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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00089
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: September 23, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00089
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text





For the Week Ending


I904 .4


-,WEEKLY INDUSTRY t1EG*


Published every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Malnufacturlag hitersts.

00 01 800 aaC R m. fir # Ae an ocuggv Commntte of 920 TinPOSUM OCerstorV AsscNUou as Oft Exclstre SeeolW ergn. and Ad"~etW. nM. #"Z Am Annual Cn
mtenef as a 6MI ert aSamAims of eft esordl AsaODCU iads~ SeW. I Its, MA. as al onlali Orgam ofthe Werpuatfafir OpsaterW Amocun.
idoplod Apeel 27t*. 89W. as Me Oaml So W of Me ltadr-Srite Came 6seers' Associatio. Eaiersed by tan eoregta Sawmi
Aogft.cf Orgae of Me Southe--tera StacS Orona's Aa aOCAUe.


JAO~eU~LL FlA3U


- - - - -A 1e* 6eeee.


The Farers' Meeting Secures Results. i


CuAmpy t Compri Farmers, Organid in Jackn
vill for VM. (i*g Produce.

l-i--- ;:ww* 99^w^ 9 I


S I. e Florida Bat Coast Truck and Fruit
.o N which met in Jacksonville last
4. k, eampjleted their labors last Tue-
AJ t, after the organization of an
e ispeted stock company, to be known
= the COoolidated Fruit Company, to
t- the farmers and fruit growers of
oa0 part of the Stte to market their
f iM e to advantage and to conduct their
t i upon a business basis.
h "- o-temr elected by the stockholders
em ew eomsany are as follows: W.
S, -hanker, Miami, president; W.
Marb I, prident of Fruit and Veg-
.. rowers Asociation, of Delray,
vA410rMiient; T. V. Moore, farmer, of
0; mi, ,e4etary; G. L. Branig, banker,
SW4 Pate Beach, teeume; W. M.
A g : wm W. W. Blackmer, T. V. Moote,
I- W ." I LrL B- g F. A. Bryant, U. C. Hr-
J. T. Weoord, M. B. Lyman, A. E.
r, A. C. Fret, T. King, M. A.
Sand T. J. Peters, directors, and
A. Bren, W. W. Blackmer, T. V.
jF. A. ryant ad W. B. Lyman,
a of the executive committee.
She oh et of the Consolidated Fruit
m-- < qmy is set forth by President Brown
^;.. ag--
As dcirma of the committee appoint-
S to devise ways and mea to bring
sh. t the better condition of affairs to
h. towers of the State of lorida, and
a -eoiy to the east coast section, I
ep fl Yrto that the matter was very
th omughly dismswed by the committee,
) *-M S ggershtions were offered and ope-
4= m presented, and the report which
'm heem ead to you seems to be for the
'bet intemits of all concerned. I myself
Slh noet given this subject much consid-
Aftlon, but I recognize that something
Shm got to be dome in order to avoid the
lster which visited the grower last
w aer, from whatever cause it might
ai e abe.
The eammittee recommend as absolute-
ly essential that each community has its
lbml organiatio, with its offleers and
hed of diuetdors and to be managed in
the bet pasible manner. It also thought
it best to have a general or central or-
gami ti s, and this report covers that

SThe Iemp presents itself to me as
K'like a trunk of a tree with its
SThe bramehes are the losal or-
--.in the different communities.
Str.k ao the tree is represented by
a_^ad^T t


the general organization. We have tried
to eliminate all features of a personal na-
ture and to entirely eliminate the feature
of commission. We believe that every
dollar that came through the production
of the crop belonged to the farmer and
he was rightly entitled to it.
It was a difficult matter to determine
how to eliminate this feature, and it was
suggested by one of the members that the
organization, this general organization, be
a mutual association, rather than an as-
sociation of profit. It was recognized
that a general organization could not
conduct its business without some revenue
to start on. An empty bag certainly can-
not stand by itself, and in order to de-
vise the ways and means of revenue for
the general organization to carry on its
business we decided that it must be an
association of profit, but the profit, and
every cent of it, should go back to the
farmer.
Stock is not Offered.


It being an association of profit stock
would have to be offered, and I believe
one of the members suggested that if
outsiders were allowed to subscribe stock,
some might take large blocks of it and
get large benefits from, it. To eliminate
that feature it was decided to have two
kinds of stock, one preferred and the other
common. The common stock to belong
entirely to the farmers, the preferred
stock to be subscribed by the outsiders.
For instance, if an outside firm, a commis-
sion man, or a fertilizer man, or a banker,
or anybody else, wanted to take stock in
this concern, why we intended to give
them the preferred stock which pays a
dividend only if earned, and subject to
the discretion of the board of directors.
The people who bought the preferred
stock would have a preference only as to
dividends. They would get some 5, 6 or
7 per cent, as the stock might pay, and
that only. The preferred stock has no
voice whatever in the management of the
association. The common stock could be
subscribed by individuals making up the
local organizations, or by the loeal or-
ganisation itself, whichever might seem
best. Preferred stock could be called in
at any time, so that if a commission man,
or fertilizer man, or an outsider wanted
to put money into this concern, and we
invited it-we cannot get along without
money-and we realized it was a poor


ATUMATA, CA.


time to ask the farmer to put'up money
to run this organization, and the preferred
stock provides a ways and means for get-
ting money for the immediate use of
carrying on the business of the general
organization That is why we put pre-
ferred stock and common stock into .the
association.
Now, with regard to the common stock
and the corporation for profit. It is pro-
posed that the general association shall in
no way interfere with the local organiza-
tion. Cash sales are advisable and in-
vited. If the local organization can sel
its produce at home, it interferes not at
all with the general organization. A
commission man can go down to the local
organization and purchase his fruit from
the local organization, pay for it, but if
he asks for a consignment of fruit it is
proposed that the local organization sa
that all their consignments are made
through the general organization and re-
ferred to them.
The general organization proposed o
carry on its business on a commission bi
sis, just the same as if the business was
handled by distributing agents, but from
"t coming from that source it becomes
part of the revenue or funds or assets
of the general organization aml belong
to the growers, divided among them ac-
cording to their interests in the general
organization.


The Pat of the Banker.
It was suggested, what part the banker
plays in this scheme? And that was
quite a delicate proposition to take up,
because, fortunately, the committee hap-
pened to be composed of one interested in
that pursuit. The banker has no "uxq
to grind." The banker realizes that the
prosperity of the country is his prosper-
ity; unless the farmer prospers, the.mer-_
chant prospers, the bank will-not prosper.
The question came up about loel or-
ganizations, and I think Mr. Lyman made
that suggestion, or Mr. Hardee: Can the
association guarantee in any manner the
credit of its members, and with that per-
haps it might be a scheme on the part of
the banker, or the fertilizer man, or the
crate man to get some collateral back on
the security besides the moral risk itself,
and that matter was thoroughly discuss-
ed, and it was decided that the banker
should look out for himself, and credit
should be extended to the individuals
according to their merit. The banker
cannot extend credit to an individual, no
matter who he may be, if that individual
lacks certain elements of managing his
business. A great many men can grow
a successful crop. they are fine farmer
but when it comes to marketing their
crop and getting returns for it. they are
very poor, and that characteristic is in
all classes of business. But if a mem-
ber of the association comes to the bank


$3 A YEAR.


1!


SAVANNAH, GA.


nd wants to borrow money, we feel that
f he is a member of that ametios and
will give to the bank an order on the as-
sociation for such returns as may eom
to him through his marketing through
hem, we feel that that is all ,we am ask
r that we can desire, and I believe it in
all the fertilizer man or the material rm
or any other editor can deue of the
general organization.
Guaranteeing anything is not ontm-
plated in this organization or meeting at
all Especially was that the sentiment
of the committee, The bank iat mimes up
the man as to his moral standing, -
if he is willingto bid himself to a lor
association in suh a meame that U
credit shall be guaranteed through them,
it is a guarantee to the bank and to other
creditors. It is a guarantee that th
kbsiaes, will be conductad in a inkteMl
gent sort of way, and it is "up to" t
bank or "up.to" the fertilizer an whtt
er he will grant that man credit T
AikTwe a*re willing toi, 4 Iat, 1
d mbaak ri toso it m
as te bank i concerned it ha
to grind." It is simply interatod i
welfhk of the farmer d-1t 'wudihm qF
the country, and to extend to them l
the credit that they poemibly em wit .
reases. -
There were a number of their tWer
discussed. -the meetin.. sa
question came up as to the rm l of
conern. We thought it best to s-Q
the general organization with a rspi
ble capital, say of $100,00, W$S ;f
which shal b e preferred stock. bhe l -.
organization can take as mueh of tht
as its board of directors deems fa. It
is a good investment. The mre they ea _
take, the better it is for fthe, b ni
every dollar belongs to them, and in
final windup it remains with the lodm'l-
ganiation. It all come back to %he.
If the groewr market s r nerato f
tomatoes, and that is not ai exaggerusd
estimate, it means a revenue from them
Jo,00 rates of $1,000,00. The corn-i
sion on that amount of produce will wi
from $50,000 to $10S,06 It is really a
big thing The farmers certainly realism
how much there is in that, and how
they have been bearing. Where t goes
we -o- aet know, and it wil pemaps be
a loss of time to look into the mcas of
the past bad results, beeaue it will-he
a difficult matter to find out what was he
trouble. But thete is something wrong,
and the object of this meeting is to see
if we cannot remedy these arors aad
bring about better results in the future.
From the length of time that the commit-
teen have taken in the consideration of
this matter, I think it is evidence that
the committee has weighed seriously and
conscientiously the interests of the m-
ventioa which they have represented.
The denomination of pmeaerred stik


-j






4r








42


" ~r3~3
~ '
i






JIIIIIIII-11111|,|||||1| I ,| |>1I -, -,,,,,,| ,|-,,||,,,|,,,,|,,,| -I,,,-
--- -- ------ 1 --1 00 1000 Ne ds --- ---- --- --- ---- I -08 664


C. 3. ROGEs,2 Par.ZM.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, VICX-PXUlsm Ds.


C. H. HODGSON, Bsc, and Txuas'a


DIRECTOLS : C. B. Bogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEaeherj and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
SB. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


-I I


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5,000oo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches la Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Ceusist o e mnree-Story BAlllagM, 70x200; ome two-story belldMiu. 50x390; oe one-story baildig, 80x250,
aklae the largest space of ay Compawy of the Hlad In the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa, Fla., Peinsacola. Fla., and Savannah. Ga.

TV ECOID WILL -- wOr- -O-.As TO o r -w--- -W
TM 22001M WUU L 2z WOM DOLLIas T" alta I1U


il 2


THE WEEKLY 1LDUTraJAL RBEOOD.







THE WEEKLY IU BWUTIAL RECORD.


dlm be $0 each, of ommon stoak $10
am. Every grower ean take some in
tog in it, on aoseont of the amount of
eaMh sea of stok.
T" paret m be paid n, and while
we ha w am orgalsiation of $100,00, the
e ti e does not think that over $5,000
or $1a0M will be rluired.
e bea of directors of this general
. l. .tliit and tht board should be
lsepAed of the very best or choiee of
m- from he local organization, and it
M-i to to to manage this business,
d it is their duty to select a man who
i espab of handling this business for
ti amesotios, with all ideas of a per-
-l --I'e eimnated and all graft at
st, and to work on a salary. The local
.rainastio can commuicate with the
-- g:--tion, keep it posted as to
wiat s being done in its particular see-
t M---he m er of acres tha are grown,
do kind of fruit that i put up sad
-pase and to ee that it is a uniform and
b--t pact and to keep the organisation
In every way posted.
The S ral manager of the parent as-
-se-tioi shall work simply on a salary,
ant I believe it was proposed by one of
M members that he be not a stockholder
al be ia no wise interested in the aso-
eatum, so if he does not fill the bill he
-a be reoved and- somebody else put in
s plas. His office shall be in Jack-
esavile, lHa.-&rt suggested that we
maem the oase of the association in Jack-
s..aile, but it was suggested that on
asm t of the time it could be handled
in ~ owm eoonty best. The place was
mad-- M.
The was a great deal of interest and
oM R eo-aaeted with the meeig,
andt the farmers steered the proceeding
to est ther desires and their needs. It
was strily a farmers' meeting in every
sm of the word. The busine men
present we there as delegates, but were
mus in the mimrity. Dade Comoty
sen her mot intelligent farmers, and it
wm a meeting whe intelligence and
sue ssl judgment were characteristics.
The plan adopted is accepted very fa.
vrably by all those who were member
of the invention, and it is believed thai
there wi be a number of branch organ
I fio arranged for at once.
-estsatio Adopted.


We further recommend that the mia-
utes of this meeting might be published
in pamphlet form and distributed by the
secretary to all members in atteadame,
and that copies be sent to amy who may
be interested in the movement
Be it further resolved that a copy of
these resolutions be set to Mers. Par-
rott, Wilson, Miss Thompson aad the
Jacksonville Board of Trade.
M. C. HARDERa
WALTER HAWKINS,
V. IB RIC.

Of en Vacatio.
Mesrs. W. F. Coachman and H. A. Me-
Eachern, of the Consolidated Faval Stores
Co., Mr. C. B. Rogers, president of the
Consolidated Grocery Co, Capt. W. J.
Hillman, president of the Hilman-Suth-
erland Co., and Mr. J. G. Spottswood form-
ed a party of prominent Jacksonville gen-
tlemen who left this week for New York
and other points North where they go on
their much deserved vacation.

Snt m year rdtm far Cemsi
de e. s The 1aD pints -s ammis-
dy deh tan all the painting bemm
in the Sout cmbin

THE CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
IN S19.500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barreb b and will ps the se
vaest American and Eropea inspection.

Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, QUITMAN, GA,
and MONTLCELLO, FLA.
SAdress order to hom office
QUITMAN, GA.


