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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00092
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: October 14, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00092
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text


, -"


WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD-


Publlshed Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturig Interests.

4~*e smt, A. 19. A9 W sr ae CMtW C foIMe I t e rpetWme pftar tw AsecMt as Its cMulstre arct eram, aAn Adoptede Sept. Itla 192. Am b i-m C
mrie as a- rim A s tee a~ al a*r A~wsmc 1d sepre. t._flate, a19. as tee utr OlMcl ~r a rt metae penratwrs' Alsecrrtle.
Adopted ArI NM, I8j as the 0ealst OfrUte taer-Stae Coae rwers' Associaies. bejaralb by the Seerais SawmidU
Aimssems. faesCU WguM of (Me S.utheaster Stork GCrwer's Assciastio.

VOL 1I. ACKSONVILLE. LA. ATLANTA, GA. SAVANNAm, GA. $3 A YEA.


IIIIbs = -- ----------- so is

Export Trminal is Now a Certainty f
B f9iB9@~~ w b, 9e999 Cw9 ti
Bds were opened yesterday in this city globe. There was no other port on the P
hr an improvement that will mean much line of the Plant System which had sdf- t
Ib segd to the future growth and pros- fcient depth of water for deep-draft ves- 1
pity e Jaeksonyille a a port, and for sels to enter and load cargoes. t
srk, wMhch, when completed, will place Now that there is no longer any doubt
Sm--imes in the front of south Atlantie of Jacksonville securing at least twenty-
g rt uetI for forag trade. four feet of water in the channel from
r TU UM in question were for the work the city to the oeean the Atlantic Coast t
W bedig wharve, grading a railroad Line, as successor of the Plant System,
t and omating a landing place on the ha determined to ship all Florida prod-
o f t p apaty of the Atlantie Coast etsm handled by its various railroad lines
a Baoim eO COempany, for the proped from a Florida port, and as an abundance
t Op--- of the company. of water will be secured for the port of
h a md teradnl, which win in a Jacksonville by the time the proposed
1- i" 1 a etusa fact is located terminal facilities of the company can be
m bl a emr the banks of the 8t completed, the company has selected Jack- '
1 J river just onth of what is now sovrille as that port.
S" S ill, frmerly know In accordance with the following ad- l
a. d.Thi U MaLis only on vertisement, bids were opened last Wed-

nesday in Wilmington, N. C, the head- I
."o M eo"tboy m& quarters of the company and in Jackson-
swaol j, k u go the Plant Invemt- ville,
-- company bought up a large tract of "Wilmington, N. C., Sept. 12, 190t.-
in fairM subub, and from ti Sealed proposals will be received until 12
M,_ t there was talk of the great im- oon. October 12, 1904, at the office of the
*u .to he nade by the compa Assistant Engineer at Jacksonville, Fla,
mea that LH. B Plant, now for the construction of wharves ad piers,
S M a, d deid to build a great and for the grading for tracks and yards
-t hWt, Whira would mrpass i at the proposed export terminal at Jack-
1. r anything that has yet been bu sonville, Florida.
i nf r isd, and that the property would "The work will require approximately
iba b up in vils and homes for rih 250,000 lineal feet of piling, 2,000,000 feet,
er s. That section of the city immed- board measure, of lumber and 50,000 cubic
ate yh beak o a being boom, ad there yards of earth excavation.
wnee a nber of hanreome residences .ia and peeifiati fsltse work
meta in Faireid. Then for a kg may be seen at the offilee f the-sistant
Stb was no activity i the suburb. Engineer at acksonville, or at this office.
1. 8Sae the transfer of the Plant Invest- "E. B. PLK AANTS,
- et O y ho-ings to th. tlan "ief Engineer."
Cast Liit' there b been talk of bn In conformity with the sbove adver-
l og imume docks and teminal faili- tisement, which appeared in numerous
tea of the cmpiany in the eastern part publications during the past month, bids
;of the dt.. g b peed has bua were opened by Mr. L L Sparrow, As-
4 mse by the empany in regard to its distant Engineer of the Atlantic Coast
Splans, b for the past six month th ese ]Ane, in this city, and by the chief en-
S pln' s p I bea maturing, until now cos- gineer of the company in Wilmington,
trac nre about to be awarded for the North Carolina at noon Wednesday.
a~ mtwets of what is officially desig- There were several bids received, for
.- wrlecf *l Iof tia nhplry aw eaclh of th itr-- eaumerats, by Mr.
Sthe "A if COM t Line Railway Corm- Sparrow, and presumably as many more
."' - '3a tkloville Export TrminaL" by the chief engineer. The names of the
Th we d."export" in eoneetion with bidd r and the amount of each bid will
ta le tiu of the teanirl has a deep i e :at be made pube untl all of the bids
SI ImnUn the cojpay **bhev been b ose over at tht hesdquartera
o make kasasovlfle it part of of the company and the contract awarded:
ei amee d clearance for nearly al of The quantity of piling alone shows what
-. Pm Iodts of orida handled by this an immense project in the matter of
SI--m e ystem of riet Trs r WYf wts ff 1bilding is, proposed ad the quan-
S asly Florida products handled by the tity of lumber shows that the improve-
.; 1 System of Railways have been meats will cover a large area, in the way
d, e frnm the port of Savanah. Vea- of flooring for wharves and timbers of
ak wore lead at the Havamah docks all kinds for the same. The item of
wifth tmaloado of hFlaid pre ueta and 50A yards of earth excavation i an
-i l ri stM AI to n Waterm of the item of considerable importance, espec-
. J -.


lly when it is known that the larger
portion of the excavation is to obtain
eep water for the piers and wharves.
The original project of constructing
three or more long piers from the com-
any's property out to deep water, so
hat several ships could lay alongside and
oad or unload direct to the cars on the
racks on the pier, has been modified some-
bhat.
On account of the character of the soil
t the bottom of the river it was found
o be impracticable to construct such piers.
he new plan is one that will give even
nore wharf room for vessels and it is be-
ieved that it can be carried into effect at
less expense than the original project.
The plan that will be carried out in the
building of the wharves is to construct
en piers along the river front on what
s known as the saw-tooth plan. Each
per runs out at an angle from the shore
ine of, say 45 degrees, though some may
e more and some les. The frontage of
each of these saw-tooth piers are as fol-
lows: One has 325 feet frontage, one has
10 feet frontage, six have a frontage of
119 feet and the last one has a frontage
of 300 feet. This gives a total of 1,750
feet of wharf frontage and the greater
advantage is that the end of each of the
saw-tooth piers is also available for load-

The entire river front along these piers
is being dredged to a depth sufficient for
any vessel that can come up the river to


load. As the work of deepening the chan-
nel of the river progresses and deeper
draft vessels are enabled to enter the com-
pany will keep pace with the improve-
ments and deepen the channel along its
wharf line.
Just inside the line of the saw-tooth
docks will be laid a large number of side-
tracks in the new railroad terminal yard.
The nearest track to the docks will be
only eighty feet from the outer edge of
the dock line. There will be seven side-
tracks in this set alone, and numerous
others to accommodate all business.
In addition to the saw-tooth piers, there
will be one long pier at the northern end
of the wharf line. which will be 300 feet
-a length. This pier will have a pier bead
150 feet in width and 75 feet in depth.
There will be three tracks running out to
the end of this pier for the loading and
unloading of igoes direct from ears to
ship.
This only gives a faint idea of the im-
provements that will be made along the
river front, and, in addition thereto, there
are numerous other .improvements -to be
made on the tract of land owned by the
company on both sides of Talleyrand Ave-
nue.
Under the terms of an ordinance recently
passed by the City Council the Atlantic
Coast Line Railroad Company is to open


-Mt


up a new avenue, to be known as Taley
rand Avenue, from a point 300 feet nort
of Marshall Street to a point just e
of the abutment of Deer creek brwMe, j
is to pave this new avemn *ith vriisd
paving brick for a width of twety fae
for the entire distance which is estimate
to be about three-fourths of a mil. A
consideration of the railroad compare
opening up this ew almrs wM
straightens the old route, th dty
the old avenue between the two
mentioned to the railroad ecpay. .
West of the new avenue 'he eompyll
now putting in a large mn ert
track, making e of thp lhs m
ing and store yards of any in 4 .
tion. These yirds are comItatid i t
lower or river front yards by e i -
trog s tr, that the new- M
crossed by a railroad track aly- in
place.
The main line track, to ommA tif
yards in the eastern p artM 4jy woP
the main lines leading awr-O the uin*
em and western part of tne city, ee .
in by the Georgia-FDd"a m~I.IPY. ~-
factory crossing Eighth Street at t
point, and leading on the great exqt
yards.


The improvements now auder way
the company and the work for wMY h 1
were opened yesterday, will eat, it is ei-
mated, not less than $1,0000 antd thb
is a good prospect of other great -l
provements being made by the esmg
in the near future. .
These improvements woudd nemer h
been located in Jacksonville if the d -
ning of the St. Johs river to the-
had not been pushed through a
ance given that the deep water pmject
speedily be completed.


A *aooooo Croati C Mpmy OipFiL
Letters patent have been ied t.5UU
Plorid Croestie ard MCihfb Cmygj.
with headquarters at Jakenmil, w4 a
capital of *00,000.
The general nature of the bues t be
tr,?qaeted shall be the pI rh l t-
inag, dAeloping, Wp ari-npeng iAf
patents and patented macbhi n i
cry for the cutting and bew ing t
and timber, and the m~afaeeI 4 ,
ad #isap6i g of meh lm ilj
hiMny, erestim atnd
products orameh maind
and the doing of any b-iness
similar or eounected and p utaplf
section therewith. The
have power to acquire, own an
timber, timber lands anday Vt
erty necessary or preftable to
use in connection with its aid f h
The incorporators are J. N. I3 -
F. DillM and A. W. Barn.

.-


r '


- For One W~eek Enids 14. 1904


00 \


OC~f.
r----T-~






- ---- - - I ... II
22222222222202222222 2----


C. B. NOGX8, PRUIar".


W. A. GALLABER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, V1ca-Pa suats


0. H. HODGION, 00c, sad Tnas'.


DIRECTORS: C. B. Rogern, W. AA.Gallaher, Ei Chaplain A. McBEee and J. A. Cr ford, of JaMkbville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; 0. M. Covington, Penascol.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY'


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Brasches In Tampa, Peasacola, PFl.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Groeery Company
of Jackonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commiesion Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Storee Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensmeola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain,


Pro-


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


CWalst f Tb reef-Story aBudla, 70z200; am two-story Alhklin. S0xs90 ame eme-story haNtlil, 0z20,
maklag the l est spae a amy CnWpaay e the klad Ia the SMth.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacol.a, Fle., .nd Savannaeh. G(.

S------ --------- --------- -- ----- ----------- -- ------ -------------------------
--- --e-U w- xx- w- -u -s --- -- ---- -r-
TMB =COED VUL =B W==l 99""iM TW ZVI=rl Wlm


*


THE WEEKLY LNtDUbTdlAL BRBOXD.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
--- -- R ---- --- --- --> -- -- -- -- --- -- -- ^-- -- ~ ih


W ay Cetts 1i I ts Ka of the Wed
t Instry.
Srest st acrp presents assy
very fim i features. Ordinarily
there is o bnl emnt to the farmer to
g6 everything he possibly CaM from the
saL The moa of his mad he makes
roduetive, the more successful he is apt
to be a a farmer. Of coure, i t hea
shmild be a great surplus of a particular
aduet, bhe is apt to be loser, but ordi-
nauyl it pays him to raise all the wheat,
ear and other gram he can.
JZyith eoctoa it is'differeat. An eleven-
mlion-bale rop is not too much for the
world's coumption. but in the past that
ha meant a very low price for cotton,
a low-priced cotton saects generally the
property of the South.
Secretary Heter's report shows that
the commercial crop of the season of
19-04T was slightly in excess of 10000,-
00 balea This i the lowest siee 189-
1IS, yet thi has been the mot valuable
n ever raised in the Soath. Though it
was a bales lower than the preed-
Ing se, it was worth $137AM800
re. Thoug it was 670,0 bals less
than the crop of 1901-0M it was worth
$SW6O maor. Though it was U1,6,-
Sbale less than the bumper crop of
16w-9, it was worth a33600000 mor
A diffeesme of a million and a quarter
bales made the small rop worth more
than twice as much as the big crop.
It is not easy to understand this. In
IMe eot s was worth about 6 cents. A
reduaio of about one-tenth in the sime
o the crop of 1904 sent the price over 12
eat.. The rhyme or reason for this sort
of thing is hard to And ouL The only x-
plastion is that a small crop can be man-
iplated better than a large one. The
ils need the cotton, and if they an't
et it they must shut down. With so
many competitors in the market. the price
h neessasrily ran up out or normal pro-

s. retary Bester estimates that the
aveage value of cotton per bale for the
eason just closed was $1.68, and this
would give a tol valuation of 617,501,-
S48 for the crop. This by no means rep-
resents the actual value of cotton pro-
ductien for the year. There is half a
t f sed to evpry ble of cotton, and
Mi -au mke .a 5oo0,0oW tons for
St entire op. Very ton of seed will
Sprodue ga pnlo of oil, valued at 1030;
27U pounds of meal, valued at $7J0; 2
Spends of Hiters worth $1.50; and 7r
pend of hulls, worth $1.12, making
total of WLBs. The value of these by-
products for the seamo just dosed is there-
fore about $10500,000, which added to
the value of the cotton would make aboul

Bat it ias been estimated that the
Strmportation companies make 2M,000,
Shaling the cotton seed and the by
S products alone, and out of the entire cro
n d its products they must receive con
Ssiderably mo than $100,000.000.
The southern planters during the lasi
season sold 3,4,19 bales to the Amerl
an mills. Of this amount, 2aS6,9 wea
to the Southerni From this it will be see
that tton .--.dfcWu;ag in the Souti
ha developed so that it almost equah
that of the North.
Here, then, is a great and comparative
ly reent industry in the South. It give,
sm loymt to thousands of people. I1
S'i~m IU S southern mil owners to maki
mnflis of dofara. This has been a ha
year for the manufacturing industry, be
OaN ef Io bi Wam of the raw mate


rial The Southern mills bought less than
they did the year before, and they were
unable to run at their full capacity. But
this is, of course, only a temporary back-
set, such as all the milk of the world
have suffered.
When we take into consideration the
thousands of men engaged in the planting
of cotton, the thoummands of men engaged
in picking, in ginning and in baling cotton,
the thousands engaged in the cotton seed
business, the thousands engaged in samp-
lig, buying and selling cotton, the thous-
ands engaged in compressing it and the
thousands employed in cotton manufac-
tures it is not too much to say that the
cotton crop of last season was the equiv-
alent of $1,000,000,000 t the very least.
It is no wonder, then, that it furnishes
the backbone of Southern commerce, and
is a sure index to Southern prosperity-
Memphis Commercial-Appeal.


H. 0OBISON Pres. ILHGAILLARD. COher
W. B. OWRN. Vice-Pre
Commercial Bank,
State Depositry.
BRAnCHm: Oas. Fi. LMke City. Vri
Jacksonville, - Flrida


TE CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00


BARRELS

ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barrels hold d w pass the se
WIN Aincica ad Eunroped uapdm

Plaat at MEGS, CARO, QOUTMANM GA,
ad IONTICELLO, FLA.
Addres orde t home office

QUITMAN. GA.


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACIKSVILLE
lACKSONVILLE. PLA.
CAIlTAL 530,000 SURPUIS aad UNIXVIDED PROFm S3000
We isre Time Certieates of Deposit. whch draw interest at rthe ate tofe at
am, if hea ninety days or loBKer. T.ae adatar ta nd l oria av
aomtabYoMuT. PaUcnUar ttnom Paid to utof-Tows .acos. mug respmya


"When the Leaves Begin to Fall"
Watch out for Chills wnd Fever.

Planters Tasteless Chill Tonic
Is a sure Cre-GUARANTED TO CU BG 4
We ru no risk inn maarUi tls guaranty. "
Read"i: : AIMnTu


I h en suering with chills ad fever for the
last five years, and had tried doctom' medicle, bat got no
relief until I began to ue Planters Chill To which, I
am thankful to sy, has oure= me.
C.W Boein.
Write aus for booklet and special prices.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO..


Chattanooga, Tenn.


a* R. PO&L. CBAS. 6. NMAIS, BZERR ASM W.
seit. Vgce-Presdemst ad fresurer. Scresry.
Dfascroes:
DIRECTORS:
a Powef, Cas. C. 6arris, D. rls. c. cllma, P. r. .SktHerlmd. . C. Vrf'."

THE


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Coer of West Ba a"I lant Sto.
Jacksemvile, nforda.


Wholesale Drugs Commissary Suppies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote price e .
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty d and eao yes
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.



THE ARAGON
"JACKSONVILLE. fIA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroaiugh
renovated and repaired througbom, ht-
eluding new eletri elevator ad ors
own electric light plant.
,O ftf H. N. O'NEAL Prop.



