
Department, U. S. Government, is co-operating with
the National Good Roads Association, and all other
associations and committees, in urging organization for
better roads.
This office was created by congress in 1893. The
able director, Hon. Martin Dodge, and his assistant,
Hon. M. O. Eldridge, with a corps of Division road
experts, giving attention to all States, have done a
most practical work by presenting every phase of
road construction in illustrated bulletins andscircu-
lars which are sent free upon request from any tax-
payer, and in the construction of object lesson roads.
The science of teaching communities how roads should
be graded, drained, crowned and surfaced requires
special engineers and road builders. Every road su-
pervisor, commissioner, county judge or contractor who
desires special information about building any kind of
road can have same from Mr. Dodge's office. There is no
excuse for ignorance on this subject when such valu-
able knowledge can be obtained without cost by drop-
ping a postal card or letter to the "Office Public Road
Inquiries," Washington, D. C. It is the duty of
farmers, all road officials, commercial organizations

























COL. A. MANN,
General Organiser of the National Good Roads Aaeoclaton.

and people of cities to appeal by petition to their re-
spective members of congress in urging liberal ap-
propriation for the support of the office of road in-
quiries. Object lesson roads should be built in many
sections of each and all States annually.


*161`11 2 114011,111111 NSA I a a -1~









SUPPLEMENT TO THE WE EKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7

0****,4"1,,* 1888l ,,51* elt#ll$*|||40i *1 10181* 86* 801# 2I 1# #014 get so e e ~II I#| OttIe Iso s lts l:****** I


CAPTAIN C. E. GARNER.
PrMdent do the Jack onvafle, Fla., Baud of Trade, under whoe atipicas the National Convention
in Jacakonville, January 19-21, 1905 i held. An enthudatic advocate of
Good Roads and a leader In movements for the welfare
of Jacksonville and Florida.


14668#0 $too&$$ 64611180#0 1 it&$ 101440401 a a I I I I I






8 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
41185118816*18oIo 8814414 so go6001eeBt I*a IIt i MI& Ie11 i18 ott I e B i e I)I oell BIti )|$t


Ideal location.
On beautiful St. Johns River.
Select resident section.
Three blocks from Country Club.
Reached directly by street cars from
all parts of the city.
Take Fairfield Car.


Hotel Roseland


Special Rates to Convention visitors:
$2.00 and $2.50 daily; $10 to $15
weekly; American plan.


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SUPPLEMENT TO THE WE EKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9

~ Ir ee su u~ i v --- ---,- t- vv- a-------


Vice President and National Organizer A. S. Mann's


i Address at Good Roads Convention, St Louis, May, 1904,

0I-0 -0 IN f 1119 *"9-#91 9'#19 9- - 115 9- r --eoo'---sai


Following is the full text of the address
delivered before the National Good Roads
Convention by Vice-President and Nation-
al Organizer A. S. Mann, of Florida:
Ladies and Gentlemen of this Conven-
tion: I esteem it an honor and a great
privilege to be selected as one permitted
to address you on the most important
question of this or any period of which
history speaks.
Great preparations have bee made to
carry our products to the consumer, no
matter in what part of the world a mar-
ket is found. It only remains to make
the connecting link and give us transporta-
tion at the farm, garden and home to any
part of the world. This should have been
done years ago; but it is never too late
to do right.
I am supposed to address you on The
Outlook for Better Roads in the Southern
States. If I tell what they will do for
us, you will better understand me. We
have gone into the work to stay until we
have not only good roads, but we feel the
best are none too good for us. In my
own State, and others I have visited, I
find the people fully alive to the impor-
tance and advantage of good roads. They
see immense sums of their money spent
in preparation to carry them and their
products to any part of the world when
they shall have reached a shipping point,
but at certain seasons of the year this is
nearly impossible, and at all seasons a
hardship and cost that leaves at best scant
profits. The larger part of the entire
country is so remote from shipping sta-
tions as to make home a dreary place,
and raising anything for the market is a
thing not to be thought of. Existence
alone is all that such homes promise.
Southern States Progress.
While it is the plain duty of the general
Government to aid us, we are not idle,
and the work of road improvement is go-
ing forward in most of the counties of
the Southern States. Since the agitation
began in Florida our most progressive
counties have built from fifty to one hun-
dred miles of good roads. These roads
are pushing out into the country to con-
neet the largest settlements and best
lands with the shipping points. This work
progresses slowly, as it is done by a
county tax. Where such roads have been
constructed, lands have advanced in value
many times the entire cost of the work,
and products grown for the markets of
the world pay handsome profits, which in
other sections go to pay the heavy expense
of transportation. In many cases the
bruising of vegetables causes not only a
total loss, but the grower must pay the
freight. The railway lines often refuse
to receive such shipments unless charges
are prepaid. Hence you will see our only
course is to continue our efforts nutil ev-
ery section of our fair State has an open,
easy, rapid outlet to the markets of the
world.
The Work in Florida.
The last Legislature gave to the coun-
ties the right to increase taxation for
road purposes. They also gave an im-
mense amount of what is known as I. I.
lands to do this work, and to-day Florida


has in sight a large sum of money for
good roads, which is to be divided among
the counties, according to valuation.
Florida is not waiting for Government
aid. It has been said that "God helps
those who help themselves." If national
aid is secured, we will come into our
rights as the common people sooner; but
if we have it to do ourselves, we are al-
ways working until it is done. We will
fight this to a finish, calling on all inter-
ested to do their duty, and we will not
fold our arms until our product-no mat-
ter who grows them or where they are
grown-can go from the home to those
who want them in any part of the world
any day of the year. This will require
good hard-surface roads, which will be
built as rapidly as possible.
To my mind there are greater advan-
tages than money to be derived from good
roads. More than half of the children of
every State have a poor chance to get an
education. We pay for an education for
the youths of our land, but allow bad
roads to prevent the child from getting
the advantages. Every child should have
an education free, and should be put in
position to receive it. What does it profit
the child that a school is being taught
when the child cannot attend.
When we shall have covered our State
with a system of good roads, it will be
found more profitable to gather the chil-
dren together at central points, where
graded schools give a cliance.for a higher
education. Power lines should carry the
children to and from their homes, and
every child should be compelled to ride the
round trip every day that the school is
in session. It would be a healthy exer-
cise which the child needs. The small
school abolished would pay the expense
of the free delivery of the children at
the schools and leave a surplus to help
support the central schools. Great speed
is being made by power lines, but a safe
speed would be twenty miles an hour;
and the children from a distance of from
ten to even twenty miles meeting at some
central point, would in nearly every sec-
tion make such a school as would justify
every advantage or aid to a first-class
school. Teachers of splendid attainments
would take the place of the present coun-
try teacher. I would add free books.
Rural Mail Delivery.
The people of this country are all be-
ing taxed to support free rural delivery
of mail, and it is said that in some cases
they are doing away with postoffices, as in
the case of the country schools, has made
free delivery a saving; and whether it
does or not we want our share as we
must do the paying. There are about
25,000 delivery clerks, costing us in this
item alone fully $50,000. How much do
the farmers get?
The auto, or power line, which delivers
our children at school, requiring say only
two hours each day, can do this work at
a fair price, and carry our people up and
down the full length of the line, and
should pay a profit. Life in the country
would be different; daily papers and mail
at our door.
The families of wealth are compelled
to remain in the city on account of not


wishing to take the children out of school.
They would live on the farm at any time
they choose, as the children would be car-
ried in to school and back again free;
while the head of the family could go
back and forth at will, thus creating busi-
ness for the power lines. Our people in
the country would have a chance to hear
a good sermon in the city, attend the the-
ater, trade or visit friends, and life on
the farm would become an ideal one. There
would be no complaint of people wanting
to leave the farm, but people of means
would all have summer homes in the coun-
try, while those of moderate means would
leave the tenement house, buy a few acres
on some of the power lines, and make for
themselves a home of love, comfort and
plenty.
The man of moderate means-the work-
ing man-would own his few acres and
have his cow, chickens, garden, etc., where
each child would in some way help in the
support of the family, and acquire hab-
its more valuable than such a child is lia-
ble to in the city; and the father, after
his day's work in the city, would re-
turn to spend a profitable evening with his
family, every member of which would
show pleasure at having him with them,
when none will deny that life has been
made full of promise for him and his.
What Will Follow.
Such homes will follow where good roads
are built. Good roads will soon be con-
structed connecting the cities of import-
ance and power machines, both for freight
and passenger, will be run each way many
times a day; and the farmer or truck-
grower on the line of said road will have
hisown packing house or depot, and ship
and receive at home, thus saving the ex-
pense and time of going to the city as he
must to-day. These freight power lines
will receipt for all shipments to any part
of the world. A speed of twelve to fifteen
miles an hour can be made by these ini-
tial lines, and if a high rate of freight is
charged by any one line, one may correct
it by shipping in another direction over
a competing line, and a better rate may
be had, which gives relief by competition
not possible to-day.
The horse will not be used much in
hauling, as it can be done so much cheap-
er and more rapidly by power lines. The
horse, I think, has had his day on the
public roads, and I am confident a few
years only remains to him to serve in the
cities. In ten or fifteen years, I predict,
horses will not be allowed to enter the
cities. Power machines are rapidly com-
ing into use and no matter what power
it may be, it is under better control and
moves more rapidly and occupies much less
space on the streets. The present con-
gested condition of the streets makes it
necessary that this change be made as
speedily as possible. The horse and the
steel-tired wagon soon wear out the best
pavement. This cost and that of clean-
ing the streets considered, would cover
the cost of delivering every person and
every pound of freight in our large cities.
Pavements would last always, and remain
as clean as an ordinary floor, which must
improve the health and increase com-
forts greatly.


Use of Convict.
In making good roads convicts would be
used in the counties where convicted, ex-
cept in the case of a hardened criminal-
such should not be allowed among those
who may be termed mild offenders, who by
being allowed to associate with them are
educated in crime, whereas the object
should be to reform them. This can best
be done by keeping them where the influ-
ence of family and friends can be exerted.
Many years ago I advocated permitting
them to go home Saturday night and re-
main till Monday morning with friends and
family, returning to camp and road work
Monday. In North Carolina, where they
are working convicts on the public roads,
they are doing this, in a few instances,
and they report it a great improvement.
Suitable rewards for good behavior are
promised by which the sentence is mater-
ially shortened. Any attempt to escape
is punished by lengthened time, so that
every inducement is offered in the way
of reform. No escapes are reported. North
Carolina is making great progress in good
roads as a little money goes a long way.
The most expensive part in making good
roads is the labor. They have gotten this
down as low as twenty cents a day in
some counties, and by their system some
genuine reforms are reported, and the
convict never comes in contact with free
labor, but as his offense is against the
State or the people, he is made to do a
service that, as nearly as possible, re-
pairs the wrong. Vagrants and mild of-
fenders should be given short terms on the
public road. If kept in jail they are a
burden upon the honest people, who are
really the ones punished. Hardened crim-
inals should be under State control and
used in preparing material. The present
system is a school of crime-the old crim-
inals are the profess and should issue
diplomas to the young placed under their
charge, which should state compulsory
education in crime furnished by the
State." The use of the criminals may be
made to add much to the pleasure and
profit of honest people whom they have in-
jured.
Bring City and Coutry Together.
Good roads add value to every acre.
They practically bring the country and
city together, so that the present crowded,
unwholesome conditions may be avoided
and change dreary country life by easy
visits to the city. The hand that guides
the plow supports the nation. Any ill
that befalls the farmer increases the cost
of living to everyone. Therefore, any-
thing that benefits him helps those in all
the walks of life. The nation rests upon
the shoulders of its workers, and their
protection should be well considered in all
we do. We should encourage home build-
ers, for from the home come patriots.
In times of trouble we look to them for
defenders. Men will do and die in defense
of family and fireside, while they would
not defend a boarding or tenement house.
In the home where love dwells will be
found the faithful husband and patriot.
Any man is in luck who owns his own
home, no matter how humble it may be,
and has the love of one good woman who










10 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


presides over its destinies. They should
teach their daughter that her highest aim
in life should be to be worthy of some
splendid man and make him happy; and
their son that his highest ambition in
life would be to be good enough to be
worthy of some splendid woman, and
that life would be all too short in which
to love and cherish her. In such a home
one would get a glimpse of heaven. In
such a home one would have no excuse to
quit courting, but new reason would be
added daily to strengthen the mutual
regard and love. Such love would remain
eternal. Can anyone imagine such rela-
tions to exist in a boarding or crowded
tenement house?
Close, rapid connection with the country
makes it possible for all who will to own
a home. The sense of ownership and the
daily improvements would soon make even
a modest home with our loved ones around
us so attractive that the greatest joy in
this life would be possible only when sur-
rounded by our dear ones in our own
home. How sweet the sound. If com-
pelled to be absent, one would be ever
thinking of Home, Sweet Home, for "there
is no place like home, be it ever so hum-
ble," especially if we seem to hear the
"old, old story ever new. For its 'the
sweetest story ever told." If it ever
grows cold where such love exists, home
is not the home we are talking about.
Love will not thrive without cultivation.
Neglect it and it withers and dies. Cul-
tivate and care for it daily, as you would
anything else you prize, and as years go
on you will be surprised to find what
strength your love has attained. When
you were courting you thought you loved,
but years will have shown you how much
you have added and how happy it has
made you all, because you gave your love
to another whose happiness you studied,
and your love and tender care has re-
turned many fold, and your happiness is
complete. One must live for and love
some one in order to be happy. Living
for self alone never produced a happy man
or woman; the tree of selfishness bears
only bitter fruit.
Beneftsqto Poor People.
This work on good roads will result in
many more of our people owning their
own homes, and every home in the land
will have more happiness in it by reason
of what we are doing, and I hope there
will be many where love reigns supreme.
If you and I have helped to make more
happiness possible, we will not have lived
in vain, and the roads we build will be a
monument to the energy of the period in
which we permitted to live. They will
be such a comfort to the people that they
will be constantly repaired and improved,
and like good wine, "improve with age."
Every good road of which history speaks
is more perfect to-day than when first
built.
The Roman empire passed away over
fifteen hundred years ago. The roads it
built are imperishable, and stand as an
evidence of the great Roman empire. The
people living along these roads treasure
tlem as their greatest blessing left to them
by this great people, and they improve
them every year. Everything else they
left us is more or less lost or decayed,
but a good road is such a blessing it is
not allowed to decay but grows more per-
feet as we advance in knowledge of road
building and cultivation. The old Roman
roads were, no doubt, good ones, but in-
ferior in every way to the ones we see
to-day.