After the articles of incorporation of
the mw company had been disposed of,
the feios wng resolutions were unanimons-
ly adopted:
We, your committee on resolutions, beg
leav to report as follows:
o it R olved, That this convention
rtea its hearty sad sincere thanks to ILLAS DOUBIED
t Fiords East Coast Railway (Mr. J. BY USB oF
. Prrot, vice president), for traspor- a b'-r" ars Pf o ad
tatim fished te delegates. We realize I e prctalt erm the
that tbe orida East Cast Railway's its htee ghien n the heds of
fruit and tnrk rooe is promv
Inte ts aw Me dical with our own, and by the fact tt oar 9ssto
we inlge the hope that they realize thlk r ne pirofi s. ad o
while inelob o= abe
a m we r uter reolved, that this an- did acirt S c rt e no
to mature atei crops, and leot
,ntr te its extreme thanks to the mo-. t ill py youtoin-
Jadt omlle Board of Trade for the use vstit this nd rite u for
o their magnifcent auditorium as a meet- it is doe.
in plae. We aho wish to express to Wi e II C..
Mr. L A. Wilson of the Wilson & Toomer A
Irrtilisr Company our sincere apprecid-
to mf k ns active support and energet
aert in bringing about this meeting at
Jaelm in and for his many courtesies J. P. aAIW EAL
retrdd as members whle harm M F.
We abM wih to extend our sincere
thant tbro.g Mr. Wilson to Mi Jean-
T stemr. aper fo .es Sen all orders for printing for the tr-
no Tm ePrpnter, hfr coim P a mmissary traes to the
6r1isr t- M ei m s cIra office to i re prompt delivery.


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
CAPITAL $300,000 SURPLUS and U DIVIDED PROPS 5300,000
We se Time Certlfcatea of Deposit, which draw terest at te ate athfree r cPr
wmu. if held ninety days or longer. Teake aratage Ms anle t Iam ara fsEi
sonethla fr ym. Particular attention paid to Outof-Town account, sealing


"When the Leaves Begin to Fall"
Watch out for Chills and Fever.

Planters Tasteless Chill Tonic
Is a sure Cure-GUARANTEED TO CURE. 4fG 4
We run no risk in making this guaranty.
Bead this:
Neese, S. C. June 1, 1 90.
I had been suffering with chills and fever for the -mlJ
five yS*ra, ad hAdried doctors' medicine, bat got no B
relief until I began to use Planters Chill Tonic, which, I
am thankful to say, has cured me. C" Wi
C. E. Bolin.
Write us for booklet and special prices. i
SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga. Tenn.

a. R. POWrLL. cCAsI. HAAr BmENR ASnEyr.
re*"*a*t. vice-Presidert &nd rremrer. Secrettr.
DIRacreaS:
B. R. Powell. Chas. 6. Iarris, N. cnIMcIha P. L. Sthterlanm, I. C. Cevtwr.

TNE


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Cwer *f West a y ani Mar Sft.
Jacksonville, Florida.


Wholesale Drugs I Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote priea -
anything in the drug line. We make peeked drugs a specialty ad an eav yo
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.



Young's Female College,
Thomasvile, Georgia,
OrPNS SerTrrEse 3th., 1904. Unsurpassed Climate, Cultured Cmmit, SY g
Equipment, select aociations, individual attention to each student, limited amber o imu
students: broad comprehensive coures leading to A. B. and B. S. degrees; falty efaet alS-
tian specialists; Music, Elocution and Physical Culture Specialties; total cost from W tom t' o
ten months term. Write for catalogue to-
I. COCHIRANE HUNT. President.
ill Sept. Ist, Richmond, Ky.


THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. rLA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoruaghlj
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant
f HH. N. O'NEAL. Prop.



East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Speciaty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.

For Prompt Delivery Sad Us Yar Commissary GM Irs.


IT 0i 1 2= U U 01=T TEAUIS JOURnAL


~~uas~r~a








4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


W IWAIIVQWAL VBIID S INVIT-
ED TO T=E 89TIS


8utb~ embers of the Amo n Bank-
e Caveatism Vait la a Criali
m W to British at O her Ea-
*apau Cetta Nanufactmr.
New York, September 16, 1904.
Southern delegate to the American
Bankers' Convention met at a dinner at
Shary's tight given by Mr. Richard
LH Edmonds, editor of the Manufacturers'
Record ad Mr. S. F. B. Morse, with the
result that an invitation was issued to
the cotton spinners of the world to meet
in convention t some Southern city this
fall. The full text of the invitation in
the form of an unanimously adopted res-
oltion, offered by Mr. N. H. Hillyr,
emahie of the American National Bank of
Maon, Ga., is as follows:
Buakers from the cotton-growing States
attending the American Bankers' Con-
veation, having heard that it might be
possible to induce the cotton manufac-
turers of Great Britaiq and the Continent
of Europe, either as organizations or as
duly appointed delegates, to visit the
United States and make personal study
of the cotton-growing and r-= f-etring
possibilities of the South at a special
meeting held for that purple, desire by
that resolution to express their earnest
hope that the spinners of Europe may
visit his country this fall, promising on
behalf of every business interest a hearty
*ieloome."
Mr. John Skelton Williams, of
Riehmnd, Va., the toastmaster of
the evening, declared this occasion
to be the beginning of a move-
ment to locate the cotton mills of the
world in the South. He introduced Mr.
Edmonds, editor of the Manufacturers'
Record, who explained that the occasion
of the dinner was the belief that the cot-
ton spianers of the world should come
to this country to see conditions under
which cotton is grown in that part of
the world, where cotton production must
1ad its greatest opportunity for increase.
So great is the demand for cotton to-day,
so far is the consumption of cotton ahead
of production that the most vital, the
broadest question in commerce today is
whether cotton production can be in-
reased to keep pace with the demand.
"We of the South," said he, "say it can,
in spite of boll-weevil and labor scarcity,
aml more assuredly so if our English
friends will join with us in the effort.
Civilization itself rests on the cotton crop
of the South. We may find a substitute
for wheat or for corn, but nowhere on
earth is there a substitute for cotton.
Destroy cotton and civilization itself will
beddestroyed. The cotton industry is the
largt industry on earth. The day is
not far distant when 15000,000 bales of
cotton will be required. General Grant
declared that where the Isthmian canal
is built, Asi alone would need 1,000,000
bales. There is today a cotton famine in
the world. While consumption may be
checked temporarily by the impression
that cotton prices are abnormal, as a
matter of fact there have been but two
decades in the history of cotton produc-
tion in America when prices have av-
eraged lower than the prices of today.
Commer controls the world. There
would have been no war had the South
and the North socially eomminl4 ft is
therefore desirable that there should be
dose relatis between the bglinsh-speak-


ing peoples of the world. England has
about one-half the capital that is in-
vested in cotton spinning. She has 48,-
000,000 spindles, or about six times as
many as the South has. The South is so
far from being developed as she should be
that Massachusetts has more money in-
vested in cotton-spinning than all of the
14 States of the South. This movement
to bring the cotton spinners of the world
together has received the hearty indorse-
ment of manufacturers, of cotton growers,
governors of Southern States and commer-
cial bodies generally, who see the greatest
possible benefit to come from a visit of
European cotton spinners to the South
to study conditions here for themselves."
Col. S. F. B. Morse, president of the
Southern Cotton Corpration, was intro-
duced as the man who had achieved the
most wonderful development which the
South has known in any one direction in
having carried 75,000 farmers from Iowa
and other Western States into Southwest
Louisiana and Southeast Texas, where
the rice industry of this country has been
built up within a few years.
Colonel Morse briefly related some of
his experiences in connection with South-
ern development work, and declared his
belief that the Southern Cotton Corpora-
tion had a mission before it, which would
result in great benefit to the cotton inter-
est of the entire South.
He scored cotton speculation, and gave
some amazing instances of the supersti-
tion by which cotton brokers permit them-
selves to be influenced. Neither the South
nor the world at large, he said, under-
stands or appreciates the tremendous im-
portance of Southern cotton production
to the civilization of the world. A better
understanding of conditions in the South
and of the possibilities of cotton produc-
tion and the manufacture of cotton in
that section can be reached through the
proposed visit of European spinners than
would be possible in any other way, and
he declared that when cotton production
of the South had reached the proportions
to which it is destined, that section would
be the happiest and most prosperous in
the world.
Robert Donald, managing editor of the
Daily Chronicle of London, declared that
the market for cotton goods is only just
opening up. With the building of rail-
roads in Africa there are millions of naked
peoples who will require clothing and cot-
ton is the only material that can be sup-
plied. The same condition exists in Asia.
English spinners are convinced, as are the
Amerians, that cotton spinning is only
in its beginning. English cotton spinners
will be greatly benefited by meeting with
American manufacturers, whose business
methods furnish in many ways opportuni-
ties for improvement.
George S. Graham, of Philadelphia, made
a rousing speech on the unity of the North
and South, and of the concord between
the peoples of England and America, and
he heartily indorsed the proposition to
have European spinners and manufactu-
rers come to America. Such a union of
interests as this trip contemplated would
insure peace throughout the world.
Henry W. King, of Worcester, Mass, a
New England mill man, declared that the
Massachusetts spinners will welcome the
English spinners and will uphold the
hands of the Southern people in their
attempts to advance the interests of the
cotton industry. Clients of the speaker
were glad to make investments in the
South, believing in the prosperity of the
South and that the interests of Mamsa-
a1 YroU DUT ,m1 IT N


W. C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T DUDLEY. Sea. & Tea


STamnpa Hardware Co.
--

Wholesale

r Hardware

STfurpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.
.-.,
- Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks

aend Pullers on Hand.

TAMPA, FORIDA.
-
i 1111111111111111111111 III1111111111111I 11111



.. NATIONAL..



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA., U. S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
Preddeat.


J. P. WILIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
L. A- ALFORD.


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGZTT.
J. B. YOUNG.


H L. KAYTON,
Secretary saM TraemT1m.


B. r. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY,
A. D. OOVINGTON.


J. I CHE NUTT
G. W. DBXL,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and -aw
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. 0. L
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARICULARS.


We


R. THOMAS


GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Bugges
I B Nseme Vw & Uq


0o **o*s** e**** e*a** *es ***seo*******,g*so $, o -4, .

J. S. Schofeld's Sons Colpany,

Headquarters fr *

e Distiller's Pumping
z : Outfit *
No plant Complete without one.
o Hundreds of them in use in Go
** Florida, Alabama, Misiasippi and
SSouth Carolina. Write us for Mtiac-
Slars and prices. We also manufactMr
E ngkis, Bilers am "itoi

Sas well as carry a full and complete
--stoo
FMill Saauplies, Pi, *
S0Boller Tubes, Etc.
SAdvise your wants.

Wia Macon, -- eorgla.
* A Leat SpeCdty of al
S*Mieso of Tak Wort fr Trpoals Stma PmMum
4I******* **** **e t 2 t*4*** ********* t t ** *** Is@to*

Illll Il l lll l ll l f I t 1 I I I I I I I I I a I Il I IIII I I ffIIs


* W. W. CANES Press.









THE WEEKLY INDUSmrlAL RECORD.


chsets and of the South are identical.
Other speakers were Joseph H. Headley,
of New York; S. W. Travers of Richmond,
Va.; T. A. C r, of Durham, N. C.; Thos
P. Grasty, of Staunton, Va.; all of whom
Swarmly commended the movement for an
international convention of cotton spin-
ers, and pledged to it their hearty sup-
port.-Manufacturers' Record.

GORGIA VAGRANCY LAW.
1 -Vagmant Act.
Vagrants are: (1) Persons wadering
or strolling about in idleness, who are able
a' to work and have no property to support
tm; (2) persons leading an idle, im-
moral or profligate life, who have no prop-
erty to support them, and who are able
' to work and do not work; (3) all persons
able to work, having no property to sup-
port them, and who have no visible or
known means of a fair, honest and respee-
tae livelihood. The term "visible and
known means of a fair, honest and res-
Speetable livelihood," as sed in this see-
tieo, shall be construed to mean reason-
ably continuous employment at some law-
ful occupation for reasonable compensa-
tin, or a fixed and regular income from
property or other investment, which in-
csme is sufficient for the support and
maintenance of such vagrants; (4) per-
sons having a fixed abode, who have no
visible property to support them, and
Swho live by stealing, or by trading or
bartering stolen property; (5) profession-
al gamblers living in idleness; (6) all able-
*. bodied persons who are found begging for
a living, or who quit their houses and
leave their wives and children without
the means of subsistence; (7) that all per-
s who are able to work, but hire out
their minor children and live upon their
wages, shal be deemed aid considered va-
grants; (8), all persons over sixteen and
ao twenty-one years of age able to
wrk and who do not work and have no
property to support them, and have not
some known and visible means of a fair,
honest and respectable livelihood, and
whose parents, are unable to support them,
'and who are not inattendance upon some
educational institute, it shall be, and is,
hereby made the duty of the sheriff and
the constables in every county, the police
Sand town marshals, or other like officials
in every town and city in this State, to
give information under oath to any officer
now empowered by law to issue criminal
warrants, of all vagrants within their
knowledge, or whom they have good rea-
son to suspect as being vagrants, in their
respective counties, towns and cities:
thereupon the said officer shall issue a
warrant for the apprehension of the per-
son alleged to be a vagrant, and upon
being brought before him, the said officer,
and probable cause be shown, shall bind
sueh person over to any court of the
county having jurisdiction in misdemean-
or cases. If, upon trial by a jury sworn
to inquire whether such person be a va-
grant or not, or (the court, provided the
defendant so desires or demands), the fact
of vagrancy be established, the said va-
grant shall be bound in sufficient security
.in the discretion of the court, for his
future industry and good conduct for one
year, said bond shall be made payable to
the court.
Upon such vagrant' refusal or failure
to give such security, the said vagrant
hall be punished as for a misdemeanor;
prided, that it shall be a sufficied de-
fense 1 the charge of vagrancy under any
of the provisions of this set that the de-


fendant has made a bona ide effort to
obtain employment at reasonabel prices
for his labor and has failed to obtain the
same.
Repealing Clam
Section 2.-The foregoing act has been
so amended as to provide compensation
to the person or officer who report these
vagrant cases, in the acts of the last Leg-
islature of Geprgia, which has not been
published.
Procuring Money e Contract for Services.
An act to make it illegal for any per-
son to procure money, or other thing of
value, on a contract to perform services
with intent to defraud, and fix the pun-
ishment therefore, and for other purposeeL
Section l.-Be it enacted by the Gen-
eral Assembly, and it is hereby enacted
by the authority of the same, That from
and after the passage of this act if any
person shall contract with another to per-
form for him services of any kind with
intent to procure money, br other thing of
value thereby, and not to perform the
services contracted for to the los and
damage of the hirer; or after having so
contracted, shall procure from the hirer
money, or other thing of value, with in-
tent not to perform such services, to the
loss and damage of the hirer, he shall be
deemed a common cheat and swindler, and
upon conviction shall be punished as pre-
scribed in Section 1039 of the code.
Section 2.-Be it further enacted, That
satisfactory proof of the contract, the
procuring thereon of money or other thing
of value, the failure to perform the ser-
vices so contracted for, or failure to re-
turn the money so advanced with inter-
est thereon at the time said labor was to
be performed, without good and sufficient
cause, and loss or damage to the hirer,
shall be deemed presumptive evidence of
the intent referred to in the preceding
section.
Be it further enacted, That all laws and
parts of laws in conflict with this act
be and the same are hereby repealed.
(The foregoing act is held to be con-
stitutional by our Supreme Court)

