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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00095
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: November 4, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00095
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text





For g Fr



V;


5 W1IEKLY INDUSTRIAL fN

"' .e ld Every Friday, Devoted to the Naral Stores, Lumber ad.i aaund actur L mtereat s
-I-


4,1111010ad Sept. saw I ana"2* ommofte of n Itllr ola~'I MmSM sefi a an Aft EAANNIM O& ft ME
gooef An maigu Ab. of Me. 60smnl iAsseigsn. Ak~E~ Z@P "Mn wS90. as me ml ou& OA., Onea t st~
Ado~ -C A26J a9" Of 08 0AVC208 -- Of. me 2i trh..a Ca OPaM' Asila. Z -us-
-.Y~ rr 4 )S iasa( ol~ iwloaI IlSt C Seinbs Santro Isne~r's sa. -J I
NN o t outse#p

FMC~OV ATLAWA, U

1 1may weJok fe the uftLlbim of our


_ The Cotton Supply and Immigation. ou
responsibility as to the parent and future
14L0.4L -J Li u A


S tnder present conditions the South
Ss" m to have reached the almost aver-
mit of eatton prduction, and wheth-
; the yisM be UlljM00 bales or mo,
Swould scarcely seem reasonable to look
d a larger average crop until the labor
-ply ba been greatly increased. As a
whibolee t weather thi year has been fair-
I fa vemra and the areage up to the ful
1t of the labor spply. The world
i- t, therefore, face the fact that we
:- 4 square op ag i the danger of a
Sm uP ttally.imndequate to met
SwVrl's ineremaig needs. The whole
V014 Is entering upa a period of expand-
iN tmde sad of adveig eiviliation in
A*, Afries and the isles of the sea,
S witA will inevitable vastly ineaae the
mlegowth in thec ad fio cottao .
a s- stana uleasne hora year


S^ to face a cotteo famine, and this
S W, be a disaster of far-reaching effect
1l6 time has come fdr the South as the
e;ef as se of cotton supply, as wel as
r the eatton interests of the word, to
gbe serious heed to the situation. We
m-l take a broad view, and not look at
i matter merely from a narrow, selfish
aw, taking acoat of the present only.
The suggestion ma last week by the
eeminrino of agrititure of the South,
that an efort be md to reduce the crop
to ,BM bales, woald be, if carried out,
as fatal to true Southern prosperity, as
wol be the effort of a few men to pre-
vrr hmiattion, for fear that this would
man an imneaa la the cotton crop.
Tbeie views, however, are not more nar-
row, advanced as they are by good men
who look only at one side, than are the
views of some eoaT manufacturers
Narth and South who want to see otton-
growing developed in other countries in
order that this may lessen the demand for
'Buthera cotton and thus enable them to
|k bay at a lowbr price. These manufactu-
es naturally do not want to see other
aAis built North or South, and do not
want others from elsewhere, Europe es-
peially, to come South and study the
sitaution, for they would much prefer to
force Europe. to grow cotton in Afria.
"We do not want to encourage competi-
tion for Southern cotton, because we want
to keep it here for Southern mills" said
one Southern mill man lately. All of
thse views are narrow and mistaken, but
It i not surprising that they are advo-
ted by some good men, for all men am
tto apt to see only one side of the shield,
Si that the one which seems to concern
h sr wns Imeiatem e.


The world's demand for cotton is grow-
ing at a rapid pace, and it must grow
still more rapidly. Instead of about 15,-
0004M bales of cotton nw samally con-
sumed, it will not be many years before
20,00,000 or 26,00AN00 bales will be need-
ed. Shall the South supply this, and thus
enormously add to its wealth, or shall in-
action on our part force the growing of
more cotton in Africa, in Asia and in the
West India islands? Shall we avail our-
selves of the first great opportunity which
has offered for a 100 years to turn the
tide of population Southward, and thus
forever settle the race question, while
doubling and quadrupling our wealth and
power, or shall we, because of ite mistak-
en notions of people who will not look at
these que ti from the broad standpoint
of good to al and thu of greater good
to every inidual, lose this magnificent
opport y n the goose that is ly-
ing our golden eggs? That the race ques-
tion is in some respects a serious one
we must all admit; that the race question
would be forever eliminated as a danger-
ous factor in social and in political life by
a great inflow of white population is
universally admitted. This is the su-
preme need of the South. Beside it every
man who looks ahead and sees our dan-
gers must realize that all other question
are of but little moment. It is a ques-
tion which cannot be settled by presiden-
tial elections; it is a question that takes
hold of the very life of the South. It is
time for such rairoads as the Southern,
the Illinois Central, the Southern Pacific,
the Atlantic Coast Line, the Louisville &
Nashville, the Seaboard and others to
really wake up to its importance. They
are doing a little immigration work, but
pitifully little as compared with what they
should be doing. For every dollar they
are spending in this work, they should
spend ten. Until recent years the condi-
tions have all been against sueeess in im-
migration work, and large results could
hardly have been expected. People never
flock to a land of poverty, and under low-
priced cotton Southern agricultural inter-
ests were, indeed, in poverty; but people
will pour into a land of prosperity, and
high-priced cotton ias made the whole
South more prosperous than for many
years, provided its attractions and advan-
tages are pressed upon them. Let the
railroads, the State and municipal govern-
ments of the South inaugurate such an
immigration campaign as the Western
roads and States carried on when the
mighty tide of population swept over and
enriched that section, or such a campaign
as Canada is now pushing forward. Then


~- -- -------- -- -- ------ ---- -- ---- -- 7 -r ------- -


Ate s Ua m .. ft mm ...d
. .-- ,


U, GA. $3A AL/

Mississippi, 68 counties, a88m, haI. 4
Missouri, 8 counties, 14131 hles.
North Carolina, 67 comatis, 31MM
bales.
South Carlina, coplek, SeRN Tia.,
Tennesee, 36 coSties, 72618 bha.
Texas, 13s counties, 1,S4 bl.
Virginia, 9 counties, 5,145 bah
The number of counties reporting prio
to October 18, 1903, was 8. The am Mr.
of round bales reported Us yer is ir-
969, a compared with 313,6M bt YAr.

Will Have a Now !ns94uu Room
Ground was broken t WWMenM "
morning at the corner of Bay an'md'iM
Streets for the ernetir if a lrmehy
brick building for P. L 8MthrlA.
The new building wil faces Mj
Street. It will not be om the mr. h
directly in the rear of police b tin..
The structure wil be of red F md rM .
W. T. Hadlewn Ca. we nt ba i,
Mad Mr. Hfdl o tated tu y tnat & tf
work would be comnmeed at Wum '
ew building to he Iniab 1" ifcr
for ee-napey by JsMrin w- ,
Thia new three-story b J 6Iw '*
occupied by the SouthernDn Menlr
factoring Compuy, now da& bimH .
on West Bay Street The esitl Mtolo
of this compsty has bhem d ,
now $40,00. It was staed 6as0IAW
that in a very short time the mpitalW st
would be again imereed to mat the so
quirements of the growing dMe e
B. R. Powell, one of the beat knw.
citizens of Jacksonville i the prea e
of this company. Mr. Powell was fom-
ly with Fairhead, Strawn & Co., dems
in lumber. He has bee in the drug I -
nes for thirty years and is w e-
quainted with every brah.
The Southern Drug f-aafietwi
Company wll not only fMS-k dam-.
ists' supplies, but do a wholesal rg.
business on a much rgr ale than at
present.
The directors of this company ar BL. .
Powell, president; C. G. Harris, neraay
and treasurer; D. H. MeMila, B. V.
Covington and P. L S8atherled.
P. L Satherland was mm Tuesday af-
ternoon in regard to the new baudi g, and
stated that it would have all of the md-
ern conveniences known to the uilmdg
world, and would be an ormasit to that
portion of the city.
The first floor of the building .WR h
occupied by the clerical forces of t --
pany, and one portion of it as a samph
and show room. The firm will do a
retail bainess, though k' Bl eater t tho
wholesale trade. It is the itaotim f tu
Southern Drug Manufaeturiag Copanay
to own and operate one of the large
wholesale drug manufacturing phntd in
the South. The entire uptairs will be de-
voted to the manufaetwrig dearItmat.


us sas oUL K we v Pub Kwrvw
effort to enlist the co-operation of the cap-
ital and the manufacturers of Europe and
the North and the West. We would wel-
come every dollar of outside capital that
could possibly be induced to invest is
the South, for it would help to bring new
population, and we would welcome every
newcomer, for capital would likewise fol-
low and wealth be created and race dan-
gers swept away. Then would we vastly
increase our wealth and power, vastly in-
erease every line of agricultural-aad ma-
ufacturing interest, and create new ave-
nues for profitable employment for thous-
ands who now annually go elewhere.
Since 1800 we have sent out from the
South 2,500,00 of whites to help people
other sections. This drain of brain and
brawn has been greater, measured from
the financial side alone, than if the South
)ad dumped into the sea $2,500,00000;
and this drain must continue until we
turn the tide of population Southward.
With our enormous area and our vast re-
sources, the South cannot begin to show
a full measure of prosperity until its pop-
ulation is greatly increased Let us then
welcome the coming to the South, whether
as investigator or investor, of business
men of Europe, of the North and of the
West. Let us show to them, as well as
to the farmers of Europe and the West
and the Noirth, that here are unequaled
opportunities for th expansion of agricul-
ture, the investment of money and the
development of industrial interests. The
time has come for every man in the South
and every man interested in the South
to take a broad view of the present op-
portaity and his responsibility to the fu-
ture.-Manufacturers' Record.

Ceau Offce Makes Pablic Blleti of
Cotta Ginnin
The Census Office issued on the 31st day
of October a bulletin showing that up to
October 18, 1904, 5,776,565 running bales
of cotton have been ginned in 668 coun-
ties located In the various cotton-produc-
ing States, as against 3,445,08 running
bales as reported to the same date in
1903. Counting round bales as half bales,
the number of running bales for 1904 is
reduced to 5,704,570 and for 1903, 3,345,-
702.
The number of counties in States from
wh:ch ginning is reported and the num-
ber of running bales from each State, is as
follows:
Alabama, 55 counties, 601,482 hales
Arkansas. 61 counties, 216,457 bales.
SFloridia, 19 counties, 40,483 bales.
Georgia, 124 counties, 1,052,818 bales.
Louisiana, 42 counties, 305,153 bales.


i^r-*-"
'. : '






THE WEEgKY lNIMJISTlAL BECORD.
:: : : :: : : :: : : .. . .. . .... .CV .. . . .
........... ...... ... ...Ire -- ---------.-


C. geSme8, Pam U. o W. A. GATT.AH* and E. A. CHAMPLA N, VIjc-Pabawrs. C. H. HODGSON, SEmc,
DIMRECTORLS C B. Rogers, W. A. Gallher, E. A. Champlaia, H. A. McEachern amd J. A. Oranford, of Jashewrile


sad Tk-


SB. F. Bollard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500oo,ooo.


Si



I


( 4


4
4
4
4





.4


4


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


C4mesrt f ore krec-Story B ellMag, 70x200; we two-story baildiag. 50x390; owe mc-story nlldlag, 80xz20,
rUsala the largest space of uy COmpaMy of the kad I the Soeth.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.


Branches Tampa. F1a., Peneacola. Fle., end Saevannah. Ga.


TH- -mcom--- --- -- or---- .As-------- -TO O ---T
TRZ EXCORD WUL = WORTS DOUAW TO YOU rav ERT r Nr


Mali Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches nl Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of. Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Waval Stores Company, of Tanpa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
gromey branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.
t






.w-~


Wa


mAgmwaox.Pm3. aILGAUD, (aIer
W. 8. owEN. Vie-P-ro
;cociraeura S~ink,
asananus; s ~ aw

-R~lV/t ----florid


!~CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
4M SOo.0000

BA RRELS

ALL KINDS.
Ow plegtrr 3 howd and Will pm the -
yueg Amercan ad Ruomp.. bupetlmi

remb at MUGS CARO, OU17MA. GA.,
ad NIOKflCEMU PLA.
Mhm redo1 te home ofice,
QUITMAN. GA.


SIh lrllf IM l,.
BUIERS A"ND DEALERS IW


ENGINES. BOILERS.
Cutta, Saw, Pertlier, On and lee Ma-
enharyd plS m ad Repair.
CAPACITY FOR 300 HAND.
Maeahn Tools, Wood-Wdrking Maddary
Setting, Pulleys, Hagers, rather aIN
Rubber Belting ad Howr, railroad ad
Milm pplie ad Tools.
PlM -tiates funished for Pwer
Plunts and Steel Bridges.
team Pmps, Feed Water Heate .and

AUGUSTA. GA.


J6 P6. @aIEW-ILw
__ 1O A #


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSOM
JIACKSONVILLE. PLA. -i
CAtrrAL s3oooo SURM=S "d WNIVIm FpROMP sa
We issme me erViates of Deposlt. which draw aterest at he rate it11i t
an, itheM minety dayspr eer aklo ede d thmet s and 1l=t ye sS
mwata ar ys. Partcular atienios paid to Mt-of- TNw rmaoam.l aijalgsmla q


Augut noun" Larsn
The complete statement of railroad
mizlmnhfor the ihAith of Aunut, as
aetsifld by Dun' Review, has been pre-
pared and shows total gro earnings for
United States roads embracing 143,039
miles, of $128,056,64, p_ utially the same
a in August, 1903 f4l 140,615 miles of
road. Average earig per mile read
operated this year were $86&00, against
$91156 in August, 19, deereaase of 5.1
per cent. Compared with August, 190,
when earnings per mile averaged $806-
there is a gain of 7.8 per cent this year,
but in August, IW, the atacite coal
tonnage on all rads wa practically at a
standstill, owing to the eal miners' strike
and earnings on anthracite coal roads were
only 65 per cent. of earnings this year.
Omitting the coal roed in eompariso
with August, 190 gross earning per
mile of road of other United States roads
included, are 6.2 per cent: larger this year.
The statement of gross earnings for Au-
gust is somewhat better than for any
month since March, earnings of the inter-
vening months showing a larger percent-
age of loss, but the improvement reported
for August is in part due to larger pasmen-
ger earnings, attributable to the heavy
passenger traffic to the St. Louis Expo-
sition. On many leading systems passen-
ger earnings show a considerable increase
this year compared with preceding years,
while freight earnings are reduced, and
the lass in freight earnings clearly indi-
cates a smaller merchandise tonnage.

Losses in the Manure Heap
In order to determine the value of fresh
and fermented manure the Central Experi-
mental Farm, at Ottawa, Canada, made ex-
periments extending over seven years,
using both fresh and rotten manure, to
various grain crops On March 7, 1904,
about 8,000 pounds of horse and cattle
manure were placed in a shed on a tight
barn floor. It was turned and weighed
twice a moth, and the pile carefully
watched in order to preserve the proper
conditions of moisture. In one month the
weight was reduced to 5,530 pounds, in
two months to 4,278 pounds, in three
months to 3,947 pounds, and in four
months the exact weight was reduced to
3,480 pounds. At this time the manure
was in what may be termed first-class
condition, having that pasty character
which would admit of its being cut with
a spade and mixed readily with the soil.
The turning and weighing was continued
until December 7, when the former 8,000
pounds of fresh manure had lot two-
thirds of its original weight, as it then
weighed only 2,000 pounds. From this
lesson, together with a knowledge that for
seven years fresh manure gave larger re-
turns, pound for pound, than rotted ma-
nure, the unduly expensive method of
killing weeds by allowing the manure to
heat in a pile is at once apparent. As
to germination of seeds of weeds, it would
seem much better policy to combat
weeds by rotation of crops, together wiih
the thorough cultivation so necessary to
success. If the fresh manure gave larger
returns, pound for pound, and 8,000 pounds
of fresh manure was reduced to 2,600
pounds, as recorded in the experiments,
it is very evident that the farmer will
save two loads in three by applying his
manure to the fields in a fresh -condition,
and if it can be done daily, then so much
the better. In comparison with fertili-
zers, which remain unchanged, manure are
not stable in value, and should always
be fortifed with complete fertilizers.


** R. POWLL., CEAS. S. AARRIS.
President. Vic-Presidest ad Trwessrer.
irecrToes:.
a. well. Ctas. . arrfs. N. M. McllUs, L. Sathersoad,


A
NEr? AmW?


THE


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
CrM of West Bay anI Mldm St.
Jacksonvlle, flriw


Wholesale Drugs i Commissary Sippli
*We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad e quote pria
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and can sa you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.



THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE FL6A.
a NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thomrohig
renovated and repaired throughout, ia-
eluding new electric elevator and a
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.



East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Sblpmets a Specaty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


W. t. RILEY,
Ptesment.


J. A. 6. CAISON,
Vace-Presest.


GE0. J. SCOVEL,
&W -Il~ws


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Factories,
8th Street R. R. Crossin.
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIBA


KE= 22M0D = -= 1092" OZAT IRAm JOURnAL


--- I,


NUBIAN TEA frt .. Uthver ... Kiy

BENEDICTA A medlew for w1.

