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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00096
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: November 11, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00096
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text







r the kNovember





WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL .


a -


Publisked Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Maaufacturilg Interests.


ie"W" Dept. I A. 1e# by me Eaectfre Centse or te Iet peafine seutse- "Nocs iso a" its LZcIsI'0 fIlsidal r& Sad AIdet Seett. #ISM. 1952s a I o
01a .. as so ain ars Ao of fth rl Iwscasn. A ted sept. 5 NIr. 1903. as ane m&l meb, -m Athe frpetteS Prateru Assosin.
Adpted Apr 27h NOW3. As fte 01nc" Om a m ofMe SolseStaft Can Grwers' AsisoVstte E Z109011i &Y the eawifa 59s9dif
Asso hlse. 0M0r1r dog" of the Southeastern Stch grwers Associatio.

WL U aN. 19. JACISONWAV., rLA. ATLANTA, GA& -UAVANNAH, GA. $3 A VEM 4W


VOIMWGS EVENTS CAST SHADOWS."

'T.I Outik far BeiMiag and Lumber
*Pri s Legil P t -
hfnessiig the tranfonnation now go-
ag o in lumber circles regarding sup-
ply and demand aad outlook for building
material and prices thereof in the future,
the Savannah edition of the Southern
S Lmber Journal in a double-leaded edito-
ril on this all-important question affect-
ing o many people, quite lengthily and
logielly discuses the situation as fol-

S The sigi of the times are portentous.
The handwriting on the wall is so plain,
that "he who run may read," and though
he be a fool, he need not err therein.
Rash rising and setting of the sun wit-
esses some new development in the lum-
er trale for the better or the worse. Day
by day, week by week ad month by
th i nufactur of lumbe have
tcaed the value of stumpage climb
aldily during the past tea years, and
w s they have sees it halt they have
nrn sMee it go backward. They have
f i d that it would be praetially impos-
se to buy a large traet of timber at
the preaiing low prices to-day, install
ad' put up milling plant, sell the mill
preet t a enurnt prices and show a
preit om the tra eton. Consequently
they have come to the coneclion that
te timber on the section they own is
JLt as valuable as that on the adjoin-
S g tract; that if they cannot replace the
st-mpage they cut and have a margin on
S he traction then they will let their
own trees stand until it is possible to do
SIn other words, they now decline to
mse farther roads on their stumpage
wl"at adequate compensation, an ilm-
tka i of which is to be foud in the
Waan of yellow pine manufacturers in
' t..Lris the other day when the first of
a series of advances in prices to a basis of
psft t tthe A-aactu.t was inaug-
S ated. The action of the yelow pine ope-
aters in St. Loai on the 15th will doubt-
Ml he followed by the North Carolina or
hortleaf pine people all over the South
il. the vry near future
Nine-tenths of the money made on lum-
hr manufacturing in the South during
the past three years was from stampage
purchased Ave years and more ago at
abnt one-fourth the present market value
f stumpage. During this time manufac-
tmed lumber has not advanced more than
5 per cent of the increase in raw mate-
ril. Is it not, therefore, plainly to be
m e thAt the manfaeturers have about
t aet an of their cheap or low-priced
rs purchased some years ago, and
ant now turn upon that which cost them
us or e ee times and in some instances


out their high-priced stumpage into lum-
ber and sell it at the same old prices they
have been selling lumber they eut from
low-priced stumpage? Not for a moment,
and the man who attempts it will go to
the wall as surely as he attempts it.
Henee it is that we say the action
of the yellow pine operators in St. Louis
the other day in marking up price any-
where from 50 cents to $3 per thousand is
only the beginning of a series of advances
that are inevitable if the manufacturer
are to make a reasonable proft on their
investments, and anything short of that
woulh be contrary to all business princi-
ples and ethics. Long and shortleaf pine
could be advanced anywhere from $3 to
$10 per thousand feet and then be the
cheapest wood on the market in compe-
tition with it for the purposes it is ap-
plied to.
The prosperity of no other class of
people contributes more to the universal
prosperity of all, the country over, than
that of the lumber manufacturer. He has
laid more foundations for trunk line rail-
road systems, to say nothing of the in-
numerable villages and towns that have
rapidly grown into cities nd great commer-
cial and industrial centers in his wake,
than any other lass of our people. Like
the sturdy pioneer of old he penetrates
the virgin forests, illumines the dark
places with the flashlight of civilization
and speedily converts barren waste into
busy arteries of commerce. To his pros-
perity, therefore, every man should be glad
to turn a willing hand, and while his prog-
ress has been slow, it is nevertheless now
an assured .fact. So say we all, gentle-
men.


New Timber Seases. i Statisa.
The Bureau of Forestry has recently
signed an agreement to make extensive
timber seasoning tests in two Western
States, in cooperation with two telegraph
and telephone companies. Fperiynemenl
stations will be located at Marinette, Wis.,
and Eseambia, Mich.; and probably a
third station will be established at Ash-
land, Wis. The expense of the experi-
ments will be borne jointly by the Bu-
reau and the companies. Cedar and tama-
rack telephone and telegraph poles will be
furnished by the State of Wisconsi free
of cost, and two railroad companies have
agreed to haul them to the experiment
stations without charge for freight.
The object of the experiments is to de-
termine how many years aes be added
to the life of each pole by proper season-
ing. Since millions upon millions of poles
are used along telegraph and telephone
lines, even one year's extra service for
each pole will amount to a tremendous
saving in expense. Unseasoned eedar


times a muck! If o, ean they uat poles las from twelve to lften years.


Seasoning experiments have shown how to
increase this time by three or four years,
and it is now expected to improve on
this increase. Past methods of season-
ing have effected a drying out of 20 per
cent of the original-weight of the poles.
The better seasoned the pole, the less
chance. there, is for decay, which is pro-
moted by moisture.
Such experiments are of large impor-
tance not only to telegraph and telephone
companies, but to all users of heavy tim-
bers which come in contact with the
ground, at which line decay gets in its
most deadly work. It is believed that
still greater economies can be secured by
the use of proper methods of preservative
treatment. The latter is a subject which
the Bureau of Forestry has for some time
been investigating, as set forth in its Bul-
letin No. 41, "Seasoning of Timber," and
other publications. Further bulletins deal-
ing with different aspects of the same
problem will be issued later.


Vagrants Must Mere On.
The Manufacturers' Record has the fol-
lowing to .say about the labor supply
in the South and quotes several Southern
papers on the vagrancy question:
"In many localities in the South com-
plaint is made about the inadequacy of
the labor supply. Mobile importers say
that they eannot get a sufficient number of
competent hands to unload vessels. There
is competition for help between cotton-
growers and rice farmers of the Carolina
loast. Cotton planters of Missimippi
have their agents in the cities seeking to
secure cotton pickers. There is a short-
age of labor fdr farm, mill and public im-
provement work in louisiana. 8pasmodie
efforts to overcome these difficulties are
discovered in the employment in Texas and
other States of Mexicans and Italians in
the field and on sonstretion work, while
early last month five or six dosen men
were brought in a body from Chicago to
New Orleans to take the place of negro
roustabouts in the latter city. The arri-
val of a steamer with 1,000 immigrants
the other day at New Orleans brought
requests from many parts of Louisiana
for hands in ane-cutting and cotton-
picking.
"In the meantime come demands from
many quarter fr an .ifpd-r. of laws
to suppas agmaa y. The Memphis Com-
mereial-Aejy eaps Mi want columns
of newpp ae 4ed, high wages are
offered, lanters are calling for hands,
steamboat me for roustabouts, hoeue-
wives fr servants, while the streets anm
corner saloon am thronged with the un-
employed. The Birmingham News imst
that the idle should be made to go to work
on the streets if they wil not wrk eke-
wheme, whie the IWao Time aa~Ls


to the city authorities to estab i a .-'
rock pile and to put to work on it o ry
man unable to prove that he is employed
at honest labor or that he enjoys an in-
come ufficient to support him in dimness.
The cry against the vagrant is heard from
North Carolina to Tea, in spits of ',
stringent legislation recently in Gemrg a
Alabama and Mississippi, and in spite of ;
laws in other States, which, it enfad, .
would do much for the settlement of lheal
labor problems. Publi opinm im-
South should demad that these laws he
enforced, and at the same time shl -
make-it impossible for the vagrant in any
form to be countenaned. Vagraney in a
drain upon the community in two makn
directions. The man able to work but Me .
working has to be supported by som- ame.
There is one waste. The manh db
work and not working subtracts ft m
the productive capacity of the commminmi
and is a block in the path of its beal;h
progress. He should be made to woer .
move on." -


I

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,i.
.
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Lumber Shipmentas tar Nevm-i.


There has been a wonderful imerea e i
lumber shipments from this port' s--
the first of November. There have bam
eighteen cargoes learned at the e nmm-
house and the total shipments amount 0I
6,153,475 feet of lumber.
This is the record for six days that th
customhouse has been open, for ta-M -
been one Sunday and one holiday. T s
is an average of over one mlion feet e -
lumber per day. If this record eado
be kept up'for the month all preio
reeords of shipments from JacdmM --
would .be broken.
There has been a slight eae i
prices and the demand fa lumbr in
Northern markets is iMamir us eal
vessels are now under charter to eme to-
Jacksonville to load and there are sti a
dosn or more vessels in pat taking ar-
goes.


During August and September the mR-
her shipments were far below th avw-
age, and October only showed a l ht Im-
provement, but November bids f! to
equal any month in the history of ta t
port in the matter of hmber ll'|as1..
The Iastern market is Vt
ries are coming maor tag y. Osd s.
are being placed throughout the State. tr
lumber for bothbe the Eastern and We-t
er markets ad here is a spirit t aetiv-
ity amnpag the u. -u** wiceh has
not been noted king the past year.
Receipts of lumber here are larger than
they have been ad it is the gmeral under-

arge for tis month. tThere amre a.
shrters oat th arl of nem hr the op e
cut mmah a a an vame t abadk vi
per menforar Iw let a


'*'*'**


7 t


^
-1


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Awd





I THE WEEKLY INDUrXIlAL ZBCOBD.
-i i- "-- u -----i -
- ----,----- So------------------------------


C. a& 1OG16s3 PammNt.


W. A. GATJ.AIUH and E. A. CHAPLAIN, VIC-PasxnsnwDi.


C. H. HODGBON, 8c, ad Twuas's


DIRECTORS a C. Rogers, W. A. allaher, F. A. Champlain, H. A. Mcchern and J. A. Crnaford, of Jacksoville;
SB. F. Bllard, Tampa; C. M. Covinaton, Penacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Mala Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Peasacola, Pla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Commolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jaksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Store and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf waval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grry branch of the Southern Naral Stores Company, of Savannah.


WIll handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Camtlt e me Three-Story bildlag, 70z200; owe two-story buaills. 50x390 uWe oAe.story hlldlag, 80x290,
maUka the largest space of ay Compay of the Uhad Is the Soeth.


CINSOLI DATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pena.cola. Fla., and SavannaJh. Ga.
------------------------- ----------- -------------- -- -- --- ------


I.








THB WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BRECOD. .
I~~~~~- I I I I I L


.OaamaoR.P.. .QAIoLLAWD. ahler
W. I OWRM ViM-Pr&O.
Commercial Bank,
stat Depsitry.
Banao-ns: Otfl, Ma.. Lake City. Na
JaMieMlle, - -iti


Ta CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00


BARRELS

ALL KINDS.
Our rSpr Badl bolMdd will pas the se
ert ArocfMl Da meoan inpectioma.

fie at MEIGS, CAIRO, QUtMAN, GA,
amd NMONIELLO, PLA.
AdEcr ormer to home ffie,

QUITMAN, GA.


m I Mn sill 0.
BUILDER AND DEALERB I


ENGINES. BOILERS.
(oeta, Saw, Frwtilier, Oil sad lee Ma-
eaiery, sad Supple and Raepirs.
CAPACITY FOR 300 HAN
Maihid Tools, Wood-Working Maehiny,
baftiag, Pulley, Hangers, Leather anm
mlbber Belting d Home, Bailroad and
Mil Suppai ad s Tools.
PlRa aad ertiates furnished for Power
Plnat ad Steel Bridge
Steam Pnmps, Feed Water Heater and
Baisting Eginem.
AUGUSTA. GA.












DO S .DOUBL ,


The Wratkl ste sek t! oat-


lE6 Po eaaa,
--0 f WIMA FLA


Goad Soap ad BaLd
Speaking in a broad way, the oap of
the present day is made by what is known
is the cold "process"-that is, with very
little boiling, with the use of a great quan-
tity of free alkali, says "Science 8iftings,"
that is mixed with the infinitesimal
amount of fat used by chemical means.
Nearly all of the cheap toilet soaps are
so manufactured, with a heavy perfume
and gaudy wrapper depended upon to find
customers for them, which they do in con-
stantly increasing numbers each year.
Red and roughened hands and face never
fail to ensue from the employment of
such cleaning compounds. That they do
clean, and clean thoroughly, cannot be
denied. The large amount of free alkali
in the soap dissolves the dirt by a chemi-
cal action and clanses the skin effectual-
ly. If the hands or face have become ex-
ceptionally soiled, therefore, an alkali
soap is the only thing that will sucess-
fully combat and loosen the accretions of
dust, dirt and grime. The best of the
modern soaps for all ordinary toilet pur-
poses are those of what is known as the
"over-fat" variety. Less aalki is employ-
ed in thier manufacture. With this ex-
ception the preliminary steps in their
compounding are somewhat similar to
those of the cheaper grades- As the mix-
ture begins to solidify, however, a quan-
tity of fat- is injected into it by a pro-
cess that does not require description,
and hence the designation, "over-fat."
The added amount of fat lessens the harm-
ful effects of the small quantity of alkali,
and such soaps as these may be used
freely on all parts of the body without
injury to the skin resulting. Their eleans-
ing action is soft and easy, and no chem-
ical process occurs in the removal of the
dirt on the surface whatever. Instead of
this the soap forms an emulsion with the
dust and grime, and cleanses in this fash-
ion, more slowly than in the ease of the
alkali compound with its chemical changes
under the influence of the water, but
though more gradual in doing this, it is
none the less a good cleaner, except in in-
stances where a great amount of dirt has
literally been ground into the skin through
work, exercising, or from other causes.
To determine whteher a soap is good for
toilet purposes is not at all difficult. The
amount of suds made by a soap is one of
the methods by which the presence of too
much alkali is -indicated. The more suds
a soap makes in a comparatively short
space of time, the more alkali it contains.
A cheap soap will create a large quantity
of suds without any trouble on the part
of the operator whatever, whereas an
"over-fat" soap has to be rubbed repeat-
edly before it manifests a disposition to
make even a little suds. The suds are
caused by a chemical action in the water
when the alkali mixes with it, and, as
has been stated before, the over-fat oap,
the good soap, forms an emulsion, does
not under much chemical change. Another
way to determine the presence of alkali
is to touch the piece of soap to the
tongue. If there is much alkali in it the
taste will be bitter, if there is no alkali
there in harmful quantities no bitterness
will be observable. Still another way,
the most effective of all, is to drop a little
sublimate of mercury on the piece of soap.
The mercury will at once cause the alkali
to assume a yellowish hue, and the more
alkali in the soap the deeper this yellow
colour will be. The first two methods will
suffice, however, in the household--Oil
and Colourman's Journal.


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSANLLE
JACKSONVILLE. PLA.
CAPITAL O 30000= SUIRPIS rl UXVWWSD PROFITS SW OmC
We isme ime Cermaetates of Depoik waheh drsw dterest at tm rats tdreh r cepr
asem, ifhed ninety days or lower, Take dnaatagels t Ms e a_ Iryriew s
s*metag r yro. Particular atteatiok pid to Ont-ot-Town aeooesa, mileg emfl t

NUBIAN TEA for tie Liverm ad K

BENEDICTA, A melce f.r W

CUBAN RELIEF r C c.B ... -

CUBAN OIL A-a-"for C", -.
BriS5es and R1 1 k
A supply of these medicines is what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for prices and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,
sattm.gss Temesse W

0. R. FwrEtt. CSAS. *-. IARMI. MYer AsBLEr,
President. ice-Presdsest aed Vreanrer. SMermtsr.
DIRtECros:
B. R. weil Chas. c. earris, .. EcALata. P. L. Sutaerlfsm, R. V. Cowrmte.

THE


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Cerl- of West By am Maibem stb
Jacksmlville, Iriida.


Wholesale Drugs Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote p
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty ad ear ave yo
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.



THE ARAGON
JACKSOWVILE. FLA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, l-
eluding new electric elevator and o
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.



East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a 5pecaty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


W. T. NILLeY
FiewEent.


J. A. &. fPRS@N
Vke-PrcresE at


see. '. ScoWmL,
Sec. BMW. TO


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Factories,
8th Street R. R. Crominsg.


JACKSONVILLE.