Big Fertiliser Company Starte.
Tallahassee, Sept. 20.-Rockwell has a
new corporation, the Barker Chemical
Company, with a capital stock of $500,-
000, to manufacture, purchase and sell
sulphuric acid and acid phosphate, super-
phosphate and of fertilizers; to buy and
sell phosphate rock and phosphate or oth-
er properties.
The stockholders are Ralph Barker of
Connecticut, John L Inglis, of Florida,
Charles U. Shepard, of South Carolina,
Hugh D. Anchineloes, Stephen Baker, Jno.
W. Anehinelosr and Samuel S. Anehineloss
of New York City.
Big Timber DeaL
Col. Felder Lang, president of the Oeala
sub-Association of the T. O. A., was in
iwe city last Saturday and closed a deal
involving over sixty thousand dollar'.
The property sold was fifteen thousand
acres of timber land situated at Fort Mc-
Coy, Fla., which was purchased by Messrs.
Hodges & O'Hars, large turpentine opera-
tors of this State.


KIRK & JONES
DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.
MAIL OkLcrnS SOLICITED.


*W ---------- -I
S


i J. A. Craig ,. Bro.

2 239 W. Bayv Strot EVEREITT OCIK

Ir -.*A.er- in Men's and Bors' Fine Cloth-
ini and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.





The Bond & Bours Co.



HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, RlinAs. Paints, Oils and Glass.
Stoves, Tinware, Countr-Holloware.


IS WEST SAY BTREET


Jacksonville. Fa.


T. MURPHY

JACKSONVILLE MACHINE AN IRON WORKS
ENGINEER IRON AND MASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Iren
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARIEB NGIN~S AND BOLERS PULILYS AND SHAFTIPG
Agent for Stationary Engines, Boilers, Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden-
sers, Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Goods
NWM TU ISMW AM rTER U EUIMuIT IA ESUITT
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.

--------------------------------~--------

I Cfble Addres. Florid


Standard Naval Stores


DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN


ROSIN

AND TURPENTINE.

Jacksonville, Fla.


JACKSONVILLE. PLA.
WVn WFJM2 AVZI Es= MINTo TM INCOR


For Sale

7, At R found Timber, Walton Co. Turpentine prv-
ilege only. $1.50 per acre. Water transportation.
0000 A gW Voluria Co., Round Timber, on Bail trans-
portation. Splendid timber for turpentine. Price $3.3. Fee im-
ple.
S. Aepme Hillsboro Co. Water transportation. Splen-
did Turpentine timber. $8.00 per are, fee simple.
We have several choice Turpentine locations in operation. Write
for schedules. Our No. 8 Bulletin will be mailed upon applieation.


Brobston, Fendig & Co.
dsKuret, lrMk.L & WKlkm


LIW4Y~I~I~~III~ly44~1~4-- 1-~------- -


---


- - -- 1 0-0- 90190"


a








6 THE WEEKLY ImMUUSlTAL RECORD.
Sw an imls IE ip thoe o Business Directory. c 'A'se, P. J. S". V"iwvlf MlP Sp. *-
"ctr BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
In a recent letter to the Manufacturers' F
Record by Mr. . Pters, pree rt of mE NOg, 9 10 Pm NAVAL STORE FACTORS.
he Te fw G., witi, he Ja.y : Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Resins
"The price of cotton, grain, etc., raised 1B0M ZAHM-S RanoPrN BOTl Strctly a Predmeers' Cempany. Cau es,
by the farmers has, up to this time, been 1u a. Bay Street. Grades a Wed ts G Mramted
practically controlled by chalkmarks made Saloon and Restauranrt. NseelyT rs D Jarl Olw at iPe.k.a Pf aCiMudlM $m1d Smm- .-
on blackboards in a room called exchanges Rooms. Open day and alht. Bettillnas
and located in New York, New Orleans old Stand. Crrespnude Slcited. JACKSONVIL. fL.
and Liverpool. These exchanges were ml-- 1.1.s
originally intended for places where buy- 8B 4 "" "tIlill ""* 0
era and spinners of cotton could protect
themselves by buying future contracts.
but they have been used by a lare clahs
of peculatorsad gambles t'ht d SOUTHERN STATES LAID & TIMBER COiMPAN,
idea of taking cotton that they bought or
delivering a merchantable character of
cotton that they sold. It is gambling 0 NVIsN M. WELC Ma..Kr.
pure and simple, to the great detriment
of the farming aad agricultural cla, as
they have sold the product a great many : F oi da V X
..bT b 0rlda Timber, Orazing S
times over, often below the cost of pro- Florida Tim ber, Grazi L
duetio .
ev'0." and-tBolfY I .UEY i Agricultural Lands.
"The remedies agiat this evil and to U Tfn D A 1 11
m ac a fair priee for our product are 0HlU ll r Sri ultural La
simple and can be put in effectual opera- !
tion I would sagept the organization of Commir Pecl>nI A
firms, and through that organization N Stor & Cotton 401-404 LAW EXCHANGE, JACKSONVILLE, RA.
would inist upon the market of their Liberal adsaces mae against ap-
produet slowly, not to exceed 10 per cent mesTT. ECHmI Nlam smd uI o LD1, 8 ft * *
a month. To aist the farmers in this NEW YOT E CIT. hSlIotteusues s WsI I* s slI*eutSII ooi uS**--- --<*
thee should be tablihbed throughout
the South warehouses suggested by the WHEN WAITING DVERTISS W. H. BCKlTH. W. B. HENDEBSON. B.. WASIM.
Soth tton Corption, whereby the BECKW TH, HENDERSON & WARREN.
farmer can place his cotton and secure a CYPRSS BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.
CYPRESS WATER TANKS *
warebhom receipt on which he can draw C
mey at a low rate of interest to liqui- Best in the World.
"'." ".'" "t". ". o .," ^-.^. =- LARGE TRACTS OF TURPEHTINE AID MILL LAiNS.
date say indebtedness to his banker or For delivered prices write, LRGE TRACTS OF TURPENTRE AND MILL LANK
merchant, aad enable him to sell at any CPmuess TafI Ce., N s aiA
time he is atified that he s ieu ing Rooms 1.2-3, First Natleal Bask asMMlf.
a fair price for his product. Mie TAMPA, : : : : FLMOlDA.
I consider 12 cents per pound a mini Ma"tee Caty Abstrt Compy.
mum price for this year's crop, as this L S. Jobaes, Abtracter. tI 1 SA I I I I 1 OOu I 1u I 8 8 1 I I
is the fifth year of short crop, with the Brad Jtow, Maatee Cetly, Rdd. --
propect of 10,0,00 bIale or under, and Complete and reliable books, titles perfected.
the fact that the European spinners have Taxes paid for non-resident property owners in IOMn D AKL nPi C w. BArItLaON. Vwea BAxR & AU P. r. a
contracts ahead for the sale of their prod- Manatee County. (amr & o Hol Cs.) (C a sam C) Gesin CAmL sed.
Loans negotiated for sonresidents on approved
net on a basis of 12 cents o the farm FtlOe ith it-eed rnFREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY
and that their warehouses are bare of cot- at '" per cent per annum, seml-nually.
Correspondence solicited.
tom for to fill their contracts, with the References furnished (' nepeT.)
prospect of the speedy settlement of the We ca cOllCCt yor f elght Clatms against
Rui -Japanese war and opening up W M AT Ralfroads aml StCaMSp CoMpeateS.
that section for the consumption of the We LARENDON, Charges Reaso able. Yosr Membersp Slcted.
products of our mills. re save rr& Ea treated. oatrdee or a 0 6r c ases
"This is probably the last year where Naval a t e CtyStores a Dm al-Vpr JAC. mlA.
crop will be made amounting to as much Naval Stores 216 .Dya .pchurh JACKSON IE rIA.
as 10,000,000 bhales, as with the increase mission Merchants.
of territory covered by the boll-weevil immISIOn Merchants.
ad the fact that in a short time 8,000,- R N IP TAR, T BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
000 bales will be a maximum Ameican GUQ TuraS, nU I wRI rT ezrm. rread. the fona.w,
crop, and 20 cents per pound a minimum 3 re q u rt ua Cmty. Sunnybrom k Ry or Hamna .. MU
price, I ee no reason why cotton should 13 Frol t Street, N1W T stage BottleA -....... ... ..
not go to 15 cents this cotton year. I will e.d four tm qurts of Somer Corn, Mewoo R e Gole Wae-
1" ary, Holand GIn. Tomi Gin. Peach Brandy. Peach and nemyr
It a to be hoped that the Southern A Whiey, in and Manhattan Cocktafs-any of the abey for ....... ..
Cotton Corporation will be inshape to O e bottle of any of the above ........................................................ .
S ou th a n ther bottles a the foioewig Californla Winae: OSerry. Part. Mment.
hale the erop of 1905, and there s no Catawba .............. -..............
doubt but what it is a move in the right, aile bottle ...
direction and will prove highly beneficial FOR THE pou3 bottles MWhiskem r a ......,... U *
to the promoters and the farmers of the l e bottles Duffy. t asU
South. With this corporation in the ngde bottl ..... U
hands of such able men as Mr. S. F.B. U NI OM IRYoods OI[r. oal cal Prics P" item. IIS Lr mail
S aqurs in jus from to .4 f. o. b. Jacksomvll.
orse and his aoiate, who from l THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD F. BETTELINI W. Bay St. opp. U4ion epet, JaMksemvi4, rl
experience thoroughly understad the needs
of the Southern farmer, and with his manufactures more of them
broad-gauge foresight is preparing for than all the printing and office K ingan's Reliablei "
them a way that will emancipate them supply houses in the South
from the exchanges which have been set- combined.
tin a price on their cotton for years, Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
and will place the power to name the Send all orders for Corn- Canned Meats B e, Butter, THE BEST ON E.
price where it belongs-in the hands of missary Checks, any color, any
the farmers of the South." denomination, padded or loose Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowet mr-
to the ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotatiom--
1-t m rd. ld *si2 l ted thispaper. O
i- t -dStril IC r GO., KINmAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
ARK YOU A a.Mm- TO Tt RCO?







17jI


STHE WEEKLY ijrA urklAL R GCOED.



SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY


Waycrows, Ga.
MANUPAOTURiER OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located hI the beat of the Lumber Dstrit gives a- dvas-
tage of sheleest mtertal at lowest cat.


Letter from Mr. W. IH Mayo.
The following letter was received from
Mr. W. .H. Mayo, woodsman for Johnson
& Bro., at Bruce, Fla, and contains some
good advice:
Bruce, Florida, Sept .16, 1904.
editor Industrial Reord:
Dear Sir: As I have been reading with
materet the different letters on the labor
4 W io" asd realizing, as I d!. the face
that something i necessary for the sp* *,y
adjustment of the cauae, I feel, as some
previous writers seem to, that the money-
iemling feature in turpentie work is fast
becoming detrimental to the financial ad-
vaeement of most of our operators and
eom a gaining view it eem that there
is am immediate help for it
As han been said by a former writer,
Sw-see the railroads, sawmills and other
large industrial concerns do not loan mon-
ey to common laborers; we also se that


those just mentioned do not have near
the labor troubles that the average tur-
pentine operator does.
When you lend a negro money, instead
of encouraging industry yo are paying
for an increase of idleness in your quar-
ters. If they can get money every pay-
day, work or not work, it reasonable
to suppose that they will acept the no
work plan. It is oftea uid that "if I
fail to get out I can get a few dollars
anyway." If they could only get money
when it was due them, they would do
one-third more work, and stay at one
place months instead of days and the-
work would be better. If the negro owes
a big account you cannot get as good
work out of him, as if he owed nothing,
and if the woodsman worries him too
much, he will go somewhere else and
then you ean think over the past and if
you forget him, look on your ledger
and see if the left hand column don't


make you pull your hair.
Now, my friends, if you operators will
refrain from loaning money to laborers,
keep bak a week at pay-days, only kemp
common groceries in your eommimary, let
the laborer live off the fruits of his labor,
cut only a few boxes each winter and
work them well, the labor question will
soon be settled. Respectfully,
W. EL MAYO.

Quitman Cooperage Co.,
QUI MAN. GA.
Manufacturers of

HIGH MC SPT EILS
According to speelaestiom of
Beard of Trade, Savannah.
Almo ake
Dip and Syrup Barrels.


bIi khfnIbN* L
BUILDERS AND D3A1LMS IN


" I


ENGINES. BOILERS.
CoUtt, Sawr,Frtli (O and b M]-
ab i and a Supp1 and EPaks
CAPACITY FPOR HAND
Machine Tool, Wod-Werif Mad r,
Shifting, Pulleys, Hans, sAs4--K
Rubber Bdlting adt Bees MaiLa ad
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans ad estimates frinlhe for Pewr
Plants and Stel Bridges.
Steam Pumps, Fead Water BHesem a
B Aittng ngims.
AUoUSTA. oA.


