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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00103
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: January 6, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00103
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text







For the Week Ending January 6, 1905.


WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

AdoptsC Sept. 12t, 1902. by tre Ezective Cmmittee of the rTrpemtlu Operators' Association as Its Zclsiser Oftcial Orga, and Adpted Spt. IIta, 1902, I AImnal Coo
retia. as an Officlai Organ Also of the General Associatrlo. Adopted Sept. I th, 1903, as te only Osmcia Organ of the Turpeuti Operators' dsmet.
Adoted April 27t, 193J, as the Official Ornu o the tltor-State Came Erowers' Assecirstie. ZadMrsed by the GeorCea SaJIJm
Assocatli. Official Orga of the Southeastern Stock grower's Associattin.

VOL IO. NO. I. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ATLANTA, GA. SAVANNAH, GA. $3 A YEAR.



Turpentine Operators Have an Object Lesson in Cotton,


What an Increase in Produc-
tio Will Mean to the Na'
val Stores Men.

(Written especially for the Industrial
Record by A. 8. Hough.)
The value of every commodity offered
for sale is fixed by the relation of the
supply to the demand. It is not correct
to say this is generally the ease, that it
is the case nine times out of ten, or ninety
nine times out of one-hundred. It is true
just precisely one hundred times out of
one hundred. It has been true of all
sales since the first sale was made. It
will be true of all sales until the last sale
is made. If the demand for a commodity
exceeds the supply that commodity will
bring a good price. If the supply exceeds
the demand that commodity will bring a
poor price. If the supply is unlimited,
men will pay nothing for it, no matter
how useful it may be. Air is vastly more
useful than diamonds, but does not sell
for as much. There is plenty of it for all.
there always has been, and so far as can
be seen, there always will be. Hence all
enjoy it without price.
This truth is known by children, but
grown men do not always recognize it in
their conduct. During the last year the
cotton men did not recognize it, and their
failure to do so, cost them certainly
more than $100,000,000-possibly more than
$200,000,000. The turpentine men are
showing signs of a disposition to ignore
it. If they do ignore it, they will pay
dearly.
Wise men profit by the experience of
others. Men who are not wise have to buy
experience, and pay for it themselves.
Sometimes even then they do not learn,
but keep buying and paying dearly for
what was placed before them free and
would have saved them trouble if they had
only used their eyes and kept their judg-
ments tolerably clear.
There is a probability, if the present
rate of box-cutting is kept up, that the
turpentine men will increase their output
this year 25 per cent over last. That is
just precisely what the cotton men did.
The crop of 1903-04 amounted to a little I
over 10,000,00 bales. The crop of 1904-0
will show a total of more than 12,500,000
bale
The cotton situation now is attracting
universal attention. It also attracted it
last year, but the interest is from re-
versed conditions. Last year men were
wondering why cotton was so Jigh. Now
they are discussing with surprise why it


has fallen so low. The contrast between
18 cents per pound and 7 cents per pound
is but another manner of stating the dif-
ference between a 10,000,000 bale crop and
a 12,500,000-bale crop. An increase in
production of 25 per cent divided the price
by little less than three.
But this is not all. The 6.85 to which
spot cotton declined in New York was
based on the idea of a crop of 12,162,700
bales. This would have been an increase
of only 20 per cent over last year. When
it becomes known, as it will be, that the
crop is over 12,500,000 bales-that the
increase was 25 instead of 20 per cent-


it is not improbable that the price will
go lower. It will unless the supply is
cut off by the cheapness of its price, like
the demand was cut off last year by its
dearness.
We will not guess as to the future, but
take 11 cents as the difference-a differ-
ence that has already been shown. With-
out considering fractions, we will take 18
cents and 7 cents as the price last year
and this when the size of the crops be-
come known. Eighteen cents per pound
would make $90 per bale. Seven cents
woud make $35 per bale. Here then is
the comparison in round numbers for last


EX-GOVRNuOR W. & JZNINW GS, VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE FLORIDA BAK
AND TRUST CO, JACKSONVILLE, FLA

Governor Jennings Retired from Ofice Tuesday, January 3d, and entered upon his
duties as one of the executive officials of Florida's largest bank the following
day. He made a business governor, one of the best the State has ever had.
As a banker and business man h influence will be felt in the great industrial
and commercial development that is going on in the Southeast to-day.


A Graphic Desciption of the
South's One Great Dis-
aster this Year.

year and this:
Last Year's Record, and This
10,000,000 bales at $00 per
bale ..................... $90000000
12,500,000 bales at $35 per
bale ..................... 437,500,00

Lost by a 25-per cent, increase
in product ............... .$462,500,000
Let's take another view of the matter.
It costs fully 61-2 cents per pound to
produce cotton, or about $32.50 per bale.
Then we have for last year and this:
10,000,000 bales at $00 per
bale ...................... $900,000,000
10,000,000 bales cost $32.50 per
bale ....................... 325,00,000

Profit 1903-04 ...............$575,000,00

12,500,000 bales at $35 per
bale .................... $437,500,000
12,500,000 bales cost $32.50 per
bale ...................... 406 50,000

Profit 1904-05 ............. $31,250,000

Profit on small crop ........ $575,0000
Profit on large crop .......... 31,250,000

Loss by 25,per cent increase of
production ............... $543,750,000
At the outset we estimated the loss to
the farmers of the South by an increase
of 25 per cent in production at certain-
ly more than $100,000,000 and possibly
more than $2,000,00. The loss would
have been more than $500,000,000, if the
size of the crop had been known at the
beginning of each year. The bulk of the
cotton crop was sold last year at from
12 to 14 cents, because it was not known
how small the crop was in time for the
farmers to get the full benefit of it. The
bulk of the crop this year was sold at
about 10 cents per pound, because it was
not known how large the -crop was in
time for the farmers to sustain the full
injury from their increase of production.
They unloaded much before the drop came.
The fact remains however, that the world
values a 10,000,000-bale crop of cotton at
nearly double the value it places on one
25 per cent greater, and the farmers will
lose enough on next year's crop on ac-
count of the size of the crop of this year
to eat up the three or four hundred mil-
(Coatiamd oa page 8.)


~`d~~
'-L"-~







:1


For the Week Ending January 6, 1905.


WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

Adopt. Sedpt.. 12t 1002. by te Excutivre Committee of the Turpentine Operators' Association as s Exclasire Oaclial Oraa. and Adopted Sept. Ilth. 1902. si Anual Cam
reatles as a Oaicia Orga Also ot the General Association. Adopted Sept. Ilth, 1903, as the only offMcai Organ o the Turpentine Operators' Assocats.
Adopted Aprll 27t. 19J3. as the Offcial Orsn ot the Iuter-State Cae Growers' AssoelatMio. Endorsed by the Georgia Sawmill
Association. Official Organ of the Southeastern Stock Grower's Association.

VOL 10. NO. I. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ATLANTA, GA. SAVANNAH, GA. $3 A YEAR.



Turpentine Operators Have an Object Lesson in Cotton,


What an Increase in Produc-
tion Will Mean to the Na-
val Stores Men.

(Written especially for the Industrial
Record by A. Hough.)
The value of every commodity offered
for sale is fixed by the relation of the
supply to the demand. It is not correct
to say this is generally the ease, that it
is the case nine times out of ten, or ninety
nine times out of one-hundred. It is true
just precisely one hundred times out of
one hundred. It has been true of all
sales since the first sale was made. It
will be true of all sales until the last sale
is made. If the demand for a commodity
exceeds the supply that commodity will
bring a good price. If the supply exceeds
the demand that commodity will bring a
poor price. If the supply is unlimited,
men will pay nothing for it, no matter
how useful it may be. Air is vastly more
useful than diamonds, but does iot sell
for as much. There is plenty of it for all.
there always has been, and so far as can
be seen, there always will be. Hence all
enjoy it without price.
This truth is known by children, but
grown men do not always recognize it in
their conduct. During the last year the
cotton men did not recognize it, and their
failure to do so, cost them certainly
more than $100,000,000-possibly more than
$20000,000. The turpentine men are
showing signs of a disposition to ignore
it. If they do ignore it, they will pay
dearly.
Wise men profit by the experience of
others. Men who are not wise have to buy
experience, and pay for it themselves.
Sometimes even then they do not learn,
but keep buying and paying dearly for
what was placed before them free and
would have saved them trouble if they had
only used their eyes and kept their judg-
ments tolerably clear.
There is a probability, if the present
rate of box-cutting is kept up, that the
turpentine men will increase their output
this year 25 per cent over last. That is
just precisely what the cotton men did.
The crop of 1908-04 amounted to a little
over 10,000000 bales. The crop of 1904-06
will show a total of more than 12,500,000
bales.
The cotton situation now is attracting
universal attention. It also attracted it
last year, but the interest is from re-
versed eomditions. Last year men were
wondering why cotton was so high. Now
they are dicussing with surprise why it


has fallen so low. The contrast between it is not improbable that the price will
18 cents per pound and 7 cents per pound go lower. It will unless the supply is


is but another manner of stating the dif-
ference between a 10,000,000 bale crop and
a 12500,000-bale crop. An increase in
production of 25 per cent divided the price
by little less than three.
But this is not all. The 6.85 to which
spot cotton declined in New York was
based on the idea of a crop of 12,162,700
bales. This would have been an increase
of only 20 per cent over last year. When
it becomes known, as it will be, that the
crop is over 12,500,000 bales-that the
increase was 25 instead of 20 per cent-


cut off by the cheapness of its price, like
the demand was cut off last year by its
dearness.
We will not guess as to the future, but
take 11 cents as the difference-a differ-
ence that has already been shown. With-
out considering fractions, we will take 18
cents and 7 cents as the price last year
and this when the size of the crops be-
come known. Eighteen cents per pound
would make $90 per bale. Seven cents
woud make $35 per bale. Here then is
the comparison in round numbers for last


NX-GOV .RNOR W. S. JEmNINGS, VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE FLORIDA BAK
AHD TRUST CO, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Governor Jennings Retired from Office Tuesday, January 3d, and entered upon his
duties as one of the executive officials of Florida's largest bank the following
day. He made a business governor, one of the beat the State has ever had.
As a banker and business man his inuence will be felt in the great industrial
and commercial development that is going on in the Southeast to-day.


A Grapic Description of the
South's One Great Dis-
aster this Year.

year and this:
Last Year's Record, and Thi.
10,000,000 bales at $90 per
bale ....................... $90,000,000
12,500,000 bales at $35 per
bale ...................... 437,500,000

Lost by a 25-per cent. increase
in product ............... .$462,500,000
Let's take another view of the matter.
It costs fully 61-2 cents per pound to
produce cotton, or about $32.50 per bale.
Then we have for last year and this:
10,000,000 bales at $90 per
bale .....................9000,00,000
10,00,000 bales cost $32.50 per
bale ...................... 325,0,000

Profit 1903-04 ............... $575,000,00

12,500000 bales at $35 per
bale .................... .$437,500,000
12,500,000 bales cost $32.50 per
bale ...................... 406250,00

Profit 1904-05 ............. $31,250,000

Profit on small crop ........ $57500,000
Profit on large crop .......... 31250,000

Loss by 25 per cent increase of
production ............... .$543,750,00
At the outset we estimated the lose to
the farmers of the South by an increase
of 25 per cent in production at certain-
ly more than $100,000,000 and possibly
more than $2,000000. The loss would
have been more than $500,000,000, if the
size of the crops had been known at the
beginning of each year. The bulk of the
cotton crop was sold last year at from
12 to 14 cents, because it was not known
how small the crop was in time for the
farmers to get the full benefit of it. The
bulk of the crop this year was sold at
about 10 cents per pound, because it was
not known how large the crop was in
time for the farmers to sustain the full
injury from their increase of production.
They unloaded much before the drop came.
The fact remains however, that the world
values a 10,00,000-bale crop of cotton at
nearly double the value it places on one
25 per cent greater, and the farmers will
lose enough on next year's crop on ac-
count of the size of the crop of this year
to eat up the three or four hundred mil-
(Contised on page 8)


b`P7~:





2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
uesiast s-u-u--


C. B. ROGER,


PalMIDNT. W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, VlcB-PnslrIDNT. C. H. HODGSON, SBc,
DIRIECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain. H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
SB. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,ooo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches in Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Coaslst of oae Three-Story Bulldlag, 70x200; one two-story bulldiag. 50x390; oae one-story belldiag, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the knld Ia the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola. Fla., and Savannah. Ga.


---- c L ------- WOr----- ----o -------as TO --YU YY
THK KKCORD WILL N WORTH DOULAS TO TOU XvXT WKKKX


and TRZAs0'.


sI!:---------- :t---i







90956
THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 8


The Million Dollar Bank Begins Phisiess,


The Florida Bank and Trust Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla., capital $1,000,000, began bus
iness yesterday. With the dawn of the
day the business of the Mercantile Ex-
change Bank was transferred to the new
institution. The officers are:
W. F. Coachman, president.
W. S. Jennings, first vice-president and
general counsel.
Arthur F. Perry, second vice-president.
W. A. Redding, cashier and secretary.
George J. Avent, paying teller.
T. E. Jordan, receiving teller.
The board of directors represents prac-
tically every interest in the State. They
are as follows:
George W. Allen, president First Nat-
ional Bank, Key West, Fla.
Charles H. Brown, president First Nat-
ion1l Bank, Live Oak, Fla.
Frank E. Bond, cashier Volusia County
Bank, DeLand, and Merchants' Bank, Day-
tona, Fla.
William M. Brown, president Fort Dal-
las National Bank, and Bank of Bay Bis-
cayne, Miami, Fla.
C. W. Bartleson, president of the C. W.
Bartleson Company, Jacksonville, Fla.
W. F. Coachman, president; president
Consolidated Land Company and vice-pres-
ident Consolidated Naval Stores Company,
Jacksonville, Fla.
A. D. Covington, manufacturer naval
stores, Quincy, Fla.
Raymond Cay, manufacturer naval
stores, Jacksonville, Fla.
J. H. Crosby, Jr., president Greenleaf
& Crosby Company, Jacksonville, Fla.
SJohn G. Christopher, machinery and mill
-upplies, Jacksonville, Fla.
H. L Covington, president American
- National Bank, and vice-president Consol-
idated Naval Stores Company, Pensacola,
.-Fla.
' John H. Carter, president First National
Bank, Quincy, FIL
C. A. Carson, president State Bank of
Kissimmee, Kissimmee, Fla
Albert Carlton, president Carlton &
Carlton, bankers, Wauchula, Fla., and
vice-president First National Bank, Arca-
dia, Fla.
C. Downing, president National Bank of
Brunswick, and president the Downing
Company, Brunswick, Ga.
John T. Dismukes, president First Nat-
ional Bank, St. Augustine, Fla.
Frank H. Fee, president Bank of Fort
Pierce, Fort Myers, Fla.
F. P. Forster, cashier of First National
Bank, Sanford, Fla.
W. R. Fuller, wholesale grocer, Tampa,
Fla.
L A. Fraleigh, vice-president First Nat-
ional Bank, Madison, Fla.
James M. Graham, president First Nat-
ional Bank, Gainesville, Fla.
C. E. Garner, president Jacksonville
Board of Trade, and president Independent
Line Steamers, Jacksonville, Fla
D. T. Gerow, postmaster, Jacksonville,
Fla., and manager Standard Oil Company,
Jacksonville, Fla.
S. B. Hubbard, president S. B. Hubbard
Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
A. M. Ives, president Julington Naval
Stores Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
W. S. Jennings, vice-president, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
J. F. Lewis, president Citizens' Bank,
Valdosts, Ga.
W. C. Lewis, president State Savings
Bank, and cashier First National Bank,
Tallahassee, Fla.
J. C. Little, secretary and treasurer Con-


solidated Naval Stores Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
W . McClelland, president McCeland,
Hobbs & Isted, bankers, Eustis, Fla.
H. A. McEachern, vice-president Con-
solidated Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fa.
D. H. McMillan, vice-president Consoli-
dated Naval Stores Company, Jackson-
ville, Fla,
W. H. Milton, cashier First National
Bank, Marianna, Fla.
James I. Munoz, general merchandise
broker, Jacksonville, Fla.
T. V. Porter, capitalist, Jacksonville,
Fla.
J. P. Taliaferro, United States Senator,
Jacksonville, Fla.
James Pritchard, president Indian River
State Bank, Titusville, Fla.
George M. Parker, general merchandise
broker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Arthur F. Perry, vice-president, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
C. B. Roegrs, president Consolidated
Grocery Company, and vice-president Con-
solidated Naval Stores Company, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Charles E. Smith, president Smith, Rich-
ardson & Conroy, Jacksonville, la.
Telfair Stockton, real estate, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
P. L. Sutherland, president Bank of
Green Cove Springs, vice-president Hill-
man-Sutherland Company, Green Cove
Springs, Fla.
G. W. Saxon, president Capital City
Bank, Apalachicola and Tallahassee, Fla.
Lorenzo A. Wilson, president Wilson &
Toomer Fertilizer Company, Jacksonville,
Fla.
Executive Cemmitee.
W. F. Coachman.
W. S. Jennings.
Arthur F. Perry.
T. V. Porter.
C. E. Garner.
C. B. Rogers.
H. A. MeEachern
James P. Taliaferro.
D. T. Gerow.
When this bank was organized the In-
dustrial Record had the following to say
of it which will bear repeating at this
time:
"That there is an urgent demand for
such an institution as the Florida Bank
and Trust Company-must appeal to every
man of means in the State. Its organiza-
tion is another step in the rapid devel-
opment of Florida and in the phenomenal
growth of Jacksonville. It is a step that
anticipates the future that is in store for
Jacksonville when she has deep water to
the sea and becomes the shipping center
forcofton as well as the products of the
pine-a great commercial and mannfaetur-
ing city, with the ships of every nation
loading and unloading at her docks. Its
organization is looked upon by business
men generally as one of the imperative
requirements of the times. It is the larg-
est bank in the State, and consequently
prepared to handle business requiring larg-
er facilities than were heretofore supplied.
It is a bank with stockholders in eery
avenue of trade, and cooperative to the
extent that it will not be a close corpora-
tion. It will furnish a trust feature that
has been regarded for years as a business
necessity for Jacksonville, particularly so
now that great financial interests are
centered here and are continually being
added to her commercial development. It


will provide a bonding and surety fea-
ture that will furnish home accommoda-
tions to the thousands of people in Flor-
ida who are to-day, by necessity, employ-
ing foreign companies for the purpose. It
will keep in Florida, for Florida invest-
ments and for circulation among Florida
people, the thousands of dollars annually
that are being sent out of the State to
surety companies. It will be an institu-


Florida, so that all the people, however re-
mote they may be from Jacksonvilyle,
may feel its influence and enjoy its ad-
vantages. It will be an institution that
will develop and help Florida develop.
As the product of a necessity, it will not
interfere with any other bank, but work
in harmony with them all. The great
growth of Jacksonville has simply made
an increase in her banking facilities es-


tion with connections in every section of sential."


