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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00094
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: October 28, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00094
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text






ik -a op d E7jf OF
y ^:.;, .i --- N --r


EEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECO.

: PbIhed Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing laterests.

A e Dept. 26 02. 80 e me se committee et tae ofth arpa Mrars* Asrsk as As ocistoe aesf eru. am dsee sat. s1t # t 8 .Z Amab Coo
Wsas a ea eram -A s Os on e of Te Ia As-r c M9rsIs. I IS gept. a .h. ME., as the eaaly OIt i rf e rresa pete Oparatorss i -
Asfta o e ArM 27sM "a" as see e *c rasme s ab a : Sta. e C w 1p rs' Assess52sm. Laderse aO thee se0rga s a0110
A-sat on. -*t o oetf the Senteasers Steck r*ewr's AseeCsCaeu.

"L ... Me AiSOILE rLA. ATLANTA, GA. SAVANNAH, CA. &

S=3M E R TRAD CNDIIOWM N that the yield for the tate as a whole SOUTHlT R IDDUSTRY. operate steamers in Florida waters.
-;w l q win equal or possibly exce that of last Chaires.--Coton Giery.-J. Pat-
Otg tke Throshn t the Suth- year. Corn is generally good. The early Aal. terson will rebuild in Pebruary is eo
"eaM as ,m by :B-atetx'a. marketing of cotton has circulated eon- ton ginnery recently destroyed by ae. ,
; sig~rable money, and all lines of trade Birmingham Candy Factory -Mon- From M3,000 to $5SO. wfil be b
Oklahoms.-obbig and retail trade in have been benefited thereby. Collections arch Candy Manufacturing Co, previously Ingl--Superphosphate Piast-Barker
aE d e shows a decided improvement. continue good. reported incorporated with 15,00 capital, Chemical Co, reported incorated ate it
Sg isn yieling better than was a- Chattanooga general trade conditions contemplates purchasing site and eret- month under Rockwe, a., with
t at oHt s thus far during Oc- min this section are excellent, while coBe- lo f stoy f y bf aiin per capital, s let cont to
d t tune tious ore good op ponds of candy p hrist of Charlotte, : aC, -er ibh -e-,
S better t at y time with KnoxvilleBusiness in a manufaetur- Birmingham-Timber ads. Yellow of plant which will have a a al e
Spt six r ing and jobbing lines is inremas ing this Piae Lads Co hb be- inorpote d, city of 400~ tome of s up rh
Whe ling .ri editions in the Ohio val- section. Lumber is quiet, especially pop- with $50,000 capital, by John M. Cad- Additional buildings for plut will be
ki ddimut to improve in a very sti- la, bt oak moves freely at good price. wel, of Birmingham, W. F. Monroe, J. F. erected later. Company can be addrL sen
S Practically all of the emphis.-Retil business is in ewis, of Valosta, Ga. J. aunders, at Inlis or care of A& k s
S.tin the m-owing to cool weather, nd w e of PeIaheola Fl, and associate. 22 William Street, New Yek, INY.: ,
a eatabishments in the mi report a gain Picking and marketing Bridgeport-awmill.-Rce & Riggs- Jacksonville-otie Ma fn
Sally a M r oprtio- The of cotton is very active. Collection run bee have removed their hardwood dimen- etc--The Florida Croutie & Masi M
i i idltrl y is regarded as being in the from fair to good. sion sawmill from Sequatchie, Tenn, to has been incorporated, with -pil aek
bI 0B for inthms. n Li-tle Bock.-Tra"de is not up to ex- Bridgeprt. of $200,000, for -mairmuMf orW A
and stea l om s m practically u- petatios, and i considerably short of Cowarts-Timber Land Development- and for making and introdm l a m-
p the bs a sm o orders main- last year's. Collections are slow. It is reported that Charles E. Dniel, W. chinery for said masti J. M.
^ the gsent running of plants. IH. Bunnell, Hayden Evans and George Barrs, B. F. Dillon ad A. W. a,
; jp whi dry guds and nothing New Orlea.-Whil g l trade is Schwar, a of Srantom, Pa, have pur- the incorporator. -
0 t a. sr fIir volume of business, qet retailers Tport activity i : ta pk chased ,000 acres of timber land aad will
i hri rdware and builders' supplies Co ion are good. Crop condition i organic company for its development. G .
^! i1.1 am .~ f a re ai stisfactry. *
oveSr bat ye Faargope-4fmprov. ent ompay. Albany-Machine S -h -pt i& -
y union miners yi .o. Worth.-WhlnssuI e and retail trade Fairbope Improvement Co. has been aeor- li Supply Co., lnc., will ereek

esnt l prt of the 8tAe is enag i improving. Cotton is sti being held Forated with $85,000 capital, by Geqge shop and equip with mseinery, at a e
osmieraMS nsti em in purehasaes eon for better pieces. CdUh-tis am r M. Ba mroft, Frank L Brown, E. R. Gas- of about 0,000.
SIra t f meran-ts in that vicinity ported more active, and from now ton and sciat -- es.a.- a y"
nre muo btslows. mewheta expect a large volume of bil- Geneva-Cotton MlL-It is proposed to Paint Co. is erecting ait aetcaAsy,2
4l i"e4 M:i and jobbers ne organic company for the establishment output 1,000 gallons.
1"" "-l T^ a sJ al mDA I -Farmers throughout this see- of a otto W. Bamtt, D. O. Atlant.-Ice Factory.--Atlrt lea &
Sr of m Smmtay ord tio are reported to be holding eotton for Vaughn, D. L Watson and other are Coal Co. is increasing capaelty of 1;
a ,SNt of mneasnable weather retail higher pric The weather is cooler, but intersted. by the installation of ISI-to fhe
SIn Vii Ollction a good. it % too late to damage growing crops. Huntsville.-Ice Factory. Huntsville machine
b --u h-'Trne in all .lin is quiet, Genra trade is active and olleetio are Ice & Coal Co. is having plans prepared Camill-- lectrie Light Plant r We-
S i ry orders being moderate. gd. by Cowell & Love for addition to ice fac- ter Work.-The city has voted the pr-
I V'e .a afo proemeWnat Wh-Gerlal tire ortie good t ay; apaty will be ialW .- posed issuance of bonds for $7,J3 to buN
-tlle.as s olletioan s are ro h ot-W and collections are satisfactory. Jasper.-Sewerage System.-The city an electric light plant and $11,S00 for om-
i al cole ios aw council has ordered an election to be held structing waterworks system. Address
he is farly active, ad signs of im-
; os- n sA t he lu r Sa November 14 for the purpose of voting The Mayor.
St s umrn Partial i tttepm Ct iiaM $15,000 of bonds to construct anitary Claksville--Eltr Li.t an Water
S- a eA bulletin issued last Tueday by the sewerage system. Address Mayor Cran- lants.-The city will isa bods for the
Scensum bureau gives a summary of the f construction of a system of waterwrk
cI:' reports on ctton ginned in the United Meotgomery-Electric Light Plant, Ice and the erection of an eletric eight plit,
S m .-lk.h. ntinoe. Whil States in the present year to October Factory and Water Works.-D. P. West and probably build one or two miles ef
Sii is favorable to cotton pick- 1 The reports cover inty-six eam- has purchased site at Bibb and Moulton modern streets. J. Hieks i mayor.
i in I fall crop Buems im ties, and show a total of 420986 ra ing Streets on which to erect l~,0-light ele- Cordele-otton-seed Oil MI.L-aeperts
Sp el PPspect. am for my bales a against 2, ruling bales trie light plant, 10-ton ice plant and state that C. C. eer will estMih
rsad 1 vey promising fll trade. ported from the same counties for the wterworks tot-seed oil mill at a cot of $7M
11m1gham.-The iron market is ex- same period last year. The eauties eov- Talladega.-Flor Mill.-Talladega Mill Monroe-Waterworks and Electrie lgh
S4 i ad orders am coming in from every red are in the States of Al~bama, Ar- Manufaeturing Co. is remodeling flour Plant.-T. C. Bliname, city de-
i. At ent No. 2 foundry is kasas, Georgia Lonisi, Miisippi, mills and incrsing capity to 2 states that there i m trt i ts w-
-i d at $11. Missouri, North Carolina, south Carolina, bushels per day. It is stated the company port recently published that eity -te -
ji oery.-With the exception of Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. Georgia contemplates adding 50-barrel Sour mill plated r ntreting water rk a B
r I to modemte Aowers in a few north- makes the largest showing, with M4 emun- next year. trick list pl nt.
a k eonmie the drought of a number of t'es, and 196,744 bales, as against 117,- York-Cotton Gin.-C. B. Hightower, J. Newn-Corn Mill.-T. Barpe,
-ms. continues, in consequence of which 139 bales last year. The number of gin- j. Williams, J. H. Coleman and others whose wte-power mill as rer
: inor mcrop have be ~shortened, but series from which reports were relied have incorporated the York Cotton Gin burnedlast week t a loss of $Aa0 wil
Styiedig satisfaterily. In souther is 2,411, as against W for M A Co with a capital of $3,00. b d m
a- s the gathering of cotton is nearing comparative statement fqr M1S shows
whie about three-fourths of that up to October 18 of that year a to- Rome-Grist Mill.-. J. Locb, of At-
eev- has been gathered and marketed tal of 3,83,627 bales had been gimed. lanta, Ga., is erecting grist mill in East
middle diLtriot. There has be a The total number of counties from which Braidentown-Steamship LUne.-. J. Rome, which will be operated by Wolf
improvement in the yield of ginning w reported in 190 was 812 ad Fogarty, B. W. Fogarty and George Prime Cornwall & Co. Daily capacity will b
In Mt, and rerta now idia the number of ginneries was 2',723 have organized a company to build and 500 bushels of meal


b-`



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___ I I __Mi___-W"" __i_--_- WL_-- i


-ri"11wr --T Ir 71 -7 7 - - - -U-


C. XOGB,. PaIsmmI?.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, Vaca-Paamzwmr


C. H. HODGSHO, 6c, ad T4as' '


DILE=CTOILS C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. McXaehern and J. A. Craford, of Jasaomvije;
SB. F. Ballard, Tampa; C. Coovinton, Penzscola


r


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Caslat ft se T re-Story BAMdlng, 70x200; owe two-story baldlia. 50x390; me O e-stary bwuldi, 80z280,
iarkla tBe largest space of amy Compaay of the Ud the Seth.
*


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Brnches Tampa. Fla.., Pensacola. Fla., and Savannah. Ga.


THwE.WEBKLY 1INU8TUbmAL KSC00D.


I -(


'-


---------------'----~---~--------------- -------------------


c-


-* *-*


1;


CONSOLIDATED GROCERY CO.

PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Pla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, la.,
and Savannah, Ga.


The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
groery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.



Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-

visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given ag orders through the main office and branches.








THE WEEKLY IPDuU*rtIAL RECORD. IS


MaUlel fr am Wek.
Under tis title The Farmer's Call pub-
ids a article at we commend to oa
reade. Mules sw more common in the
Bmrth ta at the North. But there is
eem for many more than are now in use
Many people, who know hatu mules are
vaMble for heavy team work on the
rad, se not to understand that they
will work just as well single, and an be
sead for amy kind of farm work where a
horse is ow used.
Extract from an address by J. B
Thompson, before an Ohio farmer's insti-
"I will undertake to show some of the
advantages that the mule has over the
hoe. To begin with, the average period
of service of the horse, as given by vet-
riary authority, is about ten years, be-
gi sg at the age of three, and although
so horses last considerably longer than
this there are quite as many that fail
dbre completing their thirteenth year.
The average period of service of the mule
is nearly or quite twenty-five years. He
sometimes begins to fail at twenty yeas
oM, and in other cases remains as good as
ever until early thirty. Few of his race
are worth much after that age. One mule
then, in his lifetime, will ordinarily do
the work of mre than two horses, at an
expense eeah year from 25 to 30 per cent
less in keeping.
Another important consideration is that
the mule thrives best on dry feed and
grain unground. The reverse suits the
hose best, as his feed should be all chop-
ped or ground. His diet should be light
anad moist, and corn is unquestionably in-
jurious to him, especially when he has to
bte it from the cob; but orn is the
mude's favorite food-it never appears to
have any ill effects upon his system, and
nothing is better adapted to his needs
thn dry hay, if it is good and sweet.
This is an item of some consequence.
Wham the saving of the miller's toll-
never less than that of the horse-this
ad labor of going to mill are all reek-
oned up, it will make the aggCegate differ-
emes between the horse's keeping and that
of the mule seldom less than 40 per cent.
The cost of wintering a mule is computed
to be ten dollars less than that of a
hoe. This great saving in feed, taken
in connection with his readiness to labor,
his comparative freedom from disease, and
the number of years he will work, makes
the calculation largely in favor of the
mule s a trusty and valuable servant.
"Not only is the mule much better adapt-
ed than the horse to the performance of
the labor of the farm, but he does better
in drawing heavily loaded wagons on the
road, and is especially preferable for the
movement of machinery, as his movement
is much steadier than that of the horse.
The mule is also much less susceptible to
disease, and when he does fall ill, the
trouble is said to yield much more readily
to treatment than with the horse. An-
tr and no less important fact is, he is
meh less liable to bone ailments, such as
ringbone, spavin, splint, surb, etc., his
eyes are unquestionably stronger than
the horse's eyes; mules very seldom lose
an eye, except by accident.
In purchasing a mule the buyer will
hardly expect to find a blemish, and if
he should he will not hesitate to purchase,
as he would were he buying a horse with
the same kind of blemish. Again, the
mdle is convertible into cash at any time
frm birth to old age, and a dead mule is
se a rare thing that the question arises
-what Ibome of all the old mules?"


H. IOBINSON.Preo. H. OAILtARD. Cakiser
W. B. OWEN, Viae-Pres.
Commercial Bank,
State Depository.
BuA~sca: Ocal. Pa.. Lake la. Fla
JuMl-ks ille, - f- -Fli


THE CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00


BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Sprit Barrels ld ad wd ps the sll
ereust Amerin ad mBUOpe impsctiol


Plants at MEIGS CAIRO, OUrrMAN, GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address orders to home office,
QUITMAN, GA.


Mle IaNs MB et.
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN.






ENGINES. BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilier, Oil and Ice Ma-
chinery, and Supplies ad Repairs.
CAPACITY FOR 300 HANDS.
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hangers, Iather anm
Rubber Belting and Hoe, Railroad ad
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps, Feed Water Heater and
Hoisting Engines.
AUGUSTA. GA.


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSOWNLLE
JACKSONVILLE. PLA.
CAPITAL S300,000 SURPLUS and UNIWVIDUE PROrlTS $30000
we isme Time Certifcates of Deposlt, whieh draw Wterest at the Irte fa tree S p st .
asuin. f heM ninety days or longer, Take ra fte rlths n let y"er smrrs r
saetarag r yeo. Particular attention pa to Out-of-Town aecomts, smai d~eos

NUBIAN TEA Fr the Liver m.. KMney

BENEDICTA A .medle fr wfom
CUBAN RELIEF r u crsam" .md D

CUBAN OIL A nisent e.uad fr Cat, -n.
Brnriss and RheMMlttlna.
A supply of these medicines is what every family needs to
insure good health.
Write for prices and booklets.

Spencer Medicine Company,
Chattmnega, Tomes.e.


B. R. rOWnrL.. CZAS. ARwaS. MEAMr ASMlET.
Presdest. Vlce-Presdest am Treaurr. Secret7.
DIREcroRS:
s. X. frwel, Chas. 6. Narrfs, D. N. AMcllMs P. L. Stheirs. Jnde . Coeargto.

THE


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Cwmar of West Bay ma MIsaau St.
Jacksonville, Florida.


Wholesale Drugs I Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices as
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and an save yao
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.



THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. FIA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, ia-
eluding new electric elevator and or
own electric light plant.
o ft HH. N. O'NEAL. Prop.



East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.-

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipmeats a Speiacty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


W. T. RILEY,
Presidet.


J. P. OA*MBU.l,
- F 0 % 40ALA, FLA.


J. A. 6. CARSON,
VIce-Presdert.


GEo. J. SCOVEt,
Sec. andljreas.


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Factories,
8th Street R. R. Crossing.


JACKSONVILLE.


FLORIDA


T=E RUCOM TMI OUTWS GREAT TRAME JOURAL.









C4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
I 1 I; I I


I~ is--i-M a Ctt Caslthiv is

In !i Brtti Woods addrme before
the NIw If Ottoa Mianufaetures'
Alaidtion, Mr. Beay G. KHitedg pro-
at some interesting opioM on the
sject of cotton production.