D. M. FLYNN, President

D. M. Flynn


W. B. JOHNSON, Vice-Preident


Walter Ray


J. W. Oglesby


DIRECTORS
L. Horn


N. G. Wade


A. 8. PENDLETON, See'y & Tres


J. L. Medlin


W. B. Johnson


Independent Naval Stores & Export Co.,

Jacksonville, Florida.




Naval Stores Factors and Operators.

Capital Stock, $5oo,ooo.

The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal advances made on consignments.
Our interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operative company.



Some Money and Some Timber For Somebody.


All Producers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.


TEL mCOmD s Tre sOn .=a'A-


p


I










W1


--- --


I


~jC)CjSSEjE~


2


r


*









B. THN WmEEY INDutkuIIAL RECORD.


IDmSTRIAL "OTMS FMR ALAAMA,
GEOO IA AMD FLOJIDA.

AlamamL
Birninghm-Coal mines.-- J. Fran-
eis, C. R. Atkins and K. B. Lantz have in-
corporated the Standard Coal Co., with
S15s00 eapitaL
Columbia-Mahine Shop.-A. A. Jones
ba let contract to A. B. Faulk for the
erection of brinck building 30x70 feet,
with L 20x40 feet, coating $2,00, to re-
place machine shop reported burned lasi
week at a los of $4,000.
Crudup-Iron-ore Land.-Republie Iro.
Iron & Steel Co., principal offie Stock
Exchange Building, Chicago, Ill., has pur
chased a tract of iron-ore land near Crud
up for development. Company has also
secured the mineral rights to several
thousand acres of land in this vicinity.
Motgomery-Drug Factory.-American
Drug Co. has increased capital from $10,-
000 to 25,000, and will remove plant
from Birmingam.
Piera.
bEatis-Telephone System.-- G. Whit
sett, Henry W. Bishop, Charles H. New
ell, W. B. Merck and F. A. Hall have or
ganied company to construct telephone
line; capital $2,00. Mr. Bishop was pre
viously reported as having secured fran
ehime for construction of telephone line
10 to 20 miles long and to organize com
pany for its operation.
Graeeville-Waterworks and Electrit
Light Plant-City has granted 10-yesu
franchise to Robert Boone, Marianna, Fa.
for waterworks and electric lights.
Jacksonville Mercantile. Incorpo
rated: J. 0. Chambliss & Co., with $5,00(
capital, by Barney Hart and others.
Miami-Tannery.-Reports state thai
Girtman Bros., handlers of dry hides anm
skins ar negotiating with Northern api
talists relative to the establishment oi

Palatka-City Hall and Fire Station.-
City has accepted plans by H. J. Klutho
Jacksonville, for proposed city hall am
fire station to cost $10,000; to be of ordi
nary construction, have electric lights, etc
Date of opening bids for erection has not
been decided.
Pine Barren-Lumber Plant.-The Nich
olson Lumber & Stave Co.'s plant wil
soon be in operation, manufacturing oak
ash, gum, shingles and slack staves. iur
company is incorporated with capital o:
100,000, and Win. T. Reager is its genera.
manager.
Tampa-Phosphate Mining. Tamps
Hard Rock & Plaster Co. has been incor-
porated, with $10,000 capital, by J. L.
Houle, C. R. Crevenston, O. W. McDonald
and C. H. Wing.

Adel-Waterworks. City has under
consideration the construction of system
of waterworks. Address the Mayor.
Augusta.- Water-distributing Station.
-Frank Sutter has made a proposition to
city to deliver 3,000,000 gallons of artes-
ian water to the city limits, the city to
build distributing station.
Oordele-Candy Factory.-It is reported
that John Macris, of Greenwood, S. C.,
will establish candy factory.
Cordele-Ice Plant.-It is reported that
the Cordele Ice Co. will erect another ice
factory.
Dublin- Public Improvements. City
will vote October 10 on the issuanee of
$45,000 in bonds for public improvement;
20,000 to be expended in erecting city


hall, $15,000 for extending watet
and sewerage system, $5,000 for imp
fire department, $3,000 for imp
electric light plant, $2,000 for buildii
nex to school building. Address The
or.


mains
roving
roving
ng an-
May-


Helena-Electric Light Plant.--City is
receiving bids on the construction of elec-
tric light system, and contract will be
let shortly. Address The Mayor.
Savannah-Flour Mill.-Savannah Mill-
ing Co. has been incorporated by F. R.
Clarke and W. M. Coney, with a capital
stock of $10,000, and privilege of increas-
ing to $50,000.

Car Shortage-A Remedy.
The Southern Lumberman has the fol-
lowing to say on the car shortage ques-
tion and offers a remedy which the In-
dustrial Record commends to its readers:
"The echo of the car shortage lingers
with the railroads and shippers year in
and year out. As soon as winter's freight
blockade is broken and everything is run-
ning smoothly on wheels, then the rail-
road people begin to plan to avoid a fall
car shortage, which car famine always
happens, just as it did the year before.
The car shops are put to work at full ca-
pacity making freight ears, but the out-
put is too small or the freight crop too
large. .Then comes a general freight con-
gestion, a blockade, stagnation of trade
and much cussing.
"September is on us and likewise the
car shortage; also the biggest crop of ev-
erything this country ever produced. The
demand for cars will be about ten to one
and the nine will have to wait from one
to thirty days for cars.
"The passenger arm of the railroad is
wise in the summer days, and about the
first of June they take up a big fat man
and haul him across the continent and
bring him back home for something like
-ne-third of the regular fare one way.
This gets business and moves the peo-
ple. Fully seventy-five per cent. of the
summer travel is induced by excursion
rates.
"Why not put lumber on a summer
rate and move it like a fat passenger-
make a summer rate on lumber one-third
off the regular rates, and it will prove a
blessing to the railroads and the mills,
and will greatly avoid the car shortage.
The railroads admit it costs them one-
third more to handle congested freight,
and the suggestion of a summer rate on
lumler of all kinds is wort the consid-
eration of the railroads and lumbermen."


H. ROBINSON Press. H. OAILARD. Omhler
W. B. OWRN. Viae-Pre.
Commercial Bank,
State Depstory.
BnAcnam: Oeala. 1Fu.. Lake Oty. rPe
Jaksmiolle, - -Flrida



ngO. R. OSIER.
MANUFACTURE OFI


BRICK.



Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.

'NE. .


e Ig 1 gi og ligie o I 1 gIal taI 1 1111111 tO l ll t 6I

MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


SBoilermaking and Repairing
0Still Boilers and Puaps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
Jelckaonvflle. Fla.
0e oo Ito$ Nt ettles@$ 18 eee161 Note f fe ll 8 --H186 -00-01

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and Blwcinmith Coal, Lime. Cement, P1Brk, P1i 41
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla



Cummer Lumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long L af Yellow Pine.
BOXES and CRATES.

*Standard Clothin***********************.**** **Co

SStandard Clothing Company |


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
S7 "ad 19 West Bay Street, Jackdmoevbl, RIMHdd
S Stetson and Hawes ata. Speeal Atteoutho Olve to ail Ornts&
*eeteteo*eoo*o***** o***o ****** o se*** o*a e *s 0
m m


Ia TOLAIR


J. H. HART.


T. I .LAOILY.


(EBtablishcd 1872.)

TOLAR. HART & CO..
160 FRONT STREET, NEWOYORK.


Commission


end Jobbers of Nevel Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of Nw
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futams.

JOSEPH D. WEED. H. D. WEED. W. D. KRESWu

J. D. WEED k CO.,
*SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OP

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Batting, Etc.


Read the Record Adv't's.


- OF U3 W01MW LARO MehZ PAPMLm


One Price


. R. TOLAU4 .


Merchants -








THE WEEKLY mDUlbIkrxUL RECORD.


ZINC NAILS


Turpentine Cups
AmIgoved by Dr. Berty. Made of a
-mlam butt oft light metal. They are
thN mft which will hot injure f
erws wha left in the tree 1

r9I NilM Co 0,
AM esif At. Mew Yrk, N. V. i
Aflo alldqurtr for Galvanised and t
Tnned Nails, Boat Nails, SpikeL Round f
Itm Rods, Etc., lasting and Roofing
Na BSators Tool, Copper Nails and




T.ypewriters

AU MakeM-$10.00 Up.

GRIVOT 'L"

Th~ Worriater, OatreR, writes in sight.
ho JFmrWZrr King of doeble-bead Ma-

is SW I Asy Make of Tyewrier.


THE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
MtraeL the plrt without adesrea the
wee" sie. Ru e oat a chalre ina than
twrty- our hor.L Makes from twenty to
OwW-t4 s GO ftr eal ea wof
Mahas We water white spirit fr trm
the oder et tar or acreote. No chemiaa s
es adt Mat the s-irit. Nees to b
Ji ol eamy es afur omatai fre -
lart.
No trbouI with Mb-preoduct the spirt
es to be far the anot W We pr-
nd san from woro. Only ame grde
of apirita proedend amd that the Mhiest.
ABOOLUTALY NO DANMER FROM FIRE
Bastt er amet material by Mhis-rad
weormem. The helspeat mialne oOered to
the peulim.
We afenge comperaon ot output and
mtr of prout. We smuaante ou
m4 q4aty.
TIe met hft Cstuctiu Cnpy
P. 0. Box s0O RAIMO. N. C.



Tailor-Made Shirts

THE KIND THAT FIT
















'SM fr ssw


s wi


F. S. BLACK
gE M OlBilW LU CA KL.
SSLL' m YS. C.t


Freh Our Atlanta Ofce.
Plans for the entertainment of the Nat-
onal Association of Manufacturers, which
rill hold its annual session in Atlanta
text spring, are being made by the At-
anta Chamber of Commerce. The direc-
ors of the Chamber of Commerce have
ixed the date for May 16, 17 and 18,
906.
The yellow pine sash and door manu-
acturers of the Southern States are meet-
ng in Atlanta this week. The object of.
,he meeting is to organie an association
for the mutual benefit and protection
of the sash and door manufacturers.
Every record of the Atlanta building
inspector's office for one month was liter-
ally slaughtered during August, when
there were issued three hundred and twen-
ty-three building permits involving a to-
tal expenditure of $804,956.
The end of the cotton season of 1903-
04 has been reached and there are just
210 bales of the staple in the local ware-
houses. At the end of the season one
year ago there were but 33 bales in At-
lanta. The total amount of cotton re-
ceived in Atlanta during the cotton year
1900-04 was 124,653 bales. The total ship-
ments amounted to 124,443 bales. During
the previous year 150,221 bales were re-
ceived here and the shipments amounted
to 150,188. The new cotton season which
has just opened promises a heavy yield
Judge J. H. Lumpkin, of the Superior
Court, has granted charters to two At-
lanta corporations. The new companies
are the Atlanta Automobile Company and
the Great Southern Medical Company.
A petition for a receiver for the Inter-
national Steam Engineering Company,
capitalized at $10,000, has been filed here
by William Jennings, who claims to be a
stockholder in the company. The case is
set for a preliminary hearing on Sept.
24 in the Superior Court.
Work on the new bridge on Edgewood
avenue over the tracks of the Southern
railroad has already started and will be
pushed along as rapidly as possible. The
Baltimore Ferro-Concrete Company has
the contract.
The Almand Hat Company has applied
for a charter in the Superior Court. The
incorporators are M. W. Almand, A. E.
'hornton and J. G. St. Almand, all of
Atlanta. The capital stock is $10,000 with
right to increase it to $50,000 by a ma-
jority vote of the stockholders.
C. B. Howard, for twenty-two years
prominently identified with the cotton
business in Atlanta, has been regularly
admitted to the firm of Inman, Aker
& Inman, one of the largest cotton houses
in the country.
President Harvie Jordan, of the South-
ern Cotton Growers' Protective Associa-
tion, has just issued a call for the con-
vention to be held in the main auditor-
ium, agricultural building, world's fair
Trounds, St. Louis, Monday, Sept. 26.


Big Demand fraM Africa.
The tarpaulin business is constantly
expanding. In the British possessions, and
especially in South Africa, it has displaced
the old flax duck covers for flat cars and
vans, wagon covers and tents. In South
Africa the cotton blanket has completely
driven out the woolen blanket and 2,00
bales, 200 blankets to the bale, are im-
ported by that country annually. Consul
W. Stanley Hollis places the cotton .im-
ports into the Transvaal for the eleven
months ended November, 1903, at 294,-
000, against 253,000 for the correspond-
ing period of the previous year.


TURPENTINE


CUPS.

If yon expect to use the NERTY ep
next season, place your order now r
future delivery. Prinm and all inform-
tion cheerfully furnished on
CUPS, GUTTERS
AND ALL TOOLS
u.sed in the Herty system of turpeatinlng.
Address

Chattanooga Pottery

.7 PRIKS 0o AmTi Xy,
PATIV PDaisy. T ee
COMpARATIVE PRICS 0F SPIRTs AT SAVIzz i n ma M M TRAM


April 1 .......................
April 8 ..... ..............
April 1 ...................
April 22 ..................
April 29 ...................
May 6 ....................
May 13 ....................
May 20 ...................
May 27 ...................
June 3 ..................
June 10 .................
June 17 .................
June 24 ..................
July 1 .... ..............
July 8 ...................
July 15 ....................
July 22 .................. .
July 28 ....................
Aug. 4 ..................
Aug. 12 ..................
Aug. 19 ........... .....


1904-06
ND
53

53%
54%
554

53%
54
52%
58%
52%
53
52%
52%
53%
53%
52%
53%
54%


1903-04
ND
50
49%
47
45
45
47%
47%
49
45%
46
46%
47%
47%
47%
48
49%
50%
49%
62
52


1902-03
45
42%
42%
43
42%-43
43
46
45
45%
46%
47%
48%
47%
45%
45%
44%
44
43%
43%
44%
44%


lsm-a


a
344
32%
31%-u
U

32L
31%
32%
32%
32

34%
33%
34%
34%
32%
34
-34


tMe
46
47%
47
48
46



%
a%
40%
44
a

30%
3%


Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advertisements Wil be Iaserted is rTs t pe rtment at tae Poew~ Anises
For aeo week. ents a le.
For two weeks, 35 eeatea lie.
For three week, oets a lime.
For four weeks, Set a iane.
Nine word of ordinary length make oe ne.
Head omuts as two liaes
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra care for cope off rT
containing advertisement. Copy must be i this oam no later t ha T-ln
m.orita to secure ineartio n riday's paper.