CUBAN RELIEF w Cr'aps" a" f

CUBAN OIL B ts eir~f
A supply of these medicines is what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for prices and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,
chttaagmsa. Temmassei.


i


j
n


.-ic .--


- -


TEE WBBIKLY mu~t1&rxb" RBCOjtDU


t;t









4 THE WEEKLY INIDUtIraAL SECOND.


Wbat is the buory of the Shorthaorn
a a dairy eawT I have understood that
1k airis of Seotlhr ard Englad are
igdly esrinpd of Shorthorns. I know
that the horthorn cow was at one time
is tis e rmby c idered a choice dairy
-ca. I e nom editors o farm journals
writig against the dairy se of Short-
hmn. What, if ay, families of this
lhe have retained good milking quali-
ter Os C a Shorthorn of good milking
quim he reied ou to produce like off-
I rg eK w uM the temdenay be away
anf' I qua ,tien and too much to-
I hed makio ? In this section there
a vwy few this bree ad so I have
as beus Mb ton t any help from local
Ids m el tam point.
Ze llgto the above, I shall not go far
Shadk ito the history of the breed to as-
eartasi what the original Shorthors were.
I wad fr per y Correspondlent to "san-
i' srthorn Cattle," by the editor of
The Gamete, also "Allen's sory of
Ithberma anl "Btefl History of Im-
pareed Shorthorn," the latter written in
gireati of Bates' Shorthorns, wherein
the pail was an exorable neesmity to
the sapro l of the owner. I be-
ew s the tw aist named books ae now
t of print. Mr. Bell ued to point with
prie to the nImero pounds of butter
rkted weekly, made from his Short-
hem, in adti to raising their calves,
ed remarked: "Are thee rent-payers not
d ma f impertne tha a few extra
pe--m efeef ad the back I would
aim rdeer yewr mrresponent to the ay-
ngs d dog of Sir Charle Knightley,
who mver woel diseotate the Shorthorn
hem the dairy standpoint, ad who prob-
Aly mlaet bef sad milk ore sue-
tBeafly th any of bin eantemporarieLa
S n- t gliompo of a noted Shorthorn
was that of the Earl of Dublin, unknown
mw where oly Campion of Bngland
rmlo mapre. BUt the Earl, a white
emw was a lkhty power in his day as a
tmmtrn tera of milking qualities without
S1. g mu ofa t he bef qualmiation
S With y s Hig" eyes I looked upon
i S with fear and trembling. With the
S a-kbowledge with adoration and re-
..+ qek. And n one but may be proud of
the quartering of the arl of Dublin upon
*I th es-adee of his bet Shorthorn cow.
t ts in ambient history, on which I
apt to be te prof-e and write what
+ emrepnam does not require.
S1wreli by trai rom London to the
LsR RTal, msy twenty years ago, with
1 oampmin, we met on various
of the way with other pilgrims,
M .t were bent to the same shrie.
W ,a eng d at oem of the refresh-
-ft into e compartment all of
0 -- pnro i t-ea farmers, but
40e--n ad the backbone of agriculture
OtN w a over. The talk was of stock
iON8, ouch holding is own particular
Viwa1, a sttle fellow in one corner
H.Hh'id: "Ye seem to think there is
4 bted but Durbhn. I be Devon, ard
f do t 6ew but your cow ashll trace
t VI Ni Iphak 319.'" (Hubbaek.)
What doa tiht mean A big fellow with
*i fpeaname of a wel-to-do stock h.o-
lir, elat: "Don't you know what
aIn m It jat refet back 319 gener-
M 8i 1 Noah was injected-into the
Ank. He weM take no cow that would
at give slik d eaise aalf, appoing
6 i am i P.eter out dui.g the


voyage." Thi sort of Eff oftrn emtains
some kernels. I thought o ad listened
for more, which I still retain b it is
not applicable to this letter. This man
(my companion informed me) was one of
London's big dairy men We met later,
and after a "refresher" at the Bodega, I
gathered that he milked 1200 to 1,M00
cows in various lairs in London. No cow
left his place under one year, some were
in milk four years. The average price of
cows sold fat to the butcher realized the
price of cows previously bought. Hence
the machinery cost nothing to produce the
output.
"Where do you buy your cows, may I
ask?" "Mr. Johnson, of Stony Stratford,
supplies me. He has an unlimited com-
mission to buy me the best Shorthorn
cows he can get. They mostly come from
Lincolnshire and Yorkshire." "What of
Dutch or Holsteiu ?" "They may be use-
ful under different conditions, but with us,
we have to consider every penny, and tor
our purposes they are unproftable."
"How? Please explain." "Just this way.
We buy the best Shorthorn dairy cows
after calving that can be procured. We
pay extreme prices and no doubt get the
pick. These cows go into our lairs and
do not come out until they go to the
butcher. Some remain with us three or
four years, but when unproftable to keep
for their milk they go out fat to the
butcher at about the same price originally
paid, whereas the Dutch cattle go out
at a los for cats' meat (they have no
canners in England), notwithstanding the
Dutch (as they are there called could be
bought for about $15 per head less than
these Shorthorns."
Looking up my diary for 1868, I find
this entry: "Looked over Mr. Fowlers
farm, etc. Saw Aylesbury ducks of fame.
Next day drove to Messrs. Deuehfeld's
who milk abut 200 cows and have about
100 more which are dry and heifers com-
ing in. Having seen few sights through-
out England which pleased me more than
this utility farm. The cattle are very
large framed, carrying lots of flesh. The
owners have Ased nothing but registered
Shorthorn bulls for the last forty years
and have bought ocaionally a pure-bred
Shorthorn cow that suited their fancy.
Here are men who are farming for profit
with which to pay their rent, and who de-
pend upon their milk supply for that prof-
it. They are fortunately fixed as regards
disposal of their milk, for a milk train
leaves Aylesbury every morning for Lon-
don. Passing beyond the milk question,
the calves are another source of revenue.
No bulls are raised. The bull calves from
the cows are on offer at $25 each before
eight weeks old, then every one not taken
as a bull is converted and may be a can-
didate for 8mithAeld as a fat steer."
Quoting further from my diary: "The
vale of Aylesbury assumes to be the best
dairy pasture in Britain. The herbage
is very thick and fine. I have been going
over Westear's (one of the founders of
the Smithfield Cattle Club) large field of
300 acres, which is stocked with 300 head
of cattle and 1,000 sheep." These steers
that made Smithfield's market sensation
for years, were from the cows which were
supplying London with milk. And West-
car's steers were anticipated for days.'
I refer back to another item same year:
S"Went to Mr. iIttledale's farm, Listeard.
I was pleased with the whole place, every-
thing being very neat and ocean. The
pails were white as a dairy maid could
make them, and the hoops shone like
burnished metal But what astounded me


J. S. Scloficid's Sos CE p y,
C

Heaidwmrters fi

Distiller's Pumpiang
Outfit.
/ II No plant complete with at t:*
*I Hundreds of them in us in m o
S I Florida, Alabama. Yl -.
South Caroiu Writer rLSf -

h* 0
El&t wnes, ers aw d Hv 4

" Ias w. I waar a fltO a ,nd

SI MW Suppmies. Pipe,
I I IIT Bolter Tlbes, tma .
^In rI IIAdvise your want.
--l I Macon, Georgia.
** * * * ***Abe*k", 'N gramLwd
s or T-wut in *r pTd erm, $EW r.o..


I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I, 2 a 2 l l t l I I 1 I 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1 ll l ll l a*&


W. W. CARNaS. Pra.


W. C THOMAS. fNaer. C. T DUDLEY. Sea & Tse


- Tampa Hardware Co.

: Wholesale
Hat dware

Turpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplel.

Large Stock Council anil Holmes Hacks
S antnd Pullers on Hand.

TAMPA, -LOR D

IIll l 11 1 11 IIIII I llI 114111111 1111111111111111111 1i



I ... NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

I Of SAVANNAH, GA., U. S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
Prealde

J. P. WIJIAMS,
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. 6 COVINGTON,
Vioc-Presidest.


C. S. EILJS.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J B PADIMKT.
J. B. YOUNG.


EL. L KAYW
s ary aneeselas e


B. ULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. R. OHBNUTT
G. W. D.z,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. 00QOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and ae
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. .I
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.





W. R. THOMAS

GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons. Harness and Buggie


IF TYM Ba OM n m X c2a= n Warn UL








THE WEEKLY DNDUSTEIAL XNOORD.


moat was the condition of the cows. Soam
had not hd exercise outside of their
stall for four years. These eows were
yet kept became ft was proftable tokeep
them for their ilk. The farm was a
MBa one, omparatiely speaking, but its
results were large. A system of partial
irrigation was employed. The cattle sta-
bes were pushed with water whenever
Sneaeeary and this liquid manure was used
to eax the Rye grass to another effort.
Sm four crops a year were cut, but
ths digression simply leads up to the
poit that nothing but shorthorns would

Let me note here that if Liskad is still
i the milk business no American farmer
interested in supplying milk to large e-a
tas should omit this sight. It is only a
shrt distance from the Birkehead side of
verpool, just over the river. Cows were
parhaed as required. ome had bee in
the stable ve years and wer yet profita-
bl. Profitable meant whether they paid
fr keep, attention and intenst on cast.
Thi was the first farm within my knowl-
edge at which accurate ted s were made
ad the results were absolutely in favor
f the Shorthorn I believe I am not beg-
ing the question when I say I have won
pres with ad bred some -of the best
of either Jerseys or Ayrshires. Four years
in session I won the gold medal at
New York State Fairs with Ayrshires.
I bred the Champion Jersey at Torono,
and yet, with all my experience with the
vrou breds, my heart lings to the
Shorthorn yet as the profitable cow.
I have tried to breed the dairy Short
hwa, but my success ts not to be emulat-
ed. The buyers have yet to be educated
and my experiese is that it is a work
fr younger men. Invariably the buyer of
a dairy Shorthorn bull will insist upon
s being up to almost show form. Then
e alys asks to asee the dam and usually
goe of an a tangent because the dam of
the calf he ought to buy is thin inflesh
far the reason that she has been filling
a barng pal of milk night and morning.
I Ma going to try to prove my poi-
tam V figures. Anyone ean obtain them
ia peonally interested. At' te dairy
sows in Britain the Shorthorns invaria-
bly bold their own.
Replyin gto your correspondent's ques-
tiarns after this rambling preamble: There
is no family or families that have retain-
ed the signal dairy instinct for the rea-
s- that milk has been bred away from.
"Beef!" "Beeft" is the only cry. With
.r extended outlook ver the immense
prairies the cry is: "Herefords, Angus,
Galloways, Beef, Beef!" Anything to
make if easy and escape the drudgery
of the dairy. We are an easy-going peo-
e and m st psess patience and years
It my be of quiet home work before the
men int ted will appreciate the effort
made in their behalf. My own opinion,
bamed upon forty years' experience with
nearly al the dairy beeds, is that the
dairy Shorthorn cow is the equal of any,
an if bred along dairy lines for a few
greratiMns, would bring the breed back
to the days when the name of a Teeswater
cow was syaisryinuou of a great milker
and when dry of a beef producer.-
reeders' Gauette.

Phb@phat Shipaents
The following shipments of Peace River
phoihate were made from the port of
Punta Gorda during October: By steam-
si p Shawmut, Philadelh, 1,950 tons;
ehoonE Fannie Palme, Norfolk Va.,
2,K tone; enhn ip Carolyn, Chrteret,


N. J, 3,120 tons; schoonr Paul Palmer,
Baltimore, 2,445 tons This gives an ag-
gregate of 10,200 tons. Previously re-
ported in 1904, 61,440 tons, making in all,
71,640 tons.


The Manufactire of Silk.
In the November Cosmopolitan
Stewart discusses various phases
silk industry as follows:


W. R.
of the


"As in many other industries, the art
of making silk goods, brought to the
United States from Europe, has been so,
developed and improved upon here that
this country now stands in the front rank
in comparisons of manufacture. More
raw silk is consumed in the United States
than in any other country in the world;
in production of fnished goods the United
States occupies an equal position with
France, and New York City is second
only to Shanghai as a raw silk market.
"At present there are upward of 550
active silk manufacturing *bli-hmantJs
in the United States, having a capital of
about 10000,000, and giving employ-
meat to some 75,000 wage earers. The
value of the products of these mills last
year was over $125,000,000, and 11000000
pounds of raw silk were consumed in their
making. A greater quantity of raw silk
was sold during the year in New York
than was consumed in the whole dr
France, which is the largest raw silk con-
suming country of Europe.
"More than any other industry, per-
haps, the making of silk goods is influ-
eneed by queer vagaries of market con-
ditions. The particular condition of the
digestive organs of the silkworms in Ja-
pan, the breeding rate of the insects in
China, the general behavior of the creat-
ures in Italy, are reported regularly by
telegraph. The caprices of the sex which
wears most of the solks have also to be
watched. The manufacturer keeps his
eye on the worm that makes the silk and
on the butterfly that makes the fashions.
"New patterns, too, must be introduced
continually, for who would want a silk
garment with the ima design that a
neighbor's has, or that others had worn
long years before? To provMe the feat-
ure 6f novelty, therefore, corps of artists
are employed. Every large silk plant in
the United States is now a school of de-
sign, where scientific and technical edu-
cation is taught, not only along Ameri-
can Laes, but by means of association
with artists and establishments abroad.
"There are silks and silks. You can pay
$100 a yard-if you have the money to
spare-for the finest textures, and you
can get silk goods for 10 cents a yard.
In the latter case, the fluffy product of
the cotton plant plays a larger part than
the filament of the silkworm. Wool, too,
is much used nowadays in conjunction
with silk, and the yearly output of silk-
mixed goods is increasing rapidly.
"No raw silk is produced in the United
States, because the reeling of the fiber
from the cocoons has to be performed by
hand labor, the remuneration for which is
too low for the average Amerian.
"The price of raw silk has declined
greatly from the figures formerly obtained
for it. In the fourteenth century the
raw filament sold at from $40 to $60 a
pound. It is now about $3 a pound. Thir-
ty years ago the price was between $8
and $9 a pound. The largest proportion
of the raw silk consumed in the United
States comes from Japan, the progressive
people of which country give close atten-
tion to the requirements of American silk
manufacturers "


ASL PEMLMETO
Presla


W. I. iU5sU.
Vbe Pro&


MS AsVrm W. W.smins,
Om. b naa. fg. T@Liree


5he W. B. JOHNSON CO..


Wholesale Grocers

0040M 40 East as utr. s n am. l.


a. W. Suymbd
WALnr
T 107816M


ECEsM:
IL r. sAw As. &5LEXTU
U.S. WI. PE N. 630
rLre WK IN ft


J. A. Craig (. Bro.

239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BOCLK

Ies-aers ia Men's and Bors' Fine Clodb-

Sing and Up-to-Date Furnishins.

SAgents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest took in the City.


The Bond & Bours Co.
WOUS O Al U & RNTAML


HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, RIlnds. Paints. Oils and 3i-r.
Stoves. Tinware, Countrr-Hollowero


30 WEST BAY STREET


jackionvlke t1i:


*pf--p--fa------------------------------

Cable Address, Florida


Standard Naval Sto

Company.

DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY I


R.OSIN

AND TURPENTINE.I

i Jaclsonviil. Fla.
-------- -----------------


wV wm= m *uyum ass 300MM IME -.


.-*,it


S3-- - "--T** ---******iiiu: j j u



I For Sale
Seven Room House, corner Hubbard and Sixth 8t., Sprigeld. Twrs
S Eight Room House, Fourth St,one of the nicest residences in do dWc.
SExtra large lot; house has all modern improvements. Ower lavk sy.
* Special price for quick sale.
S Eight Room House Oak St., Riverside; all modern; nie ya, has
0 and buildings. House faces the river. Very desirable.
i Lots in all parts of the city. Now is a good time to invest in Jfd-
ville real estate.
S North End lots are the greatest value ever placer on this market.
Down and $1.00 per month.


Brobston, Fendig & Co.

-- -- -- --r,-id r, -
Jtadks-.iEe, Rtenid.. kessuidc, 6usg.
0 999999W99t^9m 999 99 W99





,


r
li-'


:











i'


raa Read Ntate-a I. Ag Jeiniag
state O 1hl.u,.
There have been a number of appliea-
tions received for membership to the H lor-
ida BRel Estate and Immigration Associa-
tio by Charles Davies, secretly.
The recent additions to the list of mem-
rs are as follows: J. E. Low, of Green
Obe Sprinag, J. H. Tatum, of Miami,
as. R. Delier, of New Smyrna, John W.
deso, of Palmetao, and Silas B. Wright,
ef Delad. There is more interest in the
Mganitios than was at first promised.
n n belt e that every active real
-tLmfeJr te a tate will jmeeme a
&=er of this club.


ia Awardet for Ceamelidated Baild-

W. P. RKichrdson, the we-known con-
trscr of this city, was yesterday award-
aed the coa)act by the Consolidated Gro-
eay C-f -1 erect the magnificent
even-story building that is to be the
headater of tU great corporation,
W 7_ 4 completed be the
st handsomest building in the
State of Florida.
la addition to the main building, which
is to be located on the south side of Bay
Ste-t, klet.een Ocean and Newman
I cb t eor Richardsm was also
awarded the contract to erect a three-
story brik warehouse, immediately in the
ril W ai strMeture, and a wharf
ad dock in the rear of the warehouse,
iek will qes y yet sostrated
g the ive frant of the city.
*The Comsolidated Grocey Company's
ilding is to have a frontage on Bay
Sof seventy feet, and will be two
- =44* ttb feet deep. The front
Sbe of limstonae and it will be seven
seri i bne- i m Af story higher than
t hghet building in Jacksonville at the

heW rat, secondd -and third floors will
b hpu.msi in mposaM by the
a(~j teal__4 G ery Company, and the
few upper stories will be used for oiees.
The enItr| dh will be baadsomely
ipq t aed ak. The
oor e l tiling and the
waimeoting will be of marble.
Eery modern device for the comfort and
eonvenience of the occutnats of the boild-
ng will be mintaled, nd "Te Cbnshi-
date" will be the pride of Jacksonville,
a by fr te dsomest building in the
stA n', the contractor,
has eretee4 -qp jf the hmadsomest and
best buildings in Jacksonville since the
rai, T COpapolidated is to be the
aee- o his work in this city.
Wble It may seem that a building 70x
204-0esParVni rIes 1 hight, would be
lB enough for any business conern in
Friday for years to come, the Consoli-
ded Grocery Company knows, from past
eipg tits-abusines has grown
tspoeiiosM t -at:-noo
w bousee room than be obtained in
tl mmaoth building is necessary, a
eiatly has arranged foran annex
t in h eJa ,onville will be reeog-
an immense structure.
Be t S rear of the Consolidated is to be
aed three-story brick warehou
which will be seventy feet front
b]Ci styJeeitjcelp. This building will
f L-;t a bho e Lne of rail-
)erated by the St. Johns River Ter-
Of l pany. Thee will be ee-ry eo-
1- i direct


from the cars. The warehouse will be
specially fitted for the receiving and ship-
ping of goods by the Consolidated Gro-
cery Company and for the storage of large
stocks of all kinds of merchandise.
But, there is still another improvement
to be made on the water front property
of the company that will give it facilities
that will be of great advantage. This will
be an immense wharf, or river pier, ex-
tending fully four hundred feet out into
the river from the bulkhead line.
The pier is to be about ninety feet in
width and will be covered with a substan-
tial roof for the entire length, making it
practically another warehouse. Railroad
tracks, four in number, are to run from
the main line of the St. Johns River Ter-
minal Company out on the pier, so that
cargoes unloaded from vessels can be
loaded directly into cars %rd shipped to
any point reached by the various railroads
of the State.
And what is it all to cost? That is a
hard question to answer until the work is
all completed, but a quarter of a million
dollars is a modest estimate. The main
building is to cost at least $150,000. The
brick warehouse will cost approximately
$80,000, and the wharf $50,000 more.
The erection of this building is now a
certainty, for the contract was awarded
yesterday to Mr. Richardson by President
C. B. Rogers of the Consolidated Grocery
Company. The work is to begin as soon
as the W. T. Hadlow Company finishes
removing the two-story building now on
a small portion of the lot. The W. T.
Hadlow Company is removing the mate-
rial of the two-story building to the lot
in the rear of the police station, where
that company is to erect a building for
P. L. Sutherland.

Important Deal in Sawmill Property.
One of the biggest deals in sawmill
property and timber lands to be consum-
mated in West Florida in many years
was closed Wednesday night, when J. R.
Saunders and H. L and C. M3 Covingtaa,
of Pensacola, purchased the milling plant
and timber lands, together with all boats,
lighters, etc., of the Skinner Manufae-
turing Company, at Escambia, a few miles
east of Pensacola. The consideration was
close to half-a-million dollar, as the
property is considered about the most
valuable in this section, there being nearly
100,000 acres of almost virgin timber in
the various tracts.

Retail Merchants to Meet in C avention.
Arrangements have been made for a
convention of the Florida Retail Mer-
chants and Grocers' Association, to be
held in this city November 21 to 24, in-
clusive.
This will be the first annual convention
of the association since its organization.
The convention will be held in the audi-
torium of the Jacksonville Board of Trade.
A large attendance is expected, as the
membership of the association includes all
of the leading retail merchants and gro-
cers of Florida.
The State organizer of the association,
John B. Cordero, of this city, has prepared
and will send out to-day, the official
notices of the convention to all members
of the association. Mr. Cordero reports
that the membership of the association is
constantly increasing and that all mem-
bers are taking great interest int the work
of the organization.


