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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00097
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: November 18, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00097
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text








For the Week Ending November 18 1904. -





WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber / ut aUfCturlag Isterests.

"ul 5010 2.06 8e0r se amesv rCOemOe .r mme ft .1r 0 aVOsae' sAM09a0Ms 2l..M..... a rr
suqle, as am ael Orans AIsr ot ae saeral i Adaped spt. A tat, l93,z ait s 2an ealecfal oras n aoof s s '
Adespac Aprit 27ta 0sec, as taW eVmci cra m Wee -se r.ugassst CAe irrs sc* Ases. Enasedrby at r e aswuar -
Asseclats. Ofmctal srgea of ate qrsI at ramr StecW rsewir's Assocfuteafm. .r aesL

VOL 9. I. 20. JACKSONVILLE, A. ATLANTA, GA. SAVANNAH, GA. $3 A YAR.
.- Ii .


13 Vo OF OIL AWD CLAY In CON-
8TRUCTIMG HARD ROAD.

O esmu Ceunty iles Application for a
sample .t to be Co tracted by
Gveranmmt Aid.
The inlosed letter from the Board of
Trade speaks for itself, and shows Fer-
mmwiam, with its many advantages, will
not rest til she has added good roads.
t also indicate that the first one to be
built will be to her splendid beach. All
agree that few, if any, points in Florida
smd offer as much to the tourist, es-
pecially thosp who desire to bring their
sntomobile with them. When this con-
aeion is made, Jacksonville will have to
be up and doing, or the drive to the
beach, which means so much, will be
Iut made at Fernandina.
I am not posted a to the work, if any,
that is being done on the Pablo road. It
agm strange, if this road is to be built,
at we should miss the use of it for the
lmmmt oseasou
S ta advantage to Jacksonville should be
ere than its eat during the present ap-
pl ching season, if built at once.
f taken in bad w it can be ready
by the first of Febrry.
The heapst and best road from Jack-
aenvile to the bemah ear be made of shell,
fant, lay ad oil.
Sueh a road would be smooth, easy on
thus and free from drt.
The history I have of such a road in-
.m s me to believe it will outlast a rock
waed, as rk road works up into dust
aa blows away, or when it rains washes
Vway. The dust is a nuisance, and a light
S eating of oil prevts it.
I hbe samples of such road surface,
and when I eome home will show them to
pove the value of oil on road onstrue-
S Mim. The rods I have examined were
*ade of delay, sand and oil, but I am satis-
S fld hat while they drive fine, a shell
Imundatio would be a great improvement
ad require much less oil. I am going to
Wasington tonight to make sure of ae-
ive work on the part of the department
S t the earliest possible day in Florida.
is winter i Florida's opportunity, and
I am sure you will use your great and
pmerful journal to arouse our people, as
Sam confident we must secure the build-
fg of amale roads where needed this
winter, as another year other sections i
the Soeth wll put in a elaim for this val-
Mble work, and we will not be able to get
Sth service another year.
Thanking yd in your help in this work,
S I am, yours, A. MANN,
State Organiser.

ermandina, a., Nov. 10, 1904.-Dear
- t: The Fernndina Board of Trade, a
e.-


body representing all commercial and
other business interests of this city, and
of Nassau County, appreciating the great
work being done by you in the eneour-
agement and building of 'good roYds'
throughout the State of Florida, would
earnestly request that you file with the
Hon. Martin oDdge, the Government rep-
resentative, our application for a sample
road of one and a half miles in length from
Fernandina to Amelia Beach.
"In this county we have no stone, but
an abundance of new and old oyster
shells, which have served as an excellent
paving for our city streets, which present
a hard, clean and beautiful appearance.
This board, therefore, feels confident that
if these shells are laid sufficiently thick
upon a well- graded road no material
would prove more durable and pleasing to
the eye, while serving also as an object
lesson to other seacoast counties where
rock for macadam roads is difficult to
obtain.
"Our people are ready to do what may
be required of them by the Government,
and they earnestly hope that work on the
short road suggested may be commenced
with as little delay as possible.
"It will not be out of place to mention
here that our twenty miles of broad, hard
beach (excelled by no other beach on the
Atlantic coast) is a favorite resort for
visitors from all parts of South Georgia
and Florida, and hence the proposed road
(already opened and partly graded) would
be an object lesson to a larger number of
people from the interior than if it were
built in any other part of the county,
where neither shell or stone can be pro-
cured.
"May we not hope you will give this mat-
ter your best and earliest attention?
Very respectfully, G. L. BALTZEIL
Secretary.
"Hon. A. S. Mann, State Organizer,
"140 Lalede Building, St. Louis, Mo."


"Col. G. L. Baltzell, Secretary Board of
Trade, Fernandina, Fla.: Dear Colonel-
Yours of November 12, showing action
taken by your honorable body in relation
to sample road making by the Govern-
ment, just received.
"I have wired Hon. Martin Dodge that
I will leave here for Washington, as I
wish to see him personally in relation td
several applications which I wish to make,
and while there will get something definite
-and wire or write you as to results.
"I am indeed glad your people have
taken this matter up in the spirit they
have, and feel confident that I can assure
you the work will be done this winter.
"The beach at Fernandina is simply per-
fect, and there is no reason any point in
Florida should surpass as a winter tou-
rist home your beautiful city. A road
connecting the city with the beach would


make your situation an ideal one, and it
can be done at a very small cot. I am
confident oyster shells, with a light cover-
ing of clay, sprinkled with oil and sand
would make a frst-class road. The clay,
oil and sand would make a soft surface,
easy on tires and free from aust, as well
it would be more durable. Such a road
can be made cheaper than a rock road,
and in my judgment last longer ad be
better.
"I expect to be in Florida soon, and if
possible I will drop over for a day to see
you in relation to this work. Respect-
fully, A. S. MANN,
"State Organizer.'

Merchant Marine Commisel Meeta.
The National Merchant Marine Com-
mission, which is making a tour of South-
ern ports, visited Brunswick yesterday,
and had an interesting meeting that after-
noon at which delegations were present
from Savannah, Fernandina and other
South Atlantic ports. The object of the
meeting was to receive suggestions on
a bill to be presented to Congress at the
next session for the betterment of Amer-
ican shipping. Col W. E. Kay, of Brus-
wick, advocated American ships for Amer-
ican cargoes, and said:
"The fathers of the republic legislated
against the introduction into our system
of foreign built ships, and the disrimi-
nating duty they applied for a while ae-
complished the desired purpose. If our
ships are to fy the American flag in com-
petition with foreign vessels, we have got
to repeal the legislation against free ships
or make some bounty on tonnage, mail
subsidy, or differential duties, to build
up a system of shipping at the expense
of the people, for it is clear that ship
for ship, we cannot compete in the mar-
kets of the world for freights and in order
to fy our flag we must do so at a prem-
ium paid by ship ownere"
Col. C. P. Goodyear, chairman of the
Brunswick (Ga.) Board of Trade, com-
mittee on merchant marine, presented
many arguments in favor of Government
subsidy and other aids in building up the
United States merchant marine.
He asserted first that all American eit-
iaens who had given the subject of the
revival of the merchant marine a thought,
are a unit for its revival as an emergent
necessity. Ninety per cent of our com-
merce, he said, is bein carried by foreign
ships. We proudly talk of our $400000,-
000 balance of trade in our favor, and.
putting that in one national pocket, we
take out of another $M,000,000 and pay
it back in freights.
It would be a wise policy, he said, to
force the contruction of American ships
in American shipyards, of American ma-
terial, by American material, superintend-
ed by American brains and operated by


American seamen. To do this wI illnl
state aid from the Government, at lean
for a time. This aid could be given i tih
form of a subsidy upon tonnage, navi
tion bounties, mail contracts, or by ra
duction of dues to the American ship,
by all of these.
To know exactly what the result at
such a course would be, our statesman
had only to look to foreign Goearmmem
The United Kingdom has gained sream-
acy upon the seas by a system of subM -
dies extending for more than a hudred
years; Germany and Franc have lerge
increased their tonnage siee 1873 by th
same means.
Touching on the possibilty at e
growth in this direction, Colond GeOidyar
said there are but twenty-fs deep water
ports with channel depth f twnty-Om
feet and upward, on the Pacis, adf s
Atlantic coasts. Of these eleven a
Southern ports. In the period to IM
there is no reasonable prspeet of an in-
crease to more than thirty-fve. At pea-
ent these twenty-four ports ser a total
commerce amounting to RA ,OsANma ad
a population of 81,00,000 people. In I
this population should be, under morm
growth, 234,000,000 and the omm rea -
500,000,900 Our payment to foreign
tries for shipping wil increase in M
proportions i we continue our pme
policy.
Other interesting addresses were -m
and the commission left lst night fr
Newport News.



Announcement has been made eo tm
selection of Mr. Albert Redding as emah-
ier of the recently organized Floria Ban
and Trust Company, J ackwlle a r
million-dollar financial intitatio
Mr. Redding is at piaset mng(
the collections department a the Natia-
al Bank of Jacksonville, whose service i
entered seven years ago, and ha gam
ally worked his way up to this, the hi-
est, next to the elective offieea Twety
years ago, a mere boy, he enteid the
banking business as an employee of the
Bank of Ocala, which was later merg
into the Merehats' Natinal, of which be
eventually became ashier.
His early training was received udr
Mr. J. M. Blair, a very prominent fi
then in Florida finaial eieles, a r
president of the Equitaele Natia Ba
of Cinnina ti. Mr. Redding r vmoe to
Jacksonville shortly after these aiArn
fire, and may properly said to have be
in the employ of but two carprati
in the twenty years of his Iuinss M
It is alro worthy to note as to th
training of the young men of the Natial
Bank of Jacksonville that Mr. r-wid
makes the ffth chosen from thir
to become cashiers of other baink
f'.y


C.-,'


I--


a-. S






2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RBIORD.
-.U-uI--I..--- i -------.
. .-...,.--.^. ......... ........ ........... .. ^........... ... ^....... 8 7^... . ... ...... '


C. B. IOG-R8& PumarxT.


W. A. GAT,.AH1Ri and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, VIcx-PaussImes


C. H. HODG80, cN, and Tmaus'A.


DIILECTOIS C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, R. A. McEacbern and J. A. Canford, of Jackonville;
SB. F. Ballard, Tampa; 0. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, rla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Pla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor tb the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries,


Grain, Pro-


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Cajslst of Ore Three-Story BewiMdl, 70x200; oee two-story baldIg. 50x390; ome one-story btildiag, 80x250,
maklau the largest space of ay Compay of the kind IA the Soeth.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.

Branches Tampa, Fle., Pensmcol., Fla., and Savnnn h. Ga.

TN uaco WLL an wOQTH DOaUarS TO Yo av1-- m-w-.


I
I
I
I.
I
I,


t. ..
i-i
1-- -
i
5;~ t
i:
i
I








THE WEEKLY 1nDUb-srzL& BECOED.


L 2B0OM. ft*.P R. BGOAJILE&D. Omler
W. E OWSr. Vik-nPrs.
Commercial Bank,
State Deqpwtry.
Banc m: Oeanr Lab I.s pL
-A- e - - Flerida


TI CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.600.00


BARRELS

ALL KINDS.
SOur BSpar &nls hod and wll poas the se-
werst A Srican ad Euopan inspectioPn

ae, at MEIGS, CAIRO, OUIMAN, GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
AM r ,dr b om oth ic,
QUITMAN, GA.



BUILDERS AND DgALERS IN


ENGINES, BOILERS.
O mtte Saw, F rtilier, Gi sad Ie Ma-
chiery, ad Supplies ad Repairs.
CAPACITY FOR 300 HANDS.
Maetl Tools, Wood-Working ,Madne,
Saheftag, Puleys, HaEnr, Leather am
IRubber Beltingu and Ho, Railroad and
Mil SppHea and Tools.
Pns ar estimates fura~ed for Power
Prats ad Steel BridgeS .
fteam Prmps Feed Water Heater and
AU USTA, giA.
AUGUSTA. GA.


_____ FLA.


Chace for Chea HR n .
The United States Department of Agri-
culture has just issued advance sheet
of a soil survey of Davidson county, Ten-
nessee, of which Nashville is the county
sat. It is a valuable document, ina
much as the soil of this county is similar
in its constituency to that of many thous-
ands of acres in Tennteaee, Kentucky and
northern Alabama. The report makes no
reference to the timber resources of the
country, and treats but slightly of its
mineral resources, but is confined to a
descriptive analysis of the soil and of the
crops and kind of fruits for which it is
especially adapted. If an the homeseek-
era of the United States only knew of
the quality of the lands in the hardwood
section of the central South it is safe
to say there would never have been such a
rush for the so-called cheap government
lands as there were to Oklahoma, the
Rosebud lands amd cther reservation.
Those lands cost the settlers all of four
dollars an acre in cash on five-year pay-
ments, besides the cost and trouble of se-
curing them. In Davidson county, lands
can be had for from three dollars up to a
thousand dollars per acre, and the highest
priced lands are a better investment than
would be the choicest lands of the Rose-
bud reservation as a gift. This fact is be-
coming to be pretty widely known in this
country and the railroad companies, the
State Agricultural Department, the Cham-
ber of Commerce and the newspapers are
making it known to the people of north-
ern Europe. As a consequence a flow of
desirable immigrants from the northern
States of our Union and from the Ger-
manic and Scandinavian countries of Eu-
rope, such as was never known before, is
pournig into this hardwood section. The
people of this section do not take very
kindly to immigrants from the South of
Europe, nor to the Slavonic tribes, but
extend a hearty welcome to the Germans,
Swedes and Norwegians. The lands of
the Highland Rim and the Cumberland
Plateau of Tennessee and of parts of
North Carolina, Kentucky, Georgia and
Alabama are almost identical in aoi con-
stituents with those of the valleys of the
Rhine, the Rhone, the Saone and other
grape producing countries of Europe, and
are especially adapted to the growth of
all kinds of fruits, from apples to berries
of all sorts, as well as the root crops. Ex-
cluding Nashville, the population of Da-
vidson county is only eighty-four people
to the square mile, and is much less in
all the other counties in the central part
of the State. The lands will furnish a
good support to ten times the present pop-
ulation, if the newcomers are industrious
and thrifty. Near the railroads and
floating streams lumber timber is becom-
ing comparatively scarce, but for fuel
purposes there will be an abundance for a
century with very little care. Excellent
bituminous coal can be had at an aver-
age price of three dollars per ton, which
many people consider to be cheaper than
wood fuel that only costs the chopping.
With all these advantages and the ef-
forts being made to induce desirable im-
migration it is evident that land values in
this section of the South will rapidly en-
hanve, manufacturing industries will flour-
ish, and a prosperity exceeding that of
the palmy days of 1840-1800 under the old
regime will be permanently established.

Send aa orders for printiag for the tur-
pentime ad commissary tdes to the
Record sce to insre prs t delivery.


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSOVILLE
ACKSONVILua. rLA.
CAPITAL U3000 SURPLUS ad UIN VIB) P RORIS S3Moo
We ase Time Certiaates of Depose. wMeh drw interest at te rat afe r st er
rnam IffhlM ninety days or longer. Take _ar tae attain at =t sl s oI
uNsI*Va ye r. Particular attetion pa to Out-of-Town acomauamt, snIag 40pe"f

NUBIAN TEA rT th. Uvr mi KMas
BENEDICTA A wne"lc for w-m
CUBAN RELIEF 'r c.1 cra .a. w

CUBAN OIL SAflhsl es sum.e .
A supply of these medicines is what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for prices and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,
chattamNea. Temmaae

a. MWE L. CIAS. sARUIS. afray ASMaEL .
PfrsMeet. Ice-hresMeet ad frumwer. Sacrreray.
DIREcrTOS:
R. sw.lr Chs. r. Msrrins f. A cMlna, P. L. Sotaeriam. R. Cer. fefr

THE


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Caeer of West a ad t aei St.,
Jacksovnlle, FrlrM.


Wholesale Drugs g Commissary Sopplis
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote priea
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and ean ea ya
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.



THE ARAGON
JACKSOrV. rIA.
SNOW OPEN
Under new management. Thorolghl
renovated and repaired throftgot in-
eluding new eleeri elevator and o
own electric light plant.
S\ H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.



East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Sbipments a Specdaty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.
em


W. T. RILEY,
P"sment.


J. A. 6. CARSON.
Vke-f e.. deat.


ewe, J. SC@9'NL,
SCV6 a r lVW40


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Fsctories,
8th Street R. R. Crossing.
JACKSONVILLE,. FLORIDA


T=N Inain a bowi 89V .iGnRT =ADS JOURNAL








4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
n ,


m-- -amo1 of the Seuth.
So much has been written and said
rgrding what might be called staple
meourees in the Sooth that possibly the
imported of some of its minor resources
is not appreciated. As a matter of fact,
eac year, apparently, reveals some source
of wealth about which little or nothing
has been known, and it is due to this
fact that the Southern States form the
S seee of a more varied industrial activity
than probably any section of the coun-
try, not even excluding the West. For
example, only recently has it been possi-
ble to secure the sulphur in considerable
quatities from the beds which exist in
Lema-a. The salt mines of the same
Sate have been worked but a few years,
and in spite of the extent of the South-
wester oil industry this also dates back
les than five-years.
Iouisian is not the only State which
has contributed what might be called in-
dustrial surprises. What lies beneath the
surface is but partially known to this
day, in spite of the exhaustive investi-
gations which have been made by geolo-
gists and others. Possibly the great area
of Iad available for the production of
cotto, the petroleum district and the
pine lands in the eastern part of the State
have overshadowed other products which
are contributing to its wealth. One of
these, as yet comparatively unknown, is
imabar, which might be termed the raw
material from which quicksilver is secured.
yet examinations have proceeded far
enough to show that at least one portion
of Texas embraces veins which cover a
airge area of territory, considering their
thebaess and number. Thus far the
miinig operations have been confined to
Brewster County, rhich, as is well known,
is situated in the extreme southwestern
portion of Texas and forming one of
the Bothern tier of counties bordering on
the io Grande. Although among the
lagest inmtmeaions in Texas, much of ft
is uninhabited, and, like other minerals
found in the Southwest, the cinnabar ore
was discovered by accident some years
ago. SuIient capital has been invested
in mines and furnaces, however, to give
u idea of its present importance and
future outlook. The town of Terlingua
.y be considered the center of opera-
tions, as in its vicinity the principal cin-
nabar mining companies have secured
sites. One company has installed two
tea-ton furnaces for reducing the ore,
another has a fifty-ton furnace, another
a ten-ton, while a fourth has been sue-
eesefully operated with four retorts, each
of 600 pounds capacity. It rs an inter-
eting fact that the four produce a large
percentage of all the quicksilver which
is ed in the United States, despite the
fast that the plants are located at such
a stance from the nearest railroad line
that the expense of hauling the mate-
ral to the depot is a great handicap. The
only system passing through this section
of Texas is the Southern Pacific, by which
the quicksilver is conveyed to market.
The principal mining company has been
carrying on operations for a period of
four years and has the deepest shaft.
of any which are engaged. The cinnabar
ore is found as near the surface in some
places as 100 feet. Consequently the ex-
pease of labor is alo taken into considera-
tiH. The veins exist principally'in ig-
neous rock, and the largest quantity thus
far secured has beea taken from what is
known as the Edwards limestone forma-
tip The mining is done largely with
hand tools, while the ore is hoisted to


the surface by mecanial or animal
power. The largest company has equipped
its workings with a wire rope tramway,
which extends from the principal open-
ings direct to the furnaces, so that the
ore can be handled at a minimum expense.
The reduction process is comparatively
simple and the Texas grade of quicksilver
has a reputation for its high quality.
As already stated, the area known to
contain veins of the ore is very exten-
sive in this portion of the State. Tests
which have been made show that the de-
posits reach all the way from Terlingua
,o a point twelve miles distant, and some
of the veins underlie others. The mining
district is situated in what might be called
:he foothills of the Chisos mountains, the
beds lying east and south of this range,
and in a region which is generally con-
sidered a desert land. The deepest shaft
which has thus far been sunk extends
150 feet, but so successful have been the
minig operations that it is proposed to
sink others to a depth of 500 feet, as ex-
perts believe that the ore in pockets and
veins exists in large quantities below the
levels which have already been made. In
addition to the cinnabar ore itself, another
grade containing what is known as ter-
linguaite has been discovered, taking its
name from the town which is located near
the center of operations. This is obtained
in sufficient quantity to pay for mining it
on an extensive scale.