Mr. Kittredge is oe of the foremost an-
thoritis oa eottoa in its broader sense.
He is aa ecoisit of reeognied ability
and his imlion on the subject are
worthy of attention. Some of them,
bhweer, are less well founded than others.
o ma will argne that the South should
plant only cotton; on the other hand,
e em thoroughly familiar with the agri-
eacbe o the South will counted that
aott is not the most desirable crop for
this set when the staple commands a
fair prie.
*MLa it Bheo a satisfactorily prof-
itMd product to the planter," says Mr.
Kittega, "at six to eight cents per pound
thm is me telling how far the demand and
livation will be carried." Cotton will
never become a satisfactorily profitable
predt to the planter at les tha eight
eaIt per pound. Only those who were
gam of the condition of the agri-
enlteal Soth during the reign of cheap
eettm ea appreciate what six cent cot-
ton ms to t he producer. Only a sec-
ti sa bl Meed in natural resources, as
Mr. Kitedge says the South is, could
ae -rvived aeh a trial as that. A
poeea of swapping dollars wherein the
nte borrowed in spring to be enabled
to ive though the summer and repaid
ts bla in the winter with the entire
peSmeds of is year's labor and invest-
m t was necessitated by cheap cotton.
Thre was no increment of gain under
i procedure, and, bad not cotton en-
hased in value point by point, its culti-
vation wold have been largely abandoned
as it was to some extent, or the South
wved to-day be bankrupt.
In am other pursuit of which we have
knowledge is the producer so dammed by
bth ammuctmer and comumer a is the
eatto later. Dollar wheat in the Mid-
di West was a subject for congratulation
to the tire country. Yet the consumer
am manufacturer set up no howl at the
it a- price of Sour. The increase
wn, of course, felt, as it affected the
eati people of the civilied world where
sow is eate.
oto is not quite so necessary to man-
kind a bread, yet the temporary enrich-
moot of the grower has caused dire
threats to be made by w tu-tmrers and
em-r the Secretary of Agriculture
and the honorable United States Consul
to Chemisette, or some other foreign
pont. The inference of Mr. Kittredge's
statement, and the attitude of the man-
hFders seems to be that for a differ-
em of two ents the pound, which will
work ot on the majority of cotton goods
-a than haf a cent the yard, the peoples
of the world, eivilied and the reverse,
will uit wearing cotton clothes. With
this aditioual cot cotton is still the
heeapest clothing available, and it is
ahead to intimate that for a differeee of
eme-half ent the yard people addicted
to wearing clothes will quit the habit.
Cotton is not indigenous to the South.
Fer tat matter neither is the Caucas-
in, yet here the oe has reached it high-
t development and the other has at-
tained at least as notable point as his
enlthe anywhere else. The South has
adopted ettoa and will grow t if the
price be suicient. Successful competition


eammot come within fifty year. There-
fore, the question before the trade re-
solves itself into this: Cannot the price
of goods be forced to a point commensu-
rtae with the increased cost of raw mate-
rial? The bears would undermine the
foundation to erect the superstructure.
They begin at the wrong end and ar just
bull-headed, paradoxical as it may seem,
to believe their efforts will succeed. At
ten cents the South will supply the world
with cotton for seventy-ve years to
come. The question of labor supply, the
improvement of methods of cultivation,
the increase in yield per acre necessary
will all be solved and brought about if
the price remain at a profitable point.
The Southeast is really the backbone of
the cotton crop, notwithstanding the pop-
ular belief to the contrary. It is the con-
stant factor that is the reliance of the
spinner. Texas may account for the
surplus or the deficit that appears yearly,
but the Southeast prevents the famine.
This will be more marked in the future,
and the production of the Southeast will
increase very rapidly. Texas and the
territories were peopled by experienced
cotton growers from the abandoned farms
of the Southeast. The decreasing price
of cotton led to the abandonment of this
area. This drain upon our population has
almost stopped and ten-cent cotton and
the boll-weevil in Texas will stop it en-
tirely. The Southeast is coming to know
more about the production of the staple.
Our farmers are learning more about com-
mercial fertilizers and their proper ap-
plication. The yield per acre will show
a decided increase in future. The esti-
mated weight of the cotton crop this year
divided by the estimated 32,000,000 acres
planted will not show an imreme, but
there are not 32,000,000 acres in cultiva-
tion in cotton. The acreage figures upon
which the entire trade depends have never
been even approximately correct. It is
guesswork, pure and simple.
The South at one time was called a one-
crop section. The agricultural world
pointed a derisive finger at her. She di-
versified her crops and the world then
howled for more cotton. Now it has come
to pass that in the cotton crop alone there
is more of diversification than most see-
tions can boast The cotton crop is really
two crops, staple and seed. In the proper
utilization of the seed lies the future of
the cotton crop. Seed prodnets returned
to the soil either direct or through the
medium of cattle, will increase the yield
per acre, and the life supporting property
of the land.
Given a fair price for cotton-and ten
cents is an equitable one from every stand-
point under normal conditions, and the
South will fill up with a suffiient supply
of labor. The condition of the planter will
improve and he will improve his farm.-
Cotton.
Cottoa Iamu e Proble
The Memphis, Tenn, Insurance Ex-
change has sent a circular letter to the
Western Union Insurance companies, ask-
ing them to stand by it in the contro-
versy over the use of the "per bale" form
in writing compress cotton.
The Southeastern Tariff Association is
seeking to force the use of this form.
The question was referred to the Govern-
ing Committee, which finally decided to
put the whole question over to the an-
nual meeting of the union. The Mem-
phis Exchange holds that it would be poor
underwriting and destructive to its cot-
ton business if the change should be made.
-Cotton.


| J. S. Schofeld's Sons Co npay,
;*too$.#$$seae.e 9o060o6o0o.-oesoeeoO s O O


: Distiller's Pumpingl
I Outfit
SNo plant complete without am
0 Hundreds of them in aie,








l oAdvise your wants.
8aten W r for .-
0 1s san prices. W aL -Gesra. f





^^C A RMa dl ^f inry,
Sus well sarry a full and ana te






*** ************ *********



. I-f IllI1 II I I IlllI IIIIII ll l 11i 111111111111111111
W. W. ARE Pre. W C THOMAS. Magw. C. T DUDLT. S. A


STarpa Hardware Co.

- Wholesale

: Har dware



- Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks

^- and Pullers on Hand.

STAMPA, .FLORIDA.

"IlI t111 l11111111I11 41 ill11111111111I I lIIII



... NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH. GA., U. 5. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
rregeen,.


J. P. WILJJAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. D6 COVINTON.
Vice-president.


0.a. ZXuS.
P. LI SUTHERLAND.
J I PAOEUTy.
J. IL YOUNG.


EL U KAYT1ON,
-wsad Y "AT.re


Ba BULLARD
W. C. POWELL
WALTUR BAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. Ia CHmuimU
G. W. DIx,
RAYMONDCAY.
J. L. GOLE.T.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and ae
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE ErIIER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.





W. R. THOMAS

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggies.


IVYOU 3WD VIED IT IN T11 MOM Wit=K V&











THE WEEKLY INyDUbIrrbAL RBEOOD. 5 5


New oglem m Iilmsirat to the Sbeth.
New nglan buying its coal in Vir-
gini ad Maryland, its iron in Alabama,
Virginia and Peailylaia, much of its
imer in the far South, all of its cotto
i the South except a few thousand bales
i Egypt, and its foodstuffs in the West,
has developed an industrial life and a gen-
ral wealth which should be a tremendous
immiration to the South. With an areas
o. only 8,000 square miles and a popu-
jatio of a5,6,O0 against an area of
87A0 square miles and a population of
esm,00 in the South, New England on
its barren, rock-bound soil has created
inetrial interests producing nearly $,-
S00408041 a year, against Ian400000,A0M
a year for the entire South. Massachu-
sett alone, with an area of only 8,00
uear miles, or nearly one-fourth the
sem of South Carolina, one of the small-
est Sutbern States, has an industrial de-
velopmeat which until a few years ago
equalled that a t entire South, and
even to-day, with all the advance which
the South has made in eatton-mil inter-
aets, Massachusetts has still more cotton
saddle than the 14 Southern states.
Thme facts are not presented as a crit-
iesm of the South, for conditions which
hae prevailed in the past were mainly
rsapoible for the baekwardea of the
Smbuh' iminstrial life aa compared with
- that of New England and the Middle
States, bt they are given as a Sugges-
tim to the South of the illimitable po-
adities of the future. With more iron
thea an Erope possesses, with one-half
of the standing timber of the United
States, with coal estimated at forty times
a much an Great Britain ever had before
It mined a single ton, with 80 per cent.
of the word's cotton production, with
.. etiemlly unlimited stores of oil, with
a frtlle soil, capable of yielding almost
ry ariet of agricultural products, and
Vi a U *m rainfall, the South holds
ioimlile for W--nf-' g se h as
have bea vouchsafed by nature to o
eher country on earth
Pennsylvania has developed its enr-
mom wealth out of its coal and iron and
-el interests; New ngland laid the fom-
Batuo for much of its vast wealth in the
maCeture of cotton goods, and Great
ritsin has s related its wealth on coal and
pad turang our cotton into finished
Sjra s Th Northwest grew rich on
S i The South ombie d the
-rth a me of all countries in the world
ha. th* eomnation-all raw material
peasessed ia part only by all these see-
at.'. ft has possibities for industrial
dv~te -mmm sum as no other section or
otlr emutry ea duplicat Even if
New n l had had great natural re-
sourees, wht it, as one of the leaders in
Ainimn indtrial &.4.--t, has been
able to acomplis should be an inspira-
tio to the South, but what New England
hans ampbihed without having natural
semas should be a still greater inspi-
ration to the South. In order that by
the story of what other sections have done
the South may gam a new coneeption of
its own limited pen abilities and may
ese to lean tha the field for its devel
ement is broader and more inviting tha
that of any other country on earth, the
Manufaetuers' Beeord begins in thi
weeks issue a series of letters dealing witi
the material building of New England
The general aim of these letters will Ib
to eovr broadly the material advance
mant of New England as an inspiration
to the Sonth-Manufaturers' Reord.


Spners cure Big aRm I TYanm
A meeting of the hard yar spinners of
the South was held at Charlotte, N. C,
last Tuesday afternoon. Nearly five hun-
dred thousand spindles were represented.
The object of the meeting wa to review
the state of trade conditions since the
organization meeting, September 27.
The greater part of the time of the
meeting was consumed in a discussion of
the report of the advisory committee, em-
bracing a number of repommnu&A^iona
looking to further promoting the inter-
ests of the spinners. It was pointed out
that substantial advances in prices had
already been secured through the coope-
ration of the spinners, who were urged
to stand by the organmation and ssint
in bringing about further reforms and
improvements.
Mr. J. P. Wilson, of the Louise Mills,
Charlotte, resigned as a member of the
adieMry committee, and Mr. Charles Ice-
man, of McColl, S. C, was elected to
succeed him.
Price of hard yarns have increased
from 2 1-2 to 3 cents a pound since the
original meeting held in this city on Sep-
tember 27 and without exception every
spinner was disposed to give credit to
that conference and the action taken for
the stimulus. Several spinners did not
hesitate to say that they had made good
sale in accordance with the new sched-
ules, and all agreed that the trade was
recovering from its recent state of demor-
alisatio.
The spinners finally approved the pres-
ent and original plan, that of a permanent
advisory committee, to meet weekly, study
market conditions, and fix the schedule of
prices for Southern mills. It in expected
within a few months that every mill in
the Southern States will be in the asso-
ciation and bound by its iron-clad agree-
ment of reformed prices.
An official statement issued by the ad-
visory board tonight says that the re-
port of the board to the meeting was re-
ceived with much interest, and the report,
together with the corse prsued by the
Board in its several weekly meetings,
was unanimously indorsed and approved.
The statement then continues:
"The general situation was thoroughly
reviewed, and evidence conclusive preent-
ed showing that the cooperation during
the past several weeks by the hard yarn
spinners has resulted in stimulation of for-
merly demoralized conditions of the hard,
or weaving, yarn business, not only in
the Southern States, but in the New Eng-
land States as well
The schedule of pries issued on the
18th inst, beginning with 4-2 ply at 16
l-2c. and running to 40-2 ply at 28c was
reaffirmed.


C. G. Memminger, of Lakeland, general
manager for the Domini Phosphate
Company, hai just raetrd from a sum-
men spent in the mountains of North Car-
oliolina, recuperating at the resorts for
which that State is famous.
Mr. Memminger says that his company
will at one begin the election of a phos-
phate plant at Mulberry which, when
completed, will be the largest d most
extensive in the world. The plant will
have all the latest and newest devices for
mining phosphate, the most expensive and
improved machinery in all departments,
including its own electrical equipment.
The buildings and grounds will be ilum-
hed from this plant. The ofies will be
on an elaborate scale and there will be a
large crops of clerical help.


>---------------------------------------



For Sale


S .y1 rE IAA110 ,-IIg Ae, (SJ0 amose
this round) 19% crops. Now being worked. Complete outft. We
S will make immediate delivery, or price for delivery after pret
crop taken off. This is one of the best propositions in the state.
SO~ Agaees Round Timber, Volusia County. Will make
special price for sale before November 1st.



Brobston, Fendig & Co.

Jadcsv., eid. rmawi, Qr"i#.

| e vew ,w: *..........


A.s.rENmCLES,
Presieant.


W. L Jeeeas.
We Pres.


JA& LAS@UT. W. W. SUWLUS
flowMea06mr. AW.LTremr


VAhe W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


WholesBae Grocers

402 104 4Cs IC EaMst y Stret. k 15sonm. .r


D. 11. SUAV


sr. AW A. & CNELETO
T"&S. W*UU W. I. MOM
U&. MAE. PER 1,111m


Wa. %


I~~"'4=U~-& - - - - -'''


SJ. A. Crai rb,&Bro.


239 W. Bsy Stret


EVERETT BOCL.


; laders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-

ing and Up-to-Date Furnislains.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.





The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE ILrETA


HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints. Oils and Ghlas
Stoves.. Tinware, Country-Holloware.


e WMET MAY BTU.ENT


Jacksonvile. l ra.


---------------------------------
Cable Address. Florlda


SStandard Naval Stores

Company.

DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN


ROSIN

AND TURPENTIN E.

JacKsonville. Fla.
- -- -- - -


mum wmm -U MENTION TH 3OWD.










* THE MW VrKY 1lN'utmIrAL 29ECO0D.


Amnag the Nom the Tais
Mr. F. M. Plank, manager of salesmen
for the Spencer Medicine Co., of Chatta-
noogn, Tenn., was in the city last Tues-
day, accompanied by Mr. W. A. W. Carden,
abo representing the Spencer people. They
will remain in the city several days and
tour the State in the interest of their
well know afm.

Mr. D. C. Strieklin, one of the leading
operators from the Green Cove Springs sec-
tion, was in the city Monday.
D. II Edwards has sold his extensive
turpentine farm at Lawtey to J. H. Bos-
tict and W. F. Godwin, well known tur-
-pentine operators of Milltown, Ga. Capt.
Edwards retains his mercantile interests
at Lawtey and will continue to make his
Sbone there, for the present, at least. Bos-
tick & Godwin are experienced and sue-
cessful turpentine operators, and will
prove themselves a valuable acquisition
to the business interests of the county.
Mr. Godwin will manage the firm's af-
fairs at Iawtey.

SMily tracts of woods have been swept
by fire in South Georgia, the grass and
undergrowth being in such condition that
it readily feeds fires when once started.
No precautions having been taken on tur-
pentine farms, many fine trees have been
ruined, one farm near Albany having had
1,00 boxes burned. The large sawmill
ef K. L Moore, at Boulan, twenty miles
west of Albany is reported completely
- destroyed, together with much lumber, all
insured.

The Powell-MeILan Company, capital-
'ised at $550,000, naval stores manufactu-
rers and wholesale grocers, has entered
the business arena, with large storerooms
ad general offices in Perry, F. They
are receiving a large merchandise stock
to do a jobbing business, opening large
.turpentine plants at Hampton Springs
-and Boyd, and will work several hundred


John H. Powell and John McLan, pres-
ident and vie-prsident, are the wealthi-
steea en in that section They ae at the
head of four banks, several turpentine
plants, sawmills and a railroad in south-
n Georgia. The firm wil expend thous-
ands of dollars and be a great stimulus to
the upbuilding of Taylor County.


Flynn, Colson & Co. have bought the
interest of W. Taylor & Co., naval
stores operators at Stephenville. They are
large owners of timber lands in Taylor
County, and are continuously buying.
Perry M. Colson, the general land buyer,
always meets with a hearty welcome, as
he usually turns loose good sums of money
and makes business on the go.
Malloy Bros. are opening a new turpen-
tine place at Boyd, Fla, on the Georgia
Southern Railway.

It is reported that Mr. John E. Fender,
of Valdosta, Ga, will soon open a large
turpentine place near Perry, Ia.

Last Tuesday night a shooting affair oc-
curred at the turpentine camp of Drew
& Conoley, Oviedo, Fla. One negro was
killed and another seriously wounded.

Mr. D. G. Crenshaw, of Meneola, Fla,
was here Thursday.

Mr. A. Morgan, one of the leading
turpentine operators of Benton, Fla., was
a visitor to the city Thursday.

Phosphate Motea.
A large plant is to be established at
Inglis, Fla., for the manufacture of sup-
er-phosphate, the first unit to provide for
the annual production of about 40,000
tons. The product is to grade from 14
per cent to 18 per cent available as may
be required by the market. Additional
plants will be erected later on as demands
warrant. The plant will be built by the
Barker Chemical Co, which has been in-
corporated, with a capital stock of $00,-
c)0, by Messrs. John W. Auehineloss, Hugh
D. Auchineloss and Stephen Barker, of
.New York. The company can be address-
ed at Inglis or care of Messrs. Auchin-
closs Bros., 22 William Street, New York
City. Contract for building the plant has
been signed with Peter 8. Gilebrist, of
Charlotte, N. C.


KIRK & JONES;

DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.


MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


C. IL BARNES, Prem J. 9. SHAW, Vie9-Pme. RMLPH JESIP. Ss.*Was

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Resins
Strictly a Predmcers' Cmpawmy. GAges,
Grades and Welgbts Garanteed.
Deliveries at Jaeksenvlte. Pensaeala, Fermmh and Sawm-ia
CorrespeeaA ne SoActed. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ... II* ** ****I* ********A*^^


Eass wmmU. Pros.


T. IL MCARTu,Y. ViesPrs.


MMEUW14 WO Tem.


SOUTHERN STATES LAID & TIMBER COIPAIY.


1VIrs N. WISSLC. MinMr.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


: 401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSON VULE Fl.


I ) I I I I I I II II II ##too W9 1111IN@ V I I I I I I I I -----' '''
'uu tef olu ems uu-----------
U sa~)lon a mua menasma a mu usi mmmm sg muumu ammas


W.H M CKWIT .


W. B. HENDEBSON.


G. C. WAuDIL


BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.


LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE AID MILL LAS.


: TAMPA,


Rooms 1.2-3, First Natioal Bank B adlng.
S = ? = FLORID.


'V w W 'W -W mv W 1W W -W W W -w -W 1W W W W W W Wq


The West-Raley-Rannie Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksoxvile, Fla.
A. N. WESr. rw -. s. -t., c wre.. a. Raale, Vce-Pres. H. Vr. Aec. K a f.ress.

-We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
t Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.



CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS,

AND VATS.

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
"t. ("l DA. VIS d" "1VON, PMLLrTxI VPLI.


B'TTELINI'S SPECIAJLT Y. .
I wo n by "eW0, peaM. to 11111 -ft.
Four rn quarts Lnniol Comrty. uannybrook Re or me-a Ha s .a m .
Snse Bottles U..
I wllm Mod our lrn quarts ol Seor Cor MeIwood Re, Goa W.-l
dn Rye, Holland Gin, Tm OGn. Peach Brandy Peach sa 3Md n
Whl.e, OGin and Manhatan C, --kte -%a t the amo sr........ aU
One bottle of any fo te bore ....................... ......................
Pour bottles of the so own Calernfa Wlams: Shm r. PaC. Ma.m
Catawba .................. -. aU

anl% e .......b..... ............
PFte bottles DusYs Malt
Ble good of an knda. feplal Prices on apspleatis. An MWaB ht
alquors n Juls from LUS to IL tf. o. b. JackanvUa.
F. BETTELINI W Bay St, pp. Unie Depot, Jacksmvl e, Fl


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EIAR .
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotation--
thispaper.
KINUAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, LA.


AMK YOU a FD I3 TO I= ZWo=


eamnuasa. unguo 'uu w-----u--------------.