CI N. RMES. Prs. J . SAW, Vise-Pre. RALPH JESSUP, Se.-Troas

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Predrers' Company. Gmaes,
Grades am Weibts Guaraateed.
egverlks at l Pe da, termma and mSavamb
CerrespuIdenlc Setieted. JACKSONVIULE. A.

$ $g move sml heiig I $goesa 116 4 146i 1 $t ig 14141m


P ft am.W Pan


T. ML MaoCAET, Use-Pree.


KUUW FI Tr"am.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.

mivRM M. WELA.n Maner.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


: 401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FUL.


Su19 1 RlOifl @ guS O u fI gm 8m t ull s u uim u ugue***
III*hIISII@'3gIuIIIruiia*rii3U~gS)gIISUIiiiiigigiuI....,
SW. H. BCKWI'H. W. B. HENDKBSON. G. C. WAX.

: BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.


LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE AID MILL LAUIS.

I Rooms 1-2-3, FIrst Naiolaal Baok Beildag.
:TAMPA, : : : FLORIDA.
*emmeheeeoteeeIIuAm 88eueeIeeee teil eue tethg go egee..e.

Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.



CYPRESS TAKES, ,

AND VATS.

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
M1. *. ODAVIS & SON1, PALnTrKxA, FLa.

BBETTELINI'S SP4CIA6LTY.

ni I Bottlesy t
I wilm and for fn quart otf so Corn, Meiwood ar. G olde We-
ding tRa Honaa 0N Toea OG. Peac B~. PMa and Emo
Wb., ot and m atant C**s -%r o tbhe ahove or....... s
O e bottle of any of tke above ........................ ..........................
oar bottles t the folowiu COiftora Wlae: hImry Port. Mast,
Catawtba CU
Single bottles .
our bottles WSloa W el essumd. aU0
mnase bottles ... N.
Five bottle Dufyfs Malt aU
bal-e bottles .. U
Balk Soods of all kind. 8peelal Prie n appiHeatin. All klad af
liquors In Ja from "LC $ to .6 L. o. b. Jacsoavills.
F. BETTELINI. W Bay St., p. Union Dept, Jacksemville, Fl


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage in respectfully solicited. See quotationh-
thispaper.
KINGAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST.,JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


AM TV -A 41999Ce T= &N OON


THE WEEKLY lNutTrrKlAL RECORD.


I-i~~-- 1









THE WEEKLY IMuarBfIAL BBOORD. i


Pftt Statitie fWr Me h of October.
While there has been a slight increase
i demand for lumber ad prices have
heproved somewhat, idipmet froma the
prt of JasoMville during the moth of
October were very little in excess of the
september shipments, according to the cus-
tomhouse record
There is eery indication, however, that
there will be a great increase during the
moath of November, for there are at
least fteen ailing vessels now in port,
all of which are loading, or will load, with
lumber.
The records of the customhouse show
that 2 vessels entered port during the
mouth and that 41 vessels cleared. Of
the veele entering, 24 were steam, 26
were sail aad one was a barge in tow.
Two of the steam vessels were from for-
eig port sad three of the sailing vesels
were from foreign ports. Of the vessels
hearing, 25 were team vessels for coast-
wine ports, 9 were sailing vesels for
coastwise ports, 2 were barges in tow
for eastwise ports ad 5 were sailing
vesels for foreign ports.
The tonnage and number of men em-
ployed on the vessels were as follows:
Vemels arriving coastwise: Steam, 49,-
3 tons, 1,165 men; sail, 9,619 tons, 1l6
men; barge, 995 tons, 6 men. Vessels ar-
riving, foreign: Steam, 1,591 toa, 33
m ; sail, I1 toes, 21 men. Total Yes-
els arriving 71,606 tons, 1,390 men.
SThe tonage ad number of men em-
ployed o the vessels ailing were as fol-
low: From eoaatwise ports: Steam, 51,-
1I tons, 1,228 me; sail, 4,587 tens, 70
en. Vesels from foreign ports: Steam,
mome; sail, 1,tW tons, 39 men; rlso two
barge in tow for coastwise ports, 1,830
tas, 11 men. Total of vw sel cehring
6,192 tons, 1,348 men. Making a grand to-
tal for all veels entering aad clearing


during October of 93 vessels, 133,811 tons,
employing 2,738 men.
During the preceding month of the pres-
ent year there were 88 vessels to cross the
bar, having an aggregate of 112,72 tons,
and employing 2,605 men, showing an in-
crease of 5 vessels, 21,049 tons and 43
men for October.
The cargoes brought here by the ves-
sels entering from coastwise ports were
as follows: Flour, 3,030 barrels, sugar,
3,010 barrels, bacon 820 boxes, oil 1,60
barrels, coal 7,867 tons, cement 7,000 bags
and 1,000 barrels, fertilizers 490 tons and
5,00 sacks, salt 850 tons, boots and shoes
8,100 cases, partition bricks 144 tons, mis-
cellaneous merchandise 98,614 packages.
The imports from foreign ports consit-
ed- of 6,368,352 pounds of raw material
for the manufacture of fertilizers, 1,00
cases of brandied cherries, 75 cases of pre-
pared peas, 5,000 cigars, 27 cases of jew-
elry, etc. The total value of the foreign
imports was $60,150.50.
The cargoes carried from Jacksonville
by the vessels sailing coastwise and for-
eign during the month of October show a
slight increase in the coastwise business,
but a falling off in the lumber shipments
to foreign ports.
The lumber shipments by vessel were
as follows:
Lumber to coastwise ports, feet, 13,245,40
Lumber to foreign ports, feet 1,423,628

Total lumber shipments, feet 14,668,568
The other shipments to coatwise ports
during the month were as follows: Cross-
ties, 43,900; shingles, 27,200 bndles; na-
val stores, 25,105 packages; eottom, 15,-
600 bales; fruit and vegetables, 16,971
packages; kaolin 8,100 sacks; domestics
and cotton, 33 carlaods; miscellaneous
merchandise, 31,699 packages.
The exports to foreign ports consisted


of 1,423,628 feet of lumber, 110,000 shin-
gles and 3,000 bricks. The total value of
the foreign shipments was 22,972.12.
During September, 1904, the total lum-
ber shipments amounted to only 12,788,-
204 feet. In October of last year, the
lumber shipments amounted to 17,657,-
412 feet.
With ffteen sailing vessels in port load-
ing lumber, and at least ten more under
charter to come here for cargo, the pros-
pects are good for a large increase in the
lumber shipments from Jacksonville dur-
ing the present month.

Turpentine Concessions i British Hean-
ra.
In an official report, United States Ca-
sul Avery, of Belize, British Honduras,
says:
"An agreement has been made by the
acting governor with Buckner Chipley, of
Pensacola, Fl, by which the latter is to
pay 1 cent each for the privilege of tap-
ping 12,500,000 pine trees for turpemtine.
For the concession, which runs a number
of years, Mr. Chipley is to pay $125,000
within a little over two years.
"The exploitation of the pine woods of
this colony will necessitate large pur-
chases of mechanical and food supplies
for many years, and will increase largely


'a -?


the trade with the United State. rr-
haps one-third of the areas of Brit- m-
duras is pine ridge, ad though the tas
are not of great side, t wood is Wy
,heavy and rich in sap.
"The Chipley cocession was seemi
primarily for the purpose of making tr-
pentine sad exporting the timber, bu th
enterprises that will develop later wil m
be confined to these aima. Tramway, per-
manent roads sad agriculture will
follow, and the opening of the md-asrd
lands will be elected, or a st least
advaeed."
Largt.Cae i thi Wh V -
A cask recently comtrusted I -sr
form frm hba put the rin-i
Heidelberg completely in the bad ~B
it is made of California dwen el *i -
out, and the selection of the Umt Wad
making required two years. lbeve at
of every twelve trees selected ~e re-
jected as umuitable. Two entc-r t n
of wagons were needed to com ey,* so-
lected timber to the vineyard. 1h%4B op
of the cask, which are of the ineat dtsl,
weigh eighteen toms, while the ee- -
cask is thirty-eight feet high and seenty-
eight feet in cireumferemee, and lahg
enough to form a threestory hem, w
three hundred people ould dinm in esm-
fort.


The West.Raley-Rannie Company.

114 W. Forsytk Street, Jac tmvele, Fla.
4. N. WEST. Pres. X. s. Wat, flo-Pres. W. R-. a.tmm Vice-.rPs. X. F. Mary, assac. w e


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sel your property,
Write us and when in the city make our officeyour
headquarters.


D. M. FLYNN, President


D. M. Flynn


Walter Ray


W. B. JOHNSON, Vice-President
DIRECTORS
J. W. Ogleeby L; Horn


N. G. Wade


J. L


A. 8. PENDLETON, See'y & Twain

edlin W. B. Johaes ..o :


p


SIndependent Naval Stores & Export Co.,


Jacksonville, Florida.





Naval Stores Factors and Operators.


Capital Stock, $5oo,o0o.

The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal advances made on consignments.
SOur interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operative company.



Some Money and Some Timber For Somebody.


Al Producers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.


TEK aouRD B TIVOTO3SU RELIACI.'L*


WFJD ,Y mvutyrKIAL ]P.D. V


1=1__ -







;I


THU WUINKLY UIDUS1'fIALL RUCORD.


Business Directory.


and ve yew C a*= he od gwan
: W6 m hr an C
FM 1 R~ nemihel. =& 's
m IL Gua & Cl,1 and 10 Pat 116.&
a ,Fh


m_ bi m,
Ca-l-***- Ierchalnts.
flavel Storw & C(oto

Cor rr"Arg- wmbUL ,
C2SU W(UAEr 3UU.DlNB,
JIM agm cm.
WEMI W1lTIG ADVEETISMS
Mi m T2 IIBCOND.

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
]est in the V0dl.
FW de&md Pi wrule
CI.rW TAR C0.D Ob u,1a

--M N te Abdy rd C--
Lr Jh, Astnrter.
Owa IArte t, F rMa.
0a0a08 Pa 0e0Mma te ao-n Sides praeM
"hs -mr some-t imiamcty owners in

T'SfftigkaaC7.1.



M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

CoiInissioan Merchuats.
m Wem a o TAX nyC
AV ft" Sliam*, NEW TOYO







THE INDUSTRIAL REcoRD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
apply houses in the South
cunbined.
Send all orders for Corn-
imuary Checks, any color, any
deomation, padded or loose
to the

stril ItJIr4 Co.,


SOUTHKER TRADE COMDTIONS.

Trade Coeditias Tt1ebhat the South-
east-as Shewa by Brastreets.
Savannah.-Retail trade is improving
and collections continue good. Jobbers
are receiving supplementary orders, but
they are small. Some effort has been
n:ade for spring business, but results are
meager. Cotton is dull and receipts are
decreasing.
Jacksonville.-The carnival is in full
blast here, and trade is benefited thereby.
Naval stores are firm, and lumber shows
some improvement. Oranges and pine-
apples are going forward in good quantity
at good prices. Interest in Florida real
estate is increasing. Colletions are fair.
The general outlook is very hopeful.
Augusta.-Trade in retail lines shows
an increase over last week. Wholesale
business is good, and so are collections.
Atlanta.-Trade is active in all line
and collections are good. Drought is un-
broken, and considerable loss of minor
crops is reported. Cotton is in good
shape, but there is no top crop.
Macon.-The weather is open and dry,
a few sprinkles and heavy dews assist-
ing maturing erops. Trade and collections
are good.
Birmingbam.-Iron market is strong
and $11.50 is offered for No. 2 foundry.
A few small orders were placed Thursday
at $12. Cotton fluctuates around 9 cents.
Spot buying is fair and reedits are
heavy.
Montgomery.-Cotton continues an ac-
tive feature of the local market, though
receipts are gradually decreasing. Trade
is of satisfactory volume and collections
are good.
Chattanooga.-Business with both re-
tailers and jobbers is on the increase and
manufacturers are kept busy in their va-
r:ous lines. Collections are good.
Memphis. -General jobbing trade is
quiet, but retailers report an increase over
last week. Wholesalers announce a good
business. Collections are fair. Market-
ing %f cotton throughout this section is
vigorously continued.
Nashville.-General business is good and
the weather is favorable. Collections are
good, and jobbers and retailers feel en-
couraged over the outlook.
Little Rock.-Neither wholesale nor re-
tail trade is meeting expectations. ol-
lections continue slow, considering the
movement of cotton, which is liberal.
New Orleans.-Merchants report a sat-
isfactory advance in the volume of trade,
both in jobbing and retail lines. Collec-
tions remain good, and planters feel en-
couraged by crop conditions.
Dallas.-General rains visited this see-
tion the past week, and were regarded as
beneficial to the wheat crop. Cotton crop
has been retarded to some extent, al-
though the major portion of the crop has
been gathered. Trade is active and col-
lections are good.
Fort Worth.-Steady rain for some thir-
ty-six hours over the entire State the past
few days has materially improved condi-
tions for wheat planting. Cotton is being
held, and wholesalers and retailers are
complaining of dullness in trade on this
account. Collections range from fair to
good.
Waco.-Heavy rains the past few days
have affected cotton-picking, but the bulk
of the crop in this section has been gath-
ered, though the movement is still slow
on account of low pries. Cool weather
is stimulating general trade, and ollec-
tions continue fair to good.


R. TOLAR.


WV lvi 5 WUWS s~e 9 5153 3


SL. HART. T . lBACHLY.
(Euteblibhed 1672.)


a. R TOLAR, i


TOLAR. HART & CO..
160 FRONT S I n1M w, NEWOYORK.

Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Member of kNe
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton utares.
*


J. D. WEED l CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORMGA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Balings, Etc,


Read the Record Adv't's.


JOBIPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRgESOt


e W T= V1W1W LARIEST tAM. pAINII


s4****SguIessessM>Msssssniigiinsmnsugs
MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


IBoilermaking and Repairing
otill Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
JacEaonville. Fla.
S****4 .e9 l I Ile is. I p o l go I I ..I.II .I.^ ,.. "Is8 -

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and FlRacrmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Pa0te.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


Cummer Lumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leef Yellow Pine.
BOXES end CRATES.

******s********SO*********O*****oo. aseaoa. dslassaa.


Standard Clothing Company



One Price One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 mmd 19 West Bay Street, - keo iv rlen .
Iotateenad Eawes Eat. Splal Attemler ten tin Nan *grr.


************* .


L'


r








THE- wignajX Ir USNTJIAL K( BXKD.


ZINC NAILS

Turpentine Cups
Aapema by Dr. erty. Made of a
llubut soft light metal. They are
S L e whic- will not injure
W left in the ite

Semf&&. New VIYe* .
AMb sears for Galvanisad aad
imed Balt, Boat Nail, Spikes, Roond
- hsisbi, ees, 81ting ad Booing
m S Eatrs Toot, Copper Nait nd
e...


Typewriters


aORIVOT S'N1""
I" WeaGUister. WuVe writes tI sight
h CIfES?. KLh oft IMe-baMrd Ma
B N Sad ft Am Oes of Typewter.




MANUVACTURER O03


W W.
BRICK.

MIE F ICES.
Capaelty of Yr 80n0000 Per Month.



Whiskles, Gins,

SRums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Bye
Whiskies -
Camtkuler Blam'i Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jaun Cineia-
ant and Pabst Milwaukee Ber.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM a CO.
o17 aS 819 West Day Street.
JACKSONVILLEC, FLA.

TE

Bethuine

Apparatus.

The New Process.
a-san the mom ulsnt wa th
*" t&r. Ram at a. ee to los them
twowo-uer oeers Makas 1m twenau t
r-, water wsteltte, tree
On la -r le the btir. No to be
-afSrS sae -after codag Pn-
se oabe wb h eea the opm
ra ft ibe tase ans got as OLge-t

me om -eOnt amaL ses
eesmwassteea aot soupat at


p. So I RanMM N. C.
~-^~W L. -IrmB I,(L^^^^ ^^^* ^^


Cotton Preaucties, Cmnpdties a" Im-
portation in China.
(From the Boston Journal of Commerce
and Textile Industries.)
Ninety-nine people out of a hundred, if
questioned as to the national characteri-
ties of China and the Chinese would, in
an probability, reply that they were ob-
solete, effete, hopelessly behind the times
and good for nothing.- But this is by no
moasa correct, although it must be con-
ceded that the Chinese have rested the
developmental influences of modem edril-
stion to a greater extent than any other
people on the face of the habitable globe.
Yet the yellow children of the Celestial
Empire are not unknown amid the cities
of Europe and America, and their econo-
my, versatility and stoicism are every-
where acknowledged, while their faults
are mainly the result of their national
environment.
Until recently the Chinese Empire was
absolutely debarred from contact with
modern progress by an inherent and gen-
eral aversion among the mass of the peo-
ple to intercourse of any kind with out-
siders. This repugnance went so far as
to breed a savage desire to destroy every
discovered intruder, know little, and
caring less for anything the "outside bar-
barian" might think or do. The historic
records of this strange people extend
back probably thousands of years before
the Christian era, annd even yet they re-
sisted all efforts to take part in the pro-
"ressive march of civiliztiom which has
characterized other nations, although, cu-
riously enough, they have ministered un-
consciously to the advance of knowledge
by industrial potentialities and their pro-
ductive inventiveness.
The time has come, however, when no
nation will be allowed to exclude itself
from participating in the progress of evo-
lution, and China must either conform
to the new order of things, or be subju-
gated and divided amongst the civiliing
nations of the world. The end of the
present struggle between Japan and Rus-
sia May convince China of her ineptitude
for modern existence; but. whatever may
be the result, the quondam immutability
of the "Flowery Land" must be completely
ehanged--she mut awake, revivified and
vigorous, and take her place amid the
resists activities of modern times, or
erase to exist.
We may here advert, briefly, to the im-
portance of this immense country as af-
feeting the world's production of cotto,
and its manufacture.
With regard to the cotton production of
the Celestial Empire, it has. bee- vari-
ously estimated as averaging fro 1,000,-
000 to 12,000,000 bale per annm. All
the garments of the country are made of
cotton cloth almost exclusively, and dur-
ing ecld weather those of the people who
can afford it, wear several smits of loth-
ing, one over the other. When we eon-
sider that in China there is a popula-
tion of about 4000,000, it must be evi-
dent that cotton production is an object
of prime and pressing imprtaame. Al-
most every one there cultivate a little
patch of cotton-many of them eme to
satisfy their own requirement, and, if
any of the staple is unused, it is peddled
or hawked about for sale according to eir-
eumstanees.
If the "open doo" were only kept open
in China, what commercial possibilities
would be aeccesiblel
It has been estimated that if the Chi-
Cootinued an Pase 1.


TURPENTINE

CUPS.

If 3ou expect to use the mCERT ap
next season, place your orders now fo
future delivery, Prices and all informa-
tion cheerfully furnished on
CUPS, GUTTERS
AND ALL nOOLS
.sed in the Herty svatem of tuopentining.
Address
. Chattanooa Pottery
.C lawy,




Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advrtreetmmft WNtbe se1 rtfed to rls ueartmrf t t e ffewifor em
tor one week, 20 cents a lie.
For two Weea, 3c tealime.
1or thr week. SB eet a lime.
For forw e, cents aUe.
Nine words of ordinary leagth make oe line.
Headif comts as two line.
No Il= e=eept the headiws an be admitted.
Retitmces to aeeompy the order. No extra charge for copies of
oomlting advertinemat masA be Is this ofce mot late than unmt
.*mpais to secure hieta mr da s pape.