When the operations in the oil fields,
for example, are borne in mind, it will be
realized that scarcely a beginning has
been made in the development of this re-
source of Southwest Texas. The few
companies occupy but a small fraction of
the available territory. Consequently the
industry possesses great future possibil-
ities, owing to the indications of ore.
Although a very large amount of cinna-
bar has been taken from the present work-
ings, there is no singn that they are being
exhausted, and it has not been necessary
for the companies to prospect for this
reason. Apparently an excellent oppor-
tunity is afforded for a much greater in-
vestment of capital in legitimate mining
in this field, and the prospects are that
the activity will be greatly increased in
the near future, owing to the interest
which has been shown in it by outsiders
who have been following up the efforts
of the companies now engaged. Several
new corporations are in process of forma-
tion and arrangements have been made
to increase the smelting capacity of the
district by another fiftyt-on furnace of the
most modern pattern, as it is demon-
strated that the most economical method
of carrying on the business is to smelt
the ore at the mines, owing to the diffi-
culty and distance of transportation.
At present one of the principal draw-
backs to the development of the industry
is the question of fuel. As yet no coal
veins have been discovered in this section
of the State, and the smelters have been
obliged thus far to depend almost en-
tirely on wood for fuel. The supply is se-
cured principally from what is known as
grease wood. The available timber in the
vicinity has been consumed and it has be-
come necessary to obtain it from a dis-
tance. The idea of utilizing oil as a fuel,
however, has been given attention, as the
oil could be brought from the fields in the
eastern portion of the State in tank ears
and piped from the railroad to the mining
district at a comparatively small expense.
The expense of fuel, however is in part
overcome by the cheap labor. The miners
are mostly native Mexicans who receive


*********,-,***************** *******eswu *ww

J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,

* HdIrtrs r

Distiller's Pumping
SOutfit

* Hundreds of them in use in O *
oFlrid" Alabama, Miippi -2
Bouoth Carolina. Write us or Pro-
* lars and prices. We also mfac
S0 Engiuns, Beiers "Alla
jiGrad Madd-.y,
Sas wella as carry a full and omplet

SMI uMill Suplies, P, p,
a^ Beier Tubles, Et.
o f Advise your wants. O

t lMacon, - Georgia.
SnicA te es Speillet aot N
a* m f T-sk Wr fw as atirr sinOri mpH s .
*-************A**i*s** y*********************


1II iiI I I a :a a a i i II it r al a ii I ii I I I II rrll
SW. W. CARNES. Pr. W. C THOMAS. Ma-aer. C. T DUDLEY. SWL s& as


STarpa Hardware Co.

Wholesale

Hardware

STvrpentine. Mill and Phosphate Suppi"es.

SLarge Stock Council and Holmes Hacks I
&and Pullers on Hand.


TAMPA, FLORIDA.

11illi l11 lllllll l 1 4 I I4I3 111I IIII11l llI3 31ll



I .. NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH. GA., U. S. A.


JOHN B. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLAMS.
o. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vlce-Pareent


C. S. ELLIS. B. BULLARD
P. L. SUTHELAND. W.C. POWE.LL
J B PADGoTT. WALTER BAY,
J. LB YOUNG. A. D. OOVINGTON.


H. IL KAYTON,
Secretary auted


J. a CsMBsUW
.L W. DEM,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. 0NOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and ar
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.





W. R. THOMAS

GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Bggies.


IN YOV DON'T MID IT =I T=IS LuCnD WiE 9us









MEH WEEKLY INbUMirkXAL RECORD. 9


frmn 90 cents to $1.25 for a day averag- i
eg tea hours. They are inured to the (
dimate, and in a comparatively short i
time become skilled, while they are also 1
depended upon for working about the c
melters.--radesman.
t
I
Amsmg Seuthern Lumbermen.
The turpentine firm of McCranie & Mills j
have just bought about 4,000 acres of
choice timber lands from E. Paulk. This f
timber is not far from Willacoohee.

The plant of the West Savannah Excel-
-sio Manufacturing Company was almost
totally destroyed by fire last week. The
re started in a mixing room and spread
rthaoghout the plant. oss, $5000 to
6oX9; total insurance, $2,0.
I
The Britton Lumber Company, of Lake-
wood, Ma., was in corporate with a cap-
ital of $100,00, to deal in land, timber
and other property, operate sawmills, etc.
W. H. Britton, W. A. Mills, E. P. Rodwell
and P. A. MePhail are the ineorporators.

The Batehelor Cypress Lumber Com-
pany is arranging to rebuild its lumber
iffla, recently destroyed by fire at Pan-
sekee, Fla. This company is one of the
foremost and largest cypress operations
the State.

Fire at the mill of the Southern Pine
Company, at Oferman, Ga., destroyed the
dry kiln aad contents and some of the
outside lumber, about 100,000 feet in all.
No other damage was done the mill prop-
e*y.

Mr. C. D. Shaw and his brother, Mr. L
L Shaw, have purchased from Messrs.
Gerge Griffi and Hamp McNabb 4,000
ares of timber five miles from Nashville,
GC, sad will establish a turpentine plant
there.

The Southern Hardwood Manufacturing
OCmpnay, of Pensacol, with a capital of
$50,300, to build and operate sawmills, to
mamufaetnu lumber and other wood
goods. The inorporators are A. M. Avery,
A. M. Avery, Jr, C. W. Hagerman, F. B.


The J. T. Bell Lumber Company, of
oolidge, Ga, are reported to have sold
out and are to settle with their creditors
at 50 cents on the dollar. A schedule of
their affairs shows that they have assets
to the value of about $12,000 and liabil-
ities amounting to over $10,000.

Mr. J. B. Lewis, of Tifton, Ga., was in-
tersted in a big deal at Glenmore last
week, his Arm, Caughman, Lewis & Co.,
bmyng 20,000 acres of timber from Myd-
dietoe, Wells & Co. The price paid was
about $160,000. The firm owns other tim-
baer lands adjoining, and it is said that it
is fourteen miles across their possessions.

The large boilers in the mill of the Hil-
ton-Dodge Lumber Company, at Santilla
Blff, Ga., exploded, demolishing the mill
property. Three negro workmen were
killed outright. The body of one man was
blown across the river. The mill was a
large one, cutting 40,000 to 50000 feet
per day.

Mr. W. L Wilson, receiver in the bank-
mrptey proceedings of McDonough & Co..
has fled his schedule of assets and liabil-


ties with the clerk of the United States
Court, showing the liabilities to be *S88,-
85.76, with total assets of $211,404.76.
rhe report of the receiver is voluminous,
covering ffty-two closely type-Awritten
)ages. In conclusion the receiver as ks
he court to pass an order which he be-
ieves will enable Mr..McDonough to sue-
eessfully straighten his affairs without ad-
udication in bankruptcy, and as the prop-
nsition submitted has every appearance of
airness to all creditors, it is believed
natters will take this course.

Messrs. John Rourke & Son, of Savan-
sh, have leased the Marine Railway, of
.he Seaboard Air Line Terminal Com-
)any on Hutchinson's Island, and will
nake extensive improvements to same.
Work has already been started. It will
ie so improved that only a few of the
largest vessels that visit this port cannot
ie accommodated.

Mr. Wm. B. Stillwell, of the Southern
Pine Company, has returned from St.
Louis, where he has been for several days
is a delegate from the National Lumber
Manufacturers' Association to the In~er-
state Commerce Law Convention, which
met in St. Louis on October 28. The con-
vention was a representative body, Mr.
Stillwell says, being composed of some-
thing like 300 delegates representing thir-
ty-one States. The chief action of the
convention was the adoptio- and prepa-
ration of a memorial to Congress asking
that the Interstate Commerce Commission
be allowed to make rates and enforce
them, if they be unsatisfactory to the
railroads interested, until they are acted
on by the courts.

Coming for Lumber.
According to the New York Commer-
cial's record of "Ocean Freights and Char-
ters," the following charters of vessels
have been made to carry cargoes of lum-
ber from Jacksonville:
British schooner Havelock, 212 tons,
Jacksonville to West Indies. lumber, pre-
vailing tariff.
Schooner George D. Jenkins, 398 tons,
Jacksonville and Palatka to New York,
cypress lumber, at prevailing tariff.
Schooner Estelle, 342 tons, Jacksonville
to Stamford, lumber at $5.75 per thousand.
Schooner Jennie E. Righter, 565 tons,
Jacksonville to New York, dry boards,
$5.37 1-2 per thousand.
British schooner Scotia, 347 tons, Jack-
sonville to San Juan, lumber, at $5.75 per
thousand.

Handsme Somvenir
At the last meeting of the Georgia In-
terstate Sawmill Association the souve-
nirs were handsome and useful pocket
knives. The Georgia Supply Company and
the Hartfelder-Garbutt Company each pre-
sented one. Mr. Denny, of the former,
handed out three-bladed Wostenholms,
with the Georgia Supply Company and
New York Belting and Packing Com-
pany imprints on the ivory handles. Mr.
Hartfelder, of the Hartfelder-Garbutt
Company, handed around flat, metal-hand-
ed "two-bladers" that were "made from
Disston saw steel." The latter, with his
usual toneh of humor, also handed around
some little packets of sticking plaster,
inclosed in a celluloid case with the Hart-
felder-Garbutt imprint. He said he was
afraid some of the little boys might cut
themselves and in that case the plaster
would come in handy.


se*-- ----------ds*- --- -------


For Sale
Seven Room House, corner Hubbard and Sixth Sts, Springfield. Ters.
Eight Room House, Fourth Stone of the nicest residences in the city.
SExtra large lot; house has all modern improvements. Owner leaving ety.
Special price for quick sale.
Eight Room House Oak St., Riverside; all modern; nice yard, arm
and buildings. House faces the river. Very desirable.
SLots in all parts of the city. Now is a good time to invest in Jacksn-
ville real estate.
6 North End lots are the greatest value ever placer on this market. $3.0
down and $1.00 per month.


SBrobston, Fendig & Co.

i Jadcsvri, @Rw .rid rswkidc Gergi.09


I. &. PENSI.E10
Priaat


w. I. .NSUOV
Vice Pros.


JA. RLASTER. W. W. STRPL
saa. MeRnaer. Asst. Treaemn


6he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers

4024404-40-40 ast nay Street Jackse-lme. Fla.


SW.T -Sm


DMC -
mr. s&r. a& runk4ef
vw& Wp.mIWL W. .JIN~IM
X~. &WAM W.


W&3


J. A. Craig e Bro.

S239 W. Bsy Street EVERETT BOCK.

I- eAters in Men's and Bors' Fine Cloth-
0 Ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.





The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE & RETAIL


HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints, Oils and Glas.
Stoves. Tinware, Country-Holloware.

* WEST BAY STREET JacKsonville. Fla.



Cable Address. Florid.


Standard Naval Stores

SCorrpany.

:DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN


R.OSIN

AND TURPENTINE.

Jacksonville. Fla.
r Mi--n M--- --iii--ii-- ----- ~iiiii--- W- N r


WNW WRIEinG AVTZNSlss IMEMTI T=E RECORD.










THE T WIMMY lihjiitbftjIAL RUNWED.
ali


f80tuanL TRADE COnDITIOWS.

Tdie Cemditine. as 8l by l ral-

Loisville.--older weather has caused
a brisk movement in retail clothing
throughout the State. Wholesale clothing
h e are doing splendidly and report col-
leetio as being above the average. Hard-
ware and impleets are in strong de-
mand and orders are of good volume, col-
lectims alo being good. Demand for gro-
emies an drugs is heavy. Wool is higher
and in better request than at this time
st year. Pig iron has made another ad-
vance during the week. Receipts of cat-
tle have been light; heavy high-grade
cattle are still quoted at good price, with
very little demand for common stock.
barbers in his section are complaining
of lack of moisture, which has made pas-
ture lads all but valueless and endanger-
ed the coming wheat crop. Whiskey has
been very active, shipments being much
larger than at this period of last year;
Sae good ad frm, especial demand
beig made for ol whiskies. Colry to-
haeo is gaining strength; dry weather
is delaying the handling of the new crop.
BMness all over the State seems to be
in a nourishing condition and future pros-
peets appear bright Collections are gen-
erdy reported as easy, and money seems
to be plentiful
St. Loan--Jobbers in dry goods ex-
pess themselves a satisfied with the
year's renuits. Traveling menarid sill
doing a good volume of business on small
orders for immediate shipment, and in
some imn duplicate orders have been
received direct Hats. gloves and kin-
dred lines are busy on duplicate orders.
aSoe manufacturers have enough orders
aa had to warrant them running their
factories full capacity until the end of
the season. Orders already placed for
spring shipment indicate a large business.
Prices so far have been Arm. Jobbers
in holiday novelties are busy, and from
present appearances the volume of busi-
ness in this line bids fair to excel past
years Comparatively mild weather has
had a tendency to retard clothing busi-
ness, as hbt few fill-in orders have been
received. Spring business, however, is
very encouraging. Millinery and kindred
lines show some activity in duplicate or-
ders. Groceries and drugs show a decided
L-rfevuat both in volume of business
and price Hardware and building mate-
rial are unchanged. Lumber is less active.
Furniture, arpets ad draperies are quiet.
Winter vegetables sad produce are in good
demand at steady prices. Retail trade is
brisk, although the heavy fall trade has
hardly begun. Business, on the whole, is
satisfactory, and exceeds last year. Col-
letions range from fair to good. Reports
from the growing winter wheat are favor-
able; the plant has started off nicely and
is doing well; in some sections' seeding is
still in progress. Flour conditions are
still unsettled, millers as a whole running
little better than half capacity. Most
Sour buyers take supplies only as needed
and show no disposition to order ahead,
but to continue in a conservative course
until the market steadies. Export busi-
ness is very dull, and only an occasional
small order for an established and is
received. Local stocks and bonds are ac-
tive and higher.
Kaias City.-Jobbers in dry goods, no-
tions, nothing, boots ad shoes report a
vry active week, and trade in other lines
eomprm favorably with a year ago.


Cooler weather has stimulated business
with retailers and heavy goods are moving
freely. Collections are satisfactory.
Milwaukee.-The weather has had an
unfavorable effect on the volume of busi-
ness, both jobbingan retail. Collections
are fair.
Sioux City.-There is inerased activity
in some lines owing to cooler weather.
Collections are fair.
Davenport.-Retail merchants report
business only fair, as is generally true in
election week. The weather is cooler,
which will stimulate busins. Collections
range trom fair to good.
St. Iul.-The volume of wholesale
trade suffered somewhat during the past
week on account of the general election.
activity, but the outlook is quite prom-
ising, especially for staple lines dur-b
the holiday season. Collections continue
satisfactory, although farmers seen. skw
;n marketing their grain.
Minneapolis.-Trade generally has been
rather broken in upon by the election, but
colder weather of the past few days ar-
gues well for sales of seasonable goods.
The situation in flour is unchanged from
last week. Lumber is in good demand.
Duluth.-Jobbers report trade for Octo-
ber in cess of the same month last year,
and good prospects for November. In dry
goods there is a good volume of business
being turned in for spring delivery. Trade
is picking up in hardware Grory houses
report business and collections coming in
freely.
Omaha.-Trade is good for the season
in most lines, and in groceries and hard-
ware is very active. Retailers of season-
able goods complain that mild weather
makes trade very quiet.
Sioux Falls.-Business in general is
good. Collections range from fair to good.
Charleston.-Trade i: -U! jines, both
wholesale and retail, continues good, and
prospects are very bright for fnture busi-
nes. Collections are full up to the ttan-
dard.
Savannah.-In shoes, hats, clothing and
kindred lines spring orders are being re-
ceived in fair volume, the favorable fall
season having resulted in a depletion of
stocks to a greater extent than usual
The grocery trade is active, and in all
lines collections are good. Seasonable
weather has stimulated retail trade. Trad-
ing in cotton is fairly active, while sellers
look for advances. Lumber and naval
stores are unchanged.
Augusta.-Trade, retail and wholesale,
remains unchanged. Collections are fair.
Atlanta.-Trade continues in good vol-
ume, with good collections, money being
easy. The cotton crop is practically all
picked in this section, and farmers are in
good condition. Much cotton is being
held for better prices. The ordinary fall
crop of wheat has not been sown on ac-
count of drought Jobbers and manufae-
turers are doing a large business.
Birmingham. The basis for No. 2
foundry is $13; large producers are de-
clining to take less. Receipts of cotton
are large, but prices are firm.
Montgomery.-Cotton receipts are fair-
ly good, though better prices are being
urged. Trade in both wholesale and re-
tail lines continues satisfactory, and col-
lections are up to the average.
Chattanooga.-Busines with whole-
salers and retailers is good and prospects
excellent. The varied manufacturers of
this place are kept busy, and this action
is in good condition.
Knoxville.-Orders for spring goods in
clothing and dry goods for points south


J. I. SiAW. Vie-Pres.


KNP" JEISM. "&s-To*"


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Promeers' Compamy. Gseas,
GrMades ami Weilts Guarateei.
Ddlveries at Jakseuvl Pensaser FPeenAMim mi Sa
Cerrespemind SIted. JACKSONVILLL FLA.