NUBIAN TEA For the Uver and Kdneys

BENEDICTA A medicine for wen

CUBAN RELIEF r, c Cps and -D
arrhoea

CUBAN OIL Unlment unequaled for Cuts, Bumrns,
Bruises and Rheumatism.
A supply of these medicines is what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for pnces and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,




THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.

Ideal Lcates a Beautif St Johas
River Select Ieside Sectiem- A
HOTEL ROSELAND
Iligh-Ciss Terit ad Faty Metel
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Every comfort and amusement. Unexcelled cuisine. Northern cooking. Special rates, $10 to $18
weekly; 82 to S daily, American plan. Illustrated booklet mailed. Car going to ostrich farm
passes hotel grounds. Headquarters for naval stores men, lumbermen, cattle growers and Good
Roads Convention delegates A. 0. EKHOLM. PROpmETron.


Windsor Hotel

JackA--IWe' Fimet ad
FIlorMa' Larest Mad Best

Year-Round Hotel.

DODGE & CULLENS,
Owners oi reretr,


East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Speciaty.

WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.

C. ARNES, Pr J. SW,Pr Vice-Preo. RALPM JESSUP, Se.-Tres

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jakisonvlle. Pensacea, fernandim and Savannah
Correspondence Sllited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


MM mWcOm 0 2W nWp GMRAT TRADE JOWRAL.


iA-








4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


With Southern B
m_us__


JOacenviu AuasI Meemung.
The annual meeting of the Jacksonville
Board of Trade was held Wednesday. The
attendance was large and enthusiastic.
Following is President C. E. Garnerv
annual address:


To the Members of the Jacksonville
Board of Trade: Gentlemen--The year
1904 has been a most prosperous one for
the business interests of the entire coun-
try, and it has been especially so for the
State of Florida and the city of Jackson-
vill.
No disaster has visited our State, and
all obtainable reports show a wonderful
gain and increased prosperity in every
branch of industry. The growth of our
city has been phenomenal. It is esti-
mated that we now have a population of
from 45,00 to 50,00. During the past
year a number of new commercial houses
have been established and new industries
started Several very large fertilizer fac-
tories have been erected, and it is safe
to say that in a short time Jacksonville
will be one of the leading manufacturing
points in this country of commercial fer-
tilisers.
Among other industries established dur-
ing the past year were the Georgia and
Florida Sirup Company, the Union Coop-
erage and Supply Company, Operators'
fank and Warehouse Company, Southern
Turpentine and Paint Manufacturing Com-
pany, a box factory at Panama Park, a
large packing establishment and a number
of other smaller industries.
In the month of April of 1904 the pres-
ent Board of Trade building was com-
pleted, and was formally opened, with
proper exercises, in March. It must be
a matter of pride and gratification to ev-
ery member of this board -to know that
we have one of the finest buildings for
this purpose in the South, if not in the
country. It is not only an ornament to
the city, but almost perfect in design and
appointment, erected in the most sub-
staantial manner, of artistic design, and
with a rent roll for the ofiees and stores
that will more than pay the fixed charges
on the bonded debt. It is to be hoped that
the building will stand for generations as
a monument to the public spirit and en-
terprise of our people.
A Csventlmc City.
The pomession of this beautiful audito-
rium has made it possible for us to hold
a number of conventions in this city.
During the past year the Stock Growers'
Association, Interstate Cane Growers' As-
eociati Agricultural Convention, Horti-
cultural Soiety, Studentshelp Fair, Flor-
ida Real Estate Association, Georgia In-
terstate Sawmill Association, Turpentine
Operators' Association, Florida State
Dental Association, Florida State Teach-
ers' Aseociaton, and the Southern Educa
tional -Association have all held their con-
ventions in this city, and have had the
free use of our auditorium. The bring-
ing of so many strangers to Jacksonville
has been of inestimable advantage to the
city, and we hope to make this one of
the greatest convention cities in the South.
It is vry gratifying gto note that the
heavy outlay involved in the holding of
thee convention has been cheerfully and
generously met by our members, notwith-
standing the fact that the beneft de-
rived therefrom has not been exclusively


mcss Organizations,

ours, but has been shared by the entire
community.
Our membership list is greater than
ever, and one hundred and thirteen new
members have been added to the roll, as
against seventy-two for 1903, which was
the largest increase for any one year up
to that time.
The financial condition of the Board
is good, as our treasurer's report will
show.
In the past year we have lost three of
our esteemed and useful members-Judge
John F. Cannon, John M. Fleming and B.
W. Sperry. In the death of these mem-
bers not only this board but the city and
State have lost three upright, honorable
and progressive citizens. This organiza-
tion passed suitable resolutions and took


proper action commemorative of the de-
ceased.
Increased Trasportation Facilities.
Our transportation facilities in the past
year have been increased by the estab-
lishment of the Cook-Cummer Ship Com-
pany, which operates a line of ocean-going
barges, with powerful sea-going tugs,
from this city to Northern ports, intro-
ducing a new feature in transportation
of lumber and other heavy material.
The terminal facilities of our port have
been entirely inadequate to the increased
business. The Atlantic Coast Line Rail-
road officials, realizing this fact, and real-
izing the future necessities, have decided
to build immense wharves and warehouses,
with suitable trackage, in the eastern por-
tion of the city, and the contract has been
let, and the work, I am assured, will be
vigorously prosecuted. This is of very


CAPTAIN C. e. GARNR.

Elected Wednesday to succeed himself as President of the Jacksonville Bard of
Trade.


BT A COPM OF THE NAVAL STORES BLUX D00LK


great advantage and absolutely essental
to the future growth of the city, as it
will relieve the congested conditions that
now prevail at other places, and especially
around the Bridge Street viaduct.
I do not desire to weary you with a
large number of statistics, but it is very
interesting to note, indicating as it does
the wonderful growth of our city, and
these figures are given in the absence of
more definite information which cannot
be obtained at this time. The Clearing
House makes the following gratifying re-
port:
For 1901 ................. .$16,757,772.66
For 1902 ................... 18,927,04.39
For 1903 .................. 26,112,716.59
For 1904 .................. 42,20,499
In roughly estimating the increased bus-
iness of a community there is .no method
more indicative than that of the amount









THE WEREKL INDUSTRIAL RCORD. &


of business transacted through the post-
office. The following comparative state-
ment of receipts, showing the business of
our office for the past four years, speaks
for itself:
1900 .........................$ 91,044.20
1901 ......................... 110,442.70
1902 ......................... 112,393.38
1903 ......................... 127,428.01
1904 ......................... 157,333.05
Weoderfl Gain in Business,
In addition to these figures, the con-
sensus of opinion, obtained by this board
from the merchants, manufacturers and
business men generally, proves conclus-
ively a wonderful gain in business during
the year 1904, as compared with any pre-
vious year in the history of the city. In
addition to this, we have the testimony
offered by the number of beautiful and
substantial business houses and residences
erected within the last twelve months,
there having been erected a total of 889
buildings, as against 837 for the previous
year. This is a remarkable showing and
a very gratifying one, as it has been gen-
erally thought that after the buildings de-
stroyed by the big fire had been replaced
there would be a cessation in building ope-
rations. The total number of buildings
consumed in that great conflagration was
2,68, and the total number that has been
constructed is 4,410.
While we have shown such splendid
achievements along material lines, our
people have not been unmindful that there
are interests of even greater importance.
Our churches are all in a flourishing condi-
tion, and, notwithstanding the fact that
our public schools are better than ever
before, they have not kept pace with the
increased population of our city. This was
brought forcibly to our mind at the last
meeting of this board by the very able ad-
dress of our fellow member, Mr. Waltel
B. Clarkson. I am of the opinion that the
present conditions can be very much im-
proved, and nothing should enlist the
hearty cooperation of our citizens to a
greater extent than providing proper school
facilities for the children. Without de-
siring in any way to reflect upon the
teachers or management of our public
schools, undoubtedly there is room for en-
largement and improvement.
River and Harbor Work.
The river and harbor committee of this
board has held several meetings during
the past year, and it is very much pleased
with the progress of the work, under the
efficient management of Captain Francis
R. Shunk and his assistants. The build-
ing up and extension of the north jetty
has resulted in increasing the available
depth on the bar 5 1-2 feet, and while this
has been of very great advantage to com-
merce, the full benefit cannot be obtained
until the shoals in the river have been
removed, and the channel at Dames' Point
widened. This work is now being vigor-
ously prosecuted. The powerful dredge
Jacksonville, with a 30-inch dredging-
pump outfit, was completed in February,
1904, and has been employed at Dames
Point since that time, except when under
repair, and there is now an available
depth of about 24 feet and a channel 200
feet wide at that point. The powerful
dredge Atlantic is also at work in the
river, and the new dredge Key West has
just begun operations. The dredge St.
Johns, authorized by the river and harbor
act of June 13, 1902, is just about com-
pleted, and is due to arrive here on the
15th of this month, and will be put to


work as soon as possible. There has been
considerable- delay in completing this
dredge, and it is gratifying to know that
we shall soon have this powerful new
dredge, in addition to the fleet now at
work. Captain Shunk in his annual report
states that funds will be required to carry
on this work, in addition to the amount
authorized in the act of June 13, 1902,
and it is to be hoped that sufficient funds
will be provided by the present Congress
to continue the work without further de-
lay.
An effort has been made during the past
year to have the Governmentt deepen the
river from the harbor line to the channel
in front of the city. The matter was pre-
sented to Captain Shunk, the engineer in
charge of the work here, and also to the
chief engineer at Washington, and it was
decided that no part of the present appro-
priation could be used for that purpose.
It is of very little use to have deep water
from Jacksonville to the sea, if vessels
cannot come to our wharves, and there
are a number of shoal places between the
harbor line and the channel. An effort
should be made by this board to have a
bill passed by the present Congress mak-
ing a sufficient appropriation to remove
these shoals, and it should not be left to
individual owners of water front property
to perform this work, as the Government
has established a harbor line, and has ab-
solute jurisdiction from that point to the
channel, and property owners are forbid-
den to build their wharves beyond the
harbor line. I recommend that the river
and harbor committee have such a bil
drafted and indorsed by this board, and
that our members of Congress be urged
to use every effort to have it passed during
the present session of Congress.
I recommend that the committee on im-
migration take up the matter of securing
more favorable rates from the railroads
for settlers who woud come among us to
make permanent citizens for Florida. The
small home owner is worth as much to
us as the richest tourist. This matter
should be emphasized before the Passenger
Association, which meets at Palm Beach
in February.
In the retirement of Mr. W. W. Cummer
as first vice-president and Mr. Walter K.
Haile and Mr. T. G. Hutchinson as gover-
nors, the board loses the services of three
faithful and efficient officers, and the
thanks of the board are due these gentle-
men for their labors in behalf of this or-
ganization. We have the satisfaction of
knowing, however, that as members of the
board, and serving on their respective
committees, we will still have the benefit
of their counsel and influence.
Closing Appeal for the Board.
Every business man in- this city, and
every one who has its interest at heart,
should extend a helping hand to this or-
ganization. They should consider it an
honor, as well as a duty, to become mem-
bers. They should not sit idly in the boat
and permit others to do all the rowing.
Let every one assist, and the burden is
not so great on a few. It is too often
the case in matters affecting the general
welfare that some will hang back, taking
it for granted that others will bear the
expense and perform the work, such as
this board is doing-work that is so nec-
essary for the upbuilding and prosperity
of a city. The members of this board
should assist each other; they should rec-
ognize the fact that those who jo'n this
organization and participate in its work,
are inspired to do so, because without such
sacrifice and labor many matters of the


greatest importance to all would be neg-
lected. The deepening of our river and
bar, extending our trade relations, culti-
vating a friendly feeling throughout this
and adjoining States in favor of our city,
securing the best possible freight and ter-
minal facilities, and the lowest possible
rates from the railroads, and the best ser-
vice from the teleraph and telephone and
electric lines, promoting good roads, good
schools and encouraging the -tblisshm nc
of new industries, inviting capital, and ad-
vertising the advantages of our city as a
place for investment and residence, pro-
moting meetings, conventions, and inviting
distinguished visitors to the city and
State, fostering immigration, protecting
our forest industries, indorsing legislation,
both State and national, which is deemed
advantageous, and opposing that which is
considered detrimental, and especially in
fostering among our people a sentiment
of civic pride and public spirit, and de-
veloping kindly and helpful relations be-
tween our members-all this is especially
the work of this board, and we invoke
the aid and assistance of all good citizens
in our efforts.
We are reasonably proud of our achieve-
ments in the past, and with a larger mem-
bership than ever before, and with a cor-
resonpding larger income, we hope, and it
can be reasonably expected, that the work
of this organization for the coming year
will eclipse that of any previous one.
Result of Electien.
Following the reading of the annual ad-
dress the vote for officers was announced.
There was a president, first and second
vice-president, and two members of the
board of governors to elect. The vote was
as follows:
For president, Charles E. Garner, 108
For first vice-president, Walter.F. Coach-
man, 103.
For second vice-president, W. A. Bours,
103.
For governors, two to be selected-W.
P. Corbett, 24; F. P. Conroy, 63; G. R.
DeSaussure, 52; S. B. Hubbard, 33; Sam
Holmes, 19; F. P. Hoover, 8; Irving H.
Welch, 34.
The president announced the election
of F. P. Conroy and G. R. DeSaussure as
members of the board of governors, they
having received a majority of votes cast.
The Board's Members to Date.
Following are the members of the Jack-
sonville Board of Trade at this date:
R. V. Covington,
E. E. Cleaveland.
O. L. Keene.
Jas. W. Locke.
M. A. Dzialynski.
G. T. Erickson.
Chas. Benedict.
W. G. Toomer.
W. D. Griffing.
C. D. Mills.
Joel D. Mead.
Dr. H. Robinson.
Arthur F. Perry.
H. G. Aird.
Bion H. Barnett.
C. T. Doty.
E. M. Fetting.
Wm. Byrne.
C. H. Hargraves.
J. N. C. Stockton.
Chas. P. Sumner.
Geo. M. Nolan.
J. K. Munnerlyn.
T. V. Porter.
W. Frazier Jones.
J. W. Archibald.
Rufus A. Russell.


Horace Drew.
Mike SabeL
J. H. Crosby.
Geo. W. Haine.
J. Cohen.
J. F. Hormer.
F. C. Boyleaton.
J. Register.
J. B. Mass.
Jno. B. CB aglini
W. B~ Brnett.
J. J. ogan.
W. B. Dawso.
W. D. Barett.
Edward W. Lane.
Archer Hubbard.
T. P. Denham
Jno. M. Fleming.
J. W. Snyder.
Geo. H. White.
C. C. Lorraine.
F. T. Christie.
Wn. L. Williamson
F. M. Dowling.
Jno. Bond.
J. D. Holmes.
Blair Burwell, Jr.
Alexander R. Merrill.
C. D. Rhinehart.
8. F. HalL
J. R. Parrott.
W. K. Hal.
Chas. A. Clark.
D. Ed. Williams, Jr.
O. Pierre Havens.
W. W. Ford.
L Furhgott.
W. A. Sebring.
Morton. J. Taylor.
F. J. Hyde.
A. 8. Baker.
J. A. Craig.
Those. Hilditch.
A. J. Mitehell.
F. Pierce Hoover.
8. P. Herndon.
U. D. Fackenthal.
W. P. Webster.
F. T. Culleml
F. M. Ironmonger, Jr.
A. M. Endel.
Gustav Muller.
8. B. Hubbard, Jr.
J. Fried.
Jno. F. Franz.
J. D. Horn.
H. E. Harkisheimer.
W. F. Cummer.
W. A. Jones.
H. H. Richardson.
Walter Hawkins.
R. W. Simms.
W. F. Seeba.
Harwood Rouer.
Irving H. Welch.
Reed MeLane.
Montgomery Corse.
E. E West.
F. 8. Hodges.
W. F. Coachman.
D. N. Reynolds.
Harold Weaton.
John D. Baker.
J. f. Muno.
J. H. MeLaurin.
T. B. Stringfellow.
Edwin Brobeton.
G. W. Stuart.
L. E Spencer.
J. E. Ingraham.
A. G. Cummer.
D. P. Myerson, Jr.
T. A. Bethel.
W. B. Young.
C. M. Cooper.
J. B. Christie.
[OoatiMne4d m pe l]


PATITONIZE RECORD ADVERTISERS FOR SATISFACTORY DEALIM .










6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Review's Accusation is Proven False.


