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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00091
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: October 7, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00091
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text







For thd Wilk&


791904.


JCI- 10 190


WEEKLY


department Irof A -'". .-


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Pwblised Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Luamber and M4anufacturIg Igterests.

-0t JW IP L. .7 rfe EneefVO C4Mtat Of t* IWVMWW 45p0ter A A WCAe 8 an 4acbOft e AI ewmern aNri Of Aet A11tho S n. #1#. imo Con
v a a ar A&* of to 6te S Aerseeila Admo m Sept. tA6 PdO. as t i e-. esme ON&pentdae narrator' mea rene..
AYptt AWO Oam aei". amtft OMCW Nef OWftm ftE fnShte C85 6 0661' Assecteaa. bruerd byhMe der" SIV_%ra
Ais ition. 6 nal*M of Me Southeastern Stoct krwr's Asuedat

WIS. 9S 14. JACUVIE MA ATLANTA, &A. SAVANNAH, GA. $3 A YEAM.


Phosphate Mining Industy in Florida.

MThe fuwing itsm writtm.by Edward occupies such a unique position amoa
iWr for the America Fertilier: the varied mining industries, for through
Sits peculr value as a commodity it a


F m- time th time various deposits of
-mhetm have beem foud ad mined
sqag t the world, but the principal
moipssk t-day ma to be found in Flor-
0. Suth Cbok asdl Tennessee in the
fted Stas, Aerfei and Gasa in North
Sa s a Oeean and Christma Islands
the ar BWet, bt the mot important
Sa is the ri. prodtion.
ftim os-a-e atis"mp have been made


S O big undertaking in this
t piice in- Ca-nda, o minor
l he k ae the Cae dian "apatite."
a a aaihful, extraordinarily high-
tarL bht, a the oher hand,
epaes e to mine; sad later
w e the Booth Carolina ad lorida
wee exploited, the oandian miners
unm ea to eet the competition.
Ne aK t eae South Carolia. The rock,
Sdivded into two grades-river
ld sek--wase found i considerable
ah" the Xrgi of the navi-
tsm and in the river beds be-
^ ^Avm awriebton aad Beaufort. It is
; ati aMd, l covenient to treaspor-
bo^-ahth by water and rail.
e doveries in Florida and Tenes-
Ls wud afterward, ad since then the
Sof Christma Mad Ocean Isl-
The sek of North Afria, on se-
eat its mearness, is consumed en-
Ia I aeep, and the production of
*1t Inies in Japaa,- Australia and
ain aepen markets.
g- 187 phaiphae was discovered on
%lks ea t the Ashley River, in South
but did not become of commer-
amporhance until 1874 In 1881 the
'P.k beds were discovered, says the
maitte, yet this And was not
phbl e nti 1888, when immediate-
asg espamales, aggregating many mil
oft dollars, were organized to mine
S-mheit. Phompbate from the South
beds almost revolutionized agri-
in the eastern States, while the
from the Florida deposits was, and
7te, heguly shipped abroad to the Eu
hiamers. In I8ME, while searching
.ea Hickmmaa County, Tenneseee
l plsaes of phosphate were discovered
proto had already been real
Lm the mining aad sale of Floridi
and, naturally, this discover]
mrmk exmetement, and at once at

regoauing brief y covers the origi
apso ft phemphate mining, es
a thO Unated States, where i


h
it


once becomes one of the most-important
Due to it are the numerous big fertilizer
works, which do such enormous traffic,
and makes possible the richness of so
much soil in many States that, without
the aid of this ingredient, would be either
vrailess or comparatively poor.
Phosphate mining in Tenes has
made wonderful strides. The production
has risen from 19,00 tons in 1894 to over
445,00 tons in 190, covering a period of
only nine years. Over 100,00 tons are ex-
ported annually through Pensacola to Eu-
ropean markets, chiefly to Italy and
France, and foreign shipments have also
been made through Newport News and
New Orleans. The blame, or nearly
360,00 tons, is shipped to the various
fertilizer factories in the vicinity of tha*
mining district
The Florida deposits are the richest ii.
the world. They are divided into five
gades, hard rock, land pebble, river peb-
ble, plate and soft phosphate, but only
the first three are to-day mined. About
twelve years ago there wer at one time
14 plants actively operating in the plate-
rock fields, known as the "Anthony Dis-
trict," but this mining has all been aban-
doned. One or two unsucessful attempts
have been made to mine the soft rock.
Regarding the position assumed and
since held by the Florida producers, we
quote the following extract from our June
number: "At the time of the discovery
of Florida hard rock, Canada and South
Carolina were producing large quantities,
but they have been forced to give it up
for export buniuess." And the article
goes on further to state that "they (the
South Carolina producers) were prosper-
ous then, more prosperous than the Flor-
ida miner to-4y. They were making
money rapidly, and had been doing so for
years. Stock in certain phosphate com-
panies in South Carolina bad risen in
price from five to twenty times the roit
Sof original capitalization. This condition
Sof affairs was due to the fact that the
I miners of phosphate rock in that State
- had agreed to work in harmony."
During the first six months of this '..tr
S29,751 tons of hard rock were shipipd,
. which, with the exception of only a few
- thousand tons, were exported to foreign
i markets; and during the same time 20,-
r 363 tons of land pebble, and 28,400 tont
- of river pebble, popularly termed "Pear
SRiver pebble," were produced and shipped
a The hard-rock shipments were 11,82 ii
- excess of the shipments during the cor
t responding period of 1900, and the increase


companies, transporting the rock to the
ports, have, in some instances, reduced
the inland freights, while some of the com-
pani have obtained their own indepead-
ent outlet to deep water. At a recent
meeting of the big producers it was agreed
to Armly maintain uniform prices during
this and net year.


in pebble represented nearly S,0O, while
the Peace River production remained
The Florida phosphate industry is grad-
ually getting into the hands of a few big
opertort Among the notable itances
of recent years is the consolidation of tUe
Peace Rier interests, the purchase of the
land pebble mine, the Phosphoria plant
and the plant of the Florida Eig-Iering
Co., together with the propertie belong-
ing to them, by the Prairie behb!f Phos-
phate Co.; 'the abeorption of the Ford
& Hiller interests by the Dutton Phos-
phate Co.; the community of interests re-
cently established between the Dutton
Phosphate Co and J. Buttgenbaeh & Co,
and the leasing of the vast Camp interests
by C. & J. Camp. The gradual absorption
of the individual mines has formed a few
big companies, and these concerns now
practically control the market.
In quality and quantity Florida hard
rock leads, being guaranteed to analyze
not less than 77 per cent. bone phosphate
of lime and less than 3 per cent. iron and
alumina. This, of course, is the minimum
and maximum guarantee, but quite a
number of shipments have gone much bet-
ter, sometimes as high as 80 per cent.
bone phosphate of lime. Nearly 500,000
tons of hard rock is exported annually,
where it has always been a prime favor-
ite among the continental superphosphate
works of Europe, but most especially Ger-
many.
The land pebble next in grad gar-
anteed to contain 68 per cent. bone phos-
phate of lime, also ranks second in amount
of production. The demand for this ma-
terial has increased rapidly, more rapid
than the increased supply would provide,
notwithstanding the fact that several im-
mense plants have been erected in this
district in the last few years. This rock
is exported largely to Europe, Australia
and Japan, and, besides, about one-half of
it is shipped to the large fertilizer works
at Weymouth, Carteret, Philadelphia, Bal
timore, etc.
The Peae River production is consumed
entirely at home now, the demand on thi
side being much greater than the supply
The most serious problem confronting
Sthe Florida miners to-day is the laboi
question. It is becoming more and mor
a source of annoyance, not only on ac
P count of the scarcity of workmen, but th
high wages demanded, which is a nature
r sequence. Still, withal, the outlook i
, unusually bright. Prices have remain
Fair, and the demand good. The railro


Larson originally came from the Nrth-
west, and understands the agricult al
conditions there as well as along the easL
coast. He is thoroughly reliable al a .
one sent down here by him will ever ham
occasion to say that anything wr =-
represented.
- c'


Ii>


'* A-


ast Coast Railway to ZdtaMb Lad
Burm in" Chimak
Under the direction of J. R. Prrot
vice-president and general memae ore the
Florida East Coast Hotel Compay, th
is being established in the prfacipal e-
ter of Chicago one of the most complete
and up-to-date railway, lad and bhot
bureaus in the country.
The office is on one of the prildpl
street, and the plate glass wiadas a
Iing decorated with appropriate msgm.
The office is being fitted wift hea- --
furniture, and the fSer spa Wil he
cupied by desks, chairs ad florM ph b
and fruits, while from the wBal WO he
suspended somare of the met atrn
scenes along the east coask. Dring pa
of each year representative of the d -
ent hotels of the eamt eojt system wm
have desk room in this general de., b
meet prospective tourist, impat & .
nation and make bookings. A reprsase-
tative of the railway wil be venamiEt
there, and anyone wlting informtimh
about land, in city or coautry, or't-
tages to lease, can obtain fua d rama -
rate information.
Louis Larson, at present eeretary to
J. E. Ingraham, in charge of the ha d b-
partment, and third vice-president of the
railway company, of St. Augutie, h
been appointed general manager of te
Chicago office, and will leave the i t4t1
part of the month to take carg of the
office, which is now being fttM ap by ma
of Mr. Parrott's representatives Mr.
Lareon has been conneted with tie Mot
Coast Railway for the past ten yer
For several years he was plaim agut, a .
during the past six or eight years he has
been secretary or chief lerk in the e d
department. He is thoroughly fam er
with every branch of the railway, bet
and land interests. He has be in ide
F contact with settlers and boomesackas a
Sthe east coast and thoroughly mnderstalns
the nature of the 500 miles of laud fam
SJacksonville to Key West; and, in fact,
s a more capable representative ould not
. be chosen.
g It is the aim of the general -amager e
r the Florida East Coast Railway to seeat
- a class of settlers something above the
e average for the lower east coast. It is be-
l lived that this clas can be reahi
Through Mr. Larso in the Nrthwe t
, with Chicago as his headquarters. Mr.


* *' ^


- z"






* THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL B BCOBD.
d -0 1 1 1 1 - 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0


C. B. ROGEB8. Pasmtamr.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, Vicx-Puaswmrn.


DIRECTOIRS C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain. H. A. McEachern and J. A. Ci
B. F. Ballard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


C. H. HODGBON, tec, aad TamaPa
aoford, of Jacsonville;


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.


)


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Cosasst of oMe Three-Story Bulldisg, 70x200; one two-story bsldiag. 50x390; ome oee-story blrdljg, 80x250,
amlklag the largest space of ay Company of the klad In the Seeth.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola. Fla., and SavannJah Ga.
TH-E RUCoRD W-IL 3 WOtR- ----AS--------- -- .R E E .
TmI iuCcDm WILL = WNOHT 1WLA9 TO W IviTy WXKKL


Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Pla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery braieh
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensaeola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


:4


I
I


1








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


bm hab 3s.
The trade en Miot s in the SoAt as
T ta by Bradstret's show a general
neeam in ar lies of binesa.
Oh a.-Trade in all lies i good.
Oste is eMing in. and bringing god
- oeetions are improving
avak-h-Busiaess in anll lines is in-
aihing. Ooections have improved,
may ters anticipating notes. The
gemal outlook good.
Wheling.-In gise manufacturing, es-
p ally window glass, improvement is
moted, and price are better than at any
tie for the pat yea, while inquiries
r nm ro. Local potteries work-
Ssteadily, with fair prospects. Inde-
pemdent iros ad steel plants are opert-
iog o good time, with very favorable
prospects for eaotinuane. Jobbers and
retailers a reporting satisfactory busi-
, with a betterment in collections.
Te apple erop in this vicinity is the
hagt i many year
Augta.-The weather coatiaues fa-
raMeks for harvnting Retail trade re-
maim quiet, while joding trade contin-
m to improve. Collections are quiet.
.Atinat.-Thel volmae of business is
sort 10 per eaMt. largr than at the or-
repoading time in 19, but not equally
detribated in all .. Building contin-
me active. Meyas i easy. The drought
is very severe, and the cotton crop lost
heavily in September.
aeo-Coatinusd hot weather retards
toade. Coleetioi are fair. Cotton is be-
mg marketed rapidly. The crop will be
average eOa.
-tgmery.--OCtto eontinies active,
-sd very little is being held for better
plaea. The weather, although exceeding-
i warm, is very favorable for the harvest-
leg of all rope. Jobbing and retail trade
i stimlated by the steady movement of
otton. Collections are good for the sea-

Chattanoog. Trade in general and col-
eetions remain entirely satisfactory.
Mempis.-Wholesale business is in.
creasing. detail trade is quiet owing tU
t weather. Crop reports indicate gooc
bottom and middle crops, but poor tol
r. Cotton is opening rapidly; pick
ig is general. Total yield is estimated
to be 25 per cent. in exKes of last year
The price bas for middling last year wai
97- cents; this year, 103-8 cents. Col
emtians run from fair to good.
Nauhille.-Fall season business is sat
tfaetry. Crop conditions are pleasing
Qie an increase in volume is looked for
Bans report good business ad feel en
raged over the outlook. COllection
bed au well Retail trade is somewhat
retarded by unseasonable wether. Con
isMrable bdiMing is going on.
little Boek.-Unfavorable weather to
the past week has retarded cotton picking
and very little is being marketed from
thi section. Trade generally is report
as ot equal to last year's. Collection
are somewhat slow.
New Orleas.-eneral business is ap
pretly in good condition. Retail trad
shows a gradual increase. Collections ar
good. All crops are said to be in fai

SFort Worth.--teports are that 45 pe
aet Mof Texas cotton crop has been gath
eed. Indications for further fruiting o
top crop are poor. Pickers are scarqc
a should bad weather set in, much c
the open cotto will be lost. Trade i
povng slowly on account of tendene'
of farmers to hold for better prices.
IhDu -e.l Statistitcs, deemed reni


ble, show a probable increase of 6 per
cent. in the cotton crop over last year.
The weather is favorable for picking, and
the product is being marketed rapidly.
Local buyers report a scarcity of corn on
the market, owing to the fact that farm-
ers are giving undivided attention to cot-
ton. Wholesale traders report a steady -
increase in sales, and collections are good.
Waco.-The cotton situation is practi-
cally unchanged. Farmers are holding
for higher prices. Retail trade is report-
ed dull, but wholesale is active and col-
lections are good.


KIRK & JONES

DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.
MAIL OkHD rS SOLICITED.
JiAOKSONVILLK. FLA.

H. OBDNSON.Pro. R. GALTT..LA. O(aMer
W. a. OWN. Vice-Prm.
Commercial Bank,
State Deposity.
Ba.cum;: Oais.. I.. Lae Cit. Via
Jcksuville, -... florida


TE CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00


BARRELS

ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Bre hol and will pas the se
vraet American and Euopean infection.

. Pl at ,MES, CAIRO, ourTMAN GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address omrs to hoe office,
QUITMAN, GA.
d


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JAOCKONVILLE. FLA.
CAPITAL S O SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS s$OO3,O
We sias Tm Certicates Depoit, wMhic draw interest at the rate ad three poe-r ctr
MurIf held NMnety days or longer, Take arafaffae o this ma ert year parl5s ea
Umetai bf oyM Particular attention paid to Out-o-Town account. mending deponrIm by


"When the Leaves Begin to Fall"
Watch out for Chills and Fever.

Planters Tasteless Chill Tonic
is a awe Cre-GUARANT- B TO CURE. BIG 4
We rua no risk In making this uaraty. BG
Read this:


Neeae, 8. C. June 16, 1904.
I had beea sPering with chills ad fever for the
Ma Ave yea..M and hatrid do, m ban at
Relif until I began to usPlanters Cbil m ie, which, I
am anul tos, has ured me. .
C. IE BolC.
Write m for booklet and special pries.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga.


- I=




Tenn.


. R. POWELL. CRAS. 6. MArIS, NrMRY ASBEAr.
rrset. Vice-Preslet d Trresaurer. Secrets.
DIECCTORS:
3. Pwell.. CAMs. . 6. Narri. L .aterau. it. V. C.rlagto.

THE



CemU"r i Weat UBa am M Ualm l St.
Jacksenville, florida.


Wholesale Drugs I Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote price on
anything in the drug line. We make peeked drugs a specialty ad can save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.



THE ARAGON
JACKSONVIUL.L. rLA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.



East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Sbipments a Specaty.
WATELTOWN, FLORIDA.


W. T. RiLer,
president.


606 PpAalnA,
- l M


J. A. 6. CARSON,
Vlce-Presidet.


G2`. i. SCOVEL,
Sec. ad Trea9.


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Factories,
8th Street R. R. Crossing.