'W v- v- v v v -v v w '- v MP-
10WI D. BAKE. PreI C V. BArmESON. Va.s rAXE BAKER P. .
) (C. a. ram.in CCa)GC...C Ci.l s&T a

FLORIDA FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY
) aa c. Yo aur aI
SWe can collect your Feght Claims agllast
S Railroads awd Steamisip Compaies.
) CAurgcs Rcawsnabr. Yor Memabersap Salete. 4
We ame yea a or"r rre. erl y al rJ s .a ,S
I 216 DyaVpurch B. JACrtSONVILt. CoA.l
S216. Dyl-Vaickurds bldg. JACIKSONVIKAX .fL~


-


-










THE WEEKLY 1MnuurriJAL RECORD.


am-ir -kapmt Ordea
Aeording to the Rairad Gamtte, the
foawng orders for leoeootives and ears
have been placed:
Detroit United Railway is having me
himetiv bilt at the Rogers IOOmem-
tiv Works.
Mexian Coal & Coke is having cem lo-
omotive built at the Baldwin Loeomo-
tire Works.
New York Cetral is in the market for
locomotive. The number is reported to
be 25
St. Paul expects to build omni pas nger
locomotives at its West Milwaukee abops.
Pemnylvani Lines west are reported
to have placed order for 25 locomotives to
be built at the Altoona shops.
S Toledo, St. Louis & W tern has or-
dred tea locomotives from the Amerian
Locomotive Co.
American Car & Foundry Co. ha mis-
eolameous elder for sevea era.
San Pedro, Los Ageles & Salt lake
is it tl market for some pssegr ears.
Te swift Refrigerator Tranportatin
Co. h asking bids n 200 stock cra.-
Wheeling & ake Erie has ordered 1,000
coal ears ad the Rodger Ballast Car Co
ha dered ar from m the Amerleas
Chr and fondry Co.
* The German-American Cr Co. has or-
ed 41,6 refrigerator ears from the
Standard Steel (r Co.
cinenati, ilt- ona & Dayton will
plae an order for some new passenger
eqplbeut during the winter for next
spring and a 10 me.
Ceoimati Traetio as ordered 50 emi-
eonartile ers fro the Cineimti (ar
Central of Georgia has ordered 500 vm-
tilated box ears of OO,0 lbs. capacity
frem Haskell & Barker.
- - - - - - - -


Nre Lumaer Cmpany.
Jacksonville is to be the headquarters
of a new lumber company just as soon as
letters patent can be secured from the
Governor. The new corporation will be
known as the Strieklad Lumber Com-
pay, and is principal place of bmine
is to be Jaksonville.
The incorporators are C. Strikland.
Frank Roberts and J. W. West, of Val-
dosta, G., J. Harris, of Jacksonville,
and W. J. Kelly, of Savannah, Ga.
The general nature of the business to be
transacted by the company will be that of
manufacturing, mining, buying, selling
and dealing in lumber and building mate-
rial, naval stores, phosphate and fertili-
ers, the buying, ein, rating leasing,
using and operating sawmills, plants,
tramrods, machinery and supplies, tim-
ber, minerals and lands of every descrip-
tion, buying, selling and trading in mer-
chandise, raising, buying, selling and deal-
ing in any or all see property or busi-
nesses on commission or otherwise, as
agents or brokers for others, etc.
The capital stock of the company will
be $100,00, divided into one thousand
shares of $100 each. The highest amount
of indebtedne or liability to which the
corporation can at any time subject itself
is 2so,000o. It is provided in the articles
of incorporation that the company shall
exist for ninety-nine years.
The temporary ffbeers of the company
wil be Colquitt Strickland, of Valdosta,
president and treasurer; Frak Roberts,
of Valdosta, vice-president; and W. J.
Kelly, of Savannah, secretary. The di-
rectos will be the incorporators until the
new board of directors shall be elected at
a meeting to be held on the second Mon-
day in January, 1906.


50---BREEDING CATTLE-.50


On Tuesday, Nov. 1. 1904
At 9 o'clock A. M.
We will hold our Third Great Sale of Shorthmon t aW
and Heifers-the kind that give bone, sise and big, flat beri-
when crossed on native cattle. Besides their premier qpalitiea
as beef cattle, they are also great milkers. Good milk raike
fat calves.
At the same time we will offer some choice registered Here-
fords, so that the friends of the "white faces" can get what
they want.
TERMS OF SALE:
Half cash, balance in six months, with interest at 8 per cent
per annum. It is no longer an experiment to buy registered
bulls for use in Florida. Of the 200 odd we have sold from North
Carolina to the Everglades, not one has died from disease.
Write us for letters received from our customers. Reamast
ber the hour. Be on time.
Railroad rates from all points to Ocala reduced to one cent
per mile, good from October 81 to November 6.


Z. C. Chambliss & C., Prep. Palmti Park Stk Fie,


0c iaf. Florlda.


For Prfmpt Delivery Sid Us Ymr ChMissry aek


D. M. FLYNN, Preddent W. B. JOHNSON, Vie-President A. 8. PENDLETON, Sea'y & Tmes
DIRECTORS
D. M. Flynn Walter Ray J. W. Oglesby L. Horn N. G. Wade J. L. Medlin W. B. Johnmo






Independent Naval Stores & Export Co.,


.. Jacksonville, Florida.




Naval Stores Factors and Operators.


Capital Stock, $5oo,ooo.

The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal advances made on consignments.
Our interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operative company.



Some Money and Some Timber For Somebody.


Al Producers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.


T=E zm Al T1OPPR&TOTPrW flu? XME! w


a


V


SI;






I





* I







p


'pr


r ~ ~~_i----~L-----~1-


!


q~sI









-~8 YPRI1 WmLnT llbiN At naoInt. -


Real Late Mm frm Orposm
Florida Be Estate and Immnigrtion
Association is the name of an organization
that was perfected in this city last Tues-
day by the real estate dealers and real
estate agents of Florida in convention as-


11r &s wa The rel te te e "of mesembled.
a. R.ay S .reL The real satet men of aFlorida met


mea 3sstmwaat ail Vur
seen&. Osai 4aO al0. usafl.*
am SteuL


ALYT 1 ITIIx,
Commission Merchants.
Naval Stores & Cotton
ULAM tsnsse ndspt d, -
-I-um *-d m, ,,,- *


WHmn WRITING ADVERTISERS
31TIUI T=K BCOn&
CYPRESS WATER TANKS
ea in the Wod.
For divadprd i write,



S. Jebmli. Abstracer.
o--saBM re Ma ge cmty ul1w,.
4p amleft lame books, ttles perfect.
liM mrdon4rsiideat property owners In
,\ ifef Goenty.
an negotaia for o-rsBdeatB oau aepoved
Usi with ltf-aeded security plyag iateae
t 1o per cent er a rman, seaml-emnuiy.
emdacesoldted.


M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores
CtimiIdssion Merchants.
riSEna TiAN U mH,
i sto, t rIst, s A


Trade Checks
FOR THE

c lmOIINUIR88IE .
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
mantifactures more of them
than all the printing and office
umpply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the
'WuIttAl lW 60 .,


here last Monday, pursuant to a call is-
sued by W. C. Battey, of Fort Myers, Lee
County, Fla., and there was considerable
discussion in regard to the formation of
the proposed association.
All present were impressed with the idea
that it would be greatly to the benefit of
the real estate men of the State to form
an association and work harmoniously for
the upbnilding of the State. It was point-
ed out that with the members of the as-
sociation in all parts of the State, an
agent in one place would know exactly
to whom to send a prospective customer
who preferred a particular part of the
State.
At the meeting Tuesday morning Cp-
tain C. E. Garner, president of the Jack-
sonville Board of Trade, presided, aad
Mr. Chrles Davies acted as secretary.
After some discussion, the plan of or-
ganiation was agreed to, and the Flor-
ida Real Estate and Immigration Asocia-
tion was formally organized, and the fol-
lowing officers were elected:
President, W. C. Battey, of Fort Myers,
Lee County.
Vice-president, Telfair Stockton, of
Jacksonville.
Secretary and treasurer, Carles D-
vies, of Jacksonville.
Executive oCmmittee, W. C. Battey, Tel-
fair Stockton, Edwin Brobston, Courtland
Buckman, and eleven more to be appointed
by the president.
The object of the asoeiation is to pro-
mote immigration and advertise the State
as a whole. The association will oop-
erate with the National Real Estate As-
sociation, which has headquarters at Des
Moines, Iowa.
The headquarters of the association will
be in Jacksonville, but the object is to
secure members from all parts of the
State. All real estate dealers and agents
in Florida who are recommended by the
banks of their respective communities,
are eligible, and will be admitted to mem-
bership when passed upon by the exam-
tive committee.
A constitution and by-laws will be
adopted as soon as the committee an
draw up the same and submit them to the
members. The asbeiation wante repre-
sentative in every county in the State,
and a cordial invitation is extended to
every real estate dealer in FIMida to com-
municate with the secretary in regard to
becoming members of the association.
It is the intention to incorporate the
association as soon as the same can be
done according to law.
The men who have gone into the organ-
ization are a guarantee of the success of
the Florida Real Estate and Immigration
Association.

The Pensacola Investment Company has
made o he h largest purchases of farm-
ing lands closed in Pensaola in years.
The purchase includes 15,000 acre of
fine farm lands lying northwest of Pen-
Bacola, the purchase price being S75,000.
The company has also purchased from the
Penseola City Company 250 acres of land
lying in the eastern section of the ity,
along the eastern shore.


'Business Directory.
"at INSUDANCK--lWa mte=. I'-
m- GQr & 0o, a nd 10 Pmk BMg.
Jasmimvl r1k.


Standard Clothing Company


One rice One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND PURNISHlfES,
87 ind 9 West Ba Street -eelisi to In l Orls
Sstete and wa, reHa,. Special AtmU, vey fr a Ro Orin.


************* e


I. TOLAR,


4L O. HART. T. L. ULACHLY.
I~C*mihtlmat UmLI~A


ILa TOLA, III


160 FR-ONT -S Afi--- NtaWY6A.


Commission Merchantt
and Jobbers of Navel Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Member of N*r
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton PFutma.


IbsZrP D. WEIM.


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVAMNAN. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.


.W. D. K116"


MAKE A SPECIALTY OF'

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Batting, Etl


Read the Record Advt'&


H. D. WEED.


-03 W W VS.VE LABIG N 2! PaPE ?


MEIRRILL-STEVENS CO.

Boilermaking and Repairing
W Still Boilers and Pnmps.
SHIP BUILDING end REPAIRING.
Jacksonvill. Fla.
* |0 |001|100808 18 00|1010 O 8 I I I g l 8 I t all I l iO0000,0@
---- *********imm f '

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and BlW-kmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brlok, Paati
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla


Cummer Lumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES and CRATES.

.*Oo. ...o....eo..Oeoe..O...0.**,B.i.o.*.... o.. .


a smewass-asassesses a


i
r


I-,









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


ZINC NAILS

TurpeIAUne Cups
w by Dr. Herty. Made of a
l5J ilt soft light metal. They are
o0 SMFSam which will not injure
s wha left in the trees.

afrpe ar. ass mw rw &, a. r.
A4ao N r~tIrg for Galvanised aad
Ted Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
irr ods, Et., Slatng and Rooing
a0s, fatrs Tools, 0Coppr Nail and



Typewriters
O A k ,--SlO.OO Up.

GRIVOT '"
o WMwamater. OfreRt writes in sight.
Jhe JLWlrrr. inr of nimble -ia m
i 5 S Sae6 d a- Amy -Me of Typewrmer.




fob.
MAU R ACTURER O






Capeoe of Yard 800,000 Per MY i.

uIl. Ul.

Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies :-
*1
N_. C~sobtei Blum's Monogram and Syl
vm Rye-Ageat for Jun, Cinain-
satl ad Pabst Milwaakee Bee.
Priocs on application.
CHIAS. BLUM & CO.
971 -M Sf9 West DBy Stret,
JACKSONVILLf, FLA.

THE

Bethuine

Apparatus.

The New Process.
krg o I"we a srte 1e o am weN th
S 201 ROOM 401t &libeal sbee tha
t yer wmar w te s1 i t tMr t
-o eer o ta aer ee te No *cb ri
no" fs relalda the 1i-. NeeI s to be
drri only me aftobr omi m rOe-k
Streable wi M-preaots.C- tie 6
ri*6 sam' Urn wes OCti eme gr a
f saute ea dheem amn that toe wheet L

3set ofas t inten by Uo-w ae
we ask aop me amms welm to
We aI.amsagme 61murbmm or pt
quw of *temt. Weaates a" eut
aNe 4qu~i.
Tk afts a1f CadCnr Cu Ni
P. CL am 64 MA TA M X Q


Now Corporaetbs.
A movement is reported to be under
way to establish a bank at Pineville, N. C.,
with $20,000 capital.
The Bank of Fayette has begun business
at Fayetteville, W. Va, with L. W. Nut-
tall as president.
Authority has been granted J. M.
Brown, .L W. Yates, M. Little and others
to organize the People's National Bank of
Lampsas, Texas.
The Bank of Cumming, Forsyth county,
Georgia, capital $25,000, has been incor-
porated by L. Edmondson, W. S. Daven-
port and S. LH Allen.
The First National Bank of Commerce,
Ga., has been organized with $25,000 cap-
ital. W. B. Hardman is president, and
W. L. Williamon, cashier.
The Thompson Investment Co., capital
$2,000, has been organized at Birming-
ham, Ala. by W. 8. Thompson, W. L D.
Wallace and A. J. Wallace, all of Birming-
ham.
The new bank organized at Oneida,
Scott county, Tennessee, by O. H. Ander-
son, cashier of the Bank of Monterey, and
capitalists of Gainesboro and other points,
has been opened for business.
A new bank has been organized at
Mountain Park, O. T., with $10,000 capi-
tal, by J. M. Brown of the Bank of Gran-
ite, J. P. Jones of Kentucky and capital-
ists at Mountain Park.
A charter for the Laborers' Investment
Co. of Atlanta, Ga., capital $10,000, has
been filed by E. W. Howell, of Atlanta,
J. W. Brooks, of Macon and F. J. Howell
and Richard Reid of Estonton.
The National Bank of Brundidge, Ala.,
has been authorized to begin business;
capital $30,000. The officers are James T.
Ramage, president; Burr Bamage, vice-
president, and A. G. Seay, cashier.
The First National Bank of Corbin, Ky.,
capital $25,000, has been approved. The
organizer are W. T. S. Blackburn, Dry
Ridge, Ky.; J. Glascock, J. F. Wetherall,
D. M. White and H. J. Harris.
The Del Rio National Bank, Del Rio,
Texas,, Capital $50,000, has been author-
ised to begin business. The officers are
James McLymont, president; C. W. Odell,
vice-president, and J. L Dodson, cashier.
The Palmetto Progressive Benefit In-
surance Co. has been organized at Green-
wood, S. C., with the following officers;
W. J. Smith, president; G. W. Gilbert,
vice-president, and W. C. Johnson, secre-
tary.
The Bank of Brazil, Gibson county, Ten-
nessee, has been chartered with $15,000
capitaL The incorporators are W. W.
Howse, A. A. Donaldson, J. M. Harris,
Dr. W. T. Matthews, M. B. Charles and
A. T. Booch.
The Empire Mutual Insurance Associa-
tion of Atlanta, Ga, has been granted a
charter. The incorporators are G. B.
West, A. W. West, J. S. Flipper, H. N.
Newsome and Willie Grant Newsome, all
of the city of Atlanta.
The Tylertown Bank has been incorpo-
rated at Tylertown, Pike County, Missis-
sippi, with $25,000 capital, by W. M.
Lampton, L. L Lmpton, George H. Col-
lins, Chauncey C. Collins, A. L Perryman,
J. C. Rimes, N. E. Ball and associates.
The Trades-Union Savings Bank &
Trust Co., of Memphis, Tern., capital
$50,000, has made application for a char-
ter. The incorporates are James Shee-
han, F. L. May, T. Hopfner, C. A. Aufe-
rath, C. W. Merker, E. F. Parsons, D. C.
Wagner, J. J. Maley, Morgan Jolly, S. W.
Tate, E. P. Anderson, F. E Miller, L T.
aBell, T. D. Ruffin, G. B. Harper, W. H.
Johnson and J. G. Tate. The oicers are:
Charles N. Auferath, president; W. Horace
Johnson, first vice-president; F. F. Par-
m, second vice-president; T. Rffin,
thin vice-president.


3., TURPENTINE

CUPS.

If you expect. to se the e Tr ry
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery, Prices and all inform-
tion cheerfully furnished on
CUPS, GUTTERS
AND ALL TOOLS
ased in the Herty system of turpentining.
Address
S Chattanooga Pottery





Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advertisements WIh e Imserted i3 o epartne t the ft h lew Res:
Foroneweek, eentealine.
or two weeks, 35 eaeta lime.
For three weeks. aeste a line.
For four weeks, 4 cets a lie.
Nine words of ordinary length make one lie.
Heading coats a two Uies.
No diy except the heading can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of
containingr advertisement. Coman. be In this omae not later than T79 y
1ornlng to secure inertioon irn y's paper.


Stiller Wasted.
Wanted-First-clas stiller, white man
with family. Can furnish good hose,
and will board with family. I want a
man who is competent to take charge
during my absence. Address P. H. Baker,
Campville, Fla. 4t
Woodsman Wanted.
Must be single and strictly sober and
not younger than twenty-five or older
than thirty-five; also must be a first-
class bookkeeper, and furnish good ref-
erences. Address J. D. X, Chipley, Fla.
4t.
For Sale.
Small turpentine farm, 12 erops boxes
for one and two years. Plenty high boxes
near still. On railroad. Schedule fur-
nished on request. Address H. W.Mereer,
Cottondale, Fla. 4t
Wanted.
To buy a first-class turpentine location
in Florida. Will pay the right price for
the right place. No flat woods place need
apply. G. A. Petteway, Box 26, Leroy,
Marion Co., Fla. tf
Wasted.
Reliable man to take charge of turpen-
tine camp in Florida. Must be well recom-
mended. Address XYZ, care this office.
S2t


Wanted.
First-class stiller. Must have referemee
Address ABC, care this office. t
Twrpenatle Men.
Buy a Blakesleh e Gasoline Pu ing Ot-
At for your still. No. 1 oatt pumps 2jW
gallos per hour at a cost of 3 me e and
require. no attention while rl---
tarted in one minute. J. P. C pb
Ocala, Fla.

For Sale.
35,000 acres St. Johns and Vobmi; 13,-
000 acres, DeSoto County; 14,60 are
DeSoto County; 30,00 aeC, (CaIoo
County; 20,000 acres Hillaboro County
80,000 areas Manatee County. All omad
timber. D. T. Doutry, Boom BUM-
win Bdg. 4t

Distiller Wanted.
A distiller. We want a good, sober
man with family, to run the still another
season. Can give steady employment
through the winter. None need apply but
first-class man with good references. Ad-
dress F. & W., Jonesboro, Fla. tf -

Are ye reading yer pper, Or m-
me else's If not a subscriber to the Rec-
ord, send in yor name today, with 03xo,
the price of subacriptio for m year.