In recent attack on the Turpentine
Operators' Association by the editor of
the Savannah Naval Stores Review, in the
columns of his own paper, the charge is
made that some of the officials of the As-
sociation are preparing to increase their
output. The Record knew at the time
that the charge was untrue-that every
oflcial of the T. O. A. was loyal to the
teachings and policy of the organization.
At the same time, to verify its convie-
tions, the editor of the Record addressed
the following letter to each official and
member of the Executive Committee:
"Jacksonville, Dec. 27, 1904.
"Dear Sir: The Savannah Naval Stores
Review makes a very bitter attack on
the T. O. A. by declaring that while it is
preaching a curtailment of production,
its officials are going ahead and increasing
the output. Is this accusation true?
Please let me know immediately if you
are going to increase your output.
"Yours very truly,
"J. A. HOLLOMON."
The officials of the Association are as
follows: President, A. D. Covington,
Quincy, Fla.; vice-president, W. J. hill-
man, Live Oak, Fla.; treasurer, H. A.
MeEachern, Jacksonville, Fla. The Ex-
ecutive Committee: A. D. C ovington,
Quincy, Fla.; W. J. Hillman, Live Oak,
Fla.; H. A. McEachern, Jacksonville, Fla.;
W. W. Timmons, Tifton, Ga.; John D.
Callahan, Bainbridge, Ga.; W. B. Conoley,
Enville, Fla.; R. Hall, Ocala, Fla.; A.
P. Malloy, Panasoffkee, Fla. The replies
to the charges of the Naval Stores Review
are published below:
"Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 28.
"J. A. Hollomon, Jacksonville, Fla.:
"Dear Sir: I am not cutting as many
boxes as last year at any of my places
The production will not be as great as
last year at any place in which I am in-
tereeted. The Review's charges to my
knowledge are absolutely without founda-
tion. Yours truly, A. D. Covington, Pres-
ident"
"Live Oak, Fla., Dec. 30.
"J. A. Hollomon, Jacksonville, Fla.:
"Positively No. Your friend, with best
wishes, W. J. Hillman."
"Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 28, 1904.
"Mr. J. A. Hollomon, Editor Industrial
Record, Jacksonville, Fla.:
"Dear Sir: I have yours notifying me
that the officials of the T. O. A. have been
publicly accused of making preparations
for an increased output of turpentine for
next season, and asking if I am going to
increase where I have operating interests.
I beg to say that any accusation of this
kind, relating to me, is false. The places
in which I am interested will reduce as
per the Association's resolution. H. A.
MeEeachern, treasurer Turpentine Opera-
tors' Association."
"Tifton, Ga., Dec. 28, 1904.
"Mr. J. A. Hollomon, Editor, Jacksonville.
"Dear Sir: Replying to your letter of
the 27th, in which you state than an
attack has been made on the T. O. A.
by the Savannah Naval Stores Review as
to curtailment of production, will say that
comparing my output of 1903-04, I find
that my reduction for 1904 is 500. barrels
of spirits less than that of 1903.
"In the summer I bought a back-box
place, but owing to the outlook and in pur-
suance of the agreement with the Asso-
ciation, I shut this place down. My
production for 1905 will be at least 10 per


cent lea than it was lnat ymu. The at-
tack is ill-grounded and must have been
made without due investigation. Yours
very truly, W. W. Timmons."

"Bainbridge, Ga., Dec. 28, 1904.
'Mr. J. A. Hollomon, Jacksonville, Fla.:
"Dear Sir: Replying to your inquiry
of the 27th, can safely state that I have
been reduJng my cuttig of new boxes
for the past three seasons, I will reduce
my cutting for 1904 and 1905 25 per cent.
"I think I am safe in stating that the
Bainbridge territory will not cut as many
boxes this year as it did last, and I know
that the operators in this territory are
not paying over 11-2 cents per box.
"I note that the Review of the 24th
inst. states that there are fifty turpentine
places opened up between Waycross and
Bainbridge, but knowing the country as
I do, can safely say this is not true, for
there is not timber enough in this section
to afford this much business; it may be
possible that there are a few small places
in the Waycross territory, but no new
places in the Bainbridge territory.
"I have noted the attack of the Savan-
nah Naval Stores Review on the T. O. A.
and as I kept myself well posted on this
subject, I knew there was nothing in it,
but at the same time, it is liable to mis-
lead some operator who is not well posted.
I am not reducing my cutting of boxes
for lack of timber, for I have plenty to
last me several years. I hope this expla-
nation will be satisfactory. Yours very
truly, J. W. Callahan."
"Enville, Fla., Dec. 29.
"J. A. Hollomon, Jacksonville, Fla.:
"Dear Sir: I don't expect to make as
much spirits in 1905 as I did in 1904. The
Review is no Bible. W. B. Oonoley."
"Ocala, Fla., Jan. 3, 1905.
"J. A. Hollomon, Jacksonville, Fla.:
"Dear Sir: Replying to your favor of
recent date, beg to say that I am some-
what surprised at its contents, as I know
no one who is interested in the Turpentine
Operators' Association paying 2 cents for
cutting boxes. I beg to say I am paying
11-2 cents per box for cutting, and will
cut about one-third as many as I did
last year. My output, however, will be
about the same as last year, on account of
having opened up a new place, and having
a good many yearling boxes. Yours very
truly, R. S. Hall."
"Panasoffkee, Fla., Dec. 30, 1904.
"Mr. J. A. Hollomon, Jacksonville, Fla.:
"Dear Sir: I cut about 3 crops boxes
here last year, and expect to cut 4 crops
this year, but have 8 crops old boxes
worked five years that will be about
worthless the coming season, so I think
I will do well if I make as much turpen-
tine next season as I have this. I have
just cut such timber as I could not get the
lease extended.
"I cut about three crops last year at
my Haines City place and expect to cut
about the same there this year, and think
we will make about the same quantity of
turpentine. If everybody was as conser-
vative as I have been we might hold down
production. Yours truly, A. P. Malloy."
Further comment is unnecessary. These
gentlemen are men of honor and integrity.
If they say they are not increasing their
last year's box cutting or curtailing it,
that settles it.
Thus another of the Savannah Naval
Stores Review's falsehoods is nailed.


Falstaff Restaurant

For Ladies and Gentlemen


Brmefut a Ia earte. Luncheon 12 to 2:30, 50e. Table d'hote
dinner, 6 to p. m., 75c. Oysters on half shell. After theater
lunches a Specialty.

25 MAIN STREET,

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.




it 8* B 88 84 88 98 *8 88 S 80 G 88 8 88 9 8GA 8 88 8 88


'PEARL UMT. Pres.


T. IL MeCART N. ise-Pres.


MAMICE STERN. Tres.


SOUTHERN STATES LAID & TIMBER COMPANY.

mIRWN u. WELcu. Muaner.



Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Iui.aIIIgs ages Isu i 8 iI88I8111 aIeI I Iiae$II uII I III
.iaI~~l~llrI)ui(meIIIauIgIIi)uu~..g.IIeeuii


W. H. BCKWITH.


W. B. HENDERSON.


G. C. WARREN.


: BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.


LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTIlE AID MILL LANDS.

RRoo s 1.2-3, First Natloal Busk BWlldlag.
STAMPA, : : : : FLORIDA.

***IIIIIIIIIIIIII**l*.**l**lllll IIIIIIIIIIIIIII!1111II

CYPRESS TANKS

Are Beat by Every Test
Cpress withslins the effects of heat and moiaure
better than ay other wood. shrinks and swells le s
than other woe, is inperviou to acidsboi paint
well and lam fo ages with. decay ing Located
a we a e, right in the gnat cypre forests, we ar
able to secute the bestelection of thewoodandat
very low price. We have bees building tanis for
more than a quarter of a century and bo dGr aert
that o tanks ae better baut or wll ln longer.
Sed jer ctaow and prices.
AG. M. DAVIS PALATRA, FLOMIDA



BETTELINI'S SPECIALiTY.
I wi l -em by lerio. prepaid the following:
Pour tun luarts UIh ela County. annybrook By or Big Horn ye .. 5a.5
ag Bott -.......... ............... M.
SI will -ami fow fun quarts of samers' Corn. Mewood ye,. Golden Wed-
diWa RMye Hoela Gla. TomI Oh. Peach Brandy, Peach and Honey
Whisey, GOl and Mabattan Cocktakl-uy of the above for........ SLM
0- bottilsf ay of the abve .................................................. *..l
our bottle at the followia Califorla Wine: l1rry. Port. Muscat.
Catawha .. ......... ..... ........................ s.
EBagle bottle ........ .. ............
Poar bottelsWle a Whie. es......... Shem ea
atgle betta ....................... .....................1 L
Flve bottles DuWy's Malt ........... S.0
miagla bottLes .......................................
Bulk g m of all kinda. Me al Price app catio. All knda of
Iqwes in l em ft s to .aS L. o. b. Jakaonmills.
F. BETTELINI. W Bay St, opp. Unae Ueept, Jaeksmnville, Fla


AM YOU A SUDUCIM TO "T= 1nami







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


THE


COVINGTON


Co.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.





Wholesale: SHOES -
Wooe: DRY GOODS.



"Success For Our Customers is Success For Us."


PINE PRODUCTS CORPORATION.

Petersr-Weraicke-Marier Co. Gets its
Letters Patent; Capital, a1oopoo.
The Peterson-Wernicke Mariner Com-
pany, a new pine products company, has
just incorporated, capital stock $200,000,
with general offices in Chicago, and branch
offices and manufacturing plants at Jack-
sonville and Pensacola, Florida.
The officers of the company will be O.
H. L. Wernicke, a large stockholder and
director in the Globe-Wernicke Co., Cin-
cinnati, and Macey-Wernicke Co., Grand
Rapids. Mr. Wernicke will be president
of the company; F. E. Mariner, vice-pres-
ident, who is now president of the Pensa-
cola Tar & Turpentine Co., of Pensacola,
Fla. T. J. Peterson, who was until a
few weeks ago secretary of the Central
Commercial Co., of Chicago, will be secre-
tary and treasurer. Prominent among the
the stockholders are W. R. Shelby, vice-
president of the Grand Rapids & Indiana
Railway; Eugene E. Adams, of New York,
a large stockholder in the Globe-Wernicke
Company; E. A. Stowe, president of the
Tradesman Co., of Grand Rapids; Mr.
Hoskins, of Mariner & Hoskins, Chicago
chemists.
The business of the company will be
largely manufacturing and dealing in ros-
in, turpentine and pine tar products



ABSTRACTS
T'tle and Tax Abstracts, Maps, etc..
of large tracts in all parts of Florida and
South Georgia, prepared for owners and
intending purchasers. Correspondence
solicited.

REALTY TITLE AND TRUST CO.
Law Exchange Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.


Sam'I P. Holmes &Co.
Steks, Beds, Cotton,
Grain and ProvIsions

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
BeD Pkome 853 Baldwim Block


U ".a are tbianka of baulns& a
s3aos. &O15MA tbo Oin. "ai bave. OR
treadlus 11 you awe blinklng of In-
vesting I= nur lU&atups tt xu wVarn
to bur aw asne k 57 Oil
Ih ~ ..d .


COURSE OF PALE AND MEDIUM ROSINS AT SAVANNAH FOR TWO YARS.


DATE
April 1.........
April 8.........
April 1........
April 22........
April 2 .......
May 6.........
May 13........
May 20........
May 27........
June 3 ........
June 10........
June 1 ........
June 23........
July 1 ........
July 7........
July 14 ........
July 28 ........
Aug. 4........
Aug. 12 ........
Aug. 18 ........


K


1904-06
$4.10
3.96
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
386
3.95
496
4.35
4.5
4.00
4.05
4.75
4.75
4.70
4.52%
4.67%
4.60
4.C0%


ohn= Furchgott = Compan:
WHOLESAE DALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS OIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Don't forget your subscription to the Record.
WHmE WRITING ADVERTIS &S, MENTION THE RECORD.


W.W.


W.G.


1903-04
$30
3L0
3.00
3.50
340
3.35
36
3.05
3.42%
3.66
3.65
3.60
3.40
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.40
3.50
3.50


1904-05
3.80
*&SO
3.75
3.00
&00
&00
3.50
3.50
3.55
3.65
4.05
4.10
4.1
4.25
440
4.40
4.40
4.25
4.42%
4.36
4.37


1903-04
$3.00
3.45
3.35
3.25
3.25
3.27%
3.35
330
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.30


1904-05
$3.O6
3.00
3.45
3.45
3.45
3.35
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.85
3.85
3.85
3.90
4.00
3.00
3.90
3.82%
4.00
4.00
4.02%


N
M
1903-0
$360
3.35
3.35
3.1
3.1
315
3.17%
3.25
3.
3.20
&300
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.05
3.06
3.15
3.15


1904-06
5.35
3.35
3.30
3.20
3.20
3.20
305
3.50
3.65
3.65
3.06
&3.
3.80

3.72%
3.90
3.85
3.87%


1903-04
$3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
3.20
3.15
2.95
9.95
2.96
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
2.95
3.065
3.065


1904-0
$3.30
3.30
3.16
3.1
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.2
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.56
3.55
3.50
3.6
3.55
3.57%


190-04
uM
3.0
3.00
3.00
3.00
o00
&o00
3.43%
3.10
3.10
3U
3.L
3.86
3.85
LS0
Lao
2.6
2.86
2.956
2.95
2.6


190645
100.m
U95
LI9
Lu
L80
S.80
&OO
3.00
3.6
3.00
&l0
3.10
3.26
3.30
3.30JO
SAE


3.38
3.3 %
31,320


190t-0M


L5

L&8
Lt0
.TO
3W






L.0
2.80
3700
s.W
$.8


y.








8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


H. ROBINSON.Pra. H. OGAILLARD. Oshier
W. B. OWEN. Vice-Pres.

Commercial Bank,
State Depesitory.
BIAJCHs: Oeas. Fla.. Lake City. Fla
Jacksemville, - -Florida


THE CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
IN 819.500.00


BARRELS

ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Brr hold and wi pass the sec
rest Americand European ispectio=.

Plants at MEGS, CAIRO, OUYTMAN, GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address eeders to botc office,

QUITMAN, GA.




BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES. BOILERS.
Cotta, Saw, Fr tffirm, Oil and Iee Ma-
hinery, and Supplie and Repair.
CAPACITY FOR 300 HANDS.
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hangers, Leather am
Rubber Belting and Hoae, Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tool.
Plan d estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges
Steam Pmp~ a eed Water Heater and

AUGUSTA, CA.


aL P6 DAinPM5A
w I V %ew FLA


TURPENTINE OPERATORS HAVE AN W. T. RILEY,
OBJECT LESSON IN COTTON. Precsidet.


What an Increase in Production Will
Mean to the Naval Stores
Men.
[Continued from page 1.]
lion they saved by selling their cotton
before the size of the crop was known.
Now, little remains to be said to the
turpentine men. The experience of the
cotton men is before them. The cotton
men increased their product by 26 per cent
as it is feared the turpentine men will do.
If they should do so, they will invite dis-
aster, and it will be quick to accept the
invitation. It matters not whether the
commodity be cotton or turpentine. The
effect of increase of production on one
will be the same as on the other.
There is much in common between the
two products. The South has a practical
monopoly of both. The South can fix the
price of both, and in the same way with
each-by regulating the production. The
demand for both commodities is increasing
slowly year by year. Either will bear an
annual increase of production of one or
two per cent. Neither will bear more. An
increase of one or two per cent would be
imperceptible. Neither can bear an in-
crease of ten per cent. Either industry
would be wrecked by an increase of 25
per cent.
Either might ultimately become pros-
perous again, but only after years of
decreased production had cut the supply
down to the demand.
The turpentine men have been pros-
pering during the last few years. They
have so regulated the output that they
have had a steady demand for all they
have offered, and have received a satis-
factory price. They have made money rap-
idly and the State has shared it. It
would be difficult to say how much of the
prosperity of Jacksonville has flowed from
the prosperity of the turpentine men,
but it is entirely safe to say that more of
it has come from them than from any
other class. This prosperity will continue
as long as the conditions on which it is
founded continue. Change them and dis-
aster will follow.
The price of cotton was cut nearly in
three by a 25 per cent increase of produc-
tion. A like change by an increase of
25 per cent in turpentine production
would cut the price to 20 cents-about
half the cost of production. Certainly
it would cut the price to a figure below
the cost of production, and it would so
demoralize the industry that years would
be required for its recovery. It would
mean a loss for all and ruin for many.
The operators have the situation in their
own hands. What will they do with it?

Repair work and castings-when it
comes to this class of work, The J. S. Scho-
field's Sons Co., of Macon, Ga., are pre-
pare to take proper care of you. Com-
municate with them.
Will Begin on the zoth.
The West-Flynn-Harris Co., naval stores
factors, Savannah, Ga., and Jacksonville,
Fla., will begin business under the charter
recently granted on the 10th of January.
This company vill succeed the well-known
factorage firms of Peacock, Hunt & West
Co., and the Independent Naval Stores
Co.
There will be only slight changes in
office forces, as at present organized in
the Peacock, Hunt & West Co.'s offices.


J. A. G. CARSON,
Vice-PresideMt.


610. J. SCOVEL.
Sec. A" Treas.


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Fertories,
8th Street R. R. Croisrng.


FLORIDA


.. NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA.. U. S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.
MRMCTORs:


c. S. ELIWS.
P. L. SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


a F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER BAY,
A. D. OOVINGTON.


H. L KAYTON,
Secretary and Treasurer.


J. CHFIENUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
SWRIr EITHER OF THE AOVE FOR PARTICULARS.

*@*s@*e**es******O*eOa*s******OO@*Oe*@*o****e*O*@*e


J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,


*- feadquarters fw t
SDistiller's Pumping
o. Outfit.
No plant complete without one.
SHundreds of them in use in Georgia,
SFlorida, Alabama, Missisippi and
-- 1- Soath Carolina. Write us for paticu- .
lrs and prices. We also manufacture *
SEngiues, Bellers amd fih i
Grade Machinery,
l as well as carry a full and complete *
-*--tookof-
i; Mil Supplies, Pipe, p
i* 1 Bller Tubes, Etc. ,
S/ i Advise your wants.
S.- Macon, - Georgia. -
A Lseaf Sodelfty o f *
t fo T6 Wrt f t Twp.s Stessr Prs
*-*-* ************e o*ee**oo**************5o *e0e*5 0a

John R. Young. J. W. Motte, C. B. Parker, James MeNatt, W. W. Wilder,
President. Vice-Pres. Vice-Pres. Vice-Pres. Sec. & Tress.



(John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.
* m

SNaval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.