JACKSONVILLE,


FLORIDA


THE RECORD 1O T=E SOME'S GRET TRADE JOURNAL


I h


``


'- ;










I - 1


Dr. Jobs A. Wyeth, the distinguished
Alabmana now a resident of New York
et, during a recent trip to Europe was
s interested in the matter of Italian
immigration to this country that he spent
a month in leisurely travel from the Nea
politanm eetion in the south of Italy to
the metral sad northern districts. He has
embodied his ending in a letter to the
M1itgmery Advertiser, and they must
be suggestive an valuable to everybody
aeking to hasten the solution of the
Stern labor problem. Dr. Wyeth
agrees with other thinkers in the convic-
tion that, notwithstanding what has been
eommplled and is being done by the
b har clas of negro workers, the negro
Srae eanmot meet in quantity or quality
the deand for labor required for the com-
plet. developmet of the agricultural or
Smindal reaoumes of the South, though
he in de*allg with Alabama especially.
He looks, therefore, to judicious work in
immigration aad believes that overcrowd-
ed Italy may aid in the solution of the
problem. He does not believe that the
SeSicilia and Neapolitans, held in co-
Stempt by their northern brthren because
Sof thar physical, mental and moral in-
feriority, would be desirable additions to
or population. On coming to this coun-
try their tendency i to Sock to great
cities, whme they are eoatent to grind
tJ cat aa existence with organs and pukh-
earts But Dr. Wyeth looks to the na-
tives of Campagna, in the Roman districts
and of the rich farming sections of Lorm-
bardy and Piedmont as contituting in
every way material for possible and de
siraMe immigants. He writes:
"They are industrious, sober and affa
ble. I do not recall having seen a drunker
person, and their politeness is proverbial
The greater number are farm laborers
and owing to the system of large-handet
prpristorships which prevails, they an
very poor. They are overcrowded, and a
doubt would respond to a judicious anw
tactful effort to secure them as immi
grants. Moreover, they are excellent far
men. I have yet to see any portion o
the earth made to yield such crops o
presmt a -.ore beautiful agriculture
picture than the country lying just to th
sath of Milan No wonder that Bona
part's oldies won the Italian eampaig
whme, after years of starvation, he tool
them to the heights of the Appenines, an
with their eyes gazing upon this glorion
sad fertile vista, said: 'Soldiers, the ric
plais of Lombardy await you!'
"All through this section there are vas
Sads of wheat, oats and corn and vario
grmms and forage crops. The elimat
does not materilly differ from ours c
Midle aad Northern Alabama, and on
eatto i the only important crop in whie
they now require much instruction. A
for laborer in our mines and public
works, they should do equally well.
"The ove.a.wded condition of th:
country is apparent on every hand, an
the diieulty of sustaining life is evider
hem one sees the thousands of miles <
stone wall with which the hill and morm
tain sides are terraced to their higher
points where a wagonload of earth ma
be retained and made productive."
When onee this class of poor but ii
dustrious and thrifty Italians, eking o0
a living in their densely-populated na
tire land, may lean of the opportunity<
for them in the South, they may be e:
peteed under wise direction to find pro
table homes in the Soth. There hu
dreds of thousands of acres are awaitim


Letters Patent Granted.
Letters patent have been granted for
two new Florida companies, as follows:
At St. Petersburg, the St. Petersburg
& Gulf Railroad Company, with a capital
of $25,000, to construct, own and operate
a line of railway, telegraph and tele-
phones, by the use of steam, electricity or
compressed air, from St. Petersburg, in
the county of Hillsboro, and through the
village of Disston City, in said county, to
a point on the Gulf Coast, the approxi-
mate distance of eight miles, with the
right of power to extend any of its lines
into any other county in the State of
Florida. F. A. Davis, Gum S. Gandy and
W. L. Haddock, all of Philadelphia, are
the incorporators.
At DeLand, the E. O. Painter Print-
ing Company, with a capital of $25,000,
to construct, operate paper mills for the
manufacture of paper, and to sell and
otherwise dispose of the product of aid
mills; to make and bind books, print
newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, book
catalogues, price lights and blank books;
to construct and operate type foundries,
etc. E . Painter, S. W. Johnson and
W. C. Painter are the incorporators.


Convict Guad Held for Manslaughter.
Pensacola, Oct. 3.-Preley D. Hawkins,
the convict guard under whose charge the
two negroes, Payne and For.'iy, recently
died of sunstroke cause. by walking them
rapidly eleven miles to the eanvict canp
of Varn Brothers & Company, was to-
night held to the grand jury on the charge
of mansldghter, and given into custody
to-day of Sheriff Van Pelt.
Senator Blitch, supervisor of State con-
victs, was present at the inquest in be-
half of the State, and S. A. Bawls, of
Oeala, who has charge of the convicts
leased by the State to the Florida Naval
Stores Company, was present in the in-
terest of his company, of which Varn
Brothers are sub-lessees.
Senator Blitch said that this was the
first instance of its kind. in the State,
and further said that the convicts of the
State were being well treated generally
by the lessees.
Mr. Rawls did everything in his power
to further the investigation.
The verdict of the coroner's jury was
expected ald appears to give general sat-
isfaction.
Hawkins was released later on bond of
$2,000 in each case, the bond being signed
by J. R. Saunders and J. R. Rose


just that sort of careful ad intelligent
culture which has of necessity been forced
upon the Italians, with their little hill-
side plats. There the density of popu-
lation is less than forty persons to the
square mile, which means, of course, an
even smaller density in rural communities.
There the Italians may have unexcelled
opportunities to expand their now limited
farm operations in all crops to which
they are accustomed, and in addition may
occupy themselves in cotton-raising, in
which many of their pioneer fellows have
succeeded admirably. It is for the South-
ern officials charged with the duty of
attracting settlers to confer with the
Italian authorities seeking homes for a
surplus population, to the end that a
stream of healthy immigration be directed
and sustained between Northern Italy
and the South.-Manufacturers' Record.


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA., U. 5. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
Presideat


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-Presdea.L
a#s:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


H. L.K RAYIW.
seeary as* Trmm


B. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. L mamrK M
O. W. DnM,
RAYMONDCAT.
J. L. OaOOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and am
conveniently situated at the terminals of the 8. A. L. and A. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE OF THEEhE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARiS
I-A


Wo


R. THOMAS


GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggles.


1 YOV DOn'T nM IT IXI T30CORD warn V


119e's* *O*s44*e*s* 4s *e e4o t *e*** * *-*

J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,


Headuarters fr

S Distiller's Pumping
N Outfit
*1 No plant complete without OB.
0 Hundreds of them in use in
SFlorida, Alabama, Minappi -
Soutb Carolina. Write us for paUfr
Sslars and prieo. We aso manfastue
SEngines, SBers Maid R i
*9 Grade MasMdery,
a twell as arry a full an eompkft

SMil Suples, Pipe,
*i Bliter Tubes, Etc
*. Advise your wants.
f Macon, - Geora.
Z* 0s or Tuem Wrkt for Terol Stap Iam


l 11 11111llll 1l li lll l lJ I l Il11 111111111111111111 l
W. W. CARNS. PreO W. C. THOMAS. Manser. C. T DUDLEY. Se'. mw


Tampa Hardware Co.

SWholesale

Hardware
STusrpentine, Mill and Phosphate Suppiles.

SLarge Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
- and Pullers on Hand.


.
-N TAMPA, FLORIDA.

II11 .lit lllA Tlittll O 3 lll.l1 1111i111 lill 11



... NATIONAL... I


S4


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.










THE WEEKLY iaUSftnIAL RECORD.


Ehamuse Cemon sm of Tobacco Owan
The Amrican Society of Equity, J. A.
wieritt, president, andianpolis, has i-
sued the following call for a national coa-
veation of tobaeeo growers:
S t has bee abudantly demoentrated
that fmers can be factors in shaping
the prices of their products. Proofs of
this statement are found in the wheat
market of the past year; in corn, oats,
cattle, hogs, cotton, etc, prices of all thee
have permanently, or for periods, been
imsaeneed by the quantity thrown oi the
market, or withheld from it. Even in
your own special rop-tobacco-ther
have been unmistakable evidences that
withholding the supply compels the price
Whie this society entered the tobaeeo
district of Kentucky about five months
go and proclaimed its intention of organ
Z3ing all the tobacco growing sections of
*the country, your crops was selling at
.tarttion prices, and buyers were telling
yo -that there wun an overproduction
and suient supply to last from three
-to fve years. You know a revolution has
;iake place since that time. Prices are
About double what they were then
and buyers are scouring the country anx-
-am. to buy, and impose a condition that
dedivery must be made in a short limit
At tis. This don't look like over-pro-
duntio, does it?
Tobacco growers, you now have the
greatest opportunity of your life, and
oa you rests a great responsibility. What
wilm you do about it?
Another crop has been produced. Grow-
oes everywhere are wakened to the im-
artae of doing something to preserve
to them the fruits and profits that should
mine as the reward of their labor. What
I needed, is to learn how. To this end,
.a convention is called to meet at Lynch-
Va., November 10 and 11, 1904 At
this convention, the whole tobacco situ-
,alon will be considered and a minimum
will be decided upon for the va-
Svarieties and grades.
Ticonvention i not for the Amrian
bIIsr 4tffiq-ityW alone, but for every
be gro owners' association that has for
Schief object, "A profitable price for
4 rop." Also, for every idepdnt
#rower who wants a profitable price al-
Paya.
Kentucky represents the best oran-
d. territory, and the union growers of
t rState are enthusiastic for this con-
M.A )bo, the work of organization
SIl progress in Tennessee, Virginia
North Carolina, Mryland, Ohic, Pasyl-
vans, New York, Connecticut and Wis-
eoudae Every district should be repre-
seataftto assist in fixing the price aad
to ler how to secure it through on-
tr~l marketing.
Lynebberg, Va., i centrally located, a
nalroad center and the most accessible
point for the greatest number of inter-
acted people. Exeursion rates will be
ed on all railroads, and from every
State that wR send a good delegation.
The wise, earnest and would-be success-
ul growe will embrace this--the first
of their lfe-opportunity to asert the
freedom and independence of the buying
trusts, which ae wholly dependent on
the growers of tobacco. If you ae indif-
feret or careless your industry will not
be raised to a plane of profit where it
a easily be put. Much, in fact we may
ihnm everything, depends on this con-
ention. By unity of action you will be
irre ible, It will do farmers good to
get together in convention, learn of, aad
cooperate with each other. Decide to-day


that you will attend, or see that a repre-
sentative of your local union, your socie-
ty or your neighborhood attends.


VEletric PFitre Peant.
A German engineer has recently pub-
lished some facts regarding the use of
electricity in connection with petroleum
production. The use of current, generated
in a large central station, to operate mo-
tors for petroleum wells, is justied by
the great extent of ground covered by the
wells, as well as the danger from fire
caused by the steam engines which ope-
rate the drills and pumps. Another rea-
son for using such a system is the varia-
tions of the load which occur at the dif-
ferent wells. These three points alone
will therefore explain the advantages of a
central station system. The first wells
to be drilled by electric motors were in
Roumania, where the system was inau-
gurated five or six years ago. The first
installation, provided with a set of motor-
driven pumps, was put in by the Dutel
Company. A central station was erected
at a distance of one and one-half miles,
to supply the current. The motors are
of the three-phase type, operating at 300
volts. The total capacity of the station
ia 200 kilowatts I ter on, the Lahmeyer
Co. erected a large station for the Rou-
manian Company Steau Romana to be
used in operating a great number of wells.
Hydraulic power is used here, and the
turbine plant can furnish 1,500 horse-
power. Four dynamos of the three-phase
type were installed, giving 300 volts each.
A set of transformers raises the voltage
to 11,000 for a high-tension line which
runs for twenty miles or more to the well
district. Near the wells is a reserve sta-
tion which can run in connection with the
central plant. It uses three Diesel mo-
tors of 300 horse-power each. The mo-
tor use crude oil and consume 28 litres
per horse-power hour. A year ago there
were as many as thirty electric motors
in ae at the wells at Campana and twen-
ty-seven at Bushtenari, or about sixty in
all. The first cost of the plant was $2,-
400 per well, and the running expenses
$40 per horse-power year. In Russia the
conditions ae less favourable for the
use of electric power. This lies in the
fact that the oil which is now consumed
to furnish the power for the wells is not
subject to any tax, and therefore a very
cheap supply of energy can be had, al-
though it is wasteful and accompanied
by fire risks. However it is to be noted
that there are a number of electric plants
for operating the wells in the Rusian dis-
triet. One of these is at Balachani and
was the first to be installed. Almost at
the same time a second electric station
was erected in the district belonging to
the Nobel Co. In the spring of 1901 a
large central plant was laid out for 1,500
horse-power to supply the wells belong-
ing to the Apscheron Co. on the Caspian.
the station uses two steam engines and
two dynamos of German make. A great
number of motors are used at the wells.
Since then other electric plants have been
installed at Balachani, Bibi-Eybat, Baku
and other localities.-Oil and Colourman's
Journal.


It is thought by some that this com-
pany has consolidated with the Hodges
& O'Hara Timber and Naval Stores Com-
pany. If so, they will control most of
the land from Silver Springs to Deep
Creek, near Palatka.


For Sale

S 7,00 AJras Round Timber, Walton Co. Turpentine pnv-
S ilege only. $1.50 per acre. Water transportation.
Soo A~os Volusia Co., Round Timber, on Rail tram-
portation. Splendid timber for turpentine. Price $3aJ. Fee sa-
S ple.
&0 Aeol Hillsboro Co. Water transportation. Bplan-
did Turpentine timber. $3.00 per acre, fee simple.
S We have several choice Turpentine locations in operation. Write
* for schedules. Our No. 8 Bulletin will be mailed upon appliation.


Brobston, Fendig & Co.
0 Jadmesvi, Fi.rida. .rk Wa.
W* ***--------- ----

*6*e****4f-**t6---------- M

J. A. Craig CLD Bro.

* 239 W. Say Street EVERETT BOCK.

le ,qders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
S ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.





The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE a RETAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints, Oil* and Glass.
Stoves, Tinware, Country-Holloware.


I0 WEST DAY STREET


Jacksonville, Fla.


T. MURPHY

JACKSONVILLE MACHINE ND IRON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Irem
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARIg E ENGINES AND BOILERS. PULLEYS AND SEIAFPIT
Agent for Stationary Enginet Boilers, Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Colmen-
sers. Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Goods
PMER TRISIUIIS al WATER WUI$ ESiIU T A Ki SL1T
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.

***------***-*-*- --E------------
Cable Address. Florida


eStandard Naval Stores
*Corr~oarry.


DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN


ROSIN

AND TURPENTINE.

Jacksonville. Fla.
------------------
iw w w few --------


WxU WIFG ADY=MS nUTO T= 3EOZL










0 ;- TM WRIKIY INDbUVI'kflTIA kuMOoD.


New Cerpantema.
The Bank of Portia has been organized
at Portia, Ark., with E. J. Mason as pres-
ident, and H. H. H. Collins, cashier.
The Security Bank of Cowpens, S. C.,
has been chartered with $20,000 capital
Joseph Norwood is president, and W. G.
Williams, cashier.
The Edisto Investment & Improvement
Co, of Orangeburg, S. C., has been char-
tered with $2,000 capital, by S. R. Young-
blood, Thos. J. Levy and N. C. Nix.
The Citizens' Bank of Camiilla, Ga,
capital $30,000, has begun business. The
offers are George C. Cochrane, president;
. M. Davis, vice-president, and John C.
Wileso, cashier.
The Runnels County Bank of Miles,
-Texas, has been authorized to begin busi-
ness with $25,000 capital. S. W. Meineke
is president, and W. S. Davis, cashier.
The Merchants and Farmers' Bank, re-
cently organized at Sparks, Ga., has begun
business with $25,000 capital. L. O. Ben-
ton, of Monticello, Ga., is president, and
D. P. Edwards, of Valdosta, Ga., eashicr.
The National Bank of Jamesport, of
Jamesport, Mo., capital $30,000, has been
approved. The organizers are W. H.
Keener, W. P. Klepper, J. H. Klepper,
Thomas K. Hays, John M. Grimes and S.
S. Reese.
The First National Bank of McLean
'Texa, capital $25,000, has been author-
ized to begin business with the follow-
ing officers: R. LH Collier, president: W.
E McLaeghlin, vice-president, and C. IM.
MeCCullough, cashier.
The First National Bank of Statesboro,
Ga., capital $25,000, has been approved.
The organizers are S. M. Deal, Raiford
Simmons, Brooks Simmons, W. W. Wil-
liams, H. I. Waters and others. Busi-
ness will begin within 60 days.
The People's Bank for Savings at St.
Augustine, Fla., has begun business with
$25,000 capital. The officers are John T.
Dismakes, president; T. A. Pacetti, vice-
president, and T. K. Cureton, cashier. the
directors are H. W. Davis, J. W. Estes,
W. J. Sanchez and Messrs. Dismuka., ami
Paeetti.
The Farmers and Merchants' Bank of
White Bluff, Tenn., will begin buzi-ess
about January 1, 1905, with the follow-
ing officers: President, Pitt Hensler: vice-
president. J. G. Brown; directors, S. G.
Holland, John M. Smith, J. B. Harris, W.
W. Jordan, Joseph Whithed, J. Heath and
E. A. Lindsley.
A trust company with $1,000,000 capi
tal, $200,000 paid in, will be established
at Ardmore, I. T., by C. W. Boonbaek and
A. P. White, of Minnesota, T. E. Well-
stein, of Ohio, S. P. Allen, of Kansas
City, P. C. Drign an. J. L. Live nmaon, of
La Porte City, Ind., and H. A. Waldock,
of Indian Territory.
The Continental Surety Co. is being or-
ganized at Chattanooga, Tenn, with $375.-
000 capitaL Those interested are M. Ii.
Hedges, Charles A. Lyerly, Harry C. Ad-
ler, Linus L Llewellyn, W. B. Mitchell,
.H. S. Chamberlain, David Giles, H. S.
Probasco, J. A. Patten, A. N. Sloan, C. K
James, J. C. Guild, C. D. Mitchell, E. B.
Craig, William L. Frierson, George D.
Lancastdr, Samuel R. Read, Charles Reif,
David Bukofzer, all of Chattanooga, and
-J. P. Steffner, of New York. H. S. Pro-
baseo has been elected chairman; J. A.
Patten, vice-chairman, and A N. Sloan,
secretary, with offices in Masonic Tem-
ple.-Manufacturers' Record.


Spnksh Operatr ase k agremet.
Of general interest to the turpentine
operators and factors in this State will
be the following in the Savannah News
of recent date in reference to the visit
to the turpentine belt by a Spanish man-
ufacturer:
"For the purpose of arranging an un-
derstanding between the naval stores
dealers of the United States and Spain,
Senor Rodriguez, of Bilbao, a director
of the Spanish Union Resin Company, is
in the city, registered at the DeSoto.
This morning he will present letters of
introduction and call on the leading op-
erators and disclose his plans.
"As Senor Rodriguez has not acquired
the intricacies of the English language,
he has with him Senor Jose Echezavvete,
who has been connected with the exhib-
it of his country at the World's Fair. It
was while visiting the fair that Senor
Rodriguez met him and secured his ser-
vices on a tour of the country.
"Second to the Southern part of the
United States in the production of rosin
is Spain, and the industry in that coun-
try in controlled entirely by the Union
Resin Company, of which Senor Rodri-
guez is a director. The only other coun-
try where the production of rosin is car-
ried on to any large extent is France. The
method employed in France and Spain is
known as the Thigues system, which con-
sists in boring the trees, instead of strip-
ping them of bark, thus prolonging their
life.
"The Spanish company has a capital
stock of .2000,000 peseta, equivalent to
about $4,000,000 in United States money.
The company owns eighteen farms, and
has fourteen plants for the manufacture
of wooden boxes and barrels. The annual
output is considerably over 100,000 bar-
rels of rosin, with about one-third that
amount of spirits.
"In explaining his plan through an in-
terpreter, Senor Rodriguez said:
'The idea is not to form a combination
of operators, but to bring about an agree-
ment in the price of the products of the
pine tree in the world's markets.
"'For instance, our company would like
to be sure that the American operators
will not undersell us in the open markets,
and we would give the same assurance to
them. The cooperation of France could
he easily secured, I believe, should the
United States and Spain come to an un-
derstanding.
"'1 have come to Savannah realizing
that the price in the world's markets is
fixed at.this point. With the cooperation
of the Savannah dealers our company
could be sure that there would be no cut-
ting in price below the tariff schedules.
"'We expect to spend a few days in Sa-
vannah and may go further south for a
short time. After leaving the rosin-pro-
duc'ng sections, we will go to Charleston,
Baltimore, Washington and Philadelphia.
We came over to see the fair and to visit
the large cities, as well as to look after
the rosin industry.'
"Senor Calixto Rodriguez is a deputy
from Cortez, and is serving his twentieth
term as a Republican leader. His party
is weak in Spain and his continued sue-
cession to the honor in the Senate is a
compliment to his influence. He is ac-
companied by his wife in his tour of the
United States."
I rYO a*& tIlmina oa bryin a
Pae. -monli t -sw- you sve. or
erlnai It you aw e hlisM ad i2-
9 ast o lin l an t wit S
t.e buy miaelaem of u as __ =
"elling of your w"a .