FLO RIDA-;


=E coM11 TI 235 11911M GREAT TRAM JOURRAL


- a


4


* ^








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Alli Tate Bdatiui with the Uni-
ted State.
In it issue of July 21, 1904, Export
(the-oga of the central unio for com-
mem geography and for the advance-
must of German interest in foreign
arts) has the following article in regard
to American efforts in securing foreign
markets:
That the motto Germany leads the
world is only a beautiful dream is suf-
flntly well known. The fulfilment of
this dream grows more difficult with every
Syar. This is now being diovered. We
se now stading still in foreign parts.
At home the great desire of moving for-
ward tha should characterize our people
is vaishing. I have no intention of dis-
eemlu the higher forms of politics, but
sanyum who wil east his glance outside of
the limits of the German Empire and will
take sn ..ejudickd view f the differ-
eut people eanot but ee that Germany
is begi q ig to feel weak. Everywhere
w e re ailing and bending the knee, and
yet in no part of the world are we regard-
d as favorites. Is this right? At press.
eat we are told that we are not able to
play trump because we have no fleet. Of
corset we ned a strong leet the more we
rub agir foreigners in far-off lands,
but did we not play another role twenty
years ag with a mch smaller seet?
"eAt a glawe at Nicaraugna. The dom-
hating position ed by Germany 10 years
age hi that country is being slowly but
Irreveeably yielded up to the Americans,
wh, thanks to their bold, enterprising
oprit ad thanks to her distinguished
commlr repeentation, are moving into
the plae oe occupied by us. After the
0oaee era of 1886 had endangered Ham-
g capital and based a great many
loses, which were not unexpected, there
has been an entire los of spirit. This,
to, in spite of the fact that the govern-
mae of Presidet Zelaya is not only firm
bat give great promise for the future.
The Americans, on the other hand, wJh
great spirit, have in a few years con-
aered the entire country. They said to
th r~ve that a land so blessed by na-
ture mst yield excellent results. They
have pored capital into the country.
They have sent out commissions to visit
sal to study it. They have established
depots, ad have sought and found eapi-
taists who are willing to exploit the bril-
iat eoaessioa made to them by the
Nicaraguan government. One eoneeasion
gives the a monopoly in felling various
kids of wood on the Mosquito coast.
Another is fo rthe exploiting of great min
Ug interests in the North and North-
eat. A third gives a monopoly of the
river transportation on the East coast.
Though this the culture of bannas is
pl ed in th hands of one company.
The ame syndicate lent the govern-
mnt 1,aS MMS. It has taken over the
inmmne farm of the President on the
Gulf of Pomsees, and has pledged itself
to establish a new line of steamers be-
Stwee New Orleans and the Gulf ports
of Nicaragua. The entire coast in these
parts is already Americanized. Business
homes in Blueflelds, banana and eaout-
chleu plantations, and numberless mines
ae akeady in the hands of Americans.
They re planning to buy great stretches
of territory for ranches, which will yield
eormos profits upon the opening of the
Panams Coal. An American company is
fw hing Managua with electric lines
a is ppaing to spread a et for the
tralnmisin of power over the entire


country. Apart from the far-reaching and
exploiting spirit of the American and
their almost reckless investment of capital,
a large part of their success is undoubt-
edly due to their consular representation
which undertook through personal and
social relations with the leading people,
to make an impression, first of all on the
President of the Nicaraguan Republic, and
afterwards on the leading people. They
have removed the prejudices that existed
against their country and have succeeded
in obtaining concessions for their coun-
trymen.
"Our consular representation suffers
from the lack of close contact with the
Nicaraguan people. Up to the beginning
of last year we had a consulate for Man-
agua and Salvador. Only those who know
the difficulties of communication Nicarau-
gua and Salvador will understand how
inappropriate such an arrangement is.
The consul is always traveling from one
post to the other. We held meetings and
begged the proper authorities in Germany
to remedy this evil in order to free Ni-
caragua from its inevitable results. We
asked for a consul who would be in an
independent position and able to assist
his countrymen. As yet we have received
no answer. This has produced a bad feel-
ing. The original arrangement still con-
tinues, except that Costa Rica has been
substituted for Salvador, and in each of
the two capitals a vice-consul has been
appointed. We bo not fnd that much has
been gained by this arrangement, and are
of the opinion that enormous expenses
for consular objects are thrown away."

American Shippin.
At the meeting of the Board of Trade
last Tuesday night a request was made
to appoint delegates to represent Jackson-
ville at a meeting of the Congresional
Merchants' Marine Commission, to be held
in Brunswick, Ga., on November 17.
Mr. Fields Seeley Pendleton, represent-
ing the Maritime Association of New
York, was in Jacksonville Tuesday, and
called on President Garner of the Jack-
sonville Board of Trade, and also called
on a number of the leading business men
of the city interested in shipping, and
urged them to have a representative body
of citizens appointed to represent Jack-
sonville at this meeting.
The subcommittee of the Congressional
commission, which will hold the meeting
at Brunswick, is composed of United
States Senators Martin and Mallory and
Representatives Spight of Mississippi, and
Minor of Wisconsin.
Mr. Pendleton is a large shipowner
himself, and is very much interested in
building up the merchant marine of the
United States. He has called particular
attention to the following resolution
adopted by the Maritime Association of
the port of New York last year:
"Whereas, The decline of American ship-
ping in the foreign trade from 2,600,00
tons in 1861 to less than 900,000 tons in
19024 during which period our foreign
commerce has quadrupled in value, has
long attracted the attention of the Ameri-
can people, and has stimulated Congress
to devise remedial measures, almost all
of which have failed of enactment; and,
"Whereas, It is believed that the nation
will be strengthened and protected if it
has an auxiliary means of national de-
fense a large number of merchant ships,
officered and manned by American citi-
zens, and the workmen of the country
will be benefited if they can secure em-


J S. Schofied's Sons Company,
****.0.0*se*.*eoo.ss*ts********5**0***5********0***

Ieadquarters fe

SDistiller's Pumping
Outfit
No plant complete without a.
SHundreds of them in use in Goa
0 Florida, Alabama, Mississippi
*4p South Carolina. Write us for pus ot-
S4 lars and prices. We also manufacmtur
: Engines, Beilers and nf
Grade Mah r y,
Sas well as carry a full and complete
stockof-
Mill Supplies, Pipe,
"" ~Boiler Tube Etc.
Advise your wants.

.l t Macon, Georgia.
eA Lt aesds eslt dfe sd
I "e 9s vf T"L 1f Trpos stes mW P


11111! 11111 III itit 33rI3II-III111111111I111110


SW. W. CAONS. Pres.


W. C. THOMAS. Maneer. C. T DUDI T, Sea. A es


Tarmpa Hardware Co.

Wholesale

Hardware

Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks


T a

STAMP,
to74p
m


Lnd Pullers on Hand.


m m FLORIDA.


I I a a I A A I I a 9 A i 14 6 1 a i i i a a I I I I a a I 1 9 1 a 1 9 1 a I I I I I I Iii



.. NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA., U. S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
Present.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. D. COVINGT1N.
Vice-president.
DhlDaRsw:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGWPr.
J. B. YOUNG.


EL L. KAY1ON,
Syretay sand e


B F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER BAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. B. CHESNU
G. W. DEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and an
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.


W


R. THOMAS


GAINESVILLE. FLOR.IDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggies.


] or nwr "W n 1I 33 =2m waW= VIU


mwlw










THE WEEKLY ILNDUUr~IAL RECORD. 5
mmmm


plyment in the building and the running
of the larger part of the ships required
for the carriage of our imports ad ex-
ports; therefore, be it
"Resolved, That the Maritime Asocia-
tion of the port of New York, desirous of
promoting the building of American ship-
ping and the employment of American
ofees and seamen in their navigation in
oar foreign trade, hereby aathorises the
president of this association to appoint a
committee of five to ascertain by what
methd ships built in American shipyards,
offered and manned by American citi-
eas, may most quickly and effectively
seure the larger part of our foreign ear-
rylin the said committee to present its
report to the board of directors of this
association no later than December 1,
S N1e; and be it further
Resolved, That the committee appoint-
ed pursuant to this resolution is further
authorized to confer and cooperate with
=ieWl committees appointed by other
rganiations to undertake a like investi-
gatlon."
tokhsl sI Meet to Accept Charter.
At the first meeting of the stockholders
of the Florida Bank and Trust Company,
hed Wednesday morning at the Board of
Trade rooms, for the purpose of arragingi
ter applying for articles of incorporation
and charter, the gentlemen interested were
eoamronted with a unique but enourag-
ing proposition.
It was found that stock to the amount
of $1,S00000 had been subscribed, while
the promoters of this great enterprise
were determined to keep the capital stock
down to $1,00000 It was necessary,
therefore, as one of the first acts of the
stockholders to shave down the subswrip-
tion to the stock, and to this end a com-
mittee was appointed to act.
The charter of the new institution was
read and adopted and the capital was offic-
ially fixed at $1,000000. It was nees-
mory to elect officers to manage the bIs-
lms of the company until the charter
i secured, and these wre named as fol-
Iw*:
Water F. Coachmn, president; W. S.
Jenigs, first vice-president; Arthur F.
Perry, second vice-president
There were various matters in connee-
tion with the business venture discussed
ad the indications for this great bank-
irg institution appeared to be exceeding-
ly bright.
The company has purchased the Merean-
tile Exchange Bank and will take charge
of that bank as soon as they are ready to
open fo business.

Major Wells Married
The many friends of Major W. G. Wells,
e of the largest manufacturers of lum-
ber in South Florida, will be delighted to
hear of his marriage to Miss Addie Hol-
lfsworth, of Brownville, on the 26th of
October, After receiving the congratu-
atis of their friends, the happy couple
left for points North.

The Atmayer & Flata Liqor C..
The Record begs to call attention to
the advertisement of the above named
concern, which will be found in this is-
oue, and to say that the many readers
of the Record wil find it very much to
their interests to correspond with the
Altmayer & Fltau Liquor Co. when con-
templating buying anything in their line.
They are among the best and most relia-
le dealers in liquors, wines, gin and
bies in the Southeast.


NAVAL STORKS MEN RETIRE.

Seier Partners in Peaock, Hat & West
Co. Sell Holino.
An announcement of a business change
was made yesterday that will prove of
more than ordinary interest to the busi-
ness men of this section generally, and
particularly to those interested in the
naval stores trade.
The official statement was made by
Mr. W. J. Kelly, vice-president of the
Peacock, Hunt & West Co, that Mr. S.
W. West and himself, together with in-
terests identified with the Consolidated
Naval Stores Co., have acquired the stock
of Peacock, Hunt & West Co, and that
the business will be continued in both
Saannah and Jacksonville under the same
name and management as heretofore.
Messrs. P. L Peacock and J. W. Hunt will
retire from the naval stores business.


Bank Cranged.
The following taken from the Courir-
Informant, will be of interest to Florida
operators, on account of its mention of
Mr. A. P. Malloy, who is spoken of as
one of the prospective directors of the
bank, which is considered one of .the
strongest institutions of its kind in South
Florida:
"The Polk County National Bank has
taken steps to strengthen its already
strong gsmitiom in the finanial field. Sev-
eral of our leading citizens have purchased
stock in the bank and will, at the next
annual meeting, be placed upon its board
of directors in addition to those now com-
posing the bank directory.
"For the present, the administration
will remain as before, that is to say,
Mr. Chas. H. Robinson will remain prsi-
dent, Mr. E. W. Codington and Mr. J. N.
Hooker, vice-presidents and Mr. Wirt,
cashier. It is the intention, however, of
Mr. Robinson and Mr. Oodington to retire
from active duty on the lst of January,
1906, and it is expected by that time the
new directors will have become sufficiently
familiar with the business to enable those
gentlemen to do so without prejudice to
its-business; in fact, it is hoped that in a
year from now the bank will take on new
life by placing its administration into the
hands of younger men while the old heads
retire to take a well earned rest.
"This bank, under its old managers,
has been a strong factor in the growth of
Polk County for many years. We do not
doubt that, when it shall pas to others,
it will continue in its course of useful-
ness.
The names of the new prospective di-
rectors are E. E. Skipper, A. P. Malloy,
U. A. Lightsey, C. E Earnest, Jr.
"It is expected that Mr. E. W. Iane, of
the Atlantic National Bank of Jackson-
ville, will become connected with this
bank and that the two institutions will
work in harmony hereafter."

Reported Pneurchae of Large Turpentine
Intermt.
It is reported that the Hillman-uther-
land Co, of this city, have purchased the
large turpentine and timber interests of
Mr. A. D. Covington, of Quincy, Fla. We
understand that Mr. Covington will in the
near future move to Jacksonville and
assist in the management of this coenern:
If this report is correct, Mr. Covington's
many friends in Jacksonville will be de-
lighted to hear of his becoming a resident
of this city.


:~es- u-e .:.o - -- h------



I For Sale
Seven Room House, corner Hubbard and Sixth St., Springeld. Tarm.
S Eight Boom House, Fourth Stone of the nicest residents in the dl.
4 Extra large lot; house has all modern improvements. Owner leaving ey.
SSpecial price for quick sale.
Eight. Room House Oak St, Riverside; all modern; nies yaer, bar
4 and buildings. House faces the river. Very desirable.
S Lots in all parts 'of the city. Now is a good time to invest in Jacksa-
Sville real estate.
North End lots are the greatest value ever place on this market. .
* down and $1.00 per month.


SBrobston, Fendig & Co.

SJacksve, Fisda. mrid Geargia
\ *;e99s:999>ee s* # l ...... 11111119999...99..9.


A. &. POMmoN,
PmesEL


W. UIL SOU.
Wee pres,


JA u LUr
60 Rorw.


V. V. SJSIAW
Rgan t. ram


Whe W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers


DALrLyal.
T. W. maad


402-4041-4060 EA Wp Steet. Jasliseesm. OW013

IL IL S. PENLKET60,
W. .L isusM.
X 0. WAIC PCVM O.UI


WJ&'Manm


*^*6*4*4- ------- -I-------- --------


J. A. Craig 1& Bro.

0 239 W. BSry Street EVERETT BOCK.

Seaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-

i ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

SAgents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.





The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE C ILETAIL


. HARDWARE


Sash, Doors, RliUs-fs. Pejnts, Oils and Glass.
Stoves, Tinware, Countr7-lIolloware.


30 WEST BAY STREET


Jacksonville, Fla.


----------------------------------------------------
Cable Address. Florida


SStandard Naval Stores

! Company.

DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN

ROSIN

AND TURPENTINE.
Jacksonville, Fla.
- - - - -- - - - - - -


WRZ vW2ms AWymmeai6"& aUEm m r2M2Cim.


'rI











THE WEEKLY 1R In3tJUSI1AL EROD.


COLD STORAGE FOODS.

Dr. Wiley WlI Soem eme His .xperi-

Uncle Sam's boarding house for Govern-
meat clerks who are willing to risk their
stomachs as well as their digestions in the
interest of the great cause of science will
begin operations again immediately after
the volunteer clerks have had an oppor-
tunity to rover from the excitement
ITeident to the forthcoming Presidential
election, says the Washington Star.
Dr. Wiley, chief of the bureau of chem-
istry of the Department of Agriculture,
who plays the genial role of "mine host,"
has announced that on November 10 he
will start a new table with an elaborate
mean made up of elegant viands that have
been in cold storage for a greater or less
length of time.
-Inst winter a half dozen or more Gov-
grment clerks sacrificed themselves on
the altar of science in order that the
genial chemist might determine the effects
Upon the human system of certain foods
that had been treated with preservatives
such as borax and formaldehyde. The
young men for many weary months had
the long-suffering undertaking of eating
according to schedule and under pledge to
partake of only such tempting dishes as
were put forth by the bureau of chemistry
chef after having been secretly and vary-
ing amount laded with chemicals
As the winter progressed more or less
fun was poked at Dr. Wiley's "poison
squad," but they survived the "johing."
The medicated food appeared to make the
fat ones grow thin and the thin ones grow
fat, and each alike was able to withstand
the harrowing wintry blasts that blew al-
most continually during the long and
dreary months. Three times each day, as
if preparing for a prise fight, each mem-
ber of the squad was "weighed in" before
being admitted to the dining saloon, al-
most simultaneously the temperature of
each was taken and varying symptoms
noted. Then the men were admitted to a
Stable on which was a bounteous eal.
some parts of which had been treated
with preservatives in larger or smaller
amomtt, and some of which had not. In
ousequenee they tackled each alike with
varying emotion. Coming from the ta-
ble a p..furrnn similar to that under-
gone upon entering the disingroom was
gone through with and the men were dis-
missed until the next meal. this was the
proceeding for days and weeks and

Now comes Dr. Wiley with another me-
ries of experiments, another eomplimen-
tary invitation for some of Uncle Sam's
faithful hirelings, who are willing to un-
der ke to sacrifice themselves to the
,* strange and mystic way of science. Dr.
Wiley has co-ldeuce that when the first
meal, of frozen food is served his faith-
Sfu subjects will be ready for the tests
that am td be made.
It is the desire of the Department of
Agriculture to learn exactly Iwhat effect
oeld storage has upon various foodstuffs,
qad to this end, beef, mutton and veal,
gs, butter, lard and such products, which
have been in cold storage from a period of
Sme o week to two years will be served up
in the mot tempting style known to an
S pert chef who has been especially en-
gaged to prepare the meals.
The experiments will not be undertaken
uatil after the election, because Dr. Wi-
ley say he does not want anything to
- -s the miams of any of his subjects
^,^ *''- "~-r


He thinks this because the usual efects C. N. UIBAR r


of mind over matter is at best a question
of doubt. He will begin in the first week
of his experiments with a table made up
entirely of fresh foods as choice as the
market can afford. He will gradually
call upon his cold storage supply and note
the very effects of the foods as they are
served. It is not the intention to serve
up an entire menue of cold storage food,
for it is realized that the aims of the ex-
periment could not be met in this man-
ner. One kind of cold storage products
will be served at a time and its effects
noted.
These experiments Dr. Wiley feels will
be of great benefit in determining the
value of the cold storage plants and will
at the same time show conclusively
whether or not beef that is thoroughly
frozen and kept so for a period of a year
or more is as good and as nourishing as
beef that has been freshly slaughtered.
Eggs will be another of the important
articles for the test. It is known that
during the summer months eggs are bought
by the dealers in large quantities at a
very low price and placed in cold storage
until the middle of winter, when there is
a scarcity of the product of the hennery,
and the fruit of the hen has soared to
lofty heights. Whether these eggs are
nutritious and of the lame value as fresh-
laid eggs is to be determined.
Those men who will allow Professor
Wiley to "try it on the dog" will be
weighed in early next Wednesday morn-
ing. Their general physical condition will
be noted. They will be given meal tick-
ets at Uncle Sam's expense, and for seve-
ral months will receive the sympathy of
their friends and neighbors, but those of
them who have made the promise to Dr.
Wiley say they feel perfectly assured
that they will fare better than their
predecessors, who had to take food that
had been treated with preservatives, while
the newcomers will be certain at least
that no "poison ow dope" has been inject-
ed into the juicy steaks, delicious chops,
ham and- and other like viands that will
be served to them, and take consolation
in the fact that much of the food they
have been eating from day to day has
come from the various cold storage ware-
houses of the city.

Suar Cane Raimes in Florida.
Florida has a land area of 54,240 square
miles and a population of 528,542. Dif-
ferent from all other States, her entire
area above water is most excellent sugar-
cane and cigar tobacco growing lands.
Florida has a general average in the
length of season for maturing cane over
Louisiana of about two months, which
largely increases the yield. Louisiana's
yield of brown sugar under favorable cir-
eumstances is about 1,000 pounds per acre,
while on the common pine land of Florida,
when fertilized with unskilled cotton seed,
will make 2,800 to 3,000 pounds per acre.
Several have reported that 1,000 gallons of
syrup per acre is not extraordinary. They
get from 75e. to $1.00 per gallon for their
syrup in the northern markets.
It is a general admission that the grow-
ing of ane is the most profitable field
crop that can be grown. The Floridians
can go a step farther by saying that if
the industry is properly encouraged, they
will raise in the next few years 75 per
cent of all sugar consumed in the United
States. A new impetus has come over
their dreams since they have found out
that they can make perfectly pure syrup
which will bring from 75 cents to $1.00 per


J. D. SHAW, VIe-pius.


RMLPU Sss.kss


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Resins
Strictly a Prodcers' Cempamy. Gaes
Grades and Weights Gmaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksmville. Pensasea, fenadiem Sawom-
Cerresl ndense Sllsited. JACKSONVILLE. LA.