SSavsVuAnh 8 Brunswick. Ga.
*. IIa fIsI*alIII t III IOIISI IIIII I3llmrIIIl3rr


WHEX WVS1TS ADIW 8ES IMETIO TH2X BCOMD.


JACKSONVILLE.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


WITH SOUTHERN BUSINESS ORGA
IZATIONS.

Jackamville's Anaal Meeting.
(Continued from page .)

J. M. Barra.
W. M. Bostwick, Jr.
W. B. Clarkson.
Chas. W. Tucker.
E. W. Wilon.
A. 0. Dawson.
Walter S. Till.
Wm. H. Lucas.
G. P. all.
Chas. M Kaufman.
H. T. Barker.
M. A. Brown.
Fulton Saussy.
Chas. A. Brown, Jr.
A. Drysdale.
R. Cay.
Francis P. Fleming, Jr.
A. D. Covington.
Loreaso A. Wilson.
W. A. Redding.
John Robinson.
0. H. Champlain.
Gov. W. 8. Jennings.
E. B. Walker.
H. A. Renfroe.
W. J. Powers.
C. J. Turner.
G. E. Nugent.
T. J. Brown.
Chas. M. Lynch.
J. W. Dowling.
A. H. King.
E. T. Kennedy.
Geo. P. Wilby.
C. E. Boyle.
Henry J. Wilson.
J. Noreaberg.
Alfred E. McClure.
R. H. Paul
Walter M Davis.
W. C. Lerts.
Fred A. Rae.
Jas. A. Abrams.
Jno. D. Carswell.
E. 0. Painter.
Geo. W. Brook.
Roland Woodward.
Jas. D. Stuart
I. M. Baker.
A. W. West.
Benj. S. Hubbard.
C. Briekweidel
Francis C. Miller.
Jno. E. Harris.
C. Hunt.
Jas. 8. Easterby.
E J. L'Engle.
P. D. Casidey.
Paul R. Wiggp.
Henry Elson.
Ja. E. Johnson.
J. A. Hollomon.
G. R. DeSaussure.
James Y. Wilson.
H. B. Sell.
Guy L Metelf.
T. J. Mott, Jr.
E. H. Hopkins.
8. L Earle.
Geo. T. Christie.
C. W. Chase.
H. ONeal.
Henry Benedict.
H. Gaillard.
J. C. Lusk.
F. 8. Robinson.
Jas. E. Kirk.
W. D. Miller.
W. B. Franci.
J. 0. Chambliss.
J. H. W. Hawkins.


N- Joseph E. Peacock.
P. C. Morton.
J. N. Taylor.
W. H. O'Neil.
Benj. F. Hobgood, Jr.
I. L Farris.
Reed E. LaMance.
R. D. Drysdale.
A. B. Humphries.
E. P. Axtell.
T. A. Gillespie.
Geo. E. Herring.
Chas. B. Fraser.
E. A. Reicker.
A. L. Turner.
DeSoto D. Fitzgerald.
Jules Kauffman.
A. J. Hedrick.
L. A. Mitchell.
R. E. Wheeler.
Wm. L Williams.
R. R. Roseborough.
Simon Benjamin.
Cill Sandusky.
Arthur M. Dennis.
Those. A. Davis.
J. F. Horner.
Chas. F. Verelst.
J. P. Lynch.
J. R. Dunn.
F. E. Waymer.
W. B. Pickett.
F. E. Wood.
J. H. Wolfe.
F. H. Puckhaber.
William Marvin.
T. T. Stockton.
Frank E. Chase.
C. B. Smith.
J. H. Rafftery.
A. W. Barrs.
C. H. Rivers.
Geo. L BahL
Dr. M. Souvielle.
Edward Anderson.
D. T. Gerow.
B. D. Otis.
W. T. Hadlow.
Rutledge Holmes.
H. W. Otis.
E. O. Locke.
Geo. W. Parkhill.
R. D. Knight.
A. B. Gilkes.
B. F. Dillon.
Simon Benjamin.
Geo. W. Clark.
J. C. Greely.
J. H. Norton.
J. D. Burbridge.
Lawrence Haynes.
R. K. Shaw.
M. D. Johnson.
W. W. Frazier.
E C. Budd.
W. P. Corbett.
J. R. Walsh.
Chas. C. Harris.
Jno. Einig.
Wm. Baker.
Frank S. Gray.
A. D. Stevens.
J. R. Porter.
J. B. Yerkes.
H. B. Snell.
Archibald Meldrum.
Henry S. Wilson.
F. O. Miller.
J. W. Hollister.
H E. Day.
W. C. Grivot.
W. B. Thompson.
Joseph Zapf.
P. A. Holt.
A. St. Clair-Abrams.
W. J. Bryan.
J. N. Stripling.


D. U. Fletcher.
F. B. Fleming.
William Pruden Smith.
R. M. Call.
W. B. Owen.
Telfair Stockton.
Arthur Meigs.
D. Warrington.
J. D. McEachern.
Henry Clark.
H. A. Hodges.
C. C. Hunt.
C. E. Pepperday.
G: M. Parker.
W. A. Bours.
B. W. Vincent.
Horace C. Avery.
T. A. Jones.
Chas. M. Lynch.
I. Vorenberg.
S. E. Foster.
N. P. Bryan.
W. H. Baker.
J. E. Hartridge.
Cromwell Gibbons.
H. B. Phillips.
Geo. C. Bedell.
J. P. Taliaaferro.
J. C. Cooper.
Jno. L. Doggett.
R. W. Davis.
Wilkinson Call.
E. J. L'Engle.
Walter M. Davis.
Wm. Moore Angua.
T. Murphy.
Geo. R. Foster, Jr.
C. W. Perkins.
Geo. Emery.
Frank C. Russell
H. C. Suttles.
W. S. Ware.
J. Eugene Merrill.
W. A. McMillan.
H. W. Stafford.
C. H. Mann
Chas. R. Tysen.
H. B. Garrett.
S. P. Holmes.
A. B. Vance.
F. W. Haward.
Chas. Blum.
T. J. Mott.
E. F. Kennedy.
J. M. Schumacher.
Jas. H. Boden.
Robert Bamble, Jr.
L M. Boykin.
H. J. Klutho.
W. T. Cotter.
W. P. Richardson.
Thos. Owens.
John Price.
Wm. H. Tucker.
R. N. Ellis.
August Blum.
Sig. Hess.
Paul R. Wiggs.
M. V. Raley.
C. W. Kinne.
E. A. Groover.
L. A Shipman.
W. P. Gifford.
Cecil Willcox.
Miller H. Dancy.
W. A. Macduff.
A. H. West.
W. S. Jordan.
C. Buckman.
W. W. Cummer.
C. M. Cooper.
Dexter Hunter.
W. R. Carter.
R. B. Archibald.
B. H. Barnett.
D. G. Ambler.
F. C. Long.


R. G. Ross.
N. B. Broward.
T. G. Hutchinson.
B. Hart.
W. B. Pickett.
Arthur W. Dennis.
J. W. White.
J. A. Cunningham.
S. H. Melton.
C. S. Hammatt.
Dr. S. A. Morris.
C. C. Bettes.
Ja S. Easterby.
Carl Moller.
H. W. Clark.
H. W. Stafford.
Dr. Edward Andrade.
B. Marion Reed.
J. H. Cay.
L G. Moore.
B. H. Chadwick.
C. W. Bartleson.
Paul E. Peck.
W. IH Adams.
Edwin S. Spencer.
Benjamin F. Umer.
C. L. Myers.
W. K. Haile.
B. F. Bowen
Kingsley McCUum.
Smith D. Pickett.
E. C. Patterson.
D. H. McMillan.
W. C. Powell.
W. J. Hillman.
J. A. Cranford.
Ja. E. Johnson.
Jno. G. Christopher.
J. H. Durkee.
C. B. Rogers.
Geo. W. Wilson.
J. S. Fairhead.
C. P. LovelL
Geo. W. Spalding.
C. IH shmead.
Jai W. Spratt.
A. M. Ive.
S. J. Melson.
C. Turner.
W. P. Wilkinson.
F. J. Brown.
Dr. C.K Sandusky.
W. J. Power.
aR J. Riles.
E. M. Delgado.
J. A. Conover.
T. W. Dunk.
Jas. Lasseter.
F. P. Conroy.
H. X. Day.
H. Barnes.
0. P. Bartlett,
Geo. F. Parson.
W. W. Shipman.
Francis C. Miller.
Geo. P. Willy.
Jno. E. Harris.
W. J. Harris.
Loren H. Green.
Claude L'Engle.

Southern Lumber Manufacturers
To all Members: The dates of our fif-
teenth annual meeting have been definitely
fixed for January 24 and 25, 1906, and
place St. Charles hotel, New Orleans, Ia.
In event the work of the convention
is not completed in two days, the meet-
ing will continue during the 26th.
Full particulars as to railroad rates,
hotel accommodations, etc., will be an-
nouneed early in January.
This notice is sent in order that all
members may arrange their affairs so as
to have no conflicting engagements, thus
insuring a large attendance.
GEO. K. SMITH, Secretary.


READ THS ADS IN THI RECORD.








10 'HE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BECOXD.


J. X. PABnOT, ABcuz, S. HUBmsAiD ArMUBR F. PAnAr *
President. Vioe-President. Cshier.

The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
Capital. $200.000. Surplus. $100.000
STATE DEPOSITARY. 3
General Banking. Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes. 15.00 per Year.



Review of Naval Stores for a Week


Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Price Repts Sales Exp. 1900
Monday, Jan. 2-Holiday.
Tues., Jan. 3 50 1 294 80 1 324 59
Wed., Jan. 4 50 306 371 0 59
Thur., Jan. 5 50 162 155 10 59


Savannah Naval Stees Statmnt.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 .......... 6,495 44,50
Receipts Jan. 5 ......... 163 2,071
Receipts previously ......165,863 525,000
Total ............... 172,521 571,621

Exports Jan. 5 .......... 10 1,521
Exports previously ..... 140,50 506,253
Total ............... 140,300 07,774
Stock Jan. .............. 32,161 63,847
Stock previously ........ 15,117 83,939

Rosin for the Week at Savannah
Tuesday, Jan. 3. Last Year.
WW .. ... ... 5.15 3.55
WG .............. 4.85 3.30
N .. .. .. .... .... 4.00 3.10
S.............. 4.30 2.9
K ........ ...... 4.00 2.90
I ............ ..3.35 2.85
H .............. 2.95 2.65
G .... .. .... ... 2.70 2.50
F .. .. .. .. .... ... 2.67% 2.40
E ............ .. 2.57% 2.35
D .............. 2.60 2.30
ABC .. .. .... .... 2.02 2.26
Receipts, 2, 418, sales 1,722, exports 2,390.
Tuesday, Jan. 3.-Rosin firm; receipts
2,418; sales, 1,722; shipments, 2,380.
Quote: A, B, and C, 2.55; D, $2.60; E,
$2.05 to $2.67 1-2; F, $2.70 to $2.721-2;
G, $2.77 1-2 to $2.80; H, $2.92 1-2 to $2.95;
I, $3.35; K, $4; M, $4.30; N, $4.60; win-
dow glass, $4.85; water white, $5.15.

Wednesday, Jan. 4.-Rosin firm; receipts
4,759, sales 1,751. Quote: A, B, C, $2.55;
D, $2.60; E, $2.70; F, $2.72 1-2; G, $2.82
1-2; H, $3; I, $3.35 K, $4; M, $4.30; N,
$4.60; WG, $4.85; WW, $5.15.

Thursday, Jan. 5-Rosin firm; receipts,
2,071; sales, 743; shipments, 1,521. Quote:
A, B, C, $2.55; D, $2.60; E, $2.70; F, $2.75
to $2.77 1-2; G, $2.85; H, $3.00; I, $3.35;
K, $4.00; M, $4.30; N, $4.60; WG, $4.85;
WW, 5.15.


Bailey & Montgomery's Review.
New York, January 4th, 1905.
Spirits Turpentine: Stock, 1,248 barrels.
Market during the week has been quiet
but steady, sales only moderate.
Thursday, December 29-531-2c. asked.
Friday, December 30-53c. asked.
Saturday, December 31-53c. asked.
Monday, January 2-Holiday.
Tuesday, January 3-53e. asked.
Wednesday, January 4-531-2e asked.
Rosin-Stock, 28,000 barrels.
This market has also been quiet, but
steady for all grades. Sales fair.
AC, $2.821-2; D, $2.90; E, $3.00; F,
$3.05; G, $3.10; H, $3.20 to $3.25; I,
$3.60 to $3.65; K, $4.25 to $4.30; M, $4:60
to $4.65; N, $4.85 to $4.90; WG, $5.20,
WW, $5.50.

Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Review.
New York, Jan. 3, 1905.
Spirits Turpentine-Trade has been fair
considering the season. Prices have been
about steady. Stock, 1,114 barrels. We
quote Machines, 53 cents.
Rosin-The demand is light, common
and good strained especially dull. We
quote:
BC, $2.85: D, $2. 95: E. $3.05: F, $3.10:
G, $3.15; H, $3.20; 1, $3.65; K, $4.25; M,
$4.65; N. $4.90; WG, $5.15 to $5.20; WW,
$5.50 to $5.55. TOLAR, HART & CO.

Gross Makes Big DeaL
J. C. Gross, of Palatka, Fla., formerly of
Lee County, Ala., one of the best known
crosstie and turpentine men in the State,
has just purchased the plant known as the
St. Johns Log and Tie Company at Alco,
Fla. The purchase includes 30,000 acres of
timber lands, fifteen miles of railroad,
two locomotives, eighty head of mules
and the entire company outfits. The
value of the plant is placed at $125,000.


Anyone Wishing
a limited amount of paper cups to be
delivered from January 10 toFebruary 10,
and as late as March 10 can get them
of Vickers patent by writing-
E. L. VICKERS,
TIrTON, OEOROIA.


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903404 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


Crops c Sof rits and Roiam for Three Yas,


Crop M19-04.
Spirits. Rosin.
Wimington...... ....16,11 0,67
Charleaton.......... S4MA 3,130
Savannah....... .... 17418 M,308
Brumwiek.. .... .... a,008 184
Mobile ..............1, I21 M50,80
New Orleams.......... 36,017 13,1M2
CLOrabell.. .. ........ osed eloed
Georgetown...... 7,15 44,214
Pensaeola..- ....... 42,554 205,982
Jax. A Ferdina...... 187,210 63,21
Tamp .... .. ........ losd elma

Total...... ......63531 t9, M0


aop 19-86
Spirit. Rosin.
18, 113,I6
3,007 11,836
270,670 940,50
6,47 4A4,106
18,9M 70,272
33,103 108,033
3,34 32,143
10,307 4,M8
38,275 11.,M
91,97 375,211
13,65 40,A4

571,006 2,184,818


rop 1901-4
Spirits. BRai
16,M1 1-.48

31066 1,71,40
70,m0 2sls
SlC 8o72
21,0138 4,36
8,177 474*7
8,45 8 0,16
37,786 154,30
7000 245,I000
15044 1,779

03,M 31313


Imports of Turpetine to U. K.
The following table is compiled by James Watt & Son, of London, from the
official returns. For convenience of comparison we have turned ewta int. barrelss
-320 ewt. equal 100 barrels.
187 10 1809 1900 1901 19M 19
From U. S., bbls. .... 152,662 173,786 149,375 174 144 1,42 156,1 43 148,
From France, bbla.... 161 944 517 2,28 850 1,6 4,30
From other countries.. 1494 878 50 840 53 9064 1

154,30 174,907 149,942 177,509 19,341 167,08 148,3
From Rumi .......... 2,815 4,13 4,998 8,521 6,1 8,711 17,35
Total Barrels .. 167,1 17900 154,940 186,0e 0 201,20 106,03 1,592
Thus the impart of Russian Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 1903 was double
that of 1902, and over six times as much as in 1807. It is interesting to see how
this import fluetuate with the pries of American Turpentine.
Percentage of Import of Bnuian .1.7 2.33 3. 47 3.41 24 10M
Av. Price Amer. Tmrp. n Lof do .3l-0 24-06 4-1 8a ST-I 8-1 9 48-


COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVA"AR FOR FIVE TARL


April I ...................
April 8 ....................
April 15 ..................
April 2 ..................
April 9 ...................
May 6 ....................
May 13 .................. ....
May 20 .....................
May 27 .................
June 3 ....................
June 10 ...................
June 17 ..................
June 24 ..................
July I .... ..............
July 8 ...................
July 15 ....................
July 22 .................. ..
July 28 ....................
Aug. 4 ...................
Aug. 12 ...................
Aug. 19 ...................
Aug. 26 ............ .........
Sept. 2 ...................
Sept. 9 ......... .......
Sept. 16 ...................
Sept. 23 .................
Sept. 30 ..................
Oct. 7 ....................
Oct. 14 ....................
Oct. 21 ....................
Oct. 28 ...................
Nov. 4 .................
N ov. 11 ...................
Nov. 18 ...................
Nov. 25 ..................
Dec. 2 .....................
Dec. 9 ....................
Dec. 16 ...................
Dec. 23 ...................
Dee. 23
Dec. 30 ................... .
Jan. 6 .....................


1904-05
ND
63
M%
54%
52%
53%

64%
52%
62%
53%



53%
62%
52%

54%
as
52%
52%

52%
51%
52%
52%
56%

50
50
48%
36%
47%
48-%
501/4
5o
49%
50


1908-04
ND
50
49%
47
45
46
47%1
47%
49
45y
46
40%
471/
47%
47%
48
49%
50(%
49%
52
52
55@%
54
54%
56%
57
55
57
55%
56%
55%
56
56%
56
56
56
56
561/4
56%
56%
57%1/


190-03
45
42%
42%
44

43
46
45
45%
45%
47%
48%
47%

4514
46%
446
43y
43%
44%
44%
44%
45.
44%
46
45%
47%
50
51%
53%
49
52
50
51
50%
50%
52
54


1901-M0
34

32%
31%-S3
32
31%
32%
32s%
32%

324
33%-%

4t%
33
34%
34%




35
32%

364
33
24%

34
35
35%
35%
35
35%
35%
35
35%
35%
35
35%
35%
35%
361/4
37%


1900-01
13%
53%
47%
48
47
48
40
46
44%
as
42%
43%
-44%
43
42
38%
0%
38

35%
357%
36%
37
37
37%
40%
40%
40
41
40
39
39
as
38%
37%
35
35
37


1908-0 '1902-03 1 1901-02


Receipts
SRinrit, cls ................... .... ....-
otpi s, ks ..............................