C. M. BARNS Press. J. I. SIAW, Vle-PrFea. RLP JicuWUP. S.-

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Resins
Strcty a Produers' CompMy. Cu-e-.
Grades aid Weilts Guirateel
Deliveries at Jacksmlne Peusaen FenuMd lm aud Sanuml
Corespeedenee Sledte. JACUKSNVL. FLA

44Uigm11 u m eulo ss uII 111 IIIIII ellel lllP-100101".....


PAL WGf. Prs.


T. a eMITSrfl WIse-Pres


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIME


I=wu= N. wnm M1med


Florida Timber, Gr


Agricultural La


S401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACI


Kum= gum Tree


U APAIT.





zlng &


nds.

SONWLLK FL&:


I 1511III II I It II II II a 9 11 a I I I I I I I Sones@ UII


W. H. BCKWITr. W. WB. HENDRSON. .. a WAM-.M

BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.


LARGE TRACTS OF TURPEITIIE AID MLL LAUK

* Rooms 1-2-3 First NatleMl Bank DIdMlg.
TAMPA, r FLOKIDA ;

O s1O01 Is let I II .niI too iI 9189810 O O .9980010


RM IELNA.MP .FW C V. SARnUSO Vl As SAMReslAK, P.F.S
m( & r1- CI.) (C W. k ) GMMd Cr---l au

FLORIDA FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY,
(1w 1rRA1.)
We can collect your Freight Claims agafest
IRalroads and SteaMssUp Compales.
Carges JReasoable. Yorr Mebersp Somteem



Wale SWBott wrr .s tru. r aM .s




I wml serd tour full qarts of somers' .Or. Metwoee Rp, Gedl WeO-
g Dya HollanIVp 0ur, Tm Idg. Pe JACSOnVLL, Pelh in




Whiskey, Gn ad Manhattan CocktaInat the abve S........ II
One bottle of ay o th boe ............................. ....................... 0
Pour bottle of the following Calforaek Wi: rBi. Pa t, Mesmad.
Catawba ............. is
sMsle bottle .I
Four botte Wlan WhIske, a m -
nole bottles a

Bulk soodsa of a ll D peal Prise .r aw Sumln. AN Waft
Hquers in Jan from U to $IS., e. b. magavl



"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST oN EARs.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowet ma-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited See quotatio-
thispaper.
KINOAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FA.


Aru TOU A maOCUrma TO THXE MCOD









THE WKEKLY mNmUurrIAL RBOORD. T


agathera Cald Ggo@& Ameadtnima
About twenty me prominnt in t.e
Southern Oolrad Qood. Associatio met
in Nhariotte, N. ., yesterday and perfect-
ed the organisation of that association,
whi was formed in Atlanta, Setember
7.
SThe prime object of the gathering was
to improve the odmlitions of the colored
goods market, which is far from satisfac-
tory now and has been so for some time
Something more than 150,000 spindld and
urly 600 looms were represented.
They elected the following offieen:
F. Hing, secretary and treasurer of
the Curaleigh Mills, Raleigh, N. C., pres-
idLt.
J..W. ias, president of the Arista and
South Side Mills of Winton 'ewn, N.
C, viee-preideat.
B. Bobe'toon, secretary and trean
rer of the Holt-Granite Mills, of New
-iver;-N. C, eeretary and treasurer.
The following resolution were adopted.
"Resolved, That we recommend that the
colored -os miis continue to curtail to
the same emtet as in the past three
months and until the market conditions

"Resolved further, That it is the sene
-f th meeting that the colored goods
*mill should not allow the commission
merchants to make freight allowance
beyond the Mississippi river nor north of
Chicago, and that in no ease should they
permit a guarantee of prices or put goods

The secretary was instructed to notify
all colored goods mills in the Soath not
rpsentedt in the meting of the aeton
taken, and invite them to become mem-
bers of the association.
SWhen interviewed, Secretary Robert-
o said it was estimated that the ear-
talmst for the past t. m oth. rep-
4F fM Cf1 k


'V


I


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'V
'V
'V

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resented one-third or more of the South's
total prodution of colored goods. He
added: "I believe all the mills are in
sympathy with the purposes of our asmo-
tiation, and that most of them will join
when the matter is brought to their
attention. In company with Walter L.
Holt and T. C. Eawistle, I visited a great
many of the mills, going as far south as
New Orleans, and found all of them in
hearty accord and willing to join in the
movement we have inaugurated."
The next meeting of the association
will be held at the call of the president..
A number of manufacturers sent letters
giving expressions of their hearty sympa-
thy with the meeting and saying they
would gladly abide any action that might
be taken.
J. A. Smith, of Bessemer City, N. C.,
president of the Bessemer City Cotton
Mills, said, in response to an inquiry, that
he did not think business had improved
since the meeting in Atlanta. F. C. Mor-
ing, president of the association, said:
"There is very little business in our line,
and what business we are able to pick up
is at a loss. A great many of the colored
goods mills have been either shut down or
running on short time, and it is hardly
probable that full time will be made until
market conditions improve. So long as
there is scarcely any demand and a low
price, there is no inducement to continue
making-goods."

A $So0ooo Carbon Paint Plant.
One of the most important industrial
establishment ever located in the South
is announced this week for Nashville,
Tenn. It is to be a modern plant for
the manufacture of carbon paint, which is
extensively used throughout the world as
a preserver of wood and metal. The new


plant will be located three miles from
Nashville, and the shale to be used is near
Ashland City, on the Tennessee Central
Railroad, 20 miles from Nashville. It
will cost-buildings and equipment of ma
chinery-about $500,000, and aoout $200,-
000 will be expended for opening shale
mines and building railway spurs. The
site includes 1,400 acres of land contain-
ing shale deposits under a sandy soil,
the vein being stated to be from 25 to 50
feet thick. The buildings will be con-
structed of brick and steel, and it will re-
quire eight months' time in which to erect
them. By October, 1905, the plant will
be in operation, employing 300 men.
Northern capitalists are largely interested
in this important enterprise, as well as
J. S. Henderson, of Nashville, who has
been promoting it for some months past.
They will organize a company with a
capital stock of $1,000,000 to establish the
works.
Ase n realgr ear win lase
or -. borrowed efem a nelgki
If the later be the eae. write to-dy
ind ubses b*e.


W. J. L'ENGLE.
Prfesent.


Lntm IM ft IN M.
BUILDERS AND DEALS IN






ENGINES. BOILERS.
Cotton. Saw, Fertilizer, 0l and I Ma-
Chinery, and SppliMS and BO-
CAPACITY FOR MN HANdM
Machine Tools, Wood-Working IMehr,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hangs, Leather am
Rubber Belting and Hes, Bhread nd
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans ad estimates furnished afor lr
Plants and. Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps, Feed Water Hemta and
Boiting BEngins.
AUGUSTA. CA.
Aiwetinem w *61sa e
verteesamemt) eela womea
e.dea merasl o ISel amme5i em
it the Ao tb* mee wef.


J. W. WADE.
Vioe-Presgdent.


K. G. HUGEUS,
See'y as Tre s


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


D. K. FLYNN, President W. B. JOHNSON, Vice-President A. 8. PENDLETON, See'y & Treaa
DIRECTORS
D. M. lMynn Walter Ray J. W. Oleaby L. Horn N. G. Wade J. L. Medlin W. B. Johnson







Independent Naval Stores & Export Co.,


Jacksonville, Florida.





Naval Stores Factors and Operators.


Capital Stock, $5oo,ooo.


The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal advances made on consignments.
Our interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operative company.



.Some Money and Some Timber For Somebody.


SA Producers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.


T=E NE010 33 TMO URATWS DIN TAUMCU


;)~_~_'S_'~:II~rC~C~lf)~i~r~r~;~~S mmac~a~SciSi~- --------- -l~i~








S THU WRUKLY Jz41PUbtMXAL 23=11D.


Business Directory.

FI= IN1SURANOC-4l-iast X -
Jaekbomvil, a. a
JOHM e AB =UFAl HOTIno.
zM a ]tMa
135. May tieet.
bmand remnt aura. Nicmy huWdf
em. Open day and might. D"tUln'as
oe emb.


MILY T IOETiOERY,
CommlNfon Merchantp
Neval Stores & Cotton
Lbo advsae. male ahmt d
nmo C-'- Mdi
COTTON UCHANEB BUILDING

WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS
MET~ON THM RCORD.
CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Best in the Word.
For deivered pri write,
Cypress Tak Ce. eobieAlka

Mlatete Cmty Abstrac Cet ,y.
L S. Jeser Abstracter.
kradestew, Manatee Ceuty, HFirida.
Complete and reliable books, titles perfected.
T"u"eU tor nsidenPt property owners in
Ma-tee County.
tLa negotiated for non-esdents on approved
t wile ith t-edged security payin intent
at 10 per cent per annim. senmaauly.
Ore Mdce abdted.
eetenees furmhed


M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

Commission Merchants.
MOSM, aukmAiE rnAz, TAN, PNCN,
GUm TUS, 2=36, ETC.
srj Iat Street, NEW TOM.



Irade Checks
FOB THE

COMMISISARY U111S8.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

mistrial Reord Ge.,


Capital Baa e Cntry.
The September Bankers' Magine says:
"Great Britain is the great creditor na-
tion. It seems to he generally conceded
that she has something like ten or twelve
billions of dollars invested outside of her
own immediate territory. France is the
next in rank to Great Britain, and the
amount of French capital invested outside
of her own territory bas been estimated
by experts employed by the French gov-
ernment at between five and six billions
of dollars.
"In a lesser degree Holland and Belgium
are creditor nations. The United States
is still a debtor nation, in that foreign
capital invested here exceeds American
capital invested outside of our own terri-
tory. But whether a nation is a creditor
or debtor it is not in the same sense as
an individual debtor or creditor. One
nation as a nation does not owe another
in the same capacity. Nor does the fact
of a nation being a creditor nation instead
of a debtor nation necessarily add any-
thing to its strength or resources in a
purely national sense. France, a creditor
nation, does not compare with the United
States in the ability to raise revenue for
national purposes, and the United States
is as yet a debtor. The national debt of
France is vastly greater in proportion to
resources of the country than that of
the United States. The govMrnmnt of
this country can borrow money on better
terms than that of France.
"The mere fact of a nation having large
sums of money invested in enteripns
outside of its own borders does not indi-
cate that it is a richer nation than one
that has nothing outside of its own boun-
daries. This country, for instance, has im-
mense territories and great natural re-
sources to develop. There is room within
its boundaries for the use of all its own
capital and for much more belonging to
other nations. It is because there is
no opportunity to use it at home, from
the narrowness of their boundaries and
the limitation of national resources, that
France and England have so much invest-
ed abroad.
"Where the money of its citizens is in-
vested, whether at home or abroad, has
httle to do with the greatness or strength
of a nation. In modern times the over-
flow of wealth and capital into all parts
of the business world, regardless of nat-
ional boundaries, is an evidence of how
much the civilization of mankind gene-
rally has advanced. The wealth and
capital of the world are thrown practi-
cally into a common fund, from which
each and any may borrow if they accede
to the terms and conditions of the loan.
It is said that some of the Japanese loan
was subscribed by Russian capitalists.
The fact is that capital has no country,
but goes wherever it can earn satisfactory
wages, with due regard to security."
Reduction of Tea Ce a Hundred.
Texas lumbermen are gratified at re-
cent reduction of 10 cents per 100 pounds
on lumber from Texas to Mexican points
made by the Southern Pacific system, and
expected to result in greatly extending
the market in Mexico for Texas lumber.
Turpentine Sti at Pearas.. Barne
The turpentine still of Jeff Kirkland,
located at Pearson, GCa., was burned yes-
terday morning The loss is $1,200, with
no insurance. The fire raged for an hour
and a half. The hard work of the citi-
zes of Pearson prevented the spread of
the flames to other property.


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


SBoilermaking and Repairing
Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
SJOcksonville. Fla.


Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply 0o.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, P a.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


Cummer Lumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES and CRATES.

*.00,*0 *0 0 o* 0 0 o*** goe #*s40 oe0 see 484 0e

: Standard Clothing Company


One Price '


One Price


i FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 msd 19 West by Straeet, g e
S 8tet and awes Hats. Seeial AttUthe Olves to lMa Ort.
*t,*0*e* e Os**** 005*S***0*0 ***0S050S *s0 ga **
mimb


R. TOLAR.


J H. HART. T. H. .LAOCLY.
(Established 1872.) .


4L R. TOLAR, B


TOLAR, HART &. CO.,
160 FRONT S, s- in, NEWDYORK.

Commission Merchants
snd Jobbers of neavl Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of Nr
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton PFutam.


JOCgBPH D. WED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. ERUMS


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GCORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battiln, Et.


Read the Record Adv't's.


MN01W =13 0 1LV8 LA3XM ZRAW PARn.









THE WEEKLY INm uwtrIAL RECORD. 9
.-


ZINC NAILS


Turpentine Cups
4--Igge by Dr- Herty. Made of a
u aa bhut aoft light metal. They are
410 g-- LM which will not injure
m whea left in the trees.

*a" p r now 7e-& pN. V.
Also Naqarters for Galvanined and
!lmmed Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Im Reods, Ete., Slating and Roofing
afla, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.


Typewriters
All Mna --$10.O0 Up.

GRIVOT *'
aL Wmolmbtser. LWfr, writes in sight.
The JeWrrrT. King of double-board ma-
$ toS ved Amy Make of Typewrier.



10. R 1W. k
MArUPACTURER O"


,B RI K.


Cadhti of Yard 800,000 Per Month.

E1. do.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.

Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Centrilers Blum's Monogram and Syl
va Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
ati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM d CO.
917 at 8919 West Bay Strec.,
JACKSONVIULE, FLA.

TfE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.

we"e me. YMs out a ebhare In Iew thma
twnty-ter mus. Make from twenty te
e -lsa meam foma eae o wef a
Mns Mre water whit spirlte, us frm
t oor of tar or creosote. No choenimlas
umed I refman the spirits Needs to be
deisi oany ona after coming froa re-


dared a d fim w oo r one gradel
ef p1ra t produeed and that the bhglet.
ABWOLUTar T NO DAMONR FROM FVIR
Bl of lma mt material by high-grade
w010 The chseed mase ebr* o t1
o-ehmee eempmuauom or output sa
dMr of product. We guarantee utput

The nwm Et Co.nta CekM
P. 06 RN $A T.ALrO NH C.


* Lively Int"rst in Manclhstr.

A An lninathod ma Meedn Fwavctay Rerdd in the Centr of the
* De=O;Bsh Textile hdwty.


In a letter to the Manufacturers' Rec-
ord following his cablegram that the Mas-
ter Cotton Spinners' Association would
probably accept an official invitation from
the American cotton trade to visit the
South, Mr. C. P. Scott, editor of the Man-
chester Guardian, writes:
"The suggestion made by you has been
favorably received here, but I do not
think there is any prospect of its being
acted on unless it is officially endorsed
by the representative cotton-trade asso-
ciation or associations in the United
State."
In the issue of September 12 of the
Guardian were reproduced the correspond-
ence of the editor of the Manufacturers'
Record and of Mr. Edward Atkinson, of
Boston, with Mr. Scott, while the Guar-
dian said editorially:
"We have received from the editor of
the Manufactures' Record, Baltimore,
Md., a letter (printed elsewhere) suggest-
ing an international gathering of English
and American cotton spinners in the
Southern States this autumn. The let-
ter is supplemented by an article'in the
Manufacturers' Record, which we aso pro-
duce. It is perhaps rather a delicate mat-
ter for those who would be more or less
in the position of guests on such an oc-
casion to express an opinion as to whether
the gathering should be arranged, at any
rate until the American manufacturers
have made known their own feeling and
have extended an official invitation to the
representative cotton-trade associations in
England. But there can be no doubt that
a visit to the cotton fields and cotton
mills of America would be of the greatest
interest and educational value to very
many Lancashre spinners and manu-
facturers, and it is equally certain that
personal contact with some of those who
are actively engaged in the industry in
the United States would be both pleasant
and stimulating. The natural sequel to
such a visit would, we conceive be a sim-
ilar international conference in England
at which Americans might be afforded an
opportunity of learning some of the
things which we consider ourselves abl
to teach them about the spinning and
weaving of cotton. The suggestion o
the Southern textile paper is very cor
dially endorsed by Mr. Edward Atkinson
of Boston, who, although no longer n
gaged in the trade, occupies a position
of almost unique influence amongst tht
New England cotton manufacturers, ad
is regarded as the father of the America
cotton industry. In the long letter, froa
Mr. Atkinson, which we print to-day, an
in. the letter and article from the editor
of the Manufacturers' Record, there i
little or no attempt to conceal the belie
that our British cotton-growing move
ment is a work of supererogation, am
that a visit to the Southern States o
America would convince Lancashire busi
ness men that the undeveloped agricultu
ral resources of that region are far mon
than sufficient to supply all the prospect
tive needs of the world's cotton industry
This may well be so, and the most ardent
Supporters of the British Cotton Grow
ing Association would be the very firs
r to w*come the perfection of the meehan
ical picker described by Mr. Atkinso


and a substantially increased production
of raw cotton in America. But we have


to be guided by experieme, and spil-
mee tells us that of late the deveoirsp
of the Southern States has been i -
trial rather than agricultural. IndtrIl
development means an increased dometie
consumption of products of the oil and
often a diminished surplus of sueh pwrd-
nets available for export. What remains
to be proved is whether there ean be aay
Contined on Page 1.


TURPENTINE


CUPS.

If you expect to use the MErTr eap
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery, Prices and all inforna-
tion cheerfully finished on
CUPS, GUrTERS
AND ALL TOOLS
Sneed in the Herty system of turpentining.
Address

Chattanooga POttery
CMWYIy


COMPARATIVE


PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVANNAH FOR FIVE YTAR


1904-06
April ....................... ND
April 8 ................... 53
April 16 .................... 4
pril 22 ................... 54%
pril 29 ................... 53%
May 6 .................... 56
May 13 .................... 4%
May 20 ................... 4%
May 27 ................... 63%
June 3.................... 4
June 10 ........... ....... 52%
June 17 .................. 52%
June 24 .................. 52%
July .... ............. 53
July 8 ................... 52%
July 15 .................. 52%
July 22 .................. 53%
July 28 .................... 53%
Aug. 4 ................... 52%
Aug. 12 ........... 3%
Aug. 19 ................... 64%
Aug. 26 ................... M4%
Sept. 2 .................... 652%
Sept. 9 .................... 52%
Sept. 16 ................... 52
Sept. 23 ................... 2%
Sept. 30 .................. 52%.