Wasted.
Woodsman and stiller wanted. Must be
well recommended, sober and industrious.
Address Producer, care Industrial Record,
Jacksonville, Fla. at

Wanted.
Wanted--mall trpentine farm of to
10 crop, with additional timber for a
crops. A. 0 Wright, Industrial Record
office, city.


Wanted.
A partner, with 18 to 25 thousand dol-
lars to put into lands, turpentine and
sawmill timber with a turpentine place
already in operation and large tract of
good timber adjacent that needs to be
bought Healthy country. Freight rates
cheap. Best opening in the country for an
investment. Not necessary for party to
be an experienced operator. Address
"Timber," care Industrial Record, Jack-
sonville, Fla. 4t

i ou ar thdnlkn of bifufY a
alee, o. sel theo ome a ave. -
tratlin It yu are timrldlg at tn-
veamtn In any 1m oturw a etr a wa M
to buy masiamer of -a asmid, 6 d
the Nmdhwda sse vmd, a petal e
t*ling Of y~ watMa.


TurpeRtle Meag
Buy a Blakemise Gasline Pumn Ot-
fit for your still No.1 oI t p-- SmM
gallons per hour at a eoat of a e-- O-
require ano attention whil
Started in one minute. J. P. IL
Ocal, Fla

Position Warted.


By experienced man as woodsman or
distiller; married and ema fr nish hat
references. Address A. J. T, eae In-
dustrial Record, Jacksonville, Fla. 4

For Sale.
35,000 acres St. Johns aad Voehat; 13,-
000 acres, DeSoto County; 14.00 acree
DeSoto County; 30,000 acs, Csaho
County; 20,000 acres Hilleor O amC y;
80,000 acres Manatee County. Al ram
timber. D. T. Doughtry, Boo 2 BaMld-
win Bldg. 4*

Stiller Wasted.
Wanted-First-class stiller, white man
with family. Can furnish good h
and will board with family. I wast a
man who is competent to take reaa
during my absence. Address P. ]. kar,
Camprile, Ila. 4%


TER RECORD IS THE MOpE&ATOES, NELIAUC


---- -- --- --- -------~-- ---Y-~








30 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. -


t----'~T------ --------- ---------l
J. .L PAnorr. ADam 8. HUM-mAn ArvIMB Pamr 3
Preasemt. Viee-Presdemt. OMber.

The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
Capital. $200.000. Surplus. $100.000
STATE DEPOSITARY.
OGeneal Bmaktg. Intaref Pa ido Savina Depoits. Safe Depoigit BOXas. 00 per Yer.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week


Spirits for the Week at Savarna.
Price Repts Sales Exp. 1908
Mon. Sept. 19 52 512844 057
Tues., Sept. 0 52 12 1387 325 57
Wed, Sept. 21 52 429 278 440
Thur., Sept 22 52%4 377 282 0 57

Rei for the Week at Savanah.
Monday, Sept. 19. Last Year.
WW ............. 6.00 4.00
WG ........... 4.70 3.85
N .. ........... 4.40 3.70
M .... .. ...... 4.15 3.70
K............ 3.75 3.45
I ........ ....... 3.00@3.06 3.30
H............ . 2.85 2.00
G ...... .... .... 2.85 2.25
F............ 2.80 2.15
E.. .......... 2.75 2.05
D .. ......... 2.70 1.95
ABC ............. 2.o02.65 1.8
Receipts 1,765, sales 1,582, exports 0.

Tuesday, Sept. 20.-Rosin firm. Market
unchanged. Receipts 4,122, sales 1,486, ex-
ports 1,576.

Wednesday, Sept. 21.-Rosin firm; H
advanced 5 cents a barrel ABC was quot-
ed $.65i and I at $3.00. All other grades
same as Tuesday. Receipts 2,152, sales
2,003. Exports 135.

Thursday, Sept. 22.-Rosin firm; mar-
ket to-day as follows: Quote: ABC, $2.60;
D, $2.65; E, $2.70@$2.75; F, $2.75@$2.80;
G, $L80@$2.85; H, $2.85; I, $3.00@$3.05;
K, $3.75; M, $4.15; N, $4.40; WG, $4.70;
WW, $5.00. Receipts 2,109, sales 1,534,
exports, none.

Bailey & Meotgomery's Review.
New York, September 21, 1904.
Spirits Turpentin--Stock, 473 barrels.
SThere has been more business during
the week than for some weeks past, and
owing to small stock here in first hands,
we have been getting full prices over
Southern quotations.
Thursday, Sept. 15-55c. asked.
Friday, Sept. 16-55c. asked.
Saturday, Sept. 17-551-2E. asked.
Monday, Sept. 19-56c. asked.
Tuesday, Sept. 20-56c. asked.
Wednesday, Sept. 21-56c. asked.
Rosin-Stock, 33,178 barrels.
This market has also been steady and
business fair-the pale grades, however,
more slowly. AC, $2.90 to $2.95; D, $3.00


to $3.05; E, $3.05 to $3.10; F, $3.10 to
$3.15; G, $3.15 to $3.20; H, $3.20 to $3.25;
I, $3.50 to $3.60; K, $4.10 to $4.15; M,
$4.45 to $4.50; N, 4.60 to $4.65; WG,
$5.05; WW, $5.35 asked.

Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 ........... 6,495 44,550
Receipts Sept. 22 ....... 377 2,100
Receipts previously .....116,783 334,687
Total ........ .. 123,665 381,346
Exports Sept. 22 ............ ......
Exports previously .... 99,477 299,616
Total .......... .99,477 299,616
Stock Sept. 22 ........ 23,738 81,730
Range of Turpentine and Rosin at Savan-
nah Sept. a and Same Day
Last Year.


Sept. 22 Sept. 21 Sept. 22
1904 1904 1903
Spirits 5219 52 57-
Tone Firm. Firm. Steady
Sales 282 278 583


Rosin Firm. Firm.
WW ... 5.00 I 5.00
WG .... 4.70 4.70
N ...... 4.40 4.40
M ...... 4.15 4.15
K ...... 3.75 3.75
S....... 3.00@3.05 300
H ...... 2.5
G ...... 0@?28 2.8 285
F ...... 2.75@2.80 2.80
E ...... 2.70@2.75 2.75
D ...... 2.65 2.70
C, B, A, 2.60 2.65


Steady.


4.00
3.85
3.70
3.70
3.45
3.30
2.60
2.15
2.06
1.95
1.80


Sale's. ,1 34 4 21003


Cypress Prices Current F. B. New York
Market. Lumber rough or dresed:
Tank stock, 11-2 to 3 inches, $48.7 to
$56.75; Firsts and Seconds, I to 3 inches,
$44.25 to $52.75; Selets, 1 to 3 inmees,
$3825 to $45.3; Shop, 1 to 3 ianhes, $2.2
to 40.25.
For prices on 8 inch add $12W 1,00 ft;
on 10 inch add $2 per 1,000 ft on 12 ine,
add $3.50 per 1,000 ft.
Bevel siding, 1-2z6 inch dear, D to A,
$11.75 to $24.25; ceiling, 3-8x4 or 6 inch
clear, D to A, $13.25 to $2426; 1-2x4 or 6
inch lear, D to A, $1800 to $27.50; 6-8z4
or 6 inch clear, D to A, $2.25 to $3g26;
Flooring, drop siding sad eling, 4 or 8
inch, D to A, $27.75 to $43.7


Crops of Spirits and Romans fr Thre Years
Crop IW-OL Crop 43"-M3 0a1 Uag t
Spirits. Rosin. Spirits. Bods. M i-. t_
Wilington... .. .... m 18,3 11,M 16,
Charleston.. ........ 3W 3,0a 11, 3 U
Savannah.. ...... ..178418 650,938 270,70 940,5 313,6 1*1
Brnnswiek.... ...... .6,05 184,57 68,947 2l44O,1 79, U,%
Mo e.. ...... .. ....1.. ,121 soe 18is9 79,X2 1M Sw M
New Orlean.. .. .. ..... 32,17 133,18 33,103 108,133 31,3 ,41
Ckrrabele...... ......dosed daoed 334M 33148 3 W7 4 W
Georgetown.. .. ... 7,51 44,14 10,37 463e Sag WM"
Peae--co.. .. .... .. 48sp4 205e I,2 5s sa3r, A
Jax. & Ferudins.. .... 187,10 a6310 91,978 375,1 70Ag SAM
Tamp .... .........closed closed 13 56 40 I 534 sk
Total...... ......6 5351 3,0,635 571,016 ,18,818 51g SAgMg,

Imports of Turpentine to U. .
The following table is compiled by James Watt & Son, of Loadon, frm the
ofeial returns. For onveniene of comparison we have turned ewts into b1ha
-320 cwt. equal 100 barrels.
1897 Is. 1899 1903 191 mg Im
From U. 8., bbl. .... 1565 173,786 149,375 174,446 193,42 1 6,lI 14
From France, bbl.... 161 244 617 2283 860 1s A--
From other countries.. 1,494 878 50 840 53 OM -
154,3 174,W 149,942 177,56 114 1 7, Id M
From Rusia .......... ,816 4,18 4,98 8,51 6,81 o1 n1 5
Total Barrels .. 1657,2 179,000 154,940 1 38,o 201,0zo 8 IMsm3 1
Thus the import of Russia Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 10 was deMb
that of 1902, and over six times as much as in 1897. It is interesting to beow
this import fluctuates with the price of American Turpentine.
Percentage of Import of Russian ..1.79 2.33 3.22 4.57 3.41 b5. IMM
Av. Price Amer. Turp. in ndoa ..21-6 24-6 34-1 35-4 27-1 331 4


Whlm Yen Ar e JasksewMe SteM At-1


WOLFE'S EUROPEAN HOTEL
Cerer urMe an Say Streets.
Rates 50e. 75 and 81.00 per da. First Class Restaurant in Connection. AJ I WOJI. --U *ag


R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KmenT, See. and Tas.

MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.


Herbert A. Ford,
President.


Geo. H. Ford,
Vice-Pres.


F. 11- WOi
cesba.


The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPI AL, $50,000.0.
DIRECTiro: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicdte.

AAA66666664844444@M4444b~b664t669444 / -


M. A. BRIGGS, Presdent
H. C. BURIGS, 1st Vice-President.


HOMER BDOWN, ed Vles.PtsaiL
J. C. McDONALD, S&6'y nad Tb


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903.04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


Recipts
Spirit, calsk .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. - -
R asin bck.. ...........................
Total.................................

To al .. .............. .................


', ibb ... ..... .. ..............


Roa s, bbs .. .......... .. .. . .. . . . . . .
Sks ... ......... ...............
Romn ... ...................... .....
RsNew Yor.


1908-04 11902-03 | 1901-02


198,647
650,988
844,586

188,398
752,270

98,884
888,171

35,658
87,853

59.351
826.746


292 496
940,507
1,238,038

296,430
975.428

206,109
504,178

42,765
138,121

87,556
387,784


814,846
1,071,440
1,385,786

814,876
62,687

217,446
585,042

53,797
129,059.

48,633
398.586


The of spIk me fs m Man IM6 by %W9 cahe and o f dRsl 2"560 buffs


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

1 VALDOSTA, GA.
1 Sole Southern Agent for-

i RIXFORD AXES.

S HThey are the BES. Others imitate but none du-
* plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the faest
temper, hold the keenest edge, cut better and last lege
i than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual use.
S Send us your orders.

SWW. H. BRIG6S HARDWARE COMPANY,
SVaieta, ewscsrgi
Si~0enanwwwwC;wwwwwwwanw9;enewn**)eet


THE RELIABnlTY OF OUR ADVURTMIZS VOU.CB3D OM


----'~~~


-


I 1,891










THE WEEKLY IHNuarAIAL RECORD. U1


AUTOMOBILE ES PUMPING OUlTHFLS


GASOLINE ENGINES,
Mad cQitel Anorahtn of Supl~a in the Satb.



Fred E, Gilbert
29 and 37, 39, 41
t Fosyth Street

I n i M


8. P. Hemes & Company's Weekly Cot-
ten Letter.
New York, Sept. 23.-Events for the
week have not been such as thoroughly
efuse the trade Under the influence
to widely varying crop estimates, the fu-
two market has rolled around like a
storm-teused ship in the trough of a sea.
There has been plenty of business, but at
ties the eorae of prices have been so ir-
reguar that the most decided traders
have not made very much money. A
week ago everything was very quiet with
pries getting pretty close to 10 cents.
No one believed that the price of futures
Serresponded with the value of spot cot-
tea in the South, so that there was
pretty good buying around 101-4 cents.
early this week an extensive short in-


terts formed around 101-2 cents and be-
low, and was forced into the market on
the unfavorable weekly weather report.
The narrow character of the market left
only a limited supply of contracts for sale
and the short covering lifted prices to
about 11 cents. Trading increased in
activity and the tone of the market has
been such as to keep cautious traders
from the short side. The market has had
too much the appearance that was pre-
sented around 91-2 cents to warrant any-
one in attempting the short side, how-
ever cautious he might be about bulling
cotton. The attention of the trade has
been attracted by the doings of Mr. Sully
and Mr. Price, whose circulars have been
respectively bullish and bearish and cir-
culated widely throughout the country.