East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a SpecIaty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


W. T. RILEY,
President.


J. A. 6. CARSON,
Vlce-Preslet.


sgo. J. 9WOVEN,
Sec. 1mw


'on t.f Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
NAhgrl Mg. MANUFACTURERS OF

6 BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
__Machine and Hand Factories,
8th Street R. R. Crosesng
AM -JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA
THU RlCORD IS TH S0WTH'S GREAT TRADE JOURNAL.


i-








WI


4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SLuetter ft J. 8atta .
SHarri PF Oct. leth, 190.
Srat Industrial Beeord, Jacksonville,
Fla.:
Dar Sir: There has been a great deal
said by difere operators concerning the
matter of reducing the production of
naval stores aad different plans offered
s a good way to control labor.
Now, Mr. editor I have a suggestion
to ofer that in my opinion will come
very near bringing about the desired re-
salts, provided, however, that the ope-
raters one aad all will agree to the plan
ad the stick to it.
Before referring to my plans, I wish
to say that there has been much said
already on those points and some good
sgtioa s have been offered. But in my
opinion there cannot be any one rule
adopted by the association that all the
operators a whole can abide by. For
that reason, I offer a suggestion that in
my opinion can be applied to each opera-
tor. It seems to me from reading the
rules laid down by the association that
every operator that was present at the
time those rules were adopted agreed to
curtail hi output 10 per cent the coming
esae n I for one do not think that rule
eas be applied to every operator. There
e a few operators that have not got
boa eonsagh that ill justify them in
redaing their production. But instead
of reducing their output it is actually
,.eeo-ry that they increase their pro-
iade in or.r to have a good paying
biness. Now, for instance, take my
own eae for a illustration. I have only
been located here this makes two years
In opening up here I started very late,
aad only cut eight rop. Labor wa
mseM wth me last year and I did not
get th worked very well. Not near sc
well as they should have been, and owing
to that particular reason, I only cut 3
eropa last winter, as I felt like I had
rather have my timber standing unboxed
than have it boxed and not worked. Bul
labor has been much better with me thi
seas ad I have been able to keep m3
work up very well. But as I only havi
8 eaop of third year and three crops ol
aeond-year boxes for next year you ca
readily se that t is necessary for m
to erase my output, while I propose t4
work oa small sale. I only want t4
eat 4 r 5 erops this winter. My opinion
is that all who have locations had bette
make theu carry them as long as possible
For that reason I propm e to go slow
Leaving off persal matters I again refe
to the point in question. While t is t
ease that a few operators that should
hav the privilege of increasing their pro
dection, there ae plenty of operator
who have enough boxes cut to give tbhe
a good paying business without euttin
a box, and as there is where the over-pro
dUton eomes from, it i reasonable t<
suppose that there is where the reduction
will have to come from.
My suggestion is this: That every ope
rater, little and big, in the whole tur
peatine belt, make a statement in writing(
as to the number of boxes he has work
of each elsa this year, and in the sam
statement et forth the number of boxe
tfeah class he intends to work the coer
g season, and send the written state
meat to the secretary of the association
and the secretary should keep a record o
Sthe statement. and if the operators ar
anxious to curtail the production, as the;


seem to be, they ean eat it down more taan
10 per cent, and still have a good pay-
ing business, and in my opinion it would
be well for a committee to be appointed
to investigate matters and see that each
one does not exceed his agreement set
forth in his statement. If those plans
were adopted, it is my opinion that it
would bring the reduction down so as to
warrant us good prices the coming season
And as to controlling labor, I will say
that the operators alone are responsible
for the condition labor is in.
But if the proper reduction is made in
the turpentine business and the following
rules adopted and stuck to, the labor ques-
tion would be settled. To-wit: First,
hold $5 on each hand four weeks, to secure
us against accounts made after they have
been paid off. Second, loan no money.
Third, after the Ist day of March, pay
no accounts for hands. Fourth, require
that each man applying for a job bring
a written certificate from his last em-
ployer showing that he is out of debt, etc.
Now, Mr. Editor, these are very strict
rules. but once adopted that will settle
the labor question, and I don't think there
would be any need to be uneasy about
labor. I think there would be a plenty
and the labor would be looking for us,
instead of us looking for them.
Let me hear from some other operators
on these points, and if anyone can offer
any better plans, I would be glad for
them to do so.
With best wishes for the success of the
business I remain,
Yours truly,
J. B. BUTTON.

Six Cervieta semap
A clean loss of $W00 occurred Monday
When the D. W. Monroe convict camp, lo-
Scated near Titusville. Fla., lost six negro
convicts.
Among those who escaped are several
Swell known in Jacksonville, and two of
Them have been captu ed here once before.
IJohn Wilson, known about police head-
tquarters as "Alkali Bill," was born in
Jacksonville and was committed to prison
Son October 21, 1902, to serve five years
Son charge of larceny. "Alkali Bill" for-
f merely worked about the police headquar-
a ter.


Sam Brown was born in Gainesville and
was committed to prison on June 5, 1902,
from Dade County to serve a life sen-
tence for murder. *
Jeff Frierson was born in Wilmington,
N. C., and was committed on October 19,
from Dade County, to serve four years on
a charge of larceny.
Will Groce was also born in -Jacksonville.
but was committed from Hillaboro Coun-
ty to serve seven years. He was sen-
tenced in 1902.
Dave Cook, a well-known pickpocket,
was born in Charleston, 8 C., and was
committed on June 5. 1902, from Dade
County to serve five years. This is his
second escape. After his first escape he
was captured in Fernandina on a charge
of picking the pockets of Mr. Keene in
Jacksonville. Deputy Sheriff Vinzant
went after him.
When he was brought to Jacksonville it
was discovered that he was an escaped
convict and Detective James C. Crawford
delivered him to the Monroe camps.
Peter Cole was born in Sampson County,
N. C., and was committed in November,
1895, from Jefferson Cunty, to serve
twenty years for murder.


***'O**eo*eeOeOO* sos*gO*Oes* ee*******-**0*:

J. S. Schoflelis Sons Comply,
0I o**o*t*s*ees$ SO**@ **S* t 00:p*:*.p
S* fw t

Distiller's Pumping

Outfit
No plant omplee without am
Hundreds of th in aMuse aI OG
lFlornaida s i dnim Jatippi -m
Sra and pries. We hae rrdm

S Grade Madury.
se* well as ary a ftll and eomplet
e 1 L -o. -Le--
MW SUPPOMa PIMe
s BUeslr Tres, Es.
Advise your want.
Macon, -- Georgia.
t* t rI oft TM *et S Irs Tings e aeis ftig
*****t@5500.*********eO.0e00***0***S***O0*5.*s 4

SI33lll3 IllIII lltl llll||| ||||| ||1 Ili llIllIJ llIIIII ,
W. W. CARNIS. Pres C. TBOHAS. Mamseg. C T DIDL3Y.8sa. & fte


= Tamrpa Hardware Co.

SWholesale

Hardware

Turpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

SLarge Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
S aend Pullers on Hand.

TA MPI, FWA

fI1 111li113l1111 11i ill 1lllll31 1 4 ll31lll31 1 ll131 3 l4141


...NATIONAL ..



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA., U. S. A.


JOHN IL YOUNG,


J. P. WLLaAM8.
a W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALORD.


A. D. COVINGTON.
Vlee-Pr-emIa.


c. Ljs.
P. L. SUB LAND.
J B PAD.IWT.
J. IL YOUNo.


EL KAY-RON,
Sea


R r.. SULARD
W. C. POW.L
WuAnr nAY.
A. D6 COVINGTIO.


J. IL CmwKU"
a4 W. zmn,
tAYU31 OAY.
a. I- OIOPLy.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled d a e
eonveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. 0. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHERt OF TM ABOVE FOR PARTICULAR.





W. R. THOMAS

GAINESVILLE. FLORA,


Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mdues.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buies


ziyo BOUT IEM D ITm 13 TE= MRO W3un UL









TME WUNKLY IIIDU~-rIziA kROORD.


UM JOHN YOUg r ACK.

Tarvia 0vr the Mae Importat se-
team of the WeL
pamMat Jahn R. Young of the Elis-
YTng ., returned during the week from
a tor of the Weat, much b wanted fro
he trip ad looking the picture of health.
He received the congratulations of frieds,
were pleased to ad the good he
drvd from his journey.
Mr. Youg visited the more important
Um of the Wat, and aso took in the
pitreaque trip through the Yellowstone
Park, which he greatly enjoyed. Mr.
Yong oecupes a prominent place in local
Ameas, and consequenly was received in
many kiame quarters where e visited.
esidm being at the head of the LIlis-
Young Company, he is s-o president of
S the Savanah Board of Trade, president
of the Natioal Tank & Export Co, pres-
iMet of the Standard Barrel Co, and a di-
'etr in the Ctiam's Bank of Savannah
and other suceemful business institutions.
Bis haraetiriatie public spirit and hoom
prde maifested itself at once upon his
.ratr, whea he deviated from a well-trod
path and declared he preferred Savannah
aad ha hobme couary to any section of
the West he saw.
Mr. Youg gave m special attention to
a study or inquiry about naval stores
whe away, believing he hears enough of
thi sabjet at home. While at the
Word's Fair he of course visited th
heard of Trade exhibit, which he was
largely instrumental in having prepared.
-Cottot Trade Journal

W YOU Ta Shaam 2t to the Geargia
htraateat Sawmi Aasciatian.
An open lter from the president aad
semetary.)
Tifto, Ga., Sept. S0.
1. It is an organization of muufae-
tftr of yellow piae lumber and designed
for the mutual good of alL
S. It is impossible to do individually
whst has been and can be done through
this org,--tic-.
It is the only medium through which
the sawmill mn of Georgia and Florida
mc combat evils of trade, resist unwise
and huatfl legislation and promote the
eo-operatio of manufacturers in better-

4 The periodic Necesary changes in
rues of impeetion and correction of evils
of aspection ean only be accomplished
through an amoemtion.
5 The tire trade, manufacturers ad
deales, have been beneted by the asso-
eation. The larger the membership, the
greater the influence and benets, sad the
sma*er the eot. 4o one should be will-
ag to let all the burden rest on a few,
or to reap where he has not own.
& The --uf-et- rs supporting the
S e ams aton ae paying out their money for
your beneAt
7. Yo are getting the result of this,
as wen as the time and thought that hare
been given to it, ad you aodd therefore
become sliated with the association aad
help bear the expense of maintaiinig it
& The bnemt derived from te price
list, if simply used as a baia, is worth
many times what your membership will

You should give us your moral sup-
port by joining, ad te beneat of your
imp)reia and ees in shaping the work
o the amesatia. so as to do the great-
met good to the greatest number.
I1 We anelse homewith appliaetins for


membership, which we trust you will sign
and mail to K. C. Harrell, secretary, Tif-
toa, Ga. In any event yo are hereby
invited to attend the next regular meet-
ing to be held in Savannah, Ga, October
1I, 1904, an become aquainted with our
members anad the working of the assoia-
tion. The information you will get will
amply repay you for the time and expense.
H. H. TIFT, President.
E HFARRmEj, Secretary.
The Mercatfle la n Bank SeM.
The Mercantile Exehange Bank, of Jack-
sonville, one of the stsongest baking
intitution in the State, has been sold
to the Florida Bank and Trust Co, of thin
city.
The Mercantile Exmange Bank will be
conducted as heretofore under the able
and eeient management of its present
officers and directors until the firt of the
year, when it will be merged with the
Florida Bank and Trust which will
be organized soon with a capital of one
million dollars, with Mr. Walter F. Coach-


man, president; Gov. W. S. Jening%,
vice-president, in charge of the trust d
surety department, and Mr. Arthur F.
Perry. vice-president in chrg of the
banking department.

Adulterated Spirits of Turpetine.
The adulteration of spirits of turpen-
tine has been growing to such an extent
in this city, that complaints from the
consumers are numerous, says the Oil,
Paint and Drug Reporter, of Phil-
adelphia, P. Thi evil has been
practiced here as far bark as 1884,
and since then the subject of adulteration
has been brought to the attention of the
members of the local Paint, Oil and Var-
nish Club, and a request was made to
formulate plans to protect the paint and
varnish maaufaturers against the un-
scrupulous dealers who resorted to the
nefarious methods of adulterating spirits
of turpentine with kerosene and benine
and sell ame a pure spirits. The at-
tempt to cheek the adulteration was never
tried and it appeared that the trade look-
ed upon naptha and its kidred p.-duets
with such favor that the subject of adul-
teration was never opened by the members
of the Paint, Oil and Varnish Club. Since
the time mentioned above, when the sub-
ject was discussed, the evil of adulteration
of spirits of turpentine has grown to
such a large extent that if not cheeked
will place New York at the top of the
list for the highest honors of the worst
adulterated market for spirits in this
country. It is claimed that samples of
turpentine have been purchased from sev-
eral firms as pure spirit, and after the
samples were separately tested, it was
ascertained that all of them proved to
be adulterated. At normal temperature
one sample showed a Beaume gravity of
thirty-two ad seven-eights, another show-
ed a gravity of thirty-three, aad the other
thirty-four and one-quarter degrees, and
Hashed at eighty-nine Fahrenheit, where-
as pure spirits of turpentine at a normal
temperature has a Beaume gravity of
about thirty-two degrees and lashes at
one hundred degrees Fahrenheit. At a
meeting held by the Paint, Oil and Varnish
Club on Thursday last it was resolved
to use urgent means to cheek the adulte-
ration of spirits of turpentine, and the
delegates who were appointed to attend
the National Paint, Oil and Varnish As-
sociation at Buffalo will urge the mater,
which will be presented to the chairman of
naval stores of the association.


SFor Sale



this round) 19% crops. Now being worked. Complete outt. We
will make immediate delivery, or price for delivery after pent
crop taken off. This is one of the beat propositions ir the stale.
OAMOO Asees Round Timber, Volusia County. Will make
special price for sale before November 1st.



Brobston, Fendig & Co.

SJadsav FHrMda. ismi Ogirgi

i mwwwwwww w iwinw------------ niT


J. A. Craig (0 Bro.

239 W. Bay Stret EVERETT BOCK.

Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.


--- --***** ;***V***W9* 9---------- --



The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE & RETAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints, Oils and Glass.
Stoves, Tinware, Countrr-Holloware.


a WEST T Y STREET


Jacksonville, Fla.


T. MURPHY

JACKSONVILLE MACHINE nD IRON WORKS
ENINEE IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaied. Ire
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MAR NE INGINS AND BOERS PULLEYS AND SHAFTIG
Agent for Stationary Engines, Boilers, Pumps, Feed Water Heatersami CQeadsm
ers, Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and RabLbe Goieo
pWER TImlIISI ui WATER ni EuMI IT i MPEcUnI
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


--------------




Stand



DEALER


AND


----------------------------<
Cable Address. Florida


ard Naval Stores

Company.

RS EXCLUSIVELY IN


R.OSIN

TURPENTINE.

JackSonville, Fla.


V=[ vIF Avmr s_ T=3 32UOS


SF;


1 0110


5


c


-- ---- -------- ---- --- -- --------- ~


--------------









6 THE WEEKLY JluWUItrjIlAL RKCOBD.


Hoe-rews 8Stck Fel in Fleria.
Florida is well know as stoeraising
State. That South Florida, especially in
Lee County, is foremost in this line, is
proven by the fact that Punta Rasa is
moe of the most important cattle shipping
ports or the west coast. In Southern
Florida there are large ranges, affording
excellet cattle grazing-wild grasses on
both dry and wet lands. In some parts
cattle run all the year round; and hogs
which sometimes stray away from farms
and become wild, find food on which they
seem to thrive at all seasons. Lee Coun-
ty has many extensive grazing districts.
Thplghout the pino lands there are va-
rieties of wild grasses, tracts of which are
bmh d in winter; in early spring and sum-
mer cattle feed upon the fresh bunches
wheh spring up thickly from the old roots.
Several specimens of Bermuda grasses are
eormmo here; also red-top, crow-foot, and
others, all affording excellent picking for
atoe
That thdre'ae great possibilities in the
growing of stock feed in Southern Florida
we believe s amply demonstrated here at
SEsteo There is a great variety of eul.
tivate products which are most nutri-
tios for all kinds of stock. We have
* oted here about twenty varieties, some of
the most important of which we may
mention. An excellent meadow may be
made of pa grass, from which two or
three crops of hay per year may be cut.
This gras is very hardy, growing from
the living joints or the lod roots. Its first
growths ae along the ground. roots start-
ng-from joints in contact with the sur-
fe of the soil; then tufts start up, and
as the gras becomes thick, it sends up
perpendicular stalks which may be cut
with the scythe or mowed with the ma-
hine. In the fall the meadow may be
plowed, the sod turned under; next spring
the gss comes up fresh and thicker than
ever. This grass is very nutritious, having
good body of stem and blades.
Another very valuable grass here is the
tes grals. It nay be planted in rows
and tended like cane or corn. It grows
in great bunches from very large roots
which take firm hold in the ground., We
have seen specimens of this grass at En-
tOr eight and ten feet in height, the
bunches being several feet in diameter.
It may be cropped close to the ground
two or three times a year. It thrives
along ditches also, the thick clumps tend-
ing to hold the form of the banks. It will
grow on nearly all kinds of soil in Flor-
ida, and is valuable not only because it
is good feed, but because of its large
yields of either green grass or hay.
On Estero Island the Koreshans are
experimenting with German millet. A
short time ago we were looking over the
farm there, and were very much surprised
to Mm great stalks of millet ten to twelve
feet in height, appearing in the distance
to be corn or cane. It is planted in rows
and cultivated and cut and shocked like
"et corn." Several crops a year of this
millet may be successfully grown, fresh
drops coming up from the old stumps. We
have seme millet grown in Missouri, Iowa,
Illinois and other States of the North,
but the specimens seen on Estero Island
were certainly ahead of anything in the
line of millet that ever before came under
or observation.
Both sugarcane and sorghum are easily
brown here, affording excellent fodder.
The Florida soil is capable of producing
immeme crops of cane, and the tops,
either green or cured, are nutritious, and
s-Atute an excellent feed for stock.


The crops of sugarcane at Estero thief
year consist largely of very higa and
rank stalks. We have walked along rows
of sugarcane the past few days where
stalks ten to twelve feet high were not
at all uncommon.
In the line of grasses there are several
varieties good for both cattle and hogs.
A prolific grass overruns neglected, and
uftentimes tended, portions of farms, cal.-
ed grass burr. We have been thinking
that it was absolutely worthless, as its
,eed constitutes a burr which sticks to
everything nearly, and is somewhat troub-
iesome; but its persistence in sticking to
things leads to rapid spreading. We have
been surprised to learn the grass burr
makes excellent hay, cattle and higs fat-
tening on the burrs. The choicest hay,
however, that may be produced here, one
which yields large results even as a wild
product, is the beggarweed or Florida
clover. It is very nutritious and is much
liked by all kinds of stock.
quite a variety of vines are also good
lor hay here-principal among which we
may mention the well known oowpea,
largely grown in the South; also the vel-
vet bean, the vine, hull and bean of which
are eaten; peanut vines and sweet potato
vines, which are very good feed. This
year the Koreshans have very large fields
of sweet potatoes, and a great deal of
stock feed will be gathered from this
source. For hogs, nutgrass, of the goober
species, is very fine; while for both cat-
tie and hogs, cassava roots constitute a
superior feed. Cassava is easily grown
here and is very productive. Turnips and
beets are also easily produced. Doubt-
less in the near future experiments nay
be made with buckwheat and clover; we
see no reason why these should not be
grown in Florida. We should also :lke
to see quantities of rice planted at Es-
tero.
We notice one striking peculiarity about
a number of Florida produets-and that
is the method of propagation of variety of
things from the stalks or joints. We had
aong known from hearsay that the stalkb
of sugarcane were planted. Upon making
acquaintance with some of the Florida
farming methods, we perceived that even
various grasses are propagated in tnis
,vay, but we were somewhat surprised
to find that vines of early sweet potato
.rops are cut up in pieces and planted.
We now pass every few days several acres
of sweet potatoes grown from the mere
joints of vines. In early spring begin with
.he real potatoes by planting the eyes or
setting the slips, raise an early crop, cut
the vines and .lay them in rows; plow
them a couple of times-and there is a
rich yield of vines for stock, and potatoes
for the table and market.--Correspond-
ence Fort Myers Press.


During the month of August vessels
clearing from Gulfport, Miss., carried
about 24,000,000 feet of lumber. Three
:,f the largest shipments amounted to
over 7.000,000 feet. Exports of lumber
for the first eight months of the calendar
year amounted to over 175,000,000 feet,
as compared with 62,000,000 feet during
the same period of the previous year.
Miscellaneous shipments included 26000
barrels of rosin and 115,000 gallons of
turpentine.