*nrgg g***i r m ii i mii lessee


PIEAL 1UU Pram


T. L. MCCARTIY. V M Pras.


SOUTHERN STATES LAID & TIME


umna Sma,
IIlu 5UWAUJ 'C


EVm WELS5. Maslow.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


i Agricultural Lands.

401-404 LAW EXCHANGE, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



I *1111*111*98**8 **0*1 Biiggs *"11 uuu I s I 11 682 I884
*44 IlllugUi *tthO* g Iut11 *u** ftu I ttg 1 g11 I hJI I *


W. H. aBOLWnI. W. B. HENDEB1SO. 0. WAARMr.

BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.


LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTIIE AID MILLLA IDS

Rooms 1-2.3, First Natlonal BaSk ABuldis.
TAMPA, : : : : : : FLOfRIDA.
-...............................


----*************** III I IIl-l--------- -----

Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.



CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS,

AND VATS.

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
M1. G. D.AVIS A& ONT, PALUTrA, rPa.

BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I wll snd by express, prepaid the follow
oour fll quarts Linoln County, Bunybrook Rye or Bg Hera R .. SUa
aino Botles .......... U
i will snd tor tnl quarts or 8 Corn, Melwood Byi Go em We-
dm Rye. Holland Gin Tonu Gn. Peach Brandy. Peach and HoBns
WhiskC, Gn and Manhatta Cocktals-an-y of the alove for........
Oae botue *f any of the above ............................................... s
Four bottles of the fodowig Cofornals Win: W bahrry, Pert. MIas.
Catawba .... m
Mnagl bottlsa .
Four bottles Wson Whiske. eased......... L.
Muate bottles .......... U
Ftve bottles Dumys Malt as
inale bottle ........
Bulk soods of an knd. Speeal Prices on appf atln. A Imds a
IUurs In Jua. from L. to 5.6 t. o. b. Jacksomals.
F. BETTELINI W Bay St, opp. Uain otepet, Jadcksem lte, Fl


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest ma
ket price. Your patronage in respectfully solicited. See quotation--
thimpapr.
KINOAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


AME TY A 41013R01 Tot =3 W?


if









THE WEEKLLY LNuu.uS'd RECORD. 7


me beginning to ome in freely, and the
*otlook ems bright. Salesmen have goname
ort in all las far spring. Lumber, with
the exception of poplar, is moving freely,
d at good prices. Retail bsi has
improved, ad is reported better than a
year go.' Colletions continue only fair.
Memphis.--Reent cold weather stimu-
tes retail ales by creating demand for
seasomabl goods. Collections run from
fair to good.
Nashille.-General trade has improved,
ad the weather has also improved. Col-
Ietiom bhold up well, ad jobbers, as
wel as retailer, anticipate good results.
Little Roc--Cooler weather has some-
what timulated business in general and
a good holiday trae is anticipated. Col-
letio are good.
New Orleans.-Marked activity prevails
in general trade Retail lines continue
to improve, and collections are reported
goo Crops re being gathered and sen-
titent is favorable.
Fort Worth.-Coditions are practically
unchanged. The weather is much cooler
and more seasonable. Cotton is still being
eld for an advance. Collections range
from fair to good.
Dallas. General crop conditions
throughout this section have not mate-
rilly changed ince last report Weather
conditions are favorable. Prospects for
wheat crop are good. General trade is
active and collection are good.
Wao.-The cotton crop in this section
s been practially all gathered farmers,
e not marketing same very rapidly on
account of low prices. This fact, coupled
with the planting of a large grain crop,
is made trade somewhat dull. C d-
leetio are fair.

aL .. ym.m = wn. W
an-a, wslea


Pert List
Ferandina, Nov. 16.--Sailed: Schooner
Savannah, Gold, Portland; bark Rescue
(Br.), Williams, Havana.
Key West, Nov. 16.-Arrived: Steamer
Mascotte, Turner, Port Tampa, andn sail-
ed for Havana; tug Osceola, Tortugas.
Penesaola, Nov. 16.-Arrived: Steamer
K 0. Saltmarsh (Br.), Rogers, Tampico;
bark Giana (Nor.), Housker, iverpool.
Cleared: Steamer E. O. Saltmarsh (Br.),
Rogers, Tampieo. Sailed: Steamer Puri-
tan (Br.), James, Genoa.
SNorfolk, Nov. 16.-Arrived: Steamers
Tenay Lodge (Br.), Savannah, andn sailed
for Barcelona and Genoa; Alf Hansen
(Nor.), Darien, and sailed for Antwerp;
Nordhavel (Dan.), Galveston, and sailed
for Genoa; schooner Fanny Palmer, Pun-
ta Gorda. Sailed: Steamer Lord Antrim
(Br.), Liverpool; schooner Fred A Dav-
enport, Charleston.
Savannah, Nov. 16.-Arrived: Steamers
Alberta (Aust), Janvick, New York; El-
fie (Br.), Nielsen, Villa Real; bark Charles
Loring, Debuhr, New York; schooner Mil-
lie R. Bohannon, Smith, Wilmington.
Sailed: Steamers Merrimack, McDorman,
Philadelphia; Kansas City, New York;
Withsdale (Br.), Rio Janeiro; Saint Cuth-
bert (Br.), Liverpool, Schwaraenfelh
(Ger.), Bremen.
Charleston, C. Nov. 16.-aLiled:
Standard Oil barge No. 92, in tow of tug
Astral, Wilmington, N. C.
Philadelphia, Nov. 16.-Arrived: The
schooner Jennie E. Righter, Croselley,
hence for Jacksonville (in distress). Clear-
ed: Schooner J. E. duBignon, Charleston.
New York, No. 16.-Arrived: Steamer
Arapahoe, Jacksonville and Charleston.
Sailed: Steamer Sark, Fernandina.
Genoa, Nov. 13.-Arrived: Steamers
Marianne, Pensacola, via St. Miehaels;
Soperg, Savannah.


Stettin, Nov. 13.-Arrived: Steamer
Nordkap, Port Tampa, via Bremen.
St. Naaire, Nov. 14.--Arrived: Steamer
Sandsend, Pensacola, via St. Michaels and
Lisbon, for Hamburg.
Amsterdam, Nov. 15.-Arrived: Steam-
er Glenroy, Darien, via Dartmouth.
Liverpool, Nov. 16.-Arrived: Steamer
Oldham, Savannah.
Newport News, Nov. 16.-Arrived:
Steamer Freda (Br.), Port Inglis, and
sailed for Leith; Castano (Br.), Pemvil,
New Orleans, and sailed for Bremen.

Northern People Seeking Homes
Fourteen carloads of homeseekers from
Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Missouri ar-
rived in Jacksonville last Wednesday
afternoon over the Southern Railway.
Never before in the history of Jackson-
ville has there been so many homeseekers
come in on one train. Every seat in every
car was filled with men, women and chil-
dren.
This train came in as far as Jessup,
Ga, in two sections, but at that point the
trains were consolidated. These home-
seekers hae taken advantage of the cheap
rates recently put on by the Southern
Railway to induce homeseekers to Florida.
Most of those who arrived on this
train took the Florida East Coast train


which left here at 5 o'clock far east emat
points, while many stayed over i Jack-
sonville Wednesday night, and will leave
over the various roads Thursday mring
for different places in South Florida.
Immediately after the train arrived the
passengers all assembled in the wa"it
room at the union station, with ti
handbags and suitcases. It was quite an
interesting sight to watch them and ear
the different comments on their trip ad
intentions.
Some will start farms in small tom
in South Florida, while others will remain
during the winter, looking about at the
cities on prospecting tours.
This is only one instance among many
where homeseekers' excursions will be rn
to Florida during the winter months, and
no doubt but what many new setters
will engage in business in various por'liom
of the State.
This homeseekers' special rate from the
sections where those came from Wednes-
day is still on, and many more-people will
arrive within the next few days with in-
tentions of locating permanently in the'
"Land of Flowers."

ramtealn e*u m r Ito lm mo mew

1b ae o o afie -E a .


The WestRaley-Rannle Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksomvile, FI.
A. S. WESTr. Ffs. .. est, VIce-Pres. W. R. afe. rvc-.Prs. N. asr, Sa. a freM.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.


SD. M. FLYNN, President W. B. JOHNSON, Vice-President A. 8. PENDLETON, See'y & Tres
DIRECTORS
D. i. Flynn Walter Ray J. W. Oglesby L. Horn N. G. Wade J. L. Medlin W. B. Johnson







Independent Naval Stores & Export Co.,


Jacksonville, Florida.





Naval Stores Factors and Operators.


Capital Stock, $500,ooo.


The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal advances made on consignments.
Our interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operative company.



Some Money and Some Timber For Somebody.


All Producers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.


THE RECORD 18 THE'OPERATOWRS' UW r.W








THU WUUKLT INbtlfAIAhL flZOOD.


Business Directory.
an your "Mfor CO I
sn l et 2 1 No
my A ft am tN shntins house
I all" .obI.
713 INSUANCE-1awe rats.. I-
we L Grean & 06, 9 sail1 Pfrk Mfi.
JasMANmyl011006


MIY 1 MiNTORY,
ColUiBdonR Merchants,
Naval Stores & Cotton
Uin adreoms male "me W
COTTI ono 'WAot murnm,
NiW YORE CulT.
WE WRITING ADVERTISERS
MIrTION THE RECORD.
CYPRESS WATER TANKS
est in the Vwk.
SdoriVerd- p s rinte,
Cmr.. Ta L a.. M-.U.AI

Sinoe Cad Abdmd Camp
L S. JbH., Abstracter.
611ad0n Malee Caony, Fr'idn
Goempef ad relnae tboois tites perfected.
Ile ms o ey owners In
Ias.. neegoited for son-ireldents on approved
tttke WtH t.ee murity pinya iteMs
at 10 per cent per msma selmi-ain U y.
0-meineaice sdted.


M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

CoImission Merchants.
ROM, luwrxr-iaUs, TAI,
GUm Trs, RUB rEC.
*1W ftrt street, mW mTO



Trade Checks
FOR THE

NIA8 i 11Y MIII.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

mistrial Reorid .,


Cement Outp t ef 190.
The total production of hydraulic ce-
ment in the United States in 1903 was
29,899,140 barrels, valued at $31,931,341,
an increase of 4,1456,636 barrels in quan-
tity and of *6,56,61 in value, as com-
pared with 25,753,504 barrels, valued at
s$5,366,380, produced in 190N
of the total production in 1903, 22342,-
973 barrels, having a value of $27,713,-
319, were Portland cement.
The proedtion of natural rock cement
was 7.030,271 barrels, valued at $3,675,-
520. This was a decrease in quantity of
1,014,034 barrels and in value of $401,-
110, as compared with 8,044,306 barrels,
valued at $4,076,630, the production of
1902.
The production of pozzuolan or slag
cement was 525,906 barrels, valued at
1542,502
An interesting detailed account is given
by States of the Portland cement, the
natural-rock cement, and the slag cement
industries. The number of Portland ce-
ment works in the country during 1903
was 78. New York had 12; Lehigh and
Northampton counties, Pennsylvania, 13;
New Jersey, 3; Ohio, 8; Miehigan, 13;
other sections, 29. As a producer.of Port-
land cement Pennsylvania is still in the
lead by more than 7,000,000 barrels;
New Jersey holds second place, as in the
preceding year; Michigan ranks third, al-
though one of her large factories was
closed for a time while the machinery was
changed so as to allow the substitution
of the dry process of manufacture for the
wet process previously used. Portland
cement is produced in 19 States.
Natural-rock cement was produced in
14 States during 1903. As New York is
the original home of the cement industry,
it seem that it should, by right of dis-
covery, continue to maintain the leader-
ship in the production of natural-rock
cement. Second in amount of production
of natural-rock cement is the Louisville
district, which lies in Indiana and Ken-
tucky. Pennsylvania, which stands first
as a producer of Portland cement, ranks
third in the production of natural-rock
cement.
During 1903 six States contributed to
the total quantity of slag cemept manu-
factured in the United States. These
were Alabama, Illinois, Maryland, New
jersey, Ohio and Pennsylvania.
The report, which was prepared by L.
L. Kimball, makes mention of the cement
industry in Canada and Germany, and
closes with detailed notes on Portland ce-
ment in Michigan, in 1903. The report is
published as an extract from the survey's
forthcoming volume, "Mineral Resources
of the United States, 1903," and may be
obtained on application to the director of
the United States Geological Survey,
Washington, D. C.

L. A. Davis & Bro. Sell Their Naval
Store Business at Crandal
Another big deal in Nassau County na-
val stores property was made Monday,
Mr. John R. Wilson and the W. J. Hill-
man Company making the purchase from
L. A. Davis & Bros. The still site and
property connected therewith at Crandall
was sold outright and a lease given of
3,500 acres of unboxed timber on L. A.
Davis & Bros. Crandall tract. The con-
sideration was $16,000 cash. The sale
was consummated in this city. The same
parties recently bought the turpentine
holdings of Moore Bros., at Lessi, and
also own the turpentine still at Callhan.


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.

Boilermaking and Repairing


Still Boilers and
SHIP BUILDING snd


Pumps.
REPAIRING.


SJeaclsonville 1a.


Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and Blwk-mith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Pal~mi
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonvill Fla


Cummer Lumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES end CRATES.



: Standard Clothing Company


One Price


One Price


S FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
* 17 ad 19 West Bay Street, Jncksatov, lh.la.
* Stetent sad Hawes HMat. Speelal AtteUl Given to Wall OrdeW
>**-******e.o0o0'ee'****06 ***e*.*.*e*.*o o* **s* or


R. TOLAR.


J. t. HART.


T. n. BLACHLY.


(Established 1872.)

TOLAR, HART & CO..
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


Commission


end Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Memter of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futare


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Batting:, Etc.


Read the Record Adv't's.


O3EOW T= INGOVO LASMMTRA '133K h


JO0PRH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


d. R TOLAR, J*


Merchants


W. D. IRENSOIN









-THE WSEMrCL InDlfkrk1AL RIOORD.


ZINC NAILS

Turpentine Cups
hApered by Dr. Berty. Made of a
qkn- but soft light metal. They are
o -- which will not injure
ws whe left in the trees.
MaNWl, 0o.
aDM- et lw ork, N. G.
Also NIstmure for Galvanised and
Tid NaHil, Beat Nails, Spikes, Round
Sode, Etc., Slating and oofin
Nain, Slatirs Toolk, Copper Nails and



Typewriters
S. An Mako--SIO.0 Up.

GRIVOT
Th WeaiM-eater. OeuER, writes in sight
'he JinwTr. King of dombleebo4a ma-
O le $0 Smaed s Amy Iae ef Typewrer.



10. R NHSIER, k
MANUFACTURER OF


BRICK.


apOeity of Yard 800,000 Per Mnth.



Whiskies, Gins,

SRums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Cetroller Blum's Monogram and Syl
v Rye-Agents for Jung, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHASE. BLUM & CO.
517 -l 519 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

TB

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
almnuas ta aAs witaot destrestr the
wer- ire. Rr out a carge In ees t ha
twmo-tur ho m Makes tre twenty to
tI4Or-ae w em from m ears t r w
a. Me water wite ai fiee tm
the odar at t r ereNetao No memimal
used b e tle sbrlta Noeed to be
dla :** t. eo ..ram: -
Sar rt
-o tL n wfr OR *a* tar pro-
emd md fte weed. Only me mae
S tli prodeed and tmt the Dhe"L
=0LfITLY NO DANOMR PROM FII
EMlt eft maet mari by hb-rade
UMmn. T he apeat meeine ssis ite
f puase. -
We emage gmparm uput a ndt a
eUit aet premet. We uaub tput
m8e qmlto.
The nn ki Ceutcti Commy
p. Des Eaf 39AUar, M. V.


For Inland Water Route.
Mr. Edward B. Taylor, chairman of the
Committee on Inland Water Route of the
Columbia (. C.) Chamber of Commerce,
spent yesterday in Savannah in the inter-
est of the movement for an inland water-
way from New York to Savannah. The
matter has been before the Savannah
Chamber of Commerce some time. It was
presented by Congressman John EL Smith
of North Carolina, a year ago, and Sec-
retary Donlan has prepared a report on
the commerce of Savannah that would be
be benefited by the proposed improve-
ment.
The Columbia Chamber of Commerce,
representing the inland cities on naviga-
ble streams, has called a convention in
the interest of the movement to be held
at Columbia Dec. 28. The convention will
be composed of delegates from cities and
commercial bodies on the South Atlantic
coast. Savannah, Charleston, Georgetown,
Wilmington, Newbern, Norfolk and Bal-
timore are expected to send delegates from
their trade bodies and from their city
councils. Mr. Taylor will visit the entire
Southern territory to be benefited by
the improvement, with a view to securing
a large attendance at the convention.
Congressman Small, who is the father
of the movement in Congress in an in-
terview this week, said:
"A rivers and harbors bill will, in all
probability, be passed at this session of
Congress, and it is my earnest hpe to
have in corporate in the bill an appro-
priation for the commencement of work
on the proposed inland waterway."
The district represented by Mr. Small
comprises that large area in Eastern
North Carolina through which the inland
waterway will run, and he is, therefore, in
the interest of his constituency who will
be directly benefited, vitally anxious for
the successful prosecution of the project,
but as he stated last night, "it is not al-
together selfishness on my part which
causes my intense interest, because the
construction of this waterway will be of
far greater benefit to coastwise commerce
in general from Florida to Philadelphia
than it will be to the people of my dis-
trict.
"In fact, while I have their interests
naturally at heart, the benefit they will
derive is a mere incident compared with
the large benefit which will be derived.
When one is familiar with the conditions
existing along the coast from Philadelphia
southward and realizes the fact that com-
merce by small steamers and barges is
practically out of the question, on ac-
count of the hazard in running between
Capes Hatteras and Lookout on the out-
side, it becomes hard to realize that the
government has no long ago taken up this
question and cut the waterway.
"The three engineers who made a thor-
ough study of the question unceremon-
iously reported that there was no engi-
neering feast to be surmounted; that a
sixteen-foot channed could be cu for $10,-
000,000 and that $150,000 a year would
maintain it.
"Impartial data collected by myself
and others in the cities of Baltimore,
Norfolk, Wilmington, N. C., Charleston,
Savannah and other cities on the coast,
showed conclusively that there would be
a commercial saving of at least $2,000,00
a year in coastwise traffic. So," declared
Mr. Small, "it easily proves itself a com-
mercial necessity, not to speak of the
governmental necessity in the event of
war, for the inland movement of the gun-
botas and other small craft of the navy."