The common roads are the initial lines
supporting all transportation lines, wheth-
er by rail, river or ocean. If it is an ex-
tra costly haul to depot or warehouse,
the consumer, no matter where he may
live, pays this extra cost; therefore in
having the roads of all parts of the coun-
try made as good as possible, all have an
interest. The cost of hauling the prod-
nets over the dirt roads to shipping points
to-day exceeds one billion dollars. The
average cost per ton in America is 25
cents. In Europe, where hard roads ex-
'st, and have been built by the Govern-
ment, the average cost per ton is less
than 10 cents. Thus we pay a mud tax
of over five hundred million dollars an-
nually. This does not count the loss by
not being able to deliver perishable prod-
ucts in good condition, or of not being able
to market products at all by reason of
impassable roads. If comforts are valued
at all our loss annually may be placed
at fully one billion dollars, or about three
million dollars a day. Thus good roads
would make comforts for all and a saving
on what annually reaches the market of
over one and one-half million dollars each
day. All are made poorer. Mud roads
are an enemy to, and destroy the hard
earnings of all the people. If it were an
army of another land the Government
would put a stop to it, and with millions
of men and money push the invader into
the sea. It is just as important in this
case, and the same duty exists upon the
part of the Government to the people.
I saw an estimate of the earnings of
railroads for the year 1900, which was
about one billion one hundred million dol-
lars. This money was not lost as is the
billion wasted on bad roads, but is re-
turned in various ways to circulate among
the people in the employment of labor,
material, taxes, dividends or interest on
capital invested. Bad roads cost the peo-
ple annually one billion dollars; which is
entirely lost-not one cent of profit to
anyone. If good roads are built as rap-
idly as possible, they would soon save the
cost and be a profit and "a joy forever."
Extravagance in road building, when the
money is judiciously expended, is the wis-
est economy. Besides lessening the cost
of hauling, good roads will change life in
the country from a lonely to an ideal
life, whih may not be calculated in
money, but brings happiness not possible
otherwise. It restores the Garden of Eden.
Has our Government the right to aid
us we ask. And we A e find the answer in
the Constitution, which says: "Congress
shall have the power to establish post
roads." This is what we want them to
help us to do. To aid in the building of
the leading railroad lines the Government
gave over two hundred million acres of
public domain, and the bonds of the Gov-
ernment for many millions, taking a sec-
ond mortgage on the roads for payment.
Immense sums have been spent on our
waterways, rivers and harbors. Last year
the amount appropriated was about sev-
enty-five millions, and with an eye ever-
watchful to our interests the work of
building a great canal has been entered
into, and a first payment has just been
made for the privilege of forty millions
in gold, and an agreement to pay one
hundred millions to the republic of Pana-
ma for the right of way. The work is to
cost several hundred million--perhaps a
billion-dollars; no one can tell. But it
will be done in order to more speedily
convey our products. If the Government
has a right to spend so lavishly of the
people's money to aid in transporting us


and our products from the depots and cit-
ies to all parts of the world, who questions
the right of the Government to begin at
the beginning-the forest, mine farm and
home, where every pound of freight origi-
nates, and where an opportunity for great-
est saving in time and money exists?
The Government, under the general pow-
ers conferred in the Constitution, to pro-
tect, legislate and care for the people, have
broad powers, and have always acted to
supply an apparent need. In the early
days of the last century roads were built
by the Government, covering a period of
about thirty years, expending during that
period about fifteen millions. No states-
men ff that period questioned the wisdom
or the right of the Government to do this
work. It was allowed to drop because of
a desire to aid railroads, rivers and har-
bors, which, at the time, it was argued,
were a more pressing need. If that were
so then, it is not the case now. The
country has developed, and products have
so increased that the heavy loads and con-
stant travel require hard-surfaced roads,
as dirt roads become impassable many
months of the year, usually when the far-
mer has plenty of time and no other work
for his teams. Following up the question
of the power of. the Government to aid
the people when it is for the good of all,
Government aid to education may be
cited. In 1862 what is known as the Mor-
rill act was passed. Large grants of land
were given to the different States, the in-
come from which was to be used in sup-
port of agricultural colleges. In 1890 a
second act was passed, appropriating $15,-
000 annually to each State to support
these agricultural colleges, which has been
increased from time to time, until to-day
the sum of nearly two million dollars is
annually given to the cause of education.
In the State of Florida and many other
States the sixteenth section is donated to
the support of the common school system
The Hatch Act.
Searching farther, if more precedents
are needed, we find that in 1887 Congress
passed what is known as the Hatch act,
giving annually to each State for the sup-
port of an experiment station, $15,000.
which gives to all the Stats nearly one
million dollars, or an annual aid to educa-
tion of nearly three million dollars, not
counting the lands given to aid the com-
mon schools. Government aid to educa-
tion is, therefore, a well-established policy;
while the Constitution is silent on that
subject, it not only permits aid in build-
ing roads, but practically commands that
such work is properly 'the duty of the
Government by granting them the power.
They saw the Government's duty to its
people, and gave the power to act. Con-
gress has used this power, and is to-day,
ins mild way, aiding in the work. If they
can legally do what they have done and
are doing, they can do all the people re-
quire, and it remains for us to arouse the
people to a full sense of their rights, which
I have every confidence will he cheerfully
granted by Congress.
It looks eIke a joke to create schools
at such an expense to all the people, when
often by reason of bad roads, some can-
not attend. It is equally a bad to spend.
as we have, so much money on rail-
roads. rivers and harbors and canals to
carry rapidly, easily and cheaply our
products to those who want them in any
part of the world, and by reason of a
short stretch of impassable dirt road,
fail to receive or carry them at all, but
permit them to waste or decay on the
farm. thereby making such products scarce


and high, which is a loss to the consumer,
who thus pays his share of the mud tax,
and joins us in an appeal to the Govern-
ment to stop the enormous waste than in-
jures all and benefits no one. In every
instance our leading men have spoken in
favor of good roads and national aid in
the work. All agree it is the greatest
need of this or any age, and should be a
just claim upon Congress to help in the
work.
April, 29, 1903, President Roosevelt in
this very city, and as the head of this
great nation, plainly pointed out the duty
of the nation. On the 28th, at the same
good roads convention, Hon. William Jen-
nings Bryan declared it as a first duty
the nation owed to its people to assist
and build good roads. The same day Gen.
Nelson A. Miles, head of our army, whose
knowledge of the wants of our people none
will dispute, clearly fixed the responsi-
bility of the Government to assist.
Hon. Stuyvesant Fish, president of the
Illinois Central Railroad Company, in a
speech delivered at the Southern Good
Roads Convention, held at New Orleans,
April 7, 1904, said:
"The cost of transportation does not
begin at the railroad station, but at the
farm. Go ahead and repair your roads,
and the railroads will help you. It is our
aim to bring the farmer as close as pos-
sible to the ultimate consumer. We will
stand our share of the expense. The rail-
roads are the arteries of this country, but
the public roads are the veins. We are
interested, selfishly if you will, but it is
an enlightened selfishness."
No man is better qualified to give us
the position of the great transportation
lines on this important question. They
want our support and it comes freely
over good roads, if every one o f the di-
visions of our Government, political and
otherwise, demand the building of good
roads, who shall stay our hand? It is high
time the silent statesman found his voice.
Good roads have the right of way. Those
who want to be in the procession had
better start now for some of them are
a little lame. It will be my pleasure to
offer for the consideration of this conven-
tion a resolution that will give the great-
political parties a chance to speak out, so
the people can know what they may de-
pend upon and vote to place only friends
on guard.
Conditions in Misouri.
It has been said that in the State of
Missouri two hundred thousand children
have only a partial chance for education.
My own and other States are just as bad.
Yet our Government has seen fit to take
on the job of educating the Philippines and
paying twenty million dollars for the
privilege, not counting the valuable lives
lost in the benevolent work. More money
has been spent than would be required to
cover our own country with a splendid
system of lhard-surfaced roads. It might
ie well to remind our representatives that
charity Iwgins at home. and until their
,ronstitituents have all their own necessi-
ites looked after, they may be excused
from using money in this way. Educate
our children first.
In conclusion allow me to add that many
millions of dollars have been spent by
the Government in making good roads
for this same people and Porto Rico. It
is strange, indeed, if our money can be so
freely used for the good of others, with-
out raising the question of the power of
Congress until we ask that the same use
of it be made to give us relief. It is time










SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11

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The State of Florida lies between 25 ing lost the thirteen American colonies September, and embrace entirely what is


degrees and 31 degrees north latitude, and
between 80 degrees and 88 degrees west
longitude from Greenwich, and contains
58,680 square miles. The whole water
surface is 4,440 square miles, leaving 54,-
240 square miles of land surface, or 34,-
713,000 acres The peninsular portion.
measuring from the northern boundary,
extends south about 400 miles, with an
average width of about 100 miles. The
northern part of the State extends from
the Atlantic westward along the south-
ern boundary of the States of Georgia and
Alabama about 375 miles, with a width
to the Gulf of from 40 to 90 miles.
The average altitude of Florida is 60
feet above the level of the sea. Louisiana.
the next lowest, is 75 feet above the sea
in its average. The larger portion of the
territory of all the States on the Atlantic
coast from Maine to Florida, is less than
300 feet above the level of the sea.
There is an impression among some
that high places are the most healthy, but
this does not always follow, and is not
the testimony of experience in Florida.
Sometimes the lower places in the same
neighborhood have had quite the advantage
in the point of health. In the Old World.
some healthful and fertile localities are
below the level of the ocean, as the Jor-
dan, more than 1,000 feet below the sur-
face of the Mediterranean Sea, the shores
of the Caspian Sea, and portions of Hol-
land reclaimed from the ocean by its
dykes.
The early history of Florida was not
one of rapid and encouraging development.
From 1565, the date of the settlement of
St. Augustine, the oldest town in the
Union, to the cession of 1819-21, the terri-
tory was claimed by Spain, except the
twenty years under British authority from
1763 to 1783. In 1762, the Floridas, east
and west, were ceded by Spain to Great
Britain, but in 1783 Great Britain, hav-

to put our own house in order. This must
be done by the passage of laws. Send
only those to do this work who agree with
you; know what yon want and agree to
get it for you. Florida's State organization
resolved not to vote for any man for office
except he were known to be a good roads
man. The last Legislature gave us every-
thing in sight, and earnestly looked for
more, and will live in the history of the
State long after similar bodies have been
forgotten. They will deserve and receive
the blessings of a people who by their
acts have broken the chains that bound
them to the farm and -bade them roam
at will and return when weary to this
haven of peace and rest-the farm where
love dwells and all surroundings speak a
home of plenty.

Resolution was offered by A. S. Mann
and unanimously carried, pledging the Na-
tional Good Roads Association to support
only such men for office as were known
supporters of the Good Roads movement.
Empowering the President to appoint a
committee of five members to attend the
sessions of all conventions, State, Congres-
sional and national, and secure a plank in
the platform of each party, indorsing
good road.


in the war of 1776 and succeeding years,
receded the Floridas to Spain.
On the 22nd of February, 1819, treaty
was made, and on the 24th of October.
1820, was ratified by the King of Spain
and by the United States, February 19th,
1821.
With a coast line of nearly 1,200 miles,
accessible with small boats all along the
shore, the long, narrow figure of Florida
puts its whole surface in near approach
to the commerce of the ocean. Some of
the best harbors in the United States are
on the coast of Florida, and with an equi-
table expenditure upon them will have a
larger number of ports accessible to ocean
steamers than any of her sister States.
Nineteen of the rivers of Florida are
already navigable by steamers to the dis-
tance, in the aggregate, of over 1,000 miles.
These streams flowing in some instances
entirely across the State, make transpor-
tation available to extensive areas, and
in almost every instance have at their
mouths such harbor facilities as make
coast-wise navigation to vessels of moder-
ate draft safe and active.
The railway system of the State is
daily being made more extended and com-
plete. As fast as the roads are completed,
sawmills are erected for converting the
growing trees into lumber, and thus fur-
nishing a remunerative amount of way
freightage while much of the country is
still but sparsely settled. The turpen-
tine distilled from the pine and the resin
thus supplied, adds to this freightage; and.
before these are exhausted, vegetables artd
fruits, tropical and semi-tropical, for
Northern markets will take their place.
The facilities for transportation, for
travel and commerce in Florida, are assur-
ances of a prosperity highly encouraging.
Florida is favored above most of her sis-
ters in having all her territory convenient
to the commerce of the ocean, and in the
greater number and depths of her har-
bors, where her products may be exchang-
ed and the wealth of the commercial world
received.
Climate.
As a matter of fact, the thermometer
in summer rises higher in New York, Bos-
ton and Montreal than in St. Augustine.
Tampa and Key West. Sunstroke with
its terrors, so frequent in the cities, and.
indeed in the country North, is never
known in Florida.
The rainy season is in the summer
months, when the showers cool the atmok-
phere and refresh the crops. ThDring these
months the average moisture is slightly
greater than in the States further north.
Observation and experiment show. how-
ever. that the humidity of Florida in
summer is only 1.07 greater than that of
Minnesota, while in the winter months-
Florida's dry season-the moisture is less
than in Minnesota by 1.08 degrees.
The climate of the State resembles in
equability the climate of Barbadoes or
Madeira, both of which places are held
in high esteem by physicians as a resort
for invalids.
The quantity of rain which falls in the
State during three months of the year is
large. These months are July, August and


known as the "rainy season."
In connection with the subject of tem-
perature, we feel authorized to say that
Florida, owing to her peninsular forma-
tion and proximity to the sea, the great
proportion of inland water surface ex-
posed to evaporation, together with the
almost never ceasing air currents-sea
breezes-her summer climate is one of
the most agreeable.
Such breezes are a constant and endur-
ing feature of Florida's summer climate,
occurring with almost unvarying daily reg-
ularity, and must be experienced to be ap-
preciated. This feature is the secret of
the cool nights. It is a generally recog-
niyA-d fact that there are few nights in
summer when covering of some descrip-
tion is not found desirable.
The absence in Florida of prolonged and
severe drought, is perhaps owing to her
proximity to the influence of the Gulf
Stream. Certain it is that rarely, if ever,
in the history of agriculture in this State,
has such a drought prevailed as seriously
to impede the abundant production of the
usual crops.
Health.
Army statistics show that Florida is the
hJ1althie-t l)ortion of the United States.
Soil.
The -oil is exceedingly diversified, and
:t- varied character is suited not only to
the crops of other States generally, but
because of its near approach to a tropical
clime, to some products not grown else-
where in the States.
The soil is generally classed as first,
second and third-rate pine lands, and as
high and low hammock and swamp lands.
The pine lands cover much the larger
portion of the State, and the traveler in
the trains or over the highways through
them, is not apt to be impressed in such
casual inspection with their real worth.
The white sand on the immediate sur-
face is taken as conclusive testimony
against them; but that is not all sand
which in the careless glance, appears to be.
In a large portion of the State this sand
is mixed with finely comminuted bits of
shells, or carbonate of lime.
The second-class pine lands are all pro-
ductive. They are not hilly, but for the
most part undulating in their surface. In
some places, however, these undulations
amount to hills. These lands from their
accessibility and productiveness, the fa-
cility of fertilizing with cattle, and the im-
pression of their healthfulness above harm-
mocks. have induced their enclosure and
tillage, when the richer hammock--lias
were hard by, but more difficult to pre-
pare for cultivation.
The surface of the first-class pine lands
i- covered for several inches with a dark
vegetable mold. beneath which, to a depth
of several feet, is a chocolate sand loam,
Inixeil for the most part with limestone
pebblvei and resting on a substratum of
Ilarl. clay or limestone rock. The fertil-
ity and durability of this description of
lllnd may be estimated from the well-
knoliwn fact that it has on the upper Su-
wannee and several other districts, yielded,
during fourteen years of successive culti-
vation, without the aid of manure, four


hundred pounds of Sea Island cotton to
the acre, and the lands are as productive
as ever, so the limit of their durability
is still unknown.
The pine lands are nearly everywhere
studded at intervals of a few miles, with
the rich hammock land. These hammocks
are not, as is generally supposed, low,
wet lands, they do not require ditching
or draining. They vary in extent from
twenty acres to forty thousand acres.
This class of lands, under favorable cir-
cumstances, have produced as much as
three hogsheads of sugar per acre.
These hammocks, high and low, are gen-
erally admixed with lime, and the streams
running through them are impregnated
with it more or less.
Swamp lands are esteemed the most
durably rich lands in Florida. They oc-
cupy depressed places, where they receive
the drift from places more elevated. They
are alluvial, and still receiving deposits
from the higher grounds.
Another peculiarity is that the ferti-
lizers are applied with better effect, both
because the applications are not carried
away by the rains, as frequently they are
in hillier regions, and because the more
porous soil lets in the atmosphere more
readily to aid the fertilizers in the work
of decomposing the minerals of the soil,
and setting free the food elements they
contain for the use of the crops grown.
Tropical and Semi-Tropical Fruit
The pineapple is and will be grown
profitably anywhere south of twenty-nine
degrees north.
The cocoa-nut is attracting great at-
tention. There is a "boom" in its pro-
duction in the counties of Monroe and
Dade.
The date palm has not attracted much
attention as an investment, as about
twenty years are generally required to
obtain fruit from the seed.
The guava does well in the Southern
portion of Florida.
The "Sugar-apple," in local nomencla-
ture, the Spaniard put at or near the
head of the fruit list for its excellency.
It thrives as far north as Tampa.
The pomegranate, several varieties of
sIAeet and sour, grows finely in every
part of the State. The tree with its rich
foliage and brilliant coral-like flowers is
highly ornamental.
The mango is another tropical fruit of
high flavor and is now bearing abundant-
ly as far north as the twenty-eigfhth de-
gree of north latitude.
The sappadillo (atter a little familiarity
with it), is a very luscious and desirable
fruit. A few trees are growing as far
north as the Manatee river.
The alligator pear, is preferred by many
to any other tropical fruit; it attains per-
fection as far north as twenty-nine de-
grees north latitude.
The orange can be more extensively and
profitably grown in Florida than in any
other State in the Union and will ever re-
tain a superiority over any other section
of the country in its production.
The lemon, lime, citron, grapefruit and
shaddock can be successfully grown in a
large portion of the State.
The banana is one of the most popular
of tropical productions. With a little