. AMES, Proes J. .L SHAW, Vioe-Pros. m IW Jin,M W.se-e

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and ROsins
Strstly a Predsers' Compmy. Coge,
Grades aml Weigts GMaralted
Delveries at JaeksevlU, Pensamla, Fermil a"i Sagwml
Cerrespmudene Sesite&. JACKSO I I r F L

Ir1i itiSthIIIIIhuIuOI Iii 110111u111161 M I I Ihos**s4


PEARL W T. Pros.


T. aL M CARTIT. vUMPres


-" wfirm Tram


S SOUTHERN STATES LAHD & TIMBER CiMPAIT.

* lmmn V a.. mseir.


SFlorida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.

401-404 LAW EXCHANGE, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Os V I t I R oot I I ts s t tle l I I I _S_ 180081880 i116666


W. n BrKWrIH. W.B. HIlDE SON.. .0 WAIC. A

SBECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.


: LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE All MLL LAMS.

SROOms 1-2-3, First NatlMalI BAtl DdAflf.
TAMPA, : : : P : FLORIDA.

111126l I seel Itesll lll go uIoseI 891..81*is 99 Iuso

.M Ah Ak l d a, A
ii


BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I w l md by eI pmm preIpaC, he sAww.
For full qnrti Linoa Comity. annyerook Rae or BIs m rse .. 11
SBottles .........
I will send four fun qaurt of mer' Corn IMewoos R (y. OdeI WeS-
ding Rye. Holland t0a. TomI OI Peach Bramd. PeaRs amed wa
Whitkeyr, Gin a"d Manhattan ock**V* -%r of te above Se ........ s
Ose bottle of any of the above .......................... .....................
rour bottles of the followtiw Caiforni Winas: merly, Pat. Muasn
Catawba .. n-
Sitgle bottles .
oaur bottles WImon WMIhdm. esw4 am
Single bottles am
FIve bottles DuIf Malt a
Single bottles aI
Bulk goods of alln kds. Spedal Pries or *micatlea. A MMtb et
noru a In ftJ m UL to I. fL Jasm amlr .
F. BETTELINI W Bay St, opp. Uakm Depot, Jaeuksuvmn F


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON IEArP


ua yom ar thman e o a Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest n-
"s.-.*tmg_ toam e l he. I ~ ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. SF quotatior-
.Uas m -- Aimr wena thispaper.
te bln o myaet wer om ia =
ru. inf m.' wat KINOAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSOVILLE, FLA.
AE TYOU A U9mrm mt TO TH BO?


Sr'n D AK .h s. C V. IAITUBON. Vbs4.k,. A & 3BAmX ..
()Em tHLa CM) (C. V. hr1C0) m6 Cam m I

i FLORIDA FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY
) r( MCISMATEi.)
) We cam collect yoar Freight Claims aglast
) Railroads msd Steamship Cempmgesa.
SCargcs Reasomable. Your Membershp Sictead.
Wre sav al wirr7rar traMse. Ird SY Oa rMM Biess
"216 -U CU ru B = rt CKemss.
S216 Dyal-Ulhudmar Ble.. JACKSONUIE,. IL.A.
AMRA A A A A91 A ff h -AL


L a A, -A i- & s -d A -,A w da, 'A. A, d&


m


m


m


m


w -


. ... .... v w v v








_THE WEEKLY AJDUt1rtAL B EOORD. I
. .. .. ..


An Amerima syndicate haa asquire a
sMeU Me trenet of White Pine located
toward the midwest of the State of chi-
hasha Mexics, and contracts are about
to he awarded for railroad material, lIre
lumber mills, etc. Te indicate, which is
ealld' the Americaa-Mexican Iumbr
Coamp y, Mi controlled by the Develp-
met Compay, of Amria, in wehic en-
er are Senator Rssell A. Alger, of De-
trit; V. M. Mrphy, of Detroit, who is on
the sants Fe sBard; BUpamin B Cesm-
uny, of Botom, one of the large stock-
hlder of the Santa Fe; CoL Rthfard
Towbridge. of New Haven, Coe.; ery
Wick, of Youngstown, Ohio; Mr. Robinson,
of Youngstown; B P. Paxsu, of Phila-
delphi, and Bichard Gentry, of Kansas
City. The Cihanhau property is twenty-
b ive iles by thirty-Ave mies. Within
the boundaries are two settlements of
people from the United States, mostly
Monsa. One township sear the north
line coves about 12,00 acres ad i
mknow a the Colomi Gards. The other
is na the sothera part, and covers a some-
what similar area. The property former
ly belkged to Telesfrd Gawia. The sta-
tim of COsa Grandes, on the io Grande,
fhea Maine sad PeiCe lie, is seventy-
Iste mr to the north of the timber.
imea, n the Chibshhau a Pacife, h
abort a similar distance to the south by
east of the property. Surveys for a
brameh road have already been made for
mine fty miles to the northwest of Mi-
mena. The prjeets for the building of the
naBoad line through the property have
mrt, however, yet reached a point where
any dehiMe amnomeement would be jws-
tifiable.

SAn important deal .was made at Moul-
Iris, a.- resatly when W. K. and T. J.


ren


Ayeok, of the Colquitt Lumber Ompany,
yellow pine manufatrers at that place,
sod their giaing mi located at Cor-
betts to Messmr. L L. Daugherty, R. M.
Morrison ad J. N. Welch, who for some
time have bee operating in pine at whole
sale as Daugherty, Morrioa & Co. It is
understood that the purchasers will at
o e re-ineorporate the business under the
style of the Colquitt lumber Company,
which has been its name as a corporation
in the past The oders of tha new coa-
cern will be as follows: Mr. Daugherty,
president; Mr. Welc, vie-president and
manager, and Mr. Morrison, secretary and
treasurer.
The future business of the Oolquit
Lumber Company wil be handled through
Daugherty, Morrison & o, while Mr.
Welh will have large of the manufactur-
ing department. It is generally under-
stood that the dal was made by Mesrs.
Ayeoak for the purpose of giving their un-
divided attention in future to the operation
of their extensive timber lands in Florida,
whbene they will go about January 1.
The deal has caused considerable com-
ment in lumber cirles there. Mr. Daugh-
erty ea to oultrie Ave years ago to
enter the lumber business and has been
continomMly successful; the Arm of
Daugherty, Morrison & Co., having been
formed some time later, has sinee occupied
a prominent position among the broker-
age rm of the State Mr.. Mor-
rimo, secretary and treasurer entered the
lumber business about two years ago, aad
his capabilities added much to the strength
of the firm.
It is undertood that the Messrs Ay-
coek will maintain an office there until
January 1 in order to wind up their busi-
ms affairs in the State, after which they
will give their undivided attention to their
new Florida operation.


The Malette-Gray Lumber Company,
which is one of the largest operating in
southwest Georgia, have sold their large
plant at Doerun, together with several
thousand acres of ne timber.
The new firm will be known as the
Thomas N. Baker Lumber Company.
Messrs. W. W. Carter and J. W. Crosby
are erecting a sawmill jst west of An-
burndsle, Fla., near the McDonald prop-
erty. It will be a large up-to-date plant.
The mill company will bpild a branch road
from Morse to the mill and thence to the
A. C. L. road, connecting with the latter
at a point about two miles west of Au-
burndale.


KIRK & JONES

DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.
MAIL OnDnsm8 SOLICITED.
JAOKSONVILLE. FLA.


W. J. VLENOM
Predient.


BUEDERS AND DZAX W IN


ENGINES. BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilar, 0 and les b-
ehiery, and Sulie and .I
CAPACITY FOR M RAAM& -
Machine Tool, Wod-WwM l hMy
Shafting, Pulya, H iiAs -- -
Rubber Belting ad now J- -
Mll Supplc and Too&&
Pla ua estiuate foruld" -rf-re
Plants ad Steel Bifamk
Steam Pum Fa rd Waw NM M mo
Hoisting 0ngum
AUOUSTA. OA.
a me. ms es esmus*
5P0sy s eeds to mrPON S..
t a m AN te wamk.


J. W. WADR.
Viee.Presiakt


LSes G
See, MGVEr


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


NEW ORLAHA LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


D. M. FLYNN, President


W. B. JOHBNON, Viee-President


A. 8. PENDLETON, See'y & Tre


J. W. Oglesby


DIRECTORS
L. Horn


N. G. Wade


J. L. Medlin


W. B. Johnas


Independent Naval Stores & Export Co.,


Jacksonville, Florida.





Naval Stores Factors and Operators.


Capital Stock, $500,o0o.

The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal advances made on consignments.
Our interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operative company.



Some Money and Some Timber For Somebody.


An Producers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.


TES ouM Is T ha'OPI50t V 1JUI'M


PENSACOLA. FLA.


D. M. flynn


Walter Bay


I


---- M %_ -%% 11% *% Nm %
*%W& %V%%








a THU WE I MY MJuNDIrXIJAL BOOED.


Business Directory.

I= IgsURANcE-IAWa zAse. I&-
va I Gran & M. 9 and 10 P1zk Mig&



OEpi um 410119a L Niedy w
Mee. OpenOw a" maf ntft Bet=ls
am 6RMI


BlYT i OITOMNRT,
Co.nlmI-on Merchant,
Nmvrl Storeu 6 Cotton
d .: . . . ..-
COTTO XmresmamG BUMLDMs,
W YOmK CIT.
We-- WmrnIrT ADVlRTISZRS
I THI2 IMCORD.
CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Bes in the VWrd.
Flr deliver price wri,
Cypress Tak C4., bMteAla

MaNtee Cr ty Abstr Compay.
&-& Jobusr, Abstrater.
&8dmbW16 Mmate CM4, Rwt.
Iase Nor maredea t property owners in
-am mission-r ent o r ppch ed
ge with gat-edged mecarity pyiag interest
a 10 per cent per auau. ssnalkanusly.
Oonudraepmce saoldcited.


M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

Commission Merchants.
2NM, auzrawulam TA, PITCN,
GUM T W, Cg' ETC.
Sniat Streit, MEW YomR



Trade Checks
FOR THE



THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Mistral Rerd Go.,


W. I. Deac=s Ses Out.
William M. Duncan, the naval stores
operator of Baxter, Fla- who had one son
murdered, another cut and stabbed in a
dozen places, still another wounded, and
himself shot in two places by a gang of
ruffians, who had been trying to run him
out of the country, has sold out his entire
interests at Baxter and abandoned that
place as a residence for himself and fam-
ily.
Mr. Duncan stated that he has quit Bax-
ter for good. He himself has no personal
fear, and he is just the man to defy any
such gang of outlaws and assassins as
has been threatening him, but he has a
wife and family, and they comefirst with
him.
Mr. Duncan has closed a deal with the
Consolidated Naval Stores Company of
this city for all of his interests at Bax-
ter, and in that neighborhood, and says
that he would not return to that point
to reside or carry on business.
Mr. Duncan did not take this action
until after he advised with several uf his
warm friends in Jacksonville, and they ad-
vised him that it was in the interest of
his family to leave the neighborhood,
where the lawless element had shown con-
elusively that they were determined t.
get rid of him, and would not stop at
any act of lawlessness to accomplish their
purpose.
The purchasers of Mr. Duncan's interest
in the naval stores and eroestie business
are members of one of the most powerful
companies in the State. They have placed
in charge of their properties, Mr. W. H.
Williams, who was born and raised near
Baxter, and who has been in charge of
the crosstie business for Mr. Duncan for
several seasons.

Finds ich Deposits of Kalin.
W. J. Hodge, of Alaehua, who has been
for many years one of the progressive and
successful farmers of that section, has
made a discovery which may make him
independent in the future. A few weeks
ago. while plowing a section of his farm,
he noted a mineral which resembed to a
great extent marl, though it was of a
whiter color and more elastic. Having
gathered a sample, Mr. Hodge had the
same analyzed and was agreeably sur-
prised to ascertain that the material was
nothing more or less than a fine quality
of kaolin.
In order to satisfy himself more thor-
oughly of the existence and extent of the
mineral, Mr. Hodge went into the pros-
pecting business. He bored several places
on a 10-acre tract of his place, going as
far into the earth as twelve feet, and
was gratified to find that the deeper his
auger went the more solid the mineral
seemed to be.
The sample which has been analysed
has been brought to the office of Judge H.
G. Mason in Gainesville, and by those who
have seen it who are in a position to
know, it is stated that the material is of
extra fine quality. Mr. Hodge owns a
tract of 212 acres, and indications are that
the entire tract is rich in kaolin. If this
is a fact, the owner need have no further
doubt but that he has a fortune.

Mr. W. W. Beach, Sr., of Mayo, Fla.,
was in the city yesterday. Mr. Beach is
a son of the late W. W. Beach, of Way-
cross, .., and is one of the leading tur-
pentine operators of West Florida.


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


SBoilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
: SHIP BUILDING end REPAIRING.
JIcksonvllle. Fla.
-*guuuugggmppe iu gminimi m ri --- ;

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and Ylate-.nith Coal Lime. Cement, Briek, Pala,
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonvill, Fla


Cummer Lumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long LeJf Yellow Pine.
BOXES and CRATES.



" Standard Clothing Company


One Price


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FIPRNISIIES S,
17 ad 19 West Bay Street, -* Jblcksoel PReb.
Stetaa Ia Hawes Hat. Speeeal AtteemUe m Ov to al rds


a. as asag a s a a asa sesass as a


I. TOLAR.


.susws~.~sisagsuswae:@m


me -


J. H. HART. T. I. LACHLY.
(Established IJa2.)


& IL TOLAR. 4


TOLAR, HART &. CO.,
160 FRONT STREET, NEWIYORK.


Commission


Merchants


eand Jobbers of Nvval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. mbers of
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Ftre. -


JOSWPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. a KRUNMsM


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVAMNAH. G 0ILGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OP

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Batting, Etc.


Read the Record Adv't's.


- OWII= WQLV& LAETr IRA= PAMLm












ZINC NAILS

Turpentine Cups
.A ,oved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
sitong but soft light metal. They are
the -d= M which will not injure
amew whm left in the trees.
w. Neff 00.
am omptwe, now ralk, ff. .
Also H-e-dqt for Galvanized and
Taed Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
k ods, Etc., Slating and Roofin
ails, Slaut Tool Copper Nails



Typewriters
'A MNake-$10.00 Up.

SGRIVOT -'"urdr
bhe Wedomamter. eare, writes in sight.
lmh JEWIfT, King of double-board ma-
SW SO S S lw a Awy 11 Mose o T .ypcr



B. R. fOSR.
MAmUFACTURER Or0


BRIC K.

M M2 W.
acHely eo Yard 800,000 Per Month.
WM.


Whskies, Gins,

Rums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Cmtioller Blum's Monogram and Syl
a Rye--Agents for Jungs, Cinein-
iati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM & CO.
$17 Mad 519 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
we te s mht a sht 4ble them
&.am" I 5 or a e-s I two, t1a


M tro aftr em Pa t rmesirtt
jart.lam wna bas an ot OP



Sirtr EIra m e d ita4 a, theat ti frt.
-in una Ta thr O e AsNR r p be

ues iaislmt by hige-grade
he yes!pest mranne eoes *d*

9. s e drne a a Ma of output a.cd
4W f pofdet. We guarUte Out


1P. U'ilma IMALxMO 39.Q


TURPENTINE

CUPS.

If youtexpect to use the MC rr eap
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices and all inforen-
tion cheerfully furnished on
CUPS, GUTTERS
AND ALL TOOLS
used in the Herty system of tarpeatiming.
i Address


Amon the Operators.
Messrs. R. W. and W. N. Mattox, of
West Tocoi and Green Cove Springs, Fl.,
left last Wedneday for the World's Fair
at St. Louis.

Mr. D. C. Striclin, a prominent turpen-
tine operator of Leno, Fla., was in the city
yesterday.

Mr. W. L. Taylor, of Live Oak, FIa.,
was here last Thursday.

Mr. J. R. Maxwell, of Baily, Fla., was in
the city yesterday.

Good Grasses and a Good Cattle ange.
Not long ago we met a gentleman who
was visiting Florida for the first time
in several years.
He inquired what the outlook was for
the orange interests in the State. We
told him the prospects were very bright.
Then he inquired what would be done
with the immense acreage that was being
cleared of its timber by the turpentine
and lumbermen. We replied that we be-
lieved that the land woul be devoted to
the cattle business in the not very dis-
tant future.
He wanted to know if we had the na-
tive grasses to make a good cattle range.
To this we answered that our native
grasses were not as a rule equal to those
of the Western plains. but we have plenty
of good grasses that could be grown and
that make eeellent pasture. He said that
might be true, but people could not clear
the ground and plant grasses for a range
for from ten to twenty thousand head of
cattle. To this we answered that it was
possible, though not likely, to be done.
But if no one will undertake to create
a range for so large a herd it can and
will be done for smaller bunches.
This brings us to the point we wish to
make. It would be very much better for
the State to have ten thousand cattle
owned by one hundred different men than
to have the same number kept in one
herd on one large range. In the ease of
the small herd, each owner would proba-
bly have a family and a home, while the
owner of a large herd would probably
be a non-resident and the herd would be
cared for by a few herders. In the first
case all or most of the profits would be
used in the State to support the families
of their owners, while in the other they
would go to swell the bank account of an
already over-rich man who has but little
real interest in the welfare of Florida.
With our mild winters, which allow cat-
tie to graze in the fields during the cold-
est winters, we only need an abundant
supply of nutritious pasture grasses to
become the most wonderful stock country
in the world. As we said before, there
are good grasses that can be grown here.
We believe that it will be a very profitable
business to turn these tracts of cut-over
or turpentined lands into small cattle
ranches, stocked with improved breeds.
Instead of importing northern fresh meat,
we ought to furnish all that is needed
in the State, and thousands of head of
fat cattle for consumption in other States.
Beef cattle are not the only ones that
will thrive in Florida. There is no reason
why the dairy cattle should not be kept
and creameries built to turn the milk into
butter. Our hot climate is not a serious
objection. The best creamery butter is
made in the Northern States during the
summer, when the weather is often more
hot and sultry than it is in Florida.


i


Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

derertsamests WiN ll Irnmerfd Ia s easftmiut at mte Fefo& g Utes:
Forone week, 2 cents line.
For two weeks, 35 oeMtsa lie.
For three week, 50 oeems a lime.
For tour weeks, 5eeaas e.
Nine words of ordinary leath miake oe Hse.
No =Hcar tt- two lies.
except the heading. can be admitted.
Remittances taeoempmy the order. No extra charge for eo If eaper
contal ingr advertmet Cot t be hi their ofmce t later tea Thrsdl
normaie to secure iertion isn iday= paper.