TURPENTINE

CUPS.

If Jou expect to use the errT emp
next seaon, place your orders now for
future delivery, Pries and all inform-
tion cheerfully furnished on
CUPS, GUTTERS
AND ALL 7TOLS
i sed in the Herty system of trpentining.


SChattanoog Pottery
^ *^ Compmy,




Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Adverhmfeeaf WigOw II ertet Ns DsPsrtmm at aO rF~nOO Raf
Foroneweek, a rts allae.
For two weeks. 35 cesata lie.
For three week. a emn a tlue.
For four week, - eet a e.
Nine words of ordinary le th make one Ue.
demin ats as two line
No disy except the hearings can be admitted.
emittances to aceompnmy the order. No extra charge for oomles of
containing advrtisemet. C.P m be in this omce anot tater Tlm r
.normiu to secure nertie in rdy's paper.


Wanted.
First-class stiller. Muit have references.
Address ABC, care this office. 2
Wanted.
Reliable man to take charge of turpen-
tine camp in Florida. Must he well recom-
mended. Address XYZ, care this office.
2t
Wanted.
Three convict guards to begin work at
once. Will pay the right salary to the
right men. Address L. S. Petteway & Co.,
Gabriella, Fla. 4

Wasted.
Woodsman that can keep books and
commissary. Must be sober and give ref-
erences. None but married men need ap-
ply. C. Conoley, Wallace, Fla.
ft
Wanted.
To buy a first-class turpentine location
in Florida. Will pay the right price for
the right place. No flat woods place need
apply. G. A. Petteway, Box 26, Leroy,
Marion Co., Fla. tf
Wasted.
A distiller. We want a good, sober
man with family, to run the still another
season. Can give steady employment
through the winter. None need apply but
first-class man with good references. Ad-
dress F. & W, Jonesboro, Fla. tf
Position Wasted.
Want a position as turpentine woods-
man or book-keeper; can furnish good ref-
erences. Address A. R, care Industrial
Record, Jacksonville, Fla. tf


Woodsmwa Wasted.
Must be single and strictly wshr ho
not yomger than twnty-Ave or r
than thirty-five; also must be a rsaL
class bookkeeper, and furnish good re-
erences. Address J. D. ., Caiplr, 9ks.
4t.
Stiller Wated.
Wanted-First-ecla tiller, white m--
with family. Can furndh goad hoew,
and will board with family. I want a
man who is competent to take darge
during my absence. Address P. H. Bakr,
Campville, Fla. 41
ror Sse.
Small turpentine farm, 12 erops bhes
for one and two years. Plenty high boas
near still. On railroad. Schedule fur-
nished on request. Address eH W. rMaor,
Cottondale, FIl. 41
For Safle.
35,000 acres St. Johns ad Voaoi; 13-
000 acres, DeSoto County; 14,00 acrs
DeSoto County; 30,00 area, ahirin
County; 20,000 areas Hilboro Coty;
80,000 acres Manatee County. All romd
timber. D. T. Doghtry, Room 2 Bald-
win Bldg. 4t
Tsrpesntie Mes.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasolie Pampin Ot-
fit for your still. No. 1 ouatt pumps & O
gallon per hour at a east of3 est and
require attention whl nle
Started in one minute. J. P. .
Olaa, Fla.
Are you reading your paper, r same-
ee else'a If net a sabcriber to the Use-
ord send in year mme today, with 6~e
the price of sahecriptim far sme ya.


McMURRAY & BAKER,


Saw Mill n lnul l Hness. bat St
Wmme a real ingr U ate-Me peaNmi b&n Imse m v a F Im t
and goodsa t touch with alL Turpentine wageu and rm e a spaty. D
forget we can beat the world on haad-made amein.

M II IKTiO, 4l R I 4I L E AST.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


TIM RRCOUD 18 TIM *OPURATORS' 3M VANIMN


.N









10 tH~1 WAELY IN-UUTrtIAL U3O0DO


J. L PAmm m &HUmAmm. A F Pmna
PCmeIa. Vuee-FreMel. Oshier.
The Meroantile Exchange Bank, f
JACIKSONVILLE rLORIDA. S
CLpat.L $200.000. Suplus, $100,000
SSTAT DEPOSITARY.
ommIlBslu Itm FaenPsM atvlDeposiM. soft Deews Bosms. m ea per Year.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week


kin Unadm-
The msas of spirits were rather larger
- us al yesterday, bt the market has
madgen age from its eoadftionthat
ha lasted now about two weeks. The
openg was firm, at Oc., and the lose
arm a unchanged. At the opening the
sales were 381 cask, adt the ose 199.
In the afternoon the sales were at the
dosing price. The receipts were 183 casks,
ad the shipments 200.
The in market opened irm and um-
chsaged from the prices of the previous
day, and with sale of 1,819 barrels. The
dose was firm and uirn d, without
further sales.. In the late r sales were
made at an advance of Sc upon I and
above, ad others were made at quota-
Uams. The receipts were 3,425 barrels, and
the shipments, 3,041 barrels.


Uavomah Raval Stem a~Uta
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 ........... 64 4460
Receipts Nov. 17 ........ 933 3,425
Receipts previously .....145,191 427,317
Total ............162,619 475,292
Exports Nov. 17 ........ 200 3,041
Exports previously ......122,357 411,014
Total ............... 12567 414,065
Stock Nov. 17 .......... 30,02 61,237
Stock previously ........ 16,398 6,627

Range dc Turpentine and Res at Savan-
ash Nv. 17 and Same Day
Last Year.


SNov. 17


Nov. 16 Nov. 17


npes er w wa m at an 1 iot 1904 1903
Prce Rcpt Sales Exp. 198 T ... Firm Firm FIirm
T=L., Nov. 14 5 701 16 67 Spirits .. i50I 56
Tt, Nov. 15 4 781 6
Wed, Nov. 16 615 3 240 8 ale 680 325 981
Thr., Nov. 17 933 60 00 Roin Firmrm F Dull
WW ... 5.00 6.00 3.00
R- for the We- at aL--Nh. WG .... 4.75 4.75 3.35
Monday, Nov. 14. ast Year. N ...... 4.50 4.50 320
WW .......... .. 5.00 3.00 M ...... 4.2 425 3.00
WG .. ........ ..4.75 35 K ..... 3.80 3.80 240 -
N .. ... .... 50 30 I ...... 3 3.30 2.70
M .............. 4.2 340 H ...... 2.80 2.80 2.45
K .. ............ 3.75 2.0 G ...... 2.72% 2.72% 2.45
I ........ ......37% 2.70 F ...... 2.7 2.67% 2.3
H ............ .. 2.77% 2.4 E ...... 2.02% 2.02% 2.2
G .... .... ..2.72% 2.4 D ..... 2.00 2.00 2.15
F ............ .. 2.671 2.35 C, B , 2.55 255 2.15
B ............ .. 2.02% 225 Sales .. 1,819 1,740 .....
D .. .. ...... .. .. 0 2.15
ABC ............ 25 2.1
Receipts 4A67, sales 88, exports 4,003. Baiy & Motgemrys Review.
New York November 16, 1904.
Tuesday, Nov. 15.-Rosin frm; receipts Spirits Turpentine: Stock 795 barrels.
1,442, sales 3,28, shipments 27. Quote: The market during the week has been
A, B, C, $.5; D, 2.00; E, 2.2 1-2; F, a repetition of last week. Market very
V.67 1-2; G, 2.72 1-2; H, *.0; I, $8.30; quiet and sales small.
K, $3.80; M, $4.25; N, $4.0; WG, $4.75, Thursday, Nov. 10-53 3-4c.
WW, $5. Friday, Nov. 11-533-4c.
--Saturday, No. 12-633-4e.
Wednesday, Nov. 16.--Rain firm; re- Monday, No. 14-5e. asked.
eeipts 2,28, sales 1,700, shipments 1,249. Tuesday, Nov. 15-54c. asked.
quote: A, B, C, $256; D, 2.00; E, 6.02 Wednesday, Nov. 16--64 asked.
1-2; F, 2.7 1-2; G, 2.721-2; H, I.80; Rosin: Stock 21,860 barrels.
I, 3.30; K, $3.80; M, $4.25; N, $4.50; WG, This market has also been quiet; stock
$4.75; WW, $5. of low and medium grades in first hands
small; the pale grades are only barely
Thursday, Nov. 17.-Roein firm; receipts steady.
3,424, sales 1,819; shipments 3,041. Quo- AC, $2.95 to $3.00. Graded D, $3.10;
tatios: A, B, C, 8.56; D, 2.00; E, $L.2 E, $3.15; F, $3.20; G, $3.5; H, $3.30; I,
1-2; F, $8.7 1-2; G, 3.72 1-2; H, 2.80; $3-55 to $3.60; K, $4.05 to $410; M, $4.60;
I, 83.30; K, $380; $4.2; N, $4.50; WG, N, $4.80 to $4.85; WC, $505 to $5.10; WW,
$4.75; WW, 800. $s25 to 535.

SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903,04 AND TWO
PREVIO YEARS


Ta bbi. ......................... ..

biTotal .............. ................



ehbl.l".............................

New Yoek
fi -cas:............................
r**. bis...... ............... .. ......

^-rm, as-............. ................
cois ,bbis. ........... ..... ............


1908-04 1902-03 1901-02


198,647
650,988
844,585

188,398
762,270

98,884
888,171

85,668
87,853

59,351
826.746


292 496 814,846
940,607 1,071,440
1,2"838 1,385,786

296,430 814,876
975,428 62,687

206,109 217,446
604,178 585,042

42,765 53,797
138,121 129,069

87,656 48,633
387,784 898,586


TI es oslph am -e hr 99" ca"a ad o rw 2n,56' baend


Crops of Sp ris ad Rir 4or Threm Yea.
Oep IS0*OL Vep 151
Spirits. Bosin. Spirits. a.
Womington...... ....16,11 m67 18 1
CharIet.. ........ SM W3 37 11,1
SWmansh........ ...17,8418 M, Wo70 S3, 1
BrWawiek.. .. .. .... MAS 1aX7 a" 44,A 1
Meb...... ......... 12xS U04 16,M8 79X72
Nw OrlMam.......... S6m17 133,M 33,103 10I83
anhbeUe.. .. .. ......dead desed 3^ 3148
Georgeown.......... 7,0 4414 E s
Pemola..... ...... 42.6,4206d1 3876 1SN im
Jae. & Feradina.. .... 1i7,s2 sa,2e 1 N, nU 1
Sdm1---- ----- die 43)3


Totals.. .. .. ......USi .AUM


sn57,313


.ls


*8


SAN6 1400


MAN 410




OAK AM

NASo%=m


Imprts Turpeatine to U. I
The following table is eommilm by Jams Watt & Son, tof Lmem- fesI
official returns. For e e omapriMon we lwe tmnsd eIt hte Ma-
-320 wt. equal 100 barl.
187T 1 1830 I 1I91 Ua Ug
From U..8, b ..... 1,5 173,76 140,37 174A44 IU4 l IMa1 IMg
From France, bbM.... 181 34 517 2,83 MS m
From other countries.. 1,4I4 W88 sM aS 8 1 *I I
S- - -
14,3# 174,M 149,34 177,5 uSU1 7IJS8 M W
From usaina .......... 2,81 4,1 4,98 8,5I 6,R 711 )
Total Barre .. 17,12 17900 154,40 186W0 t01,163 1ISM 1U
Thus the import of Rumian Turpeatine (or Wood Spirit) in 1M wMV 41i
that of 1902, and over ix times as mueb a in 107. It is interting to m-oew
this import fluctuates with the price of America Tnrptim.
Percentage of Imprt of Russian ..1.79 2.33 3.2t 4.57 A 5.L MM
Av. Price Amer. Turp. in .21- 24-6 34-1 354 UW-i .1 =


COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS


April 1 ...................
April 8 .......... ....
pril 15 .................
April 2 ..................
April 29 .................
May 6 ...................
May 13 ....................
May 20 .................
May 27 ..................
June 3...................
June 10 ........... .......
June 17 ................
June 24 ..................
July 1 .... .............
July 8 ...................
July 15 ....................
July 22 ............... .. .
July 28 ................... .
Aug. 4 ...................
Aug. 12 ...................
Aug. 19 ......... ..........
Aug. 26 ...................
Sept. 2 ...................
Sept. 9 ...................
Sept. 16 ...................
Sept. 23 ...................
Sept. 30 ..................


1904-0
ND
53
M4%
64%
63%
56
54%
54%
53%
M4
52%
52%
52%
53
52%
52r/
says,
63%

53%
54%
54%
52%
52%
52
52%
62%


AT SAVARNAN IFR FMIT TZ5.


1903-04
ND
so
49%
45
45
47%
47%
49
45%
46
4O%
47%
47%
47%
48
491/,
49%
52
52
55@%
54
54%
56%
57
55


192-48
45
42%
42%
43


as4
43
45
45
46%
46%
47%
48%
47%
46%
44%
44
43%
43%
44%
44%
45
44%
46
46%
47%


34
U
32%


321
32
31 3
32%
U0%
U4%
33%.%
34%
33%
A3%
34%
33
3N4
34
33
34

34
334%
34


1904W

46
47%
48%
47
4,
40
46
.46

42%
43%
442/4
43
42~
311%
31%
29%
34
36%
65%
35jA
ST


dddd6~dbddd~w~w -~a~a :ft s-~ mn i


M. A. BRIOGS, President.
H. C. BRIGGS. 1st Viee-PreAident.


HOURI BnOWN, end Vicm4'm)fim'
J. C. McDONALD, Seey' an dT.


SW. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

* VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-


| RIXFORD AXES.

They are the DEST. Others imitate but none du-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the fiaet
temper, hold the keenest edge, cut better and last longer
than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual us.
^SeSd as your orders.

I B W. H. BRI66S h ARDWMAE HIT,
Valjla, Georgia.
i^^^ 11**~L6-- --- -----------


P rin ting Sendyourorderto the Industrial
e a Record. Prompt andv-tisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


THI ~rLIAM1.ITT OF OUR ADVERTISERS VOUCHD FO.











THE WEEKLY INmI~Itj8,rIL REUOED.


AUTOMOBILE. PUMPING OUl HIS
AR) ._-

GASOLINE ENGINES,
U0t CdMnfit Aoirtment of S-&p in the Soth.


Fred E, Gilbert
29 and 37, 39, 41
West Forsyth Street


& P. Haemes Ce.' Weekly Cotte
Letter.
New .York, N. Y., Nov. 17.-Cotton.-
STo all but those who have been short of
the cotton market, we have had a very
disappointing week. After touching the
igh point of the reaction, during which
December cotton sold at 9:96, a wave of
Hlhiutlioe, induced by speculative short
asee followed and prices have declined
to the low level of the last few weeks.
The los of 30 points has brought out con-
aiderable cotton held for speculative ae-
eo-mt ad to this extent attempts to
reach a lower level have been suceeasfuL
The object of the efforts to depress prices
ae more far-reaching, however, and there
is nothing in the present market to in-
dicate that move has been or will be a


successful one. Everything depends on
the attitude of the South. Reports show
that cotton is being eagerly bought when-
ever it can be obtained and the Southern-
er has very little ida as to the value of
the remainder of his crop. It is too early
to say such ideas are mistaken ones and
will be compelled, owing to excessive
supply, to accept prices that speculators
say will dominate in the near future. The
market was very quiet on Monday and
Tuesday and showed not only steadiness
but considerable strength. Just when the
market looked very much like getting into
new ground on the side of higher prices,
a very formidable set of bear operators
began to put out short cotton and the
selling started liquidation so that the
decline of some 30 points has not been dif-
ficult to attain. If cotton is worth the


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SpIRui b OF TURPENTINE
Ar. 1 Ar. 8 Aar. Awr. Apr.M y M a 1 May y 16 May a May aS
MD MD a 4 a 6 1-3 4-3 41-1 4
J r Jiue 2f Juae M June July 2 July I0 July 17 July 2 July a Aug. 6
*a "4 a a a % a "-4 a M In 0
Aa1 N Ans a Au Lpt 4 Iptl ~8t U ep t Oct2 Oct. Oct1 i
U4*r -m SA WA 1148-4 W ND M 57 1- a 1-1 "-.
OMe. Ot. Nov. 4 N ov. v. I Dc. % Dae 1. D 1e. 17. Dec. Jan. 14
u *a" U u I In 561-4 a 1-4 21-2-64
Jea. Jan. Feby. 11, Feb. 18, Feby. 26 Meb. 3 Meb. 10 Meh 24
I a 4 42 so s so s8
M k. n

RIOSINS


WW WO N M K
Arl . ....a .s ILaa.I a I
Ar 8...... ... &1i Lu L5 0 u
A sU .. . LS 8.5 L Le t
AIelM ... L L3 5 LU a.
A mBM. .. ..e 8.5 US 5. 8.
Sw'I L ..... S UI L3 Ln t1
MaoLr ..... .is Us ULIS Jit tLo
S . . .j A.8.5 8.5 .rA 83AT .
Mar .... .I U US 1 tL M
Mag a. ... ..& l La La I LS
JM 5 . . .LS ILS U8 S US
Jine U . . Le Lit to LI LIS
J-- M. .... .. U &]M IRM SJ6 ZI
Jme. .... L.S L9 LS Ua tS
tnem . .... Li 2 8.Lo 8.1 LIS
J .ly L .... .Ws 8.S a uIS 2.
amt .. .Le. uL. ue uS
JAV M. .. ..... L. IS IS L U
j- .. ..... t0 L3 8Li U. LS
IA M11 . . LO L &S .I 2A IS
Agest a ... &IS LA Ls LIS ISf
A ]$A A. . . La L S & L
aat r 4. ... .L US Us LI9
asmiamber a1 &ea a. e &a s o
spe s-r S.. 445 4a &M LS LIS
0 2. . ls to 4AS 4A 435
O2 s........ :.:1 4.S 4J3 4Z 43
Onamber .. .. .. 4& .s 4A 4A0 US
Olsteb* .. .. .. .4.W I* L U S L5
0omee 0 .. .. .. .. 43 SW I UL IS.L
smbeir ... .. J. LI 2. 95 .5
e tm Is.. ...3Af .I .31 IS. LIS
m- tt .... jA &S LI S M IM
Naebekr .. .& LIs LID LIS LI
zmnb~im ..... LIS L U& Ut
Deameber 1 . &8ES .6 3, 1 U.
Desber 3 .. 5n.5 &A & 5a 5.6
December a .. 4. Li 53 L


oan M ..3 ... 411 &M &1 Ls &
JU1JJgy U .. ..LM Ap A B UB .
ammr a .... 4. STO UI US Us
ebreary 11 ..4.7 34.46 4= 3*0 34
reeary 18 ...3.5 4.4.5 S 32 43
february t ...3.70 3A 3.36 2 .5
amsl.e -......aAO a 3.40 835 3.30
16re1 9 ......4 a8 3.5 3a 3&
MBeh 3S ......A 838s am 3 3 X"


I H
2.1 2.4
to to

IUS lS
L26 2.5
L- U
'15 LIS
2.3 2.W
2.7o L.5
2.6 2.5
2l. U5
2.6 2.52
Ls UL
I.S UB
UB
2I.2 U2

X.0 2.7
U* U2.
LI 2.4



tU Us
24 to
.5 2.70


to U
2.5 2.6
2* 2.7





2.5 2.35
S.. U


ta 3.5
3.2 2.3

2.3 2.7

2.L6 2.5
ti Ui



3.06 2.70
25 3.40
3.06 2.75
SV1.70
2.6 2.70


G P1

2.10 2
LIS L19

LS3 Lis
1.8 1 .2
LU Lia
LAt LW

1.3 1.3
LM L76
1.U LI
1.3 LIS
L73 LS
LB Ls
1.5 LIS
1.B L7
L. LU
L. L 1


2.15 32.
2.6 1.5
Ls LIS



X25 1J.
2.3 2.L





2. 2.0
2.6 3.