12 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


painstaking the fruit can be ripened all
over Florida, and even further north.
Many varieties of the peach reach per-
fection in Florida, and in a few years will.
equal the value of any one fruit grown in
the State.
Many other fruits are profitably grown,
among others grapes, which are successful
in portions of the State. The scupper-
nong has been more extensively propo-
gated than any other grape. In Gadsden
County, there are vineyards of many va-
rieties of grapes, and they are largely cul-
tivated in many other counties.
Figs of every known variety do well
in Florida, and plums, both wild and cul-
tivated, are found throughout the State.
The pecan of the west grows finely all
over the State. It requires no tillage and
nursing. The trees once planted grow on
indefinitely and attain gigantic propor-
tions.
The almond grows well in Florida.
Of the list of small fruits or berries, we
think experience in Florida discards all
except the blackberry and strawberry.
Blackberries grow wild all over the Stbte
in great profusion. Strawberries grow to
great perfection all over the State.
Vegetables.
Vegetable growing in Florida is a great
success. Irish potatoes, Rocheford melons.
watermelons and celery take the lead, in
an annual profit of over one hundred dol-
lars per acre net. The sweet potato comes
nearer being a universal crop in Florida
than any other the soil produces. In the
southern counties it may be planted at
any season of the year, and generally is
not taken from the ground until needed
for use.
The production in Florida of early vege-
tables for shipment to northern markets
has assumed extensive proportions, and
will, in all time to come, prove a most im-
portant and profitable feature of her in-
dustries.
Woods.
Florida, by her many varieties of woods
and etenasve virgin forests, may be eas-
ily classed as the timber State of the
Union.
Besides her boundless areas of yellow
pine, whose timber is largely supplying
the world's markets, there is in Florida,
perhaps, a larger supply of cypress tim-
ber than in any other section of the Uni-
ted States. It is the shingle timber of the
South. Untold fortunes are still stand-
ing in this timber along the numerous riv-
ers, lakes, lagoons and swamps.
The live oak, white oak, red oak, and
many other varieties abound throughout
the State. There are also large quanti-
tie of red cedar, hickory, poplar and red
bay, which is commonly termed "Florida
Mahogany." It would be quite an endless
task to enumerate the long list of Florida
woods that have been and can be utilized
in the arts.
Stock Raising.
Stock raising at present is exciting con-
siderable interest in Florida. Now that in
the velvet bean and cassava we have a
substitute for corn in fattening, making
equally fine beef or pork, and much
cheaper.
Fish.
The waters surrounding the State teem
with the choicest food fish, while on every
hand native beds of oysters of fine flavor
are found.
Plhbepate.
The phosphate beds of the State are so


extensive as to assure the world for all
time of a supply of high-grade rock and
pebble.
Springs.
Florida possesses a feature in spring
formation as novel in character as they
are surpassingly beautiful in appearance.
The bursting of great rivers at one
bound from the earth is the remarkable
feature of some of Florida's fountains.
Most prominent among these is Silver
Spring, in Marion County, and the famous
Wakulla Spring in the county of that
name, fourteen miles south of Tallahas-
see. Thousands of visitors have seen Laie
Silver Spring, upon which steamboats en-
ter. The Wakulla, being in a section here-
tofore less resorted to by winter visitors
to Florida, is not so familiarly known.
Both deserve descriptions that our space
will not admit. Their great size, depth
and transparency are the most striking
features. Lying on the bottom of Wa-
kulla Spring, 180 feet below the surface
a dime piece can be as distinctly seen as
through the atmosphere.
The Blue Springs of Volusia County,
in South Florida, are about 40 feet in
depth. The scenery about this locality
is beautiful and picturesque in the ex-
treme, and worth a long journey to see.
The most beautiful color spring in
Florida, or perhaps in the world, is at
Crystal River, Citrus County, on the Gulf,
known as Hunter's Spring. There are
many large, beautiful springs at this point,
forming a noble river.
There are also mineral springs in va-
rious parts of the State, whose waters,
as tested in a large number of instances,
have curative properties, and are the re-
sort of invalids. Of this class are the
Newport Springs, en St. Mark's River, in
Wakulla County, the Hampton Springs, of
Taylor, the White Sulphur Springs, of
Hamilton, the Suwannee Springs of Su-
wannee, and the Green Cove Springs.


Chas. Blum & Co.
We have stated before and have great
pleasure in sttaing again, that the enor-
mous trade done by the firm of Chas. Blum
& Co., 517-519 West Bay Street, is a proof
positive to whom the people of the city
and the State entrust their orders to.
Nor is this to be wondered at, considering
the very high quality of their wines and
liquors, etc., together with the excep-
tional low charges made for them. Their
being the oldest and largest mail order
house in Jacksonville is well known and
therefore quite natural that all orders
entrusted to them will receive their imme-
diate and careful attention.


The Southern Fuel & Supply Co.
As may be easily understood, Jackson-
ville and the State are looking forward
with great eagerness for the presence of
the National Good Roads Convention, for
if we are wise in our generation we will
"take hold of and inwardly digest" the
lessons for good roads making which the
committee are about to show us upon the
arrival of the road machinery from Wash-
ington, and we can but suppose that af-
terwards the demand for the services of
the Southern Fuel & Supply Co., as con-
tractors for street and sidewalk paving
will be largely in demand, this firm we
hold being one of the best in the State.
For building material, granolithic tile ce-
ment, asphalt and brick, they are well
known and we can give our recommend
with the greatest pleasure.


The Million Dollar Ban BBegins Business,


The Florida Bank and Trust Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla., capital $1,000,000, began bus-
iness yesterday. With the dawn of the
day the business of the Mercantile Ex-
charge Bank was transferred to the new
institution. The officers are:
W. F. Coachman, president.
W. S. Jennings, first vice-president and
general counsel.
Arthur F. Perry, second vice-president.
W. A. Bedding, cashier and secretary.
George J. Avent, paying teller.
T. E. Jordan, receiving teller.
The board of directors represents prac-
tically every interest in the State. They
are as follows:
George W. Allen, president First Nat-
onal Bank, Key West, Fla,
Charles H. Brown, president First Nat-
ional Bank, Live Oak, Fla.
Frank E. Bond, cashier Volusia County
Bank, DeLand, and Merchants' Bank, Day-
tona, Fla.
William M. Brown, president Fort Dal-
las National Bank, and Bank of Bay Bis-
cayne, Miami, Fla.
C. W. Bartleson, president of the C. W.
Bartleson Company, Jacksonville, Fla.
W. F. Coachman, president; vice-pres-
ident Consolidated Naval Stores Company.
A. D. Covington, manufacturer naval
stores, Quiney, Fla.
Raymond Cay, manufacturer naval
stores, Jacksonville, Fla.
J. H. Crosby, Jr., president Greenleaf
& Crosby Company, Jacksonville, Fla.
John G. Christopher, machinery and mill
supplies, Jacksonville, Fla.
H. L Covington, president American
National Bank.
John H. Carter, president First National
Bank, Quincy, Fla.
C. A. Carson, president State Bank of
Kissimmee, Kissimmee, Fla.
Albert Carlton, president Carlton &
Carlton, bankers, Wauchula, Fla.
C. Downing, president National Bank of
Brunswick, and president the Downing
Company, Brunswick, Ga.
John T. Dismukes, president First Nat-
ional Bank, St. Augustine, Fla.
Frank H. Fee, president Bank of Fort
Pierce, Fort Myers, Fla.
F. P. Forster, cashier of First National
Bank, Sanford, Fla.
W. R. Fuller, wholesale grocer, Tampa,
Fla.
L A. Fraleigh, vice-president First Nat-
ional Bank, Madison, Fla.
James M. Graham, president First Nat-
ional Bank, Gainesville, Fla.
C. E. Garner, president Jacksonville
Board of Trade.
D. T. Gerow, postmaster, Jacksonville,
Fla., and manager Standard Oil Company,
Jacksonville, Fla.
S. B. Hubbard, president S. B. Hubbard
Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
A. M. Ives, president Julington Naval
Stores Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
W. S. Jennings, vice-president, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
J. F. Lewis, president Citizens' Bank.
Valdosta, Ga.
W. C. Lewis, president State Savings
Bank, and cashier First National Bank,
Tallahassee, Fla.
J. C. Little, secretary and treasurer Con-
solidated Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
W . McClelland, president McCelland,
Hobbs & Isted, bankers, Eustis, Fla.
H. A. MeEaehern, vice-president Con-
solidated Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.


D. H. McMillan, vice-president onsoli-
dated Naval Stores Company, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
W. H. Milton, cashier First National
Bank, Marianna, Fla.
James I. Munoz, general merchandise
broker, Jacksonville, Fla.
T. V. Porter, capitalist, Jacksonville,
Fla.
J. P. Taliaferro, United States Senator.
Jacksonville, Fla.
James Pritchard, president Indian River
State Bank, Titusville, Fla.
George M. Parker, general merchandise
broker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Arthur F. Perry, vice-president, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
C. B. Roegrs, president Consolidated
Grocery Company, and vice-president Con-
solidated Naval Stores Company, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Charles E. Smith, president Smith, Rich-
ardson & Conroy, Jacksonville, Fla.
Telfair Stockton, real estate, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
P. L Sutherland, president Bank of
Green Cove Springs, vice-president Hill-
man-Sutherland Company, Green Cove
Springs, Fla.
G. W. Saxon, president Capital City
Bank, Apaleahicola and Tallahassee, Fla.
Lorenzo A. Wilson, president Wilson &
Toomer Fertilizer Company, Jacksonville,
Fla.
That there is an urgent demand for
such an institution as the Florida Bank
and Trust Company must appeal 4o every
man of means in the State. Its organia-
tion is another step in the rapid devel-
opment of Florida and in the phenomenal
growth of Jacksonville. rt is stp that
anticipates the future that is in store for
Jacksonville when she has deep water to
the sea and becomes the shipping center
forcotton as well as the products of the
pine-a great commercial and manufetur-
ing city, with the ships of every nation
loading and unloading at her dock" Itf
organization is looked upon by business
men generally as one of the imperative
requirements of the times. It is the larg-
est bank in the State, and consequently
prepared to handle business requiring larg-
er facilities than were heretofore supplied.
It is a bank with stockholders in every
avenue of trade, and cooperative to the
extent that it will not be a close corpora-
tion. It will furnish a trust feature that
has been regarded for years as a business
necessity for Jacksonville, particularly so
now that great financial interests are
centered here and are continually being
added to her commercial development. It
will provide a bonding and surety fea-
ture that will furnish home accommoda-
tions to the thousands of people in Flor-
ida who are to-day, by necessity, employ-
ing foreign companies for the purpose. It
will keep in Florida, for Florida invest-
ments and for circulation among Florida
people, the thousands of dollars annually
that are being sent out of the State to
surety companies. It will be an institu-
tion with connections in every section of
Florida, so that all the people, however re-
mote they may be from Jacksonvilyle,
may feel its influence and enjoy its ad-
vantages. It will be an institution that
will develop and help Florida develop.
As the product of a necessity, it will not
interfere with any other bank, but work
in harmony with them all. The great
growth of Jacksonville has simply made
an increase in her banking facilities e-
sential.









SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


Among The Advertisers "

In This Issue. I


ww.-";wwww;w;;+~rwwvwuwww -i;1;lli


G. W. Clark.
There can be no doubt but that many
real estate agents of our city have been
making a splendid harvest and the topic
of conversation everywhere is real estate.
"What have you done and what are you
going to do being the questions one
tinds put to them from early morning tilt
late at night, and it is a fact neverthele-,
that exceptionally profitable investments
are to be very easily found at the present
moment, if you are in the market loi
estate and building lots. That is, ui
course, providing you have put yourself
in the hands of an estate agent who has
the full confidence of the public in gene-
ral and should you desire to learn the
name of such an agent, especially foi
North Springfield lots, why we have the
greatest pleasure in giving you the name
of Mr. G. W, Clark, Main and Monroe
Streets, and strongly advise you to see
him before going elsewhere.

Sebring & Bond
There is no doubt but that the name
of one of our most energetic and pro-
gressive firms in the real estate business
is now very frequently heard in all busi-
ness quarters and, for that matter, at
home also. We allude with great pleas-
ure to the firm of Sebring & Bond, whose
offices are to be found at rooms No. 315
and 317 Dyal Upchurch Building. The
firm holds a very important position in
the commercial life of the city and the
State also, their business, which has made
such great strides during the past year
is to be attributed to their quick per-
ception, true judgment and last but not
least their uniform courtesy to all whom
they may come in contact with; and we
would add their list of real estate, resi-
dences, oranges groves, turpentine and tim-
ber properties is a very large one.

Florid Ostrich Farm.
All those who contemplate paying our
beautiful city a visit should on no ac-
count fail to visit the Ostrich Farm.
Tie a wonderful sight altogether, and to
witness the driving of Oliver W. Jr., at-
tached to a sulky, as well as the riding
bare-back of an enormous bird by one of
the attendants named Cyclone, is some-
thing marvelous. The splendid collection
of sea lions, who go through a most inter-
esting performance each day, should on
no account be missed, and in addition to
these, there is a large zoological collec-
tion of animals and birds, the whole farm-
ing a grand entertainment for the visitor.
The enormous stock of beautiful real os-
trich feather boas and plumes, and all
kinds of Florida curios are in themselves
quite an attraction, and well worth seeing.

Hotel Roseland.
The opening of the Roseland Hotel in
Fairfield, gives Jacksonville another at-
tractive home for the tourist and winter
visitor. On account of the excellent lo-
cation, the Roseland has many charming
advantages as an ideal place to sojourn.
Situated on the beautiful St. Johns River,
in the select residential section, where
every comfort, amusement withunexcelled
cuisine is to be had, together with ex-


ceedingly moderate charges, makes this
hotel (to which we are very pleased to
give our recommendation) one of Jackson-
ville's best.
Its close proximity to the wonderful
sight of our city, the Florida Ostrich Farm,
makes it agreeably situated.