#@ofIfi#I MiE61II1go Ioi II gaiiInelsIhte usee e 1


PEARL WOIO. Pre&


T. IL MCCARTHY, Vse-Pres.


AMIUE SER. Tres


SSOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.

mVIM M. WELC. Maimmr.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


S401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


64I104I1 IIIIIlSO I norlll II* U 11u1g1 los........s


W. H BKCKMWrH. W. B. HENDERSON. OG. CWARUML

SBECKWITH, H1NDERSON & WARREN.


LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTIIE AID MILL LAU S

Jooms 1-2-3, First Natleal Bank DaBitlg.
TAMPA, : : : .: POI A.



Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.




cYPRESS TANKS; TUS,

AND VATS.

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking,
1M. (G. DAVIS & SON1, PALTXrrA, Pa.

BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I wll send by press prepvad. the flbew.
rowr fun QasLrts Lito Conty. aonnybrook Rye or Big Roma y.. gU
kncle Bottles ..........
I wl send four fan quarts of Om Corn. Mewood RP aeld We-
deg Rye, Hollead ObG, Tom Gin. Peach Brandy. Pso c amd Hrne
Whiskey. ti and Manhattan Cocktals--ay of thie h frr ....... -
One bottle of any f the above .......................................... .........I
Lour bottle of the followlnc CaMfonia Wines: Msrry. Prt. Mst.
Catawba ................

hige bottle .......... .........
rie bottles DuffIy Malt .
Single bottles .....
Bulk oods of all kinda. peelal Prioe on appOatlesrh Aln Mkih
liquors in j~us from VLL to .L6 f. o. b. Jackasotle.
F. BETTELINI W Bay St., pp. Union Uepet, Jacks1 vine, Fl


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST OH EARMT.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Maats. Orders filled at lowest Jim
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotatiom-
thispaper.
KINOAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILL, FLA.


AM TYO A i TO T5 WHa











THE 'WK3KLY frwuwrkl.AL kUCORD. I


glem, for which they will have the civi-
lied world for customers and consumers.
With these facts brought to the atten-
tion of homeseekers, when life can be
enjoyed, in the most invigorating as well
as healthful eimate on earth, is there aay
reason why Florida will not become filled
rapidly with a good class of farmers from
all parts of the country. It can now
justly he termed the El Dorado of Ameri-
co-and is capable of producing more
kinds of profitable crops than any State in
the Union.
The StLck Market i Octber.
Dom's Review has the following to say
on the stock market for the month of
October:
"Except toward the lose of the moth
and at its very end the stock market was
buoyant during October. Improvement
was not confined to any one group of
properties, bat was general throughout the
list In almost every ase high records
for the year were made. The advance in
prices was influence by continued ease of
money, the certainty of bountiful crops,
L-rO...t in railroad earnings, gene-
rally favorable condition in the business
world, and rumors of new affliation of
properties, mergers and the like. The
dealings in the properties especially f-
fected by .these reports re enormous.
Indon was a material factor and the
tram tios for foreign aeeount were
heavy. There ware occasional reactions,
due to prot taking sales, but the demand
that developed on the recessions led to
quik recoveries. At the elne of the
month there was a generally weak ten-
demy. The course of prices is best indi-
cated by the average quotations which for
sixty railroad stocks advanced from i$
to *1056, for ten industrials from $674
to Se.50, and for five city traction and gas
stoek fro $129 to $137.4A, at their


highest point. At the elne of the month
the average prior of sixty railroad stocks
was $101.63, of the ten industrials $6149,
and of the five city traction and gas
stocks $134.2.
A notable development of the month,
and one to which the weakness that mark-
ed its close was chief due, was the re-
sumption of gold exports on rather a
heavy scale, with prospective further con-
tinuance of the movement in view of the
condition of the foreign money markets
and the strength of sterling exchange here,
demand bills having advanced during the
month from $4.825 to $.L868. The mon-
ey market was slightly affected by these
conditions late in the month, eall loans
rising slightly above two per cent. which
was the average prevailing rate earlier.
Time loans also showed a hardening ten-
deeny, although the latter was not ma-
terially rejected in rates. The Clearing
House banks lost in reserve $,210,500
net during the month, and in surplus
$3,119,770. A new high record for loans
was made on the 8th when the figures
were $1,145,98,200. Although mt offial-
ly confirmed until the month's very end,
it was earlier taken a a a generally accept-
ed fact that the New York, New Haven
& Hartford had acquired pisoesion of
the New York, Ontario & Western rail-
road and there were more or less definite
reports of other combinations soon to
be made known. The reports of a North-
ern Securities settlement were persistent
throughout the month, anad while lacking
eonflrmtion, were given color by the sharp
rise in the shares of the companies in-
volved and by the calling of the Oregon
Short Line participating four for retire-
ment. The quarterly statement of the
United States Steel Corporation fulfilled
all predictions and rejected an improving
condition in that industry. The essa-


tion of dividends on the Pressed Steel CO
Company's common stock was na evidence
of the effect of the railroads' recent period
of retrenchment and curtailment in the
matter of equipment expenses. The open-
ing of the subway wa particularly bene-
ficial to Interborough Rapid Transit stock,
which sold at the highest price inee its
issue.
The transactions in stocks during the
month aggregated 32,479,568 shares, a
increase of 13,774,851 shares as compared
with the previous month and 19,08517
shares as compared with the ceapoad-
ing monch of last year. The dealings
were the heaviest of any October in the
history of the Stock Exchange, and were
exceeded only by the totals of April ad
May in 1901. There were nine days on
which the sales exceeded a million and
a half shares and sixteen days when they
were above a million share. The dealings
in bonds were also on a very heavy scale,
aggregating 149,973,500, an increase of
$34,840,400, as compared with the pre-
vious month and $76,380,00 as compared
with the corresponding month last year.
The total was the heaviest of any month
in the history of the 8tock Exchange, the
nearest approach being in January, 1899,
when the dealings amounted to $144,784,-
740.


PLEASED WITH JACKES1UGEIL

Big Shipowner Mahie a Vit Of fT h
and mp ns vgham
F. Pendlkton, one of the nlr gest
owners in the country a"t wh- hr s
ral trading veemels between Jasamm
and Northern points, wna in
yesterday and left during the rafters
for Brunswick, Ga.
Mr. Pendleton stated that he wae Vy
much surprised in the growth of Jad--
ville, both as a leading busieMs-s
great shipping par. He s ite tht th
near future Jado il i d A to
become a lending import At msem
there are three vessels in prt ewa by
Mr. Pendleton. They an %1s Wly X.
Morse, Beeher and eoti. Whbi bee he
called on the eaptaine of the tha i-
mes. Mr. Pendleton is th owner f vr
one hundred vessels.
The Last Stre C8mag
Many an advertisement whih a- Irm6-
ly does not sel a dollar's w rth ert e
may do many a dollar's worth of go a,
for it brings the em emos me am
nearer to the establishment al dthe a
advertisement may bring them in. It
last stroke makes the horesboe" TML
others were merely prepatry-Bm
min Wood.


The West-Raley-Rannle Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jackshrile, Fl.
4. f. WEsrT Prrs. &. rW. VWest.f rs W. .- U. 8c-Frus. N. 7 1a. a &rsin.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your pr r.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.


D. M. FLYNN, President


D. M. Flynn


Walter Ray


W. B. JOHNSON, Vice-President
DIRECTORS
J. W. Ogleeby L. Horn


A. 8. PENDLETON, S'y & Tr


N. G. Wade


J. L. Medlin


W. B. Johnaon


Independent Naval Stores & Export Co.,


Jacksonville, Florida.


Naval Stores Factors and Operators.


Capital Stock, $500,000.


The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal advances. made on consignments.
Our interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operative company.



Some Money and Some Timber For Somebody.


All Producers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.


2.3 maco 33 w as**oesusness masar


M I&_ "N w Ml%%%V"IVV% s


I .


VIUMMPE r 1N vuwrWAZ BJMRXID.









THE WmIM UwUESTEIAL RECORD.


Business Directory.

alm" Ift fte" pdmb zones
UY" UE w ~r fur
owzy dief tfta M *a p tft Weve
ft hem 8U01 aa m
-M IN TANOW-Jnewet rWtes Lai-
us L Gree & Os, and 16 Pos t IN&
JakamnvmL 1 C


BILL I 1MIOi RY,
Comml ion Merchants,
Navel Stores & Cotton
ml aaes e a t dneP
COTTON EXCHANGE BUIL.IE,
JEW TORK CITY.
wi.m WAITING ADVERTISERS
UJITO I THM RECORD.

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
S Bat in the VWold
w dervurrd pes rie,
NePEs Tald C0.. M06b1eA1

MW ft.-- Absad Casy.
LS. J-bas Abtracter.
a .dM-i ManIee cI.y, lnr..
Comef reNIsle boots, Uitles perfected.
Taem or no-.ident property owners in
Im neUiaed for o.IMdent o approved
ewitwk grI-edged weurity paiyinrintaset
a 10 per cent per mu, med-n-aly.
S lill rnmdteab


M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

C mission Merchants.
Mo-N, M ii---.' TAX, PITiCH,
m* UNsu, c rTc.
am =94 s, mrr
asB flet Stet, NEtW TORN.



Trade Checks
MoR TRE


THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the Suth
combined.
Send al orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Sistrial eore i C.,


SOUTHMM TRADE COMzaDAO&l
Trade Celities as Shewn by Bad-
streets.
Charlestomn-Wholesale dealers in eloth-
ing, shoes and groceries report collections
and trade good.
Savannah.-Trade in all linmea fair,
plemental orders being received from near-
by territory. Collections are good, and
the season thus far exceeds expectations.
There is a fair movement of cotton, but
the disposition is to hold for advances.
Augusta.-Retail trade remains quiet,
but is improving. All lines of wholesale
trade are good. Collectiops are good.
Atlanta.-The volume of business is
quite large and collections generally are
good. The two-months drought was bro-
ken by good rains on November 2 and 3.
Jacksonville.--Naval stores are firm at
51 cents. Demand for lumber is stronger,
with mills full of good orders large ship-
mentsof citrus fruits are being made at
good prices. The succem of carnival week
was marred by rainy weather, but trade
is good and collections are fair.
Birmingham.-Cotton reipts are large,
bt middling upland brings only 914
cents. No. 2 foundry iron is quoted at
$12.50 on a brisk demand.
Montgomery.-A drought of several
weeks' duration has been brought to a
close by general rains throughout the
State, which have to some extent improved
the movement of cotton, receipts of which
show an increase over the previous year.
Jobbers report an increased volume of
business, while retail trade has been quite
active, due partly to the large number of
visitors attending the street carnival.
Collections are good.
Chattanooga-Heavy rainfall in this
section the past two days has materially
improved crop conditions, which are fairly
good. Trade with wholesale and retail
dealers is good and collections are satis-
factory.
Memphis.-Wholesale and retail busi-
ness is increasing and ompares favorably
with last year. Demand for money is in-
creasing on account of cotton being moved
rapidly, but supply exceeds demand, and
early improvement in collections is antic-
piated. Inquiries and orders for lumber
are increasing, and a better feeling is ap-
parent.
Nashvile. Dry and unseasonable
weather has retarded both business and
collections considerably, yet the volume
as a whole has been large and results
staisfactory. oGod demand for builders'
materials continues.
Little Roeck-Retail merchant in most
lines are enjoying a good trade, but job-
bers report business only fair. Collec-
tions have improved very materially.
New Orleas.-Jobbers report activity
in staples and a general increase of. bsi-
ness. Retail trade, particularly in cloth-
ing, shows an advance in sales. Collec-
tions in general are good. Crops are in
good condition, and late raims have ap-
paretly proved beneficial.
Dallas.-Recent general rains throughout
this section were very benecial to the
wheat crop, and present prospects point
to a large yield. The present weather is
favorable for cotton picking, though farm-
ers in general are reported to be holding
their cotton for higher pries. General
trade continues active and olletions are
reported god.
Waeo.-The weather is still unfavor-
able, And the movement of cotton is slow.
Trade s good in general ines. Collec-
tions are fair.


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing


Still Boilers and
SHIP BUILDING and


Pumps.
REPAIRING.


JackuOnvlle. F11.


* ae IV I6 1 IT II I I I IT w I W fII T a I e seaw W I wI I IIe eww 9

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and n k-nith Coal, Ime Cmen, Brik, Psa
Foot Hogan St., Jackonville, Fla.


Cummer Lumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSER LUMBER

Long Lead Yellow Pine.
BOXES end CRATES.



SStandard Clothing Company


SOne rrice One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FUNISHIERfS,
17 SId 19 Wet Bay Street, JkoMvi. I
* 8tetme and Mawes Hats. Special Atttmies Oves to NiaR Ordes.
*,***e*.*e*,*e*.*e*e*.*.*.* 0**e*** e
Ot~eeo~eo~eoeeeeeeeet @ eeO e O6 eO eMJ1'5


IL TOLAiR


. H. HART.


T. H. LAO3.Y.


. L TOLAI, i


(setabllheed 1172.)

TOLAR. HART & CO..
160 FRONT 8 1i um- NEW YORK.


Commission


Merchants


and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of Ne
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Fatures.


JOBPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KEJENSO


J. D. WEED ICO.,
8AVANIAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battins, Etc


Read the Record Advt's.


GINS OW TUB WGIVS 13 2r2A FAIS










T~ wMVrLY xwuzritAL RBCORD.9


ZINC NAILS

Turpentin Cups
Arqvve by Dr. Acrty. Saoe of I
w bt WNoft liht U er They ea
t* a-l hm--s which will not injure
mws wham left in the tres.
ri Nl Ma0I O
We r Ia. amw rv*, av. i.
Also HmI--rs for Galvanized and
Tuerd Nails, Blot Nails, Spikes, Round
Mods, t., Slating and Boo.n
lAL, S1aters Tools, Copper *ails



Typewriters
S AM Gkemi-- 5.00 Up.

GRIVOT yaln'l I
The Wm-barter, OIUrg writes at sight.
The JIEWlr, Kig of doble-board ma-
St oW Smi Amy Make t Tyermli.



10. R. FSIR,
MANUFACTURER Of


BRIC K.


Cp"Wit of Yard 800.000 Per Month.

WK. 90.

Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl
rm Rye-Agents for Juns, Cinein-
mati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application..
CHAS. BLUM & CO.
17 Man 519 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, ILA.

Tni

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
Steoa sp l rt wifhet destroying the
MwE nbe. m ouat a are to h sstha
tweor-itS r -ors. Mahke tr m twenty to
feely-- llrs frot r S woecood.
mPa o pIf water whitare p ~r ftme fo
a efer ot tar o eramote. No cheomsaim
m --in the pL ait. to be0
-dme only r a rom r- r-
torath wlth i-prnodne the spLrts
Sto M dai aLm Iha" Me r IWo-
ld a Id am won& Onsa o do
o fra produced ad that t a hihat
AOLLUTMLT NO DAMOR pROM IRET
iMt S mt moaisI by bi-grad.
neaodo to
wnTme The 4eK mt actin if S
vs wCsen.d es Mpar o t out and
qam t orcIt. We gmruate otput
Tsi he t drt C i

P. 0. am sa &azm uc.


Purtii- a on Worn SlU..
[Paper read before the Farmers' Institu
at Lawrenceburg, Ky, by Prof. M.
Scovell, Director Kentucky Experime
statio,.]
Although the soil furnishes only a sam
portion of food to plants, neverthele
this amount is so essential that plan
camnnt grow without it. If we eoami
the plant we find it is made up of the la
stem and root. If we study its grow
we find it takes up portions of its fo
through the hair-like threads on its roc
lets, and another portion through lit
openings on the under parts of its leavi
f we study it still further we find th
more than three-fourths of its food is o
trained from the atmosphere through t
leaves, and but a small portion throu
the roots from the soil. If we analy
the green plant we find in most instance
nearly nine-tenths of its weight is wat
If we burn a plant we find but a sm
portion left in the form of ashes. TI
small portion represented by the ashes
the portion taken from the soil by t
rootlets, together with the nitrogen whi
has consumed by the burning of the pla
The atmosphere furnishes this food to t
plants always in abundance. There
what we are to consider is the food tak
by the plants from the soil.
f we analyze the ash of a plant we f
it contains certain elements, the chief on
of which are potassium, phosphorus, e
cium, magnesium, iron and sulphur. The
elements do not exist in the metallic
chemical form, but they are combined wi
other elements and especially oxygen.
illustrate: the metal calcium combine
with oxygen to form lime; potassit
combines with oxygen to form potassium
oxide, which is know as potash; phospl
rus combines with oxygen to form phi
phorie acid, and when nitrogen combir
withoxygen in certain proportions
forms nitric acid or nitrates. When
combines with hydrogen in certain pi
portions it forms ammonia. It is t
stlts of these elements or the oxides th
the plant takes up as its food. Most
solids contain abundance of magnesium
sulphur, iron and chlorine, but many so
are wanting in or do not contain a sul
cient quantity of potash, nitrogen, phi
phoric acid and lime to produce laI
crops; especially is this true of worn soi
t has been shown by repeated expe
ments that many soils contain all the
elements of plant food, but not in an ava
able form for the plant to use as fo
It has been demonstrated that the pla
must get its soil ifood through its ro
lets in the form of a solution. The a<
sap in the little rootlets has the pow
to dissolve to some extent these elemer
in the soil, but they are incapable of d
solving many of the combinations whi
exist in the soil. Consequently, we mn
have a soil rich in plant food but whi
will not produce a good crop for the sil
pie reason that the plants are unable
dissolve these elements and take them
as food. The problem to solve in su
soils is how to make the phIa food mo
quickly available. There are many -wa
to do this. When air ciilakes free
through the soil, it is a great disintegr
tor of the soil. It oxidizes the iron, f
instance, and it brings with it carbon
oxide which combines with the moist
and thus carbonic acid water is forme
which dissolves the food elements to
greater extent than pure water. Reacti.
takes place much more rapidly in wax


.te
A.
nt







od
Its
ge
if,
th
od


es.
at
hb-
he
gh


TURPENTINE

CUPS.