Roin" bbls...... .......................
Exprts
SSpita ... .......................
Roin, bbl..........................
Resns, bbis. .. .. .. .. . . .. . . . . . . .
New York
Sits, eks..........................

Sundries
Rosins, ..........................
Rosins, bb. .............. ............


198,647
650,988
844,585

188,398
752,270

98,884
888,171

35,658
87,853

59,351
826.746


292 496 814,846
940,5071,071,440
1,238,038 1,385,786

296,430 814,876
975,428 62,687

206,109 217,446
504,178 535,042

42,765 53,797
138,121 129,059

87,556 48,633
387,784 898.586


The cps of pi anre hs than 1902-03 by 9849 caks, and of ross, 289,569 barnrs


H. N. LEIGH
ROOM 4, BSBEE BUILDIN

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT AND STENOGRAPHER

BOOKS OPENED. CLOSED AND KEPT.
TERMS *10.00 A MOUTH UP.



P rin tin g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


Tme RELIABILITY OF OUR ADVERTISERS VOUCHID FOR.







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


11 -


Wanted and For Sale THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
SACKIONVILLE. lLA,
CAPITAL S300,000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS $300000
DE P A RTM We issue Time Certifcates of Deposit, which draw Interest at t rate ftree per cet per
SDEPARTM E T ss if held ninety days or longer. Take advrutage f tls sad kt year sarmas e asea
somiethlg for yeo. Particular attention paid to Out-of-Town accounts, sending deposits by mau


Advertisemats will A Inserted in rhis Departmett at the Followf Rates:
For one week, 20 cents a line.
For two weeks. 35 centsaline.
For three weeks, 50 oents a line.
For four weeks, 65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No diifpay except the headings can be admitted.
emittances to company the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
contaaing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Tharday
morning to secure insertion in Friday's paper.


Wanted.
To buy a first-elas turpentine location
in Florida. Wil pay the right price for
the right place. No fat woods place need
apply. G. A Petteway, Box 26, Leroy,
Marion Co., Fla. tf
Position Wanted.
A position as stiller, very b.-t ref;-rence
furnished. Address S. F. Johnson. Mur-
phy. Fla. 4t

For Sale.
Small turpentine location. Can work
about ten or twelve crops with about
four hundred acres round timber already
secured. Also one thousand acres back
box timber secured. Plenty of round tim-
ber available to still for four or five
years' cutting. Address T. M. Kelly,
Black, Ala. tf


Position Wanted.
Position as woodsman, Georgia or Flor-
iida. Have family. Can give reference.
H. V. Jeffords, Balloon, Ga. 2t

Wanted.
A distiller. We want a good, sober
man with family, to run the still another
season. Can give steady employment
through the winter. None need apply but
first-class man with good referemes. Ad-
dress F. & W., Jonaboro, Fla. tf

Turpentine Men.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still No. 1 outfit pump. 2,0
gallons per hour at a eoat of 3 mas sad
requires no attention while rnn i
Started in one minute. J. P. Campbell,
Ocala, Fla.


THE

Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville,
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
Capital and Supha ............................. 4soooo
Depoait ........................ ......... Igoooo.OO
In addition to our regular banking business, we maintain a Savings Depart-
ment, under government supervision, paying interest quarterly.
We have for rent Safe Deposit Boxes in burglar and fireproof vaults at rea-
sonable rates, by month or year.

C. H. HARGRAVES CO..

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay. Feed
Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men'u Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY S KLLe.I
Jacksonville. Fla.


FOR SALE.
50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet mertchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill. r.35 per aere. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years or can
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in tk e State.
C. BUCKMAN, "...o..,....


McMURRAY & BAKER,

M Iill n01 luim nh lH n ess. I
We am reaJvm a to-date plearmer e vehSl, M, me
Ipreba. whla. amrnes and hoer tuarnaltla we have a &ebb lia Pr
am gases I tome with a.l Turpentine waonso and hare. a opesalty. Don'*
forget we ean bhat the world on hand- made harnem

Ic ll 5I IR. 401 01 413 E. L ST.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotation--
thispaper.
KINOAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Herbert A. Ford, leo. H. Ford, P. L. Watso.
President. Vice-Pres. Cashier.
The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CA PITAL, $50,000.00.
DIRECTORS: R. rI Anderson, R. S. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicited.



The Wire Virgin Gum Co.,
SIs now ready to give you all the information you may want concerning the
way we are now gathering virgin gum from high boxes. By the use of a
* tin lip put up close to the chipping and so arranged to cause the gum to
strike wire and follow same down to the box, not striking the face of the
tree. Wire is fastened on by two small nails, one just above the lip and
Sthe other at upper edge of the oldbox, and stretched tight so as to keep
Sgum from dripping off, thereby making virgin gum and more of it. There
Share many benefits and big pay where parties can get a good many high boxe.
o For further information write to
THE WIRE VIRGIN GUM CO.. TIFTON. GA.


The West-Raley-Rannie Company.
114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
A. f. WEST. Pres. . . est. ees .. ai, ice-Pro. X. V. Aley. Sec. d Trrs.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.


M. A. BRIGGS, President.
H. C. BRIGGS, Ist Vice-President.


HOMER BROWN, 2nd Vice-President.
J. C. McDONALD, Sec'y and Treas.


I W, H, Briggs Hardware Co. i
* VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-

RIXFORD AXES.
They are the BEST. Others imitate but none du- *
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the finest
temper, hold the keenest edge, cut better and last longer
than any other axe.
SThis has all been proved by years of actual use.
Send us your orders.
W. H. BRI66S HARDWARE COMPANY, .
v aMMst, Gergia.
* o a g u g nma a e aae


PATROHIZE RECORD AD alI &l FOR SATISACTORY DEALO&IN








12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BECOBD.
we


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
JAMES A. HOLLOMON.
Edter ad Manager.
Published Every Friay.
nI(Domestic) .3 .00 Per Annum
S(Foreign) .... 3.50 "
"The PFtn and Its Prodasom."
A esmmun leates should be adMrs i
Thb Industriel lR cord Company.
Jecksonville. Fla.
emeob Editsara and usalnes Offtoes at
Adalnte. Ga. A Savainnb. Ga.
Entered at the Postoffie at Jacksonville,
Fla., as second-elam matter.
Adopted by the Executive Committe of
the rpstine Operators' AssolatMes,
September 12, 9, as it exclusive official
organ. Adopted in annual convention
September 1, the organ also of the
general Auoeiatioa.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, a the offelal
ga. of the Interstate Can Growers' An-
socatioa. Adopted Sept. 11, 1903, a the
nly official organ of the T. 0. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Associatio.
COPY FOR ADVERTISING.
Advertisng copy (changes or ew ad-
vertissment) should reach us Tuesday
morning to insure insertion in the iLu of
the sms week.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the main of-
Rsem of the Industrial Record Publishing
Co. are located at o. xz South Hogan
Street, Jacksoville, Fa, in the ery heart
of the great turpentine and yellow pine
industries. Branch office, Savannah, Ga.,
and Atlanta, Ga.

NOTICE TO PATRONS.
All payments for advertising in the In-
dustrial Record and subscriptions thereto
must be made direct to the home office
in Jacksonville. Agents are not allowed
to make collection under any circum-
stamces. Bill for advertising and sub-
scriptions are sent out from the home
offee, when due, and all remittances must
be made direct to this company.
Industrial Record Publishing Co.

REMEMBER COTTON.
We are publishing on the first page
to-day a very able article, prepared es-
pecially for the Record, entitled "Turpen-
tine Operators Have an Object Lesson in
Cotton." This article was prepared by
Mr. A. 8. Hough, news editor of the
Florida Times-Union, one of the South's
able writers on market and statistical
themes. We especially commend this ar-
ticle to every turpentine operator in the
South. If they will remember cotton, it
will be worth millions of dollars to them.

STOCK GROWERS TO MEET.
The Record wishes again to call the
attention of its readers to the convention
of the Southeastern Stock Growers' Asso-
ciation which meets in Jacksonville, Fla.,
January Ilth and 12th. Reduced rates
have been granted from all points in the
South and every indication points to a
good meeting. Turpentine and sawmill
men should take an interest in this con-
vention. As the timber lands are de-
nuded they can be utilized to no better
advantage than pasturing and stock rais-
ing. It is an industry that the naval
stores men should look into carefully and
interest themselves in. Great many of the
operators are already doing this. Better
raise more bulls and cut less boxes.


Florida Must Have a Labor CMiotract Law.

The necessity for a rigid but equitable in force in Georgia. The constitutionality
labor contract law in Florida is apparent of the law was tested in the case .f Lamar
to every man who employs. The necessity i a. the State of Georgi:, and the Supreme
extends even to the merchant whose labor Court of that State decided that the act
is trusted and to the housekeeper whose did not violate the constitutional inhibit-
labor is limited; but more especially does ion against imprisonment for debt. The
it extend to the manufacturer-particular- head notes of that decision follow:
ly the naval stores and lumber operators Lamar va. The State.
-whose businesses demand the employ- (Head Notes.)
ment of large numbers of negroes.
We have heard a great deal of late "1. An act of the General Assembly,
about peonage. The case of Sam Clyatt, approved August 15, 1903, provides that
of Georgia, .has attracted attention if any person shall contract with another
throughout the country. Mr. Clyatt has to perform for him services of any kind,
been made to suffer and to lose because he with intent to procure money or other
tried to protect himself against a worth- thing of value thereby, and not to per-
less class of laborers whose chief aim was form the services contracted for, to
to defraud him. Despite the charge that the loss and damage of the hirer, or, after
he may or may not have violated some having so contracted, shall procure money
ancient federal statute, enacted when con- or other thing of value from the hirer,
editions were different, the fact remains with intent not to perform the services,
that he has the sympathy and not the to the loss and damage of the hirer, he
censure of the people who understand shall be deemed a common cheat and
the conditions as they exist; that he cor- swindler, and shall be punished as for a
mitted no moral wrong and pursued only misdemeanor. HELD, that such act does
the natural course. not violate the constitutional inhibition
The employer has. rights as well as the against imprisonment for debt; the legis-
employee. The Record has the highest lative purpose being, not to punish for a
respect for honest, industrious labor. It failure to comply with the obligation, but
is the basic principle of all development, for the fraudulent intention with which
At the same time it recognizes the ab- the money or other thing of value was
solute necessity for a legal protection procured.
against that element that is disposed to "2. The evidence warranted the ver-
defraud and engages even with the intent dict, and there was no abuse of discretion
and purpose of defrauding. in refusing to grant a new trial.
"Submitted May 16; Decided June 8,


So much by way of introductory.

The Industrial Record takes this occas-
ion to announce that it will present at
the Florida Legislature in April a bill, em-
bodying these views, a draught of which
follows:
Procuring Money on Contract for Labor.
An Act to make it illegal for any per-
son to procure money or other thing of
value, on a contract to perform services
with intent to defraud, and to fix the
punishment therefore, and for other pur-
pose
Section i. Be it enacted by the General
Assembly, and it is hereby enacted by au-
thority of the same, That from and after
the passage of this act if any person shall
contract ith another to perform for him
services of any kind with nltent to pro-
cure money, or other thing of value there-
by, and not to perform the service con-
tracted for, to the loss and damage of the
hirer; or, after having so contracted, shall
procure from the hirer money, or other
thing of value, with intent not to perform
such service, to the loss and damage of
the hirer, he shall be deemed a common
cheat and swindler, and upon conviction
shall be punished as prescribed in the
Code.
Sec. Be it further enacted, That sat-
isfactory proof of the contract, the pro-
curing thereon of money or other thing
of value, the failure to perform the ser-
vices so contracted for, or failure to return
the money so advanced with interest
thereon at the time said labor was to be
performed, without good and sufficient
cause and loss or damage to the hirer,
shall be deemed presumptive evidence of
the intent referred to in the preceding sec-
tion.
Sec. 3. Be it further enacted, That all
laws and parts of laws in convict with this
Act are hereby repealed.

The bill above is similar to a law now


1904."
In another case in Georgia where a man
was actually imprisoned under the act,
and the constitutionality of it was tested
the Supreme Court very clearly defined
the State's position in the following, all
the justices concurring:
Accusation of Misdemeanor. Before
Judge Griffin. City Court of Valdoeta.
April 15, 100t.
Wilcox & Johnson, for Plaintiff in Er-
ror. S. M. Varnadoe, Solicitor, contra.
"Cobb, J. The accused was prosecuted
under the provisions of the act approved
August 16, 1903 (Acts 1903, p. 90), which
are set forth in the first head-note. In
Calhoun's case, 119 Ga. 312, which was
also a prosecution under this act, no ques-
tion of the constitutionality of the act
wae raiaod, but attention was there called
to the fact that the legislation was proba-
bly the result of prior decisions of this
Court under the laws in reference to
cheating and swindling. In addition to
the cases cited in Calhoun's case, see Edge
vs. State, 114 Ga. 113. In the present
case the accusation was demurred to on
the ground that the act provided for im-
prisonment for debt; and if this objection
is well taken, the act is void. Civil Code,
Sec. 5718. If the act prescribes a punish-
ment for a simple violation of a contractual
obligation, it is beyond the power of the
General Assembly. But if its purpose is
to punish for fraudulent and deceitful
practices, it is valid, even though the
fraud of deceit may arise from the fail-
ure to comply with a contractual obliga-
tion. Fraudulent practices which result
in one obtaining money or property of
another were, in a number of instances,
denounced as crimes by the common law;
and by statute both in England and in this
country a number of such practices have
been declared to be crimes, although the
particular practice was not embraced with-
in the definition of any common law of-
fense. The right of the law making power
to declare fraudulent practices a crime


TER RECORD MECULLTUSAND 5O 1IYD.


does not seem to have ever been seriously
questioned. The various sections em-
braced in the chapter of our Penal Code
which deals with the subjects of cheats
and swindlers show that not only are
many of the fraudulent practices which
were condemned at common law still
crimes in this State, but that the General
Assembly has from time to time created
other offenses which are based upon such
practices. See Penal Code, Sections 668 et
seq. The General Assembly cannot under
one of a statute creating a criminal of-
fense, imprison one who has failed to pay
a debt; but if one in becoming a debtor
prpetrates upon another a fraudulent
practice, it is not beyond the province
of the law-making power to denounce as
a crime the fraudulent practice and im-
prison him who has been guilty of the
practice, notwithstanding he may be at the
same time under the obligation of a
debtor to him upon whom the fraud was
practiced. It is reasonably clear that in
enacting the statute now under consider-
tion, the legislative purpose was not to
punish one simply for a failure to pay a
debt, but was to punish the act of secur-
ing the money or property of another
with a fraudulent intent not to perform
the service the promise to do which was
the consideration for such money or prop-
erty. This distiAnishes the present case
very clearly from that of the State vs.
Coal Company, 92 Tenn. 81, 30 Am. St.
Rep. 68, which was cited and relied upon
by the plaintiff in error. Nor does our
decision necessarily conflict with that in
Carr vs. Stte, 106 Ala. 3, 54 Am. St.
Rep. 1, also cited by plaintiff in error.
The Court construed the statute involved
in that case in such a way as to make
its chief purpose the collection of a debt
by duress of imprisonment; and if this
construction was right, the conclusion in-
evitably followed. There was no error in
overruling the demurrer. The evidence
authorized the erdict, and no reaon
appears for reversing the judgment.
"Judgment affirmed. All the justices
concur."

The Record urges its readers in Florida
to discuss this mater with their legisl-
tors. In the meantime let us have your
suggestions for publication.
We appeal to you to aid us in this
fight for right.


LAWCON AND "VERITAS."
Thomas W. Lawson's attacks on Amal-
amated, or "The System," as he is pleased
to term it, appear in Everybody's Maga-
sine above his own name. He does not
seek to disguise the identity of the au-
thor. On the contrary he rather likes the
notoriety.
The attacks of Veritas" on the naval
stores factors, or "The System," as he is
pleased to call them, appear in the Sa-
vannah Naval Stores Review. The identi-
ty of the author is hidden in a nom-de-
plume.
While the Savannah author is trying to
imitate the Boston author, there is, never-
theless, a difference. We therefore com-
mend to "Veritas" the frankness of Mr.
Lawson. Our observation is that anony-
mous communications do not always im-
press the reader as those carrying the
author's name. The reasons are obvious.
The man who fights in the open is some-
times a hero. The man who shoots from
ambush is always a coward.
But there are instances where there may
be good expenses for writing above nom-








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


de-plumes. For instance, take a nypothet-
ical case: Suppose S. P. Shotter, of Sa-
vannah, a naval stores exporter, whose
interests have frequently been allied
against producers, should appear in print
above his name as the great "champion"
of the turpentine operators-a self-ap-
pointed Moses to lead them out of a wil-
derness of woe that he himself had con-
structed around them on paper, now
wouldn't that jar the average turpentine
man? The incongruity between actions
and words would be so great that Mr.
Shotter's article would entirely lose its
weight. Of course, we use Mr. Shotter's
name here merely for illustration.
So, after all, there are conditions from
the author's standpoint that make a nom-
de-plume pardonable, even in business ar-
ticles.
But, reverting again to Mr. Lawson,
isn't it queer how these millionaires are
turning to literature; and to "Veritas"
we shall have something to say about
"The Passing of the Factor" series before
long.
Happy New Year to both of these dis-
tinguished writers!


THE PORT OF JACKSONVILLE.

Business during the Year 19o4 by Months,
and Comparisons.
The shipments of lumber frcm the port
of Jacksonville during the year 1904, as
shown by the records of the customhouse.
were as follows:


Month.
January ........
February ......
March .... .....
April ... .. .. ..
May .......
June .. .. ..
July ..........
August ........
September ......
October ......
November ....
December ......