R. S. HAL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. Kmiorr, Sec. and Treas,

MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.

Herbert A. Ford, Geo. H. Ford, F. L. Watea,
President. Vice-Pres. Cashier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.


CAP ITAL,


$50,000.OC.


SDIRaECcos: R. L. Anderson, B. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operaorts ad Saw MM MIn .5c4.dL


- TEE RZCOD IS TUB NO13RA"TORaV UM-TAN I


I- :










10 TER WZNKY IJUITBIAL RZUOQBD. __


J. A PAmOMS, AsseS & auAmUn. Amr a F. PnMrIT
Predlee t.i Viee-President 0u e
The Mercantile Exchange Bank, i
JACKSOMVILE FLORIDA.
CpltmL 5200.000. Surplus, S100.000
STATE DEPOSITARY.
Oe.wanl Baml. Ie-P r. -nl sw Degelts. Sate DewDtBozes.. ..e per Yer.

Review o Naval Stores for a Week
Review of Naval Stores for a Week


spirits fr the Week at Sava ab.
Price aepta asem az. 190
Mon., Oct. 24 52 423 516 0 65%
Tue, Oct 25 51% 29 1202 345 5%
Wed, Oct. 26 51% 49 340 561 4%
Thur, Oct. 27 51% 915 416 1520 6
ard hr the weesk st 2Sa1mak
Monday, Oct. 24. Inst Year.
WW .... ...... .. 5.00 4.0
WG .. .......... 4.5 3.0
N ..' .. .......... A0 300
M ........... 425 3.30
K .... .. ..... 3.75 300
I .. .... .. .. .. .. 2.9 2.70
H ..W.. ........ 280 2.00
G ................ 2.72% 256
F .. .... .. ... 27% 2.50
S. ..... .... ... .2. 2635
D................ 257% 2.25
ABC ........... 2.52% 2.15
Receipts 2002, sales 1509, exports 130.

Tuesday, Oct. 2.-Roein Arm; receipts
2,eB; sales, 1,50, exports 10. Quote:
A, B and C, 2.521-2; D, *2571-2; E,
t2.21-2; F, .8671-2; G, 2.721-2; H,
2.80; I, $2.9; K, $3.75; M, $4.25; N,
$44; Window glass, $4 ; water white,

Wednesday, Oct. 26.-Rosin firm; re-
ceipts, 1,415; sales, 1,770; exports, 1,257.
Quote: A, B, C, $2.55; D, $2.00; E, V$2.e
1-2@2.65; F, $2.7 1-2@$2.70; G, *2.721-2
@e.75; I, $3; K, $3.75; M, $4.5; N,
$4.40; WO, $465; WW, $5.

Thursday, Oct 27.-Rosin firm; receipts
2,731, males 1,077, exports 7,129. Quote:
A, B and C, $2.571-2; D, 2.021-2; E,
a2.; F, 2.70; G, .75; H, $2.85; I, $3;
K, 3.75; M, $45; N, $4.4; window glass,
$4.-6; water white, $5.

S vamesh la Stoes sat n eme.
Bpirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 ........... ,45 44,550
Receipts Ot. 27 ........ 915 2,731
Reesipts previously .....133,082 387,376
Total ................ 140,492 434,657
Exports Oct. 27 ......... 1,50 7,129
Exports previously .....116,861 376,780
Total ...............118,381 383,90
Stok Oet. 27 ........... 22,111 0,748
Stock previously ........ 17,800 59,42


Range of Turpeatine atn Res at Savan-
ash Oct. s7 and Same Day
Last Year.
SOct. 27 J Oct. 26 Ot. 27
S1904 1904 1903
Tone ... Fm Firm Firm Firm
Spirits .. 51% 1 51% 55%
Sales ... 416 | 340 | 879
Rosin ..| Firm I Firm Firm
WW .. 5.00 5.00 420
WG .... 4.65 465 390
N ...... 4.40 4.40 3.60
M ...... 4.25 3.30
K ....... 3.75 3.75 3.00
I ....... 3.00 3.00 2.70
H ..... 2.85 2.8%@2.85 2.6
S...... 2.75 2.72@2.75 2.55
F ..... 2.70 2.67%@2.70 2.50
E ....... 2.65 2.62%@2.65 2.35
D ...... 2.60%1 2.00 2.25
C, B, A 2.57% 2.55 2.15
Sales ...| 1,077 j 1,770 | 2,251

Turpentine in Loedes.
1904 190. 1902 1901
*Stock Oct. 8 23,800 23,409 19,685 33,397
*Del'd this w'k 2,000 2,52 1,916 1,6
*Since Jan. 1 73,200 71,588 71,015 9,450
Price Oct. 10 39- 42-9 37-3 27-
Jan.-April .. 40- 43-6 38-1% 28-
*Our estimate.
Reported by James Watt & Son, 101
Leadenhall St., London.

Tolar, Hart & C.'s Review.
New .York, Oct. 25, 1904.
The Industrial Record, Jackonville, Fla.:
Spirits Turpentine.-During past week
jobbing demand has been fair, but large
buyers keep out of the market. Stock,
985 barrels. We quote Machines, 55 1-2c
Rosin-Low grades continue very scarce
and firm. Mediums and Pales firm at
quotations. We quote:
BC, $2.871-2; D, 2.95; $3.05; F,
$3.10 to $3.15; G, $320; H, $3.25; I, $3.35;
K, $4.00; M, $4.60; N, $4.75 to $4.80; WG,
$5.10; WW, $5.36.
TOLAR, HART & 00.

The J. S. Betts Company, of Ashburn,
Ga., expect to open one of the largest
turpentine places in Taylor County at an
early date.

Se anl orders for printing for the tur-
pentine and commniary trades to the
Record office to insure prompt delivery.


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903.04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS


RAcipt
SpicIhs asks.....................---- -




Com bs-... .. . .---- --**-
Ra1a bbk.........................
bTotl............. .............. ....



a ar ca-s.. .**** ***** ........... .. *

r bbsk ...............................



r Wae. ................ ...........


1908-04 '1902-03 I 1901-02


198,647
650,988
844,586

188,398
752,270

98,884
888,171

85,658
87,853

59,351
826.746


292496
940,507
1,238,038

296,430
975,428

206,109
504,178

42,765
138,121

87,556
387.784


814,846
1,071,440
1,385,786

814,876
62,687

217,446
585,042

53,797
129,059

48,633
898,586


The d qkft Imsdsn "Oft by %W eahk and of swim W9W5 h ub


Crop dSpri b

Spirit
Wfmlngtoe.. ....... 16
osr t... .. ....** ..
Savana.... .. .. ....176416
BranBwlek.. .. .. .... Sam
Momlo ..............itI
New OrkeM.. ........ Up17
Cmrabie ...... ...... faa
GOrgaw.. .. .. .. Ins
lmeses ...........7 4,5
aqps e.... .. ........ ase

.deed- ----****


Md Ra8001 for Them Ye


UN-ft
Rosin.



rm4
MW53


lowl
44,314

Mm4
Gap*'


Teoab ...... ...... aslsis Ia


1- USA=
SWt II1M-
270070 36MW

3303 1063


91M,6 M75,1

571,6 3,134
nons now5s1a
51I %INA


SAN P
79MU
31,35

SIUA
MIM

%W5 tot
Is^ IW
MAN MAIMS
SUMI YC L


Irmpes d Turpeires to U. X.
The following table is compled by James Watt & Soa, of lauds, frem te*
o cial returns. For convenience of eompariasn we have taned ew lo k sha o
-320 ewt. equal 100 barrels.
1i7 156 156 166 It1 12t 1Mi-
From U. 8., bbs. .... 152,5 173,786 149,375 17414M UtMAS 13M MUA
From France, bbie... 1M1 14 517 2283 1S 4
From olte eountries.. 1,40 88 6 3 6 n
16, 174l107 149,l2 177,5M 3M7 lUJA
From Ruia .......... 2,81 4,18 4,3 8, 81 6 a11U nrIS
Total Brrels.. 1T7, 1790 40 Ii 4 186,690 U -. 1-a 3R *a
Thus the import of Rusiat Turpetine (or Wood Spirit) in 1a doal
that of 1902, and over six times a mch as in 1807. It iL later ng to se-
this import fluctuated with the price of American Turpeati.
Percentage of Import of RuMisa .1.79 2.33 3.2 4.57 3.41 M5.9
Av. Price Amer. Turp. i La .1-6 N4 4- 34-1 3R-4 -1 as-1s 4-'
..~~~~ IN.NI ... MMEDe


COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVANAH 1MR lRVT


April 1 ....................
April 8 ....... ...........
April 16 ...................
April 22 ..................
April 9 ...................
May 6 ..................
May 13 ...................
May 20 .....................
May 27 ......................
June 3....................
June 10 ........... .......
June 17 ..................
June 24 ..................
July 1 .... ..............
July 8 ...................
July 15 ....................
July 22 .................. ..
July 28 ....................
Aug. 4 ........... .....
Aug. 12 ...................
Aug. 19 ...................
Aug. 26 ................
Septi 2 ...................
Sept. 9 ...................
Sept. 16 ..................
Sept. 3 ....................
Sept. 30 ..................


1904-06
ND
53
54%
634%
53%



525/4
524%
54%
63%
52%
S2%
52%

53
62%
52%
53%
53%
52%
53%

52%
52%
52
52%
62%


1903-04
ND
50
47%
47

45
45%
47%


47%
47%
47%


48
49%
49%
524
48


52
52
65@4
54
14%
6T%
57
55


M. A. BBIOS, President.
H. C. BRIGGS, Ist Vice-Pretdent.


190M-3 U1 42
46 M
42% 8
42% =%
43 31%-3
42%-" U
43 U3
46 31%
45% U%
45% 38%
47% 32
48% 3%-%
47% 34%
45% 33%
45% 34%
44% 34%
44 33
43% "%
43% 34
44% 3 *
44% 34
44% M.
45 38%
44% 54
46% S%


485
40.

49
VWA
a




Of
4%



40%
43V





I&A
40


540
44%iL ~
43% -


ROn ZBRWN, lae Vies.?td.
J. C. McDONALD, Soo'Y aSM TM


W. H. Briggs Hardware C.

i VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-


0 RIXFORD AXES.

rThey are te aST. Others imitate but snoe a-
Splicate. They are made of the best steel, have the finest
temper, hold the keenest edge. cut better and lest leber
than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual us.
Sewd us yoar orders.

W Wi. H. 16eS HARDWARE COMPAl
SVaesrt, feargia.
-- ----------- ------- -----


Print g Send yourorder to thelr e nd-I
P r iRecord. Prompt and -atisf-itory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksaonville, F...


TIM 3W" iAUILUy o OUr ADVEETNERS out 103.


~d~b~C~C~4CdC+~4~4C~rA tCCC+~~~C~C~(t~~CCI~-'' -ra ~ -"'`


"..o












TEN WUKL7 irunsurmL BROON3UD.


AUTOMOBILES. PUMPING OJ 1I S


GASOLINE ENGINES.
SP. a C''d ek A ettel o S,&ete In th n Soed.


iFred E Glibert
29 ad 37, 39, 41
SIWst Fowsff Shrcd
-i -- - ... J..k wi -l-^ ----------


8:. P. IlmL & CO*'s Wmkhy Cottm to *a extent that has not bea see in re-


New York, OteL. 28.-The cotton market
l rejected the same confusing factors
which have so disturbed prices and ope-
ration for some weeks past There has
been the usual declines and normal reaC-
frun with very little progress made as
a result of the week's trading. Probably
the most important development has been
the rather rge buying by houses on-
sected with spot business in this country
or Buropeoa rirm. This buying doubt-
l- represents purchases of futures at
pries lower thaa spot cotton can be ob-
tared in large quantities in the South.
On the other hand, sentiment has been so
earI that the future market has been
Pr- ld, hammered aad mauled generally


cent years. Bear operations have been in-
creased owing to the apathy on the part
of the spinners, in this country and to the
figures coming out on the quantity of cot-
ton ginned up to the 18th of October.
The Ginners' Report is being issued in a
piecemeal fashion and the figures throw
about as much light on the season's pro-
duction as would a report by the Sec-
retary of the Treasury on the condition
of national banks. In other words, the
ginners' report at so early a date is ab-
solutely valueless and serves only to show
how many gins have been running. When
the December-January report can be had
on the amount ginned and the percentage
left unginned, we will have something to
serve as a fair index of the cotton crop.


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
ruari S OF TURPENTINE
Ar.. AWr. Apr. a Ar. n Apr. N ay My May A ma a May 0
aN MXD 0 a -014 4- 13- a
'4me e S 5 a 3 J us Jauly July l July 17 Jaly 2 July K Aug. 6
-.064 a aa A 41 "- a 0 0
A.& M AM& A.u dept. 4 Sept. U Sept 2 SePt. S Oct. 2 Oct I Oct.
4 IOt 0 % sWA H -4 W ND IS 31t 1is 1-W "-s
e.s Ot. 1s M eo. 6 nov. 3 No. a De. De. Dec. 1Dee D I. Jan. 14
314 N a s a as 1-4 a 1-4 S1-2-64
Ja. 2, Jan. 1, Feby. 11, Feb. 18, Feby. 2 Meb. 3 Me. 10 Mah a
a W a 60 a so
Mik. 3n

ROSINS
WW we M M K I B r F D C-A
a L... .. ULM* 3a ao 3L al A 2.0 &* U 2.* 2 LS
A . ......L L L. .M 0 2.Xs L.O 2s 2I .S &Ls s .OS
A"I W . . 1U LO LS IS s US 2.0 L"U tOS tLS Ut U
Arl U. . ..o Ua U. &* LS L. to Lt LS L
W L .. .. U3 LS LM L .32 L. LIS LU LU LU
-r L ..... L.K Us US IS L10 46 2A LU LU LO LW L7
I-r .... aU &21 A% L40% a L% Li L LI LI Lu.
or e. ..... US.1 3* U U &LW U. LLU L 1 LO 1. L.
I ....... Us sA 2. US t .1 X.0 LU Lo LU LU L1
41 ..... &I LU LU LU s .O LU LU L L1 LU
3. .. .a. 0 2 U. US 2.t) LU L1 L. L1. Lw
W. ..... Uew so LS LU 2.7 2.5 L. L7 L1 LU L
1 .... U. S U& 0 2J U 2. LS .s LU LU e2 L L1
Jly L ...... 9 LS ULOS U N U I L. 1 U LI LI L. LO
ft W ..... L2 .03* 8O U3 1 O LU L1 L L1 L LS LO
~ 2f ..... U4K LS UL U LUO t S7 L U U LN 1.10 LO LOI
S 2L. ...... U L U Le S. 2 2.75 2L LI LU L1 LS LO
JE.r ..... .U. 3S. LK LUS LU W 2 LU LZ LO L U LU1
.- .l T .... LO 8M3 US U2 US L76 U La L LO L LU
Anet IL... U. L L5 2. U2S U 27 LU LU LI LW L7
Amst m .... LU L3 WS aK 2 2I LU LI Ln .1 LU
Augt 2I. ... .U O 25 LI 8.15 2 4 st0 L. L. W LU LU L1
9aspeee 4. LI LW Io LU La UK UK Uo Lo.s lp 1.
sep6emr 4. .. LW US 0 .Le L4 S 2* .5 1. L LU L L
.* -sp"eer 1 .0 O 2. &.0* sL 1t Ls S 2.U L LU LSt
.eptsMfaera... La 4J. U2 a sU s.UL U2 s.3 L UL U
eptmberL .. 4.S Z S L96 LW L L2.S L L LU
O6e1' 2. . 4.S 4J. 4. 4 4Z. U 2.10 L4S .U LI .s L.
0t ber8 ...... 4.10 4A 4 4JS M 4i 12. 1W L. 0 L* US LSW

4e8eWr a.. .. ..4 40 4. 4& 2U .70 L. U U2.* UL U2 UL
ie1mber B .. .. .4. UWS S 2 lS &N L. 2..0 U 10 tos U L
mber0 .. .... a U90 K K si. 2.W LU M* = M 2z

DeVember G.. AM WSB sm SA to Me to MW e M L
Wembe- ... 2 U 20 U LU I S LA 2.3 0 U 2.

.n T .... U U25 U. 2 U2 2.0 21. 2* L Uli U* ,
nob erS.. ..3 2. 2 .W 2A 2A LU L*W 2S 2. L. I
^HlO I .. "UX U U tI US UK m UK UK UK
DesemWbr .. .0 US L 2. U 2I 2* t2 2. *5. Ii 2 LW
esmMbyMr ..t ..4 UE .a 2 U.M 2.5 2 W 1.7 2 U U 3*
osmmer 1 .. ...U 0s Us Us Us X 2.L 0 Us U.s s t2.
S]..L7 n A=41 20 LSU 3. 2.9 11 2.70 2.S 0 0 2.10
rebary 11 ..76 8S5 2J 3.30 3A 3.20 2.85 2.85 2.80 2.75 2.70 2.76
February IS ... 3.6 X45 3 3.30 3M 3.06 2.70 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.5J6 2J
ebruary a5 ...3.70 3. 3.J6 3.20 335 2.5 3.60 2.55 2J50 2.45 2.40 2.40
Man 1 ...... &W. 5 3.40 3. a 3.A 3A. 2.75 2.70 2.05 2.e0 2. 56 2
-M ......6 4 3.M 3&W 3J 3 W 233 2.70 2.65 2.80 236 2. O 23
We- a ...... M LW-- &a 2a5 3a 2.70 36 23.* X a SAS 3J.
3gmee a ......4.a aserr as ass aw 5.*5 s a UOtee sasea W


Any time spent on attempting to Agure
the crop from figures issued in the near
future will be time wasted. There is no
question that the price of futures has
shown a downward tendency. This can
be explained in several ways. In the frst
place, there is no general speculatio in
the cotton market at the present time.
Anyone familiar with the methods of do-
ing business when at this season almost
every bale of actual cotton purchased is
hedged by the sale of futures, knows
what an important factor aboeses of
speculation.is. The eop is undoubtedly
larger than any crop of the last ive
years, and this would throw more pressure
on prices during the marketing season
than has been the case recently. Then
there is the uncertainty over the outcome
of political conditions at home and abroad
and a prevailing belief that prices will
reach a lower level before the South can
dispose of its cotton. Under the circum-
stances' the utmost conservatism prevails
on the best cotton circles, and those in the


business of dealing In eato e m et ri-
ing to anticipate price lower thin 91-2
cents. This is the aeson of the year whap
we will have low prices if we are to hem
them at all, but becanue eot3o bha word
back to the level from which the Aung
advance started, it does not neesaril
follow that we .are to have a bear mar-
ket from now on.