2.5 2.o
2.e5 2.5
2.70 2LI
LS LS


2.70 2.5
2.70 2.6

2.85 2.80
2.6 2.6
2.65 1.6


present price, the technical positi of the
market has, of been coiderably
strengthened. Those who are operating on
the side of lower prices, however, claim
that values should be considerably lower
and those who hold contrary opinions will
simply have to bide their time, as the
bear control of the present market is ab-
solute. There is very little speculation
in cotton, as the outside interest is in the
stock market. As long as business it
the Stock Exchange continues at its pres-
-nt proportions and ventures there meet
with so much success, there is very little
inducement offered by the cotton situa-
tion. Some very conservative people be-
lieve the crop is moving more rapidly than
any other crop on record, and that this
will soon be manifest to all. On the
other hand, prices are made more by those
in control of the future market, and as
this control is by the larger operators
who appear to be bearish to a man, there
is very little opposition, except when
prices reach the point where the demand
exceeds the supply. Those familiar with


To United Kingdom. In
Moth 1ms4
April.. .. .. ... I.A.u
May .. .. .. .. form
Jun .. ....... 1s.
July .. .... ..y 9
August.. .. .. ..Mn
Seteber.. .. 7T4
tober .. ....... 7m14
November .. 81,838
December .. 1,85A5
January. .. 2,M
February. .. 114s4A
March ... 35,2

To Betlgum ad Nethert
Month .1m-
April .... .... m.11
May......... .. I
June.. ......... I,aI
July .... .. ....U
August.. .. .. .. M
September.. 154M
October .. ......m.
November .. 133,
December 100472
Jameay .... 16,37
February ... ,130
March .. ......


spealatiom know that sentimt ha
great deal to do with priie, and
after the goveruuqest report oa IDhemier
3, buyers of cotton will be eompeled to
contend against a rather actie bear sti-
ment, which may prove to be mistake
in the long run. The movement ism stl
very full, due to the enormous r byih by
consumers as a resul( of the dejpkei
stocks of cotton the world over. The
worWd's buinems in cotton goods is mst
gratifying in many directions and S
others the best in ten years. Th is likely
to tell before the season is over.


Sam'l P. Holmes& Co.

Sekst BeIs CMtem,
Gram aam Prevtiaen


NEW YORK GOTON EXCNAM6S
CteCAGO M r Of TRAi
Direct private wires to all exelaur .
Local stocee and bonds a specialty.
Bell Pasm a" Ba.lwd b1 .


ILOSINS


gallons: To United Kinmdom. burreis a
I3-4 21K-4 Mouth mls- s-s M1.
s1a.5 l,3Ma April .. .. .. .. a
1.4 1.1, y........ .=
's.1 August.... ... W
M4 1 M.a 8etember.. . Mn -
& S tAm October .. **.... 44 Mss SM
1,A,70 rXMo1 Novembr .. 71,1" ,7m5 r4
1,531,77 57s,78 Demba r .. a ,4gs gjs g
373 1UA Ju W Y ...S AM 4U 1 10
* uskm _... ... s e m e tye s
38,0 M1, ebruary ... USl a7= a,


.... I. ld MAN Ml.. .... a0 ae-


maU an othr My ...... .. .... SM Lin
U roa Jes .. ..r.. o6a .m M

W43 Angus t........... 4" -S
a p1te ontber .. .. ..3 mi se5 sm
34,7 31,A November .. 3,301 3 i -s
M W73, December.. 37,77 1U,5 20
s1,UIn 17tU, Jamry .... maM sues IMU
372 4 MAMr February 9... sm 1,m 11
a713 r18 Ku Mnw l- . .


.... ...... -- .. .. ma- 1 JaJM4
- -..
To Germary. t gallons: To GOrmany, meg- lb.
Month 1-44 1-ls-s MU-U Month -4 32243 IN"4
Apr .... ........ 114S,1 1. a4 .... ... 4Uk WM 6 ,
May .. .. .. .. 30. 3 4 12 May .. .. .. .. nm slm 1,10
June.. .. .. 1.ULs It.a 4e1 June .... .... SAM mM-
Tuy .. .. .. .. 0.1MU M14m 7W July .. .. .. ...** MAMg K 11K
Auust .. .. .. 61. I5,4 Asaust ...... ... m
September.. .. 6 1w su 13 5NU 9s .. .. m. R
Oetoar .. .. ..* M 1W Oetobr .. .. ..m aRm am
November .. 179,010 110163 13n November .. 5 ,7 3 81 U
December -- Decemer 15,4W ,171 4
January .... 12,3S 0 15,W AN J r .... 3 M,74 4 N33
February ... 220,182 15,38 67J74 February .. 17,135 4 5U 3 n
March .. .. 6,2 .. ..... 46 March .. .. 49,5s 0,11 41A,
To all other Earope in Gaelm: To al ther 1wrop. bam rels O O:
Month nUB-4 10i-40 MW- Mouth Ja. s. a1M 310
April........ .. .. .5M 3.4 .I..s AprUl ...... .. 314 skim Mi
May.. .. ...... .... 11101 MU May ....... ... 1 06= su n
June......... U1 M 1.11 Sw Ju. .........,e KOK %n o
July ..... 0.. 3 u2s 4410E July ......... 4; L
Ausat ...... .. 1 2. A agut .. .. .. 8,i U3
September... 4uI 3L,0 t8MB Sptember.. .. 1. 14 iJ 101
Oetor .. .. .. .1 4j 11,. Oe.tetr .. .. .. Iam IM 16.
November .. 32J00 17,~ 0 ,S7 Novembr .. 13,3 AU
December .. 47,3M 0,1 1 23 December .. 48,M 3MMA
January .. 11 January ... 7,1M 7,414 M .
February .. 16471 ...... 44, February ... 8,184 64
March .. .. 14,1 1t,27 3M March .. .. 33,T 51,J n1,
Total ore san Zport In salmon, tod- Total panels of Rca. arel Ma
lg everything outside of the United Inchldinar Adk, Afrie ad Anmearse
States: ide at the U aitd tate:
Months 14 1 1243 Ms-i Mmonth 5 4 48
Aurl .. .. ... 14 1 U1K M1U0 Arl .... .... .. 411 2jr nu X
May .... .... 1.M 7 M144 2%2L May ........ ...I. WIN( im
June.. .. .. .... 1.63,m 2I3.43 2,3ra Juse .. .. .. .. .1 11M
July .. .. .... 3.61 1.U L JM x,48 Jy .... ..... 3111 U
Autst ...... LT1..184 2 4L t .e .. .. ...W Sa 311
September.... ..1,4.LS6 S.US tW b ltember. .... U. IM nt
October .. ... LiW, LI.=1 WAe Oseber ....... 1n = a amm
November .. 1,851,068 1,MAS,18 1,,574 November .. 193,8l 231,543 1
December .. 1,M, 1,74,M3318 l ,175 December .. 21047 204. n 1914A
January ... 700,2 Mlln ,33 Jamary ... 19,4n 17N0 ST A
February .. 487,577 631A,36 I s, Febury ... 30I, 18a,3i 3,J
Mareh .. .. 298,488 16,174 36M3,g Msan -.. .. 111,348 3 a3Q


TIL~RCORD CIRCUTJ13S ALL OVR T291VOT


1


SPIRIT rS OF TURPENTINE.


The Exports of Turpeatiue and Rosin.


11










II TEIR WREuXY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL ILECORD.

JAlM- A. UOUXMAO



Th l amral R ord Co y
J)...c. S.L AM

T1 e Von* a m IPseassNed .
AN e -mmm ntlem seM be sa-mms -
Tie bItdustrhal cord Company,
J cl-onville. ITa.

srmbea Ed ses aoer d e"a 1 es OmlO at
Adrt.Ga. 4 i Savwm Ga.

Entrd at th Postomff at JaMsvll,
n, a a second-claw matter.

ted by the Enentive Commn of

aptember IS, 1I3 m i me ndve oiale
nh adopted in maran i euntina
8eptmer l ,a the r ea of the
p.Wl Aoeiatm.
Adape April t7th, 196, a thi ofieil
w tn hf the Irtate OCm Grouew r -
Mai i. Adopted Sept. 11, 16, as the
Mty 81tl arga of th T. 0. A.
leasd to lumber people by special
Cesola adopted abthe Georgi h Swm






ss, dati M the hrt
CCOP FR ADVERTImIM.
Adf irtmg apy (~chag a new a
rvathem ) Yeid Leach a Tuerdag

the -ams we

TBH R2CORN OS o
The publhl ig pleat .ad the maf-
am at the Industrial WE rS Pebih
Ct. are heated at x Sei oath ega

of the peat turpmntine and ylew pla

The Atnta, Ga., me in lestesd en the
Equitale Blaing, Me. M. Atlnti a i1
the ceter of the wMt mafeturh
ted of the U th SmaL.
Ti Savannah, Ga., eee is i the Neadr
of Tade building Savannah in the 1ad-
tag pem naval stee market in the edM.

TAYLOR COUNTY DEVLOPING WITH
GREAT RAPIDITY.
Half doMse years ago Taylor County
was one of the "backeat" of the back-
woods coarties of lorida. Perry, the
county town, was a'backwoods country
village, with one or two ordinary country
stores. The nearest railroad station was
some 30 miles away and a sorry, sandy,
rooty, holy road it was you had to travel
to reach it. Greenville was the point. The
most travelers were people from Georgia
in covered wagonss on fishing trips to the
eeast and return The write remembers
making a trip through Taylor County
when it seemed like traveling weeks
through the pines. He remembers having
offered to him thousands of acres at 80
cents per acre. This same land todaysis
brigig $ to $10 per are. On every
haet and in every section prosperity
show forth. Two railroads, one from
the North and one from the East, run
several trains daily to and from Perry.
One from the West is headed for Perry,
some twenty miles from Tallahasee east-
ward having been completed and one from
the South, the A. C. L., from Newberry,
will oon be built to Perry. The contract
for this last ine has recently been let
to Wade & McNair, prosperous turpen-
tine and mill men, who will rapidly push
the work.
Perry has grown from a sorry back-
woods village, to a modern, pushing, hust-
lig town. It has two banking atm -


tioas, two hotels, good stores, lawyers,
doctors, etc., all prospering and pushing
ahead. In this section are many of the
most prosperous operators in the South.
The turpentine industry has just gotten
under full sway. Here are located Mesrs.
D. G. & J. H. Malloy, as honorable and
progressive boys as ever came from the
Old North State. They own large bodies
of land, some as fine as ever grew. Messrs
Blair & Hinley are good operators and
own much very fine timbered lands. They
are showing good judgment in operating
carefully and not too hastily.
Messrs. Powell, McLean & Co. are own-
ers of large quantities of the best lands
in the county and are preparing to ope-
rate on a large scale. It is gratifying
to learn that they have decided not to
open up as many boxes as they figured
on at one time. They realize the im-
portance of holding down the box cut
and do their part. Then, in that county
we find C. B. MeLeod & Co, Tedder Lum-
ber Co., U. Potts, Parker & Co, Blue Creek
Turpentine Co., James Holmes and per-
haps others we don't call to mind.
R. A. Paxton & Co., who have been open-
ing in the northern part of the county,
have recently sold to Messrs. Powell, Me-
Lean & Co.
Hampton Springs.
Not far from Perry--about 5 mile-is
located the celebrated Hampton Springs.
These springs for many diseases are, in
our opinion, without an equal in the
South. Within a year a hotel has been
built and many people go to be healed.
The fishing on the coast is excellent and
profitable.
Great things are in store for Taylor
County in the near future. Perry will
have some 5,000 inhabitants within 10
years. H.

SUB. RESOLUTIONS
At a regular meeting of the Sub. this
date, there seems to be so little interest
taken in our meetings now, the follow-
ing resolutions were adopted:
1st. That no member of this assoeia-
tion shall pay more than 3 cents per box
for cutting.
2nd. That members shall not cut more
boxes than they have timber.
3d. That members shall not pay over
$2.00 per day for scraping.
4th. That members must quit furnish-
ing carriages for their hands to visit the
nearest town in, as it encourages bad
habits among them.
5th. That members need not attend the
meetings of the Sub, especially during
the summer time, as so many of them
are compelled to go to the mountains for
their health, and in the winter time, it is
too cold to stir around.
6th. No operator need apply for mem-
bership unless he has an auto.

Good vs. Pr Beef.
A Journal correspondent calls atten-
tion to the fact that the beef furnished
the butchers in the cities and larger
towns, as a rule, is better than that sold
by the butchers in the smaller towns, and
asks for a statement of the reasons. This
is not very easy to do in a few words, if
at all, since a great many factors go into
the make-up of the fact mentioned. It
might be mentioned that the city butchers
largely, if not entirely, get their meats
from the packeries that are in better
shape to handle them properly and in fact
do handle them better. It might be also
mentioned that the meats handled by the


packeries, as a general rule, are selected
with reference to the idea that they can-
not afford to handle any but the best,
while the smaller towns butchers have
to depend on the local supply, which is
frequently poor both in quantity and
quality. After all, however, it is the best
fed beef animal that furnishes the best
beef, whether handled by the packeries
or local butchers, and it is worth while
for Journal readers to understand what
good feeding means. On this point a
writer in The Hometead has this to say:
"A hustling advertising firm took for
its motton, 'Keeping everlastingly at it
brings success.' While this may be true
in some cases, it would not apply to in-
structions as to best methods of feeding
animals. For years the Stockman and
Farmer has been dunning into the ears
of its readers the necessity of economy
in beef production. When we say econo-
my, we do not mean short rations, but
just the reverse. Economy in beef pro-
duction, means good animals, full feed,
good shelter.
"The steer born in spring ought to be
sold July 1st after he is two years old.
He ought to weigh at that age not less
than 1,400 pounds. He ought to be well
bred and possess a well rounded form.
That looks easy, especially when we read
of such weights attained by yearlings.
But a glance at the market quotations
would indicate that good cattle are very
difficult to produce. When we see some
steers sell at four cents, and some at
six, in the same yards the same day, and
when we find that the best ones are
scarce, and the poor ones numerous, it
would look as though the art of feeding is
a well guarded secret possessed by but
few. On the contrary the Stockman and
Farmer has used barrels of ink in its
efforts to get the feeders of the country
to grow the six cent kind, and told them
a hundred times just how to do it. Given
some fairly good cows (and most farmers
have that kind), then the bull--here is
where most people fall down. The bay
and corn and grass are just as good as the
six-cent cattle eat, but the bull is too
often the four-cent kind and his calves of
course are the same. The man at the
elevator buys your corn at, say, 50 cents.
He puts it into his elevator and expects
to take out 50-cent corn or more. The
farmer puts a bushel of 50-cent corn into
his four-cent steer and expects little in
return, nor is he disappointed. He ex-
pects little in return, because his methods
are the methods of four-cent men He
doesn't believe in shelter and for this
reason he never makes any gains in win-
ter, in fact, his animals come out in the
spring weighing less by one hundred Ib.
than they did the fall before. Not only
must this loss be made good, but the loss
of condition also. Now, if he had bought
and used a good bull at the start his
calves would have been so much better
that his pride in them would have in-
duced him to feed and shelter them bet-
ter than he did the scrubs. As well kept
animals always reciprocate for care and
attention they become an object lesson in
breeding and feeding too obvious to be ig-
nored. Thus the owner of well bred cat-
tle becomes almost unconsciously a good
feeder. He fixes up his barns. He looks
to the water supply. He studies feeding
rations, subscribes for farm papers, at-
tends fairs and breeders' associations and
farms better in many ways. I have known
the purchase of a single bull to bring about
the above results. When we think of the
thousands of cattle marketed every year


*IruIWu SUCCEEDS LKE SUCCESS."


at a loss to the readers and f-eMa Sam -
that so few make assigameea it speas
volumes for the biness and prems tet
farming is the best business on earth.-
Exch.


American and German Trade Mathe I


(From United States Con ml-Geeral lay,
Barcelona, Spain)
I have desired to place before or *-
chants and manufacturers a set of ta
showing clearly where Spain bays the
goods she imports and what she pays a-
nually to each foreign country for the
different products they supply, but esck
statistics I find it impossible to obtain i
any form that would prove of practical
use. I am, therefore, obliged to ceone
myself to broad statements of faca, gath-
ered in the course of conversation with
leading importers here.
Our chief competitor in all our prini-
pal articles of export to Spain, will e
Germany. Of this there is evideee a
every side. From the large, modern rail-
way locomotive to the modest steel pm,
nearly all kinds of steel manufacture ae
now being imported from Germany; ad
her chemical products, dream goods, hard-
ware and crockery, by the untiring emry
and enterprise of representatives, hae
also been introduced into this market.
It may be asked how has Germany ae-
complished all this? In the answer i
the best suggestion I am able to offer
to our exporters, if they wish to achieve
similar or even greater success.
The first step taken by the Germans is
to discover, on the spot, the requiremtin
of the Spanish market, or where a de-
mand for a new tine of goods man be
created. This ascertained, aa article is
produced that will, at the lowest poa-
ble coat, meet those requirem **- r-
quently it may be a cheap imitation of
some American or British invention, doubt-
less inferior both in quality and finish to
its prototype, but the average Spami
buyer prefers the cheaper article.
With a carefully prepared aneort nt,
of samples, an experienced German tma-
eler, with a good knowledge of the hn-
guage, is then sent to pain, and with
the firm's resident agent visits al the"
buyers and obtains trial orders. Adver-
tising matter, carefully printed ienco et
Spanish, is freely distributed. Prices a
quoted in gold francs, according to thO
metric system, and in many cases even
in silver pesetas, delivered free at the
buyer's warehouse, the seller protection
himself in the price against any lmetei~
tions in the rate of exchange.
Everything points to the dawn of -
era of rapid progress and development in
Spain, and it is my earnest wish to .se.
our country take an active and leading~
part in this development Four hundred
years ago Spain, in the nemith of hr
power, figured prominently in the di-
covery of several portions of our eoti-
nent. The Spain of that time is no 1a-
er; in her place we have a people imu d,
no doubt, with many old traditions, it at
last wakening to a realization of the vahl
of developing their great resoures, and
following in the footstep of the people *o
the mighty new world aere the oeemas
Perhaps no other European cormry mba n .
many unAeveloped resources or so mur
lost ground to regain. Here, then, is a
field for the enterprise of'our -
and a market for ar manufactur









THE WEEKLY DwIUSTfkIAL RECORD. M
I WER I | i I | I I I lII


THE


Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonvill.
wIMD STATES DEPOSITORY.