If you expect to uee S Frr p
next season, place yod orders now=
future delivery. Prices and all inform-,
tion cheerfully furnished on
CUPS, GUTTERS
AND ALL TOOLS
used in the Herty system of turpentinag


SChattanooga Pottery
: .Co.paC N y,
j'uSM-ife Rw6.


er.
n Wanted and For Sale

he DEPARTMENT.
ich
nt Adverasements WrI be Inserted It rMs Departmet at tae fsofwt~ f1es*
he For one week, 20 cents a line.
re For two weeks, 3 centsaline.
For three weeks 50 cents a line.
en For four weeks, . 65 cents a liUe.
Nine words of ordinary length make oe n line.
Headin counts a two lines.
nd No display except the headings can be admitted.
es Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. Copy must be in this oice not later thaa Tnsay
md- morning to secure isertio in Friday's paper.

or Wasted. Woodsmn Wasted.
ith First-class stiller. Mut have references. Must be single and strictly sober ad
To Address ABC, care this office. 2t not younger than twenty-five or older
than thirty-five; also must be a fist-
es Waated. class bookkeeper, and fish good ref
"m Reliable man to take charge of turpen- fences. Address J. D. X, Chipley, Fa.
m tine camp in Florida. Must he well recom- 4t.
ho- mended. Address XYZ, care this office.
- t Stiller Wasted.
me Wanted-First-class stiller, white man
i Wasted. with family. Can furnish good home,
S Three convict guards to begin work at and will board with family. I want a
it once. Will pay the right salary to the man who is competent to take charge
ro- right men. Address L. S. Petteway & Co, during my absence. Address P. H. Bakt,
he Gabriella, Fla. 4t Campville, Fla. 4
at
llWasted. or Sale.
all
Woodsman that can keep books and Small turpentine farm, 12 crops boms
m, commissary. Must be sober and give ref- for one and two years. Plenty high boxes
ils erences. None but married men need ap- near still. On railroad. Schedule for-
fi- ply. C. H. Conoley, Wallace, Fa. nished on request. Address IH W. Mercer,
os 2 Cottondale, Fla. 4t
e Wasted. For Sale.
ls. To buy a first-elass turpentine location 35,000 acres St. Johns and Volsia; 13.-
ri- in Florida. Will pay the right price for 000 acres, DeSoto County; 14,00 acre.
se the right place. No flat woods place need DeSoto County; 30,000 acres, Calhou
il- apply. G. A. Petteway, Box 26, Leroy, County; 20,000 acres Hillsboro Comty;
Marion Co., Fl. tf 80,000 acres Manatee County. Al rond
timber. D. T. Donghtry, oom 22 Bald-
nt Wasted. win Bldg. 44
y s-A d BlH Wel a BlyaB 5 pi ng OUt-
A distiller. We want a good, sober Turpestise Mes.
mad mn with family, to run the still another
er season. Can give steady employment Aft for your still No. 1 ouat pamps
ts through the winter. None need apply btstill No. pmp
is- first-lass man with good references. Ad- gallons hour at aest of 3 est anl
dress F. & W, Jonesboro, Fla. tf requires o attention wh il -
ceh Started in one minute. J. P.
ay Position Wasted. ocas,
ch Want a position as turpentine woods- Are you reading your paper, or m-
m- man or book-keeper; can furnish good ref- one else's. If not a subscribe to te ee-
to erences. Address A. S. R., care Industrial ord, ead in your name today, with IMi
Record, Jacksonville, Fl. tf the price of subscription for -i ya.
up


ch
re
ys
ly
a-
or
li-
re

a
on
*m


Continued an Page 15


McMURRAY & BAKER,


So ill and luen0ne Hn s .
We are reeia aly w-i-t..ate pleaue un, nees reumimesa S i.
-be.m wha. hmarass ed house tfur n we mv asbtw m~e.I"
a .aaoda la taoch with al. Turpmnttme wagoss and harma a spesmla. gft'
toraet we man beat te world on had-made haeran

IM RIT i 4N01V i E h .
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


TME RECORD IS TME 013AT010 VW !AMM











10 T=E WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RUCOND.


----- - -- [-- -- --- - - - -
J. A. PaMnoer, AmowB &HmnAn. ATTBM FV. PinaT t
PrdideLt. Viee-Presddet. aomer.

The Mercantile Exchange Bank, I
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
C.plel. $200.000. Surplus. $100.000 g
STATE PEPOSITAR.Y.
emsWl lanlkiw. ntereatPule s savi Depots. Sate Depooit Boass. .O per Yer. 9


Review of Naval Stores for a Week


L-


Spirits Held Price.
The spirits of turpentine market at
Savanh maintains its level at 50 cents,
but the tone is firm and receipts are
cleaned up so that the market is general
considered to be in a very healthy condi-
tion, and ready for the rise in price that
is considered about due. The opening yes-
terday was firm and sales of 204 casks
were reported. The close was unchanged,
but no further sales were posted. The
receipts were 867 casks, and the shipments
35.
Prices in the rosin market continued
their upward course yesterday. The mar-
het opened frm and showing gains of 2 1-2
eats on all grades from H to E, inclu-
sive. The sales were 1,624 barrels. The
lose was firm and unchanged, and with
no additional sales. The demand was good
in the post market trade, so that a gen-
eral advance was paid on closing quota-
tios. Some sales were made at an ad-
vance of 21-2 cents on the entire list,
others at 6 cents up on I and above, and
21-2 cents on H and below, and still
others at 21-2 cents on K and below.
The receipts were 1,172 barrels, and the
shipments nothing.

Spirits fr the Week at Sava-ah.
Price Repta Sal Exp. 190
Mon, Nov. 7 0 304 317 0 6
Tues., Nov. 8 5o 975 620 30 56%
'Wed, Nov. 9 50 580 93 0
Thur., Nov. 10 867 1172 1624 6


Range of Tupentie and Rain at Savan-
nah Nov. zo and Same Day
Last Year.
Nov. 10 Nov. 9 Nov. 10
1904 1904 190
Tone ... Firm Firm Steady
spirits .. 50 W50 56%
Sales .. 204 932 | 288
Rosin .. Firm Firm Firm
WW ... 5.00 5.00 3.50
WG .... 4.75 4.75 3.25
N ...... 4.50 4.50 3.10
M ...... .25 4.25 2.90
K ....... 3.75 3.75 2.80
I ...... 3.25 3.25 2.70
H ...... 2.77% 2.75 2.35
G ...... 2.72% 2.70 2.30
F ...... 2.67% 2.65 2.2
E ...... 2.62% 2.60 2.10
D ...... 2.57 2.57% 2.05
C, B, A 2.52% 2.52% 2.05
Sales .. 1,024 2,258 1,423


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903.04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS


Receipts

RoSinrs bbks ........... .. ......... .
Total.................................

T al . . .o. . .. .. .. . . . . o-o . -
cxpoees
b Mr c--............................

Roa ..... ............ ............


brk, b ak ..............................
hmies. . . . .

-a............ ................
bbs. ................ ............


1908-04 11902-03


198,647
650,988
844,585

188,398
752,270

98,884
888,171

85,658
87,853

59,351
826.740


292 496
940,507
1,238,038

296,43C
975.428

206,100
504,178

42,766
138,121

87,556
387,784


1901-02


814,846
1,071,440
1,385,786

814,876
62,687

217,446
585,042

53,797
129,059

48,633
898,586


Th -lsei of *k& afe lm than mm1 by %w9 ca", ad of mda, 239,59 b 1k


Crop d Spirit ad Roii for Thre Yeal

Spirit. Rosin. Spirikt. RoeI O m n-o
Wi .....ngt .... ..1U1 38M 1%M im loew mum-
ciarlato.. .. .. .... %Ma 3s1 sW7 nIA ""M4 |g
Savaumna........ .. ..17684 mie, 18 e10 3M7 UInM MIU4
FBrmwiek.. .. ...... ..MS 1784,5 87 M "A41n
Moble.. ... .. ........ u2, s, 138,3 7$,1 lo w,
Nww Orlen.......... . tl 33J,1 l113O 1 ,W0
uhael........ .... .1ea" co %M UM M
Ceorgetown.. .. .. .. 7J, 44114 143# 4%M 'MM
Pn.ola..4... .. .... ..42,554 85,963 3835 131,85 1.wa
Ja. a& erndimi.. .... 1mt i0 1uxle 91 3 5,0 7 l m MAr
Twmpa .... .. .........m sdma4ls U-Io M IM 4 M X I

Totals...... ......5UU 33MW 5n16 3,136313 14 SWAN

Thus ofh Turpentin to U.
The following table is copied by James Watt a Som, of Tararm, fre A
official returns. For convemieme of comparim we have tnrmd ewtna hto hm a
-320 ewt. equal 100 barrels.
1i7 138 IaM 1908 16 1IM IM g
From U. &, bbls. .... 15,68 173,75 149,375 17444 IM, 8 1U IMI
From France, bbs... 161 U4 617 2,23 WM IN A
From other countries.. 1,48 878 O 86 Ml 310
-- --
16,32 174,31 14,9^2 177,M 194,1 IWjR, IMrW
From Runia .......... 281s 4,13 4,a 8,a1 6M 11 17,V 5
Total Barrels .. 167,12 173, 154,90 186,0 381,36 U1M,2 M-A
Thus the import of rB anis Torpentine (or Wood Spirit) inr U was d IMle
that of 1902, and over six times as much as in 187. It in interesting to n how
this import fluctuates with the price of American Turpetime.
Percentage of Import of Russian ..1.79 2.33 322 4.57 3AI1 5.4 13
Av. Price Amer. Turp. in Lama ..21. 24-6 34-1 -54 7-1 -1 4
SE1


COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS


S Savanah Naval Str St atem t.
Spirits. Roin.
Stock April 1 ........... 6,495 44,50
Receipts Nov. 10 ....... 867 1,172
Receipts previously .....141,350 413,511
Total ..............148,712 459,233

Exports Nov. 10 ....... 35 ......
Exports previously ......120,961 403,690
Total ..............120,996 40,0690
Stock Nov. 10 .......... 27,716 55,643
Stock previously ........ 16,425 60,002
Roin for the Week at Savanna.
Monday, Nov. 7. Last Year.
WW.... .... ..-.. 5.00 3.50
WG ........... 4.7 3.25
N .. ........ 450 3.10
M ... ...... 4.25 2.90
K.............. 3.75 2.80
I .. .. .......... 3.25 2.70
H ............ 2.77% 2.35
G .......... .. 2.72% 2.30
F ............ 2.67% 2.25
E ................ 2.62% 2.10
D ........ ....... 2.0 2.05
ABC ...... ...... 25 2.05
Receipts 1,479, sales 2,038, exports 0.
Tuesday, Nov. 8.-Rosin firm; receipts
3,041; sales 2,003; shipments 1,607. Quote
A, B, C, $2.52 1-2; D, 2.57 1-2; E, 2.60
$2.Y62 1-2; F, 2.65@$2.67 1-2; G, $2.70;
H, $2.75; I, $3.25; K, $3.75; M, $4.25; N,
$4.50; WG, $4.75; WW, $5.
Wednesday, Nov. 9.-Rosin firm; re-
ceipts 1,560; sales 2,258. Quote: A, B,
C, $2.521-2; D, $.571-2; E, $2.60; F,
$2.65; G, $2.70; H, $2.75; I, $3.25; K,
$3.75; M, $4.25; N, $4.50; WG, $4.75;
WW, $5.00.
Bailey & Montgmery's Review.
New York, Nov. 9, 1904.
Spirits Turpentine-Stock, 648 barrels.
This market during the week has again
suffered from dull business, and at the
expense of values.
Thursday, Nov. 3-54 1-2c. asked.
Friday, Nov. 4, 541-2e. asked.
Saturday, Nov. 5-54 1-2c. asked.
Monday, Nov. 7-541-4 am; 54 pm.
Tuesday, Nov. 8-Holiday.
Wednesday, Nov. 9-54, weak.
Rosin-Stock, 18,90 barrels.
This market is also more quiet, but on
the whole prices are steady.
AC, $2.95; D, $3.05; E, $3.10 to $3.15;
F. $3.15 to $3.20; G, $3.20 to $3.25; H,
$3.25 to $3.30; I, $3.55; K, $4.00 to $4.10;
M, 4.60 to 4.65; N, $4.80 to $4.90; WG,
$5.00 to $5.10; WW, $5.25 to $5.30.


1904-0
ND
53
54%
54%

53%
54%
52%
a3%
64
52%
52%
53%
52%
582%
53%
52%
52%
54%
64%
52%
52%
52
52%


AT SAVANNAH FM FITE TRAM


1903-04
ND
50
49%
47
45
45
47%
47%
49
45%
46%
47%
47%
47%
48
49%
49%
52
52
55@%
54
54%
56%
57
55


SM. A. BRIGGS, President.
SH. C. BRIGGS. Ist Vice-President.


IS@- ISI-M
46 34
42% 3
42% 22%
43 31%-W
42%-43 3
43 3
45 31%
45 32%t
456% %
46% 3%
47% 32
48% 33%-%
47% 34%
45% 33%
45% 34%
44% 34%
44 33
43% 32%
43% 34
44% 33
44% 34
44% 34
45 .33%
44% 34%
46 34
46% 33%
47% 34


W'4
531%
-46I
47%
46%
47
43
0
49
46
44%
43%
42%
43%
43%
44%
42
U6%
N8%
38
36%
34
35%
35%
36%
37


HOMER BROWN, Sad VIe-Proe
J. C. McDONALD, See'y sa Tram.


I W, H, Brigs Hardware Co.

VALDOSTA. GA.
* Sole Southern Agent for--


SRIXFORD AXES.

* h Theey are be EST. Others imitate but none du-
* plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the finest
temper, hold the keenest edge, cut better and last longer
5 than an) other axe.
S This has all been proved by years of actual use.

* SeSd us yoer orders.

3 W. H. BRIG6S HARDWARE COMPANY,

^p. O'$e'OOOO -e, o*r- -- -e,


P rin tin g Send your order to the Indnstri l
SRecord. -Bomptand satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, la.


THE w"JAUrrArTT O OUR ADVERTISERS VOUCMED n.&


April I ....................
April 8 ....................
April 15 ...................
April 22 ..................
April 29 ...................
May 6 ...................
May 13 ....................
May 20 ...................
May 27 ...................
June 3 .................
June 10 ........... .......
June 17 ..................
June 24 ..................
July 1 .... ..............
July 8 ...................
July 15 ....................
July 22 .................. .
July 28 .......... ....
Aug. 4 ...................
Aug. 12 ...................
Aug. 19 ..............
Aug. 26 ........ .....
Sept. 2 ....................
Sept. 9 ...................
Sept. 16 .......... ........
Sept. 23 ...................
Sept. 30 ..................


eydyyeeaRygayyey r~ AeeyAAdCAW"nnyyee












THE WEEKLY INUbhrilAL RECORD.


AUTOMOBILES, PUMPING OUl [iS
AND

GASOLINE ENGINES,
Mad Coomplde Amimemt of Sqfks- In the South.


Fred E. Gilbert
29 and 37, 39, 41
West Forsyh Stree


& P. Helms & eC.'s Weekly oCtte prices had lost about 15 or 16 points the
Ltter. tones steadied again and the market pass-
ed into the same state of dullness existing
New York, Nov. 11.-There is no ques- before the advance. That general spee-
ti tha the cotton market this wek ulation has not been induced as a result
ha been very disappointing one. This of the large and profitable business re-
does not mean that prices have declined ported from Manchester and the steady
intead of advancing, for the level is improvement that is now taking place
lightly h t a week ago B in this country has been a source of dis-
there was a general expectation tht appointnkiut as well as comment. The
specauation would re ft from the elc- ony possible explanation is that the
tim and the general improvement in busi- Stock Market furnishes a more attractive
nme that was more than likely to fol- field for the time being and the cotton
low. On this view shorts covered during market w11 be compelled to await a re-
the latter part of last week, and not a vival of interest which may come at any
few bought cotton in anticipation of a time. Many believe the crop is altogether
rise. On Wednesday, the market opened
am rand higher but the improvement was t lar to ke bu prot-
short-lived and the headers was compelled able, but if the cotton market could go
to realize on a declining market. After frem 17 cents last year back to 10 cents

Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SPIK lb OF TURPENTINE
A. I Apr. 8 Apr. r Apr. Apr. M M ay 1 May May 5 May U May a
ND ND a 0 6 1-4 14 -13 -2
Ju1 JS Ie U JuneO June Ju Jul Juy 3 Jul 17 July July a Aug.
is 4 a a 4 4 41-4 48 6 4
Am& U An *3 A .& a ept. Sept.11 Sept18 U ept Oct. Oct. Oct. U
r4*I WA f A N 8-&4 M ND a 14 a I1-O 1-4
Ot. OL 3, Nov. 3, Nov.. Mer. K.Dec. 3 Dec 10. Dec. 17. Dec. 1. Jan. 14
S 1-28 n N M 6 M 1-4 6 1-4 I 1-2-64
Jan. Jan. 38, Faby. 11, Feb. 18, Feby. 2 Meb. 3 Meh. 10 Meh
a a a ab s o8
S64 00 56 OS 58


ILROSINS


WW we N M K
aGl 1. .......3 MU U U, SO S
AN s . .- L iW 3.3 L2 1
Aul . . L. 8S u.5 .5 I.6
Ap .. . Lt L Ls toL S
ay 1. ..... S .3 uI LIS .
May IL.......i is m USJ a.
ar & .. .3.61.5 &M LS LZ L36
Mo nm ... a4% L1M LIn% LI1h L
May3 ..... .u & 8. is Si s
Je . .. .. is i* s 2. 23 6
NJe ..... 1.s in i L s Lis
Jan S. .... .L L U, 8S S0 X w
a-m .....& J Ug SJK UK
July ..... .&0 U sI Ui IS i
July M. . . ... LW is is IS
juet n . . LOD 3. 36 iS IS
jWr 0 ..... &* LIDJI LI LU
jaU V..... Le Lm LS US U
JuAt L. . i. is is .16 I S
July M. . . 40 LN LO UK IM
Agst T . . L s L OS Is Ui


AApgmer . .s L.M S iU 3. LS 1
Sa8smer . i. SDL Ls tis LIS
alesI ... 4. Us 3u .
a- na .. .- ** Lis I .4 <. 4