1903-04
ND
50
49%
47
45
45
47%
47%
49
45%
46
46%
47%
47%
47%
48
49%
49%
52
52
55@ %
54
54%
56%
57
55


1902-03 1901-02
45 34
42% 32
42% 32%
43 31%-32
42%-4U 32
43 32
45 31%
45 32%
45% 32%
45% 32%
47% 32
48% 33%-%
47% 34%
45% 33%
45% 34%
44% 34%
44 33
43% 32%
43% 34
44% 33
44% 34
44% 34
45 33%
44% 34%
46 34
46% 33%
47% 34


1900-01
53%
53%
46
47%
48%
47
44
49
.46
48%
44%
43%
42%
43%
44%
43
42

38
35%
34
35%
35%
36%
37


Wanted and For Sale

- DEPARTMENT.

Advertliements WIfte tserted i fts spart st at the FblewIeg Rates
or oe week. 20 eentsa lie.
For two weeks, 35 cesta line.
Sor three weeks, S ets a line.
For four awk, eeLS a sne.
Nine words of ordinary length make oe liae.
I Head coa ts atwolin
n No dsly except th headig. can be admitted.
Remittances to aecompay the order. No extra charge for copes of er
S containing advertisement. Copy must be in this offe not later than Tharay
r Aornnlu to secure iamertion I ridsays paper.
B


Stiller Wated.
Wanted-First-class stiller, white man
with family. Can furnish good house,
and will board with family. I want a
man who is competent to take earge
during my absence. Address P. H. aker,
Camprille, a. 4t

Woodsmas Wasted.
Must be single and strictly sober and
not younger than twenty-five or older
than .thirty-five; also must be a first-
class bookkeeper, and furnish good ref-
erences. Address J. D. X, Chipley, .
4t.


Tarpemtlac MeC.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your stilL No. 1 outfit pumps 2JOS
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 ents and
requires so attention while ruma g.
Started in one minute. J. P. Campbel,
Oas, Fla.

For Sale.
35,000 ares St. Johns and Voluia; 1,-
000 acres, DeSoto County; 14,000 areas
DeSoto County; 30,000 acres, Calhou
County; 20,000 acres Hillsboro County;
80,000 acres Manatee County. All round
timber. D. T. Doutry, Rom 22 Bald-
win Bldg. t


TEE RECORD I8 TM -OPMATORs' V*LIAMCTIN


Y









10 THE WEEKLY INUI'rHTIAL RECORD.
|i~ I .


J. R. PAMoNT. Am S. HUTa anm. AATrnB F. P ma *
Preidemt~e Ve-Presmidesa OiRer.

The Mercantile Exchange Bank, i
*JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
Cepittl, $200.000. Surplus. $100.000
STATE DEPOSITARY.
Geem- Bak. Iteest PM em Savia g Depaosit. Sate Deposit Boe. efo eper Tea.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week


Crop of Sprits and Rosins for Thre Years.
oep lsb-OL erop 13B-3
Spirits. Rosin. Spirit. Baob.
Wilmington..........1651 l 1883s 11 3t
Charleston.. .... 2. 0 3,J69 3,007 11,83
Savannah.. .. .. ....176,418 65338 270,670 94SW SX
Drnawiek...... .... 55,00- 184,7 847 2844J,1O
Moil. ............ 1Is 60,080 18,93 7,272
New Orenm........ .. 36,017 133,126 33,103 1086,3
rabell..... ...... dosd eloed 3,39 32I48
Georgetown.. ..... 7,515 44,214 10,37 4
Peeo.. ...... 4.... 2,4 205os8 38s7 1,OBS
Ja. & Ferndina...... 187,210 653,210 91,976 3711
Tampa .... .. ........ dosed loMse 13,566 4,


"--

MWf up*
79MW SWlAS
UAWm son

SAN o



JOAN amus
NM~r *Amu


Spirits fr the Week at Savamah.
SPrice Rept. Sales Kp. 1903
Mon., Oct. 3 347 674 57%
.Tues., Oct 4 80 1936 57%
Wed, Oct. 5 291 220 0 57%
Thur., Oct. 6 152%04 38 40 57%

Savannah Naval s tare S t.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 ........... 6,496 44,50
Receipts Oct. 6 ........ 004 2,148
Receipts previously ......122,747 356,941
Total ...............129,936 403,639
Exports Oct. 6 ......... 40 1,355
Exports previously ......108,011 331,735
Total ............... 108,051 333,000
Stock Oct. 6 ............ 21,86 70,549
Stock a year ago ........19,004 63,344

Reas for the Week at Sarvaah.
Monday, Oct. 3 Iast Year.
- WW ...... 5.00 4.70
WG ..... 4.70 4.40
N......... 4.40 4.30
M........ 4.15 4.25
K ........ 3.70 4.10
S........ 2.90 3.50
H ........ 2.70 2.70
G ........ 2.62%@2.65 2.56
F ........ .57%@2.60 2.40@2.50
E ........ 22% 2.30
D ........ 2.50 2.05
ABC ..... 2.42% 290
Receipts 1,92, sales 1,116, exports 5,352.


Tuesday, Oct. 4.-Rosin firm. To-day's
prices show a general decline from Mon-
day's quotations. With good sales and
exports. Rosin quoted as follows: A, B,
C, $2.40@$2.42 1-2; D, $2.45@2.50; E,
$2.50@o 2.52 1-2; F, $2.55@$257 1-2; G,
$2.60@2.62 1-2; H, $2.70; I, $2.85; K,
$3.5; M, $4.05; N, $4.30; WG, $4.50; WW,.
$4.77 1-2.
Receipts, 1,988, sales 4,196, exports,
4,040.

Wednesday, Oct. 5.-Rosin firm. ABC,,
$2.40; D, $2.45; E, $2.50; F, $2.55; G,
$2.60. All other grades unchanged. Re-
ceipts, 1,050. Sales 098.


as follows: ABC, $2.471-2; D, $2.521-2;
E, $2.571-2; F $2.62 1-2; G, $2.67 12; H,
$2.75; I, $2.85; K, $3.05; M, $4.15; N,
$4.40; WG, $4.60; WW, $4.871-2.
Receipts, 2,148, sales 3,387, exports 1,355


Range of Turpentine and Rosin at Savan-
nah Oct. 6 and Same Day
Last Year.
SOct Oct. 5 Oct. 6
1904 1904 | 1903
Tone .... Firm | Firm | Firm
Spirits ..I 52% I 52% 57%
Sales .... 382 220 | 503
Sales ... Firm Firm Firm
WWV ... 4.87% 4.77% 4.70
WG .... 4.00 4.50 4.40
N ...... 4.40 4.30 4.30
M ...... 4.15 4.05 4.25
K ...... 3.65 3.55 4.10
I ...... 2.85 2.85 3.50
H ...... 2.75 2.70 2.70
G ...... 2.67% 2.60 2.55
F ...... 2.62% 2.55 2.40@2.50
E ...... 2.57% 2.50 230
D ...... 2.52% 2.45 2.05
C, B, A, 2.47% 2.40 1.90
Sales.. 3,307 J 1,698 I -734


Bailey & Montgomery's Review.
New York, October 5, 1904.
Spirits Turpentine-Stock, 1,005 barrels.
The market during the week has again
been very dull, prices have been steadily
held as compared with Southern markets.
Thursday, Sept. 29th-561-2 c. asked.
Friday, Sept 30th--561-4 c. asked.
Satuglay, October 1--561-4 c. asked.
Monday, October 3-55 3-4 c. asked.
Tuesday. October 4-655 3-4 c. asked.
Wednesday, October 5-5 3-4 e. asked.
Rosin-Stock, 26,390 barrels.
This market has not only been very
dull, but buyers are holding off expect-
ing lower prices; pale rosins are exceed-
ingly dull and hard to selL We quote the
market easy for all grades. AC, $2.80, D,
$2.90, E $2.95, F $3.00 to $3.05, G $3.05 to
$3.10, H $3.10 to $3.15, I $325. K, $3.95,
M $4.30 to $4.40, N $4.50 to $4.60, WG
$4.85 to $4.90. WW $5.10 to $5.20.
Send yn o morem for C .mmssry


Totals...... ......535,915 2,06 026


571,006 2,1,818


8


Import* of Turpentine to U. .
The following table is compiled by James Watt & Son, of l.dem, them t
official returns. For convenience of comparison we have turned ewt Ilt hbeSh
-320 cwt. equal 100 barrels.
1807 188 1890 1900 191 IMr
From U. S., bbls. .... 1,652 173,785 149,375 174,446 13,44 11U6,1 6 A
From France, bble.... 161 244 517 2,283 A60 I, 4
From other countries.. 1,494 878 50 84so I wM I
154,307 174907 149,942 177,5 194,31 17,ji
From Russia .......... 2,81 4,183 4,998 86,1 6961 711 i
Total Barrels.. 157,22 179,090 154,940 186,090 e01b 16 M5 M' -
Thus the import of Russian Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 196 was AM
that of 1902, and over six times as much as in 1897. It is interUtng to s- e S
this import fluctuates with the price of American Turpentine.
Percentage of Import of Russian ..1.79 2.33 3.2 4.5 3.41 4 I
Av. Price Amer. Turp. in Im da ..21- 24-6 34-1 35-4 17-1 lI 4


Wen' Toe Are IN Jbsoseue SW At-cN


WOLFE'S EUROPEAN HOTEL
Cmer Snme amd ay Strees.
Rates 50e. I5e and $1.00 per dav. First Class Restaurant in Connedton. J. IL WOUL M-g

R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. I. J. KmiaT, See. and Tsa,

MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.
-es


Herbert A. Ford,
President.


Geo. H. Ford,
Vice-Pres.


P. L. Wun,
Casier.


The Central National Bank of Ocata
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITAL, $50,000.00.
DIRECTros: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christia, G.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men SeMltcS



check The eeras pimes mla emsime
Iy checdw than a the plititg bheMa
in the South mcba.L


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 190304 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


Reoipt 1
Spirits, cas ... . .. .. .. .. .... "
Rosi, bbs .. ................ .......... .







Toa l. .( ...... ........................
Exports





NEc* Yo



Spirit h ... ......... .. .
Sirzins, bb. ****" *..


908-04 1902-03


198,647
650,988
844,585


188,398
752,270

98,884
888,171

35,658
87,853

59.351
826.74V


1901-02


292 496 814,846
940,507 1,071,440
1,233,38 1,386,786


296,430
975.428

206,109
504,178

42,765
138,121

87,556
387,784


814,876
62,687

217,446
585,042

53,797
129,059

48,633
898.586


M. A. BRIGGS, President.
H. C. BRIOGS, 1st Vcle-President.


HOMER B1K)WII, 26 Vlee-P31ndd
J. C. MoDOIALD, See'y AnlTime.


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-

RIXFORD AXES.

They are the BEST. Others imitate but nooe dn-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the gaS
Temper, hold the keenest edge, cut better and laot le r
than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual Wa.
SScd us your orders.

W. H. BRIG66 HARDWARE GOMPAT,
Vasldeaa Gergi.


Tiumlgbdql of Wit an Irrtlhan 1943 by W"4 ca*4 and rofinw, 2W9,50 bancrmis 39999
T=E U'Ira l[Ashk 0T OUR ADVzTlSRS= VOUCEZD IOM


---------- -- mmi o- b


Thursday, Oct. 6.-Rosin firm. A gen-
eral advance on all grades prevailed to-
day over yesterday's prices. Quotations


. . . . J- . . .











TfE VWRIKLY mijwUrzLhL KEGORD.


AUTOMOBILES, PUMPING OUlIrIS
AMD

GASOLINE ENGINES,
Mot Comite Asomnet Of Suppli in thd South.


Fred E, Gilbert
29 and 37, 39, 41
West Forsth Stret

mr oilr F


P. Hlmes & Ce's Webkly Cotton
Letter.
New Yor, Oct. 7th.-The sharp ad-
vme of half cent in cotton this week was
) t loly expected, but considerably de-
iled, a the price worked toward 10
oas a week ago, there was general buy-
yg e belief that after a decline of $4
er bale, a reaction was to be antici-
064, even in the event of a further de-
dlfe later eo. But the bear literature
f-tein the country induced a great deal
e f haut selling and prices continued the
de ward movement before a legitimate
leel. The reaction when it came was
sarp and decisive. Prices shot up fifty
paits before shorts had a chance to get
er eoer and large quantities of cot-
ten wen bought in at a loss of one or


two dollars a bale. Trading was active
on the advance and as the short inter-
est was over extended, there were some
lively times during the upward movement.
Several interesting features of the mar-
ket have been presented and two points of
information have been prominent enough
to attract general attention. The first
one is that consumers are willing to buy
cotton at 10 cents and under and those in
touch with the spot situation in the South
are of the opinion that an almost unlim
ited quantity could be sold at 93-4 cents
at the present time. This may3 of course,
not continue for an indefinite period, but
it shows the present temper of buyers.
The second point that has been very evi-
dent is that those owning spot cotton in
the South are not anxious to sell cotton


Cewrse of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- .1904
bplIK l b OF TURPENTINE
W. 1 AW. 8 Apr. Apr. 17 Apr. M My 1 Ma M ay 1 May X May a
No WNo 0 a 4 14 4K-2 4-2 4
j lue m SIM 3 Jne Je Jue Jly JulyJ 1 July17 July July 1 Aug. 4
g**4 a a % 47-4 4 M So
SA. U Aug. 3 Aug. ept. 4 Sept. U Sept 1 Sept. Oct. 2 Oct 8 Oct. U
n.a 110 WA& A 4 -4 57 ND I S" 1-3 a 1-2 8-4
On. & Ot. 3 NOM. Nov. I& Nov. L. Dec. Dec. 10, Dec. 17, Dec. 3t. Jan. 14
a 14. a sS6 61-4 6 1-4 a 1-2-
Ja. Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18, Feby. 26 Meh. 3 Mch. 10 Mdk t
a a a b e as W
S t 4 6 0

ROSINS
WW e N M K I H G F 2 D C-A
A I@ . ...4 .90 p.M 0,2 29.4 2.6 2.4 L L2 i L. S .6 L 2
A .. ... I .. 2 L &2. 2.40 L2 2.10 L6 L2S5 2L
AB .. &W L4 L3 LB 2 2.52. t 2.1 LX. tA S.f U
Ag 6 a 6 e La 25 L2 52. 1L5 t2 01 LI I. L.I
ag a .... 40 L .U L .5 1 .5i 2.5 2. 2. LI I II LII
Ap n .... L s* .16 L1 I*S 2.1 MS 1.* .Ns LIS I LIS
y L....... U L U 15 L t 2l5 21- L1O L1 LS LN LtW
Sr L . ........52.56 . LI L.Lt N LID LI7 iIL LY0 L7S
W ..... u% uS u &k% L.% 2 1% % L LWN LI LIS L
Sa....... U& S L 29 2.s L2. Lg LO 2.7 LS LW
nW ....... L is 2. tI L 3. t0 L L L Le L7 LW
8........8. LS1 *I LS 5. 2.70 2. L L7 LO 1.0 LU
2 .... .. o a I.2. 2 a L7. LOS LO Li L I
Jw L ..... LO LI .0L162-00 LIS lM 1. L7'6l LS I
sO I . . 4U L9. Us t 2.'10 LA La LI LO 1.
t L . .. . u* Las uL.5 2L 2.5 LI LIS LOS L L-_
jWr 3 . . ..& & * -* L-*I XS M &A 2 .7 x LW L .n L L-

A 3.......U 3 *a L6 L1 .6 L7 2. IN LU L L1 L-

Amtis .L . LO~ L L S &45 L 2 2 311a 1S LL I 71.7
Agn M .. ..... .2 .156 L OS I 2.752 12. L LU LS LIS
Mu.y .......2.0 2. 25 2 2. L 2 L2 6 L. LB t 1L L LR
Agest 1 ... . 7 L2 52.5 L 12* L 1& L S U1 Lu

--m-t M. 4. . 10 L 35 L 2.5L L 2.5 l. L e Lo L. La
toe . .1 . .10 L LUS .6 0 2 2.3 15 L L L. LW

a4m ~ is L 4,e L .S to &4 W 3-3 to 2.1 L. Lo 1.W 1.OS
n sitegh. S .4. 21W U41 & S L7 LA L5 130 S. In. 1n L1
a s ......as as 2 .5 1 s LU 0 r 2. LU LU U. L
6s-mbearas.. .J* s.UL S.U L.e as 262 1.16 52 S.C 1.5 1.3
'iO twember I . 4.5 4.1 4.3 24 A 2.1 X5 17 2.5 2 2.1 2. 1.3
alo' . .. 4.. 4.5 4. 4.U 3.2 2. 2. La. uLS L 2.u LM
Otem2r .. .... 42 .. 4. sa L4 LS 2 .7 .5 2. L U .1 La
Oetsber 5 .. .. ... 4 4U .s i U .o 22 2. tS0 2t .5 2. tS L
wembeir 6 .. .. ..a L s &a sAt s; 2.7 Lt s L.s us2. Ls LU
Number .. .... u 2.t 2-7s 2.L 2.5 2.0 2.5 a0 3
November a .. .. .. SX &aM ISn to 2-7" 1 2.35 1M 5 1in Ln S.L
seber S .. .. L. L. LU 2. S 2.- 2. 2.W .* 2.5 2.0 2.5
beogaer 8 .. .. U *S S.S L 2. 2.LS 2.5 IS LU 2M. S.9 US
esml .. .. L. S & 2.L 23I 2.5 2.5 L2 2.0 2.30 2. L.
bo.amur .... ..3 2.5 .3n 4 2U 2.6 L2. 2. 2.3 2. 2.U t.
Season 1 .. ..&* S L2.5 &S 2- 5 2.5 2X9 2.L 2.5 2.L L.5
T.eery S .. ..43 4.1 X2. L. &16 2.M 2.21 217 2.6 L Le 25
mesery .. .. *4 4J2 LU .* S.N3 S. IN 2 .5 2.2 S. I2 S*3
vsrwy 11 ..2.75 3.46 3.5 3.30 3.25 3.20 2.85 2.85 2.80 2.75 2.70 2.70
dryi 1 .18 ..3.U 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25 3.05 2.70 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 25
1derumry a ....70 3.50 3.35 3.20 3.25 2.95 3.60 2.55 2.50 2.45 2.40 2.40
sgh ......3. 3.00 3.40 .35 3.30 3.05 2.75 2.70 2.66 2.60 2.6 2.5
Mhe Ml ......4 a 3.70 31S 3.S 3s.0 I2. 2.70 2.65 2.00 2.A 2ta 2J.
Ush 31 ......4. .W 3.6 3.3 s 32 2.9 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.A5 I


on a decline in prices. As soon as the
market breaks 10 cent offers, it will be
difficult to buy in any large quantity.
The financial condition of the Southern
cotton grower is such that he can afford
to market his cotton from time to time
as the prices suit his ideas of values. At
the same time, spinners have very little
cotton on hand and as a result of the four
short crops, invisible supplies are un-
doubtedly the smallest in years. After
last year's trying experiences a steadily
increasing demand for cotton can be ex-
pected as the price works lower, and this
will leave abundant opportunities for re-
actions in the future market. At this sea-
son of the year no running decline in
prices is to be expected. Traders who
will pick up cotton weak spots and sell
out on such sharp advances as we have
had this week will continue to make
money. In other words, it is altogether
too early to tell whether we are to have
higher or lower prices for cotton this
season and during the uncertainty 4Ih


SPIRE rs OF TURPENTINE.