Stiller Wasted.
Wanted-First-class stiller, white man
with family. Can furnish good house,
and will board with family. I want a
man who is competent to take charge
during my absence. Address P. H. Baker,
Campville, Fla. 4t

Woodsman Wasted.
Must be single and strictly sober and
not younger than twenty-five or older
than thirty-five; also must be a first-
class bookkeeper, and furnish good ref-
erences. Address J. D. X, Chipley, Fla.
4t.


Turpestlue Mes.
Buy a Blakelee Gasoline Pumping Ot-
ft for your still No. 1 outfit pamps 2 J
gallon per hour at a cost of 3 em aad
requires m attention while ramming.
Started in one minute. J. P. smpbll,
Oea, Fla
For Sale.
35,000 acre St. Johns and Volumi; 13,-
000 acres, DeSoto County; 14,00 acres
Deoto County; 30,000 acres, Calhbou
County; 20,000 acres Hillboro Couty;
80,000 acres Manatee County. Al round
timber. D. T. Doughtry, Boom Bal-
win Bldg. 4t


For Sale.
Small turpentine farm, 12 crops boxes Aze you reading yr paper, or sam-
for one and two years. Plenty high boxes me else's. If ot a subscriber to the sec-
near still. On railroad. Schedule fur-
nished on request. Address H. W. Mercer, am& in yw ame today, with o
Cottondale, Fla. 4t the price of sabecriptia fr em year.

Whes YeT Are In Jaksemml Step At-- m


WOLFE'S EUROPEAN HOTEL.
Corier rt-e an ey ttree".
Rates Se. 5me sad $1.00 per da. Plrst Clas Restaurant la Comeetion. J. IM WOLFE MI er

R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L J. KIteIrH, Sec. and Treas.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.


Herbert A. Ford,
President.


Ge0. H. Ford,
Vice-Pres.


F. L Watesi,
Cashier.


The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CA PITAL,, $50,000.00.
DIBECyoas: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
MeKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Sew Mil Men Sdcitd.


TUE RECORD I T=E OOPKRATOUV VWtTAUM*


.*
_ *


I
TM% wipciaju 1NIUUSuwrmU~IL XWOR'I.


I


Chattanooga Pottery
Compay,


01










10 THE WETHKLY mDubarrSlAL RN0COD.


J. IL PAnOOrr. Anmc a Hunaan Anmw Fr. PSar *
Pret. Vi e-Pre"M. OM141r.

The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
Capital, $200.000. Surplus. $100000
STATE DEPOSITARY.
ea sral Dmklms. Inte. PatiosSaving Deposta. Sae Depoas Besa. .0 per rea.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week


firit for te Week at Savmab
Pri Repts Sl- xp. 1903
MOLn., Oct. 10 152%21/4 287 2549 IR5%
Tae., Oct. 11 J24% 822 563 1046 55%
Wed., Oct. 12 52 281 152 0 55%
Thur., Oct. 13 52 I 509 1172 I 2 .55%


Wi
N
K
1.
H
G
F.
K.
D
ADe
ii


Resi for the Week at Savann.
Monday, Oct. 10. Last Year.
.......... 4.80 4.45
S......... 4.60 4.15
.......... 4.37% 4.05'
.......... .. 4.17% 4.05
.......... 365 3.85
....... .. 2 @00 3.25
.. ......... 2.77% 2.70
... .. .. .. ... 2.70 &55
. .. .. .. .. .. .. 2.65 2.50
. .. .. .. .. .. 2.00 235
.......... 2.55 2.25
... ...... 2.50 2.15


eceipts 926, sales


1,768 exports 5,371.


Tuesday, Oct. 11.-Rosin steady. Prices
unchanged. Receipts, 3,146, exports 6,06.

Wednesday, Oct. 12.-Rosin firm. Priest
unchanged except 5 cents advance on WW.
Receipts 1,174, sales 3,169, exports none.

Thursday, Oct. 13.-osin firm. There
was an advance of 2 1-2 cents a barrel
on D, E and M, and an advance of 10
cents on K. G and H grades declined
21-2 cents a barrel from Wednesday's
quotations. Receipts 2,301, sales 1,739, ex-
ports 1,912.
Range of Turpentine and Rsin at Savan-
nah Ot. 3 and sSame Day
Lat Yar.
Oct. 13 Oct. 12 Oct. 13
1904 1904 1903
Tone .. Firm Firm Firm
Spirits .. 52 i 5 1|65 @%
Sales ..I 1,172 152 I 410
Rosin .. irm Firm J Firm
WW .. 4.85 4.85 445
WG ...| 4.00 4.00 4.15
N .. ..j 4.40 4.40 4.05
M .. .. 4.0 4.17% 4.05
S. ... 3.75 3.65 3.85
I 3.00 3.00 3.25
H ..... 2.0 2.77% 2.70
G ..... 2.72% 2.70 2.55
F ..2.67% 2.67% 2.50
S2.62% 2.60 2.35
D 2.5.. .. 7% 2.55 .225
C, B, A 2.52% 2.50 2.15
Sales .:1 1,739 .... I ....


Savaah Naval Stenm Sttam- .
Spirits Rosin.
Stock April I ........... 6,496 44,550
Receipts Oct. 13 ......... 50 2,301
Receipts previously ......125,689 367,207
Total ...............132,753 414,058

Exports Oct. 13 ........ 262 1,912
Exports previously ......113,048 352,210
Total ............... 113,310 354,122
Stock Oct. 13 .......... 19,443 59,986
Stock a year ago ........ 18,681 52,839
Telar, Hart Co.'s Review.
New York, October 11, 1904.
SSpirits Turpentine-The market con-
tinues quiet with but slight fluctuations.
Stocks are light, but buyers' necessities
are supplied from arrivals. Stock, 540
barrels. We quote Machines, 553-4 cents.
Rosin-The demand is fair for all grades,
preventing any Aecumulation of stock.
We quote: B 0; D, $2.95 to $3.00;
E, $3.05 to $3.10; F, $3.10; G, $3.15; H,
$320; I, $3.40; K, $4.00; M, $4.45; N,
$4.65; WG. $5.00; WW, $525. Market
steady. TOLAR, HART & CO.
Turpentie Ditillatia in Sweden.
A new plant for preparing oil of turpen-
tine by the use of overheated s*eam hlf
been laid down at Uma in .uwe.tn lPe-
torts are packed with resinous wood. amn
the superheated steam, passing through
the retorts, carries off the turpentine, and
leaves the tar at the bottom of the re-
tort, whence it is run off from time to
time. The steam is condensed, and the
turpentine soon collects on the surface
of the water. It is claimed that the'
process gives turpentine of a purity great-
er than can possibly be obtained lv dis-
tillation with a direct fire. Not only is
this the case, but the charcoal anJ fnr and
other products of the action of tle stteam
are of extremely good quality. The char-
coal constitutes about 70 per cent of the
total products. Wood which has been
made useless for any other purpose by
worms, dry rot, or exposure to the weath-
er, can be employed by this process,
wheh therefore gives a profitable means
of dealing with old stumps and worm-
eaten coniferous wood of every kind.-
Oil and Colourman's Journal


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 190304 AND TWO
PREOUS YEARS


Recaipb
S ir hak ...........................

TOa ...... ....... ...........

Or s, csM .............................




NMe Y: ::
Toaid .b..............................






T el. of i .. ... ......m b 9 a............
wwr. o... .....* .... .. o o o. ,a ...
S"l...............................



y .oia .... o......... .. ... ...
"- mm d I--- t0 b- *S4 am


1906-04 11902-03 ) 1901-02
198,647 292496 814,846
660,988 940,607 1,071,440
844,585 1,23838 1,3786,7


188,398
752,270

98,884
888,171

86,668


296,430
975.428

206,109
604,178

42,766


814;876
62,687

217,446
685,042


63,797


B7,a0 16aa,Izi 129,059

59,351 87,556 48,633
826.746 387,784 898,586
h, and aof mi, 211,9 barrels


Ca of Spiries ad Rmis far Thbm Year
ofp iag-68 Oep 1i Oa"p UMUB
Spirit. Rosin. Spirits. BFA.. fleti .g
Wa*to..k ............ I1U a I61 IM11 1 m
Ne Orieto.. .. .. .... 7 %me XJ 3X?,1 I,= M UL
Saanah.. .. ......7 ..6e8 o$ Oe w W ,336 3, It
Gargetown.. .. .... 7,515 44,314 13n "M M 7 -
ireola .... ........ .,554 6,3 36 I25* B lM W


Ja & Flerudin .. .... 1,10 65,1 910,M $,1I
TmpaD ... ...........ado dos 1a310 4611 "At 1 i
Tap ...... ........dod e lU L N Imm UJII
Totals.. .. .. ......suaps ,7s $,1, I57 3,14,MU ag 6 uw

prts ~ Turpenti e to U. .
The following table isemp ed by James Watt & BoM, ofd l-' hfer
official returns. For coneense of ompariuso we have tmrdel i*t fategta-
-320 ewt. equal 10 barrels.


167
From U. S., bbl. .... 152652
From France, bbl... 11
From other countries Il,4

From Russia .......... 2,1
Total Barrels .. 157,12


19"
173,786
w8

174J39
4,188
1793,6g


1o9
149,375
517

149,942
4,998
154,940


low
174AN6
2A=6

177,56
Sml
16560


su



-Am


,m.I

U15761110 A


Thus the import of Russian Turpetie (or Wood Spirit) In IM was asM
that of 1902, and over six times as much a in 1897. It is lsatrtin to ssLke
this import fluctuates with the price of Ameriean Turpeathe.
Percentage of Import of Russian ..1.79 2e3 &22 4J51 41 M 1.
Av. Price Amer. Turp. in LoamA ..1-4 24- 34-1 -34 UI-1 MI 4-
JUO _


COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVANIKA


April 1 ....................
April 8 ...................
April 15 ...................
April 22 ..................
April 29 ......................
May 6 ....................
May 13 ......... .......
May 20 .....................
May 27 ...................
June 3 ....................
June 10 .......... ... ....
June 17 .................
June 24 .................
July I ................
July 8 ...................
July 15 .....................
July 22 .............. .. .
July 28 ....................
Aug. 4 ..................
Aug. 12 ..................
Aug. 19 ...................
Aug. 26 ...................
Sept. 2 ................
Sept. 9 .................
Sept. 16 ...................
Sept. 3 ...................
Sept. 30 ..................


19005
ND
53
54%
54y,

53%
55%

54%
54%

53%
52%
52%
52%
53%

53%
52%
53%
64%

52%
52%
52%


1903-04
ND
50
49%
47
45
45
47%
47%
49
45%
46
46%
47%
47%
47%
48
49%
5"r' %
49%
52
52
54%
54
54%
56%
57
55


190t-03

46
42%

43
42-4
43
46
46
46%
47%
48%
47%
46%
45%
44%
44
43%
44%
44%
44%
45
44%
46
46%
47%


-M FIME YA


34
a
32
39%


31%
32%
32%

33%

34%
U9%
34%
34%
34
33%
34%
34

334%
.34
89%r
34


47%
14a7


47
0
0
a

442%
0% -
40%
an
43%
44j%
43
42


25%

211%
ST
Ii


*eee sooe he~e ~ ee .e e ~ e~ *.-o m


SM. A. BRIGGS, President.
H. C. HRIGGS, slt Vice-Presidet.


NOV3 S BOWN. mi Viea.Pte5S.
J. C. QMGDNAlD, 8esyd ft'I'


iW H Briggs Hardware Co.

* VALDOSTA. GA.
S1Sole Southern Agent for-


RIXFORD AXES.

SrThey are the 'BEST. Others imitate but& nemo4.
S plicate. They are made of the best steel, hav the
* temper, hold the keenest edge, eat better ald lhat lenw
= than any other axe.
* This has all been proved by yearof actual ue.
*d Se uas yoer oderrs.

3 W. BRIGS 1ARU WARE CUrU I,




P rin tinig Send your order to the Ioae1trw-I
Record. Promptanduatisfactgy.
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, fb


Tu OWLTAUnMr.rrr or OUR ADVERTISI S VOUCHED fO


Lk










THE WEEKLY UiiirtflAL BCOBRD. 11


racious buyers on any advance over 101-4
cents. The underlying factors in the cot-
ton situation, which became evident last
week, namely--Southern cotton grower
has his own ideas of the value of cotton
and thus far, neither the spinner nor the
speculator has been able to convince him
that h's ideas are altogether wrong, have
been intensified during the week and
have attained more general recognition.
As evidences of this, the movement has
fallen off below last week's figures and
reports from all sections of the South
show that cotton is difficult to buy at
concessions in prices. Under these circum-
stances, it is not unreasonable to ask the
causes for the exceedingly irregular price
movements taking place this week. Any-
one familiar with speculation knows that


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
.5ri S OF TURPENTWIE
Ae,. A r. 8 Apr. M Apr. V Apr. M M a 1 May I May 1 May a May I
An mA a a a 01- 4-2 a1-2 a
3m a S" U a Jun m Jun w Jul y a July l July n1 July a July a Aug. a
0* & t 0 En 41 s4 U a
Aug. M Ag. I Ang. N Sept. 4 Sept. U Sept 1 Se3pt. 5 Oct. Oct. Oct.1
ifrE a 106 IA M4 8 a ND 1-2 a 1- i -4
CO. 6 Ot. l Sw. Nov. l N. A, De De. r1 Dec. 17. Dec. U. Jan. U
a *"4 a Go f-4 1-4 S1-24
Ja. Janm. M, Fely. 11,, eb. 1Fby. 26 Me. 3 Meb. 10 Meh 24
do s b2s
Mii7s


ROSINS
WW we N a X I H
e a. .. ..... Us Us ao U u. &2.
AS . ....S.3 La La La Las s.4
AMU U . .0 L 4 La La I 2.5 2.L
AM I . . L 3. L.a LA 33 8.
ra L ..... U.e L a.s us0 Lo 2. LX.

Mor . . .&43 L*P &H Us &2M .03 % a2%
a ..... a . . a La 1 LA 35 La
I. 2..... .s L &3. a3 La is. La
sw a . . a&sL IU La LSa .* S.4 L
Jm L . .. Sa La tJM in I 131
m.. ..... .41 mr &W XJB gU &Z &*
V- ..... u ua u UK Lx 2
Jams ... as LIa I.* La 3. L2. .
Jrn ...... .3 3. t3a U .5 L2 L
Oar.........3. 3 Le. x3 t x 2.7 LA
m 1 . .. ... S.0L S. 3L 21 W 2.1
2Um. .... 3 31. Lna 14 2 2. uN

m . ... a. as La LA 2 &WS a
m I I ... W LU LS L3.3 2.3 2.M 5
F-ruMry .. 3.L .4 U3 35 3.05 20


AiM-br r I. 43.0 43. 3. 2.L 2.3
0--U.r . &M3 4 423 43 4-M 3* 2.n
08Mr. SO .... ..3 1 3.4 3.4 4 3.054 2.75
0---r 1.. 0 4J IN U I A LIS L4 La
Mage 4....3 ..4 15 3. 3.3 U S 2.03 .3


Ime 2 .... 4.. L0 4i U3 4 2.70
Nomer 6 .. ... 40 4. UL 4.0 2-10 .70
r-ST U..... AN4 UL L .3 3.5 2.B 1 .L
NIovember 0..L.a La L3 to3 703


Pl..... 1U US O UL 33 LA 2. U2.


*dkrxy 11 .. .7. 3.5 3.5 3.3 U3 32. 2.5
-y 1 .. 3.5 .45 U3 U33 2L33 2.5 3
erary I. .. 1.76 3.4 3J6 330 32 3.20 2.5
rDeeuary 13 ...35 3.6 33 230 35 3.06 2.70

Mab 10 .. ...83 &W &40 33 6 3.3 3.06 2.76
pMl 2 ......4A9 4.70 3J* 3J5 3.5 23 L7.0
Mtn 31 ......46M 67 3JM 333M 235 2.70


2.* FEs *.
LU .10 U5

L2. La 1.0
LU LI La

1. L. 1.7

La La L.
LI LS L.
1. L LA
LU L La
1a Li 1.L
1W L.6 1.70
103 1.70 1a
LA L Lt"
La La L-

LS LA La
L. LN C 1
LA LAi L.70

UL La L11
2.1 2.6 2.0
Uli U Z
2. 2*U 2.10
L4 UI* L
2.7 2.0 U
La La Uf


2.5 2.00 2.5
2.4 La 2.X

2.M U2 U2
2a 2.73 L23
ZMf to La
2. 2.t 2.
2.3 15 .15
2.85 2.80 2.75
2.70 2.65 2.60
2.55 2.50 2.45
2.70 2.65 2.60
2.65 2.00 2.55
2.66 2.60 2M


AUTOMOBILE, PUMPING OUTF S


GASOLINE ENGINES.
Mid Cmis Aketimedt of Suppbml in the South.


c

1-.
i!
a


a very small thing will inf9ence the mr-
ket for the time being, entirely irrepee-
tive of underlying factors. This has been
the ase this week. Things were very
quiet on Wednesday with January selling
around 101-4 cents when a rather large
trader, recently returned from Europe,
came into the pit and personally bought
about 25,000 bales of cotton. As the
trader in question is known to take small
losses on the wrong side of the market,
everybody turned to and sold cotton for
a decline. There was a general feeling
that a break of 20 or 30 points would
bring out this cotton and traders believed
that a little judicious headwork could
bring about a break of this extent. There
was so much unanimity of sentiment to
this effect that cotton eased off. Buyers
on declines around these figures are likely
to make money as long as the Southern
holder continues unshaken in his views of
prices.