SMen W yewsoen See, C h&
c dek T2h eM Darnesp t - em .
-sry dme t themn al te a sMg nm
in the USomk ea mb6




GraiN PM Prvuesui

NEW YORK GOTTEN EXCHANsE
CHICAGO BOARD TRAW
Direct private wires to all exchange.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
BeO Phome 83, Baih, Mock


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.


SPIRITS OF TURPE NTINE.


To United Kngdom. In gallons:
Month 23-W 1M2-U
Ap .. .. ..... .. .st1 11
May .. .. .. .. .s6 61a
June .. .. .. .. .Iwo 10,16M
Jul .. .. .. .. O.W am~
ArKUt. .. ..MM tL7as
eAuust.. ........ m,- L a *4
November .. 61,38 1,6,7J
December .. 1 6,65 1,31,77
January. .. 228^ 37340
February .. I 4A 3839
arc ... ......


12W-U

WU3




576,784
144wm
267AN

skm
164,33
647-


To Belgium and Netherlands, In Sallos:
Month m4 11-48 IU m-1-
April .... .... 3W1 3.4 Included
May .. ...... m- SAml1n all otr
June...... .... 6,0 W.319U urope
Juy .. .. .. ..801. 3a a aB am
August........ .3M 210
September ..2..01 33201 016A
October .. .. .. I64 210I 13,m
November .. 133,65 34,7W 381,W
December .. 100,372 66 72,1st4
January .... 1es sUJ, 174,3
February .. 30 372,44 3a,
March .. .. ..... 8,713 18A471
To ermany, in gallons:
Month lU2-34 U1s-"U N6-4
Aprti .. ............. .U4,s 11Au
May .. .. .. .. M.A 3M.l .mU6
Jumm.. .. .. .. 1.,M0 s.s2 MU
Tui .. .. .. .. smU1 i 1 2 .m
Auust .. .. .. SL a --,r B
September.. .-. W 2L6 TNrAr
October ...... W ar A.M KA
November .. 179,010 110,153 8,780


March .... .... ".. 4
To all other Uurope in Gallons:
Month 20- U120-0 IM-
Aprl .. .. .. .. .. s1 1.4as I.a s
May .. .. ... i.- s -- a 4,
Juam.. .. .. 1.U 1.06 L L 4.4
July .. .. .. .. 5M 12s" 4 .i
August .. .. .. .. 1 .0 U
September.. .. 3 AeW ,1 -
Octber ...... 1.. 9 4Ut IT.M
November .. 3600 17,s00 Mk9
December 47,30 80, aWI1 S
January ... -- 11,0
February 15,471 ...... 44,M
March .. 14,18 1237 36aj
Total orein Exports, In gallons. Inelud-
lu everrythai outside of the United
8tstes:
Month 16-4 I38-aI 10t1-1
April .... .. .. .14, 08 s sesu M
May .. .. .. .. 12.BB .144 2.W3, 0
June.. .... .... 1,a0W 3a*S8 .j6aA
July ...... .. 2.r Lt.LW 3S2.40
August .. .. .. 1.TM.10o U..4
September.. .. ...1,4.14 3.5 243M
Octor .. .. .. 1.U6I L.U&T L*a
November .. 1,51,08 1,9X 83 1,5,574
December .. 1,W35 1,793 1,8,175
January ... 700,P2 IsS s s
February .. 487,677 514,34 8SW
Marh .. 2s-,4 113 74 gas


ILOSINS
To United Kinldom. barrnes 1 a:
Month 109-44 160-4 u-4U
April .. .. .. .. 7 41,
May .. ..... 1. ... s
J3nm ..........0,78 5I6, .
July ... .. .. 0 IM MI
August .. .... 74
September... 8,%41 6. 1168
October .. ... 43M1 4M. 93
November ..- 7,1W ,75 U 34
December 1,4B 64 T 7M
January ... 6as 0,76 Ua8
February ... 28,351 w7A
March ..0.. U3AW 5 s WSIW


To Belgia and Meth
pounds:


Month 3046
Ma r...... ....
July ........ .. 3i.
July .. .. .. .. am
Auust .... .. 4A
September..... 4sM
October .. .. .. 3Z
November .. a3,N
December 37,77
January .... Im
February ... 9
March .. 10,
To Oermany. barrels
Month to-"
Apy .... .. .. e
May........ .1
June .. .. .. .. 4e
Julyn- .. .. .. i1m
August ...... 21.M
September.... 13
October .... .. a
November .. 56,73
December 15I,407
Jamary ....34 ,7
February ... 17136
March .. 49,eM


Barrels ft

3.6 hemmed-
ftm -out


6.23
SLOB Ilerl
13.60 AM
30 3
.10 mSL
Now36 2Lm


WWW
6UI U-


4401 am
3.AN 3.20

302 "27
a.'s amI

40,15 65,33
eon61 41AM


To all other urope, barred IW lbs:
Month 3NS-M 16- 31-40
April .. .. .. .. W548 34.10 lsm
May .. .. .... .M 40,6 W *M
June.. .. .. .... 14.6M M ,
July ...... .. is3 RA M,3
aauust ..... .. ,1
September... V.. .M 13n
October...... 3e0 3140 IL*-
Novmber 13,38 U415 MBe
December .. 2,SP 4,01 M,
January .. 17,1Mo 7,146 a,
February ... 38,184 42,64 M
March .. 33,687 51,3 71,1m
Total xpkrtes ot 3e, barrels .a peosaf
Including As6a Africa ad Amersea oet
.ie of the United tates:
Month 3060 M3-4 80-01
April ...... .. 121aL a ML =l
May .. .. .. .. un 8,8 3"
June ........ 3U8 V6 iA*l,
July.,.. ......60 UL3 31. 1
August .... .. .15 3 .1M
September.. .. SM WSM M...
October...... .. 2sLs Sit=
November .. 18a,80 231,5eM3 P
December 2.. 10,457 B,5M 1U,4
January ... 13Arl 17 ,m sRA
February ... 306,080 18M3 2 27,
March .. .. 171,648 s24,423 B4"U


TIM mO M cELA=tZ ALL oV= TIM WORa












12 TEN WEEKY 1NDUIMs*AL ULBQOnD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

JAlME A. kOI.MOR
Edkar Ame Nen8e .
h- Phldl%" Ev FT i-y.


The Pbrs and Uso Puednsas.
AN euimmnmuletatne 1b0M e1K a1s0 s
The Industriedl Record Company,
J.acknoa wilU.. 11.6

mebmi Edamessa andma&m nes Off.is at

Entered at the Poatoie at Ja -ao ale,
Pi., as gcaod-elmes mater.

Ad ed by he Eseutive O mmittee of
the TkpentmeOpwrarVWW AesoediO
September 1, 1916, a its exirmie edulal
orga. Adopted i annual convetion
September 11, as the ora also of the
gpueral asoseitiont
Adopted April 27th, 1M8, as the ofial
xwp of the Interstate ChOm Growers An-
oeeistio. Adopted Set. 11, 190, as the
may o iial organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by peil
resoation adopted by the Georgia awmill


COPY FOR ALDVJTIBI1&
Advertise epy (chugs or w ad-
vrt meats) shul rea a Tuno i y
mecain to ianre inertim in the w me et
the same we~

THE RECORD'S OfICES.
Th publishig t and the mae of-
A- fd the Industrial record Pulihing
Co. ar located at N. xx South HBegn
Street, Jackseavi le, Fa. in the very hart

industries.
The Atiata, Ga., e i lateb itd n the
Eqfutabe nlaing, No. 73. Atlata is
the center d the peat man fetuiri
trade of the tire Soeth
The Savannah, G, office i in the beard
of Trade baMing Savannah i t he ld-
Ie open saval stanr market ia the weald.

New Railroad for South Geora.
Waynesboro, Oct. 23.-The incorpora-
tors of the Waynesboro and Savannah
Valley Railroad company will apply for a
charter next week. This company has
been discussed for some time and at last
it seems that Waynesboro is to have a
better outlet to the outside world. The
*company will be capitalized at $600,00,
.with its principal offices in Waynesboro.
The incorporators are all business men
of prominence and this insures the ear-
ryiag out of their plans. The following
from Waynesboro are among the stock-
holders: Wm. A. Wilkins, Sr, R. C.
Neely, Wm. A. Wilkins, Jr., Frank M
Cate, P. L. Corker, Eton E. Chance, F. L.
Scales, W. H. Davis, F. L. Brinson, Edwin
.Flcher, C. W. Skinner and Geo. O. War-
noek, of Waynesboro, Burke Warnock,
of Waynesboro, Burke County.
The people all along the proposed line
did all in their power to further the build-
ig of this road, for it means much to
the cities of Waynesloro and Sylvania.
New life will be put into these towns and
with better freight rates more business
wil be carried on.
Waynesboro ships annually, about 30,-
00 bales of cotton and is the largest cot-
ton producing county in the State.
These facts make it necesary for
Waynesboro to have better freight rates
and this road will fill the requirements.
The length of the road will be about sixty
miles..


The counties traversed are Burke,
Sereven and Efington. The general di-
rection of the road is southeast in an
almost direct line to Sylvania, and from
Sylvania to Clyo. At Clyo it connects
with the Seaboard Air Line and from Clyo
it goes to the Savannah river, where it
will connect with the Augusta and Sa-
vannah steamboat line. The road wnu
touch Mill Haven, Sylvania, Resources,
Bevell and Clyo.
This road will be the medium of build-
ing up of this city and will place us
twenty miles nearer Savaah than the
present route.


To Use Low Grade Pihephates.
In a letter from Mr. Chas. Catlett, of
Staunton, Va, to the Manufacturers' Rec-
ord, he has the following to say on the use
of low grade phosphates:
"Some weeks since the Nashville Amer-
ican contained a brief account of an effort
which would be made during the current
month to manufacture at the Rockdale
furnace, in Maury County, Tennessee, a
considerable amount of ferro-phoephorus
to be used by certain Northern basic-
steel manufacturers.
"There is no doubt ample demand and
inducement to warrant this particular
undertaking, but the literature on the
subject does not hold out promise of large
demand for such material, or that the
experiments will result in a development
of any considerable industry along these
lines. There are, however, two points con-
nected with such work which are worthy
of the serious consideration of all those
who are interested in the welfare of the
South and the development to the best
advantage of its peculiar natural re-
sources.
"The first question is whether there
might not be developed an export trade
in high-phosphorus iron. The extensive
use in Germany of the basic Bessemer
process, in which slag forms a valuable
by-product, which was used last year to
the extent of $2,000000, makes it possible
for them to use with advantage a high-
phosphorus pig. Is it not also possible
that the German steelmakers may use as
a mixture, in order to control their iron
and to secure a phosphorus contents of
exactly the right percentage, large quan-
tities of pig-iron containing a very much
higher percentage of phosphorus than is
ordinarily available? If this is true, and
if they would pay a reasonable amount
for each per cent. of phosphorus in ex-
cess of, say, 2 per cent, this could be
added without difficulty and at a mode-
rate expense by the use of low-grade phos-
phates, which are found in such quantity
in Tennessee, and might be of special
value to all of the furnaces located within
a reasonable radius of those deposits.
"There is no difficulty whatever in get-
ting an iron with an increased per cent. of
phosphorus by the addition of these phos-
phates, and up to 4 per cent practically
all of the phosphorus would pass into the
iron. With increasing amounts an in-
creasing proportion would go into the slag.
It is probable that 10 or 12 per cent.
would be the maximum which could be
gotten in combination with the iron.
"The second, and by far more interest-
ing and valuable question which might
be settled by such work, provided simul-
taneous investigations are made with ref-
erence to it, is whether it is not possible
in a blast furnace to manufacture at a
moderate expense from the low-grade
phosphates of Tennessee a slag which


would have essentially the composition
and value of the slag obtained from the
German basic Bessemer converter, aad
which, as I said above, reaches a market
at present amounting to not leh Jhan
$2,000,000 a year?
"It is still a question as to whether
what are ordinarily known as insoluble
pitsphates tnay not be made available for
plant use by sufficiently fie grinding
(see Bulletin 68 of the Maryland Agri-
cultural Experiment Station), but it
would require a long fight in the face of
very serious opposition to demostrate
this beyond question. The same ght was
made against the basic sag, and both
abroad and to the limited extent to which
it is produced in this country it has won
out. There is absolutely no question aO
to its availability and great value. There
is no theoretical objection to the forma-
tion in a blast furnace, by means of a
suitable combination of material, of slag
which would have the same composition
as these valuable basic Bessemer slags,
several typical analysese of which I sub-
mit herewith, taken from Bulletin 213,
United States Geological Survey:
Analyses of seals sseemeir Sa8s.
1 2 3 4 5
SO.... 738 7.5 58 2. Li.0 24
ALO..... 2.57 2 1.5 1.4 4.01
beaOs...... 8& 4.1 1&42 2A .... 19
FeO........ 13. 9.3 2.1 12.72 12 1.23
nO ....... & 4 3.43 L5
CaO........ 41. 49.6 45.01 M 45 S
O....... 14 4.7 6.42 6.01 J5. ....
aS. .... .. .. ... ... .
S ......... .. ..5 3 ..... ....
so .. ... .. 2 .... .... .
PO.. 14.37 17.5 18-1 19.1 2.37 = 27.0
M ..0... 1.29.. ... 1.19........
"The amount of high-grade material in
Tennessee available for use by the pres-
ent methods is distinctly limited, though
actually very large; but the amount of
low-grade material, which has at present
little or no commercial value, and which
could be utilized by such a method is
enormous. If, therefore, it is possible, as
I think will prove to be the case, to manu-
facture from such material in the blast
furnace at a reasonable expense slags
similar in composition and comparable in
value to the basic Bessemer slags, the
value to Tennessee, as the most prominent
producer of such material, and to the agri-
cultural interests of the entire country,
can hardly be overestimated.
"I trust very much that those who
are interested in this experiment and in
these deposits which Tennessee possesses
in such abundance will not allow the op-
portunity to pass of completely investigat-
ing the whole subject along the two lines
I have suggested. I think the chances are
all in favor of a satisfactory issue, and
the matter is of so much interest as to
warrant any effort which may be put
upon it. CHARLES CATLETT.
"Staunton, Va."


New Sub-Association.
Auburndale, Fla., Oct. 22, 1904.
Editor Industrial Record:
The Polk County Sub-Association of
Turpentine Operators was organized at
Bartow, Fla., on the 20th inst. The fol-
lowing officers were elected: G. V. Til-
man, president; A. P. Malloy, vice-presi-
dent; and J. W. Crosby, secretary. The
following firms were present and enrolled
as members: Polk Distilling Co., Mal-
loy & Miller, Taylor & Crosby, O. C. Mc-
Lean & Co.. The Calahan Fort & Boyd
Co., Wallace & Mims, Boyd & Boyd, J. B.
Lucas & Co., and Lucas & Burkett. A few
firms were represented by proxies and we
expect a large crowd at our call meeting
for November 10th, when a great many


"OOTHING SUCCEEDS LIEB SUCCESS."


matters of interest wll eo a
association. This an b %ha 1 I -
largest and best I ;
State, and under the instr tias o
able piaideat and vies-preasidet,
with the advice of lot of goe
as meme, we ema hbut
good to be sabpliasha by


T. he: of -


t i now twenty-ive years f th
vention of the eantrrifal aram
tor was first made practical for featry
use by Dr. De Laval, of S1weda The
growth of the bhim b has been eas -
uous, and the benefit to the dairi is-
terest of the world has bea e
The first De laval hand separate
farm dairies introduced in 180, wsatr
hard to operate, and had a capaely of
only 150 pounds of milk per hwm. Th
same machine to-day has a eapeity of
000 pounds per hour, is emy to rn, amI
sells at the same price a the erigihr
Smaller sies have been introdaeed aies
so that a dairyman with any member O
cows can now obtain say smie ma f
he wants, with price according to the as-
pacity he selects. This practical hea-
ening of cream separators by haeras
their effectiveness and ease of oerati
has greatly increased their sal. Seea
new makes within the lat few yeaa hAm
come into the market and are now tuning
out machines which are very we ft"
by some dairymen. Th eombned yearly
output of all makes at present, ind-
ing the product of these museaer mn-
facturers, canot be far from 10000 a
chines for the United States and Cs an
The extensive adoption by the Wesmrn
creameries of the eream-gethering
cream shipping system, whereby pat
now separate their milk at hon and dae
liver their cream only, instead of th
whole milk as before, has made an im-
mense demand for hand separators ao the
farms. In the State of Iowa the dairy
commissioner reports the ever-leraig
number in use. In 1900, 3,332; 1M19, 5,3;
1902, 9,20; 190, i800. Nebraak, win
her 646,475 cows, has 23,000 had MpaM-
tors running every day, according to lat-
eat facts obtainable. The Eastern enm-
eries have been slower to adopt the hom
separation idea, but the method eam.to
be growing in favor and is very likely
be the one of the future. Whether t
quality of butter can be kept up to the
highest standard is a disputed aquedim,
but proper instruction to the dairyme
and reasonable care by them of the e nmm
should answer it in the afim ti.-
American Cultivator.

According to the statistics empiled by
the agents for underwriters, the coiM 4
shipments from Pemseola to foreign part
for one week aggregated 11,00 bals. Ts
broke all port records for one week,
which ended last night. The value f th
cotton alone reached nearly a milim del-
lars, and cotton crewmen were comped1
to work night and day, handling the r-
goes. Four vessels carried out this ament
of cotton, eah carrying only part earges,
other articles also being shipped. I in
stated by exporters thathis sea 1 wm1
be the best ever known for foreign oet-
ton shipments, as thousand of bale are
now stored in the Louisville & Nashrv
warehouses ready for shipment to for-
eign ports. Al the cott goig eOt it
week was for liverpool and .o .-L '










TBE WEEKLY INDUSBTIAL RECORD. 1t
? _| I I I I I I IBasJ i s


SUNiTESO STATS DSEPO4TO@ Y No. **G6.
"""""2 "."'"""'"" I

ATLANTIO NATIONAL BANK OP JACKSONVILLE
MW* 0 0 ON 11M o M 0*.

-OUsCu IsABwIJB.
loMw am Dbeef.... ......... 3,415M CitmiStok psid in.......... .... .ma0.O
V b a ..... ...... .......... .............. ....... 0,
r te.................. IM ....r .................... .
cS Oa" ily fl M ............... W A. ispO 0 i......U... . .... ............ .m .IO
.....IeOm::: SE -lt ''i'i *
a g Z ............ .............. ............... W.5.. 7m1
CQk *dDMrbc otter Buak.... ._MBK.
~wu..................................K3asa


---|------- ---.---...---- **** *hhu neih


C. H. HARGRAVES CO..

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpeo tine ad Sawmi lMi'o aa ,-te em-.
A ORIDA rIm FOR Ar imoUDIA
514 516 518 520- 522 524 526 EAST BAY ra rua.U

Jecksonville. Fla.