W-wted.
Firt-class stiller. Must have refereneeS
Address ABC, care this offiee. 2t
Wanted.
Reliable man to take charge of turpen-
tine camp in Florida. Must be well recom-
mended. Address XYZ, care thi office.
2t
Wanted.
Three convict guards to begin work at
onee. Will pay the right salary to the
right men. Address L S. Petteway & Co.,
Gabriel, Fla. 4t
Wasted.
Woodsman that can keep books and
commissary. Must be sober and give ref-
erences. None but married men need ap-
ply. C. H. Coaoley, Wallace, Fla.

Wasted.
To buy a irst-class turpentine location
in Florida. Will pay the right price for
the right place. No flat woods place need
apply. G. A. Petteway, Box 26, Leroy,
Marion Co, Fe. tf
Wasted.
A distiller. We want a good, *ober
man with family, to run the still another
season. Can give steady employment
through the winter. None need apply but
first-class man with good references. Ad-
dress F. & W, Jonesboro, Fla. tf
Positlos Wasted.
Want a position as turpentine woods-
man or book-keeper; can furnish good ref-
erences. Address A. R, care Industrial
Record, Jacksonville, Fl. tf


Woodsima Wasted.
Must be single and strictly sober and
not younger than twenty-five or oer
than thirty-five; also must be a rat-
elass bookkeeper, and furnish good ref-
erences. Address J. D. X, Chipley, Fla.
4t.
Stiller Wasted.
Wanted-First-elas stiller, white man
with family. Can furaish good houme
and will board with family. I want a
man who is competent to take eharg
during my absence. Address P. H. Baker,
Campville, Fla. 4t
For Sale.
Small turpentine farm, 12 erops bom-
for one and two years. Plenty high bas
near still On railroad. Schedule fur-
nished n request. Address H. W. M rear,
Cottondale, Fla. 4t

For Sale.
35,000 acres St. Johns and Volmia; 3,-
000 acres, DeSoto County; 14,000 acres
DeSoto County; 30,000 acres, Calboun
County; 20,000 acres Hillsboro 0anty;
80,000 acres Maatee County. A round
timber. D. T. Doughtry, Room 2 Bad-
win Bldg. 4t
Tarpestile Mes.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
lit for your still No. 1 outfit pmps 2,0
gallons per hour at a eost of 3 easm ad
requires no attention while na .
Started in one minute. J. P. C -amph,
Oeala, Fla.
Are ya reading yr paper, or m--
me ee's. If not a sahcriber to the B-
ord, send in your sme today, with $os
the price of sbacription far a yer.


McMURRAY & BAKER,


SNw Mill ai TllU enliRe Hare .u t
W. Ml wnsm o mw e-llse snes a-t llemu Uens s wI
4e0"4es wo. berams em beas fredanMs w have s nro abr a
mW est So tmA In w at 1m. T rpeust s w aoned Lm s a s W5a. DMn't
forget we n bet m ast wrm t a an-mal hrmn

ICBITI IH 41 II i L Bll I .
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


TKNITOOM-1'Z-3 =- w 3w1 WaC









10 1HE WEEKLY 1UNuUI8TAL BCOBRD.


< -- -- -- -- ---------I-----------------------
j. a. Pamorm A meN & NuAs.a AwrraB PusEr *
Ptdis. Ve-VsPmeaneL. Cashier.

The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
Cap.fl $200.000. Surplus. $100.000
STATE DEPOSITARY.
Genital snkf Irest Paid e Savag Depsits. Safe Depesit Boxes. SL .per Year.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week

sirts fer the Week at 8awrsra SavIanah Nav Stare. Statent.
Frip ReptO Sa e. Exp 190 Spirits. Rosin.
Mon., Oct. 31 Fi1 764 24 0 I Stock April 1 ...........6,495 4450
Tes., Nov. 1 908 1081 00ol Receipts Nov. 3 ......... 5678 2,445
Wed., Nov. 2 1 76 821 772 Receipts previously ......137,679 400,561
Tbur, Noa. 3 151 678 4560 85
Th, Nov.351 78 Total ..............144,752 447,556
eda for the Wek latw Exports Nov. 3 ......... 85 25
Monday, Oct. 31. It Yar. Exports previously .....1158 396,592
WW ......... 5.@00 30 90
WG ............ 4.65 3.0 Total ..............119,643 396,617
N . ......... 4.50 310 Stock Nov. 3 .......... 25,109 50,939
M . ............ 2.00 Stock previously ....... 19,291 61,860
K ..... ........ ...3.75 2.


I ......... .. .... 3.6 2.70
H.... ....... .. 235 2.00
G .. .......... 2.80 2.5
F ...... .. .. .... 2.75 2.50
E .. ....... .. 2.70 2.35
D .. .. .. .. .. ... 2.30
ABC 2.6. .. .. .. .00 230
Beeeipts 1,30, sales 1,8, exports 3327.
Tuesday, Nov. 1.-Roin irm; receipts
2343; sales ,018; exports 4,07. Quote:
A, B, C, 2.A 1-2; D, 267 1-2; E, $2.72
1-2; F, $2.771-2; G, $2821-2; H, 2.86;
I, $325; K, $3.75; N, $4.0; WG, $4.65;
WW, $A.0
Wednesday, Nov. 2.-Quote: A, B, C,
2s6; D, $270; B, $2.721-2$2.75; F,
2.77 1-2; $221-2; H, $285; I, $3.5;
K, $3.75; M, $.4; N, 4.0; window glass,
$435; water white, $5.00.
Thursday, Nov. 3-Rosin finn; receipts
2,445; sales 2,485; shipments 25. Quota-
tions: A, B, C, $2.60; D, $65@$2-67 1-2;
B, $.70; F, $2.75; G, $20; H, $2.85; I,
$3.a ; K, $3-75; M, $6; N, $450; WG,
$4.65; WW, $6.0&.

Rnage f Trpetine a Resin at Savan-
ask Neo. 3 and Same Day
Lemt Yar.
No 3 1 N 2 No. 3
1904 1904 f 1903


i runI Fir m Iir
51 I 5l I 56


40 I 821 358
Firm Firm Firm


WW ... 6.00
WG .... 4.65
N ...... 4.50
M ...... 425
K ....... 3.75
I ...... 3.5
H ...... 2.85
G ...... 2.80
F ...... 2.75
E ......I 2.70
D ...... l 2.67%
C, B, A 230
i ea ...I S8g


6.00
4.65
4.50
4.25
3.75
3.25
2.85
2.82%
2.77%
L72%@2.75
2.70
2.6,
2306


3.90
3.30
3.10
2.90
2.80
2.70
2.00
2.55
2.50
2.35
2.30
2.30


Bailey & Montgemerys Review.
New York, November 2, 1904.
Spirits Turpentine: Stock, 593 barrels.
Market during the week has been quiet,
jobbing business fair, but no sales of any
quantity have been made at any one time.
Thursday, Oct. 27--551-4c. asked.
Friday, Oct. 28-5 1-4c. asked.
Saturday, Oct. 29-5 1-4c. asked.
Monday, Oct. 31-54 3-4c. asked.
Tuesday, Nov. 1-541-2c. asked.
Wednesday, Nov. 2-541-2c. asked.
Rosin: Stock, 18,85 barrels.
The rosin market is firm for all grades;
the mediums, E. F. and G are scarce,
pales also meet with ready sale.
AC, $2.95 to $3.00; D, $3.06 to $3.10; E,
$310 to $3.15; F, $3.15 to $3.20; G, $3.20
to $3.25; H, $3.25 to $3.30; I, $3.40 to
$3.50; K, 4.00 to $4.10; M, $4.55 to $4.60;
N, $4.80 to $4.90; WG, $5.00 to $5.10; WW,
$5.25 to $5.35.
Both Spirits and Rosin Decline.
The rosin market showed further de-
clines yesterday. The opening was firm,
but showing a decline of 21-2 cents on
lower grades from G to E, 2 1-2c to 5c
on D, and 5e on C, B, A. The sales re-
ported amounted to 2.485. The close was
firm, and unchanged, and with no further
sales. In the post market business an-
other decline on commons took place af-
fecting all grades from H and below. An
advance of 10 cents was paid on middles
and pales, but the proportion of these
to the commons was so small that it is
not likely the market will be affected by
these sales at the opening this morning.
The receipts were 2,445 barrels, and the
shipments 25.
Spirits-The opening was firm and un-
changed at 51 cents, with sales of 450
casks, and the close firm, and unchanged
with no further sales, but in the late
trade, the best bid by buyers was 503-4c.
It is understood that no sales were made
at this figure. The receipts were 578
casks, and the shipments, 85.


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903.04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS


RucpYas


STolde ... ........ ...........

-............. .................

bRs b......^ .....................




ealm, db...........................
Cr b b. s..............................
SundrieY
M-*fb Jbbf.


1908-04 '1902-03 | 1901-02
198,647 292496 814,846
650,988 940,507 1,071,440
844,585 1,238,038 1,385,786

188,398 296,430 814,876
752,270 975.428 62,687

98,884 206,109 217,446
888,171 504,178 585,042

85,658 42,765 53,797
87,853 138,121 129,059

59,351 87,556 48,633
826.746 387.784 898,583


TheD Ub of q*k am hsn d" 9 by %W4 csim, and of ecsiu 239,f9 MAnR l


Crops of Spirts ad Rosin for Three Yter
aemp 133-44 ae" s hmp
Spirit.. Rosin. Spiri t. Ba.7. Sp r..
Wimi gto...... ....1511 J7 1833 1 1a
Chae rist...... .... ,0 6 37 11 3
Savannah........ 176,418 60,33 270,670 9407
Brunk .wi ... ..1.. .... 6 143 08 68347 244,16 7A N
Moil.. .. .. .. ...... 612,S We I83A 73=72 2U. aIs
Now Orleans...... 3.... ,17 133,135 33,16 108,33 231M
Currabelle..... ......o ed domed 3"4 3 U14 8 1
Georgetown...... 7,5 44A14 1MLW 468 SAN -
Pensaeola.. 42.. .. 4 4 32056 38,75 128,05 37,71M
Jax. & Feradina.. .... 187,21t e 63,1 91,7 375,B11 ?7 5M
Tamp ............... domd omd 13s 46 84 1 46
Totau.............. 5331s ,A M6 5 71," s,a, sM" aa ;

Ipfrts se Trpentie to U. L
The following table is compiled by James Watt & Son, of lemiea ftS tam
official returns. For convenience of comparison we have turid ewte iste eMts
-320 cwt. equal 100 barrels.
1807 IM IM 190M 193 1*M 13g
From U. 8., bbl. .... 15252 173,75 149,375 174,446 lMAW 1n51 UMC R _
From France, bbs.... 161 44 517 ,23 m 1 #A 4n6g
From other countries.. 1,494 878 0 36M Ug 3 M -

154,30 174,3W 149,942 177,M63 19,341 1657, 3=
From Rumia .......... 2,815 4,183 4,998 8,51 ,1 U711
Total Barrels .. 167,18 179,90 154,940 186,09 201,0 l16AS 1-A
Thus the import of Rusian Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 198 was dIM
that of 1902, and over six times a m m as in 1897. It in terating to as- hi
this import fluctuates with the price of American Turpetine.
Percentage of Import of Russian ..1.79 2.33 3.332 47 3.41 5. 1 1MW
Av. rice Amer. Turp. in Lraond .14 24-6 34-1 3a4 a-1 3I 4


COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVAXXAK


April 1 ....................
April 8 ...................
April 15 ..................
April 22 ..............
April 29.....................
May 6 ....................
May 13 .......... .....
May 20 ....................
May 27 ...................
June 3 ....................
June 10 ........... .......
June 17 .................
June 24 .................
July I .... .............
July 8 ...................
July 15 ....................
July 22 .................
July 28 ....................
Aug. 4 ...................
Aug. 12 ...................
Aug. 19 .................
Aug. 26 ...................
Sept. 2 ....................
Sept. 9 ............... ..
Sept. 16 ................. :
Sept. 23 ..................
Sept. 30 .................


1904-06
ND
53
54%
54%
53%
55
M4%
54%
53%
54
52%
s2%
52%
53
52%
52%
53 %
53%
52%
53%
54%
54%
52%
52%
52
52%
52%


1903-04
ND
50
49%
47


45

46
45
47%
47%
49
45%
46
46%
47%
47%/
47%
48

49%
52
52
.55@%
54
54%
56%
57
55


M. A. BRIGGS, President.
H. C. BRIGGS, 1st Vice-Presdent.


190"-03

42%
42%
43
42%-4U
43
45
44
45%
-A%
i3sv
44%
48%
474%
46%
45%

44%
43%
44%
44%
.44%
45
44%
46
47%
47%


FOR wymn yz*


191.4B
34
32%
1%-.2
32
31%
st%
34%
32%
32
33y-%

34%
33%
34%
34%A
33
32%

34
33
34
34
33%

33%
34 ,=


f53%
10%
46
47%
46%
47
48
49
49
46
43%
*42%
'43%
43%
43
42
39%
U%
36%
a

36%
37


HOMER MDOWN. 2oi VlosPusddea
J. C. MoDONAkD. Sec'y =A Tmes.


I W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

SVALDOSTA. GA.
)Sle Southern Agent for-


SRIXFORD AXES.

Shey re thr e BEST. Others imitate but none du-
Splicate. They are made of the best steel, have the fnest
temper, hold the keenest edge, cut better and last longer
1 than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual use.
h Send as your orars.

h W. H. BRIG6S HARDWARE COPAI Y,





Printing Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Promptand iatisfactoir
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, a.


T33 U W TAU1 P" OF OUR ADVERTISUS VOijCH 1.


T8e ..


ies ..
Reno


I


~ddddd~~~~L~ddlCU~C66 ~ddd&Cd6~6~d~d6C~CI~r~)












THE WEEKLY J.NIJIJWfIIIAL RECORD. 11.
-~ -


AUTOMOBILE, PUMPING OU Flr S


GASOLINE ENGINES.
Mar Comvhis Aiatma of Suppies in the Soth.


Fred E Gilbert
29 and 37; 39, 41
West Forsyth Street


--& Hil & Co.' Weekly Cotte
Letter
' New Yaok, Nov. 4th.-Cotton.-There
has been emo dahe change in both
priees and sentiment at the Cotton Ex-
ehange tht week. It would be difficult
to assign the improvement to any one
enase as many factors have changed for
the better and sentiment has responded
to te general improvement. The report
from Fall iver that everything iadiated
a resumption of business on November
9, reports of an active as well as an im-
proved business in Manchester and Lancas-
hire, the near approach of settlement of
political question in this country for the
ext four years, and estimates from favor-
able sources of a more moderate cotton
rop than has been talked of recently,


all operated in favor of prices. Thus far
the improvement has not been extensive.
December this morning sold at 9.93, an
advance of about 30 points for the week.
The advance in the market furnishes very
little evidence of the actual change that
seems to us to have taken place in cotton
circles generally. The Ginnes' Report,
giving the total quantity ginned up to
October 18th as 6,417,000 bales was the
first real set-back the bear cause has had
in the last two months.- In attempting to
justify 12,000,000 bales crop ideas, the
operators have all along talked of 7,000,-
000 bales being shown in the Ginners' Re-
port. They overreached themselves as
compared with two years ago, when there
was practically no incentive to rush cot-
ton through the gins, something over 5,-


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SPImK li OF TURPENTINE
Apr. 1 Aar. 8 Apr. Apr. 1 Apr. A M ai lMay I May 1 May 2 May
i ID 1 40 4 1- 41 -a 1- a
Jme Je nS June o June m July J July 1 July 17 July M2 July a Aug.
4154 4 41 % 4a1- 41 s M U
Ams. M A. Au. lr ept.4 LUep. U Sept I fSpt. 1 Oct. Oct. Oct. 1
ar" ut a s AP M534 5 ND IS 1 1-3 1- -4
Oat. 2 Oat. L Nwv. Nov. I Nw. 4 Dee. 31 Dec. 10, Dec. 17, Dec. n, Jan. 1
Sa 114 -1 a a a M a 61-4 6 1-4 a 1-2-4
Jaa. =, Jan. 2, Feby. 11, Feb. 18, Feby. 26 Meb. 3 Meb. 10 Mch W4
a 30
57
ROSINS


WW WG N M K
SIL .......W. u U O40 Ua
A .. ........&I 3G* LS 3.0 3a 3
Aprn .. ..- L.6 8X t. UO
APr . .. A 3.5 L L 3.
Aern . . L4s Lt s ILS to 0
may L . . .L# 8r LS" Ln Lag
aier I . . ts Ut t Li &a
MlA XM ..... &41% U= U0 U UL
MJy .-. .... U 35 U U3.* U.






noyr a ..... .o Ln La to LN
ar .. .....u s5t US 38 .1O
MaJn .... .3k0 Lie 3.n 3.L LU3.66





-I ....... 3 s &.5 3. u
fugn10 . . LS L1 U* 2A RW
July 1a. .. . .L LS LI S 2.

A3ugt 3. . . ..W SL to &W tL1
Aut M . . a gLD to L1 uS


September & . to LE LS LS L


Aetendr L . .4.4 t to LN 4.S L
Ina K..... I ..I IS. 3

JuSml 2L .... U U.s .6 L.S UL1
Dseb m .........* LS &* L.5 3.



Member .. .. to X LIN L. AL
Jur .. .....A U.3 &M LI.






tomber L ....... A 31a 3* .
JAulb.r .. .. ...6 3.45 33 4.1
Dnsm.. ..... 3 3.55 3 3 S. .
0868yW 35...&S 3.0 34. 3M LI5
Member I ... .r e us 215 Li* to4

1brurT 18 ...3 3.45 34 3.43 3.0
Februar 5... 4.T 4.4 3.5 3.5 3.4
Oefmb L .. 4. 4.40 4 t5 4 t3 o1
ovebert .. ...40 BS. &21 LI. m10
Deceber ... .20 IS 4. 2.135







aeodt *.. ..... 3.e .1t a.o 2.a3
aMker a ......4. 8.U i a.s aU .
sober ......* 3. 33 LS 3S
Dimber 5 ..*.. &5 3 3.3 3.30 2

Deema2r 3.... &7 U5 3.6 u3 3
Ma.rc .... .* 3,5 &40 M* 3M3


Fehrnuy 18 ..4.3.1 3.43 3.36 330 SS6

Mr-ua n ......68 3L4 3.50 3.36 3.39
Nela n ......60 &MU939 2253 U
I~ek 31.4,,.33.863.663.23.6 3


I H

2.0O


2.5 La
LU 2.05
3.0 t3.
36 14.





3.5 2.5

3.16 .3
L.6 2.3




2.3 LO
LaS LU


2.3 2.0
t U
2.0 LI





L74 to
.6 U3







2.W U.






to to.
2.5 2.3
2.5 2.41
"L Ls
L10 to
Li* UX











3.20 2.6
3.0 2.7
3.5 3.5



73 2.7



u s-.70
s.9 2.70
LIS LX




3.20 2.85
3.06 2.70
2.95 3.40
3.05 2.75
2US 2.70
225 2.70


P i D C-A
L1 2.l U.4 L
L36 toto 3.4
1.i 1.5 1A La
X.I L Lo Li
La Lt Lt LIS
LtO ULO L4 L
LU 1.76 LIa L
1.I LI LW L76
19 L1 LO LTO
LO L 1.L 1.
L. 1.L LI. L.