To United Khfdom, n gallon:
AprM.. .. .. ... 1914 141W
May .. .. .. .. 10.3 1.21
June .. .. .. .. .m 1,06M
July ...... .. .. mm 1 M6 ,
AugeOt.. .... ..1 ,M 1.J,
epre--mr.. .. 6. 6TM oam
October .. ....... 711.436 m
November .. 661,638 1,29,70
December .. 1,5,66 1,531,779
January. .. I238, 373M40
February. .. 118,4 38,9
March .... ......


011,30

IM70
1.006816
W1.2013
576,784
16436M
247-N
,666


market will churn around just as it has
for the last few weeks.

New York, Oct. 7th.-Few stocks offered
this morning in the market and whes the
floor contingent started to cover on the
appearance of some support the list dis-
played an oversold condition, particular-
ly in specialties and a recovery occurred
under tnat leadership. It was not sup-
iosed that short interests bad extended
so much, but the absence of important
liquidation shows that the large interests
are still committed to the bull side.


Sam'l P. folmes& Co.
SteCks, kds, fCotte,
Grain and Prevlsis.


NEW YORK GOTTEN EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
BeB Pone 853 BfdBwl Bclck


RLOSINS.
To United Kingdm barrels MI n:
Month 190U-40. 134 13-OK
April..........2 1 1.WN 81.0
Apru ........ 81s 616 n
May ...... . M. 5a. 6CU
June ........ O.IT Sm CA
July .. .. .. .. 21.2,1 3.26 su
Auaut ...... I74, UAu
September.. M541 ,4M 1M,
October ..... 4. 6 41L, I35
November .. 71,1 M,73 843
December .. 81,46 864 T72,
January ... 5% 4 SIAN
February ... 28,361 37,3a 91,1
March ... 3,015 3564 467


To osldenm ad Netherlands, barrels
To Belgiam and Netherlands, aIn allow: pounds:
Month 1036. 1I31-4 191-01 Month 311-0 13614 1M43
April ...... .... .. MU ,4 Included April .. .. .a. 6 I Inclauded
May .. .. .. .. ,6 W tUAn all otr May .. .. .. ... W= ,UUa au otr
June........... 0.m 0 ,8 3 Suropo June .. .... .. .5 3 33 rope
July .. .. .. .. 8126317 s, July .. ...... .41M6 1961 4M
Auuiti. ........ Mt S.S August ...... .. 4M a
September. . 16 78.M1 4B September.... M 10M,3 3116
etober ...... 14 Za61 13M Oeto.ber .... .. 3.m 1s4 316
November .. 133,66 34,72 381,2 Nov br .. 3aW1 64 31,M4
December .. 100,372 58,85 672,16 December .. 37,7 13,25 0O40
January .... 18,79 241,15 174,67 January .... 60,73* S,1U IS
February ... 5,130 372,44 3001 February ... 9,89 25, I 18,
March .... ...... 8,71 1474 March .. .. 101 32,12 11814
To Germany. in allo: To Germn, barrels m Its.
Monta h n44 1226 1-48 Month 114M0 1Ise-a UI2-s
Apr ................ U4.6 11a April ....... .. 4m W.M 16 ,M
Mar .. .. .. ... 6 A56 May 0 ** ** 5- 1.1
June.. .. ... I1,e W4.12 m kM Jo ...... ... 415 MB 0S
uily ... .... LU U 3412 M.W July M... .. .... UM k rI
AugMt .. ... 1, IM84W Augst ...... 6 2 W.2
September.. ... 3II,9M mU TIM. In ber.. .. 6. M12 .B 6u
october .. .. an.m 2LM I oc 1o ......1. .. 31 .m5 a,
November .. 17,010 110,14 81,79 November .. ,73 4231 2,73
December -- December .. 1,407 39,171 6A
January .... 13,000 6 4,07 IML3, Jauay .... 34,70 64, 8,73
February ... 220,182 16,838 67,174 February ... 172135 40,916 ,
March .... 65,0 ...... 94A March .... 49,938 6e,0 41,
To all eotr Iorope ln (Gkoim: To al other Surops, barrels -W Ibs:
Month 19-W 1e-41 1e1-U Mouth 1I0- UIs1 13-4
Apr .......... c ,41 6mE April.... .. .. J 3 ,1 5
May.......... aM a 04,2nu May .. .. .. ... SaU ,17 ,M
June.... 14.1 Lm. 4,M4 June.......... 141M 98, .BR
July .. .... .. m 12. M3 U July .. ......, 4USi Sl,2 14.1
August ....... .. e A August.. .. ,5 3,119
september.. .. ,W 3. ,LM September.. .. 17S.3016 1M
October..... 1m6 4,m n.6- October...... O, 1)M4 n1
November .. 32,500 17,00 947 November .. 13,38 6,4156 ,025
December .. 47,30 8,591 23,s0 December .. 25, 48,701 39,8
January ... ll Janu ... 17,1 7,148 6
February .. 15,471 ...... 44 February ... 38,184 42,"4 5,31
March .. .. 14,18 12,27 3660 March .... 33,67 51, 9 71,M
Total Foreign Uxports In l allows. Inelud- Total zxports of Rosin barrels ponds.
leg everything outside of the United Including Asa Africa and America out-
States: aide of the United states:
Month IU-0 164 10143 Month 13 W U18-4 1 11-
Aprl .. .... .. 4,1 66.815 I.616 April .. .... .. .13.6 1.1 32M6I
May .... .. .. s11,S .1 .144 2.,as May .... ...., 118,3 se144 34U3M
June.. .... .... ,Im 23I.LSB 2.M91,1 June .... .. .. m1,3 no10 S1Lm
July .. .. .. ..2J2M1, 1, 51.4 5 2I.4 July .... ... 31M6, U.711 1362.1
Augnt .... .. L.1m7 .1 2,S AMuust ... .. .. s15. 221
Septeiber.... .1,74 .146 21.5 1 3.34 2 September.... 333,3 S. P.
October ...... L4OM 1.@U.6r t1,301 October .... .. 5M 1S WU1S
November .. 1,851,068 1,32,183 1,W65,574 November .. 184,800 231,4 222,479
December ..1,993,529 1,794,3 1,6,175 December ..210,47 202,6 191440
January ... 70,2 8,S3 Me January ... ,471 170,36 it7,P #
February .. 487,577 531,340 8,47 February ... 306,000 189,632 267,24
March .. .. 28,488 118174 6, Mak .. .. 171,548 204o 3 214,1S


THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.


The Exports ot Turpentine and Rosln.










THE WEELKL 114JIUtrXIL EUCOUD.


INDUSTRIAL IRECOR.I

JAMES A. OMLLONOL

Phbethed Em v ..Pra1.t ,
n Dirne .e...S ASer A" m

Th* P1h* and les Preadhme."
AZ cmualeae suboun be akiken
The dlnstral fLecord Company.
JaLckdonmvile. Fla.

Adeimm. Ga. & Saveaarm 0. G.

Entered at the Poatomfi at Ja&inovile,
Fla., as osecmud-lame matter.

Adopted by the Exentive Coiniibee of
the Tpe Operatore' A l Fm,
September 12,1S, it. eaduve o0i1l
organ. Adopted in annual eomvat
September 11, as the oga alNe of the

Adoted April 27th, 193, as the ofkial
Zga of the interstate Ca Graers' An-
meistion. Adopted Sept 11, 1903, s the
aly social organ of the T. O. A.
Commeaded to haber people by special
reohltiom adopted by the Georgia Sawm


COPY F10t OADV/KXB1OR
Avamting Opy (da am er -
rtim t) draeM remch Tuemay
mmbg to ime t ssf be ts h 1
the alwe.

THE RECORD' OFFICE
The pbli plant am the main 1-
Aes ef the Industrial Beem Pllddg
Co. are located at Re x South Hega
aeet, Jackmevile, rL, i the vry heart
et the great tupetime d ylw -pi

The Atnlata, Ga, eMe b cateu i the
Equitabe BilMiag, .. La3. Atlmnta ie
the cter the great manuteaur
trade of the entir BltH
The Savannah, Ga., eMie i e the B rd
of Trade boiling Savam ah is the Ild-
bg opean aval ste market b the w

Report f Natinal Bans.
A noteworthy expansion has taken place
in the business of the national beaks dur-
ing the year. The special reports made to
the Comptroller of the Curremey aho-w
tat on September 6 the loses and dis-
counts of the banks amounted to $3,726,-
151,419, an increase of over $244,700,0
as compared with the most nearly corres-
ponding date, September 9, of last year.
The individual deposits amounted to $3,-
458,21,068, an increase of over $301,800-
000 as compared with September a year
ago. The cash reserves amounted to *61,-
45630, a gain of over $107,000,000 as
compared with September 9, 1903. It
need scarcely be said that in each item
the highest level ever attained was reach-
ed at the date of the report. The loans
and discounts are nearly double what
they were in 1896, the individual deposits
are more than double, and the cash held
by the banks is over 92 per cent. greater.


Augut Epert Trade.
The full returns of August trade, as
expected, show that the increase in ex-
ports in that month was due to enlarge-
ment of shipments of manufactured prod-
nets, which this year are cutting an im-
portant figure in the total trade, and, in
fact, furnishing the only important gain
shown in any department of export bIi-
neea. The total exports of all kinds in
August agregated 92,43,7, a gain of
3.1 per cent. over August a year ago. Of


this sum manufactures represented $42,-
415,644, or 4697 per cent. of all exports,
a gain of 25 per cent over Augut, 19036
while products of agriculture represented
only $36,517,481, 40.64 per cent. of all, and
a decrease of 13 per cmt from a year ago.
Products of the mine and of the fisheries
show increases of fractional amount, while
products of the forest show a slight de-
crease. Practically the entire loss in agri-
cultural products is due to the decrease
in breadatuffs shipments. Provisions ship-
ments also decreased, and while cotton
shipments show a comparatively slight
gain, the export of agricultural products
generally has fallen to a secondary place
in the country's foreign trade. The in-
creases in manufactured products are nat-
urally well distributed. Prominent among
products exhibiting gains are copper,
which shows a doubling of last year's
shipments; cotton cloth, practically the
entire gain here being in shipments to
China; iron and steel, naval stores and re-
fined petroleum. In imports, practically
the entire gain of 7 per cent. shown is
due to increased takings of duty-free raw
materials intended for domestic manu-
facture. For the eight months the ex-
ports show a decrease of 3 per cent., due
to a loss of 15 per cent in agricultural

products more than offsetting a like per-
entage of gain in manufactures. Just to
what extent the increase in shipments
of manufactured goods will offset the
practically certain continuance of the de-
erems in exports of breadstuffs is not
as yet clear. That the current of export
trade as a whole will eontiue to show a
decrease from recent bumper years seems,
however, practially cert Brad-
street's.


Organimation Perfected
At a meeting of the representatives of
the yellow pine sash, door and blind in-
interests of the Southern States, held last
Monday at Macon, Ga., an organization
was perfected to be known as the Yellow
Pine Sash, Door and Blind Manufacturing
Association. Over twenty firms were rep-
resented and the States of South Carolin,
Georgia, Alabama, Florid, Mississippi and
Arkansas furnished the majority of the
members DIavid Woodward, of Atlanta,
is president.
Tim object of this organization is to se-
cure uniformity in grades of goods, to se-
cure uniformity in railroad rates and to
reform and correct abuses of the trade.
The next meeting will be November 16, in
Birmingham, Ala.


An Apopka Lumber Company.
The first annual meeting of the stock-
holders of the Consumers' Lumber and
Veneer Company was held at the general
office of the company at Apopka last
Monday, the following stockholders being
present: J. J. Hurd, E. A. Thomas, Edwin
Scott, A. C. Starbird, PL. Starbird and
J. H. Britt.
The business of the company has been
very satisfactory for the past year, and
a 10 per cent dividend was declared.
It was voted to make many improve-
ments and to enlarge the plants exten-
sively, to better facilitate the handling of
the increasing business, as the present
capacity is inadequate.
The officers of the company elected for
the ensuing year are: E. A. Thomas, pres-
ident; A. C. Starbird, vice-president and
general manager; Edwin Seott, secretary
and treasurer, and L I Starbird, assist-


ant general manager. The management
of the company is entrusted to the same
gentlemen as the previous year, who have
proven so satisfactory. Since the com-
pany organized, one year ago, they have
been constantly enlarging and improv-
ing the plants, both at Apopka and Mof-
fltt, to meet the growing business, and it
will be the policy of the management to
continue increasing the capacity as rap-
idly as possible to keep pace with the de-
mands made upon them.


Among the Operators.
Mr. R. S. Hall, a prominent turpentine
operator of Oala F, Fla, was in Jackson-
ville this week attending to business.

Mr. J. M. Watson and Mr. Brown, of the
Brown-Watson Naval Stores Co., of Or-
ange Park, were in the city several
days this week.

Mr. Goes Mattox, manager for the Or-
ange Park Naval Stores Co, of Orange
Park, Fla., was in the city this week.

Mr. J. M.-Sutherland, of Peoria, Fla..
spent one day in town this week.

Mr. A. A. McDonald, a leading naval
stores man from Denver, iLa., was in
Jacksonville this week.

Mr. J. M. Deaton, a large turpentine
operator and lumberman or Crescent City,
Fla., was among the prominent Floridians
in the city this week.

Mr. Henry E. Pritchett, of the firm of
H. E. Pritchett & Co., of Maxville, Fla.,
was here last Wednesday.

Mr. D. R. Edwards, of Lawtey, Fla., was
in the city to-day.

Mr. R. B. Williams, of the Walkhill Tur-
pentine Co., of Walkhill, Fla., spent last
Thursday in Jacksonville.

Mr. W .C. Jackson, a prominent operator
of Green Cove Springs, Fla., was in town
several days this week.

Mr. W. H. Warpock, of Green Cove
Springs, was among the naval stores men
in the city this week.

Capt. W. J. Hillman, president of the
Hillman-Sutherland Co., returned the first
of this week from a very pleasant vaca-
tion spent in New York and other points
North. The captain left a day or so after
arriving in town for points in South Flor-
ida and will return in a few days.

Mr. F. A. Coleman, of Cambon, Fla.,
was here last Wednesday.

Mr. W. F. Coachman and Mr. H. A. Mc-
Fachern, of the Consolidated Naval Stores
Co., are expected to return to-day from
points throughout the North where they
have been on their annual vacation.

We are glad to inform the many friends
of Mr. D. J. Herrin, the popular travel-
ing representative of the Consolidated Na-
val Stores Co., that he is convalescing
after an eight weeks' severe case of ty-
phoid fever.

Mr. J. R. Maxwell, of Tallahassee, Fla,
was in the city last Wednesday.


Reduced Output ae Tebew Pa.
George K. Smith, St. Lois, senior
of the Southern Lumber UMa3faIth-'
Association, is much gratiied over t
reduced output of the yellow pine mll
during the month of July. He retimtes
the curtailment of the 223 mis rapert.
ing at 144,000,000 feet. The srmea
estimates that a full report wouM l t
a relief of not less than 175AMA hiet
for July. Two months mor wa pat
the supply down to where it wEU -hI
easy to obtain the early spring e.
The following is a summary at fL_
suits as indicated by the reports frer
different States:
ins Aus fL'C
&ro ..... as aste,4 ,e sua r maL
Missouri...... 4 7,a lU
IAouMiansa..... 40 47:53 S SSK 0Sl5S
Texas .........U 2, 4 .W1,Si m

Total........ 1 m 2.5UeW u,1s MlA'

Arkansas .... 10 ,40Ma IS"l fai Sag
Louiiana .... ois r04cel U0,111 gni
Texas........ is ,07.1H44 rsa rn
Alabama...... 6,41,0146 11.55,41 1
mssimtdeppi .... 28 19^,M446 27UM11 7
Geo.a&l.a.... 8 &~ &,& IA= USi
Total....... so1.IU l 0445l JIuun
Grand total 22 1i Sem a 1m4.3M1


atl Eitate Apmae.
A convention of real gstat agents f
Florida is to be one of the State mod-
ings which is to be held here during Car-
nival week.
W. C. Battey, who has issued the -
for the meeting and stated its object, e-
pects a great crowd of real estate me
in Jacksonville to attend this ovnti
The call reads as follows:
"Jacksonville, Fla, Oet 6, 1904L-1
the Real Estate Dealers aad Agents a
Florida: As representative of the N -
ional Real Estate Association, and hv-
ing investigated its methods of opratim,
I feel sure that the convention of rel a-
tate dealers and agents operating in ts
State would be of great mutual ibeneai
and taking advantage of the low rate
offered by the railroads during the Cr-
nival, I take this method of elling Sf
a convention of those who are dieetly
interested in the development work in th
State, to beg that they will meet with -
'and others at the Board of Trade rem
in Jacksonville, on the morning of Oc-
tober 24, at 10 o'clock, for the purpose of
formulating some plans for mutual bae-
fit, and looking to the general develop t
and prosperity of our State. I beg tha
those who feel an interest in this matter
will immediately notify the secretary of
the Board of Trade.
"I trust that the newspapers of t0
State will give this matter wide puHeity
and I shall endeavor to reach as maay real
estate men through personal letters as
I possibly can. Yours truly,
"W. C. BATTYY"
President Garner, of the Jaekommue
Board of Trade strongly indorse the pr-
posed convention.