Oe 3.m . .4.6 4.0 4. 4. 4.15
Oe r ... ...4.1 41. 4. 4 4 4.0
Oember .... .4 4.0 4.J 4L6 LS
0enber .. ....4 U* is Ui iS
O mber .. .... 4 II St Is I.
lewam1 r .... .. 8J. 3. 5i 2.93 is
November 3 .. A. M K S M S. i
Osember l i.. ...An 6 ISL Uis IS
8nmer a .. .. s S. L L Is
Desimbr a ....W U LI n 1U U
ami14 .. .. La &X U 1 s Ui
nUmmIao a .. ..A 4LI UB U. U
Sre-. .... M ..t t 3 is U.S

Demear 11 ..mTS 3.46 3. 3.5 S.5
jebuary 18 ... &45 &4S 336 a" M
Frreary 5 ...3.7.0 3.J 3i 3.10 3.
Marh 10 ......3.0 3.40 3.3 3.0
maT 24 ......4 3.79 3&.0 3.2 3.20
ursh n1 ......4J US &49 U3. &3


is LIS
is 2.0
2.5 Le
s15 2.5
I B
ISX Is




3B 2.46
3.6 2.6
2.0 1i

L70 2.5
LOS U


2.05 L
2.15 2.3

&7 L16
2.7B s1
is ti
iS t2.
is 3.6
3.1 IS
Is 2.60
Us 2.U
s 2 U





S LtO
i LU





Un 1N
L70 t


Los 2.
s IsI

230 2.I
UB IB







3.3 2.70




2.95 3.60
3. 2.675
2.15 2.70
L" Lis


2.95 3.00
3.06 2.75
2.5 2.70
t 2 3.7


* D
s. to
BN UB
Li Los
is2 La



1.51 .
LU LU

LW LB
.L LIB
L3 1.3

1.3 L3



L0 LI
1.8 1.L1

to Li
LM L7
LB LU







1.s IN
1.36 1.
L LU


L U
1.3 1.3
L-3 LU








L2. LW
is is


S.1 i



IS IS
2.5 is
2.5 S.2





2.145 2.40
2.0 2,5


2.5 2.70
UB UIS


on a crop o f 10,000,000 bales, it may be
that we are to see a advance in prices
this year on a crop of 12,000000. But
these seems to be no question that the
crop is a good one. Well informed peo-
ple coming from the South say the crop
is at least 11,500,000 bales and every indi-
cation points to an abundant production.
For this reason, we look for no repetition
of last.year's bull speculation. There is
too much cotton. But sentiment at the
present time is extremely bearish and
the short interest is very large. There is
a general belief that the prominut bear
authority on cotton in this city is heav-
ily short and in the event of a rising mar-
ket, this short interest would result in a
rather sensational advance. The market
fails to decline with all the bear factors
we have and now that the trade reports
are improving, that the crop movement
is falling off, there is everything to induce
conservative buying whenever the mar-
ket has any setback. It will be a long


,-
time before the size of the amrop k
and prices are now held by tha I -
for actual cotton, not by spe lati o
the market is depressed by paper eatteS'
and not by forced sales of the act-al .
stuff. This is the strongest kind of a
market.


Setd an orders for piting fr f
turpentine and cemmisay taes to te -
Record office to insure a pmt dieavry. '


Sam'I P. Holmes&C.o.

Stocks B, ms, Cftte.,
Grain and Prm mtsiu s-.


NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRAU
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Bee Phome 853 BwMwi Bm .-


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosln.


SPIRTS OF TURPENTINE.


To United Kndom. in gallons:
Month 1M-" 1MB4
April.. ....... I aM IUX1
May ....... .. a
June.. .... ... Mr 1.41U
July .... .... 2a0., M.M4
Augus.......... MN l.M4J
8eptembe..... 741 MsM
October ......... 711.4t 4m0
November .. 661,8 1,20,700
December .. 1,6,656 1,631,779
January. .. 228s, 373,0
February. .. 116452 38,9
March.. ......


1.0.3"
'.M.00
M67w




576,784
1646A
247AN
SAW


To Belgium and Netherlands, n gallons:
Month U N4 1N4- 11I1-M
April ........ .Ul .4C7 cluded
May ........ 61ia all other
June.. ..... U. 1 =A*U Earopo
July .. ...... M.in Im81 CM
August.. ...... 4M2 3L3.6
September.. .. k4 1IU 41.U
October ...... UWi 2, m.6
November .. 133,06 349,726 381U
December .. 100,372 6, 6T,16
Jamary .... l166, MlsO, 174Il
February ... 6,130 37244 3801m
March .. ........ 8,71 18,474
To Germay., In gallons:
Month 3334 1364- 13-1.4
Aprml .. ............... N14M sif
May .. .. .. .. I.M I.6 ,s
June. .... ... 2tm .2 a.0
aly ...... .. .ms UM43U nrM
Auust ...... na. S.,417
September.. .. 1M. M EAsU Tj
October .. .. .. wn1U 1.M 14UW
November .. 179,010 11013 817
December .. -
January .... 133,00 46w 1M,8o
February ... 290,182 1638 67,174
March .... 695 ...... M4j6

To all other Europe In Gallons:
Month U14- 130a Ilm4-
Aprl .. .... .. .. 1W ,435 Mk
Jume.. .... .. .. .1,3 1,00 M,40

September.. 23 Sa36. 21.33
cteber .... .. .M- 4m 17,M
November .. 32,00 17,00 4,837
December .. 47,30B 80 91 3
January ... A--- -
February .. 16,471 ...... 44,5
March .... 14,189 12,75 326M
Total Forena Exports, i allons inelud-
Ing everything outsmld of tmh United
Statm:
Month 110-0 14-I 19014-
Apm ...... .. .1114 g, M MNI.n
May .... .. .. .la M ,144 U21.4
June.. .... .... 1,Url Is.lM s.Sra
July .. .. .. ..2.m,3 1,1EM5 24,8
August .. .. .. 1,M.X ,I U ,A
September.. .. 1.4 32.5H Sm4 WM
October .. .... 1.41M 1. ,sr L .M
November ..1,851,08 1,32 ,13 1,62574
December .. 1,93 9 1,794,M 1,81J75
January ... 700O9 8M63 AM S
February .. 487,577 531,346 85,476
March .. 8A,488 118,74 2169


To United Kingdom, barrels 3 n:
Month 1 U164 i3-
April ........ 71 i M
May ...... .. m. a M
June .. .. .. .. 0.7.w ogf 0
July ..... .. .. 8 *
August ...... 74,6 stu
September..... .ln 4, 8 ,i
October .. .. 4.. 4I0M AMW
November .. 71,17 6,735
December 61,46 64t66 T2,1a
January ... esAs a7r 1aU
February ... 28,6351 37,32 91,1
Ma ... 39,0t 3s,ms 4a

To Dela ad. Notheri ad barrels
pounds:


Month iM4s
April .. .. .. .. ..j
June ........ ....
July ...... .. w.oM
Auust ...... 4..
September.... 4"n
October ..... ta
November 3,61
December .. 7,0
JanmMr .... e 7
February 9.. 4
March .... 10,1
To Germaa ,. barrels a
Month 3MI
April ........ A.
May ........ IL.
Jan .. .. .. .. 41NM
July ......., u.
August .. .. .. 7a.M
taember.... Mk
October ...... t
November .. 6,7
December .. 1,4
January .... 34,7
February ... 172,135
March .... 490,2


11 laaotle
.10,E an ethr

4MM Mr a

13.4 al9


32,121 11,814

M IM-
anI

4ru am







40,16 5 UM
4,8 41,M
40,315 58,367


To all other Muromp, Varrels I ag:
Moeth uNS4 13- 3 4-
April ...... .. .3. 36 0.8
May ......... 01I M
June.. ........ 64 l u
July ...... .... 0 MJ
August... ... B n
September.... W. 6.4 11, M
October .. .. ... O13 B.48 fl
November .. 13,328 415
December 26.. 48,701 N32
Jaary .. 17,14 7,148 3,.
February 38,184 42,654 6,
March .. 33,687 51,94 71,

Total sports of osl at barrels M
Including Asia. Africa and America out-
ide of the United states:
Meoth uss-es NM-S 201-
AMotU 13334 13.-6 143M
April ........ IM, U1M.1"
Iay ........ 1m ut44 U
June ...... .. r73 21,0 LUa
July ....... I...3 811 ISU
ugust .... .. I S.1 6i,
b~.teiber... UM UmI nUB4
Octeer .. .... 30,3 I2s11n nJi
November .. 184,80 231,543 22,479
December .. 210,457 202,0 1 ,4
January ... 19471 17,JM 37ATM
February ... 306,0M0 1,m32 W57
Maueh .... 171,548 90,433 214,U


TUE RUCOW C3CULATU ALL OVER TNX WON&.












12 THE WEZKLY INDUUIYIJIL XEORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECOILD.

JAMES A. ROLLOMOH.
EdAiar and Manager.
saW*ihed very FrdV*.
a mDoBmnes -.)--3.o 0sr Annum
*"e"" C(Rrin).... 3.50
"The Pkf and It PIadwu ".-
AB eemaniismla o be ae i mes
The Induastri. Record Company.
Jacksonville4 Fla.

- i Eieriael aad Busines Omfei at
Adta. Ga. 41 Svanneh. Ga.

watered at the Postoffm at Jambonvflle,
lsa, as eca d-claw matter.

Ahdoted by the Exautiv Ounintts of
the TarpeninM Oprato Assoiatio,
Sptierb 1 9, 10, a its exelUsi office
gargp Adopted in sanmal eweat
September 11, a the a lse of the
general Associatio
Aapted April 27th, 1903, a th official
waia of the Interstat Caa Grower' An-
esrtiaa Adopted Sept. 11, 1903, as the
mly official orga of the T. 0. A.
Cm.-ndmied to lumber people by special
renolti m adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Assoitino.

COPY FOR ADVERTISIG.
Atatieing copy (chaagts ar new ad-
ertismera) shoul reach as Tusday
m- fam to iure iartiea a th iMeM a
the week.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
he pblishing plat and the .ia of-
ase ad tha Inntrial ecord Puabliig
Co. are located at No. x Saoth Hoean
Street, Jacksonville, Fa ia the very heart
0 the great turpeatine at yeleaw pie

the Atlanta, Ga., oeea is located in the
EquitaMe Building, N. 73. Atl nta in
the center of the great -af-Iw.:.g
trade of the tire Sath
T Savmanh, Ga., aie is in the Beard
of Trade building. Savam ah ik the bad-
ag oen naval stores market ia the wed.

R JOCE should be the operators'
watchword. Reduction is his salvation.


WHAT IS SAVING? REDUCTION.
What is saving? Matthew Arnold, an-
swering this, question said, "The Ameri-
can would say it was, Our Institutions;
the Englishman would say, the British
Constitution; and the Frenchman would
say, the Civilizing Mission of France:"
Bat Plato said, "To love righteousness
and be convinced of the unprofitablenesb
of inquity," is the true answer. Plato has
the true answer and one all should learn,
but to the turpentine man, the answer is
n one word. It is as true to him at this
particular time as Plato's. It is-Reduce!
Reduce I


REDUCTION.
Reduce the crop-increase the profits.
Reduce the crop-increase life of your

Reduce the crop-increase your pleas-
Wra.
Reduce the crop-decrease the worry.
Reduce the crop-decrease your work.
Increase the crop-increase your loss.
Increase the crop-increase your debt.
Increase the crop-increase your troub-
les.
Increase the crop-increase your pov-
trty.
What are you going to do?


SPIRITS HANGING IN A BALANCE.
Spirits is hanging in a balance. Its
eye is on the producer. It is watching his
every movement. Rumors dame forward
about a week ago and said the producers
were making preparations for as big a
crop next year as this, and down she
started. Early this week the report was
repeated and to 48 cents she headed. But
some friend stepped up and said, "I be-
lieve it's a false report. I believe the
producers are men of honor and good
judgment as well I believe when they
in convention voted to reduce the out-
put 10 per cent, they meant it and will do
it. all these reports to the contrary not-
withstanding, and I will risk 50 cents."
Thus spirits was arrested in its downward
career. But it is watching the pro-
ducer. It's all up to him, and the factor.
The well-to-do producer must let his good
sense prevail and reduce and the factor
must let his good sense prevail and make
the sorry producer reduce. The producer
and the factors have done the talking
and the promising. They said 10 per cent
must come off of 1904 production. A sol-
emn obligation has been taken that they
will reduce. On this solemn agreement
and promise, this "friend of spirits" men-
tioned above, has come to its rescue and
taken the risk. It is up to the producer
to make good the agreement-and thus save
himself or fail in his obligation and be-
come a loser.
The Record believes the producers are
business men and honorable and will make
good this promise of reduction.
Remember, Mr. Producer, that spirits
is hanging in a balance and waiting and
watching you. Keep your promise and
act sensibly and spirits will stand by
you-do otherwise and spirits will go
back on you.


Concerning Trade Journal Advertising
The following was written by Mr. W.
Hull Western for the Trade Press List:


The purpose of Advertising is admit-
tedly two-fold; to create new business
and strengthen one's grip on that al-
ready enjoyed. Whatever therefore in the
way of commercial publicity can be em-
ployed to bring about such results is to
be recommended.
The Trade Journals, so called (and this
includes publications technical and scien-
tific in character) unquestionably offer the
means to manufacturers and others of
reaching buyers and users of their pro-
duct, effectively and economically. This
is attested by the fact that those who
have employed them for this purpose most
liberally and persistently in the past are
the acknowledged leaders in their several
lines today and continue to enlist their
aid. I question seriously, however, if the
majority of advertisers in the Trade Jour-
nals have any very definite idea of what
they actually receive in the way of re-
turns from investments in this direction
and few believe have ever endeavored to
figure the matter out fairly to themselves
and the papers.
Orders do not ordinarily choke the mails
upon the first few insertions of an adver-
tisement be it ever so expertly fashioned
and judiciously placed, and who so gauges
the profitableness of advertising in this
class of publications will arrive at con-
clusions that are in the main unsound.
Those of experience or who pause to con-
sider the matter at all thoroughly do not
look for anything more direct in the way


of results than inquiries. And this is
much. For it should be reognised that
advertising machinery and other high-
priced articles is a vastly different propo-
sition from mail order advertising. One
cannot ship an 80-ton electric traveling
crane or a 150 H. P. water-tube boiler by
rural free delivery yet, nor is it conven-.
ient to remit payment in stamps.
The matter is too weighty to be so
lightly disposed of. It is those benefits
derived from Advertising which create
conditions that make for the more tangi-
ble "Inquiry" and "Order" that are apt
to be overlooked in considering results.
That these can be purchased is fortunate,
and especially 'with so cheap a thing as
money. They obtain more or less when-
ever Advertising is done with understand-
ing, though much necessarily depends upon
individual conditions.
Too often underestimated, I take it, is
the "life" and "ginger" that a brisk and
well directed advertising campaign in-
jects into a business, awakening and stim-
ulating each and every one from mailing
clerk to the Board of Directors in a way
that tells mightily for profit when the
balance sheet is made up later on. To
the "Man on the Road" and the "Mana-
ger of the Branch Office" the fact that
there is "something doing" in the "front
office" at the other end of the line bestirs
him in turn to greater effort, that he, too,
may "keep his end up." Again, there is
the profitableness that lies in the impres-
sion created by intelligent advertising.
Appearances count largely for or against
in trade, especially where a closer acquain-
tance is impracticable.
The qualities of respectability, stabili-
ty, and bigness are to be cultivated, for
they beget that degree of confidence which
is the forerunner of all trading operations.
These are unconsciously accredited a bus-
iness that advertises forcibly and per-
sistently. There is, too, the natural drift
of trade towards enterprising concerns
and the pride in using products that are
known and quoted until they have become
veritable standards. Of value, too, is the
weekly or monthly opportunity that is the
advertiser's to communicate to the trade
matters new and important, and in a way
that is unequaled by any ether means
in completeness of territory covered and
economy of distribution. Beyond this the
concern that advertises receives the moral
endorsement of the publications in which
its announcements appear, and in many
instances this is. well worth the having.
With this may be reckoned the benefit
derived from association with other ad-
vertisers of prominence using the same
mediums. Taken altogether the value of
this "reflected light" is greater than is
generally supposed.
The various Indexes which are promi-
nent features of the trade journals are
moreover often utilized as directories, be-
cause they are corrected weekly or month-
ly to date, and a concern that advertises
and is properly listed in these is always
on the ground and in line for business.
There is also the opportunity afforded
through advertising of securing agents in
distant cities and foreign countries. It
is not an unusual occurrence for adverti-
sers to receive requests from individuals
and concerns of standing torepresent them
in their particular territory, connections
being frequently made in this way that
would not have been accomplished other-
wise. tI will of course occur to most
minds that the full advantages of trade
journal advertising will not be secured if
the proper publications are not used, but


that is a matter deserving eonsideauiM
by itself.
There are publications that ea e e
played to advantage by every brameh e
trade, and which will return value re-
ceived and more if advertiser will s
them as they are designed to be sed.
When one considers the large ezpritwes
in every direction that are made by the
representative trade paper pa hb- that
their columns may prove pretalb to the
advertiser, it is strange that they smhal
have to seek patronage as A W a
they do. Certainly as conducted tasyle
trade papers of standing deaere am&
should command the hearty support of the
trade generally. It should be rIamebereda
moreover, that only ip proportion as this
is given can they thrive am beenme sM
more valuable to the advertier.
One thing trade paper adverting de-
mands in common with all sarts of advr-
tising, for satisfactory results, va l
that the article advertised must be war-
try and the matter given the same con-
stant thought and attenin that is grt-
ed other departments of a business. Give
a device, too, or product that has abit,
one for which a need is indicated or ea
reasonably be created, and which ea be
sold at price the prospective wuer ea
afford to pay, and it remains but to make
the facts rightly known, and kep doing
so, to sell ft.
There is an art in doing the work we
of course, and it is also true that everyeme
has not a natural bent for the business,
yet even under the most adverse evtl-
tions, advertising can do and has dome a
great deal. The most desirable wares will
not, however, sell themselves very ex-
tensively. Buyers and users must be CetU
about them, constantly and elviminl.
t is my opinion, after some years the
business of manufacturers' ravrtisin
that the most naturaleeonomia 1 sal
withal effective way of doing tis is
through the aid of the trade papem, wM
are published largely to do just this very
thing.