Coastwise. Foreign
..13,106,281 2,830,965
..13,323.832 2,547,343
..10,560,767 3,001,257
..16,629,141 2.933,659>
..15,820,699 1,424,111
. 18,275,450 1,813,571
..10.085.576 1,547,497
..11,199,000 713,950
..10,334,815 2,443,864
..12,645,940 1,324,469(
..17.096,188 2,080,261
..15,552,703 1,541,686


Total ........ 164,630,392 24,262,833
The shipments in previous years, ac-
cording to the customhouse figures, were
as follows:
Feet.
Total lumber 1901 ........127,409,361
Total lumber 1902 .......... 140,511,967
Total lumber 1903 ...... ..204,453,800
Total lumber 1904 .......... 188,892,225
The shipments of other Florida prod-
ucts from Jacksonville during the year,
and a comparison with the shipments of
the same during the previous year is as
follows:
Articles: 1903. 1904.
Crossties ........1,465.535 668,445
Shingles (bulk) .. 38,913,500 22,357,000
Naval stores (pkgs). 308,060 265.407
Fruit and vegetables 359,880 678.076
Kaolin clay, sacks .. 71,170 97,150
Tobacco (bales) .... 570 1,445
Cotton, bales ...... 23,745 36.090
Sundry merchandise. 506,464 477.221
The foreign business picked up matte-
rially during the past year. The total
value of foreign imports during 1904 was
$250,846, against a valuation of $57,867.91
for 1903. This is accounted for by the
large amount of material imported from
Germany for the manufacture of commer-
cial fertilizers in this port.
The total value of the exports to for-
eign countries for 1904 from this port was
$404,696, while in 1903 the value of the
exports to foreign ports was $257,819. The
majority of the foreign exports were lum-
ber and shingtes to West Indian ports.


New Year's Conditions Reviewed.
The New Year finds the lummber situ-
ation in the Southeast generally good.
In a general way the situation affords
every assurance of an exceptionally urgent
spring trade to begin at the earliest prac-
ticable moment. Stocks are everywhere
abnormally scanty and with the return of
building weather, it is confidently appre-
hended, structural operations will be re-
vived on a scale to regularly absorb all
available supplies. Prevailing signs point
to larger railroad consumption including
both construction and car-building de-
partments. The general state of trade
and prosperity will, it is also believed,
justify the continued consumption of all
wood products, so that with building in
fall swing, railroad demand restored and
industrial consuming requirements press-
ing, there are no pegs on which to hang
any dubious doubts as regards the future.
In the general contributory state of
affairs, there is nothing at all sensational,


every promise of higher prices.
Cypress is pursuing the even tenor of
its way with -4 prospect that the pres-
sure of an early spring trade will find pro-
ducers in better than usual shape to
promptly and otherwise. satisfactorily
meet it.
Hardwoods have shared in the holiday
relaxation, but there is nowhere anybody
to speak doubtfully about the future of
that important branch of the lumber in-
dustry.
Late advices to the Record from New
York say:
"Advices from southern points do not
encourage the belief that yellow pine lum-
ber will be any lower. Building orders
are quoted at about $22; stepping, $40.
There is a fair stock on hand and no dan-
ger of scarcity. That depends, however,
upon how much winter building will be
done and some dealers say the amount of
winter work this year will be much in
excess of last."


The Industial Record for 1905,


To Our Patrons and Friends:
We beg to announce that the Weekly Industrial Record for 1905 will be in- -
creased in size, two men will be added to its staff, weekly illustrations
'will be made a feature, the naval stores and lumber markets and statistic
features will be greatly enlarged and improved, and the paper generally will
be better, brighter, stronger than ever. These improvements have been made
possible by your encouragement and patronage.
The Weekly Industrial Record ranks to-day among the leading trade pa-
pers in the United States, and the largest weekly trade paper published in
in a city of less than a quarter of a million inhabitants. It employs twen-
ty people, and owns and conducts one of the largest publishing plants in the
Southeast. The Weekly Industrial Record is read by more men engaged in i
the naval stores and lumber trades than any other half dozen publications
in the United States combined. It covers Florida and Georgia like the dew,
and its circulations is scattered over fifteen States in the Union, and four
Countries across the sea.
And we are growing--always growing.
Our job printing department is thoroughly equipped with typesetting
Machine, modern presses and competent workmen. We give quick and satis-
factory service.
a We thank you for your support; we know it has been profitable to you,
and in hoping for a continuance of the same, we wish you a most prosperous
New Year. Yours gratefully, I
INDUSTRIAL RECORD PUBLISHING COMPANY.
SJAMES A. HOLLOMON, Editor and General Manager.


but everything to sustain health-giving
confidence and energy. Iron and steel are
reported in a fairly healthful present and
prospective state of betterment. The fi-
nancial situation is flawless and no trouble
is experienced to secure accommodations
to any legitimate extent at reasonable
rates. The lumber continent is holding
its own and manfully maintaining itself
throughout the country with no ominous
rumblings or menace in any form any-
where. The disturbances that have lately
occurred belong to the domain of irregu-
lar, shady methods and are more an evi-
dence of pardonable confidence than other-
wise. The shady contingent in lumber cir-
cles is ordinarily too scanty to have kept
the instinct of self-preservation sufficient-
ly alert, but recent incidents afford un-
welcome proofs that eternal vigilance is
the price of safe lumber credits as well
as of liberty.
The position of yellow pine is very se-
curely fortified at all points and presents


The Birth of Hope.
Last night the path of life was drear
And dead leaves shivered in the breeze.
Last night the world was bleak and blear
And want and sorrow, pain and fear
Lurked in the shadows of the trees.
Dead leaves, dead leaves of other days,
Touched by the frost of fate unkind,
Lay clustered deep in woodland ways
Or hurried over frozen bays
Urged by an unrelenting wind.
But lo! the new year and the morn
Came with the passing of the night.
Another life and world were born-
The sable curtains, rent and torn,
Revealed a vista fair and bright.
The trees, new-leaved, are filled with
bloom-
The buds of new and happy hours.
Gone are the midnight and the gloom
And golden shafts of light illume
Hope's fragrant pathway strewn with
flowers. -Exchange.


Lumber Department


Whisikes, Gins,

Rums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.

Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM d CO.
517 and 519 West Bay Street.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

THE[

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
extaets tUe wrt without sotrwea th
wood fre. Rum out a ehars Iam lee the
twenty-four hour. Ma ke fto twenty to
forty-ove salns fhoa earw o we.
Make pure water whito splritam fte fe
th odor of tar or creosot. No dfiesleh
usd in reflnng the spirits. Neea to Lh
distilld only once aeter coming ftm ro-
tort.
No trouble with bi-produets, the spirtta
pronounced to be far the finet er rM-
duced and from wood. Only re adoe
of spirits produced ad that theo ight.
ABSOLUTELY NO DANORR FROM PIRS
Built of nest material by l gh--grad
workmen. The ebeapet nmashir edlt t
the puble.
We ehallene comparison of output asa
quality of product. We uant output
and quality.
The fNre it CsAtctlK Cramy
P. O. Box rAr.mn. M. C.


UOTHiEffMG iUCCIZ LIKE 8UCCZLM


This Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.

WholesleJ


Liquor Merchants

Proprietors


Jacksoille Bt0fllm Works

...Agen.t...


ACME BEER

I



GEO. R. FO1 JR.
MANUFACTURER OF



BRICK K.

IIl HoR PEI RE.
Capacity of Yard 00,000 Per Month.

1mi1.


+?COSC+r~i~c~c~c~ur~uu~uruu+S6YSC+SfYSGO






14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


ORGANIZED 1847.


CHARTER PERPETUAL


TWO AND A HALF MILLIONS


$2,500,000.00


NEW BUSINESS WAS WRITTEN BY THE


Penn Mutual Life Insurance


OF PHILADELPHIA, PA.


IN FLORIDA IN 1904


These figures show the popularity of this Grand Old Company.
Life, Limited Life, Endowment, Convertible Term, Gold Bonds and Annuity
Policies written,


$10,000 at age
$10,000 at age
$10,000 at age
$10,000 at age
$10,000 at age


25 costs only $114.50 per year.
30 costs only $126.00 per year.
35 costs only $141.50 per year.
40 costs only $161.50 per year.
45 costs only $199.00 per year.


These figures alone are worth considering to the man who is looking for Life Insurance.
The policy Is most liberal. Without Any restrictions from date of Issue as to travel,
residence or occupation.
We will be glad to have you send us your age and will take pleasure in telling you
what It will cost you, and any other Information you may desire.
An Inquiry from you Is invited and Imposes no obligation upon you whatever.


ACOSTA (& BAHL, State Agents
Suite 401-2-3 Dyal-Upchurch Bldg. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


No other Company In Florida Issues this contract, so don't go to others for the good
points In it. Naturally, they are not telling them.
By the way, there are no "others just as good."


"THr Pnu AU3 WS PRODUCTS."


i NNWX







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15



SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY

Waycross, Ga.
..MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located in the hea t ofet the Lumber District gives as advan-
tate of "clocest material at lowest Seat.


BELL PHONE NO. 592
ESTATE AGENCY
Formerly of Hedrick 1 Raloy


Sole agency for Biverside and adjoining property on easy terms. (The choice residence portion
of the city.) Improved and unimproved property in former burnt district, Springfield, LaVilla and
other suburbs. Choice business property and Investments.
MONEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTORS.


Pursuing a Policy That Means Ruin.


The Industrial Record is in receipt of
the following communication from a well-
known factorage house:
"We are advised by customers of ours
that Rose & Co., and J. J. McDaniel, at
Bear Head, Fla., and Johnson at Mossy
Head, Fla., have started paying 2c. a box
for cutting boxes since Christmas. Our
customers have all been limited to 1 1-2c.
We think you will agree with us that to
pay more than 1 l-2e. a box is the worst
kind of business and we will ask you if
you have any influence with the parties
named to use it in the direction of holding
them down to the paying of 1 1-2c. a box
for cutting."
Paying two cents for a box is a ruin-
ous policy. The operator who does it in-
vites disaster by his own efforts to disor-
ganize labor conditions and break up the
good effect of organization for mutual
protection. The Record's observation is
that the operator paying two cents does
not get more boxes cut than the operator
paying one and a half. The negro cutter
generally wants to make so much in a
week. If he has made that amount by
Thursday night he is going to loaf tnh
other two days. When he is loafing
around the camp, or a neighboring camp,
there is usually trouble. Idleness breeds
mischief. Again, the neighbor operator
who is paying one and a half cents-
which is the Association's price and the
greatest plenty-is subjected to all kinds
of annoyance and is frequently made to
lose by the disorganized conditions re-
sulting from different prices for the same
labor.
The men who have made money in pro-
ducing naval stores are those men who
have been conservative in their opera-
tions, who have stood faithfully by their
compacts, who have applied business meth-
ods to their work. We can pick out to-
day twenty or thirty, or many more, if
need be, of the most successful turpentine
men in the pine belt and we will wager
a cash bond that not one of them is pay-
ing two cents for cutting boxes. It isn't
necessary. It is poor business without a
reasonable excuse.
The Industrial Record is the friend of
every turpentine man-it is the exponent


of the producers' interests, and labors as
diligently for the general good of the in-
dustry as any agency in existence, and in
instances of this kind it is no respecter of
names. We want the names of every ope-
rator paying more than one and one half
cents for box cutting. We will publish it
and in a kindly but firm way, try to im-
press upon that operator the course of
wisdom.
We are all liable to make mistakes.
The operators above named may feel that
conditions may warrant them in their
course. If they will study the situation
they will feel differently. We know of
operators right around them paying only
one and a half cents. Let these three ope-
rators get together and decide to pay reg-
ulation prices.

Huger's Industry.
D. J. Huger was in Jacksonville spend-
ing the holidays with his family. He is
owner of and operates a successful tur-
pentine plant at Limona, near Tampa.
This business was started there by
Huger last September, since which time
he has given his whole attention to it,
and has been eminently successful. He
has in his employ thirty-five experienced
hands, six good mules, three horses and
two large wagons. He has made 100 bar-
rels of spirits and about 500 barrels of
rosin, both of which he has sold at good
prices, and by the 1st of January he will
have about $4,000 in this industry. Spir-
its have been sold for $25 a barrel and
rosin at from $4 to $5.50 a barrel.


The sales of the Altmayer & Flatau
Liquor Co., of Macon, Ga., have been un-
precedently large during 1904. Their bus-
iness continues to increase, and especially
so in the State of Florida.
This house has been in business for
nearly twenty-five years, and enjoy a rep-
utation for honest dealings and prompt
shipment second to none in the United
States. A price list will be mailed upon
application, and we assure our readers
that any orders entrusted to their care
will have prompt and careful attention,
and satisfaction guaranteed.


112 WEST FORSYTH ST.
HEDRICK'S REAL
A. J. HEDRICK. Manager. '


D. G. McKETHAN, PrIdeat.
Jacksonville, Fla.


ALFRED A. McKETHAN, Lt U. & N.
Ret'd Sea'y and Treas, Coatructtpn
Engineer, Payetteville. N. G.


Pine Product Construction Co.
INCooPOnATUD
f .yettevlle. N. C.
Spirits of Turpentine, Oil of Tar, Cresote, Tar, Dlintfetants; Wood Premmvative
Paints, Wood tains, Etc.. and Charcoa, from Lihtwood Itumps Boa-foelang
Profits Increased. Time of distllation rdedned. Conadsmto. a catroBsd at w
No danger from fire. Plant erected complete and m taught the roema. Vp
other infteatia write Alfred MaK atan, mineral raismsa. W~eU N. .


THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIAUNC


Joseph D. Christie, Business Agent

Renm 303 Dyal-Upbiernb Bddibg, Jaie lle, Fi .
Telesbeno 455.

If you want to locate in Florida and contemplate going into business, let me
help you. If you have a business to sell, list same with me.

'*****--------------------------M------------------

A Oh istmnas Sug an
What could be a better gift for a loved one than a lot in the famous
"North End" Addition to the city of Jaeksonville, or a lot in the new
Dyal-Upchurch Sub-Division out where the big improvements are being put in?
This would be a gift that would soon double in value, and, of course, the
more valuable it became the more it would be appreciated. Why buy some
trifling trinket which would be soon lost or forgotten when the same money
would buy a part of this earth, which cannot be lost?
NORTH END lots sold for $3.90 cash and $1.00 per month, without in-
terest. (After the first of the new year all lots in North End will be ad-
vanced $10 on every lot.) DYAL-UPCHURCH lots sold 1-4 cash; Ibaree
I in payments to suit purchaser. [twill only be a matter of short time before
the prices in this sub-division- SEND IN YOUR CHRISTN AS ORDER.

SBROBSTON. FENDIG & CO.
o Jadsesvile, Herida


S. A. POWELL, CUAS. G. ARiUS. AHY iS aLNaL.
President. Vke-President sad rresurer. Secretary.
DIUCCTORS:
a. R. Powell, Chas. 6. Harrls, D. N. McMUlel. P L. S. teralsd. X. V. CeVorige.

THE



Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Crr of West ky aei Malo 5t.
Jacksonville, florida.



Wholesale Drugs g Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices on
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and ean save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.









16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Mr. Covigton at Quincy.
The Bristol Bee recently said: "Mr.
A. D. Covington, who has recently re-
moved to Jacksonville, was in town yes-
terday closing the sale of his last tur-
pentine place in this county to Messrs.
Johnson & Thaggard. Mr. Covington has
been a leader in the naval stores business
in this county for about twelve years,
having operated in nearly every part of
the county, and with his big heart and
progressive spirit he has thoroughly iden-
tifed himself with the leading people of
our county, all of whom regret exceed-
ingly his departure from the county."

Fle Location Sold.
Mr. Fred R. McConnell has purchased
the large turpentine interests of A. C.
McLean & Co., on the Kissimmee River.
It is stated that Mr. McConnell paid $29,
000 for this property.


The Conolidated's Meeting.
The annual meeting of the stockholders
of the Consolidated Naval Stores Co. will
be held at the Board of Trade auditorium,
Jacksonville, January 18th, at 8 o'clock
p. m. The oldboard of directors will meet
at some hour during the day.
The annual meeting of the Consolidated
Grocery Co. will be held at 10 o'clock a.
m., January 18th, at the company's offices
this city.
The annual meeting of the Consolidated
Land Co. will be held January 18th at the
company's offices.

Barnes-Jeuup Co. Meeting.
The annual meeting of the stockholders
of the Barnes-Jessup Co., naval stores fac-
tors of Jacksonville, Fla., will be held at
the company's offices January 17th.