Dr. Herty etm .
Dr. Chas. H. Herty and his clar
family returned to-day from quite a
extended trip through the West whe
they have been for their vraeNath
L..e past several weeks. Dr. Hetty wil
immediately take up his duties in th
woods, looking after the putt* up e
the Herty turpentine cp wh I b r
being so extensively used by perm .


"NOTHrse SUCCZEED LIE SICCi L."


12










TH7RWEEKLY Lmi)urbISJAL UUooRD.


UW=00 =TAT- UPOTOY01 NO. 400.
C oaam Ou r O .ne,
T"tE ATLAWIIO NATIONAL BANK OF JAOKSONVILLE
MANIO 28s. 1904.

w-- an- aIouft ............ .,IeMA Osl ta1 Stock pMrd In............ ... -OOAO-
2fS mt 4 .IH S hius... . . 0.00
U.bM. ..L s ........... ........ ojrJ0 teelt ................ ............. 0.00
.I .o..l~ ............... ..t. M 0 a e .............. ..... 1....)O IO
a fm o U. TreM er............ loaM tl.......... .. .................. 0
Osk-d ad oer oter Baks..... E .l1
ToU ............ ................... 0

*4**eIss968****s62 ******8s asII 8ii1n1111 11 *li mIl I


Title nd Tax Abstracts.
Conveyancing. Township Maps Blue Prints.
We give special attention to preparation of Title and Tax Ab-
adtrets, lsap, et., of large tracts in all parts of Florida and South Geor-
gi. To owners and inteding pureaehars the results of our work ar
Value a~eta&
'- -mm m Ueolieted.

REALTY TITLE AND TRUST COMPANY:
'Law R=umw Builing. JACWKSO vILL, JLa
-.-h..--. IIUIuuIu0 1 tl1116r16 I *......


RIo OqaDiS PIshehate Rates.
The following is taken from the Florida
an:


iL matters not what rate on phosphate
th Ca(npmaisia requires of the railroads
to lernandisa the same rate will be played
in eect to Savannah. It is without doubt
a determination of the railroads to see
t4 there is no discrimination against
Saansah a phosphate port, and the
eaggast" this question which has
akehed this determination of the rail-
reads is doe to the activity of Mr. J.
M doch Barrs, Awho is special attorney
for the Railroad Comnmision.
Jckeonville is not a phosphate port,
but just whenever there is deep water
ove the bar Jacksonville will be a phos-
phate port It is a prime object of the
exieave building that the Atlantic Coast
Line is now engaged in to develop the
Jackanvafle port a. a phosphate shipping
poist
If Mr. Bar succeeds in having the
rate on phosphate lower to Fernandina,
he will have paid a political debt in which
he became involved when he agreed with
the. political boss of Nassan County to
lower the rate on phosphate in return
for the vote of Nassau County when he
ran for Congress.
With the matter of discrimination,
even if it existed, the Florida Railroad
Commission eca have nothing to do, as an
interstate matter, but as a matter of fact
there is no discrimination, the identical
rate akstig between the phosphate fields
to Fernadina as to Savannah, the rate
of $1J9 applying to both places.
As it now stamb the rate from the
phasphate district above Ocala is fixed at
$1J0 per ton per minimum arload of
i30,0 pounds. Taking this as an ex-
ample the comparative difference in the
rate as demanded by the commission and
the rate already in effect may be drawn.
The rate is on a long ton of 220. At
$1.6 a ton'the freight on a minimum
carload would be $*6, and at 1 per cent
per ton per mfle from Gainesville, as a
basis to Fernandia it would be $1&50.
Results of the rate war being waged
between the. BRUsi d COumiission and the
ralmoads as to phonhate is nearing co.-
d I. A hearing will be given at Tal-
Iahamsee met Wednesday, which the Cnm-
mision regards as final, but which no
oe am with say certainty foretell.


The Commission is attempting to se-
cure a rate of 1 cent per mile per ton on
phosphate This will be a considerable
reduction of the present rate, and as a
matter of course will be of benefit to the
shippers, as it will be of detriment to
the railroads.
The contention of the railroads is that
the rate of 1 cent per ton per mile is not
suficient to allow the roads to earn ope-
rating expenses, fixed charges. and a rea-
sonable interest on their investment. The
Commission claims that it will take no
answer from the railroads except a com-
pliance with the rate as demanded.
The matter is now under adjustment.
and it is very reasonable to presume at
this time that an agreement will be reach-
ed and that the rate will be adjusted.
The action against the railroads was
brought by the Commission upon peti-
tion of the rnandina Bordof Trade.
The Ferandina people claim that there
was a discrimination against Fernandina
by the railroads in favor of Savannah, and
that Fernandina was not getting what
was rightfully its own in the way of
phosphate shipments.
There is at present no published rate
on phosphate to Jacksonville, and this is
all because the facilities for handling the
product are not adequate.


electric Railway for Ocala.
At the meeting of Ithe City Council of
Ocala, held last Monday night, an ordi-
nance was presented which provides for
the granting of a franchise to Robert L.
Martin and associates under the corporate
name of the Florida Traction Company,
for building and operating an electric
street railway within the city of Ocala
This ordinance provides for a maximum
fare of five cents for a single trip within
the city limits, also the payment of two
per cent of the net earnings of the road
after the third day to the city of Ocala,
the construction of the road to begin
within one year and in active running
operation within eighteen months, and
provides for the usual restrictions to be
observed in building and operating elec-
street railways. A deposit of $00 is to
be made which will be forfeited in case
building and operation of the road is not
begun within the time mentioned above.
The ordinance was referred to the ju-
dieiary committee.


C. H. HARGRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpentine an Sawmll Memo Rep-l.m--an
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLOUMMANS.
514.- 516- 518- 520- 522- 524- 526 EAST BAY STREET

Jacksonville, Fla.

GEORGIA InTESTATZ SAW MILL A aTLUU.
Minimum Coatwie Prie Lit for a rcha blem a Rles Adlie at M
Georgia, Julysa, 19aC.


I Feet Feet Feet Feet Feet Feet Fe
S SIZES U 21-25 26 3-351 3-40 4 1-4 W 46-56 4 U r4
I x10 to 2x10.... *2504$I3.50$14.5041 o18.o I p W"5 .J ")sW 5 m$m4
s 2xx10 to 8x10.... 12.00 12.50 13.50 14.00 15.50 17.60 20.00 2M 2MM f m
8xl0/, to 10x10.... 12.50 1300 14.00 15.50 1.50 18.60 21.00 416M U6 37J8
* 1 x12 to 2x12.... 14.00 15.50 16.50 18.00 21.00 24.00 28U003 3B 4Y B~
2%4x12 to 10x12.... 13.00 13.50 14.50 1.50 18.50 21.00 2450 2860 34M 4
10%x12 to 12x12.... 13.50 14.00 15.50 17.50 19.50 2.60 2550 39M MM MOM


1 x14 to 3x14.... 16.00 19.00 2000 22.00 24.50 27.50 32.00 87. 440
3%xl4 to 12x14.... 14.50 16.50 1800 20.50 22.00 2800 28.00 38.5 458
121/x14 to 14x14.... 15.50 17.00 19.00 21.00 23.00 2600 30.00 34.5 42J


1 x16 to 4x16.... 20.50 22.00 240 27.50 31.00 34.01
4%x16 to 12x16 .... 19.00 20.00 22.00 25.50 29.00 31.0(
12%x16 to 16x16.... 19.50 20.50 23.00 26.50 30.00 33.0


38.00&W 4W M
35.00 30Ji 468M
37.00 41.00 6


57.-
WAS6


p mf


i


M3
UM


2 x18 to 6x18.... 24.50 25.50 280 31.50 35.00 39.00 43.00 49.I0 MJW 79.
6%4x18 to 14x18.... 21.00 22.00 2600 29.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 46.00 57. M
14%x18 to 18x18.... 23.00 24.00 27.00 3000 34.00 38.00 42.00 48.00 536 740
Terms: Met Cash.


Prices are F. O. Cars Savanah, Brunswick, Ferandina ald Jachmrvi


NOTICE,
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Association, held at Jacksonville,
Fla., March 15, 1904, the following Classi-
fication and Rules for Inspection of Yel-
low Pine were officially adopted, effective
July 1, 1904:
Classfication and Inspection of Yellow
Pine Lumber.
General Rules-All lumber must be
sound, well manufactured, full to size and
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;
through shakes, or round shakes that
show on the surface; square edge, unless
otherwise specified. A through shake is
hereby defined to be through or connected
from side to side, or edge to edge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken;
less than one inch thick shall be measured
as one inch.

CLASSIFICATION.
Flasring.
Flooring shall embrace four and five

quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: 1x3,
4, 5 and 6; 1%x3, 4, 5, and 6
Boards.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
inches and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %, 1, 1% and 1% inches
thick by 7 inches and up, wide.
ScantlJu.
Scantling shall embrace all sizes from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2x3, 2x4, 2x5, 2x6, 3x3, 3x4, 3x5, 3x6, 4x4,
4x5, 4x6, 5x5 and 5x6.
Plank. -
Plank shall embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness.
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1%, 2,
2%,, 3 3%,, 4 4V1/, 5, 5%, 5%x7 inches
and up in width.


Dimease.
Dimension sies shall emra an ll
6 inches and up in thicknasa by
inches and up in width, inelding six by
six. For example: 6a8, ex7, 7x, 74,
and up.

Stepping shall embrace e to two l
a half inches in thickness by seven iha
and up in width. For e.amn: 1, l4%
1 2, 2 and 2/,x7 and up, in width.
Raugh dge or itc.
Rough Edge or Fliteh shall embae aB
sizes one inch and up in thickness by ei
inches and up in width, sawed on two
sides only. For example: 1, 1% 2, 3, 4
and up thick by eight inches and up wid,
sawed on two sides only.


IaSPECI1Ofl.
Stadart.
All lumber shall be sound, sap no'
section. Wane may be allowed oe-ei th
of the width of the piece measured ao
face of wane, ex'nding oae-fourth o the
length on one corner or its equivalent en
two or more corners.
MermchataMbl
All sizes under nine inlhes hall ahew
heart entire length on one side or edg;
sizes nine inches and over shall bsow
heart the entire length on two oppoite
sides. Wane may be allowed oe-eighth of
the width of the piece means d uar
face of wane, and extending e-fourth of
the length of the piece on oe ormer a
its equivalent on two or more rnera.
Prime.
Scantling shall show heart on two fa1
the entire length; other ies shall aow
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
cent. of the pieces, wane may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the piece meae-
ured across face of wane ad exteding
one-fourth of the length of the piece ea
one corner or its equivalent on two or
more r rners.


FOR SALE.

50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred aad
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined ad redy for te
mill. $.15 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of yeas, or en
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in the tate.

C, BUCKMAN, M a a
SJeokenrvlllo lre


-IIR, 1I4aRDi4u is AND FROGUESSIVI"


13


k


1


Z.s


I










U


THE WVEKIJI fl4DUtrnnL RUOOND.


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY


Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OFP

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings..

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Leated in Uthe heart of the LuOber Distrlet lesm aival-
tage of Chelest mMterial M lowest msL


LIVELY INTEREST IN MANCHESTER.
(Cootinued from page 9.)
great addition to the annual cotton crop
of America except on the basis of higher
values than have ruled in the past, and
if not, whether additions to the present
supply of raw cotton cannot be obtained
on better terms from other sources than
from America."
In its next issue the Guardian repro-
dueed from the Manufacturers' Record the
views of Southern manufacturers and
others about the project, and said that it
had been very favorably received by mill
owners and managers of Manchester. It
added:
"One of'our representatives in a series
of interviews found that the suggestion
will certainly have a practical issue if it
is taken up by the American Cotton Spin-
ers' Association, and this result is not
unlooked for here. One of the leaders
of the Lancashire cotton industry pointed
out that an international committee was
appointed by the Zurich Congress to aid
the common interests of cotton manu-
factures, and that to this committee any
proposal of an international conference
would be referred. As to whether a visit
to America of English cotton spinners
and manufacturers was likely to have
valuable results he was not doubtful.
'Merely,' he aid, 'to bring English spin-
ers face to face with those in the South-
er States would be a great good. As to
the cotton fields, there would be complete
unanimity between the English and Amer-
ican trade. It is the interest of both to
sece a abundant supply.'"
In the issue of the Guardian of Sep-
tember 14, Mr. C. W. Macara, president of
the Federation of Master Cotton Spinners'
Asoeitaions, heartily reciprocated the
proposal and made it elear that if an in-
vitation were extended to Europe by the
accredited cotton organizations of Amer-
ica he would do his utmost to bring about
its acceptance and to promote the success
of the gathering. Mr. Macara said:
"I think such a gathering, if it could
be arranged, would do nothing but good.
It is really a proposal in the direction in
which, as a result of the Zurich Confer-
emee, we have already begun to move. It
is not altogether a new proposal, because
we have received more than one invita-
tion to send delegates to the American
congress. The last one came just at the
time that we were preparing for Zurich,
and it would have been difficult then for
us to have accepted it. Both in an official
and in a personal capacity I think it high-
ly desirable that everything that is pos-
sible should be done to bring all nation-
alities of cotton manufacturers into line.


The harmony at the Zurich Congress was
remarkable, and our readiness to welcome
the co-operation of the American spin-
ners and manufacturers is nslown by the
fact that we have been in correspondence
with them in regard to the s.ort-time
movement, and they have co-operated with
us in that, and thereby helped us in Lan-
(ashire to avert a great disaster. The re-
port of the Zurich Conference is to be cir-
culated extensively in America, and other
steps are being taken to promote a better
understanding between cotton manufac-
turers on both sides of the Atlantic.
Friendly feeling all around will be help-
ful all around, and on our side we want
to do all we can to promote it."
Mr. .J. A. Hutton, of the British Cot-
ton-Growing Association, in conversation
with a representative of the Guardian,
said he did not see how an international
conference of cotton manufacturers in the
Southern States could possibly do any
harm, while on the other hand, he had
not the slightest doubt that it would do
good. As to the possibility, hinted at
in the opinions collected by the editor of
the American Manufacturers' Record, that
the conference might lead to.an increase
in the cotton-growing area in the South-
ern States, Mr. Hutton, speaking as an
individual, thought the British Cotton-
Growing Association will not in the least
mind such a development. The associa-
tion would, he considered, be only too
glad if the Southern planters would grow
more cotton, though, as the operations of
the association were limited by the terms
of the charter to the encouragement of
cultivation within the British empire, he
did not see that it could do anything to
stimulate production in America. An in-
crease in the area under cultivation in the
Southern States, he pointed out, would
not in any way lessen the importance of
the association's work, for if the new
sources were not developed in other parts
of the world manufacturers would still be
dependent for their supply on the vaga-
ries of the weather in a particular coun-
try. It was, therefore, in the interests of
American as wel- as British manufactu-
rers that the sources of supply should be
multiplied.
The Textile Mercury of Manchester,
says:
"While we cannot agree with our Bal-
timore contemporary that the present year
is desirable or possible for such a confer-
ence, nevertheless we trust that i' may
be arranged as soon as practicable. Al-
though most of our English cotton -i an-
ners are dependent upon 'the South' for
their raw material, few of them have vis-
ited that region or made any close study
of its advantages for cotton growing as
PATRONIZE RECORD ADVERTISER


compared with the rest of the world, and
still fewer know anything at first hand of
the development which has already takes
place in cotton manufacturing in the
South. Such a conference as that now
proposed would remedy these defects of
knowledge and serve other very desira-
ble ends, not the least of which would
be the strengthening of the good under-
standing that happily marks the relation-
ship of the two great English-speaking
peoples. On Tuesday Mr. C. W. Macera,
president of the Federation of Master
Cotton Spinners' Associations, recipro-
cated heartily the expressions of opinion
in favor of such a conference, and we have
no doubt that the members of the Federa-
tion will take steps to bring the suggest
tion within the range of practical reali-
sation."
Mr. Fred Mayor, editor of the Textile
Journal of Manchester, writes the Manu-
facturers' Record as follows:
"Much interest has been aroused by
your valuable contribution to the Man-
chester Guardian dealing with Amerima


This SpMem Rmerved for


Gus Muller & Co.






Proprietor
Liquor Merchants







...Allnt...


ACME BEER


I


The West.Raley-Rannie Commpany.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jlackaqvile, Fla.
A. s. Weat. Pres. E. r. est. Vic.Pres. w. R. amImal, re.P.r.. r. V. nma. am. a tre.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.



CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS,

AND VATS.

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
M. (. DAVIS &I 8ON, PxLATrXA, L.

A 5 ETOa, W. a. JOMgSM. JMS.SETER. W. W. SWMPM1A
Prse Prst. m. mr. Lat. Tirau

he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers



T.asw a. & P" B. G
S FOR SATISFACTORY DEALIUG









-THE WEEKLY INvuTrxlAL RECORD. 1






THE COVINGTON Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Wholesale:


SHOES


m m


DRY GOODS.


"Success For Our Customers is Success For Us."


eettl-growin, and I may tell you that,
mtwitlntamlng he enthusiasm which has
bem displayed in the British empire move-
met to widen the are of cotton eultiva-
tion, theL wv a strong conviction in the
minds of some of the srewdet buyers
of the mw material in this country that
directly the shortage of American cotton
dialppears ad the price assume normal
pmuption, the demand, for instance, for
mh Wet African stple, will diminish.
For it is felt that it wi be impossible
for the Briti epi grown cott to be
soM i competition with that of American
at a margin of proft to the shipper. This
view is held, I happen to know, by one of
the leading shipping bose which is at
prset shipping ctto from the west
est of Africa. It is ot surprising,
therefore, that the cotton belts of Amr-
ea retain their interest for Lancashire
esmemers. Your timely suggestion that
a international meeting of cotton spin-
ners be arranged is highly appreciated in
many quarters here, and the view is grow-
ing on this side of the Atlantie that the
omnsumer should get more closely in touch
with the cotton elds. If the American
planters and consumers could offer feasi-
ble proposals in this direction, if they
wouldd hold out any prospect of cotton be-
aig grown in America to materially feed
the spindles of other countries at a rea-
onable Igure, those proposals would be of
inestimable value and would be welcomed
by Lancashire spinners and manufactu-
sera.
Cl. Raymond ]ay's Handsome Reme.
One of the handsomest residences in the
oath is to be erected in Jacksonvile.
Co. Raymond Coy, a prominent eitizen of
Tallaassee, has decided to move to Jack-
soeville to reside, and will erect this beau-
tifl bome.
The hose will be situated on Riverside
Avene, between Lomax and Winter Sts.
W. T. Otter is the contractor and Rut-
ledge Holmes is the architect. The place
inFdes lots 5, 6 and 8, in block 8
The ie of the building will be 6zx77,
and will be built of brick and stone. It
wib hare two stories and a ellar. The
roof will be of Nudowie Dixie tile, made
in Liberty City, Ga. All of the outside
epa-r pet opting, piam.s ad porter
cohere seats and seat of. arms and win-
dow sils, are to be built of Bedford Coun-
ty, Indiana, oeitie limestone.
aeh room will be Atted out with
dreets and stationary wa-hstand, steam
h-td and elgantly Itted out. Rat proof-
g wil be plt in of mineral wood to a
pt ofat three imo, against the brick
-ls. The work wl be commn ui
ak w s.w


COURSE OF PALE AND MEDIUM ROINS AT 8AVAMNAH FOR TWO YEARS


W.W.