ROSINS
WW WG N M. X I H
A- L .....6M 33.8M3.4W.M 2.5 2.46
Apol ... ...3.5 3LI 3ML ML 2.1 2.5 2.40
ADM 8 . .. LI M. M M3.6 &W 2..46 1
Au t. . a.W LS L5s LI 3. Ms 2.4
.eA Sl. ... 3 MB &3 U3 3. 2.M .R
"Mv a. . . L 5.5 3.L 3.6 2.5& 2-.5
May .. .. S .5 UI LA .1 I &L M S 3.5
agr I. . . as u. L L LO Ls
M1 W .. . ..L4% 3.% .17% 3.2% 8.0% 2.M7% .A%
ay .... . 5s 3 L26 US.1 2.
Ma. ....L. .5i M .B am M 2.4
J 5.. ....... 3.33 13 3 L65.
June. .... L L3 L S2.5 L 2. 2.o
Je M .... L.P L1U i a 2.LI LIS L
Jm ..... LS 3. e L 2. L. 2 .7L 2.5
UeIr a LSD aLe LIS ts o LSX
JtuOW .... ... 3. A L L2. 2.o 5 2.5
Jt 3.. ..... . L3 Ls L 3 2 2.L5 2.e 3
July M. . . .L LS LI 2.5 1 72. 2. 0
Juo in...... . 3.L1 LI LIS LIS .70 L26
JAugt ........ t L1 & 2 .1 S 2.L7 2.
JAualygt . .. L 3. 5 2.5 2. 5 2.76 M.
AJnU t . . .f 3.o L L 2.5 2L 2.
A ab t ... . W t2 5 L35 LI l 2. ML
A .... 3.4 3L l5 15 M1 2.3 24

September 4. . 7 3.L L.40 3.L3 L3 3 .0 2.50
ept.mbr n1 .. l S. l.3 S.4 3.L 2113 2.
September S. .. .. 0 W.3 W .6 32.6
September 5. . 4.5 4.19 3.1 Ls 3.I 3.35 2. 5
Oetaber 1. . 4.4 4.4 4.5 4.1 4.15 2-. 2.76
Oisber 3 .. .. .. 4.71 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.10 35I X.70
Ortber 5I .. .. .. &S 4.4 4.5 3.S 2.7
O. S* .. .. .AJI M 3LN M &Z1 2.6 2.65
dr 8::::.. 4.13 M X 1. 65 1.3 12.76 M
-e -- r.......5 &15 LO 2. 2. 2.70 2.t
Number .. ....as i .s 5.1 *0 a 2. 72.
ie.Wmber. .... W t M L l S 2.L 2.0 1
N memberr 5 .. ... M M .l 8 X 2.LI 2.OB 2.36
....ember .. .. 3L M 3.5 2S. i .3 2.55 2.54
Desmber 1 .... S 2. 3* L 2.M@ 2.5Z 2.35
D mbe ...3 If.5 3.5I 2Lo 2.O 2.8 2.5
December 29 ..&.. 3.13 31 2. 2.5 2.65 236
DeebeWr ...Mi LS LS 2.1 L.E Lo L49
Jaary 14 .. ..4.0 L. .5 1. s 2LO S3. t3
January a .. .. ..2 4J II t l S .10 Li 2.M
Juanay N .. .. ..4& 4.1 .5 3L L .s 3.36 3.15
Fernary 11 ..3.76 3.4 3.36 330 3.3 3.20 2.85
February 18 ...3.86 3.4 3.35 3.30 3.26 3.06 2.70
VdrTmry 25 ...3.70 3.50 3.35 3.20 3.26 2.95 3.00
irm 10i ...... 9 3.0 3.40 3.35 3.30 3.05 2.75
Mdak ......4 W ..750 3.35 3.26 2.95 2.70
MsIh 31 ......410 S.X. 3.J6 3J 2.5 2.70


F B D
Li L.5 2.5
LS.M t tol
I. 1. 1 LU
2.1 LU LIU
LI 1.W1 L7
LII LO Li
La 11 L7
LS 1.3 L7
LU L LI

La L 1.65
L7 L5 LI
LI W17 LU
LI L" L1.
L70 L6 LUi
LI L7E 1.
LI LW LW
LI LU LW
LM 2.1 LL
L2. LSD LU6
1. LM 1.5
2.5 2. LI.
220 2.1 2.60
LO LI in
L20 .a LOs
21 2.16 2.

2.46 X.6 2.3.
2.40 2E Ls
2.6 2.5 MB
2.3 2.5 2.5
2. 2.10 2.1
25 2.1 2.L5
2.5 2.5 2.11
2.I 2.10 2.1

2.LS 2. 2.5s
2.S 2.LI LA
2.26 23I 2.1
2.5 2.5 2.7
2.76 2.6 2.5
2.5 S.6 124.
2. MB5 X1
2.580 2.75 2.70
2.50 2.45 2.40
2.66 2.00 2.55
2.60 2.A 2.W0
2.60 2J 5L.50


for two years and notwithstanding his
failure last year in a speculative way his
estimate was probably as colse as human
ingenuity could attain. When he says
that the crop this year will be ten mil-
lion bales, the trade is interested, though
perhaps not convinced. The crop was cut
down last year by frost to the extent of
half a million bales, and any estimate
now must be made without the knowledge
of frost dates. It may be, of course, that
we are to have a killing frost at a very
early date and cut off the crop disas-
trously. Then again, we may have a late
frost, in that event the crop would be
fully half a million bales larger than with
an early frost. Mr. Price, on the other
hand, takes a bearish view of the outlook
on large receipts and poor trade. His
crop estimates are changed so frequently
every few months throughout the year
that figures from this source hardly claim
much attention. The result of conflicting
views has been to cause an irregular mar-


SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE.


To United Khindom, in
Month s61-06
April.. ....... 21I,4
May .. ..... .. .
June .. .. .. .. k1,5W
July.... .. .. m,17
Augu0t ......1. 26
September.. .. 71
October .. ....... 7T1.4
November .. 61,68 ]
December .. 1,A568W ]
January. .. Shs
February... 116,4A
March .... 35,2s0


gallons:


ILUI
Wall
40110.1
3.-



138,9110
936,36
1,76,11


16,681-
U49M
1110.30



576,784
164,aM
247,496
1I7VIG


Te Belgium and Netherlands, in gallons:
Moath a46- 1915- 1U1m-
April .... .. .. 2U 3 a.4 Included
May .... ...... n.WS 65 in all other
June ...... .... 507.41 21S*0 2urope
July .. .. .. s. 8 MInT NUM
Auust .. ...... 41M *L4
September.. ... 01 .11 41,
October ...... .. 14 216U 1,21.
November .. 133,65 349,720 381,2
December .. 100,372 68,80 67214
January .... 1688l, 241,10 174,3
February ... ,130 372,444 38601
March ............ 8,713 18,474

To ermQ ay. In gallons:
Moeat 16as54 1as--4I 14-
April ...... ........ U1.4. UUS
May ...... .. 9m3 1 .0 ats2 M
Jue.. .. .... a6s,1s a31. 4a.s
Tuls .... .... alms I, n7%T
Augst .. .. .. asm s.
september.. .. SSA S ~U1 71IM
October ...... WMS M.aSH 14U
November .. 179,010 110,13 81,780
December.. -
January .... 132,e00 64 0 1Ms3,
February ... 20,18 16,838 7,174
March .... 65,26 ...... 9400
To all other murope Ita allona:
Monta 1346 1 U- 125-4
April .......... .. .. ,4 ,
May.. ........ .,G 31, C74JU11
June.......... .35,3 1.0 0401
July ......... 65,0 1 24. 4C.4a
Augut ........ W0 UX0
September.. 4.3, 4.105 1,0
October .... .. 1M0.0 4,M 1T.
November .. 32,00 17,800 94,8
December .. 47,306 8,58 1 200
January .. 11,000 -
February 15,471 ...... 44,
March.... 14,180 12,27 36,00
Total Poreign Exports, Ia gallons, inelud-
lne everything outside of the United
States:
Month 11S44 19s- 1511-4
AprA ........ 14.4I8 1*1S S.I6
May .... .... a11.71 0.144 2ss6.s
Jane.. .... ....1.,.a0 2tam 2aa .11
uly ....... ...11 lS 1,61,e0L6 asa4
August ...... 1,73.,1M 2,60,46
September.. .. .1474.146 2.154 2, 3.N0
October .. .. .. 1.4L~ Sl 1. M LlAJ
November ..1,1,068 1,932,183 1,52,574
December .. 1993,59 1,794,336 1,859,175
January ... 700,12 80A,t3 MA,3
Febary .. 487,577 51,348 856,47
March .... 2o8,488 118,174 285,6


been somewhat hard. The supply of co-
tracts is so small and the question at
frost so important that we are not hl-
clined to the short side of the nottoa
market at the present time and wold
advice purchases on all recessions.

Cotton is the basis of rubber belting.
It is used in the airbrake hose on all rail-
roads, also fire hose, garden hose and au-
tomobile tires. The sales to these
branches of the trade alone amomut to
50,000,000 yards annually.


Sam'l P. Holmes& Co.

Stoks, Bmei, Cfttm,
Grain Mnt Provislem

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD Of TRAM
Direct private wires to all exnhanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.


ket, but in the main, the tendency has Bel Ploe 853


Baldwin B1lc


ILOSINS.
To United Kingdom, barrels M Im:
Month 12-8 1Ms8 216
April .... .. .. 1M9.as a ,4
May ........ e4,1 0.3M 6.
June .. .. .. .. .,LT4 .5M 38 56
uly ...... ... 656 suI
Auust ...... 74, aIa
September.. ... M471 4"s a
October .... .. a5 41. IM5t
November .. 71,107 93,736 43
December .. G14lS 4M664 T72,
January ... ,566 4VW 61U
February ... 28251 37,3 91,1
March .. .. 38,015 3,8 47G
To Belium and -etherlada, bma f M1
pounds:
Month 54-16 3645 30-
April ........ .7 SM lashing
ay .. .. ...... .=1 51tma anM ehr
June ........ U1 Ia. m s
July ....... .. 1, 6., 4=.n
Auust ...... 4e.M a.a
September.... 4L3 If 2.73
October .... .. n SN 45 r M
November .. 3,1 0,M 31,
December 37p7 13M4A5 O,3
January .... 6,%731 alU 1uLa
February ... 9,849 2,98 183
March .. .. 10,192 3,121 11,14
Te Germany, barrels lbs.
Mouth 316 1is4" 21141
April ........ 4 .54 6 sm
May .... .. .. nom G4 3.3 .l
June .... .. .. 4154M 4MB* SA
July .. .... U2 NA M- 5
August ...... 75 3.
September..... 3U 7 .4A W.
October .... ..I U. .14 1IM6
November .. 56,73 42,841 2373
December .. ,47 3,171 SAN
January .... 374,7 e 61 8 ,
February... 172,136 40,915
March .. .. 490,8 3,120 41W
To all other Europe, barrels SW Ibs:
Month 138-1 13948 I-1
April .... .. 5.I 31411 m,1
May .. .... .. .J1 4163 0,11
June.. ........ 14.M4 MW LRW
July .... .... 4M Slt1 14,M
August .. .. .. 8,' ,129
September.. .. 2,4 IT.318
October .... .. .L40 ,L4 L2,o
November .. 13,328 415 M2014
December .. 25,s 48,701 3,881
January ... 17,1 7,148 S34,6
February ... 38,184 42.54 56,
March .. .. 33,687 51,949 71,

Total Exports of Rosa, bbarrels 13 pouda,
Including Asia Africa and Ameriea oet-
side of the United States:
Month 19-54 13- 1s 4-
April ...... .. U0Mn Iu1 S
May .... .. .. 11s.m u 2a 41 a s1
June .. .. .. .. 17m sZtMB satU
July .. .. .. .. ,* 1uff.2 1i.
August .. .. .. a3.15 2.2
September..... a6. 335 I I
October .. ... 28M8 S5".M 125
November .. 184,80 231,543 2M,47
December .. 210,457 20 ,6 19144
January ... 192,471 170,m 7,8
February ... 306,000 181,812 27,24
March .. .. 171,48 204,433 14,13


THE RECORD CIRCULATED ALL OVER THE WORLD.


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- 1904.
bfIKl I b OF TURPENTINE
Ar. I Apr. 8 Apr. I Apr. r1 Apr. M ay 1 May 8 May 1 May 2 May Y
ND IND V A 14 3 14 4-1
ati Me s June n June July 8 July l July 17 Jaly l 7 July 1 Aug. c
684 a a a a % ss1-4 a 6 -
Aug. U Aug. a Aug. Oept. 4 Sept. 11 Sept 18U Sept. X Oct. 2 Oct. Oct. 13
rAf U1 W WA H4 -4 7a ND M RM 14 1-0 94
Og. M Ot. 6 Now. 4, Nov. 1, NWo. *Dec. 1 Dec 1 Dec. 17, Dec. 31, Jan. 14
n 513 a a 8 M 5 W 1-4 14 1-2-4
J-a. 22, Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18,Feby. 25 Mch. 3 Meh. 10 Meh 24
be 64 a a s a 68s

a


I










1* Ia 3TEM WEEKLY MbUSMIAL RIMOUD.


WNDJSTRIAL RECOR.D.

AAMMS A. EOLLOPMOW

3*hwrar end *amadsr.4
COMEE~a ss jr Am!-m


-The Pus. a" 111 re0umsm.


Al smm---kase oebls he nmamse
the k"aduteil Rleora Company.
Jal ft i e h rifta.
seem& Edasmfsal end Business 0o6megat
Adoms. Ga. ft Sawanrnh. Ge.



hdoptedby te tie O mttee of
t T t Opeatoes Ano-latiot,
Iap-ar I, its ezlnd odO

r-1rb I. a the organ ase of the
Adiept Arl 7th, M a the aedal
m- et thbte t tat Ct s Growers A-
latir. Adopted St. 11, 1901, as the
a*y .fh orpga the T. 0. A.
0.mnied fa huberb people by special
abIsll m doptd by the Gorgia Sawmill
Associateon.