GEORGIA INTER-STATE SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
Minimum Coastwise Price List for Mercantable Rules o94. Adopt at Tifton,
Georgia, Julys, g90o
Feet I eetI Feet eet I Yeet I eet Feet Feet Feet Feet
8ZS 20& U 21-25 26-30 31-351 3-40 41-451 4-60- 61-66 6-0 61-66
1 Xt1 to 2xi0.... 12. 5413.60 $14.5 6.04$18.00 $20J0 23.602lj.60432.0$40.00
2%x10 to 8x10.... 12.00 12.0 13.60 14.00 16.50 17.0 20.00 23.00 2.00 36.00
8%x10 to lOx10 .... 12.50 13.00 14.0 16.50 16.50 18.60 21.00 24.00 2.0 37.00
1 xl2 to 2S12.... 14.00 1.0 10.50 18.00 21.00 2.00 2800 32.60 3800 4o.00
S2%xl to 10x2 .... 13.00 13.0 14.0 16.0 18.50 21.00 24.50 260 34.00 43.00
10%x12 to 12x12.... 13.60 14.00 1560 17.50 19.50 22.00 25.0 30.00 36.50 4.00
1 x14 to 3x14.... l00 19.00 2000 22.00 24.50 27.50 32.00 37.00 44.00 67.00
3%4x14 to 1214.... 14.60 10-o0 1.00 20.0 22.00 24.00 2800 32.50 40.00 62.00
12%x14 to 14x14.... 15.50 17.00 19.00 21.00 23.00 26.00 30.00 34.50 42.00 65.00
1 xl6 to 4x10.... 2060 22.00 24.50 270 31.00 34.00 38.00 42.0 52.00 66.00
4%x16 to 12x.... 19.00 20.00 22.00 25.50 29.00 31.00 35.00 39.60 4&00 69.00
12%x16 to lx16 .... 19.60 20.0 23.00 26.50 30.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 50.00 6.00
2 x18 to x18.... 4.50 25.60 28.60 31.50 35.00 39.001 43.00 49.00 0.00 79.00
6%x18 to 14x18 ... 21.00 22.00 2600 29.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 46.00 67.00 80.00
14%x18 to 1818.... 23.00 24.00 27.00 300 00 4.00 31 42.00 48.0 60.00 74.00
Tams: Net Ca.
Prie are 0. B. Caro Savannah, Brunswick, Fernandia and Jackaersvill


NOTICE.
At a meting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Association, held at Jacksonville,
Fla., Marc 15, 1904, the following Clasi-
Scation and Rules for Inspection of Yel-
low Pine were officially adopted, effective
July 1, 1904:
Clas "catic ad aInspection of Yellow
Pine Lumber.
General Rules-All lumber must be
sound, well m-nuf-c*tre. full to sie and
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and
hollow knota, worm and knot holes;
through shakes, or round shakes that
show on the surface; square edge, unless
otherwise specified. A through shake is
hereby denied to be through or connected
from side to aide, or edge to edge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken;
les than one inch thick shall be measured
ma one inch.

CLASSIFICATIO.
Flooring.
Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: 1x3,
4, 5 and 6; 1%x3,4, 5, and 6.
Boards.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
inch- *ud up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %, 1, 1% and ly, inches
thick by 7 inches and up, wide.

Scantling shall embpaee all sizes from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2x3, Zx4, x, 2Xa, 3x3, lx4, lx, 3x, Ux,
4xb, 4x0, axs and oAx.
Plank.
Plank hall embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness.
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1%, 2,
2%, 3, 3%, 4, 4%, 6, 5%, 5%x7 inches
and up in width.


Dimension.
Dimension size shall embrace all sides
6 inches and up in thickness by seven
inches and up in width, including six by
six. For example: 6x6, 6x?, 7x7, 7x3, Sx9
and up.
stepping.
Stepping shall embrace one to two and
a half inches in thickness by ven inches
and up- in width. For example: 1, 1%,
1%, 2 and 2%x7 and up, in width.
Rough Edge or Flitch.
Rough Edge or Flitch shall embrace all
sizes one inch and up in thickness by eight
inches and up in width, sawed on two
sides only. For example: 1, 1%, 2, 3, 4
and up thick by eight inches and up wide,
sawed on two sides only.

INSPECTION.
Standard.
All lumber shall be sound, sap no ob-
jection. Wane may be allowed one-eighth
of the width of the piece measured across
face of wane, extending one-fourth of the
length on one corner or its equivalent on
two or more corners.
Varc,-ntabls.
All sizes under nine inches shall show
heart entire length on one side or edge;
izea nine inches and over shall how
heart the entire length on two opposite
sides. Wane may be allowed one-eighth of
the width of the piece measured across
face of wane, and extending one-fourth of
the length of the piece on one corner or
its equivalent on two or more corners.
Prime
Scantling shall show heart on two faces
the entire length; other ees shall show
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 6 per
cent. of the pieces, wane may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the piece means.
ured across face of wane and extending
one-fourth of the length of the piece on
one corner or its equivalent on two or
more e rners.


:McMILLAN BROS.,I


Florida Copper Works.
Mmmuftrrsra of

Turpentine Stills
ad General Metal Workers.
Old stills taken in exchange for
Snew ones. Patching through the coma-
try a specialty. Orders by mail or
* or wire will receive prompt attention,
at either of the lowwonig works:
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. SAVANNAH. GA.
MOBILE, ALA. JACKSONVILLE, LA.
ii(i. ii ii lll( ull.i I Sitsoiieil(a i 1i111i i 1i1 i l ilii

R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KNIGHT, Sec. and Treas,

MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.
Wime Ye Ar* a Jr eks&u e Mtp At----


WOLFE'S EUROPEAN HOTEL.
Cawr dMae and y Streets.
Rates 50e. 75e and $1.00 per day. First Class Restaurant in Connection. J. I. WOLtI. Maniger


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


J. W. WADE,
Vice-President.


E. G. HUGHES,
Se'y and Treas


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MODILE, ALADAMA.


W. HUNT. President
P. L. PSaCOK, ist V. P-


J. E. HARRIS, Id V. Pres. H. L RICHMOND, Sea. A Tress
W. J. KILLY, 3d V. P. D. .I WILLIAms, Asst See'y-Tre'a.


P ecock-Hunt & West Company,
general i: 20 Bay Street, E. Savannah, Ga. and
General Offices West Buldin Jaeksonvlle, Fia.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutual. We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that buys spirits
Turpentine and rosai.)

WHOLESALE GROCERS,

Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our Specialty
-SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wilson & Ghilds'
Philadelphia Wagfos.

Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga., and Jacksonville
and Fernandina, Fla.


IF YOU ARE PROl003Ss1V, ADVERTISE IN TE 3COR.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertising patrons of this paper and no

charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention,

rer Tur time Sawmill r Factery Supplis or Maeelmery of Amy KMI. Far Timer. Frrmlae r REans Lals.
DATE INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Ia.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main Office, Jacksonville, Fla. I am in the market for lamds for the purpose of
In the market for the following Prefer in State of Please put me in communication
with responsible parties and give me other Information.
Remr*ka
Please notify where same can be secured. Si
Signed

State specifically the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or second-handed. DATE
Lesate fr Tarpeatim. Sawmill r aery, or fr Amy leadutrial EAterprae. Fr Commisary. Offle r emosebei Suppe Sawam er TarpeUe Maes
arma. WaMs. Et .
DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, J onvlle, F. DATE
INDUSTRIALINDUSTRIAL RECORDRECORD Jacsonville, F
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Please advise the undersigned regarding a good location in (state or section of "
state) for In the market for
together with full information about labor conditions, taxes, transportation facilities,
local encouragement, etc.
Renmrks Please give me information as to bet places to bay, etc.

Signed Signed


be You Wat to Sell Sometig? Are Yes TMut f la est ?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Have for sale the following Can you give any information as to the reliability of the following firm or corpora
tion
Remarks
Can you suggest a purchaser?
Signed Signed


be Ye- Want to Empley a Ma? Be Yea Want Emilgmet?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Want a man to fill the position of Want a portion as

with the following requirements Refer to the followI.r

Can you suggest such a man? Can you assist me
Signed Sigaed




CLIP THIS COUPON !
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORDs
When you are answering an advertisement from the columns of this paper, whether you are making an inquiry or placing an order, please cut out the coupon
below and attach it to the letter. It will pay you.

I COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the Industral Record, issue dated

Signed


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonville, Fla., and Savannah, Ga., is the South's great
weekly trade journal.



The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.


W o2=rrm woeus LAaUs A TAIA paM


I,








18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


In Florida's phosphate circles the new
year finds the outlook as good as could
be expected. As soon as the few days
of dullness that usually follow the holi-
days pass the demand for 1906 rock is
expected to be spirited. The price re-
mains firm.

The Dutton Phosphate Co. now have the
two plants at Floral City, formerly owned
and operated by P. Juneau and his asso
eiates and are operating same.
The new railroad being constructed by
J. Buttgenbach & Co. is nearing comple-
tion, and as soon as the new steel bridge
is finished across the Withlacoochee River,
whereby this road will connect with the
Pt. Inglis road, this company will com-
mence shipping through that port.
The Camp Phosphate Co. are erecting a
new plant about 2 miles south of Dunnel-
lon, sad Thomas Sexton will shortly erect
a fine plant near Hernando, on property
he recently acquired. The Dunnellon
.Phosphate Co. are also erecting a fine
plant near Anita. This plant is to be built
largely of steel, and will possibly be the
most substantial-constructed plant ever
erected in the hardrock region.

Pt. Inglis the past year has been a
busy place. The shipments of the Dun-
nellon Phosphate Co. will amount to near-
ly 125,000 tons, and with the Buttgen-
bach exports next year will easily double
this figure, besides the shipments from
the new chemical plant, which will soon
be constructed. In anticipation of the
heavy business expected for 1905 the ter-
minal company has added another fine
ocean tug to their large fleet, and have
now several steel barges in course of
construction.

The Armour fertilizer plant at Jackson-
ville will adjoin that of the Wilson &
Toomer Co., at the mouth of Deer Creek,
It is stated that the cost will be in the
neighborhood of $1,500,000, and the plans
of the company are for a factory that
will have a floor area of 100,000 square
feet. The factory will have a capacity
of 25,000 tons of fertilizer per annum
on the start, and it is expected that this
may be increased in the future. The pay-
roll of the factory, when it gets under
way, it is stated, will be at least $400
per day.

One of the largest plants in the South
will be that of the Wilson & Toomer Fer-
tilizer Co., at Jacksonville. The several
large buildings are now under construction
at the mouth of Deer Creek. The com-
pany is now located near the Bridge Street
viaduct, and their business has grown so
large within the past few years that their
present plant is not large enough to ac-
commodate them, hence the building of
these fine buildings on the river front.
The neighborhood of this new fertilizer
plant will be surrounded with large ex-
port docks and other manufacturing
plants. There will also be numerous small
houses built for the employees of the
various enterprises in that immediate lo-
cality, and in a very short while this por-
tion of the river front will be a booming
little village within itself. The dimen-
sions of the three buildings now in course
of construction are 65 x 309 feet. The
main building is already completed. They


expect to have their large acid plant
(11,000 tons capacity annually) complet-
ed by March 1, 1905.

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Bet in the W ld.
For delivered prices write,
Cyfpr s Task Co.. M fUt l


ZINC NAILS

Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the am&y git which will not injure
saws when left in the trees.
Salem NMil 0o.
7" P WI 4. A ew Veae, N. VY
Also Headquarte for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc, Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.


The Oldest Whiskey

House in Georgia.
(Established In 181.)


*asssaamssaaaaaaa1mmIl~IeeaCIbmIImaIaaaIIaba~im


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing
S Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
JEcksonville, Fla.


0 uu a#u@a @Stomagmu ma *fees A 1 Boouleg Iu s um uhh as Is


Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


Cummer Luamher Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Lesef Yellow Pine.
BOXES and CRATES.



! Standard Clothing Company


One Price


OLD SHARPE WILLIAMS
Guaranteed 8 years old. By the
gallon, $3.00. 4 full quarts, $3.50
Express Prepaid
GEO. J. COLEMAN RYE


Guaranteed 6
gallon, $2.75.


years old. By the
4 full quarts, $3.00
Express Prepaid.


ANVIL RYE
Guaranteed 4 years old. By the
gallon, $2.50. 4 fall quarts, $2.75.
Expr-es Prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE
By the gallon, $2.25. 4 full quarts
$2.50.
Express Prepad.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN
Guaranteed 8 years old. By the
gallon, $3.00. 4 full uarts, $3.25.

OLD POINTER CLUB CORN
Guaranteed 4 years old. By the
gallon, $2.50. 4 full quarts, $275
Express Prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of
Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the mar-
ket and will save you from 25 per cent
to 50 per cent on your purchases. Send
for price list and catalogue. Mailed free
upon application.

Tb Altayer & Flatu Lie r Co.
506-50o-51o-5xa Fourth Street,
MACON GEORGIA.


Df^n


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksoville, Florida.
Steften and Hawes Hats. Special Attlleaou iven to Mall Orders.
-mme-^ -eeee'ee' www5~'VV~* .


R. TOLAR.


J. N. HART. T. M. BLACHLY.
(Established 1872.)


J. R. TOLAR, Ja


TOLAR, HART &A CO.,
160 FRONT STREET, NEW YORK.


Commission


Merchants


and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


JOSEPH D. WEED. H. D. WEED. W. D. KRENSON

J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEOR.GIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.


Read the Record Adv'ts.


TEE RECORD in THE -OP3RTOP3V p3rE CL"


In Florida's Phosphate Circles,


************* *


-A


~-~~-+r~+r~r++-~9


---------- --









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 19


Buyers' Directory

The advertisers are in this issue If
you want anything, look through this
classified list and write to the firm ap-
paring trein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response


ABSTRACTS
Realty Title and Trust Co.
AUTOMOBILES.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantie National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Central National Bank, Ocals, Fla.
Mercantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Foster, Geo. R., Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jackson-
vile, Fla.
CARS.
South Atlantic Car & Manufectiring Co.,
Wayerves, Ga.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, urechgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Lareadon, M. W, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
CONVEYANCING.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
COOPERAGE.
Cannon Co., The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Cooperage Co, Jacksnville,
Fla.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville; Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fia.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
gusta, Ga.
FOUNDRIS
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
FURNITURE.
Fetting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co., Savannah, Ga.
Hargraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Johnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HARDWARE.
Baird & Co., L E., Jackskoknville, Fla.
Bond & Bors Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H.,Valdosta, Ga.


Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah. Ga.
HARNESS.
McMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jackso~ville, F1
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Macon, Ga.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Croeby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, Fla.
Blum & Co., Chan., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
MAPS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fa.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jacksonville, Fa.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Brigg Hardware Co, W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Schotield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
MULES AND HORSES.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, iLa.
NAILS
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barnes-Jessup Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co., The, Savannah, Ga.
Independent Naval Stores and Export Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
PECANS.
Grifliing Bros. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Ocala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa,
Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fla.
Frazier, W. W., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Oeala, Fla.


Southern States and and Timber Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
West-Raley-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville,
Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAMSHIP&S
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville ,Fla.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jackse ville, F
TANKS.
Cypress Tank Co, Moile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatk, FLa.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. ., Maeon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fa.
Council Tool Co., The, Wananish, N. C.
TumPw LaXs APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksonville, 1la.
The Wire Virgin Gum Co., Tifton, Ga.


waUPEassMs PBOCES.
Pine Product Oo tructio Co., The, Fay-
*tteville, N. C.
Pine Belt Cmstructio Co., The, Baleigh,
N. C.
Standard Turptinm Co., The, New York
City.
TuPhaTjrxE 8TILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brnsowick, Ga.
MeMillan Bros., Savnnah, Ga.
TURPsJiTru STILL TUBL
Davis & Boa., M., Palatk, Fla.
TUIPmaTuIE VAT.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatk, Fla.
TYPKrWMTlMM
Gvriot Typewriter Exchaae, JaekMsvill
PM.
VEHICLES.
MeMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, F
Thomas, W. R, Gaineville, Fa.
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Hes & Slager, Jacksoaville, Fa.
YELLOW PIKE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jackonville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertowa, Fl.


MORTGAGES. RENTS.

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.

III W. FORSYTH STREET, ACKSONVILLE. rLORn




H, A. Renfroe Co.


TAILORS


Stetsoin Hats


Suits to Order at ReadyMade Prices Mail Orders Given Personal Attention


439 W. Bay Street


JACKSONVIEA FLAW


-11i11 i33333333333333. 353lrl l lllll l 2212 3fa 333 fat


SJ. P. WILIjAM& President.
.T. A. JNrxNIs, 2nd Vice-President.
. H. L. KAYTO, Secretary.


J. A. G. CASonx, Ist Vice-President
J. F. Dussaxuav, 3d Vice-Presldent
D. G. White, Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

INK SlIowS IN cONQ [gaTURs u WHLESaLE MWCERS.
aman Offie. bJLVarNNX, OOnaO.O .
Branch Orrieees: PrsNACOL., FLX. I Braneh Oroeer Houe,
.C jjALconvILL., LraJ. ( coLL.uuL,. G.


Naval Stores Producers are lavit


ed to Correspond With Us.


i i ti ll i iI Ii i i iiii II I Iillll s I-IIIIIIIIIIii "


N. A. BAKER,
bPme" ai
fatmcrterr iro tne

Baker hroted

Seamnkss Trpenm-

tine stills.
Write me for prices and oudtfs
F. 0. B any point in Georgia, Far-
Ida Alabemna or MissIssDiPpi. All
sill sold under a guarantee.
Job work through the
country a specialty.
Tb. Lrgest and Oldest Copper
Works in Georga. 3runswick, Ga
1W My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.


Send your order for general printing to the Record


DON'T FAIL TO MENTION THE RECORD TO ADVERTISERS.


<







20 THU WUKY IrUbsIMaAL KNooND.


Georgia Turpeatiae Transfers.
Two of the oldest and best developed
turpentine locations in Colquitt county,
Georgia, were sold last week. One was
owned by Sessoms, Barbee & Co., three
miles north of Moultrie, and was solu to
J. T. Norman & Co. This farm was open-
ed over nine years ago. The other is lo-
cated near Sigsbee. It was owned by
Mesars. Vereen & Campbell, and Mr. Camp-
bell by this sale, becomes owner of the
still. With it goes 1,000 acres of good
farming land and Mr. Campbell will open
one of the largest farms in the county.

FIRE INSURANC N-Lowat rates. I*
ren H. GQm & Co.. o e ad 10 Park BU.,
JackoTaille, Fla. fS.


HILAY I NOMEIIRY,
Commnilon Merchants,
Naval Store & Cotton
TIwsf ad* sade ra oilt diy-
nm.nL l llomsonsnd.
COTTON EXCHANOE NUILDIa O
NIW YORK CITY.
WHE" WRITING ADVERTISERS
MENTION THE RECORD.

KIRK & JONES
DRUGGISTS.
107 u. WAY sT.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

Commission Merchants.
ROSIM, luzPbmulms, TAR, PITCH,
GUM TaU8l, Rfc, rTC.


s FroSt aStrt,


NXW YORL


Trade Checks
FOR THE

COMMIS8ARIY MBIIES0.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Imlstrlal Record Go.