April
.April
April
April
May
May
May
May
June
June
June
June
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.


DATE 1906-05
1 1......... S410
18......... 3.9
S15........ 3.8
29 ........ 3.80
S29........ .80
1 ........ 3.80
20........ 3.80
27........ 3.95
3 ........ 4.35
10 ........ 4.0
16 ........ 4JO
23 ........ 4.65
I ........ 4.75
7 ........ 4.75
14 ........ 4.70
8s ........ 4.2%
4 ........ 4.67%
12 ........ 4.00
.18 ........ 4.e2%


W.G.


1903-04
$3.90
3Ao
SM
3.60
3.5O
3.40
3.35
3.36
3.65
3.006
3.60
3.40
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.0
3.40
3.40
3.50
3.50


1904-05
3.80
3.76
3.00
3.00
3O
3.60
3.50
3.50
3.65
4.05
4.10
4.15
4.25
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.25
4.42 4
4.35
4.37


1903-04
$3.80
3.45
3.35
3.25
3.5
3.25
3.27%
3.35
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.30


1900-06 1903-04
$3.80 $3.0
3.00 3.35
3.45 3.2
3.45 3.15
3.45 3.16
3.35 3.16
3.30 3.17%
3.30 3.5
3.40 3.25
3.85 3.20
3.85 3.00
3.85 3.00
3.90 3.00
4.00 3.00
3.95 3.00
3.90 3.00
3.822/ 3.05
4.00 3.05
4.00 3.15
4.02% 3.15


1904-06
$3.35
3.35
3.20
3.20
3.0
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.80
3JO
3.65
3.85
3.65
3.65
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.72Y%
3.90
3.85
3.87%


1903-04
$ 3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
3.20
3.15
295
2.95
295
2.90
2.00
2.90
2.95
2.05
3.05
3.05


1904-05
$3.30
3.30
3.15
3.15
315
3.16
3.15
3.15
3.25
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.55
3.55
3.50
3.65
3.5V
3.57%


1908-04
$3.0
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.&O
3.00
3.10
3.10
3.06
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.80
2.80
2.80
-2.85
2.96
2.95
2.96


95
4106
2.06

2.80
3.O
3.0o
3.01
3.10
3.6
3.30
345
3.45
3.45
3.65
3.0
3.30
32.%


19O0-M
W.S
LU
3.5
3.-
X.7t

32.
3.2
.80
2,
370



7.80
2.80
3.8


Kohn= Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and'Hats.
MAIL ORDERS OVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



Don't forget your subscription to the Record.

WHEM WRITING ADVIRTIUSS MENTION THE RECORD.







16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL REOQD.
-101100 1111I------- ---- St...S..e'. ----------'(- p U ---- -----h-- ----


Machinery and

Bar h I Pipe and Fittings, Bolts,
NMts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smi's Tols, Lumberan's Tools,
Packi g of all WKids, Railrad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corruated



IHN C. CHRISTOPHER i


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Mill Supplies.

STATE AGENT FOl.
ATLAS ElNGIES ii NLERS. SMLE STEaM r E
WS IMnMTON STEAM PUMPS. JENIMS' VALVES,
=SSTorS SAWS, UNTIIMTE EIfG,

yT 'VS LEATNM NT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SlMS mLtiR hI
sea OnW Rober Nesa.
SOLVE1NTWE .Bell CINMMN
amo MMsLcS. Co.'ast rer Spr Peos
"Caw nt ., Mri ta I I 5N V n
ANIMmEL pPP Stoee Padd
A. LESCM &a SON, WIre m1s.


Lumber Xete .
It is reported on good authority that
the Oklawabh Lumber Company wil ex-
ted its railroad from Silver Springs to
Palatka, passing directly through the Fort
MeCiy section. Should this rumor prove
e eet, the road will open up one of the
1est i etios of the State. It would pass
through some of the finest timber lands
in the State, besides giving the farmers
and trmk growers an outlet for their
peduts. It has been demonstrated that
the ld there is well adapted to early
vegetables,

Captain Atwater, foreman of the Wilson
CJyree Coompany, which is getting tim-
bw dot of Redding swamp, is having a
smle with melrial fever. Dr. Eaton
Iber of Anthony, is treating him, and


says he will soon bring him out all right.

The pay-roll of the Wilmon Cypress
Company is $4,000 a month. This is not
the entire expense account, as they feed
their men, and feed them well.

Phosphate Plant Sod.
The property of the Green Bay (Fla.)
Phosphate Co. has been sold to a new
company, composed of Western capital-
ists, and the new officers are Mr. R. B. C.
Bement. St. Paul, Minn., president; Mr.
E. W. Codington, Bartow, Fla, secretary
and treasurer; Mr. John Beatey, Green
Bay, Fla., manager. The operating plant
has been thoroughly overhauled and im-
proved, and the work of mining phosphate
rock is now actively going on.


McMurray Livery, Sale and Transfer Co.
HORSES AND MULES.
We carry the largest stek of any stable in the city. and b avw
on hand 1M to I2 head of al kinds and prioe. If a seed at aq~,
us a call, or write tor what you want.
B. DALTON. Manager. Jac-m.v

000******* $**o***o.o***9 o0**09 tO*$*se*ges S so
SYou Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Locatie?
1 You Want mny Kind of fleorda Lad?
S You Mean Busimss?
Call on er WrIe t
9 J. H. LIVINGSTON A SONS,
SOcala Florh
v* <*******offs$* 606801006606660**too"


When you Visit Jacksonville


Call to see the Record and be at home.

Tll the Record all you know, that will Interest others.

If you want to buy or sell advertise your place.


If you owe the Record pay the bill.

If you don't owe the Record make a bill.


Order your Printed Stationery.


e sure and give the order for your Commissary Checks.

Call on the Secretary o1 the 7. O. A.



Call at the Industrial Record Office
IF YOU ARE PROGESSIV, APV5Xtar Ur Za COrD.


-'d- Y~4Y~-i CF~L~~pP~PP~PP ~ ~ ~ ~ I~ ~))99998)9991 )~~O~lt~C0~~0)~- - - -- --- --- -










THE WBKIrY NDbiMkIAL RaICOP.


Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for the benefit f the subscribers and ;d'tiing patrs of this paper and no
charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or moe of the blanks following, a

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention

Fm Tw Po r r Saw-. a st or r.. lks r 0. me..r er Am slam. rFr ramer. rM l or I ds Lesl.
DATR INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jaebsonvile, Ml..
INDUSTRIAL REORD, Main Offce, Jacksoevle, Fla. I am In the market for lands for the purpose of
In the met for. the folowiu Prefer in State of put me In commalation
with responsible parties ad give me other IformiOaio
Remarks
Pleae notify where same can be secured.
Signpd

S tate peeleally the kind of meabtaery wanted and whether new or sec m-handed DAT
oaee3l fur T~rpin. mtwil er Fatery. er fu Amr lemtril terme. rFer Ctsemlmw,y Offlee or M ebml SmupplMes, mS er Tumrpntime Almes
DATEM hrNl Wmn, .
DnWlUSTRIA ILA X. R J.eksnle, a. DATB
INDUS INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jaekso avle,
Pleae advise the undermined regarding a good location n (state or section of
state) for In the market for
together wtth fun information about labor conidtioas, taxes, transportation facilities,
eeol emeoragement, etc.
Ber-. Please ge e information as to best places to by, ete.

Signed sign t


Dae Te Wat t se somea t AMre em TMUI Sf f ath?
DATE DATE
InDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jackwoavile, m la.
above for ale the following Can you give Say information a to t reltbility of the followlar a or 0rpra

tion
Reemarkh
Om. yem uggst a purchaser?
Signed Sli m


*e Yem Wet to IFlay a Mm? Y Wat Empgment?
DATE DATB
IOXSTMIAL RECORD. JaeksoTville, la. INDUSTRIAL RBOORD, Jacksovlle, na.
Wast a ma to fil the position of Want a portion

wt the foowlag reqlrements Refer to the fotowoIW

Oam ye ges ch a ma ? Can you aeist me ?
Signed Signed



CLIP THIS COUPON I
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD
SVI yer am wia an adrtemeat fom the coImans of this pmer, whether ~ms maiin a inquy or playing a Mr mar, please cut out e coupon
blo amd aitac it t the leter. It wi pay you.

COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the Iaduemilkal Re erd. ie dated



The INDUSTRIAL RBCORD of Jacksmoville, lh., and Savanbah. Ga., is the South's great
weekly trade journal.


The Record tauke a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.


Tr maco D -XXP8 rACK WITH SoUT8H= K 13G-Se


17









is THE wEUKLY JI'DUbFJaJ.AL BR300D.
I ----


Buyers' Directory

These advertiers are i this ima If
ym want anythi look thragh ti
deified lA and write to the trm ap-
par thera The Record guaratm
a prmpt rmpop n

ABSTRACTS
Realty Title and Trust Co.
AUTOMOILKS.
Obert, Fred B Jacksonvie, l.
BAXr&
Atlantie National Bank, Jacksonvills Fa.
Coemm ial Bank, Jacksonille, a.
Cetral National Bank, Oeal, Fl
Mesatle Bank, Jackonille F.
National Bank of Jacksonville
BOXKS AMD CRATE.
Cunmer er Luber OC., Jacmanvfl, a.
BRICE.
FePter, Geo. R, Jr, Jacksoville, Fl
Southern Fuel & Supply O., The, Jackson-
vil, a.
CAR.
South Atlantic Car & XMi-"- '- "g Co.
Wayeros, Ga.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro, J. A., Jacksoville, ka.
RBafroe C., H. A., Jacksonville, F.
Standard Clothing C, Jacksonville, a
CLOTHIG-WHO~SAL.mn
Kohn, Furehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHATS.
Bailey A Montgomery, New York City.
Lamrdon, M. W, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co, New York City.
CONVETANCING.
Realty Title aad Trut Co.
COOPERAGE.
Canon Co, The, quitma, Ga.
Cooperate C, The, Jacksoville, .
Jako ville Cooperap Ci, JeeameniAle,
Fl.
Quitmra Coopr ge O., Quitma, a.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fa.
DRUGS-WHOLESALI.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jadksoville,
7la.
DRT GOODS-WnrOW.wL
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGIES.L
Christopher, John 0, Jacksonvlle, Fa.
Iombard Iron Works S y Co., An-
Merrin-Stevs Co, Jackaonille, Fa.
Sebhoeld's SOm Co, J. S., Maso, Ga.
gusts, Ga.
FOUNDRIES
Murphy, T, Jacksonville, Fla.
Sehoeld's Sos Co, J. S, Maom, Ga.
FRI KHT CLAIM AECNI.
Florid Freight Claim Apemy, Jadm-
vine, Fla.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & supply Co, The, Jack-
sovile, Fla.
FUILL UKa.
Getting Furniture Co, Jacksonville, la.
GENTS' rJFUmmNis-DS
Craig A Bro, J. A, Jacksonville, Fl.
Renfroe Co, H. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, F
GROCERS--WOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co, Jacksonville, a.
Ellis-Young Co., Savannah, Ga.
largraves Co., C. H, Jacksonville, Fla.
.Jonson Co, W. B., Jaksonville, Fl.
eaeoek, Hunt & West Co., Savaunah, Ga
Unatd Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
White, Walton & Co, Jackonville, Fla.
',William Co., J. P, Savanna, Ga.
HATS--WHOLESALE.
:Kohn, Flehgou & CO., Jakd nvile, la
HARDWARE.
Baird & Co., L E., Jaekskkvlle, Fa.
Bod & Bours Co, The, Jacksonville, la
JBris HardwarCo, W. H,VaLdo, Ga
4hristopher, John 0, Jahaonvils, 1k.


Marion Hardware Co, Omal, la.
Tampa Hardware C T ,
Weed & Co., J. D., Sa OG.
HBARN88.
MeMurray & Baker, Jacksoville la.
Thomas W. R, Gaianevills FLa
HAT&
Craig & Bro, J: A, Jaksoaville, Fa.
Renfroe Co., H. A, Jaeksowvile, Fa.
Standard Clothing Co, Jadumovile, Fa.
HOT02L
Aragon, The, Jacksonvills, Fl.
Hotel Barthodi, New York City.
IRON WORK.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply C, Au-
gusta, Ga.
Mern -Steves G., Jacksoinvmle *
Murphy, T, Jackanvill e,Fla.
Seholeld's Bos Co., J. 8, Maeon, GL
JEWElERS,.
Greenleaf Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Hee & S nger, Jacksoville, F1k
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F, Jacksoanille, la.
Blum & Co., Chas, Jackoville, Fa.
Hanne Bro., Jaaksovile, 1a.
MEDICINES
Specer Medicine Co., Cttanooga, Tenn.
Southern Manufaeturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
KAPS.
Realty Title and Truat Co.
MACHUE WORK&
Lombard *Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusa, Ga.
Murphy, T, Jacksonille la.
Schofield's So Co., J. 8, Maa, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR juLukPEl xu PRO-

Sehofeld's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
v MAlTS.
Kingan Co., Ltd., Jacksonville, Fla.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M A., Brunswick, G.
Mellan Bros., Savamnah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co, W. H., Valdota, Ga.
Chritopher, Joh G, Jacksonville, a.
Marion Hardware Co., Oa, .
Scofied' Sons Co., J. ., Maeon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., T pa, Fla.
MULES AMD HORSES.
Thoma, W. R., Gainsvilkl, F
XAILS.
alem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES
Barnes-Jmup Co., The, Jacksonvie, Fa.
Conolidated Naval Store Co., Jaekson-
ville Fla.
Ellia-Young Co., The, Savanah, Ga.
Independent Naval Starm ad Export Co,
Jaksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co, Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Storm Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval orm C, Mobile, Ala.
PAINTS.
Baird & Co, L K, Jacksoville, Fha.
Bond & Bour Co., Jacksoville, Fa.
PCAN&.
Griming Bram. Cao. The, Jaksonville, Fa.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hadwamr Co, W. H, Valdta, .
Campbel, J. R. Oeala, Fla.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonvile, Fk.
Tampa Hardware o., Tampa, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co, Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS,
Christoper, John G, Jacksonaille, Fla.
Gilbert, Fred ., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Steves C., Jacksonville, I.
Sehofeld's Soa Co, J. S., Maeon, Ga.
White-Blakesle Mfg. C., Birmingham
Als.
TANK STORAG.L
National Tank & Export Co, Sa8vanah,
Ga.
RKAL ESTATL.
Beekwith, Hmnderson Warren, Tampa,
Fla.
Brobston, Fedig & Cao, Jaekonville, Fa.
Buekman, C., Jaksonille, Fa.
Fraier, W. W., Jaksonville, .
Liringtona Sons, J. H., OSe, ra.


Southern States lnd ad Timber Co,
Jacksonville, F.
Wet-Raley-Bannie Co, The, Jacksonville,
Fla.
SHIP YEARS.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Steven Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLKSALE
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.

Clyde Steamship Co, The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jaeksonville ,Fla
TAILORS.
Reufroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cyprse Tank Co, Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Sehofed's Sons Co., J. S., Maon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville, Fla.
Council Tool Co., The, Wananish, N. C.
1uxPE .xl APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksorville, kla.


TAILORS


runx1#xNg 112411M
Pine Product ConatruetUm (, T i-
etteville, N. C.
Pine Belt Constretio cs., .Th%,- ^
N. C.
Standard Turpetime OL, Th, Ik l*e
City.
SuxPja umsr BTLLS.
Baker, M. A., Bruwicks Oa.
MeMilan Brou, Saiva a.
TUKPE inmu STILL TOMS
Davis & Soa, G. M, Palath l.
xURJI iuams VAT&
Davia & Son, G. XM, Palath La.

Grivot Typewriter xmabng, Jacmedw
Pa.
VEMICLUS
McMurray & Baker, Jackomvlm1, Jl.
Thomas, W. R., Gaimille, Fl.
WATCIHX&
Greenleaf & Croeby Co, Jaecmkvflk .
Hess & Slager, Jackiaosill, lR.
YELLOW PINE LUIMEI.
Cummer Lumber CO, Jacklomwa, Fi
East Coast Lumber Co., Watarto0a La


MORTGAGES. REMNT.

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.


III W. I'OSYTH STREET,


mmscuwsvmix. nmuinm


Stetson Hats


Suisr to Orde rat Ready. Made Prices Mail Ordecr Given Personal AttaesAl


4lli W, Ba S t et, J l l st a t ti FLA I r llllw


J... .. .. .. .. . V
J. P. WIn.LLA. President. J. A. G. Cosao.ut VcntU
T. A. JNNIOB,2B H. L. KAO, Secretry. D. G. White. Te.rer. *


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,,

Mii MOR N NOR s f E mEU ma.
asin Office nAVXPanXH, OKONIrL.
S-ISPBlXCOILA, ~111X. ramilk 0Qseery mu-nor
raneh orne-fi: J PJACIIKOVI.LY fLL. ( r CO L5AmUf, ,

:Naval Stores Produccrs arc Isvltcd to Correspamd With fi


a iiul lal itli iallia l aaailil a il i aaall llill l laII



hh
L L --













Job work through tl
. country Ia pea



Th Le and Ol Coppe runswick, a.
WorkL in G.orarC
o My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms tbat do no lek.


Send your order for general printing to -tim Red


DOM'T FAIL TO MEfTI0B THU RECORD TO ADVERTISER&


Ho A, Renfroe Co.


C




N^


THE W EEKY Imuubr.r~IAL RECORD. 1


Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are


McM ILLAN


BROTHERS'


Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twcaty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS.


SAVANNAH, GA.
MOBILE, ALA.


J CKSONVILL, FLA.
FAYETTEVILLE, N C.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.
I Mtfilli IS IMOF EI ROMImI II FUSIIN i PII 111B U FIMS.
IN WwRNG OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED

A Florida Enterprise. Trv It.
TH RECORD'S SPACE HAS A M1 MON T VALUE


N 1





30 THE WIUE LY IIp ruUrIAL RECORD.
Pr*MMt. W. C. POW L;: TVmOPMema- wh wtts the Pt~sMeat eemitte th roete D atoy a Ba e Maaergs. W.. t. COACHMAN & BLU-
IAND. . OOVIMO T ON. N. A. MeBACHRRN, JOHN TOUNG, J. A. CRAN iORD. D. H. MeMLAN. C. DOWN-
ING, J. L. BAUNDIRU, C. I. ROGmI: Auidtor, JOHN HIBMDRlON.
I m ~


N LIDATD NAVAL MANY,


l; ocson Ie El.


iunnoh, u .