Cpit a ....................................... I 4a co50oo

In addition to our regular baking business, we maintain a Savings Depart-
int, ander government supervisor, psy*g interest quarterly.
We have for rent Safe Deposit Boxes in burglar and fireproof vaults at rea-
somble rates, by mouth or year.


'II****t oi I i I i i Ig II i I I I I **I i 1 i It I I
Title and Tax Abstracts.
Conveyancing. Township Maps, Blue Prints.
We give special attention to preparation of Title aad Tax Ab-
straets, Maps, etc., of large tracts in all parts of Florida and South Geor-
gia. To owners and intending purchasers the results of our work are

Owrrespomdene solicited.

REALTY TITLE AND TRUST COMPANY
Law n. . in. JACKSOVILL, FLA.
- - -


-U11UU361311163360166631U61'~IUISWII *I3*3*3U*Ul


Ameag the Operators.
Mr. F. A. Coleman, a prominent turpen-
tie operator of Marietta, Fla, spent sev-
eral days in Jacksonville this week at-
tending to matters of business.

Mr. W. F. Coachman, vice-president of
the Consolidated Naval Stores Co., is out
of the city for several days.

Mr. W. A. Wilkison, of Orange Heights,
Fh., spent Tuesday in Jacksonville.

Capt W J.J. Hillman was up from Live
Oak several days this week, returning to
that place yesterday.

Mr. J. B. D. Woodman, who has large
tpentie interests in both Georgia and
Florida, was among the prominent naval
stores men in the city this week.

Mr. W. X Carraway, of Carraway, Fla,
was registered at the Aragon last Tues-
day.
*y- _
Mr. J. Smith, a leading turpentine
operator of Walls, Fl., was here yester-
day.

Mr. D. C. Stricklin, of Green Cove
Springs, was in the city Thursday.

Dr. C. H. flerty, of Green Cove Springs,
spent several days in the city this week.

Mr. J. B. Wilson, a prominent naval
stores man, of Callahan, Fla., spent one
day in Jacksonville this week.

Mr. Gms Mattox, manager of the Orange
Park Naval Stores Co, at Orange Park,
Fla., was in Jacksonville Wednesday.
j~ .
Mr. R. W. Mattox, of IR W. Mattox &
Co of West Tocoi, Fla., was in the city
Thmrday.

Mr. W. C. Jackson, of Green Cove
Springs, was in the city one day this
week.

Mr. J. C. Edwards and brother, promi-
neat turpentine operators of Florida, were
in the city Thursday.

mli all orers for printing for the
taerti "a demmisray trades to the
arms ag6 to mre a pMpt delivery.


American and Russian Tupetie.


(From United States Consul Mahin, Not-
tingham, England.)
The current number of a British trade
journal contains the following of inter-
est to Americans directly or indirectly
concerned in the turpentine trade:
"There seems to be no signs of Amer-
ican turpentine becoming more abundant
and therefore cheaper. What the Amer-
icans should do, if they intend their tur-
pentine trade to revive, is to replant their
old forest lands, and to see that in future
every tree that is killed by getting the
turpentine is replaced by a new one. The
dearness of the American article has caus-
ed a good many adulterated samples to be
on the market, so that buyers who con-
tract for the genuine American article
ought to be on their guard. Then, again,
it has led to many substitutes being of-
fered under a variety of names. Some of
these contain some turpentine, others do
not; some are good, others leave much to
be desired."
The same journal notes the attention
being paid to Russian turpentine and to
methods of refining ft, so that brands of
this article can be obtained of excellent
quality, free from any unpleasant odor,
and which may very well be used in place
of American turpentine. Attention is also
being directed to rosin spirit. This has
always had a small sale as a thinner for
paints and varnishes, and the grades that
were made proved themselves to be fairly
good for this purpose, but generally they
suffered from the defect of containing
traces of rosin oil, which prevented them
from drying properly. Now, howevir,
more care is taken to refine the spirit aad
to free it from all trace of oil, so that
best grades of today are of a good water-
white color, free from rosin oil, aad dry
properly, though perhaps somewhat slower
than turpentine. It is said, however, of
both Russian turpentine and rosin spirit
that only the best refine grades will work
well in connection with paint and var-
nish making.

Money in Florida Saad
Oeala, Oct. 20.-A deed from Edward
Holder to J. Buttgenbach & Co., conveying
about 90 acres of land at Dunnellon for
the consideration of $75.000 was filed in
the Clerk's office yesterday. This is the
property recently purchased by Mr. Holder
of Charley Shaw and others at $31000.


C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay. Feed
Special attention to Turpentai &ad Sawmnll Mea'. Rgquirmase
A FLORIDA IRM FOR It -OWANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524- 526 EAST BAY aiusULi

Jacksonville. Fla.

GEORGIA IHTER-STATK SAW MII. A8Oeirs Sma
Minimum Coastwisn Pli' .ist for Mehantaube NRs. r4. A&ss a t miftI
eergis, JulyIs, 2 o9.
Feet Fit Feet liee et Feet Feet lF PIr t est
SIZES 20K IT 21-25 26-30 31- 41-41 46-S40 l-6 6 1-
1 xlo to* 2x10.... 1X1OS 143.AJ4O 00 @ 60 1&9 o 1"'1a3
xl0 to 8x10.... 12.00 120 13.50 14.00 I16i0 17.60 0.00 2.M Xa 0 6J
8%xl0 to 10x10.... 120 UM0 14.0W 15.50 16.50 1.50 21.00 SLM A0 S
1 xl2 to 2x12.... 14.00 116.0 16. 18.00 21.01 .06 28.M J .3 M 4
2%x12 to 10x12.... 13.00 13.50 14.50 16.50 1.50 21.06 24. 280 34M 4M
10%x12 to 2x12x .... 13.50 14.00 15.50 17.50 19.50 2.00 25.50 MM MM
1 xl4 to 3x14.... 1o&r. 1.oW 20.00 22.00 24.50 27.50 t32oW 37 46M
3%x14 to 12x14.... 14.50 16.50 1&00 20.50 22.00 24.00 1M.06 S. MM rm
12%x14 to 14x14.... 15.50 17.00 19.00 21.00 23.00 2.00 30M 36.5M 4 M
1 x16 to 4x10.... 2050 22.00 24JO 27.50 31.00 34.00 3&8.W 4S M MM
4%x6l to 12x16.... 19.00 20.00 2.00 25.50 29.00 31.00 35.00 =3.0 48& MM
12%x16 to 16x16.... 1.50 00 23.00 26.50 30.00 3300 37.00 41.0 MM m
2 xl to 618.... 24.50 25.50 28.50 31.50 35.00 39.00 43.00 4.01 7J0 M
6%x18 to 14x18.... 21.00 22.00 2.00 29.00 33.00 370 41.0 450 s aJ M
14%xl8 to 18xl8.... 2.00 24.00 27.0, 30.00 34.00 3& 4M0 4 MM 74M
Terms: et Cash.
Pris ar F. O. B. Cars Savamah, Brunswick, Femnadia ad Jacksmvwl


NOTIC.
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Association, held at Jacksonville,
ia., March 15, 1904, the following Classi-
fication and Rules for Inspetion of Yel-
low Pine were officially adopted, elective
July 1, 1904:
Claficatima and Inspectie of Yedltw
Pine Lumber.
General Rules-All lumber must be
sound, well manufactured, full to aime and
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;
through shakes, or round shakes that
show on the surface; square edge, unless
otherwise specified. A through shake is
hereby defined to be through or connected
from s'de to side, or edge to edge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken;
less than one inch thiek shall be measured
as one inch.

CLASSIFICATION.
Flaring.
Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six ine in width. For example: 1x3,
4, 6 and 6; I%z3, 4, 5, and .
Boards.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
nehes and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %, 1, 1% and 1% inches
thick by 7 inches and up, wide.
Scastlih
Seatling shall embrace all sales from
two to fve inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2x3, 2x4, 2x5, 2x6, x3 3x4, 35, 3x6, 4x4,
4x5, 4x6, 5x5 and 5V6.

Plank ball embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness.
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1%, 2,
2%, 3, 3%, 4, 4%, 5, %, 5%x7 inches
and up in width.


Dimension sizes shall embrace all ai
6 inches and up in thickeas by sev
inches 'and up in width, including six by
six. For example: &xA, xT, 7x7, 7x8,
and up.
Stepping.
Stepping shall embrace one to two ea
a half inhesin thiekes by seva ides
and up width For examp: I, 1%,
1%, and 2x7 and up, i width
Roagh dge or t Mea
Rough Edg or Fliteh shall em-Ma ad
sizes one inch and up in thicrn by dih
inches and up in width, sawd ea two
sides only. For exaple: 1, 1%, 8, 4
and up thick by eight inches aidp w
sawed on two sides only.


imSPECafM.
Stanaard.
All lumber shall be so sop no ab-
jectiob. Wane may be allowed em-f h
of the width of the piee meair aames
face of wane, ex'ending oe-foarth of the
length on one crr o r its a qivalesd
two or more corera
Merhantable.
All sizes under nine inches shall ahew
heart entire length oa one side or od ;
sizes nine inches and over shall show
heart the entire length oa two oppolta
sides. Wane may be allowed e.igth of
the width of the piece measau ameaa
face of wane, and extending one-fourth of
the length of the pi es on oam earr or
its equivalent on two or more esorl
Prime.
Seantling shall show heart em two faess
the entire length; other sis shll show
two-thirds heart entire length O two
opposite sides. O not exeedin 5 r
cent. of the pieces, wane may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the mpece mms-
ured aeross face of wane and extmiag
one-fourth of the length of the piesa ea
one corner or its equivalent ea two or
more P'eri.


FOR SALE.
50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred ad
fifty million feet merchsntable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill. 3 85 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or e
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in the 8tate.

C, BUCKMAN, Ji "n" "
D~v^ YI~l~a j-ioravin, *r


'7FA1 Im'EMEDZT mmD rr!=!ssY1E


A

I-


I
)
p
|








THBXXEKKlt ikuilrt)rlrL&L R3~OOI.


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY

Wayeros, Ga;
MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,
Brass and Gray Iron r-attnga.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER'DAY.

Leated in the heIm t of the Lo~er Distrlst g as -I
tag. of dheleest mater at lrest mwt


ig Picking Plant fr Jacks ailla. There remains ome stock in the hands
The Florida Packing Company will at of the treasurer which can be purchased
onem emmaece the erection of a modern by the local butchers, the object being to
ad well-equipped packing plant ne the get them interested in the Florida Pack-
tracks of the Atlantic Coast Line, just ig Company.
outside the city limits, near what is known While the establishment of this plant,
as Edgewood. which will be the largest packing plant in
The Florida Packing Company is a the Southeast, means a great deal to the
$100If corporation, incorporated under company and to Jacksonville, giving as it
the laws of the State of Florida, and does another large enterprise to this city,
composed of business men of Jacksonville. its establishment and operation means a
Its organisation is as follows: great deal more to the State. It means,
Franeis P. Conroy, president; C. W. in a few words, that hereafter the people
Richardson, vice-president; Charles E. of Florida are to have encouragement in
Smith, secretary; R. J. Embleton, treas- the raising of better live stock and are
urer; C. W. Richardson, Charles E. Smith, to be given an opportunity of finding a
F. S. Hodges, W. D. Barnett, Bion H. ready market for their cattle, hogs and
Barnett, F. P. Conroy, W. IL Bostwick, sheep. With a large packing plant in
Jr, and B. Hart, directors. active operation the farmer can invest
Those who are connected with this corn- in velvet beans and some of the other
pany aim to give Florida an enterprise Florida produce used to advantage in the
whieh will be of great value to the State, fattening of cattle, hogs and sheep, and


can by feeding their stock make such an
investment pay. A packing house is ar-
ranged to provide for the use of every
part of the animal, nothing going to
waste, and to handle beef, pork and mut-
ton with the other products of this live
stock such as hides, lard and other things
to advantage at any and all seasons of
the year. With such a plant in active
operation in this State, the stock of Flor-
ida can be worked up right at home, and
besides supplying the needs of a local mar-
ket, Florida can ship her products of this
character to other States. Even now the
Florida Packing Company is prepared to
buy Florida beef, hogs and well-fattened
sheep.
This plant is to be a most extensive
one, and is to be complete and modern in
its every essential It will have a capac-
ity of 150 cattle, 200 bogs and 100 sheep
daily, with machinery and other facilities


for caring with the greatest detail for aB
the products of these animals and for
preparing and curing the mets after ma
form.
The building will be provided with the
necessary chill rooms to take care of the
products of the plant. A thirty-toa De
la Vergne ice-making machine ad a -
K. W. generator for lights for the eatf
plaut will be intalle, thms mring
first-class and up-to-date mahinery.
The killing plants consist of two hrg
killing beds, with room for another, to he
provided as soon as the demands upon the
present facilities become taxed. All the
killing beds are equipped with up-todate
machinery, and are as complete as thes
of any of the great plants of the North
and Wedt.
Provision for the salt and pickle ear
has been made in the basement, whe
pickled meats and salt meats ae to be


The

.
*in


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade


Western White Oak Spirit Barrels



Capital $00,000.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.


OPPICBnS:


J. C. LITTLE, President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager.


JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


DIRECTORS:


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


C. H. BARNES,


J. W. WEST,


W. J. KELLY


W. F. COACHMAN.


lbC.
J. C.


LITTLE,


PATDEJZE RZECO ADvzAM&rnL9 FOR 8A781ACT4kY hPU


~UIIIII~CILIIIJ~MIIIMII~MllhCLllh~,~,~nM


c


--- -~ II











TRZE ,WXKLY LAYbtihIfAL IROORD. 1


THE COVINGTON


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.



Wl SHOES -
SFor O esaleC : i S u s or .



"Success For Our Customers is Success For Us."
"F


-enied. Ths edellr i so arranged that
the espacty ca be doubled.
All the machinery of this plant i to be
operated by direct connecting engines, and
e"ry faciky is to be afforded. In fact,
it to e an p-to-date packing plant,
where machinery is made to do most of
the work.
Julius Hoenstein, an expert from Jer-
My City, i to arrive here today, and is
to have charge of the erection of the
plant. He is to hasten the completion of
the picking plant o au to turn it ovr
to the company early in January. The
company hopes to be ready in time to care
for se of the Florida hogs this seas
Stkit.alhrs in Florida have been ham-
S pered in the pt for want of market.
There was not a desirable market fur-
d in this 8tate for their pork, and
espesifly han this been true of hogs
wei~ing 150 pounds and upward. A hog
of that weight was not desired by the
led retailer, owing to the feat that he
as not'prepared to take care of the lard,
during smaller ogs which could be hand-
led with better results. But with this
plan to take care of every part of the
beg ad utliie everything, the Florida
farmer will find that a little invested in
feed for his hogs will be profitable, and he
can dispose of them without trouble.
One of the prime movers in this enter-
prise i Mr. Freeman 8. Hodges, well
known throughout the State. He has a
large tract of land near Green Cove
Spring, which he is to stock extensively,
sad where he is to raise the very best that
the State la produce. He has already
many head of cattle there, and is to have
-e of the best stocked farms in the
State. He is confident that the demand
for a plant of this character in Florida is
sh as to lamre its success.
Farmers throughout the State who are
laterted in the raising of stock will be
eeoraged in their efforts to keep their
stock up and to plant velvet beans, eassa-
va and other products which afford an
S eellent feed for cattle and beef pur-


Terr, HBrt & Co.'s Belw.
New York, Nov. 15, 190.
The Industrial Beeord, Jacksonville, Mf.:
Spirits Trpeatine-The market contin-
e to be a quiet one, with scarcely a
change i quotations during the past
week. Stock 4 bwels.
S We quote Machines, 53 3-4 cents.
Beim-While bWes is not at all ac-
tire the demad is about suicient to ab-
sorb all arrivals. We quote:
BC, $3.00; D, $.10; E, $.1; F, $3.5;
U$M3 ; H, $SO; ; I, K.; $4 ; M
$4O0; N, $4.S; WG, $5.0o; WW, $6.25.
TOLAR, HARIT & 00


COURSEOn PALE AND MEDIUM ROBINS AT SAVANNA FOR TWO YEARt


W.W.


DATE
April 1.........
April 8.........
April I........
April ........

ay s1........
My 0 ........
May 27........
June ........
June 10........
June 16.......
June 3 ........
July 1 ........
July 7 ........
July 14 ........
July ........
A l 4 ........
Aug. 12 ........
Aug. 18 ........


K


W.G.