TRACY WILL SPAX.
Prominent Official to Talk Before Stock
Association,
Col. S. M. Tracy of the bureau of plant
industry, United States Department of
Agriculture, will attend the convention of
the Southeastern Stock Growers Associa-
tion in this city next week, and deliver an
address on what the department is doing
in grass and forage plant investigations.
In respo. ie to an invitation, the follow-
ing letter was received from Colonel
Tracy yesterday.
"Washington, D. C, Jan. 2, 1905.-J.
A. Hollomon, Jacksonville, Fla.: Dear Sir
-If nothing unexpected should occur, I hope
to be with you at the stock growers' con-
vention on January 11 and 12, and shall
be glad to say something of what the
Department of Agriculture is doing in
grass and forage plant investigations.
Yours very truly, 5. M. TRACY,
"Special Agent."
The convention in the Board of Trade
auditorium next week promises to be
well attended by stockmen from all see-
tions in the Southeast. Reduced rates
have been granted on all transportation
lines, the rate named being one and one-
third for the round trip.
To Turpentine Operators: Don't forget
that J. S. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon, Ga.,
have the reliable and never-failing, when
it comes to the Pumping Outfit you will
have to buy for your still this season.
Write them at once for prices and descrip-
tion.
Mills, The Florist.
Amongst the many windows of our va-
rious stores which are decorated to please
the eye of the holiday shopper, and in
which may be found some splendid ex-
amples of the decorated art, none can ex-
ceed in beauty of design than that to be
seen in Mills, the Floriast's window, West
Forsyth Street. 'Tie a perfect picture of
loveliness, and the numbers of ladies who
are to be seen all day long gazing upon
these beautiful flowers and plants is a
proof positive (if any proof were wanting)
that the arrangement is indeed in the
hands of an artist whom we have pleas-
ure in saying is George E. Lindemann,
whose floral decoration education was
largely gained when serving that principal
florist of New York-we allude, of course,
to ThorleyB.
C. Covint-k Honored.
C. IL Covington, manager of the Con-
solidated Grocery Company, of Pensacola,
Fla., was the recipient of a handsome gift
Saturday afternoon, December 24th, when
the employees of that firm presented him
with a beautiful umbrella. The umbrella
was of silk and the handle was of pure
gold, suitably engraved.
The many employees of the big firm,
in making 'the presentation, expressed
their appreciation of the many courtesies
extended to them during the year by the
manager of 'the business, whom they res-
pect and admire.
Each employee of the firm received five
per cent of his yearly earnings as a
Christmas present.

Sawmill men are always pleased to
learn where they can buy the most dura-
ble and substantially built engines and
boilers. Schofield Iron Works, of Macon,
Ga., can furnish them; write to them for
prices and information.


*lgl l*llll***lllllll1** llWggllW ----.......


THE DIAMOND
Whelesal sad Retail

SWines. Liquors and Cigars.
Sole Agents fer tlm feaou s A. B. C. Be.e at se the "Waheln ZueU*e MiM-
erel Wate. We ouurante al Brand puat up by u fua merm.e a femewrs
Creme de Ia Creme, bottle .... $2.00 Diamond Brand, bottle ........ 1.00
[I auh.... er r esat-i. ] Heart Brand, bottle .......... ..75
C. C. C. Brand, bottle ........ 1.50 Spade Brand, bottle ........... 00
Club Brand, bottle ........... 1.25 Premium Brand, bottle ......... .0


MYERSON CO.,
105 a 107 West ay 1.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


1&$$111666181886618 111#$$1$$


Prosideet


W. a. J0ouuse
vse pro


Pheue 173U.


II 113111 11111~11UU Il1lUI


JmS LAS@ET W. W. SMIJS
am. unmor. Ase Triasrore


Whe W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers


T. PC muina
7MMMMIY


402 404 406 408 East sBy treet Jaks-em-We a.
DCLCTORS:
W.: & Jew
N!E WME FERRY LCM~


I~~ ~ ~ ~ -----urr rr -- ~ 4 1 4----- --
J. A. Crai40g Bro 4.
9 a29 W. Bay Street EVERETT SOCK..


Leaders in
ing and


Men's and Bors' Fine Cloth-
Up-to-Date Furnishings.


SAgents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.




The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLUSAL I& RETAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints. Oils and Glass.
Stoves. Tinware, Country- Holloware.


10 WEST BAY STLEET


Jacksonville, Fla.


-C= P= An =T5I rDUCTS.


^*-^.*********MMM~rM~ -----------
Cable Address. Florida


Standard Naval Stores

Company.
DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN

R.OSIN

AND TURPENTINE.
Jacksonville, Fla.
PWI W W! -- -- -- --- ----- ---- --- ----


--




THE WEEKLY INDluuB IAL 0 BOO3D. 21
President, W. C. POWELL; Vice-Presidents, who with the President, constitute the Directory and Board of Managers, W. F. COACHMAN, B. F. BUL-
LARD, H. L. COVINGTON, H. A. McEACHERN, JOHN R.YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. IH McMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES *

.. COMPANY.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA, FIA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Bu'y.

The Consolidated Is Purely a Cooperative Company. Its
Interests are identical with those of the Producers. The
Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.

YARDS AT JACKSONVILLE, SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA AND PENSACOLA

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.
IN YOU D3OT nm IT I T X U CORD WRiE VI.







22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Stapcl Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commissr.y Trade.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South-reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 264
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 27
S10 .. 281
A C. Creamery,60, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 14

Lard

Compound Tin.
S 60-lb tin.... 56
50-lb tub.... 5f
Leaf Tin.
50-lb tin. ........... 8

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 36

Sugar
Granulated Sugar, bbls..... 6 00

Coffee

Reception Blend Mooh and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb.............. ... 22
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 18
Green Coffee, medium ...... 11
Green coffee, c~pnmon....... 10
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
Ib packages...... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 b pack-
ages........... market price
Roasted, 100lb. drum....... 17
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 16

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 Ib..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 Ib.... 27
SEnglish B'fast, 10 lb.. 7
Formosa, 10 Ib....... 27
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10c size
10 Ibs to case, per pound'.. 40


Salt
200-lb sack................
100-lb sack................
Ice Cream, 200-lb sacks.....
S 100-lb sacks.....
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-lb....
2-lb....


100
60
100
50
265
275


Pepper

Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin.............. 17
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 dos to box
sifter top, per doz...... 46
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and 80

Corn


100 Sk
Car ot Lot
W.Corn,llOlb, 1 29 1 80
S 1001b, 1 27 120
Mxdcorn,1101b,1 88 1 85
1001b,1 21 1 28


Less
Sk
1
1
1
1


100


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


100 Sk
Car Lot Lot
W.clip'd,1251b,
lOO1b,
White 1251b,
White lO01b.
Mixed 1251b
4" 1001b,


Le. 100
Sk Lots
182
145
175
1 38


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice. .... 1 85
.. . fancy..... 1 85
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 6 25
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 lb sack........6 00
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 6 25
Pillsbury's Best ..... 7 50
S Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal ......... 7 40
bbl.... ....
Flour, Boss,.............. 700
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 3 20
92-lb sacks............ 1 35
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 8 25
S 92-lb sacks....... 1 35
Rice
Good .................. ... 4.
Choice .. .............. .. t
Fancy Head............... 6
Broken ................... 24
Canned Vegetables
Doz.
Tomatoes, Bs, Chief ........ 85
T,,matoes, 2s ........ 65
Clayton,3s................ 80
Clayton, 2s ............... 60
Sifted Peas, 2s ...........1 40
Rose L. J. Peas .......... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s .......1 15
Lima Beans,2s ...........1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8s........... 90
Baked Beans, Is........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............ 1 40


Born Tomatoes, 2s...........
Beauty Beets, 3s..........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ..........
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s..............
Hay
car IotU 100 bale 1.


32 Choice....
84 No.1 Tim.
46 No. 2 "
85 No.1 Cl'ler 17 00


lots qaaJtity
1800
1700
... 1600
17 50 16 001


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to. case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
tocase, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 29, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 45
Peaches, 8s, two dos to case
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 45
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 6.
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
lb .................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per Ib........ 6

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 12
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 11
Fancy Apricots 26 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice " ..
Ev. Apples. 50-lb. boxes.....4 00
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 06
Ev. Apples, 4 1-lb. packages 25
Ev. Apples, 24 2 25
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. case 8 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
bo.x, 40-50............. 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 50-60............ 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box .......... 1 70
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 61
Extra H P, .... 6
Seed Peanuts, ....
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ ..... 18
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Peacans.... .............. 12
Filberts................... 12
al0 nuts.................. 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 LessiOo
lots Sk. Lot Sk. Lt
Cottonseed Meal 27 00
S Hulls 9 5


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Wooden ware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
8 hoop.........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz....... 1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18...... 1 00
S nested ......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per dos 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 60
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. .. 1 20


Washboards
78 Crown Combination.....2
178 Blue Jay...............8
175 Diamond Glas .........8


O. W. D., 17 inch, per dos 1
Clothes pins, five gross to box


er
sen
20
00
25
05
75


Canned Fish
Oysters, is, 2 doz to case, per
doz. .............. ... 96
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 25
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 20
Salmon is, Tale 4 dos to case
per doz Alaska........ 95
Salmon, is, 4 dos to case,
per doz Col. River .... 2 36
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box............. 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge ..... 133-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avge .... 131-2
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avge ... 141-4
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7- 9avge 101-2
"Reliable" California Hams, 6-8 7 3-4
Breakfast Bacon, light av. ...... 13
D. S. Bellies, 16-18 av. ........ 83-8
D. S. Bellies, 20-22 av. ........ 81-8
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av. ......... 7-8
D. S. Plates .................... 63-4
Bacon Plates ................. 73-4
D. 8. Butts .................... 63-4
Bologna ausage ............. 7
Sausage in on ................ $.75
Batter asn Chee.
"Strawberry" Creamery, 60-lb tubs 27
30-lb tubs.... 271-2
"Reliable" full cream cheese .... 131-2
Kingan's Lard.
"Indiana" Pt Leaf ........... market.
'jiea-Foam" Compound .........market.


Kingan's Caned MN ts.
"Reliable" Corned Beef, Is ......
Corned Beef. 2s ......
S Roast Beef, Is ........
S Roast Beef, 2e ........
Potted Ham and Tongue
1-4a ..........................
Sliced Beef, 1-2 ....
Vienna Samnage, I ..
Tripe ..................


as


1.15
I.3
M


T=D ZUDOW8 SPACE HAS A IG MOE= TALU&


ss







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BECORD. 23


T. MURPHY
JACKSONVILLE MACHINE AND IRON WORK!
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Ir
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARINE ENGINES AND BOILERS. PULLEYS AND SHAFTING.
Agent for Stationary Engines, Boilers. Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Condet
sers, Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Good
PWEl ThUISISSII AID WATER WORKS EQUIPMEIT A SPECIALTY
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


The Clyde Steamship Compan]



4 ,


SYeou Wat a Turpentine Location?
S I vY. Wamt a Sawmnl Lcatlien?
| *: You Wadn any Kind of Firida Land?
F You Mea Business?
SCa1 on or Write to
n J J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS,
Ocala. Florida
*****************Se** e******O***********************
n-
Is \WMS5W -%%%$BYS%%~uswssytmx


Record Readers:



The job printing department
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. It is reason-
able to suppose you will get


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES better and more satisfactory
The ~1i3 *Lk t *ta hit this liz are appoite to Mil a ftew~ amnllag
Sttv & c.both wa y .. printing supplies-letter heads,
Mr*m new York. *Peea JaekaseavUle fie
mowM., nr ....Rivr f. uRI.. k"re *-" w Yo I rk. S envelopes, commissary checks,
Saturday, Dee. 24, at 3:00 pm ... .ALGOXQUIN .... Friday, Dec. 30, at 10:30 am
Tuesday, Dec. 27, at 3:00 pm ...."COMA.NCHE ..Sunday, Jan. 1, at 12:00 nn a-rl rp rt, hv
Wednesday, Dec. 28, at 3:00 pm ..**xHURON ....Tuesday, Jan. 3, at 4:30 am pay- ll re ., y ing
Saturday, Dec. 31, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ......Thursday, Jan. 5, at 4:30 am
Monday, Jan. 2, at 3:00 pm ......*xNEW YORK .... Saturday, Jan. 7, at 5:00 am US make them.
UOISWednesday, Jan. 4, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE .... Sunday, Jan. 8, at 6:00 am
Tuesday, Jan. 3, at 3:00 pm .... IROQUOIS ......Monday, Jan. 9, at 7:00 am
Friday, Jan. 6, at 3:00 pm .COMANCHE ...... Wednesday, Jan. 11, at 8:00 am Industrial Record
Saturday, Jan. 7, at 3:00 pm .... ALGONQUIN ..... Thursday, Jan. 12, at 9:00 am I s il cUIU
!xMOHICAN .......... Friday, Jan. 13, at 9:30 am
Tuesday, Jan. 10, at 3:00 pm ......ARAPAHOE ...Sunday, Jan. 15, at 11:00 am Jcksk vek Flria.
*xHURON ......Tuesday, Jan. 17, at 12:00 n'n
Friday, Jan. 13, at 3:00 pm ......APACHE .... .Wednesday, Jan. 18, at 12:30 pm
Saturday, Jan. 14, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS ....Thursday, Jan. 19, at 1:00 pm
*xNEW YORK ...... Sunday, Jan. 22, at 5:00 sm
Tuesday Jan....CO NCH Sunday, Jan. 22, at 3: pm .5:00 am B
Wednesday, Jan. 18, at 3:00 pm .... ALGONQUIN ..Monday, Jan. 23, at 6:00 am
Friday, Jan. 20, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE .... Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 7:30 am N av al S stores M ar et
Sunday, Jan. 22, at 3:00 pm .*"xMOHICAN ........Friday, Jan. 27, at 9:30 am
Tuesday, Jan. 24, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ......Sunday, Jan. 29, at 11:30 am
Wednesday, Jan. 25, at 3:00 pm .IROQUOIS ....Monday, Jan. 30, at 12:00 n'n t
*xHURON ......Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 1:00 pm aTR AtOC e nO rt
Friday, Jan. 27, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ......Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 1:00 pm an d Sk
Saturday, Jan. 28, at 3:00 pm ....ALGONQUIN ....Thursday, Feb. 2, at 4:00 am Pu d ly i T
Tuesday, Jan. 31, at 3:00 pm ... .ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, Feb. 5, at 5:00 am Pubished Daily n The
*xNEW YORK ......Monday, Feb. 6, at 5:30 am
*--Boston via Brunswick and Charleston. xFreight only. --Boston via
Brunswick.
THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
DOreet Servae Betweem Jaeksonville, Bostmo and Provideme.e -am anll as.
era Pontas. O(Mllar at Ckarlestem Both Ways. 7
r MI--WEKLY SAILrGas. Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
Southbound.. .. .. ......... ...*...... .. ....Prom Lewi& Wharf, Bostem *
Northbuad.. .. .. .. ...... ..... .. rom foot of Catherine Street. Jack v daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE $5 A YAR X
Between Jaea sronlI an Sau teRM.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Franu s. Bersford (De Land) and tatermedlats A A
tandlns em St. Joblu riv'r.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
t appointed to a as follows: Leave Jaksonville, Sundays, Tuedays and Thu-B IG P
days, <: p. m. Returning, leave Banford. Monday, Wednesdays & Pridays a:* a. A S.
8OUTHBOuIuI NORTHBOUND,
Re down. I Read up..
Leave :. p. m.I ...................Jacksonville ........ ....... ...... Arrle ..f a. A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposi icn, to
Le'a : ..:::::: ::: ....... t::::::....................::::::::::.:.::::::. L Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Lav 491 al........ .. **.. ......t F rnelg.............. ......... LrAIe Im 9. M
. ........ .... eresford (DeLand)................. Leave .n noon Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
ATrrive 8: a. a ....... ................ anford........................ Ineve 9:1 a. U.for par
Ar. 10:00 a. m..................Enterprise..........................L. 10:00 a. m. scrption contest. Write for particulars.
BWRIUAL PAqWSSNBE AND TICKET 0r OIPIC. m04 W. Mka St., Jakd lone.
r. M. IRONnMONGUP. J. A st. Genl. Pass Agent. mt W. Bar St.. Jacksonville. lall
W. G. COOPR, JR., Local Mt. ALt., Jak'ville. C. P. LOVELLF Asst. Supt.,Jack'vlhl
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
A. C. HAGGR TY. G. 3. P. A, New York. CLYDB Ifl uE . r. A.. New Tersi arter Publig
Twame. 4 e n=, wM cLaP.C a oo.
S s amenS, tat tree. N Ow Ao k Jacksonville. Florida.
WRIT THE RECOD = OR AM T mIOMATDW in.





24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


of SPCA V -N S L--NGILE
SPTwo of the Patterns we showTERL in our Catalogue
SPECIAL VALVES IN STERLING SILVER.. Pb


7-KaWbm
15"


Na"pa


THE Greenleaf &
"Rose" Crosby Company
Teaspoons, g.oo per do.
Dessert Spoons, $x6.oo per doz.
Table Spoons, $.oo per dos. i t
Dessert Forks *i.oo per doz.
Table Forks, a3.oo per dos.
Des et Knie, $o per do. 41 W est Bay Street
Table Knives, 3S.o00 per doz. Jak nvie
NO CHARGE FOR
ENGRAVING. The lrta~t an fat du in te pau of he
Southem States. Prompt attention to mali order


THE
"Germania"
Teaspooma .- per do.
Dessert Spoons, 16.5o per dos.
Table Spoons, 623.5o per doz.
Dessert Forks, S1.So per dos.
Table Forks, s350o per dos.
Dessert Knives, *goo per do
Table Knives, $na2 o per dos.
WE PAY EXPRESS
CHARGES.


i Write for Catalogu
; ONE HUNDRED PAGES ILLUSTRATING

\ ]Silverware, Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Cut Glass, Clocks, etc. I




Half Tones-Zinc Etchings


Ilustrating and Engraving Department

OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.

Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.

I SPEGIIT IS lE OF %SIK, REITOGiI IN EIBLISII PIlTOGRIPIIS IN) PICTIRE.
IN WaiTNG OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GooD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


-- I