NEW YORE GOTTEN EXChANGE
CHICAGO BOARD Of TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchange.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Bes Pbome 853 lbnriIm WBek


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE. LOSING


To United Kagdom. In
Month 13M-O
April.. .. .. ... U16.
May .. .......
JAune .. .. ... .M
July...... .. .. .2
September.. .. Traw
October .. ..... A1M4
November .. 81,638 I
December .. 1, W
January. .. 1228,
February .. 1104,4
,ara .... bAW


gallons:
INS-
is"i
1U.1304

04M0
1.0310
M6U,760
L,531.779
373,30
16366


To United KIngdom. barre. I n:
10-0 Month iUW-at 1u- UKI-
UMW Apri .... .. .II. NR m
1JA May .... .. .. .as m
*** Jun ....... 8 66 6l
August .... ...4M su
ra.N September.. M.r,1 41 1A0
1L6A3 October .. .. ...4&o 4.M am
,Ml November .. 71,1 5,73 I
s76,784 December 61;44 4 7M
163 January ... aCim 4,M Os
M7, February ... 28,31 7rM ol
M Mara .. 3.. 3 35, MX C 5tU


To 11lm an Notherlst b t M
To Bealgum and Nthernd. In allons: To und m Ntherlaaa. barrr 36
Mcnth 1S-4S 1-0 4I U1mKU Moath 1A0-04 MU- au-
Apr .. .. .. .. 1U N.44a Inceluo April .... .... .oM Inftm-asd
May .. .. .. ... 71 1Ain all other May ......... M r1.M aB etr
June .. ......... 60101 auIn murope June........ ..= -I- ammu e
July .... .. .. Sls0.11 I a 3a July ....... .. .. 3 46n
Augut.. ...... ..4 SKIN August ...... 4.. *.=
September..... 0,4 25 41 .-1 September... &4. 1am MIar
October .... .. Ua4 ZnL 5,63 October..... a.,ma GO ai
November .. 133,6 34,726 381,3 November .. 3,31 6 31,s
December .. 100372 58,6 7 December .. 7S17 13a2 440
January .... 14,873 2.10 174,31 Jamnry .... 6,6M 41M 15U
February .. 6,130 372,444 36a February ... 9,843 5,26 lAU
March .. .. ...... 8,713 18474 March .. .. 102 32,1 1114
To Grmany. In salons: To Germany, mbrrels K a
Month u-1s 1IB- .M-U Mouth m-a 18- 10-U
Aprit .. ... ......... .. 114.0 11A April .. .. .. .. 4k= va MlAI
MaY .. .. .. .. 3U. a4 a a3 May .. .. .. .. S. a U,0 U.1
June.. .. .. .. m. 3 m2 4 o. t June ...... .. .. u W00 UM
taiy .. .. .. .. U.114 ak41* Ia, July .. .. .. .. .10, aeM ovn
August .. .. .. 61,3 USMa August .. .. .. 7i. m mi
September.. .. I1 I, Septemb- .. .. 0M,1R Ma
October .. .. ... 6 SA 104R October ..... .. MAI 3.M6
November .. 17,010 11013 81,780 November .. 8,748 4,841 5
Dee er .. December .. 15,4 ,171 Alm
January .... 132 0M U4,A ISUM January .... 34,7 "A 54,9C 9t,73
February ... 29182 16,838 7,174 February .., 172,13 40,915
March 6.. 65,6.8 l....... 94, March 49.. 49,36 980Jo 41,M
To all other roe In Gallons: To an other urope. barrels n h:
Month 10-46 1-U 911-U4 Mouth 10-44 3-U UK-U
April .. .. .. .. ...1 L*4 3N*05 April.... .. .. 560 30013 5m
May.. .. .. I....S3 SM J4. 1 ay .... ..... 21 4a,1 .a=s
Juo....... ... 1* 1.40 1M June......... .. 14.604 to .
July .. ....... 1, 41.4 July .. .. .. .. 2,w EM. Hi
Aucut .. ....... &W LU August ...... L.. S3 30.1
September.. .. 43 .90 3,1 September.. .. I..3 IT.
October ...... I1 4UM 17.06 October .. .. .. 1.410 5.40 lm
November .. 32,0 17,80 437 November .. 13,328 6,415 Ul
December .. 47,306 8,561 1 December .. 48,701 4s31
January ... llA -- January ... 17,124 7,48 3S4
February .. 1,471 ...... 44, February ... 38,184 4264 31
March .... 14,1 1276 3M March .... 33,687 561,34 71,


Total Foreign sports. In gallon
Ing everything outside of the
States:
Month 10U-4 1U-S
Aun i.. .. .. ..1 4.18 8U1
May ... ... 18.188 31,144
June.. .... .... 1,36.60 2.
July ..... .. ..151. 10 1 061.
August .. .... 1LU4S 2,0
September... .1,4.14 2.1545
October ...... L40Mj l.L
November .. 1,861,088 192,18
December ..1,093,59 1,794,33
January ... 7I0,2 A0,253
February .. 487,577 531,34
March ..... 29848 118,174


L, leid- Total Exports of R-esi barrels m pounds.
United Including Asia. Afric and America oet-
side of the Unite states:
1 r-a Month 01- 12 0U M-
0.MN April .... ..I".1 131 31aM
W.U Ipmy .... . UMB 4 IUI


,8.,17 Jeember .. 210,I aS. 11,440
X.4MO Januay ... 12,471 1,l 4m 7,i t
Anuut .. .. .. Ua 29.0i
23KIN September.. .. .LW 30,0 -. U
low.30 October .. .... UP= Zk=W -,
lB5^74 November .l M^ 23164 222,479
I,86J76 December 210,67 2WAN 191,449

SS,<76 February ... 306,090 180,633 257,24
ag,856 March .. .. 171,548 204,433 214,91


THE RECORD CIRCULA ALL OVER TH WORLD.


& P. Hlmes & C"'s t e IMr.
New York, October 4The stk ar-
ket today showed a more bullish trend
than for ome day. New high pri
were reached with the tread upward. It
is probable that in view of good bank
statement will be made strong until first
part of the week. It will not be well tq
count on this after publication of boak
statement, but all surface idications fa-
vor such a prbeedure.

Sel al rders for Mpri g fr the
turpentine ad comiaay traes to the
Record office to insre a prompt dley.


Sam'l P. Holmes& Co.
Stcks Btsi Cotate
Gran aII PrwvtiMm


Fred E Gilbert
29 and 37, 39, 41
West Frsyth Street


& P. Hil & Co.'s Weekly Cotton
Letter.
New York, October 14th.
The market has had quite an advance
s well as a decline this week. After
teaching ton cents for December, during
be latter part of last week, a sharp rese-
tom followed during which December ran
up to about 1035. Without any change
in the otton situation or a re ason for
a break, the market broke away until
December woid yesterday at 10 cents. the
sam figures reached a week ago From
ts it wil be seen that the market ha
made little real progress as a result of
week's bninmes. Sentiment has at times
bea very much confused as the South
hos refused to let go of cotton on a de-
dae, and spinners do not appear as vo-


UIL-


'~Vlt;'--










1 THU WUNKLY INDUS'rIIIA R -UC-lI


INDUSTRIAL KECOR.D.

JAMESL UOLLUOA .
Edl er a"n mNar .
PuMkh-* Evyrerai y.


n The Paine and Perodmea."
A cc---neas -t m M ao isaul
ThIb In. satris.l Record Company.
Jacknomvilv*. Fla.

bsach EdeImnld a d um esa f 0Bo at
Alanta. Ga. SavaruLnn Ge.
Enterd at the Postofiee at Jakaonville,
ila., Mas ecod-clas matter.


September 2,1M., ae its eadsive ofifhil
organ. Adopted n aHaal convene t
September 11, as the erga als o the
eral Asocmiation.
Adopted April 27th, 13, a the officil
irgaa of the Interstate Ow C rom u' As-
option. Adopted Sept. 11, 190l, as the
.ly aelial organa of the T. 0. A.
omanded to luber people by special
resobiio adopted by the Gorgi Sawmill


COPY FOR ADVERTISIrG.
&Ai BrtMiWg py ( m r no w a&d-
vutinmis ) swheilab ach Tmels
m a ng insure trtim i the is f
the b wed.

THE RECORD'S OFFICE &
Th pubiMing pl0t ad the mm st-
So f the Industrial Recad PblMhing
C. are located at Ie. xx SOeth Beg
St et, Jaceaville, Fl., i te vTry hert
f the geat tarpatine and ydpe eya

The Atata, Ga., elae is located i the
E itabe Buildaig, Ie. 3. Atlasta is
the center f the great =afacturid
trde of the entire Soth.
The Saranuah, Ga., ece i i the Pea
of Trade boiling Savannah I te lea-
ingps naval teres market i the werd

TRADE PAPERS.
The two following articles were writ-
ten for the Trade Press List, and go to
show the importance of trade papers, and
the position they have reached in the
commercial world:

Trade Publicaties
(By Editor Jewelry Art, Chicago, IIL)
How would the commeseial men get
along without their trade papers. Thai.
S is a very simple question, but it scarcely
admits of an equally simple answer. If
the full history of commerce were ever
written-ad whynot?-it would be found
that the advent of trade papers caused
a revolution in trade. How could it be
otherwise? The revolution may not have
been, was not immediate, but it was none
the less complete.
No firm can be considered up-to-date,
nor completely equipped, if it does not
subscribe to its trade papers. If a busi-
ness house had in its employ a dozen trav-
elers, each scouring a certain territory for
news, it is safe to say the sum total of
work done by those twelve men would not
be so great as that of a trade paper
The information they secured might bI
of the greatest diversity, but they do nol
represent an iota of the resources at th
command a well-organized trade paper
The twelve travelers would be confined it
their interests to the actual firm their


The trade paper grasp the whole trade.
Captained by a man familiar with the
trade community in its many phases
and aspects, the trade paper is able by
its resources to gather in the threads of
business from every part, and by the in-
terchange of ideas, which the courtesy
of contemporary "exchanges" facilitates, is
enabled to present to its readers a sur-
vey and review of the trade it represents,
a thousand times more complete and com-
prehensive than any travelers. Moreover,
the trade paper is a permanent record, not
merely a fleeting view or impression. The
trade paper is one of the biggest factors
in modern commerce it is possible to con-
ceive, aad the man who refuses to sup-
port his own trade paper is guilty of a
culpable negligence of the interests of the
community of which he has the honor
to be a member.
The better the trade paper is support-
ed, the greater and more valuable the
work it is enabled to achieve. Cripple ft
with insufficient support and it is a stig-
ma on the trade, and a reflection on the
trade's intelligence. The well-supported
trade paper can champion the cause of
the oppressed, of which in every trade
there is a large proportion; it removes
abuses, and watches over the well-being
of the trade or commercial community
whose name it bears.


The Trae Joral, t Juobblt er and the
Merchant.
(By W. P. Tracy, Manager Western Dry
Goods, St. Joseph, Mo.)
It is no longer a question with the mer-
chant whether ownot he should subscribe
for a trade journal. We recognize such
a publication as a part of his business.
He realizes that commercial conditions
have so changed and competition grown
so strong that he must avail himself of
every opportunity to keep abreast of the
times.
The trade journal of today has out-
grown its infancy of thirty years ago
when some of the industries had journal
devoted to their interests, but in the ma-
jority of cases these were not much more
than advertising sheets, with little or no
circulation and therefore, almost wholly
dependent upon the good will of the man-
ufacturers who supported them. Since
that time no branch of American journal-
ism has shgwn a more distinct adrvnce in
the valuable and interesting character of
their contents and the excellence of their
typographical make-up than the trade pub-
lications. They have been an educator
and leader in every progressive movement
for the trade's betterment. They have
helped overcome the prejudice and sel-
fishness that made every dealer jealous of
his brother. Trade papers, in fact, have
made far better business methods, relia-
ble goods and honest merchandise.
The jobber, in time, has come to ree-
ognize the value of the trade press as
means of communicating with the trade.
If he has anything new or anything spec-
ial to offer the trade there is no cheaper
or better method of introducing it than
through the columns of the trade journal.
And so, in the great success that is
. falling to the lot of the trade press to-
day, there must be taken into consider-
ation the continual service that is ren-
Sdered alike to the retailer and the jobber,
. and they must share in the making of such
i a publication as much as the publisher
r whose aim it is to offer to them both the
very best service he e n.


Turpentine Substitutes.
In a comprehensive paper on this sub-
ject in the Farben Zeitung, Dr. A. Hesse
refers to the difficulties experienced in the
testing of turpentine, owing to the numer-
ous adulterants (petroleum distillate in
particular) nowadays employed. Accord-
ing to the researches of Utz, the normal
index of refractions of turps (1.408 to
1.4714) is considerably lowered by the
presence of petroleum distillates; whilst
Vezes recommends a method of detecting
this adulterant by fractional distillation
and determining the refraction index of
the fractions. Colophony is estimated
by determining the acid value of the dis-
tillation residue. Herzfeld, who has gone
into the matter exhaustively, advises as
a preliminary test the determination of
the specific gravity, which should not be
lower than 0.865, and then the examina-
tion of the sample and its fractions in
the refractometer. Since, when the turps
is pure, the various fractions give approx-
imately equal results under this test, the
presence of even small quantities of pe-
troleum can be detected without difficulty.
For the uantitative estimation of petro-
leum and benzol in turps, he proceeds to
eliminate the terpene hydrocarbons by al-
lowing 101 cc. of the sample to drop slow-
ly into 40 cc. of concentrated sulphuric
acid. When the turps is pure, about 0.8-
0.9 cc. of the original substance separates
out at the end of 10-12 hours. After re-
moving the brown, sulphuric solution the
portion left enacted upon by the acid is
shaken up with 3-4 cc. of fuming sulphu-
ric acid. This operation leaves only 0.1-
0.2 cc. undissolved, a large residue indicat-
ing a corresponding amount of adultera-
tion with mineral oil Benzol being in-
soluble in concentrated sulphuric acid,
the presence of a larger residue in the pre-
liminary treatment points to this adul-
terant. Resin oil, however, is detected
with difficulty, though pine oil is revealed
by the smell.
A combination of the two methods given
above, namely those of Vezes and Herz-
feld, should suffice for the detection of
all the usual adulterants, and meet the
requirements of those who desire a simple
means of attaining this end. The adul-
teration of turps with petroleum distil-
lates is a source of considerable profit,
but in addition to the fraud practised, it
greatly reduces the sphere of usefulness
of the article, especially in the lacquer
varnish industry, the valuable property
of ability to absorb oxygen being greatly
diminished by the presence of the satu-
rated petroleum hydro-carbons. In view
of the fact that the value of turpa sub-
stitutes depends to a large extent on he
presence of substances capable of absorb-


anotNWsauAonua LIEM SUCCESS.


Spirits Tmar Ctine Cumtoa.L
J. R. Parker, supervising inspector of
naval stores for the State of Florida
confiscated ten barrels of adulterated
spirits of turpentine shipped to Fernan-
dina this week.
This should be a lesson to the opera-
tors who ship adulterated spirits. In
speaking of the confiscation, Mr. Parker
says "I regret very much that the ope-
rators who ship adulterated turpentine
have so little respect for the law which
was made for their protection and good."
The Record is glad to say, however, that
this is the first lot of turpentine that has
been confiscated recently and that fewer
efforts are being made by operators to
ship adulterated stuff now than ever be-
fore. We trust this will be the last.


FL-
r
It


TM '"EICIY INDUSTRIAL EUCMBD.


ing oxygen, it bec o des r bll b
mine the said sub hitatia fwo
sence of the bodies in qmueatia L. as
contain light petroleum distillte, if ilt
specifically indicated as of thin ma-_s
may lead to an unwitting broach of the
regulations governing the storage of thes:
liquids-a matter to which attention d
not seem to have been e hd, ah# i-t
with sufficient insistene.--8peuiayt--'
lated for the Oil sad Coimwn'sa m -'
nal. -


The Increaasig'Power of O H .
From Maine to California, from the
Northwest to the Gulf of Mexims the di
position and cry of nerehants an -a *
ness men is "get together," orgais r
the purpose of meeting asd dieMing the
interests that promote the best bune
principles, by permeating the indmius
and commercial atmosphere with
conditions. The ardor of co-operatin is
warming up the feelings of nraImpu
and elevating trade traisactieU i upa
amicable relations in harmony with the
economical laws of coneeatraties in m -
ufaeturing, jobbing and distribution. T
Advertisising World, in a reMet
presents a fore-knowing prog tiemtin
of the importance of organiatims, by may-
ing:
"It is a most agreeable fact tat the
is in most towns a growing temiad y
among storekeepers and bmminess mm to
'get together' in friendly relations. Be-
ness men's associations, for various pr-
poses. are not new, of course, sad thi
existence and endeavors have accomplished
much. But it must be admitted tla i
many cases the state of mind of moat of
the members of such organizations may be
best described as 'armed neutrality'; sa
the agreeable fact to which referee hes
been made is that more men are lemain
that their neighbors and competitors e
really 'pretty good fellows'-mem who are
worthy of friendship and capable o i,
too. While the exigencies of the pree
of carrying enterprises of vast --g-
tude may seem to demand measures ti
savor of harshness and worse, the m-
chants who are the backbone of their e -
munities can and do mingle with Meah
othef, and each learns that wht binea
the community is certain to baIn ea
man therein."
The disposition of the aggressive al-
ness man who is most succesafal tedy
is to study and work out new idaas r
the better accomplishment of greater se-
suits by best possible effort directed in
most progressive methods.
Let fifty or a hundred mer ta, the
more the better, go into a meeting fr the
discussion of measures for improving'a-
iness methods, and i will be see how
the exchange of ideas and experiea a-
sult in establishing uniform rimeiple i
the judgment of the majority that Aa-
thuses the energies and ereatee a heaty
confidence in the mind of every ma*t
worker. Confidence is the great mee of
business lines today, ad in co-operati
only can confidence among competitor*,
jobbers and manufacturers be imriet
and maintained.-Journal of ommeree.


Mr. D. R. McNeil, of the Comntiada
Naval Stores CO., spent several days i
town this week.

Mr. Goss Mattox was among the promi-
nent naval stores men in the ity this
week.









TI WYMKLY lzwuwritIrA BXOOBD.


WIITID STATUn SUSITOCY NO. -"-.
--gsamsaw Samisv op. lrs 05mm.5 or
Ton.ATLANTi NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
.m-a-ulm-.-a:-- Tr W00 ATT ew r ay a.6 a
mANION 20 1904W

ltmMs m mnisemm ........ IUmI lta Stock pad i........ ... MO
O asft ... .... .........:::: S...... m o.... ............... s 0.00
VLa ualtx s tm .............. m Y o ..............
lwU. -. ...................... U Jo C C t to ...... ............. am0.0 '.
C 0kk D u m b. ipA5.0 DWiOll NNgIUS.IO
O m r U.s T mr e............... 14at J0 Toa................ .............. 1 .oBo
SNOW .......... ........ ........ .............................

808008 11111921 1 *4'.1OtOOt898%010 1,Otil, I I 11
0
Title and Tax Abstracts.
Conveyancing. Township Maps, Blue Prints.
We give special attention to preparation of Title and Tax Ab-
straeta, Maps, ete, of large treats in all parts of Florida and South Geor-
gia. To owners oa intading purchasers the results of our work are

croam s msonekted. *

REALTY TITLE AND TRUST COMPANY
Law T~lrNl BulEing JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
....... ""... 1 10 a I I o l,.6 l0> 1 1 9 I I111 I 1


C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE. GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpmntn sand Sawmll Men. Re.lr.sau b
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FI.-OulY IS
514 516 518 520 522 524 526 EAST BAY TREET

Jacksonville, Fla.