Christie & Christie.
It is very pleasurable to note the solid
progress made by some ot our real estate
men in the city, and we call attention of
our readers with real pride to that rising
tirm, Messrs. Christie & Christie, whose
ottices are to be found at the Dyal-Up-
church Building. Their real estate busi-
ness of late has grown enormously and an
intending investor for either real estate
ol residence should on no account tail to
see their lists, which are exceedingly choice
in collection, and what is frequently very
acceptable, can oe bought by a small cash
payment.
We can also say that with their well
merited confidence, business ability and
zeal in the best interests of their numer-
ous clients, we have no hesitation in men-
tioning their names for the future con-
sideration of intending investors.

F. E. Gilbert.
Automobilism is with most of us a very
interesting theme. Tis a photograph, so
to speak, of the age, and perhaps what
is equally true a reflection upon us if we
have not one, or an old one. F. E. Gil-
bert, of 37, 39, 41 West Forsyth Street,
who is the direct agent for the Olds Mo-
tor Works, Detroit, Mich., has a very large
stock of fine tonneau cars, and the car
that they desire principally to bring be-
fore the notice of the public is the "Olds-
mobile Tonneau Car," which he claims is
the climax of automobile construction. It
certainly is a very handsome machine,
and upon making your request known to
him by either mail or messenger, he will
forward you a very handsome art cata-
logue, containing every information rela-
tive to it.

Merrill-Stevens Co.
As men of business, we are always in-
terested to learn who are the men who
are "up and doing," who it is, so to speak,
who are the builders up of our grand city
since the late disastrous fire, and it is not
difficult to know who are its prominent
pioneers when we have before us the name
of the Merrill-Stevens Co., of East Bay
St. Into our beautiful St. Johns River
boat after boat, ship after ship, steamer
after steamer is launched on its waters
continuously. Without doubt no one can
make an'impeachment against this firm
for being behind the times. They are lead-
ing the way at a quick pace in making
-Jacksonville the "City of Florida." Be-
sides their vast ship-building trade (not
forgetting ship repairing, which is an
enormous business with them), they are
our principal boiler makers and repairers,
still boilers and pumps being a specialty
with them. That the hundreds of work-
men in their shops and yards are all skilled
mechanics is well known, and being man-
aged by those most courteous, attentive
and energetic partners, Messrs. Merrill and


~" I~I~~~~~~~~~Q~~CUCI1~C~ ~~46~~CCCl~,~t4U1111~~


--


Stevens, is naturally the cause of the
firm's great success today.

C. Buckman.
The object of these few words is to ad-
vise all intending enquirers or purchasers
of real estate to place themselves only in
the hanus of our leading real estate agents,
men who have gamed their prominent po-
sitions solely and only by beig able to
give their clients, when desrea, a deear
and general view of the existing law ol
real property in Jacksonville and the
State, and of the mode of conveying anu
charging the same a well as being men
out integrity and highest conduct. zu man
can become a good conveyancer until he
has become acquainted with the doctrine
of estates. It is indispensam e that he
should know, when called upon to advse:
as to the form of a deed, lease or mort-
gage, what interest the grantor possess,
how that interest may be affected by
charged incumbrances, and how these lat-
ter may be ascertained and removed. hns
and all other important knowledge of the
Ieal Estate business is to be found pos-
aebsed by C. Buckman, 22 Hogan Street,
whose quick perception, true judgment and
last, but not least, uniform courtesy to
all his clients, makes him one of Jack-
sonville's foremost leading estate agents.

The Ploof-McKinaon Company.
The enormous business done by the
Ploof-McKinnon Company, East Bay St.,
in Mill Supplies, Sawmill Machinery,
Boilers, Pumps (and not forgetting the
very latest and most modern irrigating
plants), is astounding-nor is this to be
wondered at when one considers the cause
of this firm being one of the principal
mill supply stores in Florida, they have
by their manner of handling their busi-
ness, together with the extremely moder-
ate charges made for all supplies in their
large store, gradually but surely step by
step scaled the ladder of progress until
now reaching the top rung thep stand
pre-eminently among the most progres-
sive and reliable mill suppliers to be found
anywhere in the State. If you go to
their fine store you will see at a glance
the enormous and varied stock held by
them, and then of course 'we cannot re-
frain from speaking in the highest terms
of admiration for the exceeding courteous
attention received not only from all the
employees of the firm when entering the
store, but from Mr. Ploof and Mr. Mc-
Kinnon alike, small possibly, but essential
ingredients, we hold, in the successful
building up of all firms.

E. 0. Painter & Co.
No recommend is necessary to bring to
the notice of our numerous subscribers
the name of E. O. Painter & Co., a firm of
the highest standing in the fertilizing mar-
kets, all over the State, and of course,
Florida in particular. The name is a
household word to farm and grove pro-
ducers. But lest there should still remain
a few who have as yet not tested their
well tried and guaranteed fertilizing ma-
terials, we advise a speedy application
being made them for their lists and sam-
ples which they, Messrs. E. O. Painter &
Co., will have the greatest pleasure in
forwarding per return mail. From the
most valuable sources of information of
those who have made their lands, crops,
vegetables, small fruits and orange groves
a full success these past seasons, we learn
from them that they attribute their sue-
cessful raising largely to having used the


fertilizers from the above firm, and such
being the case, we feel the greatest pleas-
ure in giving the highest recommend. In
no instance we believe will a failure tafe
place.

3. J. Mlgfll & Co.
It is good to note the progress made
by R. J. Magill & Co, real estate agents
of our city, a record to be proud of. The
confidence shown him by hundreds of
clients who have placed unreservedly their
affairs in his hands, support this state-
ment which we make with full knowledge
of what we state. This great knowledge
of lands of all kinds, estates and houses
has been gained by the continued ex-
perience of many years and from the first
opening of his office in 304 'West Build-
ing, he has sold thousands of acres of
timber land in different parts of Jackson-
ville and the State, and we are informed
by him at the present moment that he has
some exceptionally fine lots at remarkably
low prices to offer future intending in-
vestors to whom we have the greatest
pleasure in recommending with all confi-
dence to place themselves in his hands, and
whether they desire to gain information
only or to conclude a purchase with him,
they will find that his uniform courtesy is
always present.

Greeley & SLa.
There are few subjects of English juris-
prudence which have been more fully dis-
cussed than those which relate to Real
Estate, and its mode of alienation. From
the time when Aittleton wrote his treatise
on Tenures, more than four hundred years
ago, to the present day, the subject has
in various forms, enlisted the best talent
of the English juridical writers. Although
most of their works contain matter of
great value to an American student, they
are encumbered with much that is useless
to him, and which indeed may in many in-
stances mislead him. Such a mistake,
however, could not be well made by Gree-
ley & Son, 111 West Forsyth Street, whose
practical knowledge of Real Estate con-
veyancing is, to use a vulgarism, "up-to-
date." No failure as regards full satis-
faction will be found by those who place
themselves in the hands of Greeley & Son,
and we are indeed pleased in having the
pleasure to recommend both to our sub-
scribers.

Wilso & Toomer.
One thing that should not be overlooked
when you are selecting a farm, espec-
ially if you expect to make this farm
productive of special crops like corn, early
vegetables and small fruits, etc., it is to
use reliable fertilizers. The most fertile
farms in the world are produced largely
by using those high-lass and well-known
fertilizers, and it has been demonstrated
over and over again that if such are used
success is certain. Messrs. Wilson &
Toomer, wholesale fertilizers of our city,
are too well known perhaps to have men-
tion made at our hands, but we feel com-
pelled to speak of the name of this fine
firm, lest there should be some who have
as yet not traded with them. For Florida
vegetables, Florida oranges, Florida straw-
berries, these ideal fertilizers of various
brands are undisputable and indispensa-
ble, and they wish every grower in the
State to have their books, and will send
upon application per return mail their
new and revised editions just published by
them. We strongly advise an, application
being made them.








14 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Drink a Bottle of the Most Delicious and Refreshing Drink Produced.


I I FOR SALE!

7,000 Acres Round Timber

ON EAST COAST RAILWAY e r
Ran ad Water Trausertatl pe r Ac


C. BUCKMAN


By the highest aalysis-The purest and most health-giving drink produced.
****1111 IIIIII IIIte IoI SIt*1*tt1 *# a I I Ill*** 011444
City and We Can Locate What
SSuburban You Want

HOMES

GREELEY & SON 0
Farming and I1I Wet Forsyth St.. Room 12
Timber Lands Jacksonville, Fla.
WE WAT Ee*********tt 111g4* STATE TO HAVE OteR BOO

WE WANT EVERY GROWER II tht STATE TO HAVE OUR BOOKS


22 HOGAN STREET.


I


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


TIME TrwED. OnOP FESTED
SIMON PURE FERTILIZERS


Plant Food for All Oropas


I E


NANuFAo1ru1 mY
0, Painter Fertilizer
JAOWKOVILLE, FLIOAA.


00.m,


"FLORIDA VEGETABLES"-A complete "IRISH POTATOES"-Book on "Soil,
manual on Florida crops. i Seed, Planting and Cultivation, Effect of
"FLORIDA ORANGES"-'Book of special Fertilizers, Digging and Shipping."
interest to orange growers. "PINEAPPLE FERTILIZING"-Of special
"FLORIDA STRAWBERRIES"-Booklet i interest to pineapple growers.
on "Soil, Varieties, Cultivation and Fer- "IDEAL FERTILIZERS"-Book showing
tilization." all our different brands, analyses, prices.
New and revised editions of the above. just published, sent tree for the asking.
WILOi &i TOOMER FERTILIZER COMPANY


If you want an Automobile for
Florida Roada?



A 're the only ones
That can be used.
FRIED. E. GILBERT STATE AGENT.
EVEILYTHING FOR THE AUTO AND THE MAN.
S37T-4 W. FORSYTH STREET. JACKSONVILLE,. LA.


SELCACEF RATHSKELLER

Fest S e 117 West fesyth St., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Fiest Servke
Is the Smth
T Importe and Domestic Wines
Business Mea's Lnch
z : to 2:m LIQUORS AND CIGARS

OPEN SUNDAYS ALLEC! JACOBB. Pronrletor


I I



Consolidated Grocery Co.


SUCCESSORS TO


Shipments to all
points that can be
reached the cheap-
eat hr the customer
through the branch
stores of the Com/
pany, and prompt
attention to all
ordrs
through the
main office and
branches.


C. B. Rogers Company, Florida
Grocery Compary, Florida Naval
Stores and Commission Company,
Motoal Naval Stores Company of
Jacksonville, Gulf Naval Stores
Company of Tampa, Golf Naval
Stores Company of Pensacola,
West Coast Naval Stores Com-
pany of Pemsacola, Southern Na-
ver Stores Company of Savaumat,
6a.
Will handle everything in heavy
and IIlgt groceries, grain, provi-
slons, domestic and Imported gro-
ceries, tmrpentine tools, etc.


BRANCHES:


Taupa,


SaIMab Ba


MAIN OFFICE & WAREHOUSES: JACKSONVILLE,


*- ...KNOX AUTOMOBILE CO...


ANUPACTURIERS Or
Waterless. Pleasure anid Commercial.


nembers
A. L. A.MPL


FLA.


Agencies in all cities. Send for Catalogue.


~%"f3ir313l C~is ISM Ms IN Isis 9%4S+SGx3x+%" Isis Isis IX_.f7WC~ax%%V"


+T~T+SI+ NINO I NIN+SE INIIXII NINO No 15"IEll


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I


SPRINGIFIELD. MASS.






SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15



Some of Florida's Captains of Industry

Who Are Loud in Their Advocacy of Good Roads.


T. A. Jamhias, Pe.acol, vi.


Robt. J. iifht, Crytal River, Hk.


V. A. McNia.n.


H. W. afford, Raiford, Fi


J. R. Ma weo, saioy, Fla.


k1;^)11X^ WN N N&S^







16 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The
Real Propesitlien
,eal Northern EAST COAST

Se Automobile AUTOMOBILE
190:5 MODELS NOW READY. COMPANY.

1906 models of the very latest designs are now ready for immediate delivery. The NORTHERN Automobile is the
talk of the automobile world, because it has proved itself to be the liveliest and snappiest car that has yet been produced.
It is the very latest "edition de luxe" of a touring car-graceful, easy-running and powerful.
At the PARIS AUTO EXPOSITION over 50 per cent of the cars exhibited were shaft-driven, every car had the clutch
in the fly-wheel and water-cooled. These auto-car features are accepted today by the finest manufacturers (who have been
building motor cars for the past 25 years) as being absolutely correct and indispensable.
The Northern Autenaeble.I
Is a positive success, being light in weight, perfectly comfortable, strong and durable, and, what is equally essential, hand-
some and very stylish, making it above all others "La premiere mode" in automobiles.
As expected, we are having a splendid season's business, and being perfectly assured that it will be an AUTOMOBILE
YEAR, have prepared in our garage an enormous selection of various machines, the largest stock of Touring Cars ever
seen in the South. Being agents for
seerte N. Pierce Co., Buffal, N.Y. Northern Mfg. C., Detroit Mie. Pope Mfg. Co., Hartfrd, Co.m
We can show you the most reliable and most delightful riding cars that we know of, and will be happy to refer you, by
permission, to experienced owners who will gladly tell you the good points of these machines.
Repairlag.
Is done here only by auto experts. Our foreman is acknowledged the best gas engine man in this section. Superior
quality of workmanship and materials, together with correct engineering and design are guaranteed, our charges being
very moderate.
Consist of everything for the automobile and our show windows are full of new ideas. Our storage is the largest in the
city, and we shall receive it as a compliment, if you will permit us to forward you full information and prices.
EAST COAST AUTOMOBILE CO., Deaers in Automobies and Marine Egine Supplies, 18-.20-2 Ocea Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
G. R. CHAMPLAIN, President. A. D. COVINGTON, Vice-President. E. A. GROOVER, Sec. and Treas.







JOSEPH R. DUNN 'P"' Y SLE


213 West Building JOS. ZAPF. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Wholesale Whtl. Imparted Lquao. Ale. tout and Ginger Al.,
Imparted ond Domestic Wines nd Mneral W-ters. Et.
Jacksonville, Florida Real Estate Anheuser-Busch Beers, Draught and Bottled.
Jacksonville, Florida Real Estate 4V
THE BLUE LABEL. FAUST. BUDWEISER.,
KING Or BOTTLED BEERS.
ABSOLUTE SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. OR MONEY CHEERFULLY
REFUNDED. WRrE FOR PIRK LIST.
*eseaei e e i e seessse s* i ee *I e*o*e e* ** e* ****se oesB* s ei t w w w t e el ee w %wa ww
A. D. STEVENS. N. M., Prhid.at. A. R. MERRILL. Vioe Prsideat. J. E. MERRILL. Trasurer. F. SEELEY. Secretary.

MERRILL-STEVENS COMPANY
MARINE CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIRS
Boilers ad Macklaery. 600 TO 656 East Bay St. s1, 500 "d 12 0 o ro aru e Ra lways 1A
Operation.
Dock Balldig and Sbmarlae Diving. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 40o0 To i Foms Dock nuder cosstrctlos.