Onsnil, Fi.


NAVAL IORES FiCTORS.


m i Ci l8i SoMk, 0)t. Owe aM (lol o 1 R qicl WI k

mnm h181 Id ll R 0sile 108s no Ona t w N i.


Tk Mousid is Pl uI a woere CoaIol l. In e1 ore iM cl ll MlI
I It P rieri. le Polfflie I lmee iloits erltiltle lillM
Prt 01 bl len Pl ol r01 T~ 101 [ERIl.


IDS JAC11 NI[E1 SNI NllA, MEiN IHlA oin PENSCW IA.


AM Rolucle ole inviled o Cl oI Cillesoil


T ------------ ITS PTS.


)
-4.
*1 I
I
p
.
'^
F
)





-- ,2P

THE WEEKLY IN.uurrRIAL RECORD. 31


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commm..iry Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
erd for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 21
A. C. Creamery, 0 .. 22
10 .- 25
A C.Creamery,50,llb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 11

Lard
Compound Tin.
SQ-lb tin.... 66
50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-lbtin. ............ 84

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 36

Sugar
Tiranulated 8ugar, bhls..... 6 40

Coffee
Reeption Blend Moch and
Java, 801-lb cans to case,
per lb................ 22
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
ease, per lb............. 22
O*eeA Coffee good. ......... 12
r0een Coffee, medium ...... 9
-.Gre- ofoee, common....... 81
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages.......market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 Ib pack-
ages.............market price
lRosted, 1001b. drum....... 17
-4Grond coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon..... 81
Oats
s10 k L m iO
Car Lot Lot Sk Lots
W.clip'd,1251b, 1 90
S 1001b, 1 55
White 1251b, 1 80
White 100lb. 145
Mixed 1251b
S 100lb,
Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice..... 1 85
6 fancy..... 185
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 6 25
'Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 lb sack......... 6 00
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 6 25
Pillsbury's Best ..... 7 50
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 7 40
*' C bbl.... ...
Flour, Boss,.............. 725
Meal
Meal, per barrel............. 850
92-lb sacks........... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel...........8 50
92-b sacks....... 1 50
Rice


Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40 Good...................... 4
S Gunpowder, 10 Ib.... 27 Choice...... ............
English B'fast, 10 lb.. '7 Fancy Head............... 6
Formosa, 10 lb....... 27 Broken................... 2.
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10c size Canned Vegetables
10 lb to ca, per pound.. 40 Canned Vegtables

Salt Tomatoes, 8s, Chief........ 85
Tomatoes, 2 ........ 65
00-1b sack............... 100 Clayton, 3................ 80
100-b sck................ 50 Clayton, 2s ............... 60
les Cream, 200-lb aceks..... 100 Sifted Peas, 2s ............1 40
6" 100-lb sacks..... 50 Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Pocket Saltin bbls., 8-lb.... 265 Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........1 15
2-lb.... 275- LimaBeans,2s ............1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
Pepper String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8s........... 90
Whole Ground Pepper, Baked Beans, ls........... 45
10-lb tin.............. 17 Corn, fancy, 2s............1 40
Ground 1-8 tan, 8 doz to box Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
sifter top, per doz...... 45 Beauty Beets, 3e ...........
Ground 1-16 glass pepper Sauer Kraut, 3s ........... 85
boxes, per dos ......40 and 80 Saner Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s .............. 90
Corn Hay
10 SI Le I- war loft 100le 1e


Car Lot
W.Corn,llOlb, 1 38
S 1001b. 1 24
Mxd orn,1101b,1 88
#4 1001b,l 21


Lot
1 40
126
185
128


Sk


1 49 Choice....
1 84 No.1 Tim.
146 No. 2 1700
1 82 No.1 Cl'ler 17 00


lot qu*etlty
1750
1650
17 80 15 50
1750 1550


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one dos to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s,. two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 45
Peaches, 88, two dox to case
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 45
Blackberries, 2s two dos to
case, per dos........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case.
per dos...............
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 6J
S 10-.b 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
lb.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
per Ib................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
sorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 61

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per Ib....... 81
Fancy Apricots 26 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice " .
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....435
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 l-lb. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. ease 00
Prunes, Calf cleaned 26-lb
bt.x, 40-50............. 6..
Pru es, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-60.............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, o6-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box .......... 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 61
Extra H P, '" .... 6
Seed Peanuts, ..
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds........... ..... 18
Brazils ................... 12
Peaoans.... .............. 12
Filberts................... 12
al0 nuts .................. 14


Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 LIammo
lots Sk Lot Sk. Lt
Cottonseed Meal 27 00
S Hull 10 50


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
3 hoop ........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per do....... 1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
nested......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per dos 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per dos.. 60
Ax Handles
Two dos crates per doz.. ..1 20

Washboards n.
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay............... 00
175 Diamond Glass .........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per doz 1 0O
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 dos to case, per
do ................. 9
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 80
Sardines, 5 cae lotd........ 8 46
Salmon Is, Tale 4 dos to cae
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to case,
per dos Col. River .... 2 36
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per dos
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96


Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails ............ 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box................ 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 arge .... 134
"Reliable" Ham, 10-12 avrg .... 141-2
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 sag .... 1414
"Reable" Shoulders, 7-9 avrg .. 115.
"Reliable" Clifornia Hams, 6-8. 101-2
Breakfast Baeon, lirgt ar. ...... Is1-s
D. 8. Bellies, 16-18 ........... -4
D. S. Bellies, 20-22 ar........... *1-
D. Bellies, 25-30 a. .......... 1-4
D. 8. Plates .................... 7
Bacon Plates ................... a
D. 8. Butta .................. 62-S
Bolg saumae ............... 7
samagm e ....................S a
Butter am Cmse.
"Strawberry" Creamery, 6Iblb tubs s2
30lb tabs 201-2
Kiawa's Lan.
-Reliable" full ream eeee .... 11
Klap's ai.
"Indiana" Pure Leaf ........... mar~ka
"*bes-Fom" Compound ......... m
Kiugas Cannel nets.
"Reliable" O ed Beef, 1 ...... .P2
c" Crd Beef. e ...... aS
Rost Beef, Is ........ I.U
Roast Beef, 2 ........ .A
Potted Ham and Tongue
1-4s ......................... as
S lied Beef, 1-2 .. .. i.
SVienna Saemat, lf .. .a
STrie .................. L


OWT A Cal? Of f 2AVAL ST20=8 BLUE 399L


7. T
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g3 THE WEEKLY muNUTKIaAL RECORD.
-***maga


a a a a a a a aa**a a aaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa


- .u..-. .- -------...---- - -i1 a a 1a1-11 -- - - a aaa a a a Na a a 9 -


i I I I I.-i iI I I I I I I I i I ~ i i i I I I i


4
4
4
4
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4


The job printing department
.of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-

ufacturing trades. It is reason-

able to suppose you will get

better and more satisfactory
printing supplies-letter heads,
envelopes, commissary checks,

pay-roll reports, etc., by having

us make them.

Industrial Record Co.,

JadsKMf Filrida.


* 3 1 1 1 U 1- -E -- -3 13 1- -1 -u - - - -wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww I-- WY V


UKAD TMK As a1 TMB 33COn.


w


To the Readers of the Record:


A


J


F




I-













I


1
1
1


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~LIIIIII~~~~~~-


- - -V - - - - -


V








THE[ WEEKLY lINkutrrmrIL 3IOED. 35


SPrintin l Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


McMURRAY & BAKER,


H Ii IN Tu eni mml. HIFMe a
We see readying leal use-d~et piesime sea bmases vehlates. = 110111
1 Nr wla. frames a a urn Iwe L a ae nbb m Wr P
=. gases ft "sMe with a. Terpusne wegms ma" shares a spesddt. Rsmt
siawe sm is thu Ime wrs an haul-male brtsa.
I IT a Hl, 4X II I I UT ST.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
5m .sm- t Ita|e M ep sd this ar appeitea to safl a felhw% coiM0
at ClmarlM, & C. both ways.


Ppm saw v%
dftw aset r mewn).


EWU wawinucsinvUZe se
tEmR Caurlesban am& Now York.


fM&y, Sept, 30, at 3:00 pm ..ALGONQUIN ....Thursday, Oct. 6, at 1:00 pm
SftWay, Oct. 1, at 3:00 pm .....APACLHE .... Wednesday, Oct. 5, at 12:30 pm
**NEW YORK ... .Thursday, Oct. 6, at 1:00 pm
Tuesday, Oct. 4, at 3.00 pm .... COMANCHE ..... Sunday, Oct. 9, at 4:30 am
hfby, Oct. 7, at 3:00- pm .... ARAPAHOE. Wednesday, Oct. 12, at 6:30 am
"xMOHICAN ......Friday, Oct. 14, at 8:00 am
itimday, Ot. 8, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS ...... Friday, Oct. 14, at 8:00 am
Tuesday, Oct 11, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE .... Sunday, Oct. 16, at 10.00 am
Weimeday, Oct 12, at 3:00 pm ....ALGONQUIN ..Monday, Oct. 17, at 11:00 am
FIMay, Oct. 14, at 3.00 pm .... COMANCHE ..Wednesday, Oct. 19, at 12:00 n'n
*xHURON ..... Thursday, Oct. 20, at 4:00 am
Swlay, Oct. 16, at 3:00 pm .*xNEW York ......Friday, Oct. 21, at 4:00 pm
Talday, Oct. 18, at 3:00 pm .... ARAPAHOE ....Sunday, Oct. 23, at 4:00 am
Wednesday, Oct. 19, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS.... Monday, Oct. 24, at 4:30 am
"May, Oct 21, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ....Wednesday, Oct. 26, at 5.30 am
Banarday, Oct. 2, at 3:00 pm ....ALGONQUIN ....Friday, Oct. 28, at 6:00 am
M-day, Oc. 24, at 3:00 pm .."xMOHI'AN ....Friday, Oct. 28, at .6:00 am
Tisday, Oct. 2, at 3:00 pm ....COMANCHE .... Sunday, Oct. 30, at 8:30 am
Iid&, Oct. 28, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE .... Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 11:30 am
Saturday, Oct. 2, at 3:00 pm ... .IROQUOIS ......Friday, Nov. 4, at 12.00 n'n
**xHUR(ON ...... Friday, Nov. 4, at 12:00 n'n
--Bostos via Brunwick and Charleston. xFreight only. *-Boston via

lME CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
S- A Se v ef neSw.ee JaefmeMvlUe, Bestnm ami Prevlemse au al e-
erm hPat, Om(IUg at Charlestom iLth Way..
SEaI-WU KLY SAJILnoGS.
M- -.. ............... .. ................. ..rom LewI Whart. Bostn
a b .. .......... .. .. .. .. .. ..Prom foot of Catherine street Jacikstev
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
etwee" Jaeakmarvll Am safer.
fing at alatka. Astor, St. rtancla Berestord (De Lad) and Iatermem*o
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
in aeSpMtel to sal a follows: Leave Jaksonvile, Sundays, Tuedays and Thur-
S 1p. m. turning, leave Sanford, Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays 9: a. a.
Jui4 NORTHBOunu.
ea ow. I Read ap.


lI P. A.I ..................... Jacksouville.............. ...... Arrtve :0 a. L
. at ...... .. ...... Paatk ...... ..... Leave 1 p. tm.
.. 011 a. ............. ...........Ator............................ Leave 2 p. a.
4 a. m ....... ...... ........t .............. ........... Leave 1*1 p. R
.D...................e ord (D ).................... Leave U. noo
Atrtve a. a...... .... ............Sanford........ ... ....... .......Leave 91 a. m.
Ar. 1:e0 a. m4 .................. Enterprise .................... Lv. 10:00 a. m
WUSiRAiL PAQUUlIL AND ICKIET OFlPI 20 W. may St.. Jak'livne.
V. I. z OH .tlml J, At. Gent. Pass Agent. 3t W. Bay St., Jacksonvlle. Wl
W. C. OOOPER, l Local Ft. At Jaekvlllae C. P. LOVELL, Anst. Spt..Jackvvfl
poot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
A. C. RAO I TY. 0. 3. P. A. New York, CLYDE MILNE. 0. r. A., New TYoa r
Wn . 3W E3a, WL. lcrL m a O.
lensral Manager. General Ageats.
Cbaiasu asl Bulldln,. M Stat. Street. New Tork.


Ahe
The ,ate e -110
the 6"e 0f. sot areI
To WreeMy tdustrial ed of Jak-


mavule and laveanab bas akLea Its pI A)e s
am Ththe lean e Journals in t

e M adn mas an asutority on lrae
Sat esvm It ie being quote d mt
eb per In thin country. but by tmo
to Europe a&I. A Lad.. tradele
TIw s Wesu m the ilutr sl ae orat a -
eavIe aa Savannah has aukn i t ptaec
am-Ua M te eadlna tr4e Jourasto I the


e iat evet at at a t auort. and t Is
tar ted eb storpo t a bon quoted at. *



maUIsl tte elaso yeter hm II b eA W J


Of oVeiopsat in ahem otsoost. pial
osee to theec being the as at a alf- Ion


Tsa wears p me ort tsO aisetred J o*- "
a eve etMter team La uL see at Is

as 7stro a. a" ntotama ganation of tr I
several otI. 4i odetor tdur ng the a h

weak In Geor andE I1 Piereas. w.
It has set t hem aes for enterpr6w a it Walt
St is roev bot n ite subserttion and
a ato n deIrtments.rrat te as It do s es.
Sn ihs ae of te largest advewlng pat-
mass gaost. tay O aa the outhern .
Sd oO rl t n
We a m a wree







SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
90O YEARS RELIABILITY.
aIt ta rSlrtC kt ta I aitrtpkm a













SHess Slager,
rDiamonds, Silverware, Watche s and Jew ry
CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND 44 IS MAIN.



Naval Stores Market

and tock Report
l ul -aled ID in T he




Jacksonville Metropolis,
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other

$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.


BIG PRIZE :


A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Expositicn, to
Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.

Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.

Carer & Russll Publishin Co

JaJacssovii e Florida.
Jeckraonile, Floridr,


W==TE TZZ rUCR ION AY 2INIOKI= IO 0 DE!n.


-^^
'^yf4








U ?ttHU wim~LK mlburrufi6AL RCOUD.


C N FUL&LED V%00.reeuddst


Gieenleaf 8

Crosby Comp


3etoierm aub

ktilbeursitths


JAS F LAX*illowg
Z-


Diamods and Other PAr&)0
Stones


Fine Gold Jewelry


American and Foreign W -
and Clocks


41 Wedt ay Sbet



"a lingut and Beat ie,. i is p* u of a
B&MM& IN ro tesiamlen 40 mmll -uI


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


Fine China Dinner Sets ad
Fancy Pieces


European Novelties


TIHE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
of Wasaaash. N. C.,
1lotss at CsndV. Ibtaim. R. C, wre stMI seli Diann" 36i
-ffe at IWA in Joe and Mtaar4I at 5Af Oi ftle sad Patent
Pullin at 00 a Smm. ThabseW avers"e a l ttl better tha er.
We i ,aa0' out a mew brainS. Oh Mus lin Haik at ILS ad P1N-
are at WO wWfI amre arrankeL AM wbeleaIs de hale In naual stores
aawum -. ear sr Mass me whammpb erefis"

I GDedEWMAK PG.WFHAN l. ALFR) A. I&ZZTHAZL Lt U. & N.
5mlav~e.Dim Met'S Secy mmd Tawam Comattuettug
Sla.a % =ia "aye.vfr140 "EG.

Pine Product Construction Co.
Lye" = N. c.
1101 at Tpreaine. OS et Tor. Cresefto, Tar. Ditsifectants; Wood Prnservative.
Pmbftl Wood s3o Ute.. =l ChMNaOM from Igbtwood Sterum6. Box-tslnga.
PreW L&armps at distell auti redusmi. COodmeMti oontrofmed mt wINK
No Iar im te. plant 1eeIta sompletand men taught the process For-
Owrte ANvat 311ast ha. general masswer. ZPeeMoUie N C

~eITrr MUSrNIALS II ERUE, STONE AlI MOROZE
I- t TAMe" to the amat eoborte 1 M986910=06
WrItSM o =oe to a"-or designm swi w l e. ou.
SOUTHERN MARBLE AND STONE CO.
C40 811001 sr Sudifet 4 SEEMhas"" Street.
4maskemsel. Mle
Anybi af Hamsf Nmh MammarIC .a" Tile.


John R. Young Presient. C. SEllti. ViSri, V iE--cI
J. W. Mott Jr.. Secretary and Tremmrr.


J. ELLIS-YOUNG CO.

Commission Merchants

NAVAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS i

SSavannah and Brunswick, Ga.
I,1 in l. 1 1 I I II 1 111 11 l 1 i I I 111 U l lmJ mlm


'* --Y


-u
J.W. HUNT. PreaoM. J. HAR S, M dV. Pre&. H. L. KmmnmuSL. a e -
P. L. P ACOCK, 1it V. P" W. J. KELLY, 3d V. P. D. i. WuLaum. As iM. se ~

Peacock-Hut & West Cuml
enea Office 20 B ay Street, F. Savwmk, u.iM a
General offices: ^ ..e J nk y, n.
West BuWif, JaeksavMl I -
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factor. Our interest and the prod e'le m _~t-L
never take to account, nor are we interested in any compeay that ji--
Turpentine and roein.)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Cepers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our "Spe-F
-SOLE AGENTS FOR--
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wiso & 6MM i
Philadelphia Waions.

Naval Stres Received at Savannah, Ga. am-i
and fermandimna, fl.


Write sor Catalogue


HOTEL BARTHOLDI, "~~^W N ~ d., r.
H NEW YORK CrTY.
Paeda U ile Squao Park. Newly Furnibed Throughoat.
Mall Bifa Stoems nad Places of Amusement. Uars Pan
StM for a~Udkd Stations.and Steamboat Landings.
L e sample BRooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
fdA graCd amduinificent decorations: no luxurious
gradeur; no awe-in .sarroundings; no elaborate bill
of far, printed i nch; no clerks tat will disdain to
ak 0t Ye No employees Is A y Way Iwatteatatlve.
Be Jma a coay, bhme-like little hotel that will appeal to the
hLea of theae who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plaim Amersims esl g, and affable and coarteous treatment.
------- ----------


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