LI5 LW LI L1
1.76 L7 1.4L L.
15 L4 LW L L
L1 LIS L1S LO
LO LO 1.M L
LU LIo L. LU
LN 1.76 1.7 LT
LI LI LIG L7



L1a L. L L
1 T 1TO L LUO
I, Li- 1. 1.


LU t.o 1.5L LIS
2.5 3.1 LU 1.3
L.3 Ls L.6 LW
L LI LI La
2.0 2. J.S LIU
u3 2 115 1.L
2.5 U.1 .5 3.
La UB tUS Us

to 3.6 31 2A
SU 2E U U7


3s L.a 515
to 2.3U 3 L3
IS L6 UL U
L75 2.53 LBO 2.

to to Lis is
2.5 a2.5 .5 w5
2.90 2.75 2.70 2.70
2.65 2.60 2.55 2.55
2.50 2.45 2.40 2.40
2.6 2. 2.6a 2.55
2-*0 .45 240 2.50
2.002^62JO2JOa
240UBVJS O2JtO


900,000 bales was ginned on the corres-
ponding date. If we allow for the heavy
rains during the entire month of Septem-
ber and October that year and compare
with those conditions the absolutely per-
fect conditions for picking, moving aad
ginning, the crop prevailig this year,
there's'ihbthing in tie report to indicate a
crop of over 11,000,000 baes We have,
however, insisted dll alone that the re-
port simply indicates the ginning capacity
of tie South. Nothing more. Following
tile election four years ago, there was an
advance in cotton from 83-4 to 10 cents a
pbund. It would seem as though with the
enormous exports of cotton to Eope
with the comparatively reasonable prices
now prevailing, with the improved dry
goods market now reported and the boom
in iron and steel as well as copper and
other metals, with the probability of an
immediate falling off in the movement of
the crop and the more settled feeling that
is bound to prevail after November 8th.


Tolar, Hart & C?' evinsw.
New York, November 1, 190 -
The Industrial Record, Jacksoaville, Flos
Spirit Turpentine.--Te market l
been an exceeding dull one with priem
lower as the result of abeence of bui-
ness. Stock is light, but more thea saf-
fieient to supply the demand. Stock 71
barrels. We quote machines 541-2 met.
Rosmin-The market is bare of all gade@
betow I, hence quotatlUso ate noinL
Pales are quiet, but irm. We quote:
BC, $3.00; D, 3.05 to $3.10; , $3.16; F,
30 to $325; G, $325 to a3 ; H, $3M ;
1,43.40; K, 4.10; 4 *4.70; IT, 4 ; WG,
$5.10 to $6.15; W*, $4 3 --.
TOLAB, HAh I Oh


Sam'I P. Holmes&Ce.
Steeks" BSo COtt,
Gr.in md PrWoloa.

NEW YORK GOTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRAM
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Ben Ph11. 81 Bdiwl; Slah


SThe Exports of Turpentine and Rosln.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE. IOSINS


To United Kingdom, In gallons:
Month 121-0 11-1
April.. ....... 1.411 2213
May .......... .M 11
June ....... K15, 1.t4
July ...... .. m.IaW3 .A4
Augut.. .. .. .. sUN 1, I4
September.. .. 71311 1
October ......... 711,4M
November .. 661,638 1,26,7
December .. 1,5,656 1,531,779
January. .. 2b16,0 373,M4
February. .. 116A62 38,9M
Mach .... 6 ......


To Belgium and Netherlands, n gallons:
Month U31- 110-1 I 1- 4
pri .. .. .... 2 0~.44~1 Inluded
May .... .. .. .6M .Smn allothr
June.. ........ IM4 a1.m3 Murone
July .... .. .. K.U 11= mum
August. .. .... .. 3 0, ,0
September.. 53.. 3 1 51. 1 M
October .... .. N1.4 3Z K 23.64
November .. 133,06 349,728 38
December .. 100,372 68,60 W72,
January .... 16873 so41,156 17I27,
February .. 6,130 372,444 361,1
March ... ........ 8,71 18,474
To Germany. in gallons:
Month 11-06 134-4 18K.4
April .. .. ........... .. 1 41m 11Ua
May .. .. .. .. 3S1 5.3 3. lUM
June...... .. M1M M .2 .6I i
nly.. ..... 11.116 1*A412 .14I
August .. .. .. E.L sn1*
September..... 29 71, tAM
October ...... uas 18.443 10.
November .. 179,010 110,1563 81
December..- -
January .... 132,000 407 153,0l 1
February ... 220,18 165b38 7,174
March .. 65,e ...... M4,
To all other Nurope In Galleam:
Month 116 1UI-4 11-41
April .... ...... Br 1.45 33.s
May.. .... .... LO 11.r 4.31
June.. .. .. 1,64 -4
July .. .. .. .514 4111 6.
August .... .. .. .33 .3
September.. .. 41 8.S XL1A
October .. .. .. .,11 4= 17.4
November .. 32,500 17,800 9
December .. 47,30 8,51 33,g
January ... -- 1160 -
February .. 15,471 ...... 44,
March .. .. 14,180 12,75
Total Foreig zxport.sa In aanm teludJ-
tag everything outside of the United
states:
Month 1U14- 111-4 U11-
Auri ...... .. .14,8 5uM s.i
May ...... .. u31,71 m =14 U.M
June.. .... .... ..0eao0 ,2a.i sM72.=
July.... .. .. .s.111. 1.1.e5 L41.6m
August .. .. .. 1,73S4,11 I2.
September.. .1474.16 S4. 8 S MJ*I,
October ...... La3.1 I.jn
November .. 1,851,068 1,32,18 1,6J,574
December .. 1993,529 1,79,3 1 J,175
January .. 700m~,a ,3 M,0
February .. 487,577 51I,34 8l,476
March .... e2948A 11,174 2s6m


To United Kr M om, bairres ra:
1S-41 Month m16 310- 41 .
Ms April ........ 1..3 a12 g1 r
IJ81631 May ........ 1,615 wn 1
1,.1M June ......... ,41
Li.k0 July .. ...... 81S SUM 44m
August ....... "4 41AM
UMI September.. r. I3.61 UI 1U
1.t6 Oetber ... .. 411 11
3a,1 November 7.. ,1 5,7M 1t
576,784 December 1.. 55 40 T1,
1~s0, January ... ,6M MaRS
4M7,M February 28631 1a2M S1 -
66A Mare .... 36 6M 4%m


To eilgum and Netherlad. reI
poeaft:
Month Ill-0 33&* 30341
April .. ..... ..I. 5 e anesd
May .......... 3M61 lAlg an hr
Jane .. .... .. amg 1 41111 pmoe
July .. .. .. .. .mse 416e U
Auoert .. .... a .M 1
September.. S4kA ^21 sUk
October .... .. .51 1648 161
November.. 3,31 MW 31,6M
December .. t37,I 13, 29
January .... t=s sm 11sm
February ... Ml3 ,6S 1,U
Marh .... 18u 32,11 uI
To Germany, bamrri I- .
month 11-1 3is0 24 1
AprilJu .. .. .. .. 4 M A M
May .. .. .. .. 5M A"" mi
JAun .. ... .. 1 U6


October .. .. .. 1TM WM0 WIN
November.. ,7 8 U
December .. 1E407 ,11
January .... 347 5J WA
February... 172,12 4015 M
Mar .. .. 40,M 0, 41,A0
To al other ourem bamrrle Ib ls:
Month AWN S4 1 3-40 4
Aprin ...... .. 5e3 310 5U ,
ay .... .. vi.. m 31m
June........... 1466 U 5r
July .. .. .. .. AU SM U 133
Armuat .. .. .. 5 1
September .. B 118 Rm
October .. .. .. IM IL4, 3.3
November .. 13,8 $AU 5,6.
Decmbeir 20 4%,7M 3^
January ... 17,12U 71448 MJ
February ... 3,184 43,64 ,3r
March .. .. 33,67 51,90 7T
Total aupert of Bes. barrels 31 somp i
lacndHu g Aia, Atriea and Amerbea es-
aIde of the United states:
Month 33-*6 3.43 M34R
April ........ ..3 I lm3 3M
May .... .. .. 2 MmUM UU UI
jm .. .. ...111 .5 SOMIR lm
July ........11 *1 65 ,3
Aust........ .. at.
September.. .. 5.3 61 u S.G
October .. .. .. 30 1 W SUS
November .. 186,88 231,543 22249
December .. 210457 SM 1914
Jammary ... 147n 1794M10 2Wra
February ... 36,O 6 1M3U W2,"M
Marh .. .. 171,548 34,4a3 14,U


=aE RUWRD wcwATnS ALL ovER T=E wOnIA


11


THE WEEKLY mlithrrmUL XZMRD.










2 TEEM WV33MT INLMJ8IAL UNWCOED.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

JAMES A. ROLLOMON.

Plvdishd Every FUaWay.
as m DM .e0i ..*3 JUw A s--


AL m e Wisn b
I1 P lassJU ... # -



The l iutriefi Rwcord ComPany,
JlckLonville. Fla.


*. aP ( vam; ?. oem ,

Fla., as seeon-atels matter

Adopted by the ecutive Om innt e of
the Tupnir I Opeatw AI-er .
September 1 19BM, a its exemiv ofiil
aorg. Adopted in annual convention
Bsptmber 11, a the org i aan of the
ral Association.
Adoptd April 27th, 190, as the edkal
xugn of the interstate C ae Gre iw As-
melatim Adopted Sept. 11, 193, the
sly oieml organ of the T. a A.
Commerdd to lumber people by spe dm
esolunt adopted by the Georgia SawuU
Association.

COPY FOR ADV3RTISNIG.
Advertijg eCpY (haang ar nMew a
vortlm t) shoum reach us Tuemlay
mining to mre imrtimO in tbe 1mMe a
the me weeOL

THE RECORSV8 OFFICE.
The pmMtiring plat and the ris of-
Ib of the ladutrial 1ecrd P6hliiK
Co. are locate at Ne. x SOeth 0cs
Staet, Jadmavilf, Fl., in the ty hurt
tf the great turpetine an yaow in

The Atla, Ga., affiee is leatd i the
2P1itahe BaUilig, Ne. Atlanta is
the cater ad the great man nstering
trade of te mtir erth.
The Savamah, Ga., efic i i the eud
of Tnde ailing Savannh i the Iad-
fag pn naval ster market it the werM.

Negro and the Labor Market
The Southern Lamberman has the fol-
lowing to say on the negro laborer:
"About twenty-five years ago one of the
"paramount"e sues in labor problems was
negro "exodus" from Mississippi to Kan-
as. It was the text of many leading edi-
torials in the newspapers both North and
South, and the theme for some pretty
good "ragtime" songs. At that time a
certain large class of the people of Kan-
as were using strong arguments and large
amounts of money in the endeavor to per-
smade the negroes to leave the cotton-
elds and migrate to the "free state" of
Kansas. Vast amounts of printed mat-
ter-oly highly colored lithographic
pictures, for the mass of the colored pop-
ulation could not at time read print, show-
ed the beauties of a home and the com-
forts of an easy living that could be ob-
tained in the Sunflower State just by sim-
ply going after them. One very large
picture in colors represented a big, fat,
roasted pig, with a big red apple in its
mouth and a carving knife and fork stiek-
ing in his back, standing on an open prai-
rie, with the invitation to "come and eat
me." For a year or more it looked like
there certainly would be a general "exo-
dus" of the negroes from the cottoanelds,
aed thousands of them did exodusst" as
they called it. The cotton planters were
i -despair. There was none but negro
labor to be had, and an exodus of that


class meant absolute ruin to them aad the
reversion of their fertile felds to their
original condition of jungle and canebrake.
The planters did all they could to prevent
the movement. They employed speakers
to explain to the negroes the true condi-
tions as to climate, soil, etc, of Knsas,
and that the pictures they had received
were gross frauds and deceptions. After
a year or two the. movement subsided.
'These facts, and many others of a simi-
lar import, are familiar to every intel-
ligent and well-informed man in the coun-
try who is old enough to remember that
far back. How sentiment has changed in
that short time The present generation
of negroes are, presumably, better edu-
cated, better citizens and a higher class
in all respects than were those of a quar-
ter of a century ago, but now Kansas
doesn't want them, Illinois won't have
them and Indiana meets (or did meet)
them on her borders with a gatlin gun.
"The most unfortunate and the cruelest
thing for the poor negroes is that the
cotton planters no longer want them if
they can get any other kind of labor.
They claim that the negro has become so
trifling that he is more trouble than his
labor is worth. The cotton planters'
agents are scouring Texas and the Gulf
cities for Mexicans to replace the negroes.
Agents of the planters and of numerous
contractors were in New Orleans five days
ago, awaiting the arrival of the steamer
Liguria, which has 1,00 Italian immi-
grants aboard.
"In the State of Iouisian there are for-
ty-nine public contracts under way, some
of them under a time limit penalty, be-
sides a number of government levee con-
tracts, and all of them short-handed for
labor. Steamboat men at a dosen differ-
ent points in the South are seeking white
hands to replace the negro roustabouts.
White labor is taking posessison of the
kitchens, dining rooms, barber shops and
livery stables. Greeks have put the little
negro "shiners" out of business with their
"shoe-polishing parlors." When the ne-
groes are crowded off the steamboats and
out of the eottonfelds, what are they to
do? The idea of a large class of thim is
to move to the towns and cities, but even
there they cannot be depended upon for
steady, hard work, preferring to pick up
small cash jobs.
"The best friends of the negro are be-
ginning to despair of his chances of be-
coming a success as a whole. A large per-
centage of tbem'are doing fairly wel and
making honest livings, but there are
enough of them so utterly "no account"
to keep the rest down. The saying cur-
rent among the ex-slave owners forty
years ago that "when you educate a nig-
ger you stop a plow" is measurably true
of a large number of them, ad in coming
to be accepted as a fact by many employ-
ers of labor. The lawless element among
them calls for such legal restraints as
are really oppressive to an honest laborer,
white or black. In police cirles th mere
fact that a negro is a stranger is ground
for suspicion that often leads to the ar-
rest of an innocent person. Before an
average jury or a police judge "off coor"
is the basis of a doubt of the prisoner's
innnce that must be overcome by proof.
The presumption of innocence until guilt
is proven stops, in many eases, at the
"color line."
"Instead of seeking social and polfti-
cal 'rights' the problem confrotting the
negro race is their right to a plaee in the
labor market. It is for them a vital ques-
tion, involving a struggle for existence "


Floda Phoephate Rate Quemrti Canrie
to the Spreme Curt ad the Unite
States.
The Seaboard Air Line Railway and he
Atlanti Coast Line Railway Compay, by
their attorneys, G. P. Raney and J. E.
Hartridge, have secured a writ of error
from the Supreme Court of Florida for the
purpose of appealing to the Supreme Court
of the United States the ease recently de-
cided against the railroads by the Florida
Supreme Court, wherein the Railroad Com-
mission instituted mandamus proceedings
before that court to compel the roads to
operate a phosphate rate of 1 cent per
ton per mile between points within the
State of Florida. The following citation
was yesterday served upon Attorney Gen-
eral Ellis, representing the Railroad Com-
mission
The United States of America, ss:
The President of the United States of
Americ to the State of Florida upon
the relation of W. .L Ellis, as Attorney
General of said State, and J. M. Bars,
as special counsel for Jefferson B.
Browne, John L Morgan and I. Hudson
Burr, Railroad Commissioners of said
State, greeting:
You are hereby cited and admonished
to be and appear at the Supreme Court
of the United States to be holden at
Washington on the first day of December,
A. D. 1904, pursuant to a writ of error
filed in the clerk's office of the Supreme
Court of the State of Florida, wherein the
Atlantie Coast ine Railroad Company, a
corporation under the laws of the State of
Virginia, is plaintiff in error, and you are
the defendant in error, to show cause, if
any there be, why the final judgment
therein rendered against the said plain-
tiff in error on the 9th day of October,
1904, as in the said writ of error men-
tioned, should not be corrected, aad why
speedy justice should not be done to the
parties in that behalf.
Witness the Honorable B. F. Taylor,
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of
the State of Florida, this the second day
of November, in the year of our Lord
nineteen hundred and four (A. D. 1904.)
R. F. TAYLOR,
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of
Florida.
By the Chief Justice.
Attest: B. B. WILSON,
Clerk Supreme Court, State of Florida.
A like citation to the above was served
by the Seaboard Air Line in the phos-
phate ease, and another by the same road
was served in the Florida West Shore
ease. It will be remembered that the
Florida West Shore ease was instituted
by the Railroad Commission to compel the
Seaboard to charge only one local on ship-
ments passing over the Florida West
Shore branch.

Colemo Br thaem an the Ral state Sit-
uation.
Col. Edwin Brobston, one of the best
known real estate men in the South, was
seen by a representative of the Industrial
Record to-day and had the following to
say on the real estate situation in this
territory:
"The timber market this fall has been
far more quiet than last fall, though a
number of big deals have been made.
Real estate men are more reticent about
giving out the particulars of their trades
for the reason that clients as a rule are
averse to having their transactions dis-
closed. There have been a number of deals


made during the year, mors a NM as a
million dollars, which have nat f-
their way into the pubn.la a..
"Not all of these trada wer o-'
tiated through real estate dealers.
firm has experienced a proper y
and we have every reasm to e=m '.rpta
ourselves that we moved to thkls Jb ,
which is more pregnaA with- ihbe a
the. developer than perhaps e t- r
State. .
"Next yar winl ncely he.a y5u
for trading iksawmill imer--.
be a great amount of
ket by.turpentine opersotas
is every indication for good pri@ fE
lumber, particularly for Gulf iiM am .
"The local real estate market is goa
in every town in the State. Peup a
making money in the woodi nd art ing
to town to enjoy it or to edneate Oir
children. This is making almost a tow
boom from one end of the State to the
other.
"More homeseekers are coming ia tem
other States than at say time h s the
year before the great free. The gat
wave of Southern developmet has
just gotten well under way I gi ig Iar-
ida a full share. There must be twety
years of good times hed of as red-
less of what political party is i powr.
The next census will tell s gat
stories of increased wealth for ~t Sso.
I believe that Florida will stad very
high on the list."

Plant Estate Centreals Rd QCp .'OsC
Stock.
Capt. W. W. Gordo Jr, J of Svnmmh,
has been in Maeon several 4day1 i- -
nection with the Bed Cyprea la-m
Company litigation. He is ea rm of
a committee pointed to aaider the.pr-
posal of settlement made by the -4-
pany, looking towards the w~hdraal
its affairs from the courts.
All of the different interests mz ti a
spirit of compromise, and as all there of
the concerns involved are in the hads of
receivers, there is a ehane for almh t m-
limited litigation. It is to avoid t s am-
tingency that cmpromias are tlka .E
Mr. George W. Tiedeman, repremening the
Germania Bank, abs attended th e mer-
ence.
"The Plant estate wil not pay evr i
per cent unless the compromise with -Uh
creditors of the cypress company is m--
said Capt. Gordon. "If this is dam, the.
estate will pay between 30 and 4d per
cent., but not 50, as newspaper a prt
have had it recently. The exact perOt.
will depend on the ums realized fte
the assets. The cypress company i larg-
ly owned by the Plant estate. A mle-
ment may be made and the company
taken out of the hands of a reaiver."