151-05 16M3-0 1904-05 190.04 19u445-


$U
3.96
&80
3.80
3.80
3.36
3.58
3.96
4.3
4.5J
4.00
4.65
4.75
4.75
4.70
4.A7%
4.60
4-0


3Jo
3.40
3.5
2t2%
3.65
36A
3.0
3AM
3.3
3.30
3aM

3AO
3.40
3.50
3.50


U3O
3.75

3.0
3O
3.50
3.5
3.6
3.6
4.O
4.10
4.6
4A40
440
4.40
-4.M
4.42%
4.3
4.37


3.3.
3.10
346
3M

3.256
.27%
3M
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10

3.O0
3.O
3.30
3.30


345
3.45
3.90
MOO
3MO
3.40
3.85
3.5
3.85
3.X
4.00
3.96
3.0
3.82%
4.00
4.0"
4.031%


N
190o-0t
lSS

&IS
&US

&IS
3.5


3.5
3.350


3.00
&300
3.0


3.0
3.06
LS.
3A.
3.06
3.516
3.05
3.15
3.15


190-06 1903-4 1906-06 1303-O4 130-K 19ils-


SM
3M
3M
3M0
3M
3M
3.36
3M
3.6
3AS

sms
3M

3.815
&736

3.87%


$3.40
3.2
3.15
3J0
3.10
310
3.12%
3.20
3.0
3.15
&M

2JO
2O
2JO
2.96
2.95
2.95
3.06
3.06


3.J
3.16
3.15
3.16
3.16
3.15
3J6
3.25
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.540
3.56
3.55
3.50
3.6
3.55
3.57%


$&320
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3J
3.0%
&10
3.10

3.85
3J6
3.2
2.56
2O
3(86
LAW
2.80
Lao
3M
296
236
2.J6


2.80
3.OO
.0
3.M
3.0
3.0
3.10
3.26

3..
3.45
346.
3.J
3.30
3.2%


SMA
3.5
3.5

S.3
3.0


LTO
tLi
SM
SM
L.7
L.7.
L5S
.80
3r.7.


ohn = Furchott = Compan:
WHOLES DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


V.


Don't forget your subscription to the Record.

WHE WR~TI ADv~ImLHSR, MENTION TIH REMCOD.


Co.









I EL


A-atrk Cottn Oil Rpat
l'Te maml report of the American
cotton Oil Co. for the fs year ended
Augut 31, 1104, shows: Profits for the
year, $7i,8I.16; interest on debenture
bomd, $135,000; net profts, $844,835.16;
dividends preferred stock, 6 per cent
per anmmm, $811,916; dividends on common
steek, payable December 1, 190, 202,371;
balance carried to proft ad lok, $30,-
54l16 The amount of conimon and pre-
ferred stock seed and outstanding is
imdanled There are $3,000,000 of 41-2
per cent. debenture bonds outanding and
maturing November 1, 1915.
'The permanent investment account has
been charged with $3,86539 for addi-
tis to the properties, and it has be
credited with saes of real estate, et.,
amonting to $106,56.98, leaving a met
increase to the account of 217,298.41.
For repairs and maintenance $450,921 were
rpended during the year and charged to
operating expenses.
.At the end of the fiscal year the net
working capital- was $422854.70, con-
stdin of $761,00.42 cash in banks, and
",761,96.28 in bill and accounts receeiv-
be, marketable products, raw materials
and suppie, after the deduction of cur-
rat liabilities.
The total capital, including the debe-
tare bonds, was 33,435,700, and the ear-
rent liabilities were $2380, 772.40. The
total assets were $36,816,47.40; total
balance to the credit of profit and lo,
$7,2,A44.78.
The company has ordered 80 additional
tsnk ears for delivery during the coming
season, 50 being of all-steel construction.


This Spce Renrved for


Gus Muller & Co.



Liquor Merchants

Proprietors
-^nu--L D-MS- wets-r


KIRK & JONES
DRUGGISTS.
107 IL SAY ST.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
dACKSONVILLE. FLA.


The Oldest Whiskey

House in Georgia.

(Established In s8.)


OLD SHARPE WILLIAMS
Guaranteed 8 years old. By the
gallon, $3.00. 4 full quarts, $350
pr. Prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEXAN RYT


Guaranteed 6
gallon, $2.75.


ANVIL RYT
Guaranteed 4
gallon, $2.50.

CLIFFORD RYT
By the gallon,
f2.50.


years old. By the
4 full quarts, .00
prs Prepaid.

years old. By the
4 full quarts, $.7

$2. 4 fun qurt


-XP Prepi
OLD KENTUCKY CORN
Guaranteed 8 years od By the
.gallon, $3.00. 4 full quarts, $6.

OLD POINTER CLUB CORN
Guaranteed 4 years od By the
gallon, $2.50. 4 full qurts $2.75
Az=me Pfepa
We handle all the lading brands of
Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the mar-
ket and will save you from 25 per cent
to 50 per cent on your purchases Send
for price list and catalogue. Mailed free
upon application.


ACME BEER I Thle Mt&F wUrClam..


so6-SoS-5s1-5s1 Foarth Steet,
MACON GmORIA.


Goo. H. Ford,
Vice-pres.


Ihmlrt A. rFwd,
Present.


The


CAPITAL, $60,000.00.
DIMacro : R. L. Anderstn, R. 8 Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
MeKay, Geo. H. Ford. Herbert A. Ford.
AcmuBts of Turpntine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicted.

McMurray Livery, Sale and Transfer Co.
HORSES AND MULES.
We eary the lret toc of any stable In the city, and have always
n band to 1 bend et n kinds and priae If in need o any. give
ma eall or write fr wat ye want.
aL B DALTON. Man-er. Jadenvrml.m


F. L Wedass,
caiir.


r ,,W ,,I,. ,,, .......... ---- ---------i- -- -


McMILLAN BRO,

Florida Copper Works.
0M0 n1felurs rof
STurpentine Stills

* Old stills taken in exang for
new ones. Patching through the coun-
Stry a specialty. Order by mail or
Sor wire will receive prompt atteation,
at either of the lowwoig works:
FAYETTEVILL N. C. SAVANNA GA.
S MSL, AI****LA. JAOIUiU, MA.A
29181 lii114)111 Remels s1 333tool 3133393383


I


.I HALL Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. I. J. KGeHT, See. and T ea

MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.
Wah Ten Are o Jnseumb t e A----'w


WOLFE'S EUROPEAN HOTEL
ats0. lSnd. Cer perd. FirstClasMresmtant Smeetior J. I.
Rates U~c. 2e and S.0 per daT. Pirst Claw Restairant Ia Connection. J. W fE M


W. J. L10N9GL.
Preduent.


J. W. WADE,
Vie-President.


IL 0. nu MZN,


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE ALA.


PENACOLA, FLA.


NMEW ORLHAN LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.
i


W. HUNPT Presidet
P. L. PsACoCK, ISt V. P-


J. & HARRISS id V. Pnr. EL L. NCKOD, See. &i Wa m ;
W. J. KXr.L, 3d V. P. D. H6 WneLZAAin Am See'p-Thans


Peacock-Hunt & West Cm q,
a r ffic 20 Bay Street, ,, Savamma, Ga. aml
West A Oi .IHl. JaeksMivs,. Fa.

NAVAL STORES fACTORS.
(We re strictly Fators. Our interest and the producers' is mutuaL We
ever take to account, nor re we interested in any company that mbays sirt
Turpentine and romin.)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,

Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
=opers' Twls and Naval Stores Hardware Our Spelat
-SOLE AGENTS FOR---
The Celebrated UnaIo lurpeuiUne Axes ad Wbiaa. -G L' G
Philadelphia Wag s.
Naval Stores Receved at Savamnae Ga., and alikm-
amd Fermand. Ha.


IF YOU ARu PMOGRKSSyIV ADVWE KTM THr RmCORl.


Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, F'LOIDA.


THE WUMLY INDU*FWAL RiMID.CO~b


1









THE WEEKLY lIMUarTaIAL EBCORD.


Industrial Record's Department of Information


This d pt tment is cwduted for the benefit d the subscribers and ajrtising patrons d this paper and no
charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more d the blanks following, as

you may require clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prmpt attention

Frw TOwermmamemeol e teFaetlay ples a MaYlmer of Anm Kil. Fer Tilber. Farming or ae .a Lam.
DATI INDUSTRIAL RBORD, Jacksonville, Fa.
INDUSTRIAL RBEORD Maiam Olee, Jacksoville. F. I am in the mket for lands for the purpose of
Inthe m iet for the foolowit Prefer In State of Pleae pat me In eommuncatioa
with responsible partle and giv me other informtio.

Plae notal where ssm esa be secured. Si


State -peefeafl the kind of meeanery wanted and whether new or seoMndohanded DATl
Leaetn hr Tunpage Sewml er Faestan. fr Amy u sidstdal Enlterde. Frw CesemmsmlaryO, e or a Eumeblr So gM es, SawmMl ar Turpsests Mtaes
DATE
INDUISTIAL. RECORD, Jaeheonle, ea. DAT
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jaekboavlle, I.
Please advise the anderigned regarding a good location in (state or section of
ate) for In the market for
toge wr with full iformatio about labor odonttios, taxes, trasportatilo fseilitles
el emeoramemea ete.
--.-em Please give me Information -a to best places to bty, ete.

Srnme salr9


.e You Wete he SoS emerituS? Are Ye" TkdIasd ef le1wag?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jaonvile, Its. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonvifle. Ita.
Have for sale the followlfe Can you give any informations as to the rellablity of the following flarm or erpeon
tai
Remarks
Can yeo suagt a purchaser?
Signed Signed


s Yer Waest to Emply a Mum? ft Ye Wat Eau"ant?
DATE DATE
MSI TRIAL RBCOBD. JachoTrme. i a. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, JacksoaMvfle la.
Want a a to ll the pomltioaof wat a poationu
with the tolowing requirement Refer to the foUowi

Can yaou Isgeet meh a m"a ? Can yoe amst me ?
Signed Sied



CLIP THIS COUPON I
TO ALL READERS OP THE RECORD,
When y are answering an ahart t eerom the columns of this paper, whether you are making an inquiry or placing an order, please cut out the coupon
below ad attach it to the letter. It wil pa ou.

COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the Iadeuatrtl ROewd,. ise dated

Siged

The INDUSTRIAL RMOORD of Jacksonvfle, Pta., and Savannah, Ga., is the South' great
weekly trade journal


The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.


T2 Excoum XMr PACM WITM 3uJUAnU PHOGBIM.Q


17


TH]B T/ IKLY LeWU I'KIA KIK OKD.
.










THE WEEKLY IINDUFrTNAL EUOOUD.


Buyers' Directory

These adhwaas a in this mms. If
y want aything, look tmre thin
lamifis lit and write to the firm p-
- g therin The Record guarantee
a prompt repoq .


ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trt Co.
AUTOMOBILES
EMrt, Fred ., Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlatie National Bank, Jacksonville, la.
Commercial "nk Jacksonvile, k.
Oatral Natioal Bank, Oeala, Fs.
Mraatfe Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Natiomd Bank of Jacksovilla
BOXzS AID CIATS.
Commer Lumber CO., Jackoville Fla.
BRICK
FEster, Geo. R., Jrackoville, Fl.
Soot rn Fuld & Supply Co, The, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
CARS.
South At tie Car & Manfacturing Co.,
Wayeros% Ga.
CLOTHING
Oraig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fl.
BmfrOe CoA, H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing C., Jcksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLSALE.
Kohn, Fregott & Co, Jacksoville, Fl
COMIISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Motgomery, New York City.
LaIrmim, M. W, New York City.
Tolr, Hart & Co, New York City.
COrNrYANCInG.
Realty Title and Trst Co.
COOPURAGL
Comon C., The, Quitma, Ga.
Coopage Co, The, Jaeksoille, Fla.
Jacksonville Cooperage Co, Jakwovfle,

DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jackonville, Fla.
DRUGS-HBOLESAL.
Southern Munlutf- ri- Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESAL.
Covingt o.aCo, The, Jacksonille, Fl
Koh, Furehgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGOIES.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
Merrill-Steven Co, Jacksonvile, Fi.
Behoeld's Soas Co., J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
t Ga.I
FOUNDRias.
Murphy, T, Jacksonville Fla
choeuld's Sons Co, J. 8., Macon, Ga.
rFU.
Southern Flul Supply o, The, Jack-
sonvill, Fla.
ruJUIILUE
Petting Frniture Co, Jacksoville, Fla.
GXTS' FPUiRWqIlW S
Craig Bro., J. A, Jacksonvile, Fh.
efroe Co., H. A., Jacksoille, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Ctoolidated Grocery Co, Jacksoville, Fla.
llis-Young Co., Savannah, (Ga
Hargraves Co, C. H., Jacksonville, Fl.
Johnson Ca., W. B, Jacksonville, Fls.
IPeeok, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
Wilias Co, J. P, Savanaah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Fuehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla
HARDWARE.
Baird & Co, L E., Jackakokvle, Fla.
Boad & Bows Co., The, Jaksonille, Fl
BrIg Hardware C, W. H,Vadoata, Ga.


Marion Hardwre Co, Omna, 1k
Tampa Hardware Co, T, T p Fl..
Weed & Co, J. D., Svanah. G
HAK--88&
McMurry & Baker, Jasonville, FL
Thomas, W. R., Gainvill, 1b.
HATS.
Craig & Bro, J. A., Jacksonvarille, FL
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksnvlle, P.
HOTELS.
Aragon, The, Jaksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi New York City.
IWN WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Ca, Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Steva CO., Jacksomvlla, 1k
Murphy, T, Jacksonville, Fla.
Sehofield's 8as Co, J. 8., Maeo, Ga.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Jacksonville, Fla.
He & Slager, Jaeksoille, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F, Jacksoville, Fa.
Blum & Co, Cha, Jacksonville, F
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co, Chattanooga, Tena.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jackonville,
FIA.
MAPS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
lACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusts, Ga.
Murphy, T, Jackonvills, Fl.
Shboaeld's 8oar Co J. ., Maeon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR uxPBam fL PRO-
CESS.
Schofleld's Sos Co., J. 8, Macon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kinga & Co., Ld., Jaekmoarine, P.
METAL WORKeI S.
Baker, M. A., Brunwick G
MeMillaa Bro., Savanah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIS.
Briggs Hardswre Co, W. Haldsta, Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Oala, Fla.
Schofields on Co, J. B, Maeo, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, P.
MULBS AND HORSES.
Thomas, W. R, Gainerille, Fla.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORS.8
Barne-Jessup Co, The, Jacksoville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Store Co., Jaeksoa-
ville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co, The, Savannah, Ga.
Independet Naval Storea and Export CO.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co, Saannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stor Co, Jacksoile,
Fla.
Union Naval Store Co., Mobile, Al.
PAInT&
Bond & Boura C., Jaekorille, FL.
PECANS.
Griffing Bra. Co, The, JacLkonville, F.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Brigga Hardware Co., W. H., Valdota, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Ocala, FlL
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fl.
Marion Hardware C., Oeala, Fl.
PUMPS.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksoville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. 8., Maon, Ga.
White-Blakestee Mfg. C., Birmivngi-,
Ala.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co, Savannah,
Ga.


Southern States Land =a Timber CO,4
Jacksonvile, Fa.
West-Raley-Ranie Co., The, Jacksonville,
Fla.
SHIP TARDI
Cumer Lumber Co., Jack vile, Ms.
Meill-Steveno Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE
ovington Co., The Jacksonvile, Fla
STIKASHIPS
Clyde Steamship Co, The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P, Jacksonille ,Fla.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jadsonvlle, Fl
TANK&
Cypress Tank Co, Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fil.
Schofied's ons Co, J. 8., Mao, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and TrIt Co.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville, Fa
Council Tool Co., The, Wasanish, N. C.
luKfPEa .s APPARATUS
Chattanooga Pottery Co, JacksoP ille, nla.

MORTGAGES.


WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.

Ill W. FORSYTH STREET, ACKSAItfI E ICI




H, A, Renfroe Co.


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at ReadyMade Prices Mail Orden Given Persen AfteMteI
439 W. Bay Street JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

T1III III I tI IIIIII IIIIIV11111111-111 1t1r sa1s1 1as2a aS


J. P. WnxIUa, President.
T. A. JamIN ,.a Viee.Preidet.
H. L KA Secretary.


J. A. G. CAmoM, I VIce.Pzivoent
P. 7. Doessmisja,3dVi uediest
D. Q White, T110murer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

11111 S w IN rl =ID IIE mn
Maim OffIre eaVAn KH, ORomoRN A.
Uranea Ornfce: ]P~ PKWCOLX, rlx. I ranmeh rocery Hem
SJA.CMSooVuLLun rPL. f CoLummuem, Ol.
Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Corresponf With (a.


- I I I 1 3I I I II I I I I II I II II I II II I I i I I IIIIll IiII 11511 U


MAIMBAER




Br~ I~

leeMles TurpM.
turn. stills
P.OB.or ad Ooa r



Wrhe m tar i a."a
Ir.0. B.5 Uf oint In Gaemite. 910-
ida, Alabama or 1tmisOWp. A
nullns SO aerM a goons
Job work through the
country a specialty.


REAL ESTAT. Th Larest and Oldet Copper nc G
Beckwith, Henderson Warrn, Tmp Work n Georg. r n
Fla. FW My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not lek,
Brobston, Fenidg & Co, Jacksnrille, Fla.
Buekan, C, Jacksonville, Fla.
Frazier, W. W., Jacksonville, Fin
vingsto J. L, a la Send your order for general printing to the Record
DON'T PAIL TO MJEIT10 TEU RECORD TO ADv~-kr&fWt.


Pine Product oMtretim O. T'e% lL".
etteville, N. C.
Pine Belt cometruo COa. Te, Wow
N.C.
Stadard Turpomlu O., the, Lee Yet
City. -L
aunhasms awa
Baker, M. A., Buwiek, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Q
I uxEtk=.L m STIL. TU-S.
Davis & SoL., G. M, Pulatha, l.
i uPEm auu1 VAT&S
Davs & Son, 0. M, Palatka, k.

rivrot Typewritr Eceug, JamaehB
Fis.

MXurray & Baker, Jackme sI Fia.
Thomas, W. B., Gainesvih, PF.
WATCHES.
Greeneaf & Crosby Ca., Jacknoefle, k
Hess & lager, Jacksoevil, k.
YELLOW PINE LINBI .
Cummer Lumber O., JacksovMi, f.I
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertows, B1k

RENTS. ,


- - - *


--------------





THE WEEKLY Iu.atarl m IA BKRCOBD. .

When you Visit Jacksonville
Call to see the Record and be at home.
Tell the Record all you know, that will Interest others.
If you want to buy or sell advertise your place.
* If you owe the Record pay the bill.
If you don't owe the Record make a bill.
Order your Printed Stationery.
Be sure and give the order for your Commissary Checks.
Call on the Secretary of the 7. O. A.

Call at the Industrial Record Office.


Half Tones=Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF
THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.
I mllTk IIE OF II 1 IK, E IM Ni FIISIIm PIOURIPS UD PIIMES.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
-GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIERIES PROMISED
A Florida .Enterprise. Try It.
TH2E = CORS SPAC KAS A MS EoMuT VALUE .




S0 THE WEEKLY 1Nj)UwsarAL BCOORD.
S
tPre Met. W. C. POWWL; iw.-PModMeat S. wbo wr tLh Predent eMstato the Directrry rad Board a Ma3W. WV OOACHMAX. A B L-
LRD,. a. covornT ON, a. A. MeoACHRNN, JOHN a rOUNG, j. A. CRANORD. D. L eMlLAN. C. DOWN-
I DI J. I. SAUNDRa C. l. ROGRa; Anudtor, JOMH HmnmDuaON.


~NSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES ~MPANY,


ockso nvlIIe, Fla.


Sv1nnl, Ga.


nsoill, I in..


4


4
I
-
I
I


lbe Wnsolillle i Pilel a Gooerahlie 0o1p. ItI nlersh ore
I me PliOucers. le PolonaiM I o ei line OieroIlls ei
mPln o M ono PlNM o01 lir 101 E I ly.


lenlil W i R


wlkre IBMl


IYARS JACKiSONLLE, I VANNAH, FiINlINli d PEN AIl A.


All P Iers lls e iniled aill ofi ColresnM


333333: UOUSIOlgUS99~~


"3T PIRE AID ITS PRODUCTS.


NAVAL ORES FACTORS. _

M I I Sl ti, m0. wO wdl Mle if Ra M l BIUs
mS lltn 1I oel l IYe ilRei to 1 o ll 10 O st.o C1n AN Ii fB.


M a








THE WEEKLY mjDUUrltIAL BRCORD.


31


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commisary Trades)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 0 lb. tubs.. 21
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 22
10 .. 25
A C. Creamery,60, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 11

Lard
Compound Tin.
S 50-lb tin.... 6
60-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
l0-lbtin. ............ 84

Vinegar
Bed Apple Cider bbl....... 386

Sugar
Oranulated Sugar, bhl..... 6 40

Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 0 1-lb cans to ease,
per lb.................. 22
Simon Pure, 801-lb cans to
ease, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 12
Green coffee, medium ...... 9
Gree coffee, ecnmon...... 81
Arbackles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages.......market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
e. ...... .... market price
Rosted, 1001b. drum....... 17
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 b.... 27
English B'faat, 10 lb.. 17
S ormosa, 10 lb....... 27
Pagoda Tea, 6 and 10c sise
10 Ibs to case, per pound.. 40


Salt
- ~20b sack................
1004b sack..............
Iee Cream, 200-lb sacks.....
100-lb ascks.....
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-lb....
" 2-lb....


100
50
100
50
265
275


Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin.............. 17
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box
sifter top, per doz...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per dos......40 and 80
Corn


MISk
Car Lot Lot
W.Corn,110lb, 1 88 1 40
"' 1001b, 1 24 126
Mxd orn,1101b,1 88 185
4 1001b,1 21 128


Sk
1 49
1 84
146
185


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in. cypress
barrels, per gallon..... 81
Oats
100 k Le.o100
Car Lo t Sk Lots
W clip'd,1251b, 1 90
1001b, 1 55
White 1251b, 1 80
White 100lb. 1 45
Mixed 1251b
S 100lb,
Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, vf 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 Jays on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 10( lbs., choice..... 1 85
fancy..... 185
Va. Seed Rye. per hushel..
Flour


Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl ................ 6
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 b sack.........6
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 6
S Pillsbury's Beet .....7
Pillsbury's Bast bbl .
Flour, Gold Medal ......... 7
&" bbl.... .


Flour, Boss,...............
Meal


25
50

40

25


7


Meal, per barrel............ 8 50
92-lb sacks............ 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 8 50
92-lb sacks....... 1 50
Rice
Good................ ... 4
Choice...... ............ 5.
Fancy Hpad............... 6
Broken................. 2
Canned Vegetables
Doe


Tomatoes, 8s, Chief........
Tomatoes,2 ........
Clayton, 3s................
Clayton, 2s...............
Sifted Peas, 2s ............ 1
Rose L. J. Peas ...........
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s........ 1
Lima Beans ,2s ............ 1
String Beans, 3s..........
String Beans, 2s ..........
Baked Beans, 8e...........
Baked Beans. ls...........
Corn, fancy, 2s........... 1
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets. 3s............
Saner Kraut, 3s ...........
Saner Kraut, keg .........
Pumpkin, 3s..............
Hay
car lao 100 bale ti


Choice....
No.l Tim.
No. 2 1700
No.1 Cl'ler 17 00


85
65
80
60
40
80


lots qsuati.
1750
1650
17 80 15 50
17 50 15 50


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz............... 1 45
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per doz ............... 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 45
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
case, per dos........... 100
Damson, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 61
S 10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
Ib.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
per lb.................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 6*

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, perlb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 8*
Fancy Apricots 25 Ib boxes. 18
Ex. Choice '" "
Ev. Apples. 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes..... 25
Ev. Apples, 48 l-lb. packages4 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. case 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 26-lb
box, 40-0s............. 6..
Pruies, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box. 50-60............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70.............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, -lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box ........ 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 6*
Extra H P, .... 6
Seed Peanuts, ....
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ ..... 18
Brazils ................... 12
Peacans.................. 12
Filberts.................. 12
al0 nuts ................. 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 LesslOo
lots Sk Lot Sk. Lt
Cotonseed Meal 27 00
Hulls 1050


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop.........2 20
8 hoop........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per do. ......1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18...... 1 00
nested......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per dos.. 00
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per dos.. ..1 20

Washboards Dea
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay......... ......8 00
176 Diamond Glass .........8 2S
O. W. D., 17 inch, per dos 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 76
Canned Fish
Oysters, is, 2 dos to case, per
dos: .................. 96
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........8 50
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 46
Salmon le, Tale 4 dos to case
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 6
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per do .
Beardley's Shredded Cod Psh 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 8 60
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
Ibe to box............ 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per Ib. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hamn, 8-10.avg .... 1484
"Reliable" Hanm, 10-12 avg .... 141-.
"Reliable" Hamn, 12-14 avg .... 1414
"Reliable" Shonlder, 7-9 avg .. 11 4
"Reliable" California Has, 6-8 10
Breakfast Baeon, light av. ...... 151-
D. 8 Bellies, 16-18 av .......... 1I
D. 8 Bellies, 20-22 a. .......... 94
DS Bellies, 25-30 m. ........ 91.-
D. 8. Plates ........... ......... 34
Bacon Plates ................... S4
D. S. Butts .................... 64
Bologna sausage ............... 7
Sausage in oi ................
Batter and Chen.
"Strawberry" Oeamery, s-lb tae t
S0 tbs.. I2-s.
"Reliable" fll cream cheese...
Tian'sLar i.
"Indiana" Pru Leaf ........... ..h|
"*es-Foam" Ompoond ......... mrb.

"Reliabe Oned BDu, Is ......
SOwned Bef, zb ...... g.
SRoat Bee, s. ........ 1I.
Roast Beef, 2a ........ .1
Potted Ham and Teogu
1-4 ........................
SSliced Beef, 1-b .... 1.1
Vi .a Samau. lb .. I
-Tripe..............- LISr


MT A COPY OF 2 ATAL S8ORKS KLUX 30O -'L


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The job printing
of this company
for the exclusive 1
naval stores, lumb
ufacturing trades.
able to suppose
better and more
printing supplies-
envelopes, commi
pay-roll reports, e
us make them.

Industrial Re


JksMevilf, I


Record:



g department
is conducted
benefit of the
I























)er and man-
It is reason-
you will get
satisfactory
-letter heads,
ssary checks,
tc., by having
a






































cord Co.,
r1

Rordd: t
Pisrida


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MEAD THL AD TM mComarD.


To the Readers of the


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THE WEKLY IJUluarlAL RBOORD.








THE WEEKLY JDUUrSBIAL RECORD.


F m W MEMORIALS II MARBLE, STONE AND BRONZE
ram the saiLe Talbet to the most elaborate Mauoldeum.
Write, or came to see u--our desgns will please you.
SOUTHERN MARBLE AND STONE CO.
" reong mum E LMANA, Hameaer,.
-Sil h See e DeB- l-tiw 11. 4 $0011 11911 01street
Jm kso ele, noaa.
Aythno sa Sewss% Mrble. Mesae.m and Tile.


You Want a Tursenti Location?
I You Want a STrwmin Location?
SYou Want any Kid of Florida Land?
IF: You Mean Busiess?
Ca o r r Wreo ito
J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS,
Ocala. Florida
S ooooo0ooolo*************************************** e


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
T -eae-- t t ma-i ot ti Hsn are appeitd to ail as feWll,% ceaifn
at Crmate-, & C both way.


Welm Swor 14sk
Okw W Normt siev)


rom Jneksavmlfl. f
WISANER. Charles"=n and New York.


Tme.day, Nov. 1 at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ......Sunday, Nov. 6, at 4:00 am
Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 3:00 pm ....ALGONQUIN .... .Monday, Nov. 7, at 4:00 am
tMday, Nov. 4, at 3:00 pm .... .OOMANHE ......Wedneeday, Nov. 9, at 5:30 am
~day, Nov. 6, at 3:00 pm ..***zMOHICAN ......Friday, Nov. 11, at 6:30 am
Teday, Nov. 8, at 3:00 pm .... ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, Nov. 13, at 8:30 am
Wed dy, Nov. 9, at 3:00 pm .IROQUOIS ......Monday, Nov. 14, at 9:30 am
ldasy, Nov. 11, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE .... Wednesday, Nov. 16, at 10:30 am
*xHURON ..Wednesday, Nov. 16, at 10:30 am
pt rday, Nov. 12, at 3:00 pm .ALGONQUIN ..Thursday, Nov. 17, at 11:30 am
Tuesday, Nov. 15, at 3:00 pm ..OOMANCHE ......Sunday, Nov. 20, at 1:30 pm
Wednesday, Nov. 16, at 3:00 am .-xNEW YORK .Monday, Nov. 21, at 4:00 am
fiday, Nov. 18, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE .... Wednesday, Nov. 23, at 4:30 am
Haoday, Nov. 19, at 3:00 pm .... .IROQUOIS ... Thursday, Nov. 24, at 5:00 am
..**xMOHICAN .... Saturday, Nov. 26, at 6:00 am
Tmday, Nov. 22, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE ........Sunday, Nov. 27, at 7:00 am
Wednesday, Nov. 23, at 3:00 pm. .ALGONQUIN ... .Monday, Nov. 28, at 8:00 am
idtay, Nov. 25, at 3:00 pm ... .COMANCHE ..Wednesday, Nov. 30, at 8:00 am
*xHURON .... Thursday, Dec. 1, at 11:00 am
Tuesday, Nov. 29, at 3:00 pm ... .ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, Dec. 4, at 1:00 pm
Wednesday, Nov. 30, at 3:00 pm .IROQUOIS ...... Monday, Dec. 5, at 1:30 pm
Tbwday, Dec. 1, at 3:00 pm .*xNEW YORK ....Tuesday, Dec. 6, at 4:00 am
--Bstoa via Brunswick and Charleston. xFreight only. *-Boston via
lfmswi~e
TIHE CLYDE NEW ENLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
s 'eot aere evo etweon Juoaemvtw le, oestom and FPotdemee amnd ze mat-
ors omsmlns Qang~lg at Curlestom Reth Wayu.
- b ..- ... ...... .. ..... ... .... ...From Lewi Whert Boateo
I 4.. .. .. .. .. .. ......... ...1om foot of Catberlne street. Jakoo~ le
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
metwveem 5aeanvlll ae ni gfoud.
se s-- at r1at0a,3 Astor.t. Fres a, ereso rd (De Lad) and Iatermnedla
m n U. en0L o s reer.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
L -- t to- l f hlow: Leave JaCksonvilea, Danday, Tueda a T-hra-
aS, a .. e n mt .l ave Manford, MondayR Wedneeday. & Friday. :s a. u.


Read ua.


L ave .. a. -.............. ......... d m ................... Lrrve m A. .
,s :AS .. :. ... ......... .....:. Leave S P. .
1,00" 4:1 L ...... .. .... .. .. ....t9 re-- f .......... Leave 11 1 -6
........ ..eeod IeLad)o.................... Leave 2:n noa
... ......... .......... aerd~............. ..... ...... Leave 9: m.
Ar. :w 40. L-.................. .hterpre .....................L. 10:00 a. m.
UUIIam PAwe 'uNO AID TICKr OrCc, 20 W. R Uy t., J-ek vlne.
'. m. IROwMOOR, JR.. Asst. Gen. Pass Ament, SH W. Bay 8t. Jacksonvimle, P
W. 0. OOPI. 3RL, Local het. Act. Jack'vile. C. P. LOVE~ IL Ast. Supt.,Jaek'vtM
Foot anm street. Jacksonmvlle.
A. C. HAGO ry. O.. .L P. A., ow York, OLYDB ILN P. A.. New TerY
L 333, wIt P. P. CYDE (.
oe swe BLn S~~r.e General As eYo
Chmea gh Dga& n otate street. New TYrk.


Carter & Russell F


Id A 9


JacllaoviUe, Florid&-


waR= T=u -EO M ANY E57uMAio =imu


Red p


oBwTlJU~sfW,
.~~ 0R4


Sof thos.
The mes will be --now
the tes of th sport e_
*h nt s with pleegur. F
.' WULL-tisSUwu Y UUL--. mamas
jaknemvtoe the me- of Oe me mt
A|ele**s Leading Tm"e Jeuza.
S The Wekly Industrial Record of Jack-
sonville aU Bavannab h a taken its place
amonM the leading trade Journals In the
United 8tat. and as an authority on lum-
her and navi stores It being quoted not
only by the beet and most carefuUy edited "o
OesM paper in this country. but by those In
in Europe also. A London trade paper
laching this 0111e yesterday gies ieaberal AL t
psace to the Records viTews on merWet con- *m
duiems tot I
This week's t me oa the Ineutrtal Reo- *
4r0 is even better tHan usual and It is orh
a stro and entcrttaitn general adu. tral
triW newspaper. In addition to its value Ho
the hablon of the two speelf ladua- ..
StrIt represents.t ts tbrma new Joh
stoari of development In tahe eotheaet. pla
among them beta the story f at a hl-mill- felnd
ea-dollar erporation orgaalned to Jack- o
maemille yesterday. and the oruaniation of 1
several tAr corporatio dAr the and
week tIo am fertd. w. '
It huq met the gaee for eatnpri e aad It Wal
wen enrv the great meams of socess weck
It is reoletin.g both In t su bertption and
advertising depertment.carrying as It does.
perDhap, one of the hargest adveltrn pat-
womages ea to any of the nmouthl~e tra .
JOmrnabL. F om


I whr This
-- - --- -------


(,.uA,J, uj._.uj u_._._u.a_ uAeLu..uJJJ .JJu JuAuJJJAJ..g <'
SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DI ONDS.
30 YEARS RELIABILITY.
SHess & Slager,-
D Diamonds, Silverware, Watches Jewelry
CORNER BAY AND CEDAR ST8. AND I I A IAl .



Naval Stores Markl

and Stock Re
Published Daily in The



Jacksonville Metro
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any oth
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now

$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MON1


BIG PRIZES:

A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Ex
Saratoga, to New York and to Ashe
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metro
scription contest. Write for particulars.







c~ \
R'




rt
~I '




r
i~k

i- ...


THE

"Rose"

Teseuoma, o peres.
Desert Speea, S&l.o per d
Table Spemw, b.3o per dm.
Desert Fkorl, in.oo r 4as
Tamse Fwka, a Wa per dea
Desert Xaives, Satoo per d&S
Table Kaives, ~a30 per deS

NO CHARGE FOR
ENGRAVING.


Greenleaf &

Crosby Compay


3ob31dlri anb
babealutb%
*ftelolvlitIitbo

41 West My*Street

Jacksonville

Mo heggg d a" eat *e10 ish Part of 60
- aa Prh atendee 1 o0 m Rua


THE

"Gennania"


Teupom, o per s.
Dessert Spems, SzI&o per dr.
Table Spem., *3so per dS.
Dessert Forka, Sgso per fso.
Table rork, l-3.50 per ds
Dessert Kalve, S9.oo per des
Table Kaives aM.oo per a.

WE PAY EXPRESS
CHARGES..


fi Write for Catalogue
ONE HUNUKLU PAGES ILLUSTRATING

SSilverware, Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Cut Glass, Clocks, etc.
n J I


mm- -


-s-i *- - -- ---- --- -e -------- ------ h-----

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
of Wanaalshb N. C.,
Buak Jo e standard at ask Old btyl ad a" *t
a sare mirraned. An wbolale fsekrsI t Arml stores
em amr =e 4 eab MLS" suppy OeratorsL


RO. =Seo'y. mTr.m, Co.mraIe.ag

oduct Construction Co.
r0 yette^ iiO,0N. c.
e..... on o. a Ta. creast*, Tar. DMIufeeUtMan Wood Prmes.v.lm.
I -ow, at Cas. roL f UIt.wood Stmmps Bet-taeftte
'Time t d stm- reeuom. ommma contrea at wa
i m aPlat I Ire m im@ l eapktr l mnd taught the proems. M o
fb ALfre 39seKthan, gendal maurwll. LayttomlTd. N. C.

... BARATHnOLDI B WAYv AND 24 S.. ,
ARI1LDI, aEW YORK CITY.
a dim so Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughot.
Big Stors and Paces of Amaement. Cars Pass
SDOrfor all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings.
ample Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
as amad and magnifieeat decorations: no luxurious
; o awe-inspiring usuroundi=a ; no elaborate bill
fa printed in French; no lerka that will disdain to
so No Em plfyees Is Awy Way IlattestatIve.
aJ e osy. home-hke little hotel that will appeal. to the
pM tbee who are looking for solid comfort Good.
eaam cooking, and afhble and courteous treatment.
a -a -- --*p es - *


John R Youn Pnmkr. c.- & MO*. V60...........
J. W. MoU~ Jr., aecr PYy and Trors.ror.

T FOUELLIYNDAND N C.

SCommission Merchants


MI AND WHOLESA LEYS A OCERS

Sav anannah and Brunswick, Ga.



T, MURPHY
JACKSONVILLE MACHINE a [RON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHNIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repa Led Irm
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MAFJM 4 IGINES AND BOWERS PULLEYS AND SHAPFIVA
Agnt for Stationr Engins, Boilers, Pumps, Feed Water Heaterseud Codea
ersydrants and Vaves, Gentritagl Pumps, Hose, Belting and bber Goods
MMER TAIIM A WATE WRIS Wu EAT V MWlELTT
JACKSONVILLE FLORIOA.


gis gis gig -- - - -- -- -- --- -


Ess"rrrrsffsmq~ rlP~''~~)~~:~F~


)S~%SEiilr~_'iS~:~FZI_~S~_`~~


. o


VT THE WEEKLY uIMDUWrJIAL RBOORD.




STwo of the Patterns we show in our Catalogue.

SPECIAL VALUES IN STERLING SILVER.
br --