& P. Hoemes & Coa's Grain Lett.
Chicago, IIL, Nov. lI-Whe.t-A i&
tie selling appeared i December At 'A
start but offerings were small withkaa-
timent bullish on the light Argiutib,
shipments, and reports of large eash sus
of wheat in the Northwest, also consm r-
able flour at different points. Loael abats
covered free, while Armour
sold extensively, there was talk ef a
Russian Ukase, it being stated a eielr
was issued imitating Russian exports ia-
ble to be prohibited. Bears are tmi,
bulls are aggressive, aad may be am- -
ful in forcing prices up to higher lete
but we think them now in a position
where profits should be accepted.
Corn.--Liverpool was weak on the Be-
reau report and heavy Argentine -
ments, samples 1 cent to 1-2 cent higLher
country acceptance increasing, iat a
at all pronounced. There was some se-
ing early, many in the trade thought the
Government figures would not pan Out
and there was good buying of Dlea nba
and May with shorts scoering the-Phi
party appearing a aggressive Ibyeft, the
cash situation being a strong o- to -
minds. We favor purchases on all rese
sions.
Provisions.-Weakened early in syE-
thy with hogs with a little selling by pack-
ers and the buying scattered. Tle rWar-
tone is a strong aoe aml we wo n fara
purchases on soft spots.


non0lu m sVOCE W ims succu.-


q











'IKE WZUXLY u'uwrxIAL RUGORD.


.- THE


MIlltil bifina taik Of lacksvilkI
mUNITD #TATES DEPOSITORY.

Capital an Sups .......................... .. 4s25,ao.o

n addition to our regular baking business, we maintain a Savings Depart-
meat, under government spervision, paying interest quarterly.
We have for rent Safe Deposit Boxes in burglar and fireproof vaults at rea-
soable rates, by moath or year.



Title nd Tax Abstrects.
Conveyancing. Township Maps, Blue Prints.
We give Mspeil attatio to preparation of Title. and Tax Ab-
S tracts, Maps, etc., of large tracts in all part of Florida and South Geor- *
ia. To owners and inteding purchasers the results of our work are
value aooet
Omrmspondamee soliitea.

IRALTY TITLE AND TRUST COMPANY
Law h ar n c BuiMiag JACKSW VILL, FLA.
0811811 1m g e t e e I o o i erin


Ama the Opeaters.
Mr. I. Mattox, a prominent naval
sorbes ma of West Toeoi, Fla, was in
the city this wee

Mr. F. A. Coleman, one of the leading
tarpetine operators of Marietta, Fla..
was in the city last Tuesday.

Mr. L. L Shaw was in the city Wednes-
day.

esrs. A. D. and W. A. Williams, ope-
rators from Green Cove Springs, regis-
tend at the Aragon Hotel Wednesday.

Mr. W. C. Jackson, of Green Cove
springs, one of the best operators in the
tate of Florida, was in the city this week.

Mr. Geore L Cromartie, general mana-
gr Boetick Turpentine Co., Bostick, Fk ,
as among the pondment tuetine men
i* Jacksonille this week

4Mr. 8. Smith, of Bostick, Fla., was in
t w Tuesday.

Mr. Henry E. Pritchett was among the
leading turpentine operators in Jackson-
vile this week.

Mr. 0. E. MeLeod passed several days
i town this week.

Mr. R. 8. Hall, of Ocala, was here Mon-
day.

-)Jr. A. D. Covinkton, president of the
Tarpentine Operators' Association, one of
the most prominent turpentine operators
in the State, was in town this week.

Dr. and Messrs. J. C. and P. E. Edwards,
o. Walla, Fla., were in the city attend
ing to business for several days this
week.

Mr. Goes Mattox arrived in Jacksonville
today.

Mr. D. C. Strieklin, of Leno, was in
town last Thursday.

. hee were a great many turpentine
parators in the city Tuesday, who came
to attend the first meeting of the New
Bnk and Ta s apsny, which was or-


ganized recently in this city.


Capt. W. J. Hillman has been out of the
city several days this week.

Mr. D. G. McKeithan, a leading naval
stores man of Baldwin, Fla, was in Jack-
sonville last Tuesday.

SOUTHERN INDUSTRY.

Florid.
Bartow-Ice Factory.-E. W. Codington
will rebuild ice factory reported burned
last week at a loss of $8,000 Contracts
have been let.
Eustis-Kaolin Mines.-it is reported
that the Lake Region Mining Co. will de-
velop kaolin mines near Eustis, and C. D.
Gifford can give information.
Fort Pierce-Ice and Elestrie Ligh
Plat.-Beports state that A. R. BlanjoN
C. Chillingsworth and JoseptItjeffam
will organize company to establish eleetrie
light and ice plant.
Jacksnaville Ianber Oampany.
-Strickland Lumber Co. has incorporated
with $100,000 capital. Colquitt Strick-
land( of Valdosta, G, is president and
treasurer; Frank Roberts, of Valdoeta
Ga., vice-president and W. J. Kelly, of Sa-
vannah, Ga., secretary.
Miami-Mattress Factory.-Edwin Nel-
son is erecting building which will be
equipped as mattress factory.
Miami-Fruit Company.--Conlidated
Fruit Co. has been incorporated with $100,-
000 capital. Wm. Brown is president; W.
W. Blackburn, vice-president; T. V. Moore
secretary and G. L. Browning, treasurer.
Palatka--ewerage System.-William
W. Lyon, C. E., Memphis, Tenn., has been
engaged by the city to prepare plans for
proposed sanitary and storm-water sew-
ers to be constructed at a cost of $100,-
000.
Tampa-Cigar Factory.-Havana Clearo
Cigar Co. has been incorporated with
*7,500 capital to establish cigar factory.
Wilbur E. Yocum is president, and Edwin
R. Dickerson, secretary-treasurer.
Winter Park-Electric Plant.-Winter
Park Electric and Fuel Co. has been in-
corporated with $25,000 capital by J. M.
Cheney, H. H. Yowell and H. W. Greet-
ham to erect and operate an electric plant.


Ci H.e-HA4GRAYESQ

WHOLESALE GIRLoC9

Grain. Hay. Feed-
Speoal sftesum an Torpesas 06" SawmnIl nsu 3 reuifnm00
A FLORIDA 11I FOR FLORUDSB
514-516-518-520- 5f-524-526, AST Z"Y

J2ckasiwifle. vulm
a- L - '1
GRORGUI INTZ58Ts UW LL AMWUK&
Maimna C-84 Pim list far ammo m s ugn ftw 4m.
Gorh. JN a z2. -1901


Feet I Feet Fet FeetI Ft Feat r~e
IUZ8 20IT21-26 W3& 1 T 4K &I= = i tM
i x10 to 2x0 .... .~1259l 13.5a 14.50 16. ~1 2 10N20 iftj .M
2%x10 to 80 .... 12.00 12.50 13. 14.00 150 17.60 20.00 2SSO W
8%xl0 to 100 .... 12.50 1.00 14.00 15.50 18.50 1S.0 21.0 SCS SW -
1 xl2 to 2x12.... 14.00 15.50 16.0 18.00 21.0(' 9.oW s~ 8 ;44o 0 e
2%xl2 to 10x12.... 1300 13.50 14.50 16.5 1850 21.00 24S0 &50 3J 48 M
10%xl2 to 12x12.... 13.50 14.00 15.50 17.50 19.50 28.00 2.50 30 30C 3 4M
1 x14 to 3x1.... 1&00 19.00 2.o 22.00 24.50 s27e VS.0 31t.00 A44.
3%x14 to 12x14.... 140 16 18.00 20.50 22.00 24.00 28.00 32J.5
12%xl4 to 14x14.... 15.50 17.00 19.00 21.00 23.00 2600 30.00 3450 40.M


I XID
4%x16
121/4xl6


2 x18
%x18
l414x18


to tale.... 2450 22.00 98.50 27.$@ 31.4@ 34.00 38.MI MM
m


to 6x18.... 2450 25.50 28.0 31.50 35.00 39.00 4300 M 901 "
to 14x18.... 21.00 2.00 2&00 29.00 3300 37.00 41.00 4.00 57J
to 1818.... 23.00 240 27.0, 30.00 34.00 38.00 42.00 480 S.


-M*M
a-


a-
7400


Terms: Net Cas.
Price are F. 0. B. Cars Savansa, Brunrwick, Fermamaina an Jadamrian


HOTICI.
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Association, held at Jacksonville,
Fla, March 15, 1904, the following Classi-
fication and Rules for Inspection of Yel-
low Pine were officially adopted, effective
July 1, 1904:
Clasicatios and Iapectim eof Yelew
Pine Lumber.
General Rules---All lumber must be
sound, well manufactured, full to size and
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;
through shakes, or round shakes that
show on the surface; square edge, unless
otherwise specified. A through shake ia
hereby defined to be through or connected
from side to side, or edge to edge, or side
to ede I the measurement of dressed
iuaer the width ad thicknesas of the
lmbeb belre. drabig ust be taken;
IeesneIb ihi b thick shall be measured
as one ih.

CLASSIFICATIO.
Fleeriag.
Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: 1x3,
4, 5 and 6; 1%x3, 4 5, and
Board
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
inches and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven n width.
For example: %, 1, 1% and 1% inches
thick by 7 inches and up, wide.
SctPnia
Scantling shall embrace all sizes from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2x3, 2x4, 2x5, 2x6, 3x3, 3x4, 3x5, 3x6, 4x4,
4x5, 4x6, 5x5 and 5x6.
Plank
Plank shall embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness.
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1%, 2,
2%, 3, 3%, 4, 4%, 5, 5%, 5%x7 inches
and up in width.


DiDme i
Dimension simes shall embim s m
6 inches and up in thiknes amse
inches and up in width, ieudi ax
six. For example: 8x, Wx7, 7x7,T I
and up.
8terpi
Stepping shall embrace one to twe Id
a hlf inches in thiekn by pren h
and up in width. For .samhf: 1, li%
1%, 2 and 2%x7 and up, in madt
Roagh gd eo, F ,it h.
-Rough Edge or Fliteh mia M IrM at
sizes one inch and up in thieknae by efsak
inches and up in width, besa aH tsw
sides only. For example: 1, .
and up thick b~eigt heL a upi wa
sawed on two 'd 1 y .



Stamnar "
All lumber shall be sound, ap p a
section. Wane may be allowed ameei t
of the width of the piece measured ar
face of wane, extending one-fourth of th
length on one corner or its a ~i valt em
two or moae corners.
Merchantale.
All sizes under nine inches shall I .
heart entire length on one side or edof '
sizes nine inches and over shall ab -
heart the entire length on two oppoehs
sides. Wane may be allowed one-e ihth e
the width of the piece measured aeroa'
face of wane, and extending ene-fourth I
the length of the piece on aom eOarmAr
its equivalent on two or more arma.
Prime.
Scantling sha show heart on two fae "
the entire length; other sim shall s r:
two-thirds heart entire legth on two'-
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 pe-
cent. of the pieces, wane may beaow
one-eighth of the width of the piece rmes-!-
ured across face of wane and extelmltg-
one-fourth of the length of the pines ou
one corner or its equivalent on two aer
more rners.


FOR SALE.
50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tact will cat one huladsm l
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for
mill. ~.35 per aere. Mill near the timber can be leasd for term of yews, or
be purchased. One of the beat opportunities in the State.

C. BUCKMAN, i -okroi "tt-^


VAPM, 'u---nw-A AND IUOGUZSS1YUWp


&


m ....


M


M


- -


l












SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY

Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,
Brass and O ay Iron Castingo.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAYS

Leated In the heart of th LmIber M strit givesas Maam-
tage of elsst mater at lowest eaSt.
-- **


8Uu asJKNI ImouuK1x.


-
Alabama.

eg Pbui-Crotwell Broa. have purehased
sit an which to erect plaing mil and
P. 1.3 n 18 history.
rmingham Iuadury.-White Swan
$ ing.-ayre Mining & m.enuf-ctring Co.,
preMim reported a. hving incenaed
capital to $150000, has further increa ed
it to 000oo S.
B.liLprwl8te Mill.-Bridgeport Stave
R, previouy reported ieorported un-
der Chtatooga, Tean, with $5,000 capi-
tal, i erecting main building 40x150 feet,
boiler awd pe room and two dry-kih;
pit will have annal capacity of 2,000,
0 light bared taves.


Flomaton--Hardwood and Veneering to organize the Aeworth Cotton Manufae-
Plant.-It is reported that the hardwood touring Co., with capital stock of $100,000,
and veneering plant of A. J, Ed. and Char- for the purpose of building a cotton mill
ley Jackson will be removed from C(e- Temporary officers are: President, Or-
tury, Fla., to Flomaton. land Awtrey; J. L Lemon, vice-president,
Mobile-Ice and Cold Storage Plant.- and J. J. Northcutt, secreary.
It is reported that Weinacker Bros. will Amerius-Waterworks Improvements.
erect ice and cold storage plant. -It is reported that improvements will
Mobile-Saw MilL--eport state that be made to waterworks, including the con-
the Mobile Lumber Co. will rebuild hard- struction of 500,000-gallon storage tank
wood saw mill, reported burned last week. and installation of air-compressor. Ad-
Scott J. Daugherty is president. dress The Mayor.
Mdbile-Wharf, Sheds, etc.-Internat- Atlanta-Real Etato Charte ed:
ional Mahogany Co, of Mobile and Cincin- Eady-Hardin Investment Co, with $50,-
nati, Ohio, will make extensive improve- 000 capital, and privilege of increasing to
ments to its plant in Mobile, -including $200,000; incorporators, Thomas J. Eady,
the erection of wharf 300x350 feet, apa- Edwin A. Hardin and W. D. Thomas.
ble of holding about 5,00,000 feet of tim- Atlanta-Soap Factory.-Imperial Soap
ber and costing $40,000; drying sheds, etc. Co. has been organized to manufacture
Louis W. Moragues is general manager. the dye soap to be used in washing and
e.. *dyeing goods at the same time. Com-
pany is arranging for the erection of fac-
Aeworth-Cotton MilL-It is proposed tory building.


Columbus-Foundry and Machine 8
-Golden's Foundry & Machine o. wit
erect building at a cost of about M8u
and install machinery for inreaag a-,-
pacity.
Elberton-Cotton MIL-Swsi OGe te@
Mill will install finishing machinery in
the additional building reported last week.
Fort Valley Townite. Soutladl
Town & Land Co. has been organized with
W. Peddicord, president, ad Bev. Geo
B. Culpepper, secretary-treasurer, to qa
a new town in Georgia.
Newnan-Eletrie Light Plant-OLy
has voted affirmatively the bod ise
previously reported for the purchase of
the Newnan Light & Power Oa.' plan
Address The Mayor.
Savannah-Excelsior JFetory.-It is
reported that the West Savanmah Bel-
sior Manufacturing Co. will t a I MaI
plant recently burned at a loss of 8at


The
^'.`


Coope rage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade


Western White Oak Spirit Barrels


Capital $100,000.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.


O PPICERS:


J. C. LITTLE, President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager.


JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


DIJIECTOR S:


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST,
W. F. COACHMAN.


W. J. KELLY


PATRONIZE RECORD hDvSxi N0OL R ATISPACTORY DEALINGS


MN ---- mfi


-------------------- ------- ----- r - r r rr r~~r r


14


THE WEEKLY INDU&FRIAI E3=ZD,











THE W2RKLY INDUbW,1UAL XICOD.


THE


COVINGTON


CO.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.



S SHOES -

Wholesale: DRY GOODS.



"Success For Our Customers is Success For Us."


artWiisn en Weon Se.
(Caotsued from page*L)
sols than in cold soils. Wet sois sad
ei sdils are muc improved by under-
amiinig. By this method the stagnuat
water is drained from the soil and the
air passes over the top through the drains,
the drains acting as flues, as it were,
and thus the soil becomes more porous.
The air passe though it readily and
warms it up. Tillage improves the soil.
By thorough plowing, cultivation, harrow-
ing, etc., more of the soil is exposed to
contact withthe air, thus increasing the
teMacy or aditegatci and dLeay.
It also pulverise the surface oil and
readqe it more absorptive and porous,
and more favorable for the germination
of seed, and for the penetration of the fine
roots. It further assists in rething
moisture in the soil in dry weather-for
in sea so of drought the moisture comes
from below to the surface up through the
spane between the soil particles which
serve as little tubes to conduct the water
or moisture to the surface. Tillage dis-
turbs ar breaks the connection of the
pores with the surface thus retarding
evap oration until connection of the tubes
with the surface is again established.
The application of lime or gypsum to
a soil, not only improves its physical ein-
dition, but liberates food elements as well
On sandy soils, its effect is to fill up the
openings which make them more adher-
ent and more retentive of moisture. On
clay soils, it has the property of separat-
ing the fine particles of delay or uniting
several small particles into one large par-
tele, thus making the soil more open,
porous and friable; air and water circulat-
ig more freely; the soil is warmer and
esier to work. Lime also hastens the
deasy of organic matter in soils by virtue
of which the nitrogen becomes more quick-
ly available to plants. Lirae further aids
in liberating potash from insoluble com-
pounds in the soil, thus increasing the
store of active plant-food ingredients.
reesing assists materially. Rotation of
crops plays an important part in making
available plant food. Especially is this
true when clover, cow peas or similar
plants is one of the rotation. The roots
of the clover plant reach deep into the
soil and take up elements that otler
ats cannot reach and bring them to
the surfae. Clover, eow peas, soy beans,
etc., have the property also of taking the
frm nitrogen of the air to a certain ex-
tent, and by means of little bacteria at-
tahed to the roots, make it available to
plants This free nitrogen is stred up
" in tee lover plants and in a form whih
becomes availaleor eoter crope. In
order to make use of free nitrogen in the


COURSE OF PAE AND MEDIUM ROBINS AT AVAINAR FOR TWO TYEAR -


W.W.


DATE
April 1.........

April 16........
April 2........

May 13 ........
May 20........
May a........
June 10........
June 12........
June 1 ........
July I ........
July 7 ........
July 14 ........
July 28 ........
Aug. 4 ........
Aug. 12 ........
Aug. 18 ........


1901-6


3.O
3MO
380
3M
3JM
4J.
UO
4.6E
4.76
4.75
4.70
4J2%
4.00
0e2%


W.G.


1909-06

SJO
S.