GEORGIA nT- R-TA SAW MILL ASOCIATIO. '
Minimum Costwise Price List for oerchantaUe Rules 9goP 4 Ail p t Ms o
Georgia, Julysn, 1904.
I FeetJ Feet Feet Feet Feet Feet 'eet (I el Pt so
SIZES 20 21-25 26-30 31-3 36-40 I 41-45|46-01 51- 864 -45
1 xlO to 2x10..... $ 212.0413.50l$1405l&61 i8.00420.504)23.50 6.s6ee305 111


2%xl0 to 8x10.... 12.00 12.50 13.50 14.0 15.0 170 20.00 23.00 201
8%x10 to 10x10.... 12.50 130 .00 14. 506 16.50 18.60 21.00 24.L00
I x12 to 2x12.... 14.00 15.50 16.50 18.00 21.00 24.00 2800 32.5 3S
21xl2 to 10x12.... 13.00 13.50 14.50 16.0 18.500 o 24.50 25 34s.
101xl2 to 12x12.... 13.50 14.00 150 17.50 19.50 22.00 25.50 30.00 3115
I x14 to 3x14.... 16.00 19.00 2000 22.00 24.50 27 32.00 7.00 44.1
3%x14 to 12x14.... 14.50 1650 18.00 20.50 22.00 24.00 28.00 32.50 40M
12!/4xl4 to 14x14.... 15.50 17.00 19.00 21.001 23.00 2 3000 34.50 42J.


mm
43.6
46.68
57.68
58.6
"n.6


S-ether Trade Mtes.
Bradstreet's review of the trade has
the following oa conditions of business in
the South:
Wheeling.-Coditions in the Ohio val-
ley m-tiume to progress with the opening
of fal weather. Jobbers report orders
plentiful, but small Colections are not
very satisfactory. Manufacturing plants
are running on very good time, and pros-
poets am rather favorable for a steady
ra to at heat 50 per eat of capacity.
Chalesto--Wholesalers and jobbers
report business increasing. Cotton con-
times active and little time is lost in mar-
keting. Collectios are good.
Savamnnh.-The feature of the week
is the improvement in collections, all lines
beneting thereby. The active cotton
market has enabled planters to dispose
of crops at good prices, but because of
the reent decline there is a disposition
nw to hold for an advance. A fair vol-
ume of business is being obtained by job-
ben from late buyers. Lumber shows
light improvement, and conditions in the
maval stores trade are favorable.
Augusta.-Wholesale trade continues
to improve. Collections are picking up.
Atlanta-Retail trade is somewhat cur-
tailed by continued hot weather. Manu-
facturers and jobbers are doing a normal
Ibsineas. Five weeks' drought i still un-
broken, and has done much damage te
erops.
Jacksonville.-Naval stores are active
at good prices, but there is no improve-
meat in the inquiry for lumber. for which
mills assert quotations are unproftably
low. Three-fourths of the cotton ero
has been gathered and the yield is below
the average. Returning summer abeentee
give impetus to retail business, while
wholesalers report larger orders than usu
S aL Transportation lines are doing a heavj
business. Builder are rushed to meet con
tracts in city and country, and a genera
air of prosperity prevails throughout tho
State.
air-hig-m --Cotton is coming in rap
idly, middling bringing 9 5-8 cents Thurs
day. The tendency of the iron market i
decidedly upward and inquiries are nu
merous, $10 being quoted as a basis fo
No. 2 foundry, and some orders wer
declined at that price. On Thursday $1
was asked for 400 ton of No. I soft.
Mmtgsnery.-A lage percentage o
the otto crop is now ope, due to coe


tinted favorable weather, and is ready
for gathering. Labor for this kind of
work is scarce, though good prices are be-
ing paid. Marketing of cotton is de-
creasing on account of decline in price.
Retail trade is quiet, owing to unseason-
able weather, though jobbers report a
good volume of business, and collections
are better than for some time past. De-
mand for building material is somewhat
active, and local contractors report all the
business they can handle.
Chattanooga.-Trade with wholesale and
retail dealers is still on the increase.
Crops in general are good, manufactu-
rers are being kept busy and collections
are satisfactory.
Memphis.-General business is appar-
ently in good condition. Jobbers and re-
tailers show an increase in volume of
business. Cotton is being marketed rap-
idly. Collections run from fair to slow.
Nashville.-General business is good.
Collections hold up well. Weather condi-
tions are more favorable, and the outlook
is encouraging.
Little Roek.--Jobbers and retailers re-
port trade constantly improving. Collec-
tions are fairly good.
New Orleans.-General trade is some-
what dull. Jobbers report limited trad-
ing, but retailers state there is a small
increase in volume of business. Crops
are reported showing effects of late
drought, but indications for rain are ap-
parent annd favorably counted on.
Fort Worth.-Crop conditions are prac-
tically unchanged. Cold weather, the firs
of the season. is stimulating retail trade.
SFrom now on local merchants look for
r activity in all lines and predict satisfac-
s tory collections.
Dallas.-Weather conditions the past
Week throughout this section have been
Favorable both for picking and further
Opening of bolls. Jobbers report trade
i active and collections good.
e Waco.-It is estimated that about 89
per cent of the cotton crop has been
. picked in this section, and it is believed
.that there is an increase of about 10 pel
Scent over last year. There is practical)
no cotton being sold, as farmers continue
r to hold for higher prices. Collections ar
e reported good.
I
Mr. W. C. Jackson, of Green Cov,
f Springs, Fla., spent last Wednesday ii
I- Jacksonville.


1 x16 to 4x16.... 20.50 22.00 24.50 27.50 31.00 34.00 38.00 42.50 8.
4%x16 to 12x16.... 19.00 20.00 22.00 25.50 29.00 31.00 35.00 39.50 48A
12/xl6 to 16x16.... 19.50 20.50 23.00 26.501 30.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 50.0


Um


2 xlS to 6x18.... 24.50 25.50 28.50 31.50 35.00 39.001 43.00 49.00 0.00 7AS
6%x18 to 14x18.... 21.00 22.00 26.00 29.00) 33.00 37.0 41.00 45.00 57.M a6M
141xl18 to 18x18.... 23.00 24.00 27.00 30.00 34.00 380 42.00 48.00 1.00 T4A


Terms: Net Cash.
Prices are F. 0. B. Car Savanah, Brunswick, Ferandina and Jacdknsw.


MOTIC]L
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Association, held at Jacksonville,
Fla., March 15, 1904, the following Classi-
fication and Rules for Inspection of Yel-
low Pine were officially adopted, effective
July 1, 1904:
Clasification and Inspection of Yellow
Pine Lumber.
General Rules-All lumber must be
sound, well manufactured, full to size and
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;
through shakes, or round shakes that
show on the surface; square edge, unless
otherwise specified. A through shake is
hereby defined to be through or connected
from side to side, or edge to edge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken;
less than one inch thick shall be measured
as one inch.

CLASSIFICATION.
Flooring.
Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: 1x3,
I, 5 and 6; 1%x3, 4, 5, and 6
Board.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
inches and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %, 1, 1% and 1% inches
thick by 7 inches and up, wide.
Scantling,
Scantling shall embrace all sizes from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2x3, 2x4, 2x5, 6, 3x3, 3x4, 3x5, 3x6, 4x4,
4x5, 4x6, 5x5 and 5x6.
Plank.
Plank shall embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches "in thickness.
I not including six inches by seven inches
and rp in width. For example: 1%, 2,
21/,, 3, 3%/, 4, 41/s, 5, 5%, 5%x7 inches
and up in width.


Dimension sizes shall embrace all Ma
6 inches and up in thickness by swas
inches and up in width, including ax by
six. For example: 6x6, 6x7, 7x7, 7x8,
and up.
Stepiag.
Stepping shall embrace one to two san
a half inches in thickness by seem inches
and up in width. For examle: 1, 1%,
1%, 2 and 2y/x7 and up, in width.
ough Edge or itch.
Rough Edge or Flitch shell embrace al
sizes one inch and up in thieknme by eight
inches and up in width, sawed an two
sides only. For example: 1, 1%, 2,3, 4
and up thick by eight inches and up wi,
sawed on two sides only.


INSPECTION.
Standard.
All lumber shall be sound, sap n ob-
jection. Wane may be allowed eOe-uith
of the width of the piece measured serme
face of wane, ex'i..ding one-fourt of th
length on one corner or its equivalent an
two or more corners.
Merchantable.
All sizes under nine anhes shall Ihow
heart entire length on one ide or edge;
sizes nine inbces ad over shall aw
heart the entire legth n two oppoa
sides. Wane may be allowed one-eighth of
the width of the piece measured aosr
face of wane, and extending one-fourth of
the length of the piece on one rarm or
its equivalent on two or more coram
Prim.
Scantling shab show heart on two faam
the entire length; other aim shall h ow
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
cent. of the pieces, wane may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the piece mea-
ured across face of wane and extemdiun
one-fourth of the length of the piece on
one corner or its equivalent on two or
more e rners.


FOR SALE.

50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
ffty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill. $.85 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of yews, or
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in the State.

C. BUCKMAN, "r mo-.


-FAIR, InDEPW3AUI AND PROGRNSUVK"


~-~ ~--- ----~----


M


- - ----------- --------












SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY


Wayeroes, Ga.
MAN UPACTURKS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located hi the het oe the Lumber DistrMt gives s am -
tage o f "beo material at est ea.


80uxJUdau- AsuaoIx.


iale--Vebr le Works. Beports
ftat a bIgg factory is under contempla-
tion.- Ro Blackm an an possibly give
information.
Beesmer-F4urniture Company.-Incor-
pmwad: Bessemer Furniture Co., with
$1000 capital, by Edgar L. Mitchell, Vir-
gi r Lee Mitcell and Pearl Maury Mit-

B Ilha3 m Coal Mines. Blount
Momutain Coal C. has been incorporated,
with ,Oj0 capital, by F. W. Hopkins,
M. 0. Hopkins, I. Spence, T. F. Wood
of Biringham and M. E. Partie of Swan-
.e, Als.
Brmingham--Improvement Company.-
I. K MOMs, Claree MaOM, W. L. Ward
and asoiate have incorporated the Mor-
ris improvement Co, with $10,000 capital.
UI.,b- aia n-ufactuiNg Ore Wash-
ea, Roginees etc.-Stewart Washer Co.,
Ma acturing ore washers, has comol-
in4d with the Roberts & Schaefer Com-
pany, oniltig and cotraeting engneers.
for complete coal ing ad coal wash-
arim, and will operate as the Roberts &
8dmham Company wit $150,000 capital.
The company will operate on a large sale.
(-mt.-Water Works.-CIt contem-
plats itallHing water works; T. 8. Cld-
wealk mayw.
Bod Momtai-Wood Aleohl Works.
-- lmi Mountai5 Inm & Wood Alcohol
O, prmimly reported as increasing cap-
ital *i $100,000 to $250,000, will recon-
sion -a for arborizing wood ad re
lg wod alcohol

ean Cove 8pring-Merantile-D. D.
Swartey aad others have incorporated
the D. D. Swartley Mercantile Co. with

Gra Cowe Springs-nstillery.--may
CO-nty Liquor Co. has incorporated, with
SSRUS0 capital, to manufature liquors,
wines ad beer; inmorporatei .J. L. Kirk-
patriek, W. J. Wilson and L. D. 'Wllins.
Miami--Publie Improvements.--City will
vote October 24 on the issuance of bonds
for erecting public building, street paving
and purbheiag engine and other fire ap-
paratus.-AIress the Mayor.
Miami-Cold Storage Plant-Miami Ice
Works wi erect two-story building and
equip red storage plant.
Tampa-Paving and Sewerage-City
Council has passed the ordinance calling an
election to ratify the $300,00 bond issue
for paving and sewerage. Address Mayor
Salo-on.
Wf toe-Crate, Basket and Barrel
Iectory, Law Mills, etc.--. C. Hester, J.


B. Epperson and Dr. John Harvey have in-
corporated the Williston Manufacturing
Co., with $25,000 capital to manufacture
baskets, crates, barrels, etc., own and ope-
rate saw and planing mills, dry kilns, etc.

Buffalo-Lumber Company.-East Lake
Lumber Co. has been incorporated, with
$500,000 capital, by E. W. Holt, of Buffalo,
IK E Johnston and W. J. Kramer, of
Greenville, 8. C.
Cordele-Cotton-seed Oil Mill, Cotton
Gin and Fertilizer Factory.-C. C. Greer
will erect cotton gin of eight gins, cot-
tonseed oil mill and fertilizer plant; about
$75,000 will be expended. Contracts have
all been let.
Covington-Machine Shops.-E. C. Rain-
ey, of Eatonton, Ga., has purchased, will
enlarge and operate the Covington Ma-
chine Shops.
Covington-Waterworks.--City contem-
plates issuing bonds for the construction
of waterworks. Address The Mayor.
Cuthbert-Gas Machine Works.-It is
reported that Cawhern Bros, of Brown-
wood, Ga., will establish branch plumb-
ing business and manufacture gas ma-
chines.
Dublin-Cotton Mil-The Dublin Cot-
ton Mills has awarded contract for 100
looms additional.
Eatoton-Cotton Mill and Electric
Plant.-James B. Floyd, Thomas B. Floyd,
O. B. Nisbet and others have incorporated
the Putnam Mills & Power Co. with cap-
ital stock of $75,000 and privilege of in-
creasing to $500,000 whenever desired.
Purposes of company: To develop water
power, erect electric plant and manufae-
ture cotton goods.
GrimfiCotou Mil--The RBshton Cot-
ton Mills, referred to last week, has al-
ready the machinery it will install 2,000
spindles and 60 looms were purchased.
Hartwell-leetrie Light Plant.-Cty
will install an electric light plant, and
bids for equipment are now being in-
vited; W. T. Johnson, mayor.
Monroe-Water Works, Electric Light
Plant.-City contemplates constructing
waterworks and electric light plant. Ad-
dress the Mayor.
Savannah-Ice Plant.-orrie Ice Co.,
Louis P. Hart. president, contemplates ex-
tending its plant; a new process for man-
ufacturing ice will also be installed.
Savannah-Ice Plant.-It is reported
that W. W. Aimar & Co. will establish ice
plant with a capacity of 35 tons.
Tallapoosa-Gold Mining.-. 0. Lots-
peich. James A. Weicker and Elmer D.
Roms have incorporated the Tennessee Min-
ing Co., with $100,000 capital, to mine gold
and other minerals in Haralson county.


Hardware Company far Gain ille.
Letters patent will be asked for the
S. J. Thomas Company, the place of busi-
ness being Gainesville. The capital stock
will be 50,00, fully paid up. The purpose
of the concern will be to "buy and sell
hardware, seeds, furniture and all kinds
of merchandise; to buy, sell, mortgage and
lease lands, and do a general mercantile
and contracting business in connection
with hardware, seeds and furniture, and
supplies and materials of all kinds apper-
taining thereto."
This incorporation is due to the consol-
idation of the hardware interests of S. J.
Thomas and T. F. Thomas, who recently
purchased the stock of the T. F. Thomas
Hardware and Seed Company, owned and
operated by James M. and Lee Graham.
Both concerns have catered to State bus-
iness, and the combined trade of the two
firms will make one of the most profitable
and extensive of the kind in the State.
The new concern expertss to ierease its
list of traveling salesmen, thus extending
its business. Te incrportora a S. J.
Thomas, T. F. Thomas and IB. E Hill, Jr.


The West-Raley-Rannie Company.

114 W. orsyth Street, Jacksevlle, Fla.
A. N. Wssr, rC~. frs. s. wA Vmice W. R.. Rme. Vic-es. N. V. a.ir. Sa. a& fes.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your pprty.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.



CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS,

AND VATS.

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
M. 04. DAVIS o SON, PArU ITA P a.
.5 enmsl W. t. J1s" .& 'L"adE W.
re-Malst. Use Pro&. 66U. Mm f

6he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers


VLYV
T. fu


4W-404-4064 Ewat am l res oien56 M
DIRECT:
Mre AL &PENUIETO.M
W. IL iSLUS
IL a It 1


PIATOINIZE RECOD ADvswIXMusi FOR 5ATMIACTORT 92AUUGS


This Spaee Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.




Liquor Merchants

PropriEtoB




.AC.ME B...


ACME BEER


I


_U


TJM VNEKLY Li~~i~~i~~i~~oi~ni~ mUL ZIKXMdL DiOlS










%. ___ THE WEEKLY inUM JirsTIAL REBORD. H






THE COVINGTON CO.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Wholesale:


SHOES


DRY GOODS.


"Success For Our Customers is. Success For Us."


P' i. T Trmsuy aece4# at Ependatu e
Wr Iea r b with Jme "oth, I",$.
Washigton, OIt. 14.-- ls IL Roberts,
Tremurer of the United States, has sub-
mitted to Secretary Shaw the annual re-
part em the transactions of the Treasury
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904.
The met ordiry revenues are shown to
have been 6,a31,749. a decrease of $19,-
7t435, as compared with 190, and the
et ordinary expenditures $56 ,40,321, an
ineease of $1,30,314. In the receipts the
principal falling off was $23M06,017 in
entoms, while in the disbursements the
.iportant increases were $11,423,44 in
Commerce tad Lbor, 00,788,50 in Tres-
ury proper, sad 20,338,067 for the navy.
Umual expenditures were $50,000,000 n
amount of the Panama Oanal and $4,00,-
000 loaded to the Louisiana Purchase Ex-
-poition Company, which latter has now
bem nearly all repaid. But for these, the
seeeded deAeimey of $41,770,571 would
have been changed to a surplus of $12,-
m=M
In cosequence of the deficiency in the
rvrenes, the cash in the offices of the
Treasury sad mist declined during the
year from $170,A0,62 to $13j,520,264,
and by Otober 1 to E5,964,88. The7
available balance, including deposits in|
national banks and other credits, was
4238,4,114 on June 30, 1903, and $151,-
419,10 on October 1, 1904.
An addition of $118,793,148 was made
during the year to the monetary stock
of the entry sad another of $31,~89,5
in the following quarter. Of the total in-
erease $110,80,400 was in gold. The ag-
gregate supply on October 1, exclusive of
certificates, w& estimated at 2,35,333,-
734, of which $2,562,149,48 was in cireula-
-tim The proportion of gold was 47.66
per cent, as against 44.21 July 1, 1900.
The gai of gold to the Treasry in the
mame period was $26,03,23. On October
1 the circulation reached the maximum of
$31.16 for each person, and the proportion
of gold to the whole was 44.03 per cent.