Suits A ebt Prinent Aeon Am4
Owners.
Monroe Phillips is suing a number of
large land owners for several thaband
dollars, claiming that he has a eodtaet
with them for guarding timber es
the Oemlgee Valley, below Mas~ Ga.
In a suit which named Mr. A. L. Sau,
of Macon, as a defendant, Mr. PhliPnwu
demurred out of the eourt at Jeffersme e,
in Twiggs County, last week. He eltem
that he has a contreat anthaig im
to employ a number of men to protewe the
timber, and be says he has dam tM..fr
a number of years, paying out h-a
of money for the aistas e given h-by
the guards.










THE WEEKLY ibiLJSEitAAL RECORD. I, S


THE


AHNitic atimnal Bank of Jacksonvill,
UNITXE STATES DEPOSITORY.

Capital ad Surnps .............................. 45o00.0oo
-tta .................................... ioooo

Ia addition to our regular baking business, we maintain a Savings Depart-
meat, under government supervision, paying interest quarterly.
We have for rent Safe Deposit Boxes in burglar and fireproof vaults at rea-
sonable rates, by month or year.

'*******MMg 0000lI tifit0,.lOOirm l> ill

Title end Tax Abstracts.
Conveyanciang Township Maps, Blue Prints.
We give special attention to preparation of Title and Tax Ab-
Stracts, Maps, ete, of large tracts in all parts of Florida and South Geor-
gi. To owners and intedi purchasers the results of our work are
valuable aaset
-Oopadac solicited.

REALTY TITLE AND TRUST COMPANY:
:Law ~AMap Baiing. JACKSONVILLE, FLA

--
03O113 III 33 1661 I lull.III.. .i. l l l Iti 60" 11 O00 0 *--

WN Var me as mskaesols SteP At---i


:WoLFus EUROPEAN HOTEL.
CManer aMUAs -m Bma Streets.
a. aSse e. o adme aSn.per da. isrt Class Restaurant is Connection. J. N. WOLFE, M -rmsr


The Commerce of the Worl.
The world's commerce in the latest year
for which stastics are available, is pic-
I in the animal report of the chief of
the bureau of statistics of the depart-
ment of commerce and labor, recently
plbisbed. It shows the total exports of
all ations of the world to be, in the lat-
est year available, $10,515,000,000, and the
value of the total imports of all nations,
$11,80,000,000. This would give the total
value of the world's imports and exports
combined as ,22,324,00,000, but since all
articles which were counted as export be-
came in turn imports when they entered
the coutry of destination, it would ap-
pear that the actual value of the articles
entering into international commerce is,
in round terms, $11,,0,00,000.
The chief of the bureau also estimates
the value of the articles forming the in-
ternal commerce of the United States at
about twenty-two billions of dollars in a
single year. This estimate is formed by
taking the census valuation of the manu-
factures, agricultural products, products of
the fisheries and forests, etc., and adding
thereto the cost of transportation between
producer and the first consumer, and
thus includes in the estimated value of
the internal commerce only a single tran-
smetion in each article.
Thus, while it has been customary to
speak of. the internal commerce of the
United States as equal to the entire in-
ternational commerce of the world, it ap-
peas from this statement that the ae-
tul value of the merchandise entering
into the internal commerce of the United
States is practically twice as great as
that entering the international commerce
of the world, since both imports and ex-
ports are stated in making up the world's
comreial record, which shows the total
value of the imports and exports com-
ined as nearly twenty-two billions of
dolrs. In stating the internal commerce
of the United States only a single tran-
section in eac article i included, while


in stating the international commerce of
the world two transactions in each ar-
ticle are stated, vi., the exports, $10,-
515,000.000, and the imports (the same
articles exported), $11,0,000,000, making
a total of $22,324,000,000 of imports and
exports combined.
Of the $8,301,000,000 of imports into
Europe, $1,202,500,000, or 14.48 per cent,
are from the United States, and of the
$6,498,000,000 of exports, $407858,000, or
6.27 per cent, were sent to the United
States. Of the total imports of North
America, other than the United States,
which amounted to $437,476,000, 237,903,-
000, or 54.38 per cent., was from the Uni-
ted States, and of the exports of North
America, exclusive of the United States,
which amounted to $417,206,000, $209,646,-
000, or 50.25 per cent, were sent to the
United States. Of the $349,691,000 imports
of South America, $43,878,000, or 1255
per cent, were from the United States,
and of the total exports of South America,
amounting to $537,439,000, $107,161,000,
or 19.94 per cent., were sent to the
United States. Of the total imports of
Asia, amounting to $1,001,000,000, $46,-
738,000, or 4.66 per cent., were from the
United States, and of the exports from
Asia, amounting to $1,029,099,000, $112,-
231,000, or 10.91 per cent, went to the
United States. Of the imports of Oceania,
exclusivee of Hawaii), amounting to $292,
107,000, $34,855,000, or 11.93 per cent.,
were from the United States, and of the
exports, amounting to $308,788,000, $27,-
070,000, or 8.77 per cent., were to the
United States. Of the imports of Africa,
which amounted to $436,256,000,000, $24,-
333,000, or 5.58 per cent., were from the
United States, and of the exports, amount-
ing to $288,483,000, $6,457,000, or 2.24 per
cent., were sent to the United States.
Taking the world as a whole,'exclusie of
14.7 per cent., is from the United States;
while of the United States, amount to
$9,079,761,000, of which $870,023,000, or
$9.50 per cent., went to the United States.


C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay. Feed
Special attention to TurpeatAe a"d Sawmill Ma' RM r
A FLORIDA FIRM OR rEans
514- 516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST AY TEE
Jecksonvai.e dI.

GEORGIA n iTER4TA2 = 1 IL SA-in AX !
iimum Coestwin Prie List far ndk-taomt Ib m t'ai A. 0 10M
G6e04, JVlYa, 1g0..
I r.t Ns| I F eett Y iet I reeBtl t h e l
sIZES 20 u 2- 2 U 21-2 30 1- 3 41-4 R St l i-
1 xl0 to 2x10.... 12.01$13.0114. 1& 1065 lB
2%xl0 to 8x10.... 1200 12.50 1.0 14.00 16.50 17.0 0.00 MI 2 00
8%xl0 to 10xl0.... 12.50 13.00 14.00 15.50 16.50 1850 21.00 2La0 X O
1 x12 to 2x12.... 14.00 16.50 1460 1800 21.00 24.00 28.0 Xn i M
2%xl2 to 10xl2.... 13.00 13.0 14.50 16.0 18&.0 21.00 24980 28 M.6 4
10%xl2 to 12xl2.... 13.50 14.00 16.00 17.50 19.60 200 250 36M 30 l MM
Sx14 to 3x14 .... 1600 19.00 M2 .o00 20 527.0 32.00 Sr37.06 44W S7JM
3%x14 to 12x14.... 14.50 160 18.00 20.50 22.00 2400 200 30 3t.5 41 m
12%x14 to 14x14.... 16.50 17.00 19.00 21.00 23.00 26.0 3000 J34 MM 5.M
1 x16 to 4x10.... 20.0 2200 2450 27.50 31.00 34.00 38.0W MM W MU
4%x16 to 12x16.... 19.00 0.00 22.00 25.50 29.00 31.00 35.00 3A 48M MM
121xl6 to 16xl6.... 19.50 20.50 23.00 26.50 30.00 33.00 37.00 41.6M 61 U4
2 xl8 to 6x18.... 24.50 25.50 2.50 31.50 35.00 39.00 43.00 4c "W 7W.1W
61x18 to 14x18.... 21.00 0 220 00 29.00.00 00 37.00 41.00 45.00 57,s .M
14%x18 to 18x18.... 23.00 24.00 27.0 30.00 34.00 38.00 .004 MsM ta JM
Terms: NMt Cash.
Prices are F. 0. B. Cars Savanah, Brunwick, Feraia ard Jadd nnL


NOTICE.
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Association, held at Jacksonville,
Fla, March 15, 1904, the following Classi-
fication and Rules for Inspection of Yel-
low Pine were officially adopted, effective
July 1, 1904:
Clasdication at Inspectie of Yellow
Pine Lmbk.
General Rules-All lumber must be
sound, we manucted, full to and
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;
through shakes, or round shakes that
show on the surface; square edge, unless
otherwise specified. A through shake a
hereby defied to be through or con-eted
from side to side, or edge to edge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken;
less than one inch thick shall be measured
as one inch.

CLASSIFICATION.

Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: 1x3,
4, 5 ani 6; 1%x3, 4, 5, and 6
Board"
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
inches and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %, 1, 1% and 1% inches
thick by 7 inches and up, wide.
Scantling
Scantling shall embrace all sizes from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2x3, 2x4, 2x5, 2x6, 3x3, 3x4, 3x., 3x6, 4x4,
4x5, 4x6, 5x5 and 56

Plank shall embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness.
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1%, 2,
2%, 3, 3%, 4, 4%, 5, 5%, 5%x7 inches
and up in width.


Dimmkm.
Dimension sim small emb se alB s
6 inches ad up in tbickas by am
inches and up in width, inmlsrig i by
six. For example: sGA, exT, 7x7, T a
and up.

tepping shall embrace o to two an
a lf inches in thickens by sevenma
and up in width. For example: 1 %,
1%, 2 and 2%x7 and up, in width
R egh 1Dge er itch.
Rough dge or Flitch .has emnlase aB
sizes one ineh sd up in thi y
inches ad in width, aawd e- m
sides only. For example: 1%, X, 2 4
and up thick by eight inm es ad up wide,
sawed on. two side only.

T'wSPCTW)W

All lumber shall be sound, asp n oh-
jection Wane may be aB owea i-e .
of the width of the piece maret ae
face of wane, exrt'im g ame-fourth f the
length on one corner or its equivalJen e
two or more corners
erchantablea.
All sues under nine n 4e :al;r
heart entire length on oe ide or ;
sizes nine inches and over ahaB
heart the entire. length an two neasb
sides. Wane may be allowed em-tkei
the width of the piece measmsed ama
face of wane, and extending ee-four&
the length of the piece a me eoa ar or
its equivalent on two or mra emras
PriomL
Scantling shall show heart on two fawes
the entire length; other sims aa se
two-thirds heart entire length en two
opposite sides. On not ending per
cent. of the pieces, wafe may e allowed
one-eighth of the width of the peee mes-
ured across face of wane a extenilag
on-fourth of the length of the pie em
o corner or its equivalent em tw er
more r 'ners.


FOR SALE.
50000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cat one uadtm
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready Rte
mill. 086 per acre. Mill near the timber ean be lead for term of pe~ er-es
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in tbe Stte.

C. BUCKMAN, "S


"FAI3. IuE6ruMaE6ma AND PROUSSI5MVE.7









14


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY


Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron C'~stings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located in the art of th Lumber Distrit gives us aIvam-
tage of h clacst material at lwesat cst.


AmIe the Operators.
Mr. B. W. Blount, a leading business
man an naval stores operator of Oeala,
FP., was a visitor to the city this week.

Mr. L L. Meggs, of Orange Springs,
Fla., spent several days in town last week.

Mr. W. E. Carraway, a prominent ope-
rator, of Carraway, Fla, was here last
Thrmday.

Mr. M. 0. Overstreet, of Orlando, Fla.,
was oang. the leading turpentine men
from his section in town this week.

Messs. W. Z. Haymans and D. G. Mun-
roe, naval stores operators of Osteen, Fla,
were here last Wednesday.

Mr. J. Miuselhite, of Orlando, Fla,
spent ne day in Jacksonville this week.

Mr. Carry, of the irm of Allen & Curry,
of Crows Bluff, was here last Tuesday.
Mr. T. G. Cnreth, of Tarboro, Ga, was
in the city oe day this week attending
to baimee.

D. Holmesa leading operator of Cleve-
lad, FL, was here last Tuesday.

Mr. I. J. Bishop, of DeLand, Fla., a
promtiet ad popular naval stores mnu-
facturer of that section, spent several
days in town this week.
Mr. J. J. Bihop, of Pierson, Fla., spent
tat Tusday in Jacksonville.

Mr. J. Tatum, of Barberville, spent
oe day in town this week attending to


Mears. R. 8. and T. C. Hall, two of the
leading operators in the State, with head-
quarter at Oea, were in the city last
week during the Carnival.

Mr. J. D. Pope, of Oeala. Fla., spent last
Monday in the city.

-Mr. Holder, of the frm of Holder &
Pope, of Boehelle, Fla., spent one day in
Jackaonville this week.

Our congenial friend, Mr. Felder Lang,
of Oeala, was one of the "big" operators
here this week.

Mr. R. G. Skinner, a prominent naval
storea. operator, of Hogan, Fla, was in
town Tuesday.
Mr. Gearge Pritehard, of Titusville, Fl.,


was in the city this week.
Mr. Ed Williams, of Green Cove Springs,
wa- one of the prominent naval stores
men here this week.
Mr. W. M. Williams, a leading naval
stores man of Jasper, Fla., was in Jackson-
ville Monday.

Mr. R. B. Luttoloh, a prominent naval
stores man of Tallahassee, was here one
day this week. Mr. Luttoloh is also one
of the leading real estate owners of Jack-
sonville.
Mr. A. D. Covington, president of the
Turpentine Operators' Association, and
one of Florida's best naval stores men,
has been spending several days in Jackson-
ville.

Mr. A. B. Shaw, of Ward City, was in
the city this week.

Mr. George A. McLeod, a prominent tur-
pentine operator located at Riverland, was
among the leading naval stores men visit-
ing Jacksonville this week.

Mr. D. R. Henderson, of Dupont, Fla.,
was in the city Wednesday.
Mr. J. A. McNeill, of Indian Springs,
spent one day in town this week.
W. A. Taylor, of Live Oak, Fla., was
here Tuesday.
Mr. S. A. Rawls, a prominent turpentine
man of Ocala, was in the city ti week.

Mr. A. A. McDonald, general manager
for the Crescent Timber Co., Denver, Fla.,
was in the city Wednesday.

Mr. John C. Powell, inspector of naval
stores for the port of Fernandina, was in
Jacksonville last Tuesday.

H. L. Covington, of Pensacola, one of
the most prominent naval stores dealers
in the State, is in Jacksonville for a few
days on business. He is a guest of the
Aragon.

Mr. Cowan, of Cowan & Co., at Bayard,
Fla., was in the city last Wednesday.

Dr. Chas. H. Herty, of Green Cove, was
registered at the Aragon this week.

Lumber Shipments frda Gulfport, 1h .
Lumber exports from Gulfport, Miss.,
during the year ended June 30, 1904,
exceeded for the first time those from any
other golf or Atlantic port. Hitherto


Pensacola, Fla., has been the leading ex-
port point for lumber, but last year Gulf-
port made a record of 193,00,000 feet, as
against 174,000,000 feet for Pensacola.
This places Gulfport in the lead of the
Southern ports, and second in tie United
States only to Puget Sound. The rapidity
of the growth of its foreign business has
been phenomenal, exports' having rise
from 47,000,000 feet in 1903 to 193,000,-
000 feet in 1904. During the month of
September the foreign shipments amount-
ed to 20,000,000 feet, as compared with
11,000,000 feet the previous year. For
the three months, July, August and Sep-
tember, the exports amounted to 67,000,-
000 feet or more than twice the amount


. HUNT. President
P. L. Pacocl, 1st V. P-


shipped during the same three mot of
1903. Present shipments are at the rate
of over 250,000,000 feet yearly.

SeMr an Gram frw rai for fa
turpentine an coemiusary tatas to ti
Record @ice to inmm a Ipemt l6ri6.


KIRK & JONES

DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. PLA.


J. IL HARRXI& V. Pies H.. L Ricirnmn. See. & r s
W. J. KmA.v, X V. P. D. BI WEUULI, ALn 808-y-Tises


Peacock-Hunt & West Company,

General Offie: 20 oBa Street, E,, Savammah, Ga. a
West uiBMlL rJaMkseuV, Fi.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutal. We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that bays pla
Turpentine and rosin.)

WHOLESALE GROCERS,

Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Copers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our 3yG-Lt
--OLE AGENTS FOB--

The Celebrated Unien Turpentine Axes and WilsBn & Gli '
PMiadelphia Wagon

Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga, and JadCwouvs
aMd Ferandina. Fla.


W. 5. L'NGL
President.


J. W. WADE.
Viee-Preddent


I. 0. HUOUU,
See'y and Trns.


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Cap offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


PATRONIZE RECORD ADVIlwKjIina iOr SATMISACTORY DEALINGS


PENSACOLA, FLA.








THE WEEKLY INImU)rRIAL RECORD. IS


THE


COVINGTON


Co./


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Wholes e SHOES -
Wholesale: DRY GOODS.


" Success


SStraigt Path for the Ntim's Baker.
The New York Financier preaches a ser-
mon to the bankers of the country in the
following brief editorial, which seems to
explain itself very clearly:
"The crops are gathered. They are
safe, not only from frost and natural ac-
eidest, but from lying estimates as well.
The country is richer by hundreds of mil-
ions of dollars than at this time last
year. Real wealth is aenumulating. The
indigestible security has been taken care
of somehow or other, and will no longer
disturb the financial digestion of the as-
tion. The country is ready to start again
with a lean slate. Scar are still in evi-
denee and will remain, but they will serve
a ueful purpose, for they will teach cau-
tion. The promoter has found his proper
location in the rear. He is no longer wel-
comed in bank parlors. The present im-
pune of prosperity comes from the legiti-
mate producing classes, and not from the
stock jobbing syndicate. Banks should
take a lesson from the past, and refuse
to be misled by the plausible trust organ-
inr. They should remember that bank-
log is business, not stock exchange gamb-
ling. They should make it a point to
encourage the merchant and manufactu-
rer. If they do this they will not have
occasion to preach property as a theory,
for they will be practicing it as a reality.
This nation is now entering upon a long
upward trend. The banks can extend the
period by attending strictly to their legit-
imate business. If they do this there will
be no occasion to cry hard times. But let
them be misled, let them choose the stock
exchange rather than the straight com-
mercial path, and disaster waits in front."



This Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.




Liquor Merchants

Proprietors
ta^L^JI-~~ H I y rl

JsmcSw b IIf Wsts

...ACenta...


ACME BEER


For Our Customers is


Success For


Us."


COURSE OF PALE AND MEDIUM ROSINS AT SAVANNAH FOR TWO TYEAR


W.W.


DATE
April 1.........
April 8 .........
April 15........
April 22........
April 29........
May 6........
May 13........
May 20........
May 27........
June 3........
June 10........
June 10........
June 23........
July 1 ........
July 7 ........
July 14 ........
July 28 ........
Aug. 4 ........
Aug. 12........
Aug. 18 ........


K


1904-06
$4.10
3J.9
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.95
4.35
4.50
4.00
4.65
4.75
4.75
4.70
4.52%
4.67%
4.60
4.62%


1903-04
$3.90
&300
3.50
3.40
3.35
3.35
2-42%
3.66
3.85
3.00
'3.40
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.40
3.50
3.50


W.G.