VISIT THE OSTRICH FARM JWHIENIN
JACKSONVILLE

The Greatest Attraction in Floridea.
SALIEESOOn FrO
THE PERFORMING SEA LIONS MUST BE SEEN. Ostrich Goods at the Farm.


r _C ~I ~~L ~L ~1 ~111


SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL R ECORD.


16


~,drlL~ _ILL _-L -LLCCC.,ILL II _-I ~I ~L ~L- ~LZ










SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


****69">***666 * t*f *ft--**-****


Among The Advertisers |

In This Issue.

|--"g--gg-g 9,99.9.99m# U@* *V9 99# 1


Among the foremost wholesale business
houses in Jacksonville is the Southern
Hide & Skin Co. They do an immense
business in Hides, Furs, Wool, Beeswax,
Alligator Skins, etc. They not only buy
Florida hides, but also do an extensive
business in Georgia, South Carolina, Ala-
bama and Mississippi. It seems strange
that hides from these States should be
shipped to Jacksonville, and they would
not be shipped here were it not
for the fact that shippers can ob-
tain more money for their goods
by shipping them to Jacksonville
than by selling at home. The South-
ern Hide & Skin Co. represent twenty-
six tanneries in the United States and
have excellent foreign connections, which
enables them to pay outside prices for
all classes of goods in their line, and
which has caused them to become the most
extensive handlers of the before mention-
ed goods in the South. If they can suc-
cessfully compete with the large dealers
in Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina and
Mississippi, which they are now doing, it
must appear very obvious that Jackson-
ville is one of the most important hide
markets in the South.

A Jacksonville concern which is aiding
materially in the building up of the city
and develepoment of the State, is the
Realty Title and Trust Company. Its
business is to protect investors against
losses through defective titles and furnish
impartial reports upon the character and
condition of lands offered to purchasers
or as security for loans. The business is
managed by gentlemen of experience and
established reputation as experts in their
special lines. The company's card ap-
pears elsewhere in this issue.

Coca-Cola.
We believe we are perfectly correct in
saying that the king of soft drinks is
Coca-Cola. Its wonderful strides in be-
coming the public's favorite drink is sim-
ply marvelous. Everybody is wanting and
drinking this beverage. It has surpassed
all other drinks of a similar kind and
"swept the board" as it were of, all at-
tempting to be its rival. Nor is this to
be wondered at, now that it is acknowl-
edged to be the purest and most health-
giving of all drinks. In fact, by the last
analysis it has been declared "absolutely
pure," its chemical test showing that it
was entirely free from adulteration arti-
ficial preservatives and impurities. The
bottling department in West Bay Street
is indeed a sight to be seen and the out-
put of last year reaching the enormous
total of several million bottles. It is not
only a delicious drink, but a great stimu-
lant in producing health in many ways,
especially indigestion. If our readers have
not tried it, they certainly should.

T. Murphy.
A Jacksonville concern which is un-
doubtedly aiding materially in the build-
ing up of the city is T. Murphy, Jackson-
ville Machine and Iron Works, 610 E. Bay
Street, and by this we mean to convey
that the great progress made by this firm
is a proof positive that buyers of machin-


ery know where to place their orders.
Their vast workshop is a sight to be seen.
and their stock an enormous one. The
repairing of locomotives, steamships, saw-
mill and mine machinery is a specialty
with them as well as their power trans-
mission and waterworks equipment de-
partment.
The business is managed by gentle-
men of great experience and established
reputation as experts in their special lines,
and we cannot refrain from speaking in
the highest terms of admiration of the
exceeding courteous attention when going
through their vast workshop not only
from the workmen but from Mr. T. Mur-
phy himself.

B. Hubbard & Company.
Jacksonville's finest store, the pride of
its citizens is the opinion of everyone with-
out exception, and it is quite unnecessary
for us to add a single word more in speak-
ing of this magnificent structure, but we feel
compelled to speak also of the enormous
trade that is done by them within its
doors. The S. B. Hubbard & Company, of
32-44 West Bay Street, is the finest hard-
ware store in the State, and they are not
only retailers, but wholesale emporters and
manufacturers of mill, plumbers, steam
and gas-fitters' supplies, and they carry
the finest range of brass and galvanized
boat trimmings. Beside these they are the
special agents for the famous Knowles
Steam Pumps. We advise you when in
the city to pay a visit to this vast store,
it will surprise you, and we add with
great pleasure that the courtesy extended
you by having S. B. Hubbard, Jr, at its
head is assured.

Joseph R. Dunn.
We recall with pleasure the name of a
firm among the foremost business houses
of Jacksonville, that of Joseph R. Dunn,
213 West Building, real estate agent.
That merit wins every time in this busy
city of push and progress must be the
accepted cause of his large and increasing
business. His lists of various estates,
lands and houses is a very large one, com-
prising as it does some of the choicest
in the real estate market,'and from what
we know personally at remarkably low
charges. His great success is, of course,
the outcome of the full confidence placed
in his judgment by his clients whose in-
terests he guards with the greatest care,
and in commending you to place your-
self in his hands (should you desire to
deal in any one of the above items) we
do so with every assurance that you will
find this recommend valuable to you.

The Covington Company.
Were it not for the support largely
received by the retail stores from their
wholesale friends, many retailers would
undoubtedly not be in so prosperous a
state as they are to be found to-day. On
that account Jacksonville's success is pri-
mary and largely due to these wholesale
stores who hold that "success for their
customers is their success."
These remarks pertain largely to that
splendid wholesale Dry Goods firm, The
Covington Company, wholesalers for Shoes
and Dry Goods, etc., and we say with the


true pride of a citizen that it is a Jack-
sonville concern which is aiding materially
in the building up of our city and the de-
velopment of our State, and the business
being managed by gentlemen of experience
and reputation as experts in their special
departments with R. V. Covington as the
head, is a proof positive of its continued
success.

The Clyde Steamship Company.
The magnificent steamships of this fine
line are the admiration of the State, and
indeed we are of the belief that Jackson-
ville is more largely indebtted for what
it is today than any other rail or steam-
ship line. Their splendid service to New
York and other points are perfect, and
afford all who travel by the Clyde Steam-
ship Company very quick service and what
is equally essential the most agreeable and
comfortable mode of travelling. Their
stateroom accommodations being perfect.
Their rates are fully in touch with mod-
ern and up-to-date progress, and the ex-
pense of reaching any given point, be it
New York, Charleston, Sanford, Boston,
Providence and all Eastern and Northern
points, will certainly be found con-
siderably less than by rail. Their new
offices on West Bay Street are splendidly
fitted up and every information will be
quickly and courteously given by all the
employees of the company. Over which
the attentive and energetic Assistant
General Passenger Manager F. M. Iron-
monger, Jr., is the head

East Coast Automobile Company.
The growth of Jacksonille is simply
marvelous, everyone being impregnated
with the spirit of progress. Nowhere can
this go-ahead-ness be more noticed than
with that splendid firm located in the fine
range of buildings at 18, 20 and 22 Ocean
Street. We allude to the East Coast Au-
tomobile Company, whose grand selection
of the very latest automobiles form a com-
plete exposition.
Progressive people, thinking people, have
with their manner of dress, changed the
style of their automobiles, and by this
we mean to convey to our readers the ne-
cessity now existing, if they are on the
lookout for the very latest mode in auto-
cars, to make their purchase direct only
with those first-class firms whose known
reliability is a positive fact. Hence it is
that we have the greatest pleasure in
giving our recommend to the above firm,
and whether it be for Automobiles, Ma-
rine Engine Supplies or repair work (which
is effected promptly by the most skilled
mechanics), we strongly adise a visit be-
ing paid them before purchasing else-
where. The fact that Mr. G. R. Champlain
is the president of the company and M.
C. Hutto their manager, is proof alone
(if proof were required) that the highest
courtesy and fullest satisfaction will be
given.

Consolidated Grocery Company.
Jacksonville is looking forward with the
keenest interest to the building and prog-
ress being made of that magnificent block
of buildings and wharves now being erect-
ed on East Bay Street by the Consolidat-
ed Grocery Company. It will, without
doubt, be the finest building in the city,
and, together with its enormous output
of trade, will surpass any other company
in the State. The old adage that "unity
is strength" is very positively proven here,
and of course the State are the primary
gainers by the amalgamation. The com-


pany handles everything in heavy and
light groceries, grain, provisions, and tur-
pentine tools, etc., besides all other ar-
ticles found under the heading of im-
ported groceries.

The Vehicle & Harness Company.
If any of our readers are contemplat-
ing purchasing anything in the way of a
buggy, surrey, wagon or harness they
should on no account fail to visit the large
carriage house of the Vehicle & Harness
Company, at 630 West Bay Street, the
president of which is Colonel Meyers.
Here will be found oif exhibition one of
the finest collections of carriages and har-
ness, etc., which, together with the very
latest styles (a very important item), the
very highest qualities and the most mode-
rate of prices, makes this firm above most
others the one to which a visit should be
paid before deciding your purchases else-
where.

The Rathakeller.
We are pleased to notice the great pat-
ronage being extended to our latest cafe.
We allude to the Rathskeller in the Blum
Building on West Forsyth Street, which
was recently opened by that enterprising
caterer for the public, A. Jacobs. Tis
without doubt the cafe to obtain and en-
joy a splendid lunch, dinner or supper.
Their chef, by his art, making you feel
that you are dining at some noted Paris
restaurant.
Of course it is amply supported by the
choicest wines, liquors and cigars and such
being the case, we are very pleased to
recommend it to all of our readers who
may wish to know where to dine or sup.

The Eerrett Hotel.
One hotel in particular should not be
overlooked in selecting one's hotel when
coming to our charming city. We allude
to that fine hotel The Everett, corner Bay
and Julia Streets. The management has
now passed from H. Mason to G. H. Mason
and the many improvements lately made
show the determination of the son to
keep in touch with the modern wishes
of our visitors, as to each individual
guest's comfort, etc. The hotel is on the
European plan, the rates being extremely
reasonable.

The Brobston-Fendig Company.
We have pleasure in bringing to the
notice of our readers the name of the
Brobston-Fendig Company, now situated
in their fine newly fitted up quarters next
the Aragon hotel. Being managed by busi-
ness men of marked ability and integrity,
they have gained the full confidence of the
public of Jacksonville and the State.

Joseph Zapf.
It is no compliment, and possibly hardly
necessary to call the attention of our
readers to a firm like Joseph Zapf, one of
Florida's leading and progressive whole-
sale dealers in distributors of whiskies,
wines, beers and mineral waters. The fa-
mous "Budweiser," the beverage of the
American home, is distributed by them
throughout Jacksonville and the State and
by the extraordinary output of the pasi
year amounting to over one hundred mil-
lion bottles, is a proof positive that it is
unequalled as a table beverage. Those
who may not have yet traded with this
firm should send to West Bay Street for
their price list, for they guarantee the
highest satisfaction, for everything they
keep is absolutely first-class.









SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


MARION


COUNTY,


The Pioneer Good Roads County of Florida.
Has collected during the past eight years over $100,000 out of its ordinary taxation
without issuing one dollar in bonds, and built over 100 miles of rock and gravel ..
roads, costing from $500 to $1,000 a mile. ,
MARION leads in high-grade phosphates, and has the richest mines in the
State. It is famed for the purity and volume of its lime output.
MARION leads in thoroughbred stock farms and the quality of its cattle.
MARION eured in cold storage in 1903, oe- half a million pounds of hams,
shoulders and sides, and the industry issteadily growing.
MARION'S turpentine and lumber products are important.
MARION'S lands for agriculture and trucking have no equal in the State.
MARION is famous as the home of the succulent watermelon and the delicious
cantaloupe, and its crops are heavy and profitable.
MARION contains, according to Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe, famed as the
author of Uncle Tom's Cabin, the eighth wonder of the world, in Silver Springs,
six miles from the county site, reached by hard road and rail.
Silver Springs is the main supply of the Ocklawaha River, and no more pic-
turesque stream can be found in the world, which tens of thousands of tourists at-
test. If you visit Florida and miss the trip, you have denied yourself one of
the greatest pleasures of travel.
OCALA is Marion's County Site, an up-to-date city of 6,000 people, with
modern improvement.
Marion County and Oeala have openings for men of means and purpose. The
latch-string hangs out. Come and see us, or write to


H, A. FORD, President Ocala Board of Trade


C. L, uB I INGER Secretary.


Knox Automobile Co., Springfield, Mas.
It is good to note the exceptional prog-
res achieved by some of the best auto-
mobile firms, this can be well said of the
Knox Automobile Co.
They are one of the few suppliers oi
autocars who keep pace, so to speak, with
with the arts, sciences and fashions of this
new industry, and the comfort on all roads
is insured by their cars. Their collec-
tion of the very latest designs must be
seen to be appreciated, and in speaking of
the superior quality of their workman-
ship and materials employed, we with
pleasure add that their charges are very
moderate.

Wiudor Hotel.
What we are most desirous of doing for
all those contemplating a visit to our
wonderful city, is to bring before their no-
tice the name of Jacksonville's foremost
hotel. We allude to that palatial hotel,
"The Windsor." This new hotel, erected
since the lamentable fire of 1901, is a most
beautiful building, modern in all its ap-
pointments and interior finish, four stories
in height, it covers an entire block, facing
one of the prettiest parka to be found in
Florida. Its accommbdation is for 500
guests. Its rooms being heated through-
out with steam. Its cuisine is unsur-
passed, and its rates are to be found ex-
tremely reasonable, and we have the great-
est pleasure in advising our readers to
pay it a visit.

Aragoa Hotel
Few hotels in our charming city are
more better situated for either the trav-
elling man or tourist than the "Aragon."
Since the great extension and internal
alterations of last year were made, they
have, so to speak, "been in luck's way,"
having done an enormous trade. Of course,
it is not very difficult to find the reason
for this when one learns that H. N. O'Neal
is the proprietor and we have great pleas-
ure in saying to all our readers that the
rates (American plan) being extremely
moderate, their cuisine unexcelled and


their courteous service unsurpassed, is
best of all reasons for making the Aragon
their headquarters when in town.

J. L. Jones.
It is good to note what great progress
has been made by some of the DeSoto
County estate men, a proof positive of the
exceptional ability of the man and what
is, of course, equally important, the well
merited confidence placed in him. This
is exactly the case with J. L. Jones estate
agent, Arcadia, DeoSto County, whom we
have pleasure in bringing to the notice of
our numerous subscribers.

Hotel Indian River, Rockledge, Fla.
It is with real pleasure we direct the
attention of all our subscribers to that
beautiful "Hotel Indian River," Rockledge,
Fla. Situated amid lovely orange groves
and garden, high, dry healthful and in the
center of the finest hunting and fishing
grounds, makes this hotel one of Florida's
best, and it would be an injustice to its
management were one to omit stating that
together with its unexcelled cuisine and
true home-like comforts, its torma are ox-
reptionally moderate.

DeLand Board of Trade.
We should never be too old to learn, for
wise men profit by the experience of
others. Men (or city councils, we should.
prefer to say) who are not wise have to
buy experience and pay for it them-
selves. Sometimes even'then they do not
learn, but keep buying and paying dearly
for what was placed before them free and
would have saved them trouble and some-
times vast cost, if they had only used
their eyes and kept their judgments tolera-
bly clear. Thus it is that we can always
and do always take an interest in what-
ever the DeLand Board of Trade, DeLand,
Fla., do or are doing. Their counsels are
always wise ones to follow, and we can
with the pride of a true Floridian ad-
vise many other boards of trade in our
State to keep their eyes on DeLand.


The ovington Company


Wholesale Merchants



SHOES, HATS, DRY GOODS

BOSTON:
26 Lincoln Street AND NOTIONS.