COX FOR ADVETxUnig.
hoetliIng espy (chang or mt ad
wmtins) shmuM zesah us Tueday


TIME REKCOR Ip OFFICES.
The puuhg plnt =An the no&n Od-
el an ther oilu rtod ter Pubda
C m fn liet s at Ms. ed Seth H n
ktast, jade rrife, V1.., ti the vey hart
t the gmlt mtup ti ind y=as ai-

the Athstma Ge, else in hise to the

the ctdr of the CP at maudCtbaI m

Tno Slw isna, Gil, ies int the Dear
It Trae bmilat t Savmak in the har-
mg onai nl tlaem t ta the vrwd

"OPRATORS SUGGESTION&.
SI another column of the Record is i
eommeies. tion signed "Operator" in
whek the correspondent advocates a close
erportion, in which all naval tore op-
eators shall be stockholders, to control
whelly ad absolutely the entire naval
te It business in all of its phaes. If
eah organization could be perfected
a right lines i might be satisfactory.
It has any a advantages. O the other
head there would be danger of the Sher-
*n awti-trust law; there would be dan-
ger of a war with exporters and consum-
ea; there would be danger of "over-doing
It," to use a homely slang. The Record
believe in co-operation; it believes in or-
gamiation. The prosperous condition of
the industry today is largely traceable to
these two ba principles. At the same
time it believes in conservatism. It is a
fact that most of the factorage houses
today are organized along mutual lines.
Operators and factors are now practically
eve and the same It is a fact that the
Turpetie Operators' Association is do-
ing a wonderfully good service in controll-
lag output, regulating labor, etc. Opera-
torn should live closely to this organize-
tiM. Its value to them has been pe-
mamseal. They should be personally in-
terested in its success and in the achieve-
nt of the purposes in view.
The Record does -not believe in doing
tbir rashly. At the same time it bas
beea, nad always will be the earnest
friend of the best interests of the opera-


tors and whatever is for their good, so
long as it is along fair and equitable lines,
the Record will champion.
Great undertakings need to be worked
out with great care, and we do not be-
lieve that conditions at this time are
entirely satisfactory for making the sug-
gestions of "Operator" practicable. In the
meantime, however, we would be glad to
have expressions from our various readers
regarding the matter.


Deposits of Natral Fertiliser in the Soth
One of the resources of the Southern
States about which little is known out-
side of this section, is comprised in the
deposits of natural fertilizer which are
known to exist extensively in at least
three different States. The phosphate in-
dustry may be considered both old and
new, for in South Carolina it has been
carried on fully a half century, while in
Tennessee it is of recent origin: In spite
of the quantity which has been secured
from South Carolina, undoubtedly but a
small portion of the deposits have yet
been worked, and these, with the other
beds, form a resource of the South which
is possessed by no other part of the coun-
try.
Fortunately the South Carolina beds,
as well as those in Florida and Tenns-
see,. are comparatively easy of access,
being located near railroad lines or navi-
gable streams, so that the material can
be readily shipped to market. The Coo-
saw river in South Carolina apparently
runs through the center of the more ex-
tensive beds, and the material extracted
thus far has been of a high quality. In-
dications point to the existence of the
substance in a district which covers a
very large area. Much of this as yet
has not been thoroughly examined on ac-
count of the swamp lands which com-
pose it and the consequent difficulty in
securing the deposits.
With the use of steam dredges such as
are employed in Florida it is believed
that the industry can be carried on over
a much wider area in South Carolina
than has thus far been the scene of op-
erations. As it is, however, the city of
Charleston has been one of the principal
distributing centers of commercial fer-
tilizers in the South, owing to the exist-
ence of the beds referred to, and for
many years before the Florida beds were
worked its companies were among the
principal competitors of the concerns fur-
nishing guano from the West India isl-
ands to the Southern planters.
The value of the South Carolina phos-
phate aroused such interest in this kind
of fertilizer that other territory was ex-
amined for indications of it. Undoubted-
ly it led to the discovery of the mines,
as they are termed, in Florida, which
have produced such a tonnage within the
last fifteen years. Investigation which
has thus far been made of the Florida
phopshate beds shows that they extend
a distance of fully 250 miles, although
the chain of beds is by no mean contin-
uous. The counties of Polk, Citrus, Mar-
ion, Alachua and Lafayette contain beds,
some of which have been worked to a
depth of forty feet below the surface.
Probably the Peace River region is the
most noted, for the Peace River Phos-
phate Company may be considered one of
the pioneers. The phosphate from the
deposits referred to is divided into three
grades: The first contains at least 77
per cent. of bone phosphate of lime..The
second grade contains from 68 to 73 per


IrOTHInG SUCCEEDS LIKE SUCCESS."


cent. of bone phosphate, while the third
grade is supposed to contain from 58 to
13 per cent. The latter is principally
obtained along the Peace River, while the
best grade has thus far been found be-
tween the towns of Dunnellon and Croom.
Apparently the range of its beds is about
forty miles. The second grade is per-
haps more extensively mined than the
others, but frequently all three may be
found within a radius of a few miles
from a given point.
Geologically speaking, the Florida phos-
phate exists in the form of the rock, the
conglomerate and the drift or pebble phoe-
phate, the latter being found principally
in the beds of streams. The rock phos-
phate is, perhaps, the most uncertain
quantity, for indications may point to
the existence of a very deep bed which
when thoroughly examined, is found to
be merely a "pocket," containing, perry
haps, only a few hundred tons. The con-
glomerate, as the name indicates, is com-
posed of rock and phosphate sand. The
figures above quoted indicate the really
great possibilities of this industry in
Florida alone. Unquestionably much ter-
ritory which will produce the material
in paying quantities has as yet been un-
touched, since the miners have confined
their attention principally to the locali-
ties mentioned. Florida is the least known
of any of the Southern States and it is
not improbable that the phosphate beds
may extend over a greater area than that
which has already been estimated. But
if mining was conducted throughout all
of the region where the material is known
to exist, the output in this State alone
would be far greater than at present.
Unfortunately, the development of the
industry in Florida especially has at-
tracted the attention of promoters, who
have formed companies more for the pur-
pose of selling stock and bonds than for
engaging in legitimate mining. They have
proved an injury rather than a benefit,
for largely through their influence spec-
ulation has been indulged in on a very ex-
tensive scale, with the result that a large
amount of capital has undoubtedly been
keptout of the State in the past by the
extravagant prices asked for land. The
records of the State show that since the
beds have been discovered, companies
representing over $50,000,000 in capital
stock have been organized ostensibly to
engage in phosphate mining. Probably
not over 25 per cent of this amount has
ever been placed in the industry, but the
investment of $12,500,00 in itself shows
the importance of this feature of Southern
development.
The phosphate industry is largely res-
ponsible for the growth of some of the
principal seaports of the State. The ex-
port trade of Tampa consists principally
of this material. The business has so
expanded that a large outlay has been
made for phosphate elevators, wharves,
and other shipping facilities, and annual-
ly a large fleet of vessels carries this ear-
go exclusively to domestic and foreign
ports. Phosphate is the principal ex-
port from Punts Gorda, which is the
second seaport of importance on the west
coast of the State, while from Fernan-
dina on the Atlantic coast are sent from
125,000 to 1.50,000 tons annually.
It may be said that the outlook for the
industry in Florida at present is fairly
encouraging, despite the fact that com-
petition of other kinds of fertilizer has
been increasing within the last few years.
The Florida producers are securing the
product largely by the use of dredges,


which greatly reduce the expense, as som
of these dredges will extricate from the
beds as much as 2,000 cubic yards in t.
hours. An extensive mileage of rariead
lines has also been built through the prim-
cipal producing regions with sidings entr-
ing the property of all the large mintg
companies, so that in many instase the
raw material can be loaded dired-y pe
the railroad anr from the beds withol
the employment of hand labor. while
most of the phosphate is converted ipat
the commercial product at the saibkta,
a number of crushing mills and other
plants have been erected in the mii-
region in order to economies the cast of
production. As it is, however, only the
highest grade of phosphate is s et t
of the State in considerable quantities.
This is partly due to the cost of ril
transportation. Probably the most ex-
tensive phosphate mines in the country
are those located near the towns of Do-
nellon, Bartow and Fort Mead, which -
near the principal centers of activity.
The deposits in Tennessee have only
been worked since 1804, but have bhe
investigated sufficiently to show that
they are also extensive. At present the
principal activity in the State nlasiel
comprised in Hickman and Maury cm-
ties and vicinity in southwestern Teema
see. From this section the principal per-
centage of rock and the conglomerate is
being obtained. The formati is sek
that it can he secured at a mini-m
expense, much of it lying directly ap*
the surface. Some of the companies s-
cure it by the use of horse srapers, whle
the bulk of it is probably obtained by the
use of the pick and shoveL Really iut
little mining in the ordinary ame of ft
term is required in Tennesee.
As an evidence of the importance of
this resource to the State it may be sId
that at present the annual outpt ago-
gates above $1250,000 in value. Mart'
it is prepared for commercial use in the
vicinity of the deposits, the largest plat
being located in the vicinity of Maut
Pleasant and Centerville. These re
equipped with crushing mills, elevars
separators and are so constructed t&a
the ground phosphate can be loaded 4d
reetly from the mills into the raiend
cars for shipment if desired, altho
much of it is sacked fqr the market.
The Duck River valley appears to be
the location of the most extensive de-
posits, and the beds have been traced in
a direction running from southeast to
southwest for a distance of over ft
miles in the two counties mentioned.-
Tradesman.

The navy uses an immense amount of
khaki duck running from eight to eighteen
ounces a yard. A manufacturer who -p.
plies a large portion of this material for
our navy says more cotton duck ia ami
by our navy today than in the days who
sailing vessels constituted our men-f-
war. In this connection it may be stated
on the same authority that the delbte
of the sailing vessel has not produced ay
decrease in the use of cotton duck. for
ships. Although sails have been displaced
by steam, cotton duck is used so extem-
sively for awnings, coverings for lauehas,
etc., that the amount of material used re-
mains the same as it did in the heigh
of the old clipper trade.



advOtlseuanata) dbod Naas
Iwesdaw mermanu to0 msone enseh
om 1e 1 e o the mm wer.









THU WUNKLY MIDURThUL flZOORD.


U=ITO *TATUIS O6OIMOTORY NO. 6896.

THE ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
&a *& w r ro "es o w e 1 M r wss ee v av "M owsm s OPa eel
MAISON t. 19004.
oorca s LuJAMLMIr
l-o-s m Dbeouats.... ..........SI. ,1MO.0| Capital Stock p idn ............... fhMSj.O
-----------a rm::::::::-- -
se..tt...... ..... ........... ..L.. so............ I. =96

s a y ............. o Dep t ..........................
Dls i s U. S. ~M Trer.......... .. IO OO To .............. ............. U. OMaC D1 e from oter Bnks..... 5aMt
g a .. ............................b la ssasiBm l h
---**9-***ses281111622*a82*e Iossese IkII'&s*toIelse I


Title and Tax Abstracts.
Conveyancing. Township Maps, Blue Prints.
We give special attention to preparation of Title and Tax Ab-
stracts, Maps, etc., of large tracts in all parts of Florida and South Geor-
gia. To owners and intending purchasers the results of our work are
valmaa se ata.e
Correpondenea solicited.

MRALTY TITLE AND TRUST COMPANY
Law sange Bdullf JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
L;


Wants All Operators in One Gigantic Corporation.

Ocala, Florida, Sept. 17, 1901. later I found out the negro was controlling
Auditor Industrial Record: the situation I want to say it is no joke
We have all returned home from our that the negro has done more in the last


association and from expressions heard
after its closing, session in Jacksonville
adl on the train, I feel like everyone is
sre our meeting together has done some
goat
We have met before and passed reso-
ltions and did not live up to the letter
of them. One thing is very plain, as plain
as daylight, that if we ever needed a close
organization it is now. We need an or-
gamiation that will be effective in con-
trlling everything they undertake. Let
those undertakings, however, be honest
ones and for the best interests of the
busiwe as a whole. We want such an
oripu tion and if we ever have one, it
must be composed of the people who pro-
done and manufacture naval stores only.
It Yill never do to let into such an or-
gadsattla any but owners of pine trees,
held by deed or leases. Why can't such
an organization be perfected? I sincerely
hbelee it can be done if we will just do
a little thinking and figuring for our-
selves. It is both practical and possible
to organize a company or association. It
makes no difference what name is given
it.
First by agreeing with each other to go
in together for purposes of our mutual
beaefit and profit; then elect a committee
of may fiteen good operators and let it
be their duty to value the different prop-
erties of each operator who will join with
us in this movement; let the association
take titles to all the property, both real
and personal, and issue stock for same
when organized and charter is granted, de-
ducting, however, from amount of stock
all debts due any factors, the new associa-
tia paying the same. Now, Mr. Editor,
if the turpentine operators will all come
together in an agreement of this kind.
elect good men to govern at fixed salaries
for services they render, we will have
control of our own business for the first
time in twenty years, or since most of us
quit working for wages. When I worked
turpentine for a salary I controlled my
business very well, but sine I went into
business as operator, I have been con-
trlled by some other power all the time.
iPrt few years the factor controlled me,


three years to keep down production than
the operators have done. For the past few
years 1 have learned that the new woods-
man is also to be considered, because the
negroes love him so well they will follow
him where he goes. When he is gone the
operator generally finds his commissary
empty and nothing in the cash drawer,
not even a little postage money. That's
where the negro's love originates. Iast,
but not least of those controlling powers
is the exporter. Will any man of common
sense deny today that he is the master
of our business, and have we not for the
last two years let him hold our destinies
in his hand. I for one am willing to have
one vote in the control of my affairs
rather than let one man or a few men die-
tate the price I shall have for my product
without consulting me at all in the mat-
ter. I will admit that the factors are
our friends from the fact that they are
now mostly interested themselves as ope-
rators and we are under obligations to
them for acting as a go between or our
only mediator and the good prices we
have enjoyed are largely due to
the fact that they have plead our cause
to the best advantage under the circum-
stances with the master.
The dividends on stock in an associa-
tion as above indicated would be over
100 per cent per annum, or at leat 50
per cent more to each operator than we
are making now. We would save the
profit the factors are now making. We
would save the proft the exported are
making. We would save rents and other
expenses that we all have to pay. In
other words, the business could be man-
aged at a much cheaper cost, the labor
problem would be solved, we would con-
trol the production, the price and every-
thing connected with the business. We
would insure ourselves a good living while
here and leave to our children a heritage
for which they will rise up and bless us.
Is it so under present conditions? I say
no. In a few years our pine forests will
be gone and all we can promise to our chil-
dren or expect them to be will b hewers
of wood and drawers of water, mostly
drawers of water as there will be but lit-
tle wood for them to hew.