,r m PeIs Curret F. O. New Terk
Ma Lt. n reqa or 1--d:

tIm to mU ; t 1 to s s, t s. I tM
SSto S"W; lAOI oitI, I No 3t m,
60.$40.211, '
S il~fih adlW per I, ft; en 13 M,
Bel = 1-0~e imh sear, D be A,
.SL75 fi 4MA,; olin 3-tf4 er 0 nh
der, D o A. "Ia toI SUM; 1-a oWr a
inh deai, "t*A A$ SMla to Sa7; 8It

.Vjrm i-r D to AA 6 9 0t


COtUR O PALE AND MEDIUM ROSI8N AT SAVANNAH FOR TWO TEAYA


Api
April
April
April
May
May
May
May
June
June




1a:1
JuMly
July
July
July
Aug.
4mS


W.W.
DATE 1904-5 193-4t
1 ......... .1O 3.90
S8......... 3.5 3.0
S,15........ 38 350
S22........ 330 a3
3 ........ M &R
6......... U3 36
13........ .38 2.42%
0........ 3. 3.S
27........ 3.95 3.
S3........ 4.5 3.
S10........ 45 3.40
1 ........ 4.9 SMO
S23........ 4.5 3.0
I ........ 4.756 30
7 ........ 4.75 .30
14 ........ 4.70 -3.
28 ........ 4.5% .40
4 ........ 4.67% 3.40
12 ........ 4.00 3.
18 ........ 4.02% 3.50


W.G6


1904-05
*2.5
3.75
3.SO
3.00
3.0
3..
3J6
3.0
4.06
4.10
4.15
4.5
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.6
4.42%
4.5
4.37


1903-0

3.46
365


3.27%
3.36
3.5
3.30
3.10
3.10
310
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.3JO
3JO0


N
1904-06 1908-0
&80 235
3.0 3.35
3.43 3.5
3.40 3.1
3.45 3.16
3.35 3.15
3.5) &17%
3.30 3.5M
3.40 3.5
3. 3.20
3.85 3.00
3.5 3.00
3.90 3.00
3.95 3.00
3.90 3.00
3.82Y, 3.056
4.00 3.06
4.00 315
4.02% 3.15


1904-0
1SM
3.2
3.90
3JM
3.9
3.50
3JO
390
3.0
3.6
3.5
3M
3J6


3.72%
3.85
3.87%


1903-04
$3.40
3.9O
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
. 3.20
3.15
2.
2.39
295
290
2.90
2.90
2.956
2.6
3.06
3.05


K
190l4-6 199-04
*3.330 *3.
3.30 3.30
3.15 3.0
&15 3.00
315 3.Le
3.15 3.00
3.15 3B%
3.2 3.10
3.6 3.10
3.40 3.0
3.40 2.8
3.40 L2.8
3.&6 23
3.55 2.0
3.55 2.80
3.& &
3.5O 2.85
3.5 2.U
3J6 235
3&67% 2.3


ISN- Isom

2.5 2AS
%110 2A.
Wil S.6
SJ SAM

2M SM
330 3so
3.M
&r0 tM



3.45.


3.% 2.30
3u- 3J6 n,
3JO SJO
3JO U


Kohn= Furchgott= Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS OWIVEN PROMPT ATTETION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



Don't forget your subscription to the Record.

WHEm WRITINo AoDVBA*h MENTION THE RECORD.


1 M


1, -~
`'C









16 THE WEBrLY INutM)brIAL RBOOB). -

--I----- ---- ----I - l IInIII -----*- ----*- -*-ir- ----


Machinery


and


Mill


Supplies.


Bar Iren, Pipe and flitUis, BMts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tols, Lumberman's Tools,
Paklgt of aH KInds, Railroad Material,
Pa~ited and Galvanized Corruated
Roofing.


JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


STATE AGENT FOLR
ATLAS ENMIES ad ULE- -- S Lu E SEA fe
WOTHmoMTO STEAM PUWS, JEmMIU Vs s,
MSSTOIr SAWS. rUNTMrE T NMuM
CUReS MANUIACmTUIS CLSS M aI lMe'
LsACU SAW MILLS. UMarJ W- PMUaLLE
NOewS LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERIY CAR S tRIM a- aE OC
INK me anoho asse.
SOLVENTWE BER CAMWUS,
DOgcE MS. C'S cat In SUpr Prtmke

M EAsLT PPP sEtm Pa-9ssi
A. LESCHE & SON, Whn Ms.


Bly & Meatgemery's Review.
New York, October 12, 1904.
t Turpentine--Stock 669 barrels.
t during the week has again ruled
dull, and business has only been fair.
Thursday, October 6-6ec. asked.
Friday, October 7-561-4e. asked.
Saturday, October 8-56c. asked.
Monday. October 10-66e. asked.
Tuesday, October 11-65 3-4c. asked.
Wednesday, October 12-553-4e. asked.
BaRin-Stock 28,730 barrels.
This market has ruled steady; business
in the low grades has been good, and in
the medhie and pale grades only fair.
AC, .90; D, $300; E, $3.06; F, $3.10;
G, $&.15; H, S30; I, $3.30 to $3.40; K,
$4.00; M, $4.40 to $4.50; N, $4.00 to $4.70;
WG, $4.95 to $5.00; WW, $5.20 to $5.25.

& P. Heame & Co.'s Grain Letter.
CU( ago, Il, Oet. 14th.-Wheat.-The
trade in wbel ay has been on a large


scale. Outside markets have led us. es-
pecially at milling centres. The early
trades were at about the previous close
and some fair selling on the part of local
longs caused slight reaction. The strength
came with heavy buying on the part of
Larger commission house and this buying
was kept up through the session. Much
depends on the confirmation of the news
from Argentine as to the course of our
market, as a great deal of wheat has been
bought in anticipation of some accent.
to crop.
Corn.-The light receipts, as well as
light offerings from the country together
with good cash demand at high premium
has caused renewed buying. The trade
has been large and local bull operators
been quite conspicuous in -the market.
Argentine shipment of 300,000,00 bushels


was one of the weak factors and caused
some early selling. The weather has been
all that could be desired for the curing
of corn and with a continuance of same,
our receipts of new stuff would be earlier
than usual. The congestion in December
is still noticeable.


Provisions-There was only a mlisn
trade, but the opening priea wers Lha&b
higher, soon easing off n selling by iW*
kers representing the packer. The C-
ahys sold lard ad ribs. (tah tnale ea
fair.


I YOU Want a Turpentine Lecatle?
SYou Want a Sawmil Locati.?
mYmu Want my Kild of FlrMa La-
*1 YU Mean Busimess?
C.ai en or WrM a
0 J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS,
SOca. Florida
*.g,*,*00**OO* 0O *****S***** ******SSO C0e*g......**OS


When you Visit Jacksonville


Call to see the Record and be at home.

Tell the Record all you know, that will Interest others.

Iyou want to buy or sell advertise your place.


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Call on the Secretary of the 7. O. A.




Call at the Industrial Record Office.
1r YOU AR PROGKeISIV, ADVrrTIS IN THE jcao.


<** *<*MM **W 9999--------------










THM VWUKLY mIDumrmIAL aROOm.


Industrial Record's Department of Information



This d&p tu nt is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertisig prons of this paper ad no

charge made for any information supplied or service rendered Fill in any one or more o the blank follow as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention

For Trgsant umMI o. m etr y S~eppEs or aeahierf ef oAfy Kui. er Thtbr Frm or a L
DATV INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacmokaouve, .
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Ma Oce, Jacksonville, .n the et for for the purpose o
I am la the market tor laads tor the mprpose of
I the mkSet for the foDiowle Prefer In State of Please put me In e"---tratb
with responsible parties and give e other information.

Please otify where sme ean be secured.
Signed


II
Sate speciealy the kltnd of maehinery wanted and whether new or aeeonad-handed DATE
oL0ende for Terpeato hemwemlia or Fastery. or 1r Amy iIstr Entorprie. Per Cm.-missary. Ofle or Esumsaelio SgmI. Smo orr Turpeine Ma les
DATE ra W .
INDUSTRIAL. MOO, Jacksonvlle, ta. DATE
INDUSTRIAL RBCORBD Jseksovlfle, Me.
Pleas advie the underigned regarding a good location i (state or section of
Mste) for In the market for
togehr with fal nformarto about sabor conditions, taxes, traportaton facilities,
a meouragesent, ete.
mrk Pleeae give me information as to beM places to by, et-c

sigd siix a


Ia Ya wat s to n semeti g? Are o TuIt oI "heaatwf

INDUST1RIAL (OORD. JaonEville, Ft&. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jaetbonille, Dim.
nMe for mae the foBiowilr Can you live an information as to the rllao ty of the followinar m or eorpora




Signed Slsed


e Y West to mo a Men? he Yen Wm Epnmpeg a?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jakeonville, a. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jachesonrlle, Ml.
Weat a an to Ml the position of Want a position

wih th t foowlD req renemeant Refer to the following

0am yon sfeek a m. ? Can you asris me ?
Signed Siled



CLIP THIS COUPON
TO AL. READERS OF THE RECORD
ma yo are g a- .M from the olumns of this paper, whether yo are making an inquiry or plaim an order, plese ct out the coupon
beawv and atach it t the leter. It wi p ay ou.


COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the Imdarftral eoooe lae dated

Signed

The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonville, Fla, and Savannah, Ga., is the Souths great
weekly trade journal


The Record takes a personal intei el in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.


Ta mceon 18 PrMa WrIT saoramu roNmss.


- ..*-1.^ ~-









is THE WEEKLY JiDUtRYIAL RBOOM).


Buyers' Directory

These admvtisrs ae thin s Lns. If
yea want anythiM loo through tif
dcaised UIt ad write to the arm ap-
a therein. The Beead garatees
Sprompt respom.

ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trst Co.
AUTOMOBILE.
aGmert, Pred Jacksovle, Fa.
ANXK&
Atlatie National Bnk, Jacksoarille, F1.
Commerial Bank, Jacksonville, a.
CeOtral Natuknl Bank, Oala, VMa.
emar tli Ban, Jackdsvil, rk.
National Bank of Jacsonvilla.
BDOKE AMD CRATES
Cummer Lumber O., Jaswmville, ha.

Faster, Geo. R, Jr., Jacksoar ile, a.
Southern Fel & supply Co, The, Jackson
vall, Flb.
CABS.
South Atlantic (r & Maftarin C O.,
W syeam% a m.
CLOTHBIM
raig & Bro, J. A., Jacsommvie, k.
nmroe Co., JH. A., J.ackornile, Fla.
Standard Cothing Co, Jackouvilne, rla.
CLOTHIG--WHOLN SALE.
Koh P uregott & Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
onaargsan lM CHArS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
LaureoM. W., New York City.
Tolr, Hart & Coo, New York City.
CONVYETACING.
Realty Title aad Trmt Co.
COOPIRAGE
Cno Co., The, qitman, Qa.
oeoperage Co, The, Ja ille, Fk.

Quitmaa Coopeng Co., Q..ama, Ga.
DRUG&
Kirk & Jones, Jackbonville, Fa.
DRUGS-.4WHOLSSAL.
Southern M-Crm-t*vig Co., Jacksonvile,
Flk.
DRY GOODS-WHOLKSAL.
Crington Coe,The, Jacksovill, Fla.
Koh, Furehgott & Co., Jacksonvile, a.
ENGIrNs.
Britopher, John G, Jacksorvill, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply CO, An-
Merril-Steves Co., Jackonille, la.
ebofiel' Sons Co., J. ., Maeon, Ga.
gu-ta, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
Murphy, T, Jacksoville, ms.
Sehoisld'e Som Co, J. 8, Maxen, Ga.
FlIGHT CLAM AGCr
Florida Fr Claim Agamy, Jada-
vlle, Fla.
FUEL.
Southern od & Supply Co., The, Jack-
aonrille, Fr.
fUnmir ULt
Getting Furniture Co, Jacksoville, Fa.
GUETS' r.umw-ic8I
Craig A Bro,J. A., Jacksoille, Fla.
RBfroe Co, H. A, Jacksonvil, Fia.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonvile, Fa.
GMKKRS--TmOLKSALX
Consolidated Grocery Co, Jaeksonville, Fla.
ElMs-Young o., Savannah, a.
Hargraves Co., C. H, Jacksonvile, Fla.
Johson Co., W. B., Jacksoville, FL.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
United Grocery o., Jaeksonville, Fla.
White, Walton f Co., Jackdorville, Fa.
William Co., J. P, Savamh, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESAL.L
Kohn, Frehgott & Co, Jadcaoanle, ia.
HARDWARE.
Baird Co, L Jacksokville, sFa.
Bond & Bours Co., The, Jacksonville, F.
Bri H war Coo, W. HValdota, .
OhiatanhT, John G., Jacaovrlll, Fia.


Mario Hardware Ca, O..a 1aI
Tampa Hardware Co Tapa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Saa Ga.
HARNm SS
MeMurray & Baker, Jackonaville, la.
Thomas, W. R., Gaemville, la.
HsATS
Craig & Bro, J. A., Jaksonvile, la.
Renfroe Co., H. A, Jadkmovrll, a.
Standard Clothing Co., Jauomie, Fla.
HOTL8.
Aragon, The, Jacksovfll, Fa.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
IROI WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Spply An-
gusta, Ga.
Merril- Stevo aO, Jacksomwl Fla.
Murphy, T, Jadcmoil, M
Schofeld's Sos Coo, J. S., Mason, Ga.
TKWXUB&L
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jackonville, Fla.
He & Slager, Jackasovile, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jackeoville, FLa
Blum & Co., Chab, Jacksoville, Fla.
Hanne Bros., Jacksoville, a.
KDI)CIXES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Other M ufacturiq C., Ja~kconvile,
710.
MAPS.
Realty Title aad Trt Co.
MACHIBN WORKx
Lombard Iron Works & Supply o., Au-
guata, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonvill, Fla.
Schofield's Son Co., J. S., Maon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR xurA-ALU m PRO-

Schofeld's Sos Co., J. 8., Maon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ia., Jacksonvill, Fla.
LMTAL WORIEES.
Baker, A., Brmwiek, Ga
McMillaa Bros., Savanah, a.
ILL SUPPKSL.
Brig Hardware C, W. H, Valdota, Ga.
Christopher, John ., Jaksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co, Oeala, Fla.
Sehofild's Sons Co., J. 8. Maeon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fl.
MULES AND HORSES
Thomas, W. BL, Gainesvle, Fla.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STOR .
Barnes-Jemuap Co., The, Jacksonville, Fa.
Conmolidated Naval Store Co., Jaekson-
Tille, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co, The, Svannah, Gs.
Independent Naval Store ad Export Oa.,
Jacksonville, Fia.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co, Saranash, Ga.
Standard Naval Store Co, Jacksonville,
F8a.
Union Naval Store Co., Mobile, Al.
PAINT&
Baird & Co., L ., Jacksouville, Fra.
Bond & Bours C., Jacksonvill, ra.
PECANS.
Grimfing Bro. Co., The, Jacksonrille, Fa.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES
Brigg Hardware Co, W. H, Valdosta, Ga.
Camnpbell, J. R., Oeala, a.
Christopher, John G, Jacksoville, Fla.
Tamp Hardware Co, Tampa, Fla.
Marion Hardware C., Oeals, Fk
PUMPS.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonvill, Fl.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonvile, Fa.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fia.
Schofleld's Sons o., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
White-Blakesle Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ahl
TANK STORAGE
National Tank & Export Co., Savanah,
Ga.
REAL XITATE.
Beckwith, Hedero & Warren, Tmpa,
Fla.
Brobston, Feodig & Co., Jackonville, ia.
Buckman, C, Jacksoville, Fla.
Fraier, W. W., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingstoa & BoM, J. H, Oats, Fla.


Southern States Iad and Timber Co.,
Jacksonville, Fa
Wet-Raley-Rannie o., The, Jacksonville
Fl.
SHIP YARDS.
Summer Lumber Co., Jacksonvile, Fs.
Merrill-Steven Co., Jacksonlle, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALL.
oington Oo., The, Jaksonille, Fla.
STEAMSBIE
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville Fla.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jaeksonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cypress Tank Co, Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, M, Patk, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. ., Maeon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trut Co.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, a.
Council Tool Co., The, Wasaish, N. C.
SuxPEa iU s APPARATUS
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jacksonville, kls.


Pine Product Coutruti- Co. 14 f-
ettevile, N. C.
Pis nest Co.atru Ot.. 7W Thw 1
N. C.
Standard TWrpem 06 1 WMb V
City.
I UE'raxims KSL
Baker, M. A, Brur a.
MeMila Bros., SM'mMh, k.a
IU~r-aNLEus STILL TUD


DIavis So, G. M., Platka, fa.

(rbvot Typewriter M~nmqo JaIdi


McMurray & Baker, Jad~bovIaB, I
Thomas, W. R., Gairesvr Flk
WATCHESK
Greenleaf & Crosby CO., Jashem 1 O
Hes & 5kger, JaickseT vilf Ak.
YELLOW PIM LUMBMDR
Cummer Lamber Co., Jadammlft, hl
East Coast Lumber O., Waterte J


MORTGAGES. RENU.

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.

III W. FORSYT STREET, JACU LEF.



Ho A, Renfroe Co.


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suit to Order at ReadyMade Prices Mail Orders Given Persmn Alalt


439 W.Bay Sfreet


JAcKSONVRILE, FLA.


- J. P. WIZJAM. President. J. A. G. CanomM. I Vli PMsO a
T. A. JN-ra8,-d VioPredst.- J. F. r1uNTir.V.b li.Prle
- H. L. KAYo Secretary. D. 0. Wh te, r.


- J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

- IIIIL SOREb II CO FIRS T IUHEdl MB
- Main Ofmne aIVAIkNMXH, OgOROlUO.
ar- ch orne--.: P UAcol., FLX. I BF0r.s 0 mam..
SJKaCuoVIaLL., rFLP. COLUM aBBU
SNaval Stores Producers are lnvited to Correspomd With Ua.



o. A. M rER





see mie TurpWm-


Write me or 8m
as. Alaba fit eI.







Send your order for general printing to the Re
Job work through the
COUntry a epe0Cwl
The Larg" ad Oldest Copper Uni t ck, .

gr My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do a" Lea


Send your order for general printing to the Resw


POUT FAIL TO nMTIOB T=H RECORD TO ADVERTISER.





THB WEEKLY imwuIrrlAt. 00MD. 19
U -


Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are


McMILLAN


BROTHERS'


Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS.


SAVANNAH, GA.
MOBIL., ALA.


J CKSONVILLE, FLA.
FAYETTEVLLE. N. C.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc.
I Sm8I11 i MIK O III1, u u MllUR MIIIM WIu n I iWi.
IN WRmTNG OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DescmcllPln OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


TMa 2COaWs SnACK AS A age maoT VALU.


I..




rb~"


OON~UDATED NATAL STORES ~MPANY,


acmolille, 10 fl


Svi nnl, .


MInslf, fi.


NAV ilIOR FAICORT. O R

V i ICI iU I. O MW Ownl nrll h0o011Nol O PWi omo
AIm Ullo SoAll u rwe lo Sl Io0 M siol or iWo gC uIso i .,


TeII Conill Pum hoel C olglO


1 I Plaioes.


ie PinGlle I Tunllien OIerawlrs eleie re Ml


M 01 olMl


Plel o lilber ifor Ele l.


A 1


YADS AT_~IACSO~IYILE SAVAINNAH, fERNADINA ad PENSACOlA.