NEW YORK :
256 Church St.


New Smyrna.
We are of course either speaking our-
selves or hearing our friends speak of the
beauties of our charming State, and it is
ind-eel singular how frequently New Smyr-
na is mentioned by us all, for there is but
one opinion-that it is the most pictu-
resque and healthful place in Florida.
There they have the best fishing and hunt-
inl and what is most important, the best
otf goodJ shelU roads and streets, and all
tin- other fine advantages (and perhaps
more) than many other similarly situ-
ated places.
All those who should desire to learn
about New Smyrna should either go and
.see or address Chas. R. Dilzer, who will
be very happy to answer all enquiries.

The Inn, Ormnod, Fla.
This beautiful hotel, only 106 miles south
of Jacksonville, is one of the hotels that
we can give the fullest recommend, sit-
uated directly on the famous Ormond au-
tomobile race course, it is most convenient
to all automobilists, its good garage ac-


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


commodations being perfect. For excel-
lence of cuisine and service, together with
its extremely moderate charges, makes
this hotel stand a peer among the best of
Plor.da's hotels, and that W. 8. Kenney is
the inanager makes it a surety that the
comforts of. its visitors in every direction
will not be overlooked.

A. St. Clair Abrams,

Attfrney-t-Law,
Jacksonvillle, -Frlda.'
P.O. .ex, 614. 81 Prmco. 709.
Rutledge Holmes,
Architect
Reems 201-202 West *lsll
Jacke--vMe, f. -InW

Judge Jno. W. Dodge,
Atterme ad CemM Mr-at-Law,
JaeksaavNl, - Flrlla.
Rem estate anmi COeMMI Law.


18


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SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 19






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ticn to be held in Jacksonville, Fla., January 19,-21, 1905, naming over one thousan delegates.
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20 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

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Letters of Governors and other Prominent Americans


Hon. CHARLES B. AYCOCK,
Governor, Raleigh, North Carolina.
S "The importance of good public roads
throughout the States and Territories
of this country cannot be exaggerated.
Good roads are both a means and sign
of prosperity. Without them no State
can be fully developed; the isolation of
country life is lessened, and people,
finding life on the farm more convenient
and comfortable, cease to crowd into
the cities. The direct saving in the cost
of transportation is much less than the
gain which comes from making country
life easier and communication more speedy.
"I am in hearty sympathy with the general movement for
the improvement of Public Roads."







Hon. WILLIAM H. HUNT,
Governor, San Juan, Porto Rico.
"I am a great believer in the development of a country by
means of good roads. Evidence of this fact lies in the constant
efforts made to open this beautiful island to the agriculturist and
the investor, by means of thoroughly constructed highways. In
four years we have built more than half as many miles of road
as the Spaniards did in nearly four centuries, and we have built
thoroughly good roads. The result is the reduction in the cost of
transporting coffee, fruit and other products to the sea. But the
policy of continuing to build must be kept up, and in a few years
the tourist and investor will find easy access to any part of
this rich land.
"I wish you all encouragement and success in the work
of your association."





Hon. MIGUEL A. OTERO,
Governor, Santa Fe, New Mexico.
"There is nothing more deserving the
attention of National and State gov-
ernments than the improvement and
betterment of public roads and high-
ways. The Roman roads exist to-day
as perhaps the greatest monument to
her imperial sway. Her temples and
triumphal arches have crumbled and de-
cayed, while her public roads and baths
exist. To my mind there is much more
reason for expending the public money
upon highways on the land, than upon
waterways, while the latter have been considered almost ex-
clusively in appropriations.
"In this territory the last Legislature made a large appro-
priation for the construction of a road between this city and
Las Vegas, across the mountains, shortening the distance
now required in going around the mountain more than one-
half and making a magnificent scenic route. The work upon
it is about half completed, and it is expected to continue this
road toward the South, down the Rio Grande Valley, to
the Texas line. Thus the Territory, which is not considered
fit for admission as a State, has shown its appreciation of
the good work of your Association."

^U^^S^U-
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Hon. W. S. JENNINGS,
Governor, Tallahassee, Florida,
"The advantage of good roads, and
the saving to the people with the in-
creased value of the lands as a result of
them, and the great convenience to
the traveling public, is apparent without
argument. The experiments in scien-
tific road construction which have been
made in Florida have been of great
value to the people generally, and sev-
eral counties of this State have estab-
lished local systems of permanent and
substantial road improvement. I have
recommended to our legislature that a law be enacted estab-
lishing a uniform system of road improvement outside of
the incorporated cities and towns, prescribing the kinds of
material that must be used in such work, defining a stand-
ard road, in width, convexity, depth of bed, etc., as may
be recommended and found to be necessary for the estab-
lishment and maintenance of permanent road beds, to be ap-
proved and accepted by competent engineers before the
money shall be paid out of funds raised for this pur-
pose. The movement for betterment of roads in any prac-
tical and intelligent shape has my strong sympathy and
hearty co-ooeration."








Hon. FENIMORE CHATTERTON,
Governor, Cheyenne, Wyoming.
"I am heartily in accord with the ob-
jects of the National Good Roads As-
sociation.
"The highways are the paths along
which civilization and development
move. It is important not only to this
but to future generations that these
highways lead everywhere and that they
be straight and smooth. Good roads
enter very largely into the success of
all kinds of commerce, they reduce
transportation expense; they have a de-
cided influence upon the pleasure, recreation and informa-
tion of the people, for good roads facilitate movement, bad
roads are a thief of time and money and a source of con-
stant irritation."







Hon. J. D. HAWKS,
President and General Manager Detroit & Mackinac
Ry. Co., Detroit, Michigan.
"Cities in this country would be impossible without rail-
roads. Railroads are impossible without farms. Farms are
impossible without highways. Better the highways and you
better the farms and help the railroads and the cities and
all classes under the sun. There is nothing of more im-
portance to this country than good roads."


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Maew~a<%^%iL6KiB8(x----^ -<<<










SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 21

*IA A al I MA Ia a l & a AA a&**i a Ia I a AI t I I 1ttel I 9 Ot Ol I a 8l a 8 8 &tok I I tttO I a a a It al i& s l l Ia s ate son la G A&n"


Hon. WINFIELD T. DURBIN,
Governor, Indianapolis, Indiana.
"There is no better index of civiliza-
tion than the degree of perfection at-
tained in means of transportation, par-
ticularly in the construction of roads.
Any conservative movement for road
betterment deserves the encouragement
of public spirited citizens."






Hon. ALEXANDER O. BRODIE,
Governor, Phoenix, Arizona.
"In this section of the country where the distance between
towns is so great the subject of good roads receives no more
than local attention, owing to the great cost of improving great
stretches of roads throughout the Territory."







Hon. CHAS. HAMILTON,
Vice-President and General Man-
ager, Texas Central Railroad
Co., Waco, Texas.
"The urgent necessity of improving the
roads throughout Texas, over which the
commodities of the country must be hauled
in order to reach a market is so obvious
that any intelligent citizen who does not
recognize the imperative need of the im-
provement is lacking in good business
judgment. A good deal is being done in
that direction, in a desultory sort of way
and at least one Railroad Company is
contributing quite liberally to the effort: I refer to the Texas
Central Railroad Company; and if the people who compose the
Courts and Juries of the country would show more fairness in
their treatment of Railroad Companies, when brought to trial for
offenses which they do not commit, and not be so persistent in
their efforts in the direction of confiscating and diverting the
revenues' of the Railroad Companies from their proper channel.
the Companies could afford, and would be more than willing to
assist in the construction of good roads."







Hon. T. P. SHONTS,
President Toledo St. Louis & Western R. R. Co.,
Toledo, Ohio.
"The importance of good roads to every class of citizens
of this country cannot be over-estimated, and no subject is
more worthy of serious consideration by men in every de-
partment of life."

W6Uxt(


Hon. W. H. TRUESDALE,
President Delaware, Lackawanna & Western R. R.
Co., New York City.
"The work of the National Good Roads Association is
certainly a very important one and one that should enlist
the active co-operation of a large number of our most in-
fluential people throughout the country. I sincerely hope
you will have a large and successful convention and that
as a result of this work substantial progress will be made
in organizing for the important and far-reaching work it
has undertaken."





Mr. SAMUEL C. LANCASTER,
City Engineer, Jackson, Tennessee.
"By earnest effort, well directed, Madi-
son County, Tennessee, now leads the way
in the building of "Good Roads" in this
section of the country, and is constructing
a system of improved highways on lines
of good engineering, and by the use of
modern machinery.
"During the past fifteen years our citi-
zens have sought this end; a good many
miles of city streets and a few country
roads had been built, when the National
Good Roads Association came to us with
the "Good Roads Train" of the Illinois Central Railway Com-
pany.
"A large convention assembled, and a piece of exhibi-
tion road was built; speeches were made, and illustrated
lectures on past and present methods were supplied by the
Office of Public Road Inquiries of the Department of Agri-
culture, and much enthusiasm was aroused.
"When the winter of the great mud, 1902-3, came, the
burden could no longer be borne, as our roads were im-
passable. A rousing mass meeting of citizens instructed
our Representatives to draft a bill authorizing the county
to issue thirty-year, four per cent bonds, in the sum of
three hundred thousand dollars; to establish a Commis-
sion, employ an engineer, and construct a system of per-
manent roads. What we are doing has attracted wide-
spread attention, and this community is even now reaping
untold benefits.
"Two of the roads leave the city on the south, and are
connected by a cross road, forming a seven-mile loop. A
stranger was attracted by the appearance of these roads,
and accosting a German citizen, asked: 'How far out does
this road go?' to which he replied enthusiastically: 'All de
vay-It goes all de vay 'round en cooms back again," which
is true also of the money used in constructing these roads;
It goes all the way 'round and comes back again. It blesses
thrice: in the employment and payment of those who build
them, advances the community to a higher plane of citizen-
ship, and coming generations bless and praise the wisdom
of the deed."





Hon. HENRY McBRIDE,
Governor, Olympia, Washington.
"The State of Washington is trying to evolve some plan that
will be found practical-a problem that is difficult, owing to the
great difference in climate in the two sections of the State, as
well as to the mountain chains running through, the varieties of
soil, rainfall, etc. The State of Washington, by starting early in
this work, will reap'an early harvest from good road beds and
good grades."
HENRY McBRIDE.


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Hon. MYRON T. HERRICK,
Governor, Columbus, Ohio.
"I am glad of the opportunity to ex
press my entire sympathy with the
efforts of The National Good Roads As-
sociation.and feel that the public should
realize the great benefits which will re-
sult from their labors. Improvement
of highways means not only advance-
ment of commercial interests, but also
moral welfare as well. Everyone who
has the interests of the country, mor-
ally, financially and artistically, at heart
should aid in furthering the aims of
the Good Roads movement."


Hon. JOHN H. MICKEY,
Governor, Lincoln, Nebraska.
"Nebraska has, perhaps, better natural
roads than any other State in the Union,
and yet they fall very far short of what
they ought to be and what our people
would like to have. We feel a deep in-
terest in every movement looking to the
improvement of the public thorough-
fares and look forward to the timewhen
both National and State aid will be ex-
tended with a liberality proportionate
to the importance of the undertaking.
There is no better evidence of the pros-
perity and progressive spirit of a community than good roads.
It is an economic question. If a farmer can double the
average carrying capacity of his team and wagon, winter or
summer, on account of scientific road construction, he has
added materially to the community. I trust that from the
"good roads" agitation, and especially from the meeting of
the National Good Roads Association, which meets in St.
Louis in May, an inspiration may come which will result in
general road improvement."


Hon. C. R. HUDSON,
President San Antonio & Aransas Pass Ry. Co.,
San Antonio, Texas.
"The subject of good roads is of vaster importance than
the public generally yet conceives. Transportation com-
panies fully realize it. We try in this country to be ahead
of Europe. In the matter of good roads we are lamentably
behind. Your convention, May 16th to 21st, is bound to
do good. I hope my engagements will allow my being
present."

^e^-^-CC~


Hon. BENJ. B. ODELL, Jr.,
Governor, Albany, New York.
"I wish to assure you of my deep personal interest in good
roads construction and the general interest which this sub-
ject has aroused in the State of New York. Good roads legis-
lation has been upon our statute books with increased appro-
priation from year to year for carrying on good roads con-
struction. There is nothing, it appears to me, that is more
vital to the prosperity of any state or community than easy
and cheap transportation, especially of the products of the
farm. I think this fact is being more thoroughly realized
from year to year, and that it is so, is largely due to the work
that has been conducted by the various good roads organiza-
tions of the country."





Hon. JOHN F. HILT,
Governor, Augusta, Maine.
"The question of improved highways is
one of great interest and importance to the
whole State, and especially to the people of
the country towns.
"Good roads shorten the distance to mar-
ket, increase the value of contiguous prop-
erty, and are potent factors in the develop-
ment of every community. Although there
has been a vast improvement in our tran-
portation facilities during the past twenty
years, through the building of new railroad
mileage, there has been little improvement
in our highways, along which there will always be a large amount
of traffic; and it would seem that the time has come when we
should adopt some definite and effective plan for the improvement
of our main thoroughfares."





Hon. J. W. FORDNEY, M. C.,
Saginaw, Michigan.
"The Good Roads movement has my unqualified approval and
while I have not given the matter sufficient thought to master
the details, yet am convinced that the cost should be quite gen-
erally spread thus putting the expense upon all the people 'as their
interest may appear,' being careful to local every interest, no
matter how small."


Hon. JAMES H. PEABODY,
Governor, Denver, Colorado.
"In my mind there is no more pertinent
demonstration of the intelligence and pro-
gressiveness of the community, commer-
cially, industrially and educationally, than
the establishment of good roads through
our country precincts, and I believe every
loyal citizen should lend his aid and co-
operation to the objects and ends of the
good roads movement."

&-~""


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SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.. 23


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Hon. W. W. HEARD,
Governor, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
"No subject should appear more forci-
bly to a.l classes of our citizens. par-
ticularly those living in the rural dis-
tricts, than that of good roads. A per-
fect system of well-constructed high-
ways, surveyed and planned by scien-
tific enginec:s and road experts, would
result in greater and more direct bene-
fit to the State and to the people than
any other public work that can be
named. Such roads would economize
time, labor and money; they would add
to our social and religious progress; every acre of land
through or near which a beautiful and permanent road is
maintained would add niaterially to its value and permit
uninterrupted intercourse and the transportation of crops and
merchandise throughout the year. 'Good Roads are the
avenues of progress, the best proof of popular intelligence,
the ligaments that bind the country in the bonds of patriot-
ism and thrift.'" 4







Hon. L. E. JOHNSON,
President Norfolk & Western Railway Co.,
Roanoke, Virginia.
"I cannot refrain from expresit to you my cordial sympa-
thy with, and hearty appreciation of the great work in which
your association is now engaged.
"I am satisfied that on no question has the sentiment of the
American people become so unified as it has on the proposition
that this country has reached that stage of development which
demands that every community shall be afforded, by means of
well graded and substantially constructed country roads, the op-
portunity of reasonable and convenient communication to the
centers of trade, or to the railways leading thereto. In creat-
ing this sentiment I am sure that your Association has been
a valuable factor, and in so doing has already demonstrated its
usefulness.
"The result of my observation has been such as to convince
me that many communities are ready to receive and act upon
the suggestions that may come as the result of the deliberations
of this convention, and I anticipate that the practical results aris-
ing from this conference will be of great and positive benefit, and
I feel sure that your Association, as the result of the delibeia-
tions of this convention, will be able to furnish valuah'!e infor-
mation on the character of roads best suited to the various sec-
tions of our country and the probable cost of the same under
varying conditions, as well as timely suggestions 1ipmn the financial
problems involved and how the burdens incident to the work
should be best distributed as between the State, County and
Municipalities. All of these questions are now being handled
so differently in the various States, and even in different Coun-
ties of the same State, and with such universal inefficiency that
recommendations looking to the passage of laws that would bring
about some degree of uniformity in the management of this
pressing problem, would in my judgment, be welcomed by every-
one who desires the present sentiment in favor of good roads
to be so moulded that the most far-reaching results may be ac-
complished.
"The railway company with which I am connected is using,
and will continue to use, its best endeavors to promote this great
work and realizes that in so doing it is benefitting the commu-
nities it traverses and is thereby benefitting itself."