S Ttle and Teai Abstracts.
Conveyancing. Township Map, Blue Prints.
We give peial attention to preparaio of Ttle and Tax Ab-
Straet, MapX, ee, of large tracts in all parts of Florida and Soth Geor-
gin. To owners sad intendin purchasers the results of our work are
Valable sw
-rpodem solicited.

REALTY TITLE AND TRUST COMPANY:
Law o 3sA11a1g.|t JACKSOVILLe FLA.
ma 02226222u*20l8822 1m@losses, u oofauemmeaAm


Mn


Natisal Frest Resrves
dsuding the two reserves in Alaska,
wih cover nearly 5,000,000 res, there
are -mw in the United States ffty-obe
Iaet reserves, with a combined area of
7,83374 areas. These reserves are di-
ed among thirteen States aad Terri-
ries of the West. If they redeem arid
nd only to the extent of their own areas
t wmid mean 373,337 new farms of 100
mre eah-for water is the West's great-
eat need, aad it is now recognized that
water conservation is to be the most im-
irtant .erviee rendered by the reserves.
What this would mean in the way of in-
s.sed agricultural wealth it is easy to

The people of the United States as a
whole, have little idea of the enormous
magnitude of the interests affected by the
Government's forest reserve policy. Tim-
her supply, important as this is, is a rea-
tively small part of the whole purpose.
The reclamation of millions of acres of
arid lad, a sustained or heightened fer-
tility for other millions of aeres of farm
lands, sad, nally, the safeguarding for
the future of pasturage for millions of
head of sheep and cattle are already cer-
tain results of that policy. It contem-
plate furnishing the present and thous-
ands of prospective settlers wood, water,
table lands, miad prosperous homes.
audly stated, the purpose is to give
these forest reserves their highest utlilty
o all who use them now or will use them
heeafter.
This is early a work of stupendous
proportions. Irrigation, which will prove
the salvation of millions of acres of these;
lads, cannot realize it largest possibili-
ties less the watersheds of the West are
ander conservative forest management.
Great damage has been done there by
verp~aing, mzckies lumbering, and, most
of all, by fresh. Reserves were etab-
lished to stop this damage and to give
the forests their greatest usefulness by
comerving the water supply without ihut-
ting o the supply of timber. On aeeount
of the expeame and natural conditions in-
vlved, there is a limit to the sie of im-
poemilg reservoirs, hence the necessity of
preventing their overflow by foods, and
for making their supply regular, that all
tha water possible may be saved for use.
Faerts are the chief agency in this work,
and to maintain them is absolutely es-
semtial to the reclamation of the arid
West.


This use of forest, however, is not at
all inconsistent with its use for many
purposes. Lumbering, when rightly done,
is an advantage, not a detriment Gras-
ing, when regulated, does not injure the
forest, and prospecting, locating, and de-
veloping mines are not interfered with by
reserve restrictions. Thus the Govern-
ment, in establishing reserves, in no sense
withdraws the forests from use.. On the
contrary, while all their present uses are
continued, their greatest power for good
is kept from injury and increased in value
by the wise and careful protection af-
forded by reserve management.
The Bureau of Forestry has had during
the past summer fifteen agents in the field
investigating actual and proposed forest
reeves. If they discover that agricul-
tural lands, or lands more valuable for
other purposes, have been included in
reserves, they will recommend their im-
mediate exclusion. If they find land which
will be more useful when reserved than
when not reserved, they will recommend
that it be added to an adjacent reserve
or form a new one.
Often the hardest task of the Bureau
agents is in reconciling conflicting local
interests. Sheep and cattle men may be
disputing over the same grazing grounds,
or each class may be at war over individ-
ual grazing rights. Again, owners of
farms or of water-power plants may ob-
ject to any grazing in the forests, lest
the water supply be injured. In all such
cases the Bureau experts must examine
and report on every phase of the question,
that, so far as possible, absolute justice
may done to all interests. In perfecting
present boundaries and increasing reserve
areas temporary local injury to some in-
terest is sometimes inevitable. This is
most unfortunate, but these occasional in-
juries cannot weigh against the import-
ance of the general purpose of forest re-
serve establishment.
In all of this work one large fact is to
be recognized. It is that in the execution
of the policy of reserving from private
acquisition such parts of the public do-
main as are suited to forest growth and
most useful under permanent forests, a
far-reaching and beneficent policy is be-
ing carried out. Under it the Government
is acting to secure which otherwise, un-
der the stimulus of immediate private
profits from lumbering, grazing, and the
like, would in no long time be lost for-
ever.


GOGIA SL-TAIT SAW MILL A*@gOrlATs.

Miaimm Coutwise Price List for Meradtahle Rdes 9%4. As at A n es,
- Georia, Julyis, zgg.


Feet I et I Feet Feet I Feet I Feet rel F A |I "i t"
S IZES 20& U 21-2512 -30 31-3 I364 41-45 606 6- 4 41-
1 x10 to 2xlO.... $12.50$13.5$14P016 3.00418.00w 61I'0 W M 1M l 2m
2%x10 to 8x10.... 12.00 12.50 13.50 14.00 16.50 17.0 20.00 23.00 S1M 5*m
8%x10 to 10x10O.... 12.50 1.00 14.00 16.50 16.0 18.50 21.00 MAM MM W
1 x12 to 2x12.... 14.00 15.50 16.50 1800 21.00 24.00 2800 184 3L9 a
2%xl2 to 10x12.... 13.00 13.50 14.50 16.50 1850 21.00 24.50 28. 3LM 4
104x12 to 12x12.... 13.50 14.00 15.50 17.50 19.50 22.00 250 383 385 4M
1 x14 to 3x14.... 16.00 19.00 2.00 22.00 24.50 27.50 3200 37.61 4r6OR 5
3%x14 to 12x14.... 14.50 16-0 18.00 20.50 22.00 24.00 28.00 3.50 4 EMS
12%xl4 to 14x14.... 15.50 17.00 19.00 21.00 23.00 200 30.0 34.50 42M 56.
1 x16 to 4x16 .... 20.50 22.00 2.50 27.50 31.00 34.0 38.00 42A.6# S2 M
4%x16 to 12x16.... 19.00 20.00 22.00 25.50 29.00 31.00 36.00 36.6 4M MM
12%x16 to 16x16.... 19.50 20.50 23.00 26.50 30.00 3300 37.00 41.00 MM Mm
2 xl8 to 6x18 ... 24.50 25.50 2&50 31.50 35.00 39.00 43.J0 401 .M" T7M
6%x18 to 14x18.... 21.00 22L00 200 29.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 4g.00 6A
14%xl8 to 18x18.... 23.00 2.00 27.00, 30.00 34.00 38.00 42.00 48 c6.M 748
Terms: Net Cash.
Prices are F. O. B. Cars Savauah, Brunswick, Ferandin and JadomevikL


HOTIAL
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Association, held at Jacksonville,
Fla., March 15, 1904, the following Classi-
fication and Rules for Inspection of Yel-
low Pine were officially adopted, efeetive
July 1, 190I:
Clasafication and Inspection of Yellr
Pine Lumber.
General Rules-All lumber must be
sound, well manufactured, full to sie and
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and
hollow knots, worm. and knot holes;
through shakes, or round shakes that
show on the surface; square edge, unless
otherwise specified. A through shake is
hereby defined to be through or connected
from side to side, or edge to edge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken;
less than one inch thick shall be measured
as one inch.

CLASSIFICATION.
Flooring.
Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: 1x3,
4, 5 and 6; 1%x3, 4, 5, and 6
Boards.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
inches and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %, 1, 1% and 1% inches
thick by 7 inches and up, wide.
Scantling.
Scantling shall embrace all sizes from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2x3, 2x4, 2x5, 2x6, 3x3, 3x4, 3x5, 3x6, 4x4,
4x5, 4x6, 5x5 and 5x6.
Plank
Plank shall embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness.
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1%, 2,
2/, 3, 3%,, 4, 4%/, 5, 5%, 5%x7 inches
and up in width.


Dimension sizes shall embres all sI
6 inches and up in thickna by mva
inches and up in width, inueldiu e by
six. For example: 6x, Tx7, ?x7, T7x8,
and up.
StINg, a
Stepping shall embrace one to two and
a half inches in thickness by masen ns
and up in width For ampl 1, 1%,
1%, and 2x7 and up, in width.
onugh I or at taf.
Rough Edge or Flitch shall m all
sizes one inch and up in thiknes by eight
inches and up in width, sawed O two
sides only. For example: 1, 1% X, 4
and up thick by eight inches an up wide
sawed on twp sides only.


InSPNCTION.
StamnanL
All lumber shall be sound, sap ab-
jection. Wane may be allowed e-eihth
of the width of the plece messed aers
face of wane, extending oae-fourth of t
length on one corner or its equivalent
two or more corner.
Merchantable
All sizes under nine inches shall ahew
heart entire length on one side or ed;
sizes nine inches and over shall se
heart the entire length on two oppysit
sides. Wane may be allowed onee-it of
the width of the piece measured aceaas
face of wane, and extending one-fourth of
the length of the piece on on eaorr or
its equivalent on two or more earm.

Scantling shall show heart on two faces
the entire length; other siaes shaB how
two-thirds heart entire length an two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
cent. of the pieces, wane may e aalwed
one-eighth of the width of the piece meas-
ured across face' of wane and exteding
one-fourth of the length of the piece Om
one corner or its equivalent on two or
more rmers.


FOR SALE.

50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one mhu rd aad
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined ad rnady for te
mill. 2.35 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of year, or m
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in the State.

C. BUCKMAN, s S4at t.


-FAM IUMDplsUD5I AND PROGNZSSIVE.


0


*


P
p










THE WEEKLY LNI"I 19ML EECOMD.


SSOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY


S" 1Wayeross, Ga.
r. MANUFACTURERS OF


Freight and Caboose Cal s

SBrass ano ray Iron Casting

CAPACITY: ENWCARS-PER DAY.:


Socated In the heat of the Lumber Dstrlct thes -' ava.
tage of shelest material at lowest s ea


teoaj Phosphate as a Soil Reovator.
In reply to your request for my opin-
ibm-as to the value of ordinary non-acid-
ulated finely ground rock phosphate, I beg
to say that I regard this as a material
which gives great promise of extensive use
ti the economic and profitable improve-
ment of the soils -in Illinois and other
States in the great Central West. It
abould be distinctly understood, however,
that repeated experiments have shown that
this material gives practically no immed-
iate returns if used in the absence of de-
caying organic matter. On the other hand
when used in intimate connection with
liberal amounts of farm manure or green
mmanres or both, we have conclusive evi-
dence that it is one of the most economic
and profitable forms of phosphorus, es-
pecially where the crop returns for a
eries of years are to be taken into ac-
MUm t.
In exact pot culture experiments carried
on under controlled conditions at this uni-
versity, ground rock phosphate used in
comnction with clover and manure has
produced marked results. Extensive field
eaperimeits in operation in this State also
point to the same conclusion. 'At the
Ohio Experiment Station careful field ex-
periments with the use of ground rock
phosphate in connection with farm ma-
nure have been carried on during the past
seven years, duplicate experiment having
been ade with three different crops in-
cluded in a rotation of corn, wheat and
ever. Based upon the increased crop
yields produced where ground rock phos-
phate was mixed with the manure pre-
vious to the application of the manure to
the clover, and to be plowed under for
mow as compared with the use of the same
mamre without rock phosphate, these
sol experiments have shown that the
addition of the ground rock phosphate in-
crased the value of the manure more than
0o per cent. In other words, as an aver-
age of 42 different tests, extending over
Sa period of seven years, the average value
of farm manure was found to be $1.99 per
ton, measured in increased crop yields pro-
duced. When 40 pounds of finely ground
roek phosphate were added to the ton of
manure its average value was found to be
3.2S per ton, making an increased value
due to the addition of the phosphorus of
$1.26 per ton of manure. At the present
price of ground rock phosphate delivered
in Illinois, namely $8 per ton, the 40
pounds of phosphate would cost 16 cents,
: hich would leave a net profit of $1.10 for
*every ton of manure with which the phos-
"p ite ii mixed. It is worthy of special
note that in this same series of Ohio ex-
perimats 16 cents' worth of ground rock


phosphate has produced almost as large
an increase in the crop yields as 30 cents'
north of ordinary acid phosphate. Fur-
thermore, the 40 pounds of untreated rock
phosphate is enriching the soil in phos-
phor.us twice as much as the 40 pounds
Sf acid phosphate, consequently, in the
:ong run, the untreated rock phosphate
must produce the more lasting results.
In my own opinion somewhat larger
iuantit es of the ground rock phosphate
-hould be mixed with the manure to in-
-ure the maximum profitable crop yields
of soils deficit in phosphorus. I am
practicing and advising the addition of
00 pounds of rock phosphate to be mixed
.'ith each ton of manure. The phosphate
,lay be scatteredl over the manure from
lay to day as the manure is being made
in the stable or in the feed lot; or, when
loading the manure on to the manure
spreader from the yard or stall, the
-preader box may be loaded half full, then
;00 pounds of rock phosphate scattered
over the manure as uniformly as possible
and after completing the load of manure
it may be hauled to the field and spread.
If farm manure is not available, then 1
advise applying from 1,000 to 2,000 pounds
of rock phosphate per acre every three to
six years, depending upon the length of
the rotation. In this case the phosphate
should be applied to clover sod or to a
catch crop of cowpeas, soy beans, etc.,
and plowed under with as much organic
matter as practicable. With a three-
year rotation of corn, wheat and clover.
or corn, oats and clover, 1,000 pounds of
,'round rock phosphate may be applied to
the clover and turned under, preferably
in connection with the second crop of
clover, which is often worth more to turn
under than it is to cut for seed. With a
'ix-year rotation of corn, oats, wheat,
e'over, timothy and pasture, one ton per
:I'~P of ground rock phosphate may be
applied to the pasture ground in connec-
t;on with farm manure and plowed under
for corn, preferably with a considerable
growthh of grass and clover.
With an abundant use of leguminous
crops and catch crops, such as cowpeas or
soy beans, seeded in the corn in addition
ti) clover in rotation, and the addition to
the soil of a ton of ground rock phosphate
every five or six years in connection with
all of the farm manure which can be made,
the ordinary prairie lands of Illinois can
be made to grow larger and larger crops
for many years to come. The purchase of
commercial nitrogen at 15 cents a pound
is absurd, because it can be obtained from
the almost inexhaustible supply of the at-
mosphere at a cost not to exceed one cent
per pound, or at no cost whatever, pro-


vided the leguminous crops and catch
crops which are grown are properly fed
and pastured. In most of our ordinary
Illinois soils the supply of potassium in
the soil is exceedingly abundant, and suf-
ficient for large crop yields for many gen-
erations. Consequently, the only element
of plant food which we need to purchase
is phosphorus.
In considering the purchase and use of
finely ground rock phosphate attention is
called to the fact that this is a form of
phosphorus originally provided in the soil
by nature. The richest soils in the world
contain rock phosphate in connection with
organic matter. Until recent years farm-
ers have had some difficulty in obtaining


non-acidulated, finely ground r ie
phate, but it eas now beobai~m
Robin Jones, of Nashville, T-emem4ii
from the New York and St. I~- 1-
ing and Manufacturing COompl y,. L
Louis, Missouri, and probably from a i
other dealers.
In the current Seal year the dem fir
small bills, in spite of all perml.o-w
tion, has bee unceasing. wz .e
has made it clear that the stoek f WA
notes is hardly uffileiet. The dpa--m
has employed all its reouesa but H me
are limited, for the imne of silver sia-
cates cannot exceed the ilvr dollm as I-
able, and the United States mets
a volume fixed by law.


. president J. L. HARRiS. 2 V. Pre H. L KB.naaen *
P. L PRAcoc 1st V. P- W. J. Ka.T, 3d V. P. D. IL Wraznat, AnIse =..aU


Peacock-Hunt & West Cona ,

General Offices: }20 B" Street, E. mmlk "-a
weat 601I60L JalemluU nIEA

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We re strictly Factors Our interest and the producerW Is nmemLf fr
never take to aooount, nor are we interested in any empany that bplt
Turpentine and rosin.)

WHOLESALE GROCERS,

Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Cepers' Toots and Naval Stores n ar Our -S W
-SOLE AGENTS FOR--
The Celebrated Union Turpelltle.Axes and Whift & G61
Philadelpha Wa s

Naval Stores Received at Savamih, Ga, and JacWwfl 1
and femandMia, Fla. -

W. J. L'ENGLE. J. W. WADE, m 0.L i R
Preseient. vice-PredOeat S'toee' l rs


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW OWJMANUS LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondece
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.



PATRONIZE RECORD ADVERTISERS FOR SATISFACTORY DEAIUIN


S(14


-i'


ff. __ 1W


~CI










THE WEKL l~ub'ltALREOR.


THE
jp n L


COVINGTON


Co.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.




Wholes SHOES -
Sholesale: DRY GOODS.


S"Success .For Our Customers is


Success


For Us."


g B Ir fr North Carolina.
The Waeeam w lad & Lumber Co. is
e ofa the earpeortios which propoa e to
be in a position to supply express ad jun-
per lumber to theUni Stted s Govern-
ent fr Plaamu we. It was recently
hartel In i wth Cmolina, ad l tes
to ImBld a large plant at Wilmington or
A8mhport, in that State. About 176,00
a s of timber lad have been prhased
at about $37a00, to be developed for the
tImber. These lands are practically al
do the Oteea Swamp lands in Brunswick
m Colummns counties. The Waceaaw
c(apmy com posed of Detroit (Mied.)
Smpitamt, F. W. Wheeler being president;
OC in E. Clark, trmurer, and E. H. Sille-
m seretary-manaer. They will re-
more to-Wilmington in order to give their
peaomal attention to the enterprise. The
tsd stock of the corporation is $1000,-



Cyp Pri es Curret F. O. B. New York
Market Lumber rogh or dreed:
Tank stoek, 11-2 to 3 iashes, $48.75 to
SM.75; Firts and Seoed, 1 to 3 inehem,
$445 to $2.71; Seleets, 1 to 3 indes,
4825. to 45.25; Shop, 1 to 34aches, SS.52
to $4.25.
For pries ac 8 inch add $1 per 1.000 ft;
a 10 ie d add 82 per 1,000 ft; om 12 ineh,
adm 880 per IjO ft.
Bevel sidg, 1-2 ineh elear, D to A,
$1175 to S8.25; ceiling, 3-84 or 6 inch
dea, D to A, $1~25 to 24.26; 1-2x4 or 6
Lea deear, D to A, $18.00 to $27.50; 6-8x4
r 8 tee dea. Q to A, 8.25 to $32.5;
Iooring, drop sLg d seillng, 4 or 8
haL. D to A, *B7.75 to $83.75.



This Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.




Liquor Merchants

Proprietors

Juismi b- lttl Wurks

I
...Aonta...


ACME BEER


COURSE OF PALE AND MEDIUM ROSIHS AT SAVANNAH FOR TWO YEARS


DATE
April 1.........
April 8........
april 13........
April 2........
April 29........
May 3........
May 1 ........
May 20........
May 2 ........

June I........
July ........
July 14........
July 28 ........
Aug. 4 ........
Aug. 12 ........
Aug. 18 ........


W.W
1904-0
$4.10
3.95
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.95
4.35
4.50
4.00
4.65
4.75
4.75
4.70
4.52%
4.67%
4.60
4.82A/


W.G. N
1902-04 1904-5 1903-0 1904-06 1903-04


$3.90
3.60
340
335
356
2.42%
305
&305
3.60
3.40
3.30
3.30
3.50
330
3.30
&40
3.40
3.50
3.50


*8.* $3.60
3.76 3.45
3.60 3.35
3.0 3.25
3.& 3.25
3.50 3.25
3.50 3.27%
3.55 3.35
3.65 3.35
4.05 3.30
4.10 3.10
4.15 3.10
4.25 3.10
4.40 3.10
4.40 3.10
4.40 3.10
4.25 3.20
4.42%/ 3.20
4.35 3.30
4.37 3.30


$3.0
3.60
3456
3.45
3.45
3.35
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.85
3.85
3.85
3.90
4.00
3.95
3.90
3.82%
4.00
4.00
4.02%A


$3.50
3.35
3.25
316
3.15
3.15
3.17%
3.25
3.25
3.20
3.00
300
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.05
3.05
3.15
3.15


1904-06
$3.35
3.3
3.20
3.0
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.85
3.65
3.65
3.90
3.80
3.85
3.72%
3.90
3.85
3.87%1


1903-04
$ 3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
3.20
3.15
2.95
2.95
295
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
2.95
3.05
3.05


K I
1900 1908- 1904 1
1904.05 194-0 190445 19634 -


$3.30
3.30
3.16
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.25
3.40
340
3.40
3.40
3.55
3.55
3.55
3.50
3.66
3.55
3.57%


300
3.00
3.0
3.00
&00
3.02%
3.10
310
3.05
2.86
2.85
2.85
2.80
2.80
2.86
2.95
2.96
2.956


8296
2.96
IS.

2.80
MS


.10
3.25
3.80
&ft
3.30

&46
3.45
3.06
3.30
3.30
3.32S%


8.B
L0
2.-
865
S.4
&AU
3.5

NM
2.70
2.8



M.e
2J7
2.88


Kohn = Furchgott = Company,
WOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats..
MAIL ORDERS OVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.



Don't forget your subscription to the Recora
WREn WRITER AovERTISRS, MErNTION THE RECORD.


THE WEEKLY INUUfsrTIAL RBCORD.


S '







16 THE WEEKLY INDUWrSIAL RECORD.
"--------------- *C---" il----lii--lll-------------


Machinery and


d


Mill Supplies.

STATE AGENT rOiL
ATLU EGIUES ai 0I9RES, SOME STEAM
WmnuuIIOsrin arcase rumws, Jcincuus YVaw
MWarm sawS, FunIKTE mmsvf
CUmR KAJIFACTUUS1 WS M M618M MW
Dowsm "W MEL& a ir y a uLEM
MWVM MUM UMCT,
new MICKY cm 0 M 1111! CL
ftK and1obe Mq
LoUev AW f Owl= COIW Ue
acm MPr. a.S Cast k" WK Pw""
~kl~f f LE% NMIICO inERT VICUE
DANNMV PPP Slitem Pa
A. LIESCRIEN L SMN. Whue Ems.


--------- POO"**" 44FVw 00W;__ *** 0104 "00 --------9 --- -


Tmpetime M m.
The trpetine operators of Polk Coun-
ty net at the eorthouse at Bartow, Fla.,
last Thbrday and organized as the Polk
Couty Sb-Asociation of Turpentine
Operator of South Florida.
r. 0. V. Tilmn, of the Polk Distil-
ery Co., was elected president, Mr. A.
P. Manly, vie-preident, and Mr. J. W.
C~reby, of Aaburudle, secretary.
The object of the amoiation is to
Impron the conditions governing this in-
datry and for better controlment of Ia-
bor.
During the meeting several interesting
admesesM were made and pla outlined
weh would be helpful in co-operation.
Te next meeting of the association
will be held on Thurday, November 10th,
at the eotahue.


Pensacola New Notes.
The mercantile firm of Gray & Co. was
forced into involuntary bankruptcy last
Tuesday by creditors, representing about
$25,000. The firm was composed of Paul
Gray, J. D. Lamar and W. L Brown, the
two latter having become partners a few
months since when the interest of C. C.
Goodman was purchased.
The liabilities are given as about $25,-
000, with assets of $18,000. The lack of
sufficient capital with which to meets its
obligations is said to be the cause of the
failure of the firm, as it was doing a big
business but made exceedingly heavy
purchases a short while ago.

A-wrt&~ eaw ta bana or new
dvewestmsememts) eouldm wmeab u
revM to IemMse me0a9t 0
Is the tasts f tL* n, wveek.


Wea Ten' Are ln Jksualle MAopt- M.

WOLFF'S EUROPEAN HOTEL
Cfarer as ang SeptUreats
Rates 500. S and 1.00 per dta. irst Cls Restaurant ia Coneetion. J. ll t WLt. Mallu
**O9*,*****"**St9@ '*t*S***'-- **-*-* *****
SYou Want a Turpentine Leatim?
SYou Want a Sawmil Iecatitn?
F You Want any Kind er Florida Land?
I You Mean Busiss?
SCW en or Wrte te
J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS,
SOcals. Florida


When you Visit Jacksonville


cifI to see the Record and be at home.

Tell the Record all you know, that will Interest others.

If you want to buy or sell advertise your place.

If you owe the Record pay the bill.


If you don't owe the Record make a bill.

Order your Printed Stationery.


Be sure and give the order for your Commissary Checks.

Call on the Secretary of the 7. O. A.



Call at the Industrial Record Office.
IF YOU ARK PROGnSSIV, AD VURTI IN TBN RECOD.


Bar Ir, re Pipe and ittings, Belts,
MNts, Cat and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tels, Lmberman's Toes,
PackUi of all Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corrugated



JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.










TMN W]IlMY MoulrkIUL RECORD.


Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for te benefit o the subscribers and advertuing par of this paper and no

chae is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one o re d the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention

rw Trmuerlm. 'mau er fas ILy Supspas oM eer y U A hMi .r Uamer. Farmit er 1a LaeIs.
DATE- INDUSTRIAL RROOD, Jacksonvie, Pla.
INDSTIAL OOBD, Maim Oioe, Jadmnle. l I am e the market for lands for the pulpoe of
r tke mas for tho folewig Prefer Im State of Plese put me In commucatio
with respolble parties and give me other information.

S le e anetify wbhr amne ca be mu Sig
Sifme

State opeeUilf the klt of meter wanted ad whether new or secoed-hamed. DATE
3 is6 ar Trpenesa. sm amw l er Pater. A fAlr A nmidutr Ealerr re. er nmbeay aF Ecuimmlarr m SMe upM 8mpLa, omlW a Turpi meas Mutes
DATE Br ,
nwuHm-BT L *BOOBD. jMex.le, fte DATE
NDUTA INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jakaomvfle, Fa.
Piem aevime the ureigne regl a goeo location ie (bates or eeotn of
ae) for I the market for
1-41ar. with flln Iformatbon atM labor oadidoes. taXes. traMportetio tfautsa.
eeal e...n...mrt, ate.
omhartu Pleasee give t aiformation a to bet piacee to bay, ete.

Sir g Si-ed


B te T" Witd he 8eml? Are Yes TMaio of Imtl?
B*

DATR DATE
INDUSTRIAL RBOOKD, JashmoMvle, el. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jaclonvfle, Na.
Tve for sale the folowir ( Can you give ay Informaton as to the reibailty of the following arm or eorpor
tios
Remarks
an You gea ms a parlan er?
igmneM Siem


STern Wmeeft Emple M? te Ven Wet ElpI amet?
DATE DATB
rriUS L MD. Jat Mlevi,. fh. INDUSTRIAL R1000), JaheDonvlle, Pa.
W a ma to li tb poitdon of Want a peoiton M
.'' 1 -^^. ^. sRr.m. efer to the folowltg
wan me feInwief reqWu-We,

Ma peu asies s a ma cam you am me?
Bigmed Signed



CLIP THIS COUPON I
TO Au. RaEADR OF T B RBCORDi
Whn y ar auswari an deismJrmoo t on the oumrn of thi paupr, whheo you ae mak in an inquiry or placion an order, plea cut out the mmpon
hibsr -d ah& it the Ita, ik w l serv

COUPON.
Your advertisement wa sa em the ISdireMbal Rsend. imue dated

sign

he INDUSTRIAL RORD> of Jachmoavle, At.. and SaTvaah, Ga., is the Southa great
week trade Joura.


The Record take a personal inteie e in every Reader and

Advertiser,and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.



M M PAm Md M= =" X~mza FM


- u.^











THE WEEKLY JmrwuwriLAL BRCOUD.


Buyers' Directory

Thes advertier i ith is e. If
y"O want anything look through th
ehasled Ast ad write to the rm ap-
I thera. The Reeord g -arstes
a prompt raspome.

ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trt Co.
AUTOMOBILES.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville Fla.
RAMX
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, ia.
Commercial Bank, Jacksovile, Fa.
Central National Bank, Oeals, Fla.
Mreantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fa
National Bank of Jacksonville
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cumuer Lumber oa, Jackonvlm Ila
BRICM*
Faster, Geo. I., Jr, Jacksoville, Fa.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co, The, Jackson-
ville, FP.
CARLS
South Atlantic Car & Manufa tring o.,
Wayeroe, Ga.
CLOT]EMG
am
Craig & Bro, J. A. Jackonvill, FlP.
Be froe Co, H. A., Jacksaovill, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, Flh.
CLOTHIMG-WBOLSALE.
Kohn, Frcgott & C, Jacksonvill, Fla.
COMMISSION MaCHAnnTS
Bailey Montgomery, New York City.
Laredon, M. W, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co, New York City.
CONVEYTACING.
Realty Title and Trost Co.
COOPERAGE
Canon Co, The, Quitas, Ga.
Cooperage Co, The Jacksoville, Fla
Jacksovrill nooperag O7., JaMrsniDe,
Fla.
Quitan Cooperage Co QNUtmas, G
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
S DRUGS--WHOLESAL
Southern M nmf-tinriag Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS--WHOLXSALL
Covington Co., The, Jacksoaille, Fa.
KohlipFu regot & Co.a oill, Jadem l a
XNGIES.
Chritopher, John G., Jacksonville, FLa.
Lobard Iron Works & Supply o., A-
MerriIl-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fa.
Behofelds Son CO, J. 8., Maeo, Ga.

*FOUNDRIErS
Murphy, T, Jacksonville, Fla.
BehoaL d's Bons g o, J. 8., Maeon Ga.
FRIGHT CLAIK AMEmCT.
Friday Freight Coir Age J we-
iDe, Fla.
FUEL
Southern Fuel a Supply CO, The, Jack-
sovilri, FLa
ruJUc RE
getting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GEZTS' FrUUWRISW
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
tree Co., H. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
standard Clothing Co., Jakonvll, PFa.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jaksoille, Fl.
Ellis-oung Co, Savannah, (a.
Hargraves Co., C. H, Jacksonville, F
Johnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fla.
acock, Hunt West o, Savannah, Ga.
United Grocery Co, Jacksonville, FL.
White, Waon A Co., Jackonville, Fla.
Williams Ca, J. P, Savanah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
HARDWARE
Baird A Co., L ., Jackakomvflle, Fh
Boat A Boura Co, The, Jaksorille, M.
ris Hardware Co., W. H.Vadosta, Ga.
hiistopher, John ., Jacbkonvle, Fa.


Marion Hardware 0o, Oeala, Fl.
Tampa Hardware Co, Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co, J. D., Savannah. Ga.
HARNESS.
McMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, F.
HATS.
Craig & Bro, J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A, Jackonvill, Fa.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTL&S.
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fa.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Bupply Co., Au-
gust, Ga.
Merril-Stevens C0., Jacksonville, Ha.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Maon, Ga.
JEWELERS
Grenleaf & Crosby C., Jacksonville, Fa.
Hees & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, Fla.
Blum & Co., Chsu, Jacksoville, Fla.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICIH S.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
"F=
Fla.
MAPS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works A Supply Co, Au-
sta Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fa.
Sehofield's Son Co., J. ., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR xuRPt E lU. PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. Maon, Ga.
]MAT&
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jackovill Fla.
METAL WORXER&
Baker, M. A, Brmnwik, Ga
MeMillan Bros, Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPLIE.
Brigg Hardware Co, W. H., Valdota, Ga.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Oeal, Fla.
Sehofeld's Sons Co, J. ., Maeon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware 6, Tampa, Fla.
MULES AMD HORSES.
Thomas, W. ., Gainesville, Fla.
NAILS
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORKS.
Barne-Jemnp Co, The, Jacksonville, Fa.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fl.
Ellis-Youag Co, The, Savannah, Ga.
Independent Naval Stores ad Export Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Store Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Unio Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
PAINT&
Baird & Co, L L., Jacksonville, Fl.
Bond & Bours Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
PECAS.
Griming Br. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Brigg Hardware C., W, H. Valdoeta, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Oeals, Fa.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa FlP.
Marion Hardware Co, Oeala, Fa.
PUMPS
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fa.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. S, Maeon, Ga.
White-BJakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingrhm,
Ala.
TAiK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co, Savannah,
Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa,
Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fla.
Fraier, W. W., Jacksonville, Fl
Livingston A 8os, J. H, Oeala, ha


Southern States land and Timber Co,
Jacksonville, Fla.
West-Raley-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville,
Fla
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fl.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fl.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P, Jcksonville ,F.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla
TANKS.
Cypress Tank Co, Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. S., Maeon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trut Co.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville, Fa
Council Tool Co., The, Wananish, N. C
TuRPEa lrrs APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksonville, la.


MORTGAGES. M

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.

HI W. FORSYTN STREET, AnimLtSS jIMI




H, A. Renfroe Co.


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at ReadydMa Pric Mal Ordars Givn Puwmi A 4W
439 W. Bay Skreft JACKSONVIAB HJA.

I I I 1 T I II I-I1 II 1 1 1 3 11 113 2 W I 1 1 I t t t 11 I I I II I1 3 k 3 13 101 0 N


J. P. WLarrLa. Presidat.
T. A. JuNlNGs, 2E d VIce-Preident.
H. L. KAYTON, Secretary.


J. A.9. CAnsiin.ist r min~s
J. F. IMNWaVbuPYV.d t
D U. LWbo ThWie.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

1111l Rom 110 Mmm ~~ea fox IN Im ow-
Main OCfHe I.. UXYNNE, ODOUGIA. 4
mran~i 0 s: PssInmaCOLA, XL-. t mes' 111M..

: Naval Stoes Prmdacers am lArvited to Cermreap Wkh 47..



U. Ar. Bru







tios stills.


TheL


WriFO.Bte m fr is
r. 0.B. any aO In -s
Ida. Alabamma or luis.
stmu solM Ueer a sams
Job work through the
country A 8P. bt
target and Oldest Copperns ic
Works in Georgia. sa nSW
1S My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do mo lek.


Send your order for general printing to the


DO"T FAI TO MITOn T= RECD To AtvO A--DVq--R


Pine Product o-tr-us Oa 4T It, nB
ettevrie, N. C.
Pine Belt Coastren l, th 000
N. C.
Standard Turpis M Sr k
City.
IU AP---- 1-r L
Baker, I. A, B1--uis a.
MeMilln Bros., Sav-aIh, 1a1
.LUxejmIuJS 8EUL 2
Davis & S ., L. I., PalkAt, Fh
auiAU maij.r VTAT
Davirs Son, G. M., Palatka, a.

CWrot Typewriter IEs, 1
PIa.

MeMurray & Baker, Jakaewsl, M6..
Thomas, W. R., Gainesvia, la.
WATCHED
Greenleaf A Crosby Ca., Jarmr, MA
Hess & 8laer, Jacksovmie, l.
YELLOW Pa-E LIUWR.M
Cummer Lumber C., Jasm*Me 3b
East Coast Lumber C., WatDmr *$






0 THB WEEKLY uujrlUm AL IX)DOI M 1


Special Notice.
/
Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are

kMcMILLAN BROTHERS'
Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twncty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
low by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS.
.AVANNAI, GA. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
MOBILE, ALA. FAYETTEVILLL N. C.




SHalf Tones-Zinc Etchings

SIllustrating and Engraving Department
' 0 F

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
SSpendidl equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc.
1 IteI n i wf H muI UiD BKll Pmrm uM I~RIE.
In WRITIG OR ArppeYNG FO PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPUIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT is WrNTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELVERIES PROMISED.

A Florida Enterprise. Try It.
ImaorsMaW Xa A M MoMar VArSLa,






SO TH WEEKLY INJlbIUrrU AL BROMBD.

Predemt, W. C. POWENJU; Vlce-Predemt who with the Prreident contltute tih Directory ud Board et Magerr W. COACHMAMI. L I. i l-
LARD. H. 00VIN ON, H.A.H M cACHERN. JOHN B. YOUNGh, A. CRANORD. ID H. MEMILLAN. C. DOWM-
I, JI J. BAUlNDERS, C. B. ROGER; Auditor, JOHN HEUDIWON.
1 q "


INili 11 1 [ 9 [ WAIII


JAclolnvite, Flu.


mlPioi, No.


PftHISoI i


NATAL ORE8_ FACTOR.
lir

I Wl M CM. iU I MM RI IKk:

WMidem! o SioYe it e ere l1o S itoOr 0I krh W ar
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T fie onlgulel hlelt i lh Coni.


ul 11 Pricersp.
Ii~lro


h fI~i o I r e Utilci


lt PoloNl Iulih (PeIRifi imlrsi IBM


Sil nWol


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YAiRS 1AT ACK hn LL 1vANAH E HAIiNAlll P[ 011.