1904-05

3.75

3.00
3.50
3.50
3.55
3.65
4.05
4.10
4.15
4.25
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.25
4.42Y,
4.35
4.37


1903-04
$3.00
3.45
335
3325
3.25
3.25
3.27%
3.35
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.30


1904-06
$3.60
260
3.45
3.45
3.45
3.35
3.M
3.30
3.40
3.85
3.85
3.85
3.90
4.00
3.95
3.90
3.82%
4.00
4.00
4.02%


1903-04
$3a0
335
3.25
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.17%
3.25
3.25
3.20
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.05
3.05
3.15
3.15


1904-05
$3.35
335
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.65
3.65
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.72%
3.90
3.85
3.87%


1903-04
$3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
3.20
3.15
2.95
2.95
295
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
2.95
3.05
3.05


1904-05
$3.30
3.30
3.15
3.15
3.16
3.15
3.15
3.15
325
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.55
3.55
3.55
3.50
3.65
3.55
3.57%


1903-04
$3.0 -
3.00
3.00
&00
&00
3.00
3.10
3.10
3.05
2.86
aso
2.85

2.80
2.85
2.95
2.95


I


On U&
1904-U6 n1U

u tRM
wU LU
Ln LU
EM XJ
s. &.W%
3.00 X.9



.110 It"

3.00 WU
3.10 2U
LU LU

.U .70


3.30 2.
3.36 X.7

3.33% Us


ohn = Furchgott= Compan:
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Ye..


Don't forget your subscription to the Record.
WHE WRITImO AD~PTWW MENTION THE RECORD.


a '*

JoA








isTE T E Immi Y DMUSTRIAL RECORD.


Cmtmn Pm a-i- Cm a -d In-.
-rtat -bte China.
(COaM i trm fae .)
nne uatitb ed 'mi made for hamd-made
gebA and sed bat 75 per cet. of the
Amrican eomsmptio per bead (22.6 lbs.)
they would ue not less than 13,800,000
Sbalm. As agaimt this it is more than
probable that at the present time China
proves 10,00000 bales of cotton m-
anally, more or less, which are self-manu-
faetred into eotto cloth for the purpose
cf clothing her own people.
As to the importation of Americaa cot-
ton into China ft represents the majoi
part of American report trade in cotton
good, and its praiperity is arlutely
essential to preserve the balance which
the export demand tends to establish be-
twee production ad conmumtiUoa in the
eottM in try in the United states
Ding the last fisal year there has been
a great falling off mainly due to the
ommereial distrust ad insecurity engen-
dered by the aggressive policy of Russia,
and the advaneeJ prices caused by crop
hrtaY d speculation
Up to April, 1903, our exports of cotton
Cohos to China were at the rate of 36,-
-M6108W yards &a ,cnth; in May they
dropped to 165,,00, yards, and so pro-
. gravely downward, month by month,
natl in November they amounted to only
1,6,6M yards, and the aggregate for the
first si xmouths of the present year was
very afigtly in excess of that for a single
mouth before Russia became aggessively
active in Manchuria.
The Japanee occupation of New
Owang, however, on July 25th, told its
own tale to the Chinese as to the end of
the MNmorite domination, and since that
period there has bat'. am unprecedented
demand from Cia for our cotton uWee
oods. Ahorities in the trade estimate


the extent of spot aad future business
contracted for as covered by the range
of 259,000 to 300,000 balk, elich rEpre-
ents a normal full year's business. 'his
may be regarded as the natural reaction
resulting from the r-toration of normal
conditions, and hbn in it no element of
speculation.
The increased proportion of light goods
purchased is a prominent feature in these
exports, and may be regarded as one of
the results of the recent high prices for
the staple, which prevented the Chinese
buyers from ordering heavy cotton. They
thus commenced by buying the lighter
goods, which have hitherto been a monop-
oly of the Manchester manufacturers, and
it appears that they now prefer the
American to the English makes. The
British consul at New Chwang, says that
the reason why American goods are super-
seding English goods in China is because
American goods are superior to and cheap-
er than English.
On the position which American goods
have legitimately won for themselves in
Manchuria an enormous trade may be
constructed and all that is required to
enable the American cotton manufactu-
rer to secure his share of the present and
prospective import of cotton goods into
China is a fair field and no favor. To
this he is entitled, and he asks for noth-
ing more.
The next convention of the Yellow Pine
Sash, Door and Blind Manufacturers' As-
sociation, as recently perfected at At-
lanta, has been called to convene in Bir-
mingham, Ala., on November 16, for the
further perfection of the organization and
a general discussion and outline for its
future conduct. Among the most im-
portant topics scheduled for discussion
will be prices, freight rats and uniform
grading of manufacture.


McMILLAN BROS.,

S Florida Copper Works.


Nauufastaur-r St

Turpentine Stills
ma seneraI Mtl Weaeara.
Old stills taken in exchange for
new ones. Patching through the coun-
try a specialty. Orders by mail or
or wire will receive prompt attention,
at either of the lowwonig works:
FAYETTEVILLE. N. C.
MO1LE. ALA.


SAVANNAH, GA
JAC9ICsuILE, Fi,


-u I lg g IgIg 11o I11 I Ies I I II I g I 111111 Ig IIseeg gIV g 9g0 ag g1
R. 8. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KNmeIr, See. and Tr .

MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND
TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.
i


erbert A. Ford,
President.


O(e. I. Ford,
Vice-Pres.


P. L. Wsa,
Cshir.


The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CA P1TAL, $50,000.00.
Drancros: R. L. Anderson, R. & Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christi, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Opertors and Saw Mill Men Soicid.


When you Visit Jacksonville


Ctbo see the Record and be at I-Hme.


TWk~the Record all you know, that will Interest others.


Iftl y rwnt to buy or sell advertise your place.


Itf wrowe the Record pay the bill.


If Vou don't owe the Record make a bill.


Order your Printed Stationery.


Be sure and give the order for your Commissary Checks.


Cal on the Secretary of the 7. 0. A.




Call at the Industrial Record Offic&e.
IF YOr Amr POGRsZ881VE A IDVRTISE ar THE 'COD.









THE WEEKLY i?4DIJISMAUL IMMOOD.


Industrial Record's Department of Information


This dcpai tent is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertising patrons of this paper and no

chargelt made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, as
you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention

lr Turpoles8-u.mi o a fa y Iaor l 01es a MaaJiap Maa. fr TIin rer-Mer, nard Leds
DATE INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonille, la.
INDWSMAL KOOBD, Mati Oce., Jaeonvlle, Pa I am h the market for lands for the purpose of
Sthe ret for the follow Prefer in State of Pleae put me in eomm.nicatio
with responsible parties and give me other formation.
SRe'-4n
Pem noibfy where sa eaa be secured.
SlSn'-
Bipsm

State meeMeasf the kind of mahinery wasted and whether new or secoud-bhsded DATR
Lugse Iaftr Taopu le.m SamM er Foactry, or sr ANy le mistri Eterprine. Frr commissary, oese or MenseeeM Bom es, sawmill or Tforearme Nles
DATE
IDUDWI KA. RECORD, Jaeksaole, DATa.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksorville, F.
Pleae advise the uderigned regarding a good location in (state or section of
Msate) for In the market for
toethr with n information about labor eonditioi taxes, transportation facilities,
seel eouragement, etc.
3m.-. Please give me information as to bet places to buy, etc.

SigP-4 Stro*1


a Yemn Wat ft Sa SemetMa? Arem m Thd e at Me tl?
DATE DATE
NDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacao vfile, DAT. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksoalle Fla.
Have for ale the folowi l Can you give any information a to the reiaUMtyo of t following rm or corpora
tion
Remarks
am ra yue est a pureaser?
roped Signed


s Yem WeE bto Empley a MGM? B oa Waet Emlo eemt?
DATE DATE
"M EA. BBCOCD. J mackaaTe, ua. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Wat a man to l the position of Want a position f

wtIM the rdnowin requirement Refer to the folrowi

Can yoa uggae such a ma ? Can you assist me?
Signed Signed



CLIP THIS COUPON
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD.
When you answing an ah rtiKsi t bom the columas of this paper, whether ou are making an inquiry or placing a order, please cut the copon
b rw d atach It the eler. h wi pay you.


The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser,and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.


THe RICOMD KZl rAJU WITH 80H13 ROIasSs.









is THE WUKLUYT miurrnlAL RUCOED.


Buyers' Directory

The adverters an in is oimu. If
yj want anything, ook t thoh t
dsmied list ua write to the arm ap-
arig thern. Tie Record gu-n
a prompt raepo

ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
AUTOMOBILES.
GBlbert, Id L, Jacksonville, 1.
BARK
Atlntie National Bank, Jacksonvill, la.
ommercil Bank, Jacksonville, a.
Ontral Nationl Bank, Oeam, ka.
nretile Bank, Jacksoille, a.
Natioa Bank of Jacksonvile
BOXES AND cCRATE
C-mmer Lumber Ca, Jackonville, In.
RICE.

another Fud a Supply o, The, Jackson-

CAMi
SMuth Atlantic Car & Manufacturing Co.,
- Wayeroa Ga.
CLOTHIIQ
Caig A Bro, J. A, Jaeksonvill, Fl.
anfre o., H A., Jacksonville, Fm.
Smndrd Clothing Co., Jacksonville, F1
CLOTHING-WHOL~SAL1.
Kae, FTregott & Co., Jacksonville, Fm.
COMMISSION MERCHANT&S
Bailey Montgomery, New York City.
LarMd M. AW, New York City.
Temr, Hart & Co, New York City.
CONVETAJCIWG.
Eaylty Title and Truat Co.
COoPERAG.
Camon 0o, The, Quitman, Ga.
Coa O, The, Jackmnlle,
011a11i e @ ooperage Oo, JaekoflFb

DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, JaclmoMille, Fa.
DRUGS-IWHOLESAL.
BSoutern Mef -t* i- Co, Jacksonvile,
FM.
DRY GOODS-WHOLSRALE.
Osvigto Oo, The, Jacksonvirle, 1F.
Kohn, Furgout & Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
ENGINES
Lmbard Iron Works & Supply Co., A-
Mailn-tevoe Co, Jacksonville, Fa.
heSeld's Soa Co., J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
gsa Ga.
OUNDRIES.
roumkmm

Muphy, T., Jacksonerlle, B
Se-eldas Soa Co., J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
FUEL.
Ba n me d & Supply oA, The, Jack-
mvile, Fk.
WuJnllUnkS
Fetting Furnitre Co., Jacksonvil, Fla.
GENTS' FUNWISB *RS
af A Bro., J. A, Jdaksonvill, F.
fLh Co., H. A, Jacksonvill, Fl.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, A.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Ooelidated Grocery Co, Jacksonrville, .
Eli-Young Co., Savannah, (G
HaWravs Co., H., Jacksonvile, F1.
Janson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fk.
Pamctk, Hunt & West Co, Savannah, Ga.
Wilam. Co J. P, Savanna, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kaoh, Furelgott & Co., Jacksonvlle, Fa.
HARDWARE.
Baid A Co., L ., Jackskoknvie, Fm.
eand & Bows Co, Te, Ja&sonvle, M.
V -akNi w*wa W. H.Valosa, Ga.


Marion Hardware Co, Oman, 3l.
Tampa Hardwre Co, Tampa, a.
Weesd Co, J. D., aanah. Ga.
HARmSS
MeMurray & Baker, Jaeksoill, ka.
Thomas, W. B, Gabneville, F
aIT
Craig & Bro, J. A, Jackmonilm, Fl
Renfroe Co., H. A, Jacksonvills, 1.
Standard Cothing Co, Jackasm ile, ar
HOTEL
Aragon, The, JadkovlT 1k.
Hotel Bartoldi Nw York City.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stemae Co., Jaklon1bille, kH.
Murphy, T, Jackbon ie, Fla.
Schosed's Soe C., J. S., Maeo, Oa.
JEWZLS.a
Graenleaf at Croeby Co0, Jackauvile, Fla.
He. a Slager, Jacksonvile, o .
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, Fbk
Blum & Co., Cha., Jacksomvill, Fla.
Hanne Bros., Jacksoville, Fa.
IKDICINS.
Spender Medicine Co., k-*t--'ng Tea .
Southern Manufacturing Co, Jae onille,
Fla.
MAP&
Realty Title and Trust Co.
MACHInE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonvill, Fa.
Schoield' Sons Co, L ., Maeom Ga.
MATERIALS FO'R JUokmaULSMs PRO-
CSS. '
S .ho.Id' Sons, Co, J. 8, Mason, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., a ., Jacksonville Fla.
METAL WOR.r *
Baker, M. A., Brunswik, Ga.
MeMillan Bros, Saranah, Ga.
MILL SUPPIUKE
Brigg Hardware Co, W. H, Vaota, Ga.
Marion Hardware C., Ocal, IFk.
Schofed's 8os Co., J. a., MaY o, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co, Tampa, la.
MULES AMD HORSMS
Thomas, W. B.; Gaielle, Fl.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co, New York (sty.
NAVAL STORKS.
Barn-Jemup Co, The, Jacksonville, F1
Consolidated Naval Stores Jadeaon-
ville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co, The, Savannah, Ga.
Independent Naval Stores ad export Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Peaeock, Hunt t Went Co., Savanah, Ga.
Stanard Naval Store Co, Jackoile,
Fla.
Unio Naval Stor Co., Mobile, Ala
PAINTS.
Bond a Bows Co., Jaksonvile, Fa.
PRCANS.
Griming Brn. Co., The, Jackonvile, 1F.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardwae Co., W. H., Valdeta, Ga.
Campbell, J. ., Ocala, Fla
Tampa Hardware o., Tampa, La.
Marim Hardware Co, Oala, la.
PUMPS.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksovrle, la.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksouville, la.
Schofeld's ons Co., J. 8, Macon, Ga.
White-Blakesle Mfg. Coo, Bir-so-.
Ala. *
TANK 8TO(RAG
National Tank & portt Co, Savanah,
Ga.
REAL ESTATE
Beckwith, Headerson & Warren, Tamp,
Fla.
Brobston, Fedig a Co., Jacksonvlle, la.
Buckman, C, Jaksonville, ll.
Frazier, W. W, Jaksonvile, Fr.
LIvingsto. B& ao J. H., 0mb, Ia
DOWT FAIL TO i MIM


Southern Sttea ld and Timber lO.,
Jacksonville, a.
Wet-Baley-Ranie Co, The, Jaksonville,
Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Summer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fa.
Merrill-Stevens C, Jaksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLKSAL.
Covington Co., The Jacksonville, Fla.
STEASEHIPS
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes a o., amue P., Jacksonville Fa.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., L A., Jacksoville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cyprea Tank Co., Mobile, Al..
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, F.
Schoeld's ons Co., J. 8., Maon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trut Co.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G, Jackorille, Fla.
Council Tool Co, The, Wananish, N. C.
J UxPEK sLr APPARATUS.
hattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksoevile, Fla.


u---"..-- wea16an
Pine Product os.truotm 09, The, 9i
etteille, N. C.
Pine Belt Conatrnctim OL, thb ae-
N. C.
Stndard Turpemtm Cao, Tl, Se Ye T
City.
lUJnPa Aijuu STmaIL
Baker, M. A, Brunswck, Ga.
MeMillan Bros., Savanamb Ga.
.LuPELtuaL STILL Tm.
Davis & Son, G. 1M, Palatka, AL
I uju iJums VATS2
Davis & So0, G. K, Pl.ata1, 1k.

GrTot Typewriter esieans, JaksmBelk
Fa.

MeMurray & Baker, Jaeknonvil, A.
Thomas, W. -., Ga0kreill, a.
WATCHEs
Greenleaf & Croby C., Jaeksom' b.
Hess & Slager, Jackso vi, rk.
YELLOW PIEX LMBEL
Cummer Lumber Ca., Jadomnil, Fl.
East Coast Lumber Ok, Watrtwn, lk.


MORTGAGES. NTS.

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.

III W. FORSYT S"TRET, Aci KSIVi, nL




H, A. Renfroe Co,


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suit to Order at ReadyMade Prices Mail Order Give Pesnom Atesdao


439 W. Bay Sreet


JACKSONVILLE, LA.


IilltI ittIIttth *tl1t1 it:, i fI ill It u a ffim..


J. P. WnLJAM Prlsieal.
T. A. Jnnmxrnn, iS ViaPreent.
H.LLro. KA~nS~etaqt.


J. A. 0. CrnaAnt Vbw&v@
J. F. DUMuEWAYTd VIiN4'
D.0. While. Tramor.


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

- IIl Sl IR MOIm 11 b lf E K
Main Ormnee 5jaVJlmNIH, OKOMOIL.L
n ae*_ orne P NSACOLX, FrLX. I ance Orseery enmse.
S neh on JaCXOnrnVILL, Fs r f COLUmnSUO, .
: Naval Stores Producers are Iay/ted to Correspaom With l U
= It tt l t l lll ll i ttlll l l llll ll l llllll lllIlll 1lllll l
-

0. A. AKER


Nahdir d ta
euu__W "TWPu



wrise m r tstitl, G ,m
Wmritoa Uat r a am
soMld auger a umP
Job work through the
country specialty.
The L&anet and OdeJst Copper
nWork r Go run sw Ga
or My specialty is large worms and heavy botmus that doaft eak.


Send your order for general printing to tke AtI
TBE RXCOD TO ADvrmslRS.


0





THE. WEEKLY muuwjrIAL UKCO0LD. 29
....... ---- _-----> W .. .. . I [I


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade
Western White Oak'Spirit Barrels

Capital $100,000.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.
OFFICERS:,
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurr.


J. C. LITTLE,


DIRECTORS:
JOHN E. HARRIS, C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST,
W. C. POWELL, W. F. COACHMAN.


W. J. KELLY


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF -

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved.
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc.
I n1T IS MI IW R1U, M U E~ Iia U Ii EPIMINH u WCWIU.
IN WRITING R APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


TH=E =0"W S SPACK HAS A BIG MOaEY VALUL


-





_THB WgELY IuIutrrlIAIL RBCOID.
Se s e s 111 1 11 1 II I *I*II IlI *I s *IlI, s I II I o 161I l $le I to *************************t t I


P sdmt. W.c. c. POWmaJ.; vIe.-P lA *, h wM tel P~i.Ont es.ttate the Drectory and Board o ManagM, W. .- COIACMMAX. L a2
&Arr. I. l OOV1W ON. A. W3m ramflN. JOHN I OOUNG. J. A. CRANIORD, D. i. MeMI LAN. C. DOWN-
N J. .I BSAINDW L C. B. ROGEB; Audltor. JOHN HBEDLBON.


OONLIDATlD NAVAL l ORl MPA Y,


Jac onvillell. 1 .


SWlvnoh CN.


nPesr lg fit .


4
4
4





I
4


-4
4


P al mw 8l 2,o oM.


O4
Owmn Ul Oonioleb P rucich moFmw Iq


01 SYl V Rel Ole 10o ll o Oi[mois W o Img n llIA IR
*' -, ,M


Tk MNo lhet i OM (lpue Co u pi L.
i le PriOcers. le Poilifoe ol
PINM IOI MI nl PlN i


Is llUs Ine U11e HeI Iteu
oennteinDsor eerm litih II
I TlD 101o[ vetIml.