Q 16-.


Hon. SAMUEL R. VAN SANT,
Governor, St. Paul, Minnesota.
"Nothing is so essential to the pros-
perity and welfare of a people as a per-
fected system of public highways; good
roads are a stimulus to commerce; they
facilitate intercourse between sections,
promote traffic, encourage immigration,
enhance the value of real estate and are
valuable from an economic standpoint,
for on good roads the products of the
farm are more easily transported to
market.
"Our country, so progressive in every
means to promote commerce and facilitate travel, has too
long neglected this important question. At present there
is a very marked tendency in nearly all of the States to give
thjs subject proper attention, and various plans have been put
forward. The plan of employing convict and tramp labor
on the roads is meeting with much favor in some localities;
whether this is feasible or not is still an open question, but
certainly it would meet with no opposition on the ground
that the convict system would come into competition with
free labor."




Hon. CHARLES N. HERREID,
Governor, Pierre, South Dakota.
"In this state "Good Roads" has received
no attention because too many other topics
have been pressing for consideration. The
time is approaching when the vast sum of
taxes squandered 4or allege road work
should be used intelligently and economic-
ally. This movement for good roads is
right in line with recent improvements,
such as farmers' telephone lines, rural free
delivery, etc., etc., which is making farming
delightful and farm life the most healthful
and profitable. Strange as it may appear, those who take the
least interest in the good roads movement are those who would
receive the most direct and greatest benefit-the farmers, them-
selves. A good road will, for practical purposes, reduce the ex-
pense of marketing all farm products and increase the value of
the farm. It will bring the rural population to the churches and
theaters and lecture rooms of the towns and villages. Good roads
will bring neighbors nearer together and obliterate to a marked
degree the isolation of the average country home. It will pro-
mote social intercourse which cultivates and refines and moulds
people into broader and more useful citizens.
"This is a new topic for discussion in this state and I call upon
the moulders of public sentiment to investigate what is being
done elsewhere to accelerate a movement which is destined to
transform country life by making it a life of profit, pleasure
and contentment." ff -


Hon. J. T. MORRISON,
Governor, Boise, Idaho.
"All departments of human activity
demand roads, good road. They are
not a desideratum only, they are a ne-
cessity. Build them and progress. Deny
or neglect them and the inertia of death
attaches. Bad' roads lead to 'dead'
towns."

6*41


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S4 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

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Hon. GEO. E. CHAMBERLAIN,
Governor, Salem, Oregon.
"The subject of good roads has en-
grossed more attention in this section
of the country within the past two
years than it has ever done before. The
West ought to be more deeply inter-
ested in good roads than any other sec-
tion of the country for the reason that
our population is not so dense, railroad
and other facilities for transportation
not so good and our people are de-
pendent in many places on the public
highways for disposal of their product
and supplying their homes. The agitation of the subject is
resulting in much good, and already tentative efforts are be-
ing made looking to the adoption of a general system for
the improvement of the roads in Oregon.
"I am heartily in accord with the efforts which the Na-
tional Good Roads Association is putting forth, and trust
that they may be ably seconded by every State in the Union.


Hon. A. J. MONTAGUE,
Governor, Richmond, Virginia.
"No civilization has outlived or will
ever outlive the primal methods of
transportation-public highways. The
virile strength of the Republic is our
rural population, and its relative dimi-
nution (which is mightily stimulated by
bad roads) must excite grave concern.
In the greater part of the country the
condition of our roads for several
months in every year constitutes an in-
dustrial and social blockade and imposes
at all times an immense economic waste. The statesman-
ship of America should now solve this question, which effects
not a class but all classes of the people; and public senti-
ment should be aroused to consummate so transcendent a
contribution to the social comfort and industrial growth of
our people." A-'1 AA -


Hon. ALBERT B. WHITE,
Governor, Charleston, West Virginia.
"The importance of a general system
of improved public roads in the several
State and Territories cannot be exag-
gerated.
"West Virginia in particular, with its
oil, gas and mineral developments, its
rough country and fertile valleys, has
special need of a system of improved
public roads. Our climatic conditions,
the character of our soils and the great
use made of our roadways make the
mud embargo of several' months' dura-
tion not only a hardship but a positive drawback and hin-
drance to development as well as to the marketing of products.
"Put West Virginia down as needing good roads and anx-
ious to co-operate in getting them."


Hon. A. A. ROBINSON,
President Mexican Central Railway Co.,
New York City.
"I think the general impression among a large class is
that the Good Roads Movement is due to an agitation by
city inhabitants to force country people to pay for good
roads for the benefit of Automobilists and Cyclists instead
of furnishing means whereby the products of the country
can be economically marketed at all seasons of the year.
"I think this idea should be kept to the front in presenting
and pushing this most desirable movement."






Hon. NATHUM J. BACHELDER,
Governor, Concord, New Hampshire
"The people most directly interested
in the movement for better roads are
those engaged in tilling the soil, con-
stituting more than one-third of our
population. There is no controverting
the statement that the advancement of
our agricultural interests should be the
prime concern of every statesman and
every patriot. The farmers of the coun-
try have by energy and industry placed
upon the markets of the world such
volume of the product of the soil as to
effect the balance of the trade with foreign countries, mak-
ing us a selling, instead of a buying, Nation. They have
responded nobly to every call issued in the name of their
State or Nation. When the military or naval forces have
needed recruits the farmers have sent to the ranks their most
vigorous sons, many of whom fell in the bloody conflict upon
the battle-field. They have contributed their full share to the
National Government in its adjustment of claims resulting
from war, in its liberal policy for the development of the
country, and have contributed to the enormous surplus in the
National Treasury that almost staggers those' responsible for
its management. They have, through their influence and sup-
port, aided movements for the development of the various
industries within the States. They never fail to regard their
State and Nation with feelings of patriotism and love of
country unexcelled among professional and industrial people.
In view of these and other facts that might be stated, they
now ask in the name of justice that the roads upon which
they and you travel shall be improved. Before the surplus
now held by the National Government is distributed to Na-
tional banks without interest, or the erection of expensive
Government buildings in cities which has become a fixed
policy of the Government, proceeds farther, the 3ooo,00oo
people of the country engaged in rural pursuits demand a
recognition of their rights in the improvement of high-
ways by National and State patronage. While States are
engaged in the erection of costly buildings for the various
objects of philanthropy and charity and expensive penal in-
stitutions, made necessary by crime, largely the result of
existing conditions in populous cities, the residents of rural
communities appeal to Congress and to the Legislatures of
their respective States for the adoption of a liberal policy
in opening up the arteries leading to and from those great
cities, to the growth of which they have so liberally contrib-
uted. The call is unanimous from every farm home in the
land and is as sure to receive favorable response as night
is sure to be succeeded by day. When their claims are in-
telligently and vigorously presented and a comprehensive
survey made of existing conditions by those in authority,
there will be no effective opposition to them. Whatever can
be done to hasten this result is a patriotic duty which we owe
our Country, our State and mankind."


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SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 25

^eB~_~~;eiM6^M^^f~CrC


Hon. RICHARD YATES,
Governor, Springfield, Illinois.
"I would rejoice in seeing an im-
proved condition of Illinois wagon
roads, and sincerely hope that a plan
may be devised by which this may be
brought about without imposing an un-
just burden upon the communities
through which improved highways may
be constructed. I understand there is
a strong sentiment in favor of the work
being undertaken, and the expense be-
ing borne, by County, State and Federal
aid. This appears to me to be just and
reasonable, and I shall esteem it a pleasure to aid in bring-
ing about a practicable and fair solution of the good roads
problem." ,



Hon. SHELBY M. CULLOM.
United States Senate, Washington, D. C.
"The fact is I am not in harmony with the letters and pe-
titions which come to me, asking for an appropriation by
Congress of twenty-four million dollars for the improvement
of the roads of the country. I think the states, and the lo-
calities in the states where good roads are to be built ought
to take up this question and agree on such action as will se-
cure the completion of good roads, without relying upon
Congress to make such a large appropriation at one time. I
am in iavor of the government assisting to some extent, but
the burden of the work should rest upon the states and the
people of the respective localities."

xub-J Izo-



ABIRAM E. CHAMBERLAIN,
Governor, Hartford, Connecticut.
"I am thoroughly in sympathy with
the good roads movement. Our own
State has for many years made liberal
appropriations for this work, and I am
glad to see the other States falling in
line with this movement, which assists
so materially the prosperity of the State
and the Nation."




S Hon. J. K. TOOLE,
Governor, Helena, Montana.
"I am in receipt of yours of the 5th in-
stant, asking me for a concise state-
ment concerning the importance of a
general system of improved public
roads in the several States and Terri-
tories of this country.
"I recognize the importance, and am
in full accord with any movement hav-
ing for its purpose the improvement of
public thoroughfares."


d"C"e,


Hon. CHAS. M. HAYS,
Vice-President and General Manager Grand Trunk
Railway System, Montreal, Canada.
"Millions of dollars have been spent by the United States,
and by the States individually, in the construction and main-
tenance of canals. These water highways have served their
purpose for a time and many of them have passed away, as
was the case with the Wabash and Miami Canals, portions
of their route being used by railways, others lapsing into the
original ownership. With the demand for boats of larger
tonnage and consequently deeper draft, there has arisen a
necessity for the expenditure of millions of dollars to deepen
and widen canals in order that they might still continue to be
of value as transportation agencies. Note the case of the
State of New York, which is contemplating the expenditure
of $ioo,ooo,ooo upon the Erie Canal. Had these immense
sums of money which have been expended and are yet to be
expended on the canal system, been spent on the highways.
they would not have served merely a temporary purpose, but
would be as valuable to-day as when the money was first
expended and in the meantime would have enhanced the value
of all surrounding property, and when the better facilities
offered by the railways had supplanted in a great measure the
use of these highways for the transportation of freight they
would still exist to contribute to the pleasure and comfort, not
only of the people living in the country traversed by them, but of
visitors from other countries and other states."









Hon. JOHN G. McCULLOUGH,
Governor, Montpelier, Vermont.
"This Nation, under high pressure,
during the past thirty years has been
building 13o,ooo miles and more of
steam railway; and during the past fif-
teen years, nearly 25,000 miles of elec-
tric railway.
"Now give the common roads a
chance. During the next lustrum or de-
cade, let equal energy be expended on
a general system for improved high-
ways throughout the country, and no
man can calculate the resulting bene-
fits, in the increase of farm values, in the enhancement of the
wealth, the comfort, the health, the happiness of our people,
lifting this Nation to a higher plane in the scale of the World's
civilization.
"Let your watchwords then be in State and Nation, 'GOOD,
BETTER, BEST HIGHWAYS.'"




Hon. F. D. UNDERWOOD,
President Erie Railroad Company,
New York City.
"Good roads develop good people. It has long been my
opinion that a National highway, wide enough and good
enough so that light wagons could pass over it, extending
from New York to San Francisco, would be a great educator.
We want a reincarnation of the National Turnpike on a
large scale."









26 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WE EKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

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Signed Articles from Leading Citizens and
Statesmen of the Country on the


Hon. A. M. DOCKERY,
Governor, Jefferson City, Mo.
"The paramount importance of im-
proved roadways is obvious. The neces-
sity for this reform is so apparent that
the question is without the domain of
controversy. The betterment of the
highways of the country being conceded
it only remains for the citizens and legis-
lators to determine by investigation and
discussion, the most efficient means to this
great end. The improvement in the
transportation facilities, where steam and
electricity are motors, has reached such a
stage of perfection that the public mind can well be concen-
trated upon the one remaining need of improved highways. When
this shall have been secured the needs of the whole field of
transportation will have been fully met. It costs money to secure
the facilities of electricity and steam transportation. It will cost
money to provide improved roadways. This can only be secured
by an awakened and progressive public sentiment which shall
enforce a judicious system of taxation for this purpose. When
the people are willing to tax themselves to improve our public
highways all governmental agencies will be swift to respond to
this enlightened demand." o





Hon. A. C. LATIMER, U. S. S.,
Belton, South Carolina.
"The cause of Good Roads is before the American people. By
hard work and earnest effort, the friends of the movement in Con-
gress have secured a favorable report on the bill introduced by
me, and its consideration is assured at the next session of Con-
gress. If we hope to win the fight, the people must he aroused
to activity, and no stone should be left unturned to impress upon
Senators and Representatives the sentiment in favor of this
legislation. The power is in the people. They have accomplished
much already. Men who were opposed to the whole proposition
have changed their minds when the people at home had expressed
themselves. Let us make improved roads an active, burning
issue, and we may then be assured of the result."





Hon. ALBERT B. CUMMINS,
Governor, Des Moines, Iowa.
"The necessity of improving our high-
ways, over which so large a proportion of
the commerce of the country must in the
first instance pass, is so obvious that I
would despair of convincing any man
who did not instantly perceive the im-
perative need of the betterment. I am
sure that you have with you the universal
sentiment of the people, and I predict that
the next great stride in our progress will
be in this direction."

(I&"./f Cwm6tu


Subject of Good Roads.


Hon. JOHN L. BATES,
Governor, Boston, Massachusetts.
"I appreciate the work being done by
the National Good Roads Association, and
recognize the benefits that accrue from
such conventions as one to be held in St.
Louis in May. The people of Massachu-
setts believe in good roads; they are firmly
committed to the policy oi improving the
highways through the agency of the state
government. Good roads appeal to us as
a business necessity. The farmer, the
merchant and the manufacturer all find
their interests better served, and their ex-
penses reduced by the construction of state highways, while that
portion of the public that has time for pleasure riding, join in
the chorus of general approval. The result is that no one growls
at paying taxes for this purpose, but there would be great com-
plaint should the state abandon the policy and leave the high-
ways entirely to such care as the local authorities had been
accustomed to give them."





MELVILLE E. STONE,
General Manager The Associated Press,
New York City.
"The good roads subject is one in which I have been
deeply interested for many years, and I sincerely hope
that your Convention will be productive of good results.
It was a natural and inevitable result of the phenomenally
rapid growth of the country that the building of highways
should not keep pace with the development in other par-
ticulars of our National life. In other countries the con-
struction of roads was a necessity, as the only means of
transit ante-dating the railway. With us, in large meas-
ure, the railways themselves have been pioneers and have
made for the time being, highways comparatively unneces-
sary. I think the time, however, is now ripe, and I hope the
people are coming to see that it is important, to improve
the means of communication throughout the districts not
reached directly by the railways." .




Hon. AARON T. BLISS,
Governor, Lansing, Michigan.
"I am in thorough sympathy with all
wisely directed efforts for the betterment
of the highways of this country, and be-
lieve that in this important matter we
should not fall behind other lines of prog-
ress. The efforts of the Michigan High-
way Commission have been directed to-
ward educating the people along the lines
of building and maintaining good roads,
with the recommendation that the consti-
tution be amended so as to permit state'
aid to those ends."