3JO
L-
150
340
136
3.36
3.O
3.e
3.40
3AO
3.30

3.40
3.50
3.50


1904-05
sm
LO
3.76
&3O
3.50
3JO
3O

4.10
4.15
4M5
4.40
4.M
4AG
4e
4.40

4.35
4.37


1903-ot 1u90t-

3.46 3.4
3J 3.45
3. 3.45
3.25 3.3
3.5k 3.6
3.3S 3.30
336 340
3.30 3.8
&10 3&8
3.10 3.0
3.10 6
3.10 4.00
3.10 3.95
&10 3.
3.90 3.82y,
3.20 4.00
m.30 4.00
3.30 4.02%


190I-0t
I--Os
$.50
3JU
L16
&I1
311
3.17%

3JB
3.A
350
3.W
300
3LO

3.00
3.o6
3.05
3.15
3.15


1906-0
-U



3.20
3-U

amo
3M

am

3J*
LW
3J*
3am
SAS
355
355
3O0

LW
UAS
3.72%

3.87%


1903-04
3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
3.2
3.15
2J9
2.6
2.90
2.90
2.90
2JO
296
3.06
3.06


190-6O
83J30
&3J
3.15
&11
&11
3.16
3.15
3.26
3.40
3A40
3.40
340
3U
365
3.6
3.50
3.6
3.57%


190-oN

LSrt
&as
&4lo
LW
100
3M00
3.10
3.10
am
Lu
Lo
LOS
2u
LU
LU
2M
L96
LUS


19041-06
LOS
sm
Los
so
LU

LW
LW
LW
11.0


3AS1
L46

Sim
U94
UVA


Nsm
sm
LU
LU
LU
sml -
US

&05
LUo

L78
Los
2M
us
2"1
2M
sm.
LW
tlO
tlU
LU)
Lu
LU


Kohn= Furch ott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



Don't forget your subscription to the Record.

VWE WmRITI ADvB4I-a MEgTIO THE RECORD.


;. U-


0


L
1


lf_:










7 lo


TER WUUXiY uwufirtIxAL RNUORD


atmosphere theme small bacteria must ex-
ist in the soil. Experiments have shown
tht soils which do notentain these bae-
teriamay be inoculated by applying a
ligh4ressing of soil from a feld in whleb
ISe f t at prerio ly grown to per-
fetioL- I am a)l Informed by Profes-
sor Garuma that the culture of these bae-
teria an be bought and directly applied
to soils. They soon multiply under favor-
abl eonditions and assist the clover to
erih the soil. Barnyard manure, though
it furnishes directly ploiphoric cidd, pot-
ash and nitrogen to the soili, also ats
am a phyale frtillr._ Waen decem-
posing it, harers the itdfying fermnets,
ad it loosens up the soil and warms it up,
ad betters its condition physically more
than any other fertilize.
When soils fail to produce well, even
with thorough cultivation, proper drain-
ap and careful system of rotation, green
manuring and the application of fertili-
ses to physically improve the soil, then
a direct application of plant food must be

Ow Turnetise Location Opened.
Th MeAdow land and Turpentine Co.,
whic was recently incorporated, bIve
eeryhing in readiness for cutting boxes
ad starting their stills in operation when
the sason opens. This company's place
is located about eighteen miles from Pun-
ta OGmda, o the Fort Myers extension
of the A. C. L Ry.
The MeAdow Land and Turpentine Co.
will bout 6500 Herty cups this sea-
so- t 4an experiment. They own about
75,AiO asn of the inest virgin timber
i that seetion of the State.


Thi apm. Beerved for


G mMuller & Co.



Lir Merchants



-f -


Aoo moo o


ill I I I/


The -Central


- RRO& .I~_T


KIRK & JONES
DRUGGISTS.
t07 F.-AY ST.
MAIL ORDERI SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


The Oldest Whiskey

House in Georgia.

(Establised la 188.)


OLD SHARPE WILLIAMS
Guaranteed 8 years old. By the
gallon, $3.00. 4 full qurts, $350
Spre- Ppaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN RYE


Guaranteed 6
gallon, $2.75.


ANVIL RYE
Guaranteed 4
gallon, $20.
CLITORD RYE
By the gaHon,
$250.


years old. By the
4 full quarts, 3.00
Exprem Prepwid.

years old. By the


S 4 full quarts
&8& ~ '" 4 a a


OLD KENTCKeY COW-
Guaranteed 8 years old. By the
gallon, $3.0. 4 fuil r, $.

OLD POnITZR CLUB CORN
Guaranteed 4 yersold. By the
gallon, LSO. 4ia rt, $L4

We handle all the leading brands of
Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the mar-
ket and will save you from 25 per cent
to 50 per cent on your prehaes. Send
for price list and catalogue. Mailed free
upon application.


Sao-go-e-so-So Frerth Street,
-ACON GEROaA.


Ge. II Fed F.LWat.


P. L. Watso,
Cashier.
of Ocala


CAPITAL, $50,000.00.
D3ono: .L L Anderson, R. & Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
MKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw MI Men Seolite.

McMurray Livery, Sale and Transfer Co.
HORSES AND MULES.
We carry the largest stok of any stable in the city, and have always
ea ha s to MhaA at an k ids and price. If la need at say. rve
a a ma, or write tr *Wat Y want.
L. B. DALTON. mm-.r, .a.avlls.


94-0000"1 h IM r ts$_-9upuu188140999999- mupuug-g


MOMILLAN

Florida Copper


SMsinattrers mr
Turpentine Stills
a" Gearal Me14L Weagb.
OH Atils teamin errage far
Snew ones. Patc6ingtiroug the coun-
Stry a specialty. Orders by mail or
or wire will receive prompt attention,
at either of the lowwonig works:
rFATETEVIuL, C.
MILE, ALA.


Works.


SVANAIA GAL
JACWsVILLE EtA.


. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. Kxiema, See. at Ta

MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND
TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.
Whem Yer 'Ar Is Jasksemms =sp At

WOLFE'S EUROPEAN HOTEL
Comer rld ma S*e lar eti.
rates ae. aod 1.0 per d. Fi"t Claw Restaurant is Coeneetdo. LKWLftML n. Mnr


W. J. LMNGLE,
President.


J. W. WAD.
ViesPeretliat.


IL 96 a
Beigendt s


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOeLe, ALA. PH1ACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLzAS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


W. H MR. Preme
P, L. PFacoo, tfat V. P,


J. e. BAMa. Ia V. Pree. H L Romsomn, sr & TR
W. J. m.I.r, 3d V. P. D. IB WUnIa m. A l See-yTheas.


Pacck-HMut & West Cpa,
) 20 Aty Street, L, SavaS ab, C. am
m .. .t .Na iL. JacksweuM rea.
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We ar atrietly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutual. We
never tako taeoat, nor are we Interested in any cpny tha buys miit
Turpentine and rosin.)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,

Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Copers' Tools and Naval Stores Makdware OWr Speldd
-BOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Unn Turpentine Axes and Wlse SI. Gids'
Piladelpha Wages.
Naval Stores Rceie at Savamma Ga, a d Jl.k
a"d Feeuaumdl. NOa.


IF YOU AE PROGC8SIV. ADVIaMIr I THE ro D.


71


Oeo. H. Fpd,
Vice-Pres.
National Bank
OCALA, FLORIDA.










THE WEEKLY NDuvufrlKAL RECORD.


Industrial Record's Department of Information



This depaih t is conducted for the benefit do the subscriber and adv risingg patrons d this paper and no

c ge i made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any oe or ore the blanks following,
you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention

Ier Tmtru.Swml a M a urr f hwes ra MN.NWmey av mw No. rer Tber. r.m s r f.Ram La.M.L
DATE INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksnvlle, is.
INjSTMIAL RCOWDM, Main OMm.e Jetoovflle A. I sm in the market for lads for the purpo of
a the aket for the folowr Prefer in State of Pleas pt me a eommusicatio
with responsible parties ad give me other iatormntiaL
few-fr .
Pleae notIfy where mme a be secured.
SB.

State speemeary the ktid of mebhiery wanted aad whether new or seoa.d-handed DATE
Lsalum fur Terpn e. SwWI or eatery. or r Ay EIu irbll Etrprims a Soweseury, Offl@ or usleeM Sumpes SawmW er TrpaMIne Mas
DATI
INDUSTIIAl, ~ COD, Jask0moille, a DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jaekaomvelhe, Fta.
Pleae a se d the tae unerigne regarding good location In (sate or seem of
mate) for Ia the market for
together with fal informnatio about labor coanditio taxes, trSportatio failllties,
ouls emeouragemema ete.
Pi Pleae give e nformatib a to bee places to buy ete.

8igema sI g.4


t TYme Wa st. ft semetum"? Are Ye TMuMaIM eo amest ?T
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, JaekomIvirle, t. I INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jaclksonile, Ft.
Hve for sle the folowi Ca yoa give any Informatio as to the reliability of the followlag A or opor
d-

Can ysoa m ms a purehaser?
Signed Sigma



DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL BCOBD. Jacksonvle s. F INDUSTRIAL =CORD, Jaeksoaille, rla.
Was a ma to M the position of Want a putio a

with the following reiremets Refer to the foaowlbr

-am you a~gest smeh a mEm? Can y. assist me ?
Signed Signed



CLIP THIS COUPON
TO ALL READERS OP THE RECORD,
When ym are answi an sr. firom the cohmns of this paper, whether you are king an inquiry or placing an order, pleae ct out the coupao
low ad attach it o the letter, wit p u.

COUPON. *
Your advertsement was seea in the ldiarlsl Reesed. ime dated

Signed.


The INDUSTRIAL RBCORD of Jacksoavlle, Ia., ma Savanas, G., is the South's great
weekly trade Journau



The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopesto benefit the other.


u 0m R WITE InVM mru.uu mmi n


U


AL


e '










I~~~~~~~~~I _STUWELYf__~sitA EOD


/
f


COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey Montgomery, New York city.
aI-dn, M. W, New York City.
Tolar, Hart Co., New York City.
CONVEYANCING.
Realty Title and Trsa Co.
COOPERATE.
Cannon Co., The, QuitMan, Ga.
Copae 0o, The, Jaecoville, Fla.
JacfiarO Ooperag CO, JaimoaiPe,
Fla. *

Kirk & Jaoes, Jacksoville, Fla.
DRUGS-4WHOLESALE.
ounthem Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
COsington Co., Th, The, Jacksoville, Fla.
Kohn, Furehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lombard Iron Works Supply Co, An-
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SebCld's 8aons Co, J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
gunts, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
Mrphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla
SeMod's Soa COo, J. 8., Maaon, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fd & Supply Co., The, Jack-
onville, Fla.
FuwJclz uJ.
Getting Furniture Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
GEJTS' ruW=m --
Chaig & Bro, J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksoville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksoulle Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALEr
Consolidated Grocery Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co, Savannah, (a.
Hargraves Co, C. H, Jaeksonville, lsa.
Johson Co., W. B, Jacksonile, Fla.
Peacok, Hunt & West C., Savannah, Ga.
Wiiams Co., J. P, Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Koha, Puregot u& Co, JacksomviDe, Fla.
HARDWARE
Baird & Co., L E, Jackakokaville, Fa.
Bond & Boms Co, The, Jacdoville, Fa.
BriB dware Co., W. HL.,Va eta, Ga.


Buyers' Directory

Them advertisers a in this ims. If
yaO want aytn, look thro-n thib
ela-r list an write to the frm ap-
I- tIg hbari Th Record g-
a poIpt respomr

ABSTRACTS
ealty Title and Trut Co.
AUTOmOBaIL8.
GClbrt, Fred a., Jacksomvile, FeL
RAMKS.
Atlatice National ank, Jackaoville, %aM.
Ommercit Bank, JacksoMvwile, Me.
trlra Natioal Bank, Oesi, Fta.
MIaretil Bank, Jackbouvilie, ia.
National Bak of Jaksnmville.
o0=8 AND CRATr
Cmmer Lumber Co, Jackouville, Fa.

fater, Ge. R., Jr, Jdasovlle, F.
southern Ful & Supply Co, The, Jkso-
vfle, Fla.
CARS.
BoAut AtUtie Cair & Y-f--wMg Co,
Wayeroe3 Ga.
CLOTHING
A Bro, J. A, Jaad r vfi 1a.
i Oeo., H. A, Jacksonvill, Fla.
Stmdalrd Clothing C, Jackaoavill
CLOTHnIG-WHOLKSAL.L
eKol, Furehott & Co., Jacksonville, .


Marion Hardware Co., roaal, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co, Ta a.
Weed & Co., J. D., avaa Ga.
HARKEN
M lurray & Baker, JacksaMville, Fa.
Thomas, W. B, Gainevilie, Fla.
BHATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., A., Jacksonville, Fl.
Standard Clothing Co. Jaeksmile, la.
HOTEL&
Aragon The, Jadkonvil, Fa.
Hotel Batholdi, New York City.
IRON WORKS
Lombard Iron Works A Supply Co., Au-
gusts, Ga.
Merrinl-Stevens Co., Jacksoevill, 1l.
Murphy, T, Jackonvie, 1Fs.
Schofeld's amn CO., J. ., Maeon, Ga.
JEWEXLER
Greenleaf & Crosby OCk, Jadcaomvile, Fla.
He & Slager, Jacksonvile, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelni, F, Jackonville, Fa.
Blum & Co, Cha., Jacksonville, F.i
Hanne Bro., Jacksonvile, Fla.
MEDICINS.
Speneer Medicine Co, Chattanooa, Ten.
Southern yl-uf etnring Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
MAPS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
XACHUI WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T, Jacksonille, F .
Schofield's Sao Co., J. 8., Macom, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR aunPtramn. PRO-
CSS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. &., Macou, Ga
IMEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd, Jacksoville, 1kF
IMTAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunwiek, Gh .
MeUlaa Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIS.
Brigg Hardware C, W. H, Valdoet, G.
Marion Hardware Co., Oala, Fk.
Schoeld' Son C., J. 8., Maeo, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
MULES A"D HORSES.
Thoma, W. R., Gaieville, IFa.
NAILLS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORKS.
BarnesJemup Co, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co, The, Savannah, Ga.
Independent Naval Stores ad Export Co,
Jacksonville, Fl.
Peacock, Hunt & West Ca., Savannah, Ga
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Store Co, Mobile, Ala.
PAINTS.
Bond & Boour Co., Jackomvie, Fla.
PICANS.
Griffing Brma. Co, The, Jacksaoville, Fl.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H, Valdosta, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Ocala, la.
Tamp Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Oeala, 1ae.
PUMPS.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksoville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksville, Fla.
Schofield's Sos Co., J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co, Savannah,
Ga.


MORTGAGE






Itl W. ORSYT


Southern States Land ad Timber Co,
Jacksonville, Fla.
West-Raley-Ranim Co, The, Jacksonvi l
Fla.
SHIP YARDS
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, F
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALEL
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAMS .IPS
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P, Jacksonvill ,Fla.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co, H. A., Jacksonvile, Fl.
TANKS.
Cypress Tank 00, Mobile, Ala
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Sehofeld's Sons Co, J. S., Maaon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G, Jackasoville, Fa.
Council Tool Co, The, WNanish, N. C
IUXPEn Is APPARATUS S
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jacksomvle, la.


:s.~


:S.

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.


" SWr"ET


ACKSWRIzE rLMS


H. A, Renfroe Co,


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suit to Order at ReadyMade Prices Mal Orders Given Permn AMtn
439 W. Bay Street JACKSONVILE, FLA.

111111 tIIIIIll IIIIIIIIII3 IIll IIII1 IIIarsIsesei


J .. P. WiLiAs. President.
T. A. Jugmisgs. 2iePand V mt
* EL & KAY ON, ry


J. A. CL Chanaau U Vlm
J. F. DoSNMUaVi,3iVbmFls
D. 0. White, Rer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

l11K TREI II =1ll) EN UF U IaVLE am
mAIn out.*. OXVAM1SNXHF, EOROML
mmn.ef or n... I `e`AC~o&A, VLX. Jaraft noweuew am.
JALCRESONVILI&WLAL. [ ===4011.


Naval Stores Producers are Isvted


to correspoud Wa -VA L


- go








Write me for se
,.,. a p ,asaele.s .
Use. Almama or 3XIMensWUL AM

Job work through the
country I pecialt7.


REAL ESTATE. The Largest and Oldest Copp errunswlc k, Ga
Beekwith, Hederson Warren, Tamps, Works in GeorgW iru SW l
Fla. W My specialty is large worms and heavy botoms that do an e1k.
Brobston, Fm&ig & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fla. "
Frazier, W. W., Jacksonvlle,i Fla.
Livingston a w.a, Send your order for general printing to the tc
DOrT FAIL TO TIm 0 THS COROD 0 ADvAM1ABm.d *


IUW.-wwk. Ji,. .-
Pine Produit Cotrue ou Ga, Thb A"-
etteille, N. C.
Pine Bent CobtreaUsei a, The, 240i
N.C.
Standard Turpatie C, The, w TYat.
City. .
SUKRS-mnMLA 829.L
Baker, M. A, ri a.
MeMilu Bres., Sawanh Oa.
lUiragInams a .t 133
Davis A Son., G. M., Platha, 1k.
x uigniKrBims VA.B.
Davis & Soa, Y Platka, 1k.

Grivot Typewriter rEaIhp, Jabame
Pla.

MeMurray & Baker, Jeeksimvii. M. -
Thomas, W. R., Gainesarils, h.
WATCns.=
Greenleaf & Chrby Oa, JaeksadmMm, f
Hess & Slager, Jackoeuvlle, ik.
YELLOW PIME LUMNI
Cummer Lumber (C, JTdmmfy 11.
East Coast Lumber CO., WatheteSm ,


A.


29



I
I


THR VXIMT D uputrarWAL BROORD.





THEE WEEKLY IIiwujirIAI EBCORD. 1S

When you Visit Jacksoliville
Call to see the Record- and be at home.
Tell the Record all you know, that will Interest others.
If you want to buy or sell advertise your place.
SIf you owe the Record pay the bill.
If you don't owe the Record make a bill.
Order your Printed Stationery.
Be sure and give the order for your Commissary Checks.
Call on the Secretary of the 7. O. A.

Call at the Industrial Record Office.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF
THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
* and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.
I EI I I l III D, RETMIhMK 1i FE P W OI IRI ME.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF. WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED
A Florida Enterprise. Try It.
2T= 3mCOws #rA Ec As 3A Ma Eo T VALU.





THE WMEKLY muvurmrIAL RWOORD.