YARDS AT 4ACKSOIMLLE, SAVANNIAH, lERNAND0IN end PEILCO1A1.


m PJlcels alrie Vtlle t0 o tl 01 oesm C l


I -







F




Zr
4
K


ij

45
I.


wTI PMl AID ITSi PRODUCT&*


SNAVRAL ORES FATOR8. __ __


A e-
- *< -


i








THE WEEKLY INVUSTRIAL BBCOBD. S_


1 The- Rcord's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Co ima Trades.)

The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
td for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:
i .


Batter Aad Cheese
AO. Cb.r ,60 lb. tubs.. 21
ALC. C8eamery,0 .. 22
10" 1 .. 25
AL 0. OCreaery,60, 1 lb. prints
hay Fall Oream....... .. 11

Lard
Omapoud Tin.
S 0-lb tin....* 664
4 560-lb tub....
lsaf Tin.
5-lb tin. ............ 84

Vinegar
lel Apple Cider bbl........ 86

S sugar
thasulated Sugar, bhls..... 6 40

Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 01-lb cans to case,
per lb................. 22
amon Pure, 0 1-Ib cans to
ae l per Ib............ 22
f Co .good ..... 12
GQan Cofee, medium ...... 9
Gema ofee, common....... 8f
Arbakles Rosated Coffee, 1
Ib pareage....... market price
Li mBrad Coffee, 1 b pack-
..............market price
-eated, 10lb. drum....... 17
mm d coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Oreen Tea, 10 lb..... 40
SGunpowder, 10 lb.... 27
Engh B'fast, 10 lb. 27
SFrmos, 10 Ib....... 27
Pagoda Tea, 6 and l10 size
10 bs to ease, per pound .. 40

Salt
00-1b aek..........--.. 100
100-b eoek................ 50
Is Cream, 200-lb saks..... 100
100-lb sacks.... 50
Poket Saltin bbl., 8-lb.... 2 65
"6 2-lb.... 275


Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10lb tin....... ....... 17
Ground 1-8 tm, 3 doz to box
sifter top, per dos...... 45
road 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per dos......40 and 80

Corn
N Sk Lam NS
Car At Let Sk
W.Corn,101b, 1 38 1 40 1 49
1001b, 1 24 126 184
Mxdoora,llOb,188 185 146
S "100~lb 21 1 i 185


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


e100 Sk
Car Lot Lot
W.clip'd,1251b,
1OO1b,
White 1251b,
White 100lb.
Mixed 1251b
1001b,


Lem 100
sk LotW
190
155
180
145


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice..... 1 85
fancy..... 185
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour


Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 6
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 lb sack.........6
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 6
Pillsbury's Best ..... 7
S Pillsbury's Best bbl .
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 7
bbl .... .


Flour, Boss,..............


7


25
50

40

25


Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 3 50
92-lb sacks........... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel...........8 50
92-lb sacks....... 1 50
Rice


Good................ ..
Choice ...... ............
Fancy Head...............
Broken..................


4J
bf
6
2f


Canned Vegetables
DOW.
Tomatoes, 8e, Chief........ 85
Tomatoes, 2s ........ 65
Clayton, 38................ 80
Clayton, 2s ............... 60
Sifted Peas, 2s ............ 1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s........ 1 15
Lima Beans,2s ....... 1 00
String Beans, 3s............ 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8s........... 90
Baked Beans, s ........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets, 3e...........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ........... 85
Sauer Kraut, keg..........


Pumpkin, 3s ................
Hay


car lots
Choice....
No.1 Tim.
No. 2 17 00
No.1 Cl'ler 17 00


100 bale Im
lon qnaStity
1750
1650
17 80 15 50
17 60 15 50


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 dos
to case; per dos........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 dos
tocase, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to cae
perdo................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to cae,
per do............... 1 45
Peche, 8s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two dos to

case, per doz........... 1 46
Blackberries, 2s two dos to
ease, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case.
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy


Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 6*
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
lb.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 6.

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 84
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice ." *"
Ev. Apples, 60-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lb. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. ase 8 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
xbx, 40-o............. 6..
Prures, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 0-60 ............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box .......... 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 61
Extra H P, .... 6
Seed Peanuts, ...
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes........ 11
Almonds................. 18
Brazils ................... 12
Peacans.... .............. 12
Filberts................... 12
alO nuts............ ...... 14
Cotton Seed Meal


Cottooseed Meal
A" Hulls


Car e100 eIsslo
lota Sk. Lot Sk. Lt
2700
1060


Matches
Atlantic, per grosw........ 4.
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop.........2 26-
8 hoop.........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces.... 86
Twine, boxes, per dos.......1 W-
Sieves, per doz. No. 18... ... 00
S nested......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per dos 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per dos.. 00
Ax Handles
Two dos crates per dos.. ..1 20

Washboards ,S
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay...............3 00
176 Diamond Glass ........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per dos 1 06
Clothes pins, five gross to box 76
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
dos. .................. 9
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 60
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 45
Salmon is, Tale 4 dos to case
per dos Alaska......... 90
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 36
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fsh 90
two dos in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails ............ 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box............. 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge .... 1434
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 age .... 141-1
"Reliable" Ham, 12-14 avge .... 141-4
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 arge .. 113-4
"Reliable" California Hams, 6-8 10
Breakfast Baco, light ar. ...... 151-t
D. 8. Bellies, 16-18 av .......... 1e
D. S. Bellies, 20-22 av .......... -
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av......... 91-2
D. 8. Plates .................. 734
Bacon Plates ................... 83-4
D. S. Butts .................... 3-4
Bologna Saage ............... 7
Samage in il ................at.7s
Butt an Caem.
"Strawberry" Creamery, d-lb tube 1
30-Ib tubs.. 221-.
"Reliable" ful cream cheese .... 121-.
Kiapa's Lard
"Indiana" Pure f ........... ritt.
-tea-Foma" OImpoImd ......... u


Kinun's C-anMu ats.
"Reliable" Corned Bed, Is ......
Crnd Bed, is ......
Roast Bee, Is ........
S Roast Beef, s ........
otted Ham ad Towi-
1-4s ................. ........
SSliced Bee, 1- ...
S Vienna 8a ag, l ..
TripJ '........,.....


SLN
In
LU


As
rM -


GMT A COPF =TE ELVAZ STOUS ELME DOO


1


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I







3 TMH WEEKLY UIMIaralAL BLOOD.
I I 14-1,1I I I


4
4
4
4
4
4


^Irrrrlll llrrr- -----.r --..-- -


U- Iflll~lll~''Z Zlr


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4
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U1~ U~ U WY CI U U ~ U UYY U U


I t, ------- -- --- V


=AD 2= ADS 0- iS-COaO


benefit of the *
a







I ..








you will get

















ssary checks,,
tC., by having
cRecord:























nrida.
g department
a
is conducted
benefit of the ,
#er and man-
It is reason-
you will get ",
satisfactory
-letter heads, i
ssary checks,
tc., by having ;


cord Co.,r


I



se


0


The job printing
of this company
for the exclusive I
naval stores, lumb
ufacturing trades.
able to suppose
better and more
printing supplies-
envelopes, commi:
pay-roll reports, el
us make them.

Industrial Re
.jdm..w I


To the Readers of the


v


I NT-


-- - -. -~ -. - -- - - - --.I~- -.-~~.- I-. -.-. 1. ~ I 1.


Vr V V V r kV








THE WEEKLY ImNUtnSrlAL IBOORD. 2
,- -


W I Ui UIIH ALS II MARBLE, STONE AMD ORZE
whem the e Table to the t elaborate Masoleum.
Written, or cIm to mee m -oar deigns will please you.
SOUTHERN MARBLE AND STONE CO.
oham F.em.a" g am r. I.UamE maierm.
aJ k ,,JmrLkssi rem.
Cse Sems ise De.i,,g Ne. 4 Sa sulk e Obuet.
A-ami gl I Smew Mcmri. Mso re and Tite.
g***************g************************I.
I Ff You Want a Turpentine Location?
S Yo Want a Sawmill Location?
Siem Wat may Kie of Florida Land?
1II Yo" Mean.Business?
Om a r Wriss to
J. H. LIVINGSTON A SONS,
Ocals. Florida
te -------Seesl ******* *****************o

The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
S--0Mt t -rtI .tm anr are pit to .ml a felmw, fmsg
t Chahte, & C. both ways.


Pam noew-
~ M Nest u.N).


Poem inJcrma erv fl
ChowleeIo and New Yesh.


Frayt Set. 3, at 3:00 pm ..AI.OMNQUIN ....Thursday, Oct. 6, at 1:00 pm
8m1ery, Ot 1, at 3:00 pm ... .APACHE .... Wednesday, Oct 5, at 12:30 pma
*xNEW YORK ....Thursday, Oct 6, at 1:00 pm
Ts.al1y, Ot. 4, at 3.00 pm .... OOMANCHE ......Sunday, Oct. 9, at 4:30 am
May&, Ot. 7, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE, Wednesday, Oct. 12, at 6:30 am
**xMOHICAN ......Friday, Oct. 14, at 8:00 am
e8t ny, Oct. 8, at 3:00 pm .... .... Friday, Oct. 1, at 8:00 am
Temlay, Oct 11, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE ....Sunday, Oct. 16, at 10.00 am
Wedm-ay, Oct. 12, at 3:00 pm ... .ALGONQUIN ..Monday, Oct. 17, at 11:00 am
Frlay, Oct. 14, at 300 pm .....COMANCHE .Wednesday, Oct. 19, at 12:00 n'
**rxURON ......Thursday, Oct. 90, at 4:00 am
Biay, Ote 16, at 3:00 pm ..*xNEW York ......Friday, Oct. 21, at 4:00 pm
T'eday, Oct 18, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE ....Sunday, Oct. 23, at 4:00 am
Wedieday, Oct. 19, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS.... Monday, Oct. 24, at 4:30 am
hMty, Oct. 21, at 3:00 pm ... APACHE ....Wednesday, Oct. 26, at 530 am
aturday, Oct. 2, at 3:00 pm .... AL4ONQUIN .... Friday, Oct. 28, at 6:00 am
Masnay, Oct. 24, at 3:00 pm .."xMOHICAN ....Friday, Oct 28, at 6:00 am
Temlay, Oet 25, at 3:00 pm ....OOMANCHE ....Sunday, Oea 30, at 8:30 am
M1ity, Ot. 28, at 3:00 pm .ARAPAHOE .... Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 11:30 am
Batuday, Oct. 2, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS ......Friday, Nov. 4, at 12.00 n'
xHJURON ......Friday, Nov. 4, at 12:00 'aB
--Boaa via Br nswick and Charleston. xFreight only. *-Boston via

TTI CLYDE NEW ENOLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
ZMte" see Between -meme e, aetem anmd perme ne d a l an e.
ers Wpotis, ~ a at Cmarteete. not& Ways.
M .. .. .. .. .. .. .... ... ... .. ... om Lewk Wharf. Bost
UM-med. .. ............. .... ... m tot of Cthedare Slat. Tjaiaaime
CLYDE ST. JOfNS RIVER LINE
.et.ween a..e.aea.i m.d a .. Satrdv
lMsppe at Pmlatha. As St. raelacs. Beresford (Do LanQd and iateroa. I
seem m. on ive r.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
S-ina to--s t= emm: LS Jaecksvml, SondayS Tedaym a-d Tamn-
dI a i e rmnA. lOare uamord. Monday, Wednesdays & rridws :0 a. m.
u~wt ou. Io Bend UD,
V f. m.| ...... ........ ........Ja~ouvme ..................... Aurtve 3M am.
Law ma.................. .. ..................... Lra.. ... .m.
S -& 8. mS. ........ .. ...... .st. rr--- .......... lIav. 1*M VA L
............ ............... ....B rd (Deand).................... Leae On noM
Arste ma.- .....-- ............ f d........ ... ...... ..LeaVe a.
At. r10:00 a m4..................tprie........................ p. 10:00 a. Im.
eSUA& pAkqmUUl ANU D M ON4IWCICU 2 w. Iay SL, jLUgvts.
F. a. I1mom t. n#. Art. Gent. Pass Agnt, lI W. Day t.. Jacksemvte e, wI
W. COOL r JIr. eal lrt. Agt., Jaeli C. P. LOVPI L Ast. Sopt.,Jacv
Peoot HoBgn Street. Jacknon u vl
A. NAbaierr. 6L P. A, New TerOk. CTDU IIfIL 0. F. A.. New TeaL.
4"11. 4. 11 WM . CLTm Co.
oe.mMl MOam. General Anase
Rhesir.g s2 a mtate Otreet. New TWek.


The mes f wirbe I6
the of th spotm a
t idpeasure. -wt",-,,u,

seketnwt the Ne of 0"o or t e
r* Iar eLdta h*r e J-m-" le.
"TM Wefldy taduxtrel Record of Jack- ~k
-ovMale "P Savannahb ha taken It place
umm the Idin trad1 Journals In *he
Untetd tt d as a authority on am
r wa ud uaUl torm It n betar quoted not
nly by the best and moat carefully edited
am paSers In thit country. but by those f
tn MSraop aeo. A London trade ipapr m'
-sebal this etale Vterday m tva e beral
agee. to thO Reaore views onm market o- five
dmisseO I 1Q
Tbhi Tbrks Isa- of tMh Induntrii Re-
Wr fi even better tRa usual. and It in '
a s w ad IntoItanWg general lots. trial
trl swspapmr, in addtlou to Its value Be
Sm tlm ebmpe of t-h two specfc tnd- '.
aeso t rieresents It io btetat of now Joh
It ora of dtee voeat tI 4e e Wtethewat Waltl
menis tema bea the g story at m of l-mill- tend
a-deitlr eIrportonst or.arrlnd ha Jack- do
e ll eswi tdy. am the orgalation of H. I
several otlr If eneratdoes durnt the and '
;> week In Oerz d ra d rls. W
It ban eat tMe go" Sor IntIrrM and It Wralt
won deare te 0 rMet grameaafsre a n wtek
StI Is reeealvti both In It =be=riptlaon nd
advertling departatente.carr y l as It does.
pera oe of te largest advertisng pat-
w oa M> to e-- of tan asouthera r j. rr
aouSmkw W
-em hat --hI, _.Stre"
wme at IF
r",o,
t Su-s who' Thin
rU sedri



U',JIJ.U JJJJAA UJULAJAJ J AfJ UJI*-JJ)JJJJIJJ)JJJL ~.UJJ
SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
S30 YEAR RELIABILITY.

Hess & Slager,
SDiamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry
CORNER BAY AND CEDAR ST8. AND 1I A 18 MAIN.
wI w-Irnr-mrrm''lnFo noTrn o ra nvsFV-r.-mmsmmmo '


Naval Stores Market

and StocK Report
Publish Dally in Thi



Jacksonville Metropolis,
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.

$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.


BIG PRIZES:

A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposition, to
Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.


Carter & Russell Publishing Co,

Jackaonvitle. Florida.


vms zm 1gm AY rmU~aTIn 0.


~vnn~h~-~--------- ------------------







THE- WMKLY; IMIPUUTII9AL RECORD.


- .-i;-3


. ITwo of the Patterns we show in our Catalogue.
SPECIAL VALUES IN STERLING SILVER.
SPECIAL VALUES IN STERLING SILVER.


.USSW


THE

"Rose"

TrMspm- a* g.o per d.
Desert Spoos, S&oo per sa.
Tale SpM, $a30o per im.
Dessert FJrks, $zao per &s.
Tale Fora, as3oo per &s
Desert Knives, ame per ds.
Table Kaivre, f3.o per do.

NO CHARGE FOR
ENGRAVING.


lag'


Greenleaf

Crosby Company

*. 3e fIbers anb




41 West Bay Street

Jacksonville

Th *lrMt *ad at atM e in tir pMrt of Sae
seIdra. 8m .. Prompt atactiao to man ordr.,


THE


"Germania"


Teuaspoons, %co per do.
tesMrt Spoons, SI6.5o per es.
Table Spoon,5 pe 4.
Desert Forks, Sx6.o per ds.
Table Forks, 3as50 per ds.4
Dessert Knives, S.oo per dis.
Table Knives baoo pr s.

WE PAY EXPRESS
CHARGES.


Write for Catalogue
ONE HUNDRED PAGES ILLUSTRATING


Silverware, Diamonds, Watches, Jewery, Cut Glass, Clocks, etc.

^^^ *.^:~~lMRl^^.^^^


------------------------------------ ------


4



I

I


IL -- -
D. G. aKIn72 ,Paet. ALFRED A. McKl EHAN, LI U. S N.
Jase.vrrle, ier e t' Sec 'an *adres... CoZ..roati
ailaser, fJ etterllle, N. G.

Pine Product Construction Co.
ayettevile. N. C.
serttr r T mae. Ow oR Tar, Cr.uC te. Tar, DMinfectuats; Wood PreMerrarie
Pah%, Weed Ital. t ., and Charsal from Lghtwood Stumps. Bo- faclan
Pr ats l mhase.l Th- of dita reduead. Condesmatio ctrollld at will
Sdw e n ae Plant rented complete, anI men taght the proce@-.
UMr ifmrnr wrteO Alfred Macethan. general manager, rayettrevme, N. C
S----- --.-- ---- --- ------- -
MOTEL BARTHOLDI, E""o^w A"cR'. .,
SYORK CITY.
aciarg adiso Square Ptk. Newly Furnished Throughout.
Nar, all Big Store. ad Place of Amusemet. Car PasM
the Dom bor anU Raio StasiomaP au Steamboat Landings
Iarge 8b le Boodte for Comercial Travelers: Here you
204d ua granI aud magnllest idemckasions- no luxurious
graitea"; neo awe iring .armadtig; no elaborate bill
of fa, prit a h achk; no eterks tiat will disdain to U
Spea to Ye Ne eapiYea Ia Asy Way Iatteatative.
Bat just a cosy, like little hotel tsa will a peal to the
hearts of toe a iftflooking for solid comfort. Good.
plain Anerican cooking, and aUale and courteous treatment.
n S


John R. Young. President. C. S. E1li1. Vice-PreldBAl &
IFJ W. M*te Jr- Secretary and Treasuer.

The ELLIS-OUNG CO.

Commission Merchants
NA VAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.
III mImmmlmk in IniAnmAn inImII Inn m uMIMM


T. MURPHY
JACKSONVILLE MACHINE !A IRON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Bepaid. I
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kind.
MARINE EI4IES AND BOILERS PULLYS AND SHAMFTG.
Agent for Stationary Engines, Boilers, Pumps, Feed Water Heat ers, a CoaA
users, Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and uBaber GiOal
PW TUINISSIM AIU WATER IMS EPiiUEI A IP T
SJACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


* "-
t ,
- 1


THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
of Wasaalsh. N. C.,
lPrmrl at Coamnes btatio.. 1. C. are stu selling Dilam d lse
Bas at UIL Blek Joe anudtadard at IN. Old tyle sad Patont
--- -- --- -- --- -- -- -. . . . ,* - '
Later at L a umm. They shol average a little better than ever.
We a hnewobt out a new brad. the Bine Ltue Heks at Lm and Pul-
e at MS which are warranted. All wholemle dealer n n aval atorn
rrwy mr Use md mini angb oapetars,
-------- --100111-0-1-8-99601990101690110600008066"-


~~~-E
" ~4--