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SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 27
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28 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


National Good Roads Convention.


Program, First Day's Proceedings, Thursday, Jan. 19, 1905, 10 a. m.
(JACKSONVILLE BOARD OF TRADE AUDITORIUM.)

Invocation REV. W. A. HOBSON, D. D., Pastor First Baptist Church.
Address MAYOR GEORGE M. NOLAN.
Welcome to the QuT n City of the South."
Address CAPTAIN C. E. GARNER, President Jacksonville Board of Trade.
"Welcome on Behalf of Jacksonville's Business Interests."
Address HN. W. II. MOORE, President National Good Roads Association.
"Response to Addresses of Welcome."
Address HON. JAMES WILSON, U. S. Secretary of Agriculture.
"Agriculture and Roads."
Address HON. N. B. BROWARD, Governor of Florida.
"Good Roads and Their Influence in the Development of Florida."
Address HON. JAMES B. FRAZER, Governor of Tennessee.
"Good Roads and Convict Labor."
3:00 P. M.
Address LIEUT.-GENERAL NELSON A. MILES, United States Army.
"Good Roads as an Aid to the Army."
Address HON. STUYVESANT FISH, President Illinois Central Railroad Co., New York.
"Relation of Railroads to Initial Roads."
Address HON. J. W. WHITE, Industrial Agent Seaboard Air Line, Portsmouth, Va.
"The Railroad and Its Relations to the Farm."
Short Talks by Prominent Members of the Florida Legislature.
8:00 P. M.
Lecture, illustrated with stereopticon views of Good and
Bad Roads of this and the Old Country HON. M. ELDRIDGE, Assistant Director Office Good Roads
Inquiries, U. S. Department of Agriculture.


Program, Second Day's Proceedings, Friday, January 20, 10 a. m.
(BOARD OF TRADE AUDITORIUM.)

Address HON. MARTIN DODGE, Director, Ofice Public Road Inquiries.
"Educational and Experimental Work of the Government Division."
Address HON. A. C. LATIMER, U. S. Senator of South Carolina.
"National Aid."
Address HON. J. P. TALIAFEBRO, U. S. Senator of Florida.
"Cooperation of the National Government with the States for Better Roads."
Address HON. STEPHEN R. MALLORY, U. S. Senator of Florida.
"The Lessons of the Old World in Road Building."
Address HON. W. P. BROWNLOW, M. C., of Tennessee.
"The Duty of the Government toward the People."
Address HON. A. S. MANN, Vice-President and National Oranizer Good Roads Association.
"Outlook for Better Roads."
3:00 P. M.
Address HN. A. J. MONTAGUE, Governor of Virginia.
"What Good Roads Is Doing for the South."
Address HON C. B. AYCOCK, Governor of North Carolina
"Good Roads as an Educator."
Address HON. M. V. RICHARDS, Industrial Agent Southern Railway, Washington, D. C.
"Influence and Value of Good Roads Trains."
Address HON. H. W. LONG, President Florida State Good Roads Association.
"The Effect of Good Roads in Marion County, and Florida."
Address SENATOR W. J. MORGAN, of New York.
"The East Coast Races."
Address HON. W. L. GLESSNER, Industrial Agent G. S. & F. R. R., Macon, Ga.
"Needs of the Common People."
Address HON. WuLBUR McCoY, Industrial Agent A. C. L. R. R., Jacksonville, Fla.
"Why the Railroads Desire Better Dirt Roads."
8:00 P. M.
Evening entertainment to be announced later.








SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 29

Program, Third Day's Proceedings, Saturday, January 21, 10 a. m.
(BOARD OF TRADE AUDITORIUM.)
Address H W. J. BYAN, of Nebraska.
"Internal Improvements a National Issue."
Address HON. W. H. MOORE, President National Good Roads Ass'n.
"Work of the National Good Roads Organization."
Address HON. JOSEPH RICHARDSON, Chairman Southeastern Passenger Association, Atlanta, Ga.
"The Influence of Good Roads on Travel."
Address HON. D. C. HEYWOOD, Governor of South Carolina.
"The Value of Permanent Roads."
Address HON. J. M. TERRELL, Governor of Georgia.
"The Moral, Social and Edvlcational Value of Good Roads."
Address HoN. W. D. JELKS, Governor of Alabama.
"The New South iad Good Roads."
Address HON. ISAAC W. PTrrER, of New York.
"The New Power Made Possible."
3:00 P. M.
Address HON. JAMEs B. MCcCREARY, U. S. Senator of Kentucky.
"lVhat Kentucky Owes to Good Roads."
Address HON. ALBERT W. POPE, of New York.
"N(w York State Owes Much to the Good Roads Movement."
Address HON. FRANK CLARK, M. C. of Florida.
"Our Government Should Assist Its I'opll to B'tter Roads."
Address HON. S. M. SPARKMAN, M. C. of Florida.
"I'(Pson al E.rp rictnce as to lth Value of Good Roads."
Address HON. W. B. LAMAR, M. C. of Florida.
"The Duty of a Mitbt r of ('Coress."
Address - R. W. DAVIs, M. C. of Florida.
"The Christian liit/ lIt ce of the Work."
Address HON. J. M. BARRS, City Attorney.
"Our Streets and Roads."
Short Talks by County Commissioners and Road Supervisors and Engineers.
NOTE-Several prominent speakers who have been invited had not been heard from at the hour of going to press
and the above program is subject to additions and revisions that may be announced later.


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30 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

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I Ja cksonville--Whet It Is. 5


40 It is a cosmopolitan city.
It has a population of about 43,000.
4 It is located on the noble St. Johns river, which, with its tributaries, affords 1,000 miles of inland navigation.
4 It has a water-front of seven and two-tenths miles. Its area in square miles is seven and six-tenths.
+ It is the gateway to Florida and the West Indie.
It is further west than any other Atlantic port.
+. It is nearer than any port north of Charleston to St. Louis and the Northwest.
+ It is within a short distance of the great coal and iron regions of Alabama.
+ It has direct communication with every important city in the United States via ten railway systems.
It has direct ocean steamship communication with Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
It is better located than any city farther north for the trade with the western coast of South America.
It is rapidly becoming one of the principal naval stores marts of the country.
4 It is the business metropolis of Florida.
+ It has eight banks.
+ It has twenty-eight wholesale groceries.
. It has wholesale and retail houses in every line of merchandise.
44 It has about 200 factories, great and small.
t It has ten great saw and planing mills, and sash, door and blind factories.
It has two telephone systems with about 2,000 subscribers, and has long-distance telephone service to New York
and other Northern cities.
+ Its annual trade is about $100,000,000.
4. It is a desirable place of residence; its mortality averaging ten in 1,000-the lowest in the United States.
+ It has a delightful climate, with a mean temperature of 70 degrees, and is cooler in summer than most Northern
+ cities.
+ It has churches of all denominations.
It has good schools and a fine business college. +
It has An opera house and other places of amusement.
*9 It has a fine Masonic Temple and numerous benevolent and other orders.
+ It has twenty miles of trolley lines; over ten miles of brick pavements; about fourteen miles of shell street an t
+. drives already constructed and provided for by ordinance and several parks.
It has gas and electric light plants.
It has artesian wells, yielding 5,000,000 gallons of pure water daily.
SIt has an excellent sanitary and drainage system.
9 It has an efficient fire department, and a fire-alarm telegraph.
It has excellent daily and weekly newspapers and monthly magazines.
It has nineteen feet depth of water in the St. Johns river, between Jacksonville and the ocean, with good pr- 4
Aspects of having twenty-four feet in the immediate future.
It is within thirty minutes' ride of one of the finest ocean beaches in America.
P5 It has the largest and most influential Board of Trade in the South.
On May 3, 1901, over 2,600 buildings in the principal business and residence part of the city were destroyed by
fire, involving a loss of about $15,000,000.

^ 000.
At this date (July, 1904) over 4,000 buildings have been or are being rebuilt, the value of which exceeds $20,000,-

Jacksonville prospers by the development of the State of Florida.
Florida has 1,200 miles of ocean front, and has 1,200 square miles of land more than the great State of New
+ York.
Florida will produce more fruits, grains and vegetables of all kinds to the acre than any other State in the
United States. 4
Florida has great supplies of food fish, and its fisheries are in their infancy.
+ Visit Jacksonville or correspond with the Secretary of the Board of Trade.





4.
+)




111111111 T-4A44A---1-14-144-1 -14-4++4++++++U44 ---I-tt11 1ttlI III^h






SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 31
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To Investors or Buyers on Speculation:


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You want good sawmill sites?
You want good Florida Timber Lands?
You want to buy or make investments of city property,


W. B. MYERS, President.


J. W. BROWN, Vice-President.


E. L. BROWN, Sec'y & Treas.

The Vehicle and Harness Company,
830 Wet Bay Street, JackseIille, Fla.
Jobbers of Carriages, Buggies, Wagons, Harness, Saddlery, Trimmings, Neckyokes,
Handles, Whiffletrees. Varnish, Paints, Wheels, Spokes. Rlims. Hubs, Shafts, Poles.
Bows, Seats, Tops, Axles, Springs, Steel, Iron and Rubber Tires, Carriage Hard-
ware. Everything used by the Carriage and Wagon-maker and Blacksmith. Our
Specialties: Log Cart Material, Turpentine Wagons and Harness. We solicit
your business and guarantee satisfactory service.
THE VEHICLE & HARNESS COMPANY.


Christie & Christie,

REAL ESTATE.
If you are looking for orange groves, farming lands, timber lands, we prob-
ably can come to terms, having some very reasonable propositions to offer.
Dyal-Upchurch Building JACKSONVILLE FLA.
SKXaS0X smassassassassass?^


The Inn
at ORMOND BEACH.
Situated directly on the famous Ormnond autool,ile race course. Good gar-
age aecomnumlations. Steam heat in ronsnn. Transient rates $c and $3.50
per day. Weekly rate $15 to $21. Florida East Coast Railroad; 106 miles
south of Jacksonville.


WM. S KENNEY, Manager.


ANDERSON & PRICE HOTEL COMPANY,
Proprietors.


Locomouve, Steamboat and Sawmill
Machinery Mde and Repaired.
Iron and Brss Catings.
Phosphor-Bronze Journal Be ints.


The Southern Fuel & Supply Company

Coal, Wood and
BullAng Material
Contractors fr laying asphalt, gravel, os, ready roofing and all felt roofing
materials or sale. Contractors for street and sidewalk paving,
granolithic, tile, cement, asphalt and brick.


I


Good Roads and

Progress Go

Hand in Hand,


' >) I


Florida is now offering more oppore
tunities to the investor than any- tate
in the Union. We can offer yorsyropo
sitions of all kinds in all parts o the
State.


Timber Lands, Orange Groves, Truck Farms,
Cattle Ranges, City and Suburban Property.


ALL SIZE PROPOSITIONS IN
ALL PARTS OF THE STATE.


Brobston, Fendig & Co.,
216 West Forsyth Street,
Opposite Duval Hotel

~933ii0i-~00~30O~Oi~,0


The S. B. Hubbard Co.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN


Hardware
Stoves, Tinware, Doors, Sash, Blinds, Paints, Oils,
Farming Tools, Barbed Wire, Iron,
Steel and Ammunition.

Plumbing, Steam and Gas Fitting Supplies
a Specialty.

Guns, Fishing Tackle and Sporting Goods
a Specialty.


Jacksonville


a Florida


IF


Phm 1759. Cal or Write 315-317 Dyal-Upchurch Blg., Ja gm vlMe, Fla.
WILL ENTERTAIN ANY REASONABLE OFFER.


* in /IM.9 FOUNDER. a MACHINIST.


JAO IENVILLE
MAAOM AMD IrAo WORMS.


610-617 East Bay Street.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Local and Lang Distance Telephone.


I l~sssswssscccssssso~


~S~l~l


Foot Hagan Street.


010,14 ackrsonville, Fla.






32 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



WINDSOR HOTEL



SDOD JACKSONVILLE'S
i _/' "FINEST AND


LARGEST
AM) BEST


Year Round Hotel



DODGE & CU.T.ENS, Proprietors,


CHEAP HOMES INFLORIDA Why stay in the north, east and west and
CHEAP HOMI [S N rFLO RIDA freeze when you can come to DeSoto
County, live comfortably and soon be in-
THE WINTER GARDEN OF AMERICA dependent I can sell you anything you
HE EST SP I T want and on terms to suit.
DESOTOCOUNTY GARDEN JOHN L. JONES, ARCADIA, FLA.


Fein Agn l as
LONDO AMD HANRJKG


acrh YCKa OS
NW Y=. I OST


THE SOUTHERN HIDE AND SKIN CO.
CHAS H. MANN, Prident and Gen'l Manager
DEAULJS IN AND EXPORIERS OF
Hides, Firs, Wool, Beeswax, AIllgator Skins, Tallow, Etc.


LARGEST DEALERS SOUTHERN HIDES
IN TIE SOUTHERN STATES


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


80 SPRINGFIELD LOTS
FOR SALE ON EASY TERMS BY j

GEORGE W, CLARK
306 Main Street. JACKSONVILLE, FLA
60****-- ****i** lolls 6s1a g ##*I* I **f* tu e aii ssa et


I
R. MAWOILL A CO.
MEAL EATAT Aom LOADS
Reoom e. 904 West 1l0die, say Street
MRL F 1748
JMAOI@ IVIU., FEOWDA
mm-oo to -

CHAS. BLUM (L CO.
517 and 519 West Bay St,,
JACKSONVILLL, FLA.


Wine and Liquor Merchants
PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION.






32 SUPPLEMENT TO THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
-=i m=


WINDSOR HOTEL



| JACKSONVILLELS
". FINEST AAM

FLORIDA'S
LARGEST

-us BEST


Year Round Hotel


*SIE5l00s lC^ SlSlISWS+E I 9TWIll151S l ;l 151 1051 $15 15 1 1 lSlel15155 948% *%C AMBS55585ll l l0lle

AP HO ES INORIWhy stay in the north, east and west and
CHiEAPr HOMES IN FLORIDA freeze when you can come to DeSoto
County, live comfortably and soon be in-
THE WINTER GARDEN OF AMERICA dependent I can sell you anything you
THE WINTE EN O EIC want and on terms to suit.
DESOTO COUNTY TH CHOISTSPOT IN TH JOHN L. JONES, ARCADIA, FLA.


Foreign Aenci
LONDON AND HAMBURG


THE SOUTHERN HIDE AND SKIN CO.
CHAS. H. MANN, President and Gen' Manager
DEALS IN AND EXPOTERS OF
Hids, Firs, Wool, Beeswax, Alligator Skins, Tallow, Etc.


LARGEST DEALERS IASOUTHERN HIDES
IN THE SOUTHERN STATES


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


I11soiai hi i ii*tIII l t i att iti5111 811I*tO*tl>iI

80 SPRINGFIELD LOTS
FOR SALE ON EASY TERMS BY

"f GEORGE W, CLARK
* 306 Main Street. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
m**''*m** :'uhl a ssallllllllIas I. aIaIaeal alsl** *


R. %J. MAQILL & 00.
E4AL ESTATE AM LOANM
Reom No. *04 West Almildiin, Day Street



I

CHAS. BLUM (a CO.
517 and 519 West Bay St,,
JACKSONVILLL FLA.


Wine and Liquor Merchants
PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION.


Breach Hmes a
NOW YORK-AMD NOTON


DODGE & CUT T.ENS, Proprietors,