All Rouce[ 0re iMvited m Coll or Coireusom l


-THr PINM AMD ITs PODUCTS.*


I


>*I If aIfIVIfI ao woIero II II If If IIIIfIs IVIs IIaItISIIV ai r ar *0* am&+ a- ag &&I Iao b i


,,,, i"


S-* HE!B W









'THK WtKrfKLY lNDl)tTlkIAi;fl VOR .' S'


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commiuary Trades.)

The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
eOd for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


.Btter And Cheese
A. C. Cremery, 60 lb. tubs.. 21
A. .Cramry, 0 .. 22
10 '" .. 25
A. 0. Creameryo,60, 1 Ib. prints
- l Cream ........ 11

Lard

0-lb tin.... n 6
50-lbtub....
r Tin.
.' 0-lb tin ........... 84

Vinegar
"d Apple Cider bbl........ 8


Sugar
dealated Sugar, bbls..... 640

Coffee
-mpti~ Blend Moeh and
Java, 0 1-lb cans to case,
per Ib............... 22
Bimao Pure, 01 l-lb cans to
Sse, per Ib............. 22
Gm. Coffe good. .........12
SOoffee medium ...... 9
ofee, common .... .. 8f
Armokkes Rouated Coffee, 1
lb package ..... market price
UimBraid Coffee, 1 Ib pack-
wJe ..............market price
-[stid, M10b. drum....... 17
wad coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15-

Tea
xtra Sne quality..
Oaddy Green Tea, 10 b..... 40
powder, 10 lb.... 27
english B'faat, 10 lb.. 27
FormoeaO lb....... 27
Pagoda Tea, 6 and lO sis
)0 Ib to eae, per pound-.. 40


Salt
-bs ~ek.............. 100
SOIlb sck................ 50
Ie Cream, 200-lb sacks..... 100
6" 100-1b aks..... 50
SketSaltin bbls., 8-1b.... 265
a" "6 2-lb.... 275

Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin.............. 17
sound 1-8 tn, 8 dos to box
sifter top,per do ...... 46
OnAd 1-16 glass pepper
boas, per dos......40 and 80

Corn


W.Corn,1101b, 1 38
1001b, 1 24
Mad ornllOlb,1 U
S 10I0 ,1 21


Lat
1 40
126
185
1S


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


Car Lot
W.clip'd,1251b,
1001b,
White 1251b,.
White 100lb.
Mixed 1251b
lO 1001b,


100 Sk L 100
Lot Sk Lots
190
1 55
180
145


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as.
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 bs., choice..... 1 85
4" fancy..... 185
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 6 25
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 lb sack.........6 00
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 6 25
Pillsbury's Best .... 7 50
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 7 40
bbl....
Flour, Boss,.............. 7 25
Meal'
Meal, per barrel............ 3 50
92-lb sacks........... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel...........8 50
S92-lb sacks....... 1 50
Rice
Good.................. ... 41
Choice ................... 5f
Fancy Head.............. 6
Broken .................. 2.


Canned Vegetables
Dos.
Tomatoes, 8s, Chief........ 85
Tomatoes, 2s ........ 65
Clayton, 3s................ 80
Clayton, 2s .............. 60
Sifted Peas, 2s............1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........ 1 15
Lima Beans,2s ............1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8s........... 90
Baked Beans, ls........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets, 3s...........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ........... 85
Saner Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s ........... 90
Hay


,am -M car lot
Sk
1 49 Choice....
1 84 No.1 Tim.
146 No. 2 1700
1 1 No.1 1'ler 17 00


10 bale ee
lots *qustity
1750
1650
1780 1550
17 50 15 50


I B


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 dos
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 dos
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 24, 2 doz. to cae
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.............. ..... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz....... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per dos................ 1 45
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 45
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per dos........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two dos to case.
per dot...............
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb. 6.
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
Ib.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
per lb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box.
assorted, per lb........ 61

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per Ib....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 8*
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice " "
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes ....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-1b. boxes ....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 l-lb. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. ease 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 26-lb
box, 40-60............. 6..
Prtnes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box. 50-60............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. '8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, I-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box .......... 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 6*
Extra H P, .... 6
Seed Peanuts, ....
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ ..... 18
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Peacans.... .............. 12
Filberts................... 12
al0 nuts.................. 14


Cotton Seed Meal


Cottonseed Meal
Hulls


Car 100 Lessleo
lots Sk. Lot k. Lt
2700
1050


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop......... 2 20
3 hoop.........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz .......1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
nested.......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per dos 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per dos.. 00
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. ..1 20

Washboards -
78 Crown Combination..... 20
178 Blue Jay.............. 00
176 Diamond Glass .........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per dos 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 76
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
do .................. 95
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 80
Sardines, 5 cas lots........ 8 45
Salmon Is, Tale 4 doz to case
per doz Alaska........ .90
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to case,
per doz Col. River .... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per do .
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fsh 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-1b pails............. 8 50
Sea Sides, l&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box............. 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge .... 14-4
"ReliaBle" Hama, 10-12 avge .... 141-2
"Reliable Hanm 12-14 avg .... 141-4
"Reliable" Shoders, 7-9 avg .. 113-4
"Reliable Clifornia Hams, -8 10
Breakfast Bacon, light a. ...... s11-2
D. 8. Bellies, 16-18 av .......... 10
D. Bellies, 20-22 av .......... 9-4
D Bellies, 25-30 av. ........ 1-2
D. S. Plates ................... 73-4
Bacon Plates ................... 84
D. 8. Butts .................... 3-4
Bologna sausage ............... 7
Saue e ia m l ..................SS
ntwr ad cL e
"Strawberry" Creamery, l0-lb tubs 2
30lb tubs.. 221-2
"Reliable" full ream cheese .... 121-2
-Mua~ LaL
"Indiana" Pure Leaf ........... m t.
-"ea-Foam" Compound ......... mirat.
Kbeg's Canl Neats.
"Reiable" Coned Beef, Is ...... .i
Corned Beef, 2s ....... 2B
Roast Beef, Is ........ LU
Roast Beef, 2s ........
Potted Ham and Tongau
1-4 ..........................
Sliced Beef, -1. .. .. 1.I
SVienna Satmage, 1 .. .s
Tripe .................. U


GNT A coPr GI 2= NAVAl 1 0 0 1 LU 3001


-- '---









STHM iWmarLY uIWLuwrs m ,AL COOD. -


_64 A i i i i 44+4 4.


- - - --------------------- ----- -


To the Readers of the Record:


The job printing department

of this company is conducted

for the exclusive benefit of the

naval stores, lumber and man-

ufacturing trades. It is reason-

able to suppose you will get

better and more satisfactory

printing supplies--letter heads,

envelopes, commissary checks,

pay-roll reports, etc., by having

us make them.


Industrial Record Co.,

jla-ll RieW, .


I
S
S


** V V V V V V w W w V V V V V V V V V V V V--- -- ------------------ -- -- ~J.~..-. ~ ~ 1 -1~---- --- -


RADO TUH AMS M Z=G wUCOR


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Tau WftKjI' iz41*t~stiAU1r BRCORD. a
000- OWE"000


VU MLS 11 U UtESTONE All EGIZE
u~s Lb. ii e 'Tab t snU e es etborate ausoleum.
72-:1= " we n o -ouarJr dem will ]A- you
110VTIHRN MARBLE AND STONE Co.
s famdmg *l F LANUE, Mmawle.
Vi a sf..th suafa..., No. 4 Sout hiHelio Strot.
Jack"ek Ila.
Aoisfg 6s %Seen 1sabi Mesosa and TIe.

ftMcMURRAY & BAKER.


I e e oom a d a" baseess "Oak HIS fti
~~u I El Tw* Km
'~ -- mmdrs Lov '4." D" m me V5 Ma~Ylhe .
ne V w armin sma asameum rhtu we be- a bo f&a".Use
ft is Vf. w ii, or I -- -sm wages. a"d bara a apesu. Dowt

r am Il an Was" a ban& bersan
M Y Im bus 4.1 MSd L bl- U. h

JACKSONVMILE, W.&


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
2t -am-mb m m-r o ts Ja are ae tpote to safl as follow, calling
at & C. both way.


UsMr s n


nralmmu.


From Jnek"UVUI@ f
Chasleates and New York.


ntey, SepL 30, at 3:00 pm ..AIGONQUIN ....Thursday, Oct. 6, at 1:00 pm
it lby, Oct. 1, at 3:@ pm ....APACHE ....Wednesday, Oct. 5, at 12:30 pm
-xNEW YORK ....Thursday, Oct. 6, at 1:00 pm
T aBy, Oct. 4, at 3 0 p .... COMANCHE .......Sunday, Oct. 9, at 4:30 am
rimag Oe. 7, at 3:00 pm ... .ARAPAHOE, Wednesday, Oct 12, at 6:30 am
-xMOHICAN ......Friday, Oct. 14, at 8:00 am
e ay, Oct. 8, at 3:00 pm ... IROQUOIS ...... Friday, Oct. 14, at 8:00 am
T lbTy, Oet 11, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ....Sunday, Oct. 16, at 10.00 am
We-dfAm y, Oct. 12, at 3:00 pm .... ALGONQUIN ..Monday, Oct. 17, at 11:00 am
JIM*, Oct. 14, at 3.00 pm ....OOMANCHE .Wednesday, Oct 19, at 12:00 n'n
'xHURON ......Thursday, Oct. 20, at 4:00 am
lily, Oct. 1, at 3:00 pm .*xNEW York ......Friday, Oct. 21, at 4:00 pm
T' lay, Oet 18, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE ... .Sunday, Oct 23, at 4:00 am
Webmday; Oct. 19, at 3:00 pm ..IBOQUOIS.... Monday, Oct. 24, at 4:30 am
Mrb Oct. 21, at 3:00 pm ... .APACHE ....Wednesday, Oct, 26, at 5.30 am
twm y, Oct. 22, at 3:00 pm .... ALGONQUIN .... Friday, Oct. 28, at 6:00 am
lMay, Oct. 24, at 3:00 pm ..**xMOHICAN .... Friday, Oct. 28, at 6:00 am
Tamly, Oct. 25, at 3:00 pm .... OOMANCHE .... Sunday, Oct. 30, at 8:30 am
M-y, Oct. 28, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ...'.Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 11:30 am
oatiday, Oct. 2, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS ....... Friday, Nov. 4, at 12.00 n'n
"xHURON ......Friday, Nov. 4, at 12:00 n'n
*.--Bosa via Brunwick and Charleston. xFreight only. --Boston via

TIE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
ss serves as Dtw Jsm amemavn aDestem amed Previdemee and afl ml
G-m -E, Gmig at cOlastom eoth Way.
SM-- ................. ... .. ..........F rom Lewl &War Baote
Il e.. ......... .. .....- ....rm toot of Catherine Street JacksmnvUe
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Betweenmr efamrnn a" smanter
s pp at hPalam. Aster. ramels. Bere ord (De land) and Intermediate
Sa...... an St. river.
STEAMER "CITY OP JACKSONVILLE"
I --t- to B aM mew: IaM JaLkaolle. Smndays, Tuesdays and Thurs-
al l &W V, m. altlrtlr~. lewae anftord, Monday., Wednesdays & Fridays 9:M a m.
OIrSausu NORTHBOTW D.
amsd a I R ead up.
I. Ma ...................Ja l............... ...... rraive .0 a. .
S...... .. .. .e ** Pa.* I ...... ILave a1-4 p. m.
i a. m.I ........ ........ ............................. x.,et :0 m.
4Ma. a .....................r........t. OL Pr9 .......... Leave 1:80 p6W
................. .... ....nerm..st rr P-V ............. r ,re t- noa
A mssI a a. m.......................Saf .................... ......ILeave 9: a. m.
Ar. ": a. 4.................. 11trprin ....................jLv. 10:00 a. m.
a3Iian. PASi WUeI AND TCKrT OwPIC. M4 w. ray st, Jsek*vine.
I. a #miOa L. Amt. GeaL Pass Agent. 3I W. Bay St.. Jacksonville. VM
W. OOCIn. n IRal t. At 'taekt. J e CM P. ALOVZLL Asst. Supt.,Jack'vill
PBot ogan Street, Jacksonvle.
A. 0c, Ammr . P. A., Mew York, CLATD InNB G. 1P. A., New Tesr4
m. a4. mum, WE P. cLD A co.
oemau amwer. General Agents.
__... 4 ren Damlng, U Mtate Street. Nw TOrk.


the
The l wll be
e sea of th mrt a"
ate witk plaosa

eak."sfll th. Uosme of Ow Iu o
Amevis.t's tL.dsgsn V004111 ,iuromss.
Th. Weekly Dladaftytl Record of Jack-
ai. nd Savannah "a aie its placeSO~
armng the Wo isete trafe Jor.al In e
a" ino an astbarity ao Bss-.jj
==.= stal it Is being quoted no

only by the beat and most carefully *dI=
toai Waer I this country'. but by fhos Is
Aies loo madm trdIt paw l

meekring Ibis ssodk eta rday givena lberal tIn
spoe to Ike RecorL s vi ws an marta con- lot




tri newsp r. In addi lot to It value
aw the obamp1@u of the twe, ~speifllcld V0~-vs
tr imIt aementa. It in hs Wm of new Jobs
saarisa of development isthe do utheest. Pa
gthem being the ster at ta half-mill- fend
oluer corpoatio corpumais in Jack- 06
nnm oule trjam the organizedo of H. I
WZ a"d V101u11111 W.
Itaa set@ the uses fur S se I a" It wan
Wlgret mure O1 mOSS wick
Itt re iig bot I te In scrip tio and
advertising aspartmenstaecarrylman emIt doese.
3 asone at the lagest alvewtiung get-,
tnag g to say at the n ihs e rae .
wonO "a" a uf I
stre.
INSAVIII 4W A. J16 I d a Jon
Mason at 71 kin storms u-rlll roed




ID 044 who, 7%18
4 _411 ed",


qL"'--- UU- --ww------


SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
30 YEARS RELIABILITY.
Hess Se Slager,
SDiamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry 6
CORNER BAY AND CEDAR'STS. AND I I 13 MAIN.



Naval Stores Market

and Stock Report
Published Dally in The



Jacksonville Metropolis,
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.

$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.


BIG PRIZES:

A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposition, to
Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.


Carter & Russell Publishing Co,

Jacksorvvile. Florida.


WRITrrE TH RCORD 1R AEY ar1OPAr oM DBami.





tLi .-~L`
LS aji
v ';
h'
=J. .
~- p.-
~eirr~i~ar
~


I


STwo of the Patterns we show in our Catalogue.

SPECIAL VALUES IN STERLING SILVER.


I




















r


Tuapes aoN par l Ddne% anb T*asP"
Dessrt Spteen, W"o pw des.Donut
Tamle Speea0 b3.oo pa d es. ~j rtn,*f*J TaI
Deasat ~Icke *j6Ao P, 6111.UPDesr
Table Feks faoo per TableI
Doant zaiwse sco per 0& 41 West Bay Sb-oft Deenat

Jacksonvie D
10 coma Fo WE
ENRAUiNG. Usoullo Sates.Prt attntion t mall o.a

Write for Catalogue

ONE kUnULu PAGES ILLUSTRATING


iermania"


as, ao p* lea
Sp-.. %o por fs.
Elsa-, fcsjo per Da
Forks, adn'o per
erwk sm.o pwr ft
Kniv, 0i234 per dAm
[aim es imw par fes.

PAY EXCESS
CIRAIRMS


F I |Silverware, Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Cut Glass, Clocks, etc.


-I m


THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
of Wananlsh, N. C.,
L rymerl at Omers iatIlo, M. C.. a tml -salbc DIamomi Mse
'. at BS cf Je a" .. e soadard at nLe. On st14 e Patent
PIOMe at aIS enM. ThN .LMdr M average a lttle better than eer.
We have brost out a now brand the BS u s- abe at L mend Pa-
eM at a s which afr warrant. Anll wheaMe smer tdaol inavl tomes
~ssp esrr or inem eo W Sseir O3geaf.t
***---------- I I I I I-I I --- ---0000669066I

D G. 1 rTHAN, PUsddMt. ALFRED A. McKEHA4N Lt U. S N.
Jaamflmse. t. Det'd Se'y Sed Tre,. COoatru ct
mp ear. getteil Np G.

Pine Product Construction Co.
Fayttevi e. N. C.
Sirfit of Turpetame OS at Tar. Cresete. Tar. Diatfeetante: Wood Pr-ervative.
Paitas, Wood Stas t, t n, CharueoaL from IJshtwood tammp. Boe-ft les
Probe ts nemae. Time of d Om reduced. Condemetlm coatrIoMle at wi.
No dwmeer rom e Plant meted veomplte. and mn taut the proM s. wm
tar imrma wrtl Alrd UMeKelthan. general mm e. Fettwill N. C.
g-.. ------ --.-- .-
H rbT~fI tAfTTTT lII I m"BOADWAY AND 3- d ST.,
HOTEL BARTHOLDI, AW AND Yd SW.
Facing Madlon Square Park. Newly Furnished Throghout.
Near al Big Stores and Places of Amoemet. (Uur Pas
she Door for aJ Rairoad Stations and Steamboat Laddings.
Iarge sample Rooms for Cmmercial Travelers: Here you O
sad no g orad ad ialent decorations: no luxurious
radeur; no awe-ispit mrronding; no elaborate bill
of fae, printed n French; no elerks tat will disdain to
Spea to Yes. No Empftyees l3 Aey Way Iatteatatlte.
]Bt jit a ~osr, onme-like little hotel that will appeal to the
heart of thoee who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plain American cooking. and affable and courteous treatment.
;rI -


SJohn Youn. Prri"t. C. US.m Ei Vlins..dr j
J. W. Mlofe Jr. Secretary and Trumer.

The ELLIS-YOUNG C


SCommission Merchants

NA VAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS 4

Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.
111 I III 111 111 111 k I l1 l 11 111 M i III ll Al 111 111 ll 111 11Al Ai g M


I


T. MURPHY
JACKSONVILLE MACHINE A IRON. WORKS
ENGfEER. IRON AND RASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and* Mine Machinery Made and Re-ired. Ime
and Brass Castings, and machine repair of all kids.
MAARINE MNG0S AND BOILERS LLYS AND SHAPNft
Agent for Stationary Enginea, Boilers, Pumps, Feed Water Hetmd o a .
men, Hydrant and Valve, Centrifugal Pumps, Hos, Belting and R-UL r Gcm
NE TMI hU IML A WV r EH IT A IBMIt .
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


.THE


"Rose"


i: : 4
a `- *


t


-g


*- 14


4.-.


I~h- ~---~---~i~S~;*;~;~ili-~;ii~


I


- -.-.. c-I_, _~___.~ I-L-------l~~-~IC


THE W3UKLy. RUMORLAL "WOu


Greenleaf e

Crosby Coin


~16