All RPodces ore lt ll e o il O COeimllm


-zTHz -I A.ID ITS PUu I&*"
n= ANrII ~D In PmwmX&*IB~


0 TTHE WEEKLY INmDu rrrIAL RlOORD.
*4 Selll l:eeie. l eilu eI lIl 0 Il e I1: II omie o8ee Ii9 e l I S I S1 IleleIlleOl -o- **z**'*************^**e*1*-*
- iPreat. W. C. POWMAL; vu-raam 1 vh e wth the PreoIt eomUtate the Direetory uWI Dome I Mlamsr W. r COACHMAn, I 7. DUsl-
SLiARD H. TO ] U. 00YONL A. eACIIU N. JOHM I. YOUNG, J. A. CRAIJORD. D. H. MeM.ILAM. C. DOWN-
.ING, J. I. &BUNDERa C. L. RCOBOM; Auditor, JOHN HMNIDiRON.
j"smH oaeoa .mmcmx oNB ONJ .CAwaa8 saw.ac on


-


It Iale11 are leU Ul nI R









THE WEEKLY uumutarrxAL RECORD. 1


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commi-y Trade.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 00 lb. tubs.. 21
A. C. Creamery, 0 " .. 22
10" .. 25
A C. Cram ery,0, 1 lb. prints
Facy Full Cream.......... 11

Lard
SCompound Tin.
6-lb tin.... 66
60-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
*0-lbtin ........... 84

Vinegar
ed Apple Cider bbl........ 36

Sugar
arnalated Bugar, bbls..... 6 40

Coffee
eeption Blend Moch and
Java, 0 1-lb cans to cae,
per lb. ................ 22
Bira Pure, 0 1-lb cans to
eme, er b............. 22
6 =oao Coff oodu ....... 1
Gram Ooffee, medium ...... 9
arss coffee, common....... 81
Arbuakles Roasted Coffee, 1
Ib paekages......market price
Io Brad Coffee, 1 Ib pack-
ages..............market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 17
Ground cofee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fiS quality.
addy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 27
Enlish B'fast, 10 lb.. f7
"- Formosa, 10 Ib....... 27
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10e sise
10 lbs to eas, per pound-.. 40


Salt
00-lb sack..............
100-lb mek................
Ie Cream, 200-lb sacks.....
100-lb sace.....
Pcket Salt in bble., -lib....
6" de 2-lb....


100
60
100
50
265
2 75


Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lbtin.............. 17
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 dos to box
sifter top, per dos...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per dos......40 and 80

Corp


ask
Cer Lt Lt
W.Corn,ll01b, 1 38 1 40
l001b, 1 24 126
MdA eorn101b,1 186
S 10Ib,121 123


LOsm I


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


10 Sk Lee 100
Car Lot Lot Sk Lota
W.clip'd,1251b, 190
1001b, 155
White 1251b, 1 80
White 100lb. 1 45
Mixed 1251b
l001b,
Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbe., choice..... 1 85
fancy..... 185
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 625
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 lb sack.........6 00
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb acks............ 6 25
Pillsbury's Best ..... 7 50
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 7 40
46" bbl.....
Flour, Boss,.............. 7 25
Meal
Meal, per barrel........... 350
92-lb sacks........... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel ....... 8 50
92-b sacks....... 1 50
Rice
Good ..................... 44
Choice...... ............ 6f
Fancy Head.............. 6
Broke........... .......
Canned Vegetables
Do.
Tomatoes, 8s, Chief....... 85
Tomatoes, 2 ........ 65
Clayton, 3s................ 80
Clayton, 2s ..............60
Sifted Peas, 2s ............1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s........ 1 15
Lima Beans ,2s ............1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8e............ 90
Baked Beans, is........... 45
Corn, fancy. 2s ............1 40


Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets, 3e ..........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ...........
Saner Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s..............
Hay
car left NO bal


sk
1 49 Choice....
1 84 No.1 Tim.
146 No. 2 1700
1 2 No.1 C'ler 17 00


ks q-Utity
17 50
1650
1780 15 50
1750 15 50


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per dos........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 dos
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 dos. to cam
per dox.............. 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 dos to cam, per
dos. ................. 90
Apples, one gall, one dos to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two dos to cae,
per dos................ 1 45
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per do ................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per do ........... 1 45
Blackberries, 2s two dos to
ase, per doz.......... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to came.
per do...............
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 61
** '1.lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
Ib.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
per lb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
aborted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 61


Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per Ib.......
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb.......
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. I
Ex. Choice " .
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lh. packages
Ev. Apples, 24 2
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. eae 8
Prunes, Calf cleaned 56-lb
lx.x, 40-60............. (
Pruwes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 50-80.............
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-1b
box, 0-70.............
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown .....1
Seedless, 1-b packages ....
Citron, 10-lb box ........ 1
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound....
Extra H P, ....
Seed Peanuts, ..
New Nuts


Mixed, 25-1b boxes.........
Almonds........... .....
Brazils .... .............
Peacans................
Filberts................
al0 nuts................
Cotton Seed Meal


Cottonseed Meal
Hulls


Car IN Lessoo
lots Sk. Lot k. Lt
2700
1050


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop.........2 20
"a 8 hoop .........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per dos.......1 50
Sieves, per dox. No. 18......1 00
a nested......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per dos 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per dos.. 00
SAx Handles
Two dos crates per do..... 1 20

Washboards P.
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay............... 00
176 Diamond Glass .........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per dos 1 06
Clothes pins, five gross to box 76
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 dos to case, per
dos. ... ....... 9
Sardines, American, 100 to
ease, per case ........ 850
Sardines, 5 ca lots........ 8 45
Salmon is, Tale 4 dos to case
per do Alaska........ 90
Salmon, .is, 4 dos to cae,
per doz Col. River ..... 2 36
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per dos
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fbh 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-1b pails............. 60
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
Ibe to box............. 240
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Klagan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avg .... 143-4
"Reliable" Ham, 10-12 avge .... 141-.
"Reliable" Hamn, 12-14 avrg .... 141-4
"Reliable" Sboulder, 7-9 arge .. 113-4
"Reliable" California Has, 0-8 10
Breakfast Bacon, light r. ...... 15 1-
D. Bellies, 16-18 v .......... 10
D. 8. Bellies, 20-22 av. ........... 3-4
D Bellies, 25-30 av......... 91-
D. 8. Plates ................... 73-4
Bacon Plates .................... 83-4
D. 8. Butta ................... 3-4
Bologa Sme ............... 7
Sawns* m *e ................ S


6) Buttr "a Cen&
S"Strawberry" Creamery, -lb tubs
3-lb tubs..


22
B221-2


"Reliable" full cream cheese .... 121-2
Kiag's LIar
"Indiana" Pure Leaf ........... re
"8ea-Foam" compound ......... mbe.
Kwian Caulm Meats.
"Reliable Corned Beef, I ...... .L
o ed Bed. b ...... 2M
SRoast Beef, s ........ ULS
Roast Bed, 2a ........ .3S
Petted Ham ad Toegs
l-4 ......................... ,
SSliHed Beef, 1-2 .. .. 1J
Vienm 8usmag, 12 .. is
T4pe .................. L


MT A COP OW 2= ArVAL 520335 NRLE 3OOK


i


I







s rTHE WlNmKY umuuwruTIA BUCOBD.
_


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The job printing department
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. It is reason-
able to suppose you will get
better and more satisfactory
printing supplies-letter heads,
envelopes, commissary checks,
pay-roll reports, etc., by having
us make them.

Industrial Record Co.,
Jasmsvik Fnrida.


, -------- s3aaa a~m~aa~a.ma.ak.m.a*.a.n a *


'4
***3~3*3~3~3~EZ3.E a a a a a a a a a a~ a a~


* ~ V- V- V- V-- V--- W*V W V V-- WV------- WV- V V- V VV*V *VVV V --


UAD M A2 8 IM D.


To the Readers of the Record:


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THE WBfEITJY J.NjAtrXtIAL BRECORD. U


Pri nti g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


McMURRAY & BAKER,


oltehhh inmu. ub llt- stir

1ba w hses eIN 6 hemes s ear we have a aer a& PMes
nl aen n teams with am. TepI waen and harmees a spealeft. Deam
ftnk we e boa se wee am h- memAe bimma s
I *. i Il

U I I I W5 1Qr MT sr.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
2nt eM11"i 1 an amIprtda to =11 a fe8 way=3S.
at %do's= b th C. _eth


wam Deer 11r0,
~Ise No~de nl).


swaRmn.1


ww"Ns. arnuomme ma.
Ohawreafsi and New Toeaf.


'Of thi s
The willfl 14
the a t in thim spo are
It te wita plemasour.
W L- 110004D 10"0 .
.sea.k-vine otae ism. orf -Due of
Ame le ve Lem ii TedIe i*ralsh.
Thi Weokly fadurtriLt Roeord of Jack.
Mie and savannah has Uak ie place v
amem the leading trade Journals It the
Unfated Utaj uand as Man authority on ams-
Ser und a stores It Ia beig quoted not
e lmr by the beat and most carefUTiy etId e
e*n.m apers this country, abt by th n
to Burope also. A London trade paper r
smuabla this oelo yesterday gives liberal '
es to the Records views eo mart eIao- "
Th wek's Itue of tie Ildstrial Reo- "d
eor i o ve better tBhe uens mia It is hL
a strea ard nteotantain gameral inaes trial
rie iewsaper. a addition to its value no.
e the oamgpion of the Mo speolle lodus- '5-
tri It epr sta. It iAn brit of0 now Jobs
etres ot development the en aotheoast. pla~t
6oll ar earporatkion ergamed in Jacku O6
asvoi yesterday. ad e or *o i.
linGooaw and durn Wa'
seleral o ZtP aerenoUo areas sad wa
It hs at tLhe ea ffor eIter te and it wan
well deserves the great mere orf M es wick
St fi rcaltev both It e ascriptio and
adertling departments.earrying a It does.
eIIhap. one t the largest adveitirng pat-/
**esm gien to any of the south trern F

w or A. & In
a.nthi U i

UW.1,4& WWPb5Al 5!.W

f~ *****rrrrrsarnrsrrrrrr~rr ******rrrrrrrsrarrsrrr-d se,


1dy, Sot 30, at 3:00 pm ..AAGONQUTN .... Thursday, Ot. 6, at 1:00 pm
16ly, Ot. 1, ,t 3:00 pm ....APACHE .... Wednesday, Oct. 5, at 12:30 pm
"xNEW YORK ....Thursday, Oct. 6, at 1:00 pm
TIriay OCt 4, at 300 pm .... .COMANCHE ...... Sunday, Oct. 9, at 4:30 am
IMUay, Ot. 7, at 3:00 pm ... .ARAPAHOE, Wednesday, Oct 12, at 6:30 am
**xMOHICAN ......Friday, Oct. 14, at 8:00 am
hmlday, Oct. 8, at 3:00 pm ... .IBOQUOI8 ...... Friday, Oct. 14, at 8:00 am
Thes iy, Oct 11, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ....Sunday, Oct. 16, at 10.00 am
Wedimeday, Ot. 12, at 3:00 pm .... ALGONQUIN ..Monday, Oct. 17, at 11:00 am
fll ay, Oct. 14, at 3.00 pm ..... COANCHE ..Wednesday, Oct 19, at 12:00 n'n
**xHURON ......Thursday, Oct. 20, at 4:00 am
Dmiy, Oet 16, at 3:00 pm ..*xNEW York ......Friday, Oct. 21, at 4:00 pm
I8day, Orc 18, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE .... Sunday, Oct 23, at 4:00 am
Wbieday, Oct. 19, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS.... Monday, Oct. 24, at 4:30 am
Iday, Oct. I, at 3:00 pm ...-. APACHE .... Wednesday, Oct. 26, at 5.30 am
- ~lt ay, OeC. 2 at 3:00 pm .. .IAGONQUTN .... Friday, Oct. 28, at 6:00 am
MIaay, Oet 24, at 3:00 pm ..**xMOHICAN ....Friday, Oct 28, at 6:00 am
'beday&, Oc. 2, at 3:00 pm .... OMANCHE .... Sunday, Oct. 30, at 8:30 am
~iy, Oa. 2, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE .. Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 11:30 am
ateday, Oct. 29, at 3:00 pm ... .IOQUOIS ......Friday, Nov. 4, at 12.00 n'n
"XHURON ......Friday, Nov. 4, at 12:00 n'n
'-Bost=o via Bruawiek ad Charleston. xFreight only. *-Boston via

I1WE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
oles l a e etwoem Dusets md PmrseeaM e nad an f am.-
M Prot p 0fQ at Chalrtem meth Was.
mIo-W3 iELY mAIdluem.
rnm ...... .... .. .... .................. ..Prom Lrew. Wbart. Brestrm
.e...................... . ...em feet orf Oc stf terino sret. Jacksonville
CLDIE ST. JOfNS RIVER UNE
asteoma Jbe`moarMn SAW samjmlo.
Sgr at falat~ Aar ,St. a epas, Beereord (De Lad) mad itermease
im en e t. Johs Ier.
SSTEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
II lgte to Ml aioew: Leave JaAlsona e leandaya. Tuesds ad Tr-
S m.rlll. hae Deae. Monday. We..esday. ri :ays a. M.
SNOBRTeBO unu.
E I 11 P. 6I ...............m...... .....tS ,... ........... ..... .
l"- asP. ...... .. ... .....a. ... .... AIie A-I.D .
rW ...... .. ....... ... t .......... IrFve 1 p. -.
................. ......a .....de d t ......... Leave Bn neon
A is m.........................aaawe......... ......... ...... eave a. .
Ar. 10t a. m .....I.............. r ..................... j . 10:00 a. .
-N .a&. QA U R1n A"N WICKIr oIl ca. 3 w. lny st., j.aeLvl..
V. M. nOmnMOnmt. Asst. GeaL Pass Agnt. SM W. Bay St.. Jaeksonvmll. ia
w.. c. 0oX AL3. seal t*. Aga.. sJak'vm. C. P. LOVUL. Asst. aupt..Jae via.
rost eHoga Street, Jackonuve.
a. a TR. a. P A. ew. Y.ok. CGDB r ILUnj o. F. A.. w TY.l.
5 a11. 4. an WMu P. CLDwU a 00.
emaom NI-eeff. Oeneral Agent@.
OVeh B1Ddiu. t'ate Stret. urew Teek.


SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
80 YEARS RELIAWLITY.
Hess 6 Slager,
SDiamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry
S CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND IIt 13 MAIN.



Naval Stores MarKet

and Stock Report
Publa"h Daily in The



Jacksonville Metropolis,
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.

$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.


BIG PRIZES:

A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Expositicn, to
Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.


Carter & Russell Publishing Co.

Jaclaionville Florida.


WE=rT TIN Mucm 1J hUT MR nMYn -.


'4


I %.V_1.VV__VVVVV V__%PF_1_VV__VWW4._V t








tM_ THB WEEKLY ItuuIuHItAL RECORD.
I I. I II I [i


C K FULLER. V2084raeliaat


Greenleaf 6

Crosby Comp

3btelmr anb

bilbermitbs


41 West Bay Street

Jfacksonvlle


Writ for Ciataogfe


lA" F Lam nSNOW



3 00" urc


Diaaammds ad Oilig~elr~ Pm r


Fine Gold Jeweuiy P
American wad Forein W.e i
aud Clocks


Sterrid Siverwr

Electro Plated Wae
Choice Cut Glass


Fine China Dinner Sets au
Fancy Pieces


Zaorean N=d


TIE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
of W aanlish, N. C.,
ermart at commas atatbm. N. C.. am still' selm DtMait Aft
Nns at U^I Bk *ee J d standard at IM Old Btyle As Paentt
Parls at M( a dme Ther shlra average a ttle better thaa ever.
We em -ae-aot a t w bnrami the Blue Ilme Has at Ks san PaD-
er~ at OM wk We werra L. All whlemoBe eaeS a Ina a a r


Ia.2ZrHAMPtAU. u AIFRED A. MdKEHAN, L U. S N.
aeobohetem Bet'4 So' d Terem, Coma.trcttg
Etebear VayeUttelle, N. C.

Pine Product Construction Co.
FatyY N. C.
oSptrs do Tupeuotna Oi T1ar Cremt %e T mlrim, a: Weod Prenerative.
Pitsa Wood W lab w ta. K. m Ckro l ftrom Uartw tum Boz-febma
1toe If meMa& Ti oc AtarM dueaL. OOaoeMatelm eostolMd at wilL
n dowm r ftm Mra Plant ereat eaoom0pi and mme taugmat the lroee Fur-
tter ~ere wl aMteem sWean. guaerM mamm. U V eftw Ni. C.

m f E wj MEMORIALS I MARBLE, STOIE All BROZE
Pra the mimL Tablet to the mot elaborate Mamelem.
Write, or oome to me --our desdr wml pese JYou.
SOUTHERN MARBLE AND STONE CO.
lA.m rea.sri SIM C- L M. ..r.
Can Some for h&t W 6 ma e s ee
Amr Y in s me. MIaMs Measie smd Tie.


--.----------.-----


HOTEL BARTHOLDI, O^A voY a ST.
Facing adn Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout.
ear all Big 8tolr and Places of Amusement. tUat Pase
the Door for af Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings. I
arge Sample Rooma for Commercil Travelers: Here you
And no grad andm in fieent decorations: no luxurionu
grandeur; no awe-In pig urroundinP; no elaborate bill
of fare, printed in remch; no elrks that will disdain to
Speak to Yes. No Eployees Is Awy Way lsatteutatlve.
But jut a cosy. home-ilike title hotel that will appeal to the
bert of those who ae looking or oid comfort. Good.
plain American cooking and affable and courteous treatment. I
7W-- -i *K *


.John R. Young. Prea.nt. C.S.1
J. W. Motte. Jr. Secretary an


The ELLIS-YOL

S Commission Me
NAVAL STORES FACTOR
AND WHOLESA
....... ... ^ b-


JNG CO.


rchants


S
LE sROCERS
^-.*- .


3avauuaii auu ruulwliJ, ua.


~- '
J.W. HUNT. Proedt. J. IL HA" 2 V. Fru BML -1 OMaMO6 a. &
P. L. pF ooCK It V. P- W. J. K .LY. MV.P. A -i WaUaam, -*e ,.

Peacock-Hunt West ""Moe
General Offlces: 20 Bytrn t F. Samm
west eaul., -aLVm tlNE
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We re stritly actor. Our interest and the preotner' I :
ever take to accoynt, nor we interested in any eompaey th 1
Turpentine and reiLn.)
WHOLESALE GROCER -
Hay, Grain and Heavy Iarness.
Coopers Tools and Navwl Stores nar e r w 4W .ts
-BOLE AGENTS FOB--
The Celebrated Unlen Turpentine Axes and Wsoem & s 'w
Pblaiella Waga. s..
Naval Stres Received at Savannam Ga., ari JaMt- -
anmd Ferunamima Fa.


-II I


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