Pre1aimt. W. C. POWLR: Vi-Premdimt I. w with the PrMI amt IuteMe Dreetmay adI DIe o MaIoma o W. OACOHMAMN. L . WbO
I&AD., B. In. OVIMUT ON, B. A. MeuACH RN, JO11N L TOUNG, A. RBANWORD. . MeMILLAN. C. DOWI-
ING J. a. SAUNDRB, C. B. ROG0 : Aaditor, JOHN HBNDiRmOM.
*


oNU ;11DATD NAVAL 8TORi lMPANY


jcKsom lvile, flo.


S Iovnlh Go.


PenalNhll, II.


Pa iil MIc, t,50 WO0. Owne M u WNol y RUcl Mw on

mil liniru Sl ila hlee Io Sll Iot1inIeolo WIIhI Im I.


- 4


I Ie Poilles.


PMol of


s lils 1erea oIreI MInI Il


le Paonoie oi illenine 0Iers ellliee IIM
Mre 1dl Plwl 01 T oir llt .


YARS II A llKso T 1AVl N i, fERMAN INl n PEISa l .


All Rod uces a e l vied to oll or Colresind


- - -r 1 m I m It - -m > - - --*-*-*-* - - --*- -
. . Vov --. ---D.... lu9:oo::o! i-*s
"zD PMD JAM 1:3 IJDVCT*L


/ r
I-
I


I/


l leConslise Poi llle I eA IeINi CIpiol.


-..: u -- -- -- -- -- --


4


4
4

4








THE WEEKLY NuDrbTrlAL RECORD. 1


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Comm;-a'y Trades,)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A.C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 21.
A.C. Creamery, 80" .. 22
10 .. 25
A. C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
fancy Full Cream.......... 11

Lard
Compound Tin.
650-4b tin.... 66
S 0-lbtub....
Leaf Tin.
50-lbtin. ............ 84

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl ........ 86

Sugar


ramulated Sugar, bbls..... 5 40

Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
ava, 301-lb cans to case,
per lb.................. 22
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Oeen Coffee good. ......... 12
een Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, aonmon....... 81
Arbakles Boasted Coffee, 1
Ib packages......market price
Li Band Coffee, 1 lb pack-
age.............. market price
ouasted, 100lb. drum....... 17
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fne quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
: Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 27
SEnglish B'faat, 10 b.. 27
Formoea, 10 Ib....... 27
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10 size
10 Ibs to cas, per pound-.. 40


Salt
20-lb sack................
100lb sack..............
Iea Cream, 200-lb acks.....
S 100-lb sacks....
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-1b....
*4 *6* *4 2-lb....


100
50
100
50
265
275


) Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lbtin...... ....... 17
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 dos to box
sifter top, per dos...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
bame, per dos......40 and 80

Corn


calr Lt
W.Corn,llOb, 1 88
10Qlb, 1 24
Mzd corn,1101b,1 83
lO0b,1 21


Let
140
126
185
128


Lettem I
sk
1 49
1 84
146
185


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


e OSk
CarLot Lot
W.clip'd,1251b,
1001b,
White 1251b,
White 1001b.
Mixed 1251b
1001b,


lAUs 100
Sk Lota
190
155
180
145


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice.... 1 85
49" fancy..... 185
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 6 25
Highest Grade Paternt, 06,
12 or 24 lb satck.........6 00
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 6 25
Pillsbury's Best ..... 7 50
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 7 40
" bbl ........
Flour, Boss,..............7 25
Meal
Meal, per barrel............. 850
92-lb sacks.......... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel......... 8 50
92-lb sacks....... 1 50

Rice
Good..................... 4
Choice...... ............ 5f"
Fancy Head.............. 6
Broken.................. 2
Canned Vegetables
Do.
Tomatoes, 8s, Chief........ 85
Tomatoes, 2 ........ 65
Clayton, 3s.. ............. 80
Clayton, 2s .............. 60
Sifted Peas, 2s ...........1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s .......1 15
Lima Beans,2s ..........1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8.......... 90
Baked Beans, s ........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s........
Beauty Beets, 3s ...........
Sauer Krant, 3s ........... 85
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s ............. 90
Hay


Choice....
No.1 Tim.
No. 2 "
No.1 Cl'ler


car los M bale la
Iots qanatity
1750
1650
17 00 17 80 15 50
1700 17 50 1550


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 dos
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz..,..... 140
Cherries, 2., 2 doz. to case
perdoz............... 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz............... ..... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz .......... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz........,....... 1 45
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per do................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
cae, per doz........... 1 45
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to cane.
per dos................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 61
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
Ib.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
per lb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
aborted, per lb........ 8
Sticls unwrapped, 25-lb box.
assorted, per lb........ 64
Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 8
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice '' "
Ev. Apples. 60-lb. boxes... .4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lb. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. case 00
Prunes, Calf cleaned 26-lb
box, 40-50............ 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 50-60............ 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70.........*.... 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box ......... 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 6f
Extra H P, .... 6
Seed Peanuts, ..
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ .... 18
Brazils ................... 12
Peaeans................... 12
Filberts ................... 12
alO nuts............ ...... 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 LemalO
lots Sk. Lot Sk. Lt
Cottonseed Meal 27 00
Hulls 1050


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Wooden ware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 90
8 hoop .........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per dos....... 1 0
Sieves, per dos. No. 18......1 00
nested...... 200
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per dos 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per dos.. 00
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per do.. .. 1 20

Washboards P-"
78 Crown Combination...... 20
178 Blue Jay...............8 00
175 Diamond Glass .........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per dos 1 06
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
dos.................. 9
Sardines, American, 100 to
ease, per case ........ 850
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 45
Salmon Is, Tale 4 do4 to cas
per doz Alaska......... 90
Salmon, Is, 4 doz to cae,
per doz Col. River ... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per do .
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two do in tins........ 1 80
- Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-1b pails............. $ 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
Ibs to box............. 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avg* .... 1484
"Reliable" Ham, 10-12 arge .... 141-3
"Reliable" Hamn, 12-14 avg .... 141-4
"Reliable" Shouldes, 7-9 ae .. 113-4
"Reliabl" Clifornia Hams, 6-8 10
Breakfast Bason, light r. ...... Is 1-
D. Bellies, 16-18 av .......... 10
D. S. Bellies, 20-22 a. .......... 93-4
P. 8. Bellies, 25-30 ar. ........ 4-2
D. 8. Plates .................... 734
Bacon Plates ................... 8a-4
D. 8. Butts ..................... 83-4
Bologna Sausage ............... 7
saun age on ................S.TS
Batter a Chem.
"Strawberry" Creamery, 60-lb tub 22
30-Ib tubs.. 221-2
"Reliable" full cream cheace .... 121-2
Kiaa's Luc.
"Indiana" Pure Leaf ........... ..kaL
Siea-Fonam" Compound .........
Kian's Camma Mets.
"Reliabl Coned Beef, 1 ...... S1Ij
Orned Bed, s .......
Roeast Bee, Is ........ 12
SRoast Beef, 2 ........ U
Potted Ham and Toege
-4 .......................... i
SSiced Bese, 1-2s .. ..
SVie'am sausage, las .. As *
Tripe ................. U


g A COPY P 2AVAta, 1Q8 2 Lu BOWrOK. a


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THE WEEKLY IWuuBTaIAL RECORD.


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The job printing department

of this company is conducted

for the exclusive benefit of the

naval stores, lumber and man-

ufacturing trades. It is reason-

able to suppose you will get

better and more satisfactory

printing supplies-letter heads,

envelopes, commissary checks,

pay-roll reports, etc., by having

us make them.


Industrial Record Co.,


- U U 0 U U U r


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S. I RIALS II MARILE, STOKE AND MODZE
Sthm leTMe s to the U elaborat Mu-oleam.
Wrie, or nie to 3ee --or- dadgin will please yos.
SOUTHERN MARBLE AND STONE CO.
kIrs fen1sda m1 F. LIA3Un Numager.
Co iabee for nau li 4 Sut Noesam 4steet,.
.Jksemsus. Flae.
AstiraleW in U s,,. MNao, MPsaie a"d Tile.
-*******************************************
:* Y Want a Turpentine Location? -
F.^ You Want a SawmuE Location?
SYo Wat any Kind f florida Land?

Cam on or Wrmfe to
"IF Y Mea Business?
J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS,
Ocala. Florida


he Clyde Steamship Company


New YORK, CHA RL5sTON AND FLORIDA LINES
m- aimt o" JIM he an amok" to 8al as fembwk agam
t u1 & C. beth way.
W ew Teek, VEm E1abnmVUll" r
~ "s nefth 3lvmsD OGbmarotla and Now York.


Tueday, Nov. 1 at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ......Sunday, Nov. 6, at 4:00 am
Warmbaay, Nov. 2, at 3:00 pm ... .ALONQUIN ... .Monday, Nov. 7, at 4:00 am
MrIday, No. 4, at 3:00 pm .... OOMANCHE ......Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 5:30 am
Hauay, Nov. at 3:00 pm ..*" MOHICAN ......Friday, Nov. 11, at 6:30 am
Tedy, Nov. 8, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, Nov. 13, at 8:30 am
Wdimday, Nov. 9, at 3:00 pm ..IR.....Monday, Nov. 14, at 9:30 am
rideay, Nov. 11, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE .... Wednesday, Nov. 16, at 10:30 am
*xHURON ..Wednesday, Nov. 16, at 10:30 am
atudamy, Nov. 12, at 3:00 pm ..AIGONQUIN ..Thursday, Nov. 17, at 11:30 am
Teday, Nov. 15, at 3:00 pm ..OOMAACHE ...... Sunday, Nov. 20, at 1:30 pm
WTbaday, Nov. 16, at 3:00 am . xNEW YORK .Monday, Nov. 21, at 4:00 am
Fiday, Nov. 18, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Wednesday, Nov. 23, at 4:30 am
h Nday Nov. 19, at 3:00 pm .... IROQUOIS ....Thursday, Nov. 24, at 5:00 am
.*xMOHICAN ... Saturday, Nov. 2, at 6:00 am
Telday, Nov. 22, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE ........Sunday, Nov. 27, at 7:00 am
Woimaday, Nov. 23, at 3:00 pm. .ALGONQUIN .... Monday, Nov. 28, at 8:00 am
FMtid, Nov. 2S, at 3:00 pm ... .O COMANCHE ..Wednesday, Nov. 30, at 8:00 am
*xHURON ....Thursday, Dec. 1, at 11:00 am
Tuesday, Nov. 2, at 3:00 pm .... ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, Dec. 4, at 1:00 pm
Wedeimeay, Nov. 30, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ......Monday, Dec. 5, at 1:30 pm
Thm day, Dee. 1, at 3:00 pm ..* xNEW YORK ... .Tuesday, Dec. 6, at 4:00 am
--Bostor via Bruswiek and Charleston. xFreight only. --Boston via
hmwkL,


THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
meot nrneuwiss- sim 3001% sw amd Proideme e a" aDi e em-
'-- ---v-WU -LT SAILENSm.
arris Fei caCa t CL utle et WAVID.
-.. .......... .............. .......rom Iwte Wlart -omst
aboi .. ..... fo.t .. .. .. .. o .R Street. J akssmvU
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
motweem aeamWASl en ana
sa-e at rPhaflat As.r, ra Fels, .Besrstifed M(D Lad) sad itermeael
leingh ast. Isbm re1r.
) STEAIMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
ae ea tose s mew: Lea.ve _a aos1-fl Asnd-" au d JTck
a e. s1 n. ltmILar. Mare saftsrd Mondays. wednesday a : dy a. I.
".Uuuz"s" oijNO .UN
ae dm, I la ,p.
I 0 1 p .i .|............... ..........Jao i... ..%.... ....... ... ....r. riU a. .
p............... .L ...... :--: Leae a p.
M 5..- .......... .. .. ... I ............. LAe .
1dm 410 a.I ........ .. .........38. 1riakt .......... Leave 1A p. -.
........ ... ..... ... ... .. .d a d). ... ............ IT.....L ve o m
At. -:0 IL ....... .... .....:.et rpd..r..p ..................[Lv. 1o:0 a. .
.mmAr. P Ag- zuU-6ligh AVD W11CIWtprU Ocm. 2 W. D' UIt., JaeSWI FO:w '
f. .L I NMu Jal..L Aht. emi. Pass Agnt, Us W. Day St. Jacksonvimol, n
* W.. ceO JL., Lead t. JAt.. JarkvllM. C P. LOVELL, AAst. upt.Jaek'&
Poet Hgau Street, JaOkfsonvi
A. a. 3Ag1T. CL. P. A. NMw Teck, CLTDW tIMnR P. A.. New TerS.
,a<*.. .. .., W1L. C TDE CO.
o -M a. Oaa. mtat eral Asak. i
a a ab nno not&" otret. New YOrk.


thm e o this
The menll aa
the of th peort asr


Uneetee ta tlead aa m tf *m si-
Tr Wekly Industrial Reomd oft Jack-
onville "d Savannah eas taken its place Ai
among Uw leading trade Journals la the
UnUatd 8ta. and as an suthierty M Lhum-
br ad Bnav stores it st being quoted not
e6ly by the best and mot earefuUly edtd o
elus papers In thie country. bt by thos
to Europe alo. A London trade paper tr
S aclag tht ole yes terday givs Uberal t o
aoame to the Record's vtw a mmart eoa- no
% tt. tot* I
This Wek' Issue of the lautrl R **
er tI ee better tLea usuaL sad U ks
a strong a"d entatalrw geaeal inds trial
trial ewspaer. la addltom to Its value H
as the alampld ot the two speeMe tad '. .
ites it represents. It is bimnlM of new Johs
stories of development la the Southeat. pa it
mone hem beig the atory a ab eal-mtll- fend
lW dllr corpaoratlo araed. in Jack- o4
samille yesterday. .ad tahe orgaanltlo of H.
esoeral oter big eorporaesa durntag the and
week tn Gaork mand lr l6 i '
It ae set the oea s t enterprte. sad it Wan
wen GmrV te grWeat mems at Olce- wlck
1s t Is meln. both It Its baeiptn and
sdvert-n departmeutrcarrving a it does.
par1hapa on ot the jarget aadvertlMng pt-
fomages Ctoen to aty of tha soutiera t m. T
jourmnals. Isom


w* **e.b Who, This





SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
80 YEARS RELIABILITY.
Hess & Slager,
Diamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry
CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND I4 A 13 MAIN. -
^o l oilob c dT-l-e-T-(--oTl-cTF lTlV o-eT6f(v`-UTl- 6 -(--v ^.--`-


Naval Stores Market

and StocK Report
Publshe Dally In The



Jacksonville Metropolis,
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.

$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.


BIG PRIZES:

A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposition, to
Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.


Carter & Russell Publishing Co

Jaclksonville. Florida.


WRE= TEK IZ IM ANY EII ORKAXON D3.RM


*


23


THB WRIMM iMHuzrrybjAL BZOORD.








*1


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SSilverware, Diamonds Watches, Jewelry, Cut Glass, Clocks, etc.
^B^^^^i~aa^'itgg ^-00-% A


11 *Immmesummon ********---------------------

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO..
of Wanaalsh, N. C.,
parasefty aof mers Statlan, R. C, ame atI solo Dimmond Ifte
Wiees at S.Le Bmalk Joe a"d stadard at $Lea Old styl a"d Patent
irs at Wl a d They shoul average a little better thn ever. *
W am trounst out a new brand, te Bla LiAm Hatk at S M a" PaB- *
s t La wldeh re warranted. AU wbolee deaers to naral sto snaa
mane o earrm Our linss and alomM sumy operate rss.
---------------~"r----r-~-------- Ia
IXD G. KLTHAtN,A PM. ALFRED A. ECTHAP, LI U. S N.
J&GoIe- Ia. Ret'd See' a TreasM Colarunot
Egteeor, Xa ffli, N0. C.

Pine Product Construction Co.
Fayettevile. N. C.
bl~b a TrpeaU OR et TOar. a utr Cre Tar. Di aufeetut.; Wood Preervativea
N woa e W stSa me., sa Ch aral froma ISZhtwood tuN BUn-ftloga
?s"10 lerass 2h1 orat iutan reduceS. conetlam comtroned at wm.
u ager fL t Pemt rcd amplgtel and mMn tau a t the prooes. Fur-
UIr wrtre Alitd sasthan.. -gneral mamnaar, Nwatt.tevsll N. C.
---i ---------------------------- --------
NOTEL BARTHOLDI, ^AEW hD T M .
Facing Madion Squar Park. Newly Frnished Throghout.
Near all Big Stoes and Places of Amusemet. ars Pas
the Door for all Bailroad Stations and Steamboat Landings.
arge Saple Booms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
iad no grand and magnifieent decorations: no luxurious
grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
Speak to Yew. No Employees Ie Any Way Iaattestatlve. .
BRt jeut a cosr, home-like little hotel that wil appel to the
heart of those who ae looking for solid omort. Good.
plain Amerlean cooking, and affable and courteous treatment.
-I -ar -NNrBes I


John R. Young. Pre*dent. C. S. Elli VlashPrw. &eam
JW.W. Motto. Jr., Scretry and Trsea r

ELLIS-YOUNG CO.

Commission Merchants
NAVAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.



T. MURPHY
JACKSQNVILLE MACHINE AN IRON WORKS
ENGINEER. IRON AND MASS
FOUNDER AND MACINBW
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Me and Bepaed. I-
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kind
MARINE JtINES AND BOILERS PULLEYS AND 1AFTM
Agent for Stationary Engines, Boilers, Pmp, Feed Water Heatera d and--
sers, Hydrants and Valvs, Centrifgl Pumps, Ho, Belting and RabbrQ- :
PrJACKSONVSI WATER lMI A UI
JACKSONVILLE PLORIDA.


* s THE VN WEiKLYT jimJurrIAL RKoD.
w- -wo"


Two of the Palterns we show in our Catalogue.

SPECIAL VALUES IN STERLING SILVER.


HE E
THE" Greenleaf E
"sRose C"Germania"
Crosby Comany
Toapoom- o per am -ta Domrt Spess ro pero Deuert Speea, S 6o p6 dea,
Table sp. mS3o p3r &. 9SrTabite R Sp OnM s,30 par as.
Dealert Forks, $z6oo per de. Deset er, $6.5 per s.
Taerbi s o 3a o per a0&. Table FPrks, b3.50 P ere.
D ot Kol -=mop. o. 41 West Bay Street D..srt Kives, op1 r a.
Table aire, 3.00o pr d& Tae Knives es.o per s .

S NO CHARGE FOR n. o ,. WE PAY EXPRESS *
ENGRAVING. sen... so.es. prx>.pt sea..ino ea.sl CHARGES.
Write for Catalogue
SONE HVUNuKt. PAGES ILLUSTRATING


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