C. H. HARGRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain. Hay. Feed
Specal attention to Turpentie and Sawmill lm' e Ra lai m
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514 516- 518- 520- 522- 524- 526 EAST BAY wa NLL

Jacksonville, Fla.

GOUGIA rINTr-STATE SAW MILL ASSOCIAmT2.
Minimum Coaetwie Price List for imcantable Rle 19e04. Adeti at Ttft,
Georgia, Jalyls, 19a0


SFaeet I Feet j Feet Feet I Feet I Feet Feet I FeetI Feet I Feet
* SIZES 20& UI 21-25 2-30 31- 41-4648-G 61- if
1 xIo to 2x10.... $12A.5N1 4ix i4J.a6 a
* 2%xlo to 8x10.... 12.00 12.50 13JO 14.00 16.50 17.40 20.00' 2.M 2M X.6O
: 8txlo to 10x10.... 12.50 1300 14.00 15.60 16. 1i860 21.00 tO M M W37


1 xlI to 2X .... 14.UO 16I.B 6MW I&.U l1.0w 2(.L KUW UM 8m
2%xl2 to 10xl2.... 13.00 13.50 14.50 150 1850 21.00 4.50 2 a 2U 34
101/x12 to 12x12.... 13.50 14.00 15.50 17.50 19.50 22.00 50 3000 MM
1 x14 to 3x14.... 1.00 19.00 2o 22.00 24.50 27.50 32.00 37.0i 4i4.
31x14 to l2x14.... 14.50 160 1&800 o20.50 .00 24.O M t00 3. 4MI
12%4l4 to 14x14.... 15.50 17.00 19.00 21.00 22.00 200 30.00 456M 4i.


N.s0
MS


1 xl6 to 4x16.... 2050 22.00 24.0 7.50 31.00 34.00 3800 42.O W S W
4%x16 to l2x16.... 19.00 20.00 22.00 250 2.00 31.00 35.00 36J6 4100 8 mi
12%xl6 to IxrlG.... 19.50 20.50 23.00 26.50 30.00 33.00 37.00 41.I i
2 xl8 to 6x18.... 24.50 25.50 28.50 31.50 35.00 39.00 43.00 49.00 719
6%x18 to 14x18.... 21.00 22.00 900 29.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 46.00 57.@0 J
14%xl8 to 18x18.... 23.00 24.00 27.00 30.00 34.00 3800 42.00 483 0.M 748J
Terms: Met Car.
Price mae F. 0. I Can Savanaem Brunmwic, eaaaf a and JadwiaaO


NOTICE.
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Association, held at Jacksonville,
Fla., March 15, 1904, the following Classi-
fication and Rules for Inspection of Yel-
low Pine were officially adopted, effective
July 1, 1904:
Clafieation and Inspectiek f Yelew
Pine Lumber.
General Rules-All lumber maut be
sound, well manufactured, full to ise and
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;
through shakes, or round shakes that
show on the surface; square edge, unless
otherwise specified. A through shake is
hereby defined to be through or connected
from side to side, or edge to edge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken;
less than one inch thick shall be measured
as one inch.

CLASSIFICATION.
Floerlag.
Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: lx3,
4, 5 and 6; 1%x3, 4, 5, and 6
Boards.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
inches and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %, 1, 1% and 1% inches
thick by 7 inches and up, wide.
ScantHig.
Scantling shall embrace all sizes from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2x3, 2x, 2x6, 3x3, 3x4, 3x5, 3x 4x4,
4x5, 4x6, 5x5 and 5x6.
Plank.
Plank shall embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness.
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1%, 2,
2%. 3. 3%, 4, 4%, 5, 5%, 5%x7 inches
and up in width.


Dimension asises ah embrace al el m
6 inaee and up in thi Iea s by mas
inches and up in width, idin"g S
six. For example: 8x, 6x7, 7x7, 7x8, .
and up.

8teppig shall b e to two ald
baha nhe i thickest by aevm Whim
and up in width. For emample: 1, 1%,,
1%, 2 and 2%x7 ad up, in widt
Be"&h Eg er 7N16t.
Rough Edge or FWith shal esimrae at
siaes one inch and up in thiknes by eight
inches and up in width, sawed on two
ides only. For example: 1, 1%, 2, 3 4
and up thick by eight inelhe and up i
sawed on two sides only.


INSPECTIN.

Al lumber shaB le roaad, sa ob-
jection. Wane may be allowed ope-gth
of the width of the pice measar ae
face of wane, etdlng one-fouit of ta
length on one corner or as equivalt, on
two or more corners.
NrLmmtak
All sizes under nine iees shall ow
heart entire length a oe side or eidp
siaes nine inches and over shall aow
heart the entire length on two opposite
sides. Wane maybe allowed ons-ight of
the width of the piece menared reaa
face of wane, and extending oae-fourth of
the length of the piece mna es earnr or
its equivalent on two or more earmra
Prime.
Scantling shall show heart o two faces
the entire length; other sims shall show
two-thirds heart entire length o two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
cent. of the pieces, wane may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the piece mes-
ured across face of wane and extending
one-fourth of the length of the piece ea
one corner or its equivalent ea two or
more e "ers.


FOR SALE.
50,000 acres timber land in Western lorida. Tract will cat one hundred an
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Ha been turpentined and ready for the
mill. .5 per acre. Mill near the timber can be lead for term of year, or e
be purehbaed. One of the best opportunities in the State.

C. BUCKMAN, W..,".",..S',-


OFAM16 auua*#Ubrm AND 10iG33SSIV"


ar- 0


1 ,


"I
4

I








4- THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RBOORD.


This Spae Beserred for


Gus Muller & Co.




Liquor Merchants

Proprietors




...Antmef...


ACME BEER


They Ane Mim

GMRM'S CATALOG

-ee wsle Ima




Sa--- *********



Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon '
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Cetrotler. Blum's Monograme d Syl
va Rye-Agents for Jung, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.


-CHAS. BLUM & CO.
17 and 519 West Bay Street.
JACKSONVILLE, FIA.


It is clear to me that an arrangement
as indicated would not work a hardship
on any except the Shylocks who are bleed-
ing us to death. There will be a job fewer
every man now engaged in the business.
It will not affect the groeeeryman or any
other merchant, the blacksmith or the car-
penter. We would not make or go into
any schemes tofreeze out or enter into
any entangling alliances to crush any
other legitimate enterprises, our associa-
tion being simply a protective one. We
would need no special legislation to pro-
tect our forests. We would do that with-
out legislation. We would need no labor
laws, for would protect them ourselves
under our present system of government,
but we could assure them work for years
to come and that with good prices for
thm-ir labor. They have no such assurance
under our present way of doing business.
Any common negro knows now that our
business will last for a few years only
under the present way we are destroying
our forests.
Is it not a good time now with low
prices staring us in the face for the next
season, with the prospects of a large num-
ber of new operators coming in tme busi-
neis and the unsettled labor conditions,
to be up and doing? I think the operators
and factors should rise above and lay
aside personal feelings towards them-
selves and brethren and get together in a
business way and perfect our organia-
tion on some basis that will be beneficial
to our common interests.
What say you all?
OPERATOR.

Failures Recorded for Auust.
According to figures given out by the
R. G. Dun agency, commercial insolven-
cies in the United States during the month
of August were 900 in number and $10,-
491,498 in amount of defaulted indebted-
ness, comparing with 812 in the corres-
ponding month last year, when the
amount involved was $10,877,782. Manu-
facturing disasters numbered 198 against
241 a year ago, and liabilities were only
$3,030,570, compared with $7,74886. The
numerical increase was provided by the
trading class, 682 largely exceeding the
544 in August, 1903, while the indebted-
ness was $3,728,468, against $296,352 last
year. The improvement over 190 as to
liabilities in the manufacturing class was
almost offset by the extremely unfavor-
able showing in the third division, which
embraces brokers, dealers in real estate,
transporters other than railways, and sim-
ilar concerns not properly included in
either of the two principal classes. Here
there were 20 suspensions, with liabili-
ties of $3,732,460, comparing with 27 de-
faults for only $182,745 a year ago. Five
banks were forced to close owing $383,000,
against eight failures in this else last
year, when the amount involved was $871-
075. In addition, there was one bankrupt-
cy of a large stock company, probably due
to overeapitalization, which did not stop
the. operation of the various plants, and
hence cannot fairly be included with the
manufacturing suspensions.

Cotton duck is the basis of enameled
cloths, such as the so-called leatheroids,
which for many prposes is better than
leather. Millions of yards are used an-
nually for wagon tops, cushions, water-
proof coats, etc. Both drills and ducks
are used for the garments known a
"slickers."


W RILEY,
PresMeu.


J. A. a CARSON,
Vicke= ealtefi.


SE.G. J. SCeWL,
Sec Aw IV9


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS
Machine and Hand Factories,
8th Street R. R. Crossing.


JACKSONVILLE,


lovRIDA


The West.Raley-Rannle Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, JacksMvllle, Fla.
A S. r, Pres. e. Z. West, ric-Pres. W. R. Ramse rVce-Pres. N. r. 1aor,0 Sme. a s.

We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

- !"*****.' *************.******** 0 0*****"- 00 0000
You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmnll Location?
IF YoI Want any Kind sft Forida La-?
* You Mean Busies?
* C Ml n wr Wrte to
SJ. H. LIVINGSTON A SONS,
Ocala. Florida
S.~)~~~~~++~+D))~~~~+~


W. J. LXZNGLI
President


J. W. WADZ.
Vice-Preadeat.


SG. HUGE=&
Sse- Tress


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirobt-
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.

Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.



CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS,

AND VATS.

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
ME. G DA VIS k 8OT, iPAJTIrA, FLr

A. & SLTOU. W. IL.JsUS JA. LASmcFra W. W.^W
ps5jgL WAc Po. G ass MmW. Aest. Tremmmrm

5he W. B. JOHNSON CO..

Wholesale Grocers
440-4-40-40 Est i-yteet, Jlns. la.

T. W. Ma Us w. rama L e


PATRONIZE RECORD ADVKRTISERS FOR SATISFACTORY DEALING.









THE WEEKLY INUUITKRIAL RECORD. I_







THE COVINGTON CO.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.





Wholes al6 SHOES -
Wuholesale: DRY GOODS.



"Success For Our Customers is Success For Us."


ew FVis ft Usftaln for Cotto.
A writer in the special cotton issue of
the New York Comercial says:
Cotton to-day stands at the head of the
word's textile products. Not only has it
wa an ever growing place for itself, but
in numerom lines where it competes with
wool and linen it has displaced both. The
eonumption of cotton is more than twice
a great as these two products combined.
Primarily this was brought about by the
chelapess of the staple. Of late years
the most important element has been the
improvement in manufacture, better ma-
einery and more highly skilled labor.
IEperts cannot tell the difference be-
tween goods of cotton mixed with wool
ad thUoe made of all wool. Chemical
tests are not infallible in aiding detec-
tin.
The linen shirt which not so many years
ago was regarded as an absolute essential
of the masculine wardrobe is now a thing
of the past, owing to the encroachment of
cotton, and linen bosoms and cuffa and
beooms are considered sufficient conces-
sions to ax, even for the most expensive
garments. The term "household linen"
today is largely a misnomer, simply be-
amse this material has been supplanted
by cotton for sheetings, table-cloths, nap-
kins, etc. Even silk has not escaped ow-
ing to the excellent and growing popular-
ty of mercerized goods.
So much for generalities. Much has
been said of curtailment in consumption,
not only by the mills, but by the final
consumer-the public. It might be well
to point out certain factors in consump-
tion that would not be greatly affected by
isch curtailment, as they constitute fixed
demands on the output of manufactured
goods. Some of these items are new and
have sprung into existence in the last few
years, for new needs are being discov-
ered for cotton every day. At present it
enters into the manufacture of more ar-
ticles of commerce than any other known
agricultural product.
Not only have new avenues been opened
up, but the old items have grown largely.
This is not only because cotton is cheaper
thfa other textile products, but because
ei many respdts it is better. Some of
these items ary large, some are small, but
in the aggregate they foot up to an enor-
mous total and constitute a steady drain
on supplies that is little subject to fluc-
tusties in the price of raw material.
Axrmis New Wear Cotte.
Five years ago, the armies of the world,
wit the exception of those in the trpi-
ed countries, were clothed in woolen uni-


COURSE 01 PALE AND XMDIUM ROSIQS AT SAVANNAH FOR TWO YEARS


W.W. W.G. N -
DATE 1901-5 195-040 1904-05 1903-01 1904-05 1903-0 1904-05 1903-04


April 1.......... 410
April 8......... 3.3
April 15........ 3.80
April 22........ 3.80
April 29........ 3.80
May 6........ 80
May 13........ 3.80
May 20........ 3.86
May 27........ 3.96
June 3........ 435
June 10........ 4.50
June 16........ 4.00
June 23........ 4.65
July 1 ........ 4.75
July 7 ........ 4.75
July 14 ........ 4.70
July 28 ........ 4. 2%
Aug. 4 ........ 4.67%
Aug. 12 ........ 4.00
Aug. 18 ........ .4.2%


3.60
3.50
Ss
3.40
3.56
3.36
2.42%
3.65
3.86
340



3 0
3.30

3.30
2.30
&40
3.40
3.50
3.50


375
&360
3.80
3.00
3.50
3.50
3.65
4.06
4.10
4.15
4.25
4.40
4.40
4.40
425
4.42%
4.35
4.37


$3.60
3.45
3.35
3.25
325
3.25
3.27%
.35
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.30


$3.60
3.00
345
3.45
3.45
3.35
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.85
&86
3.85
3.90
4.00
3.95
3.90
3.82%
4.00
4.00
4.021


$3.50
3.35
325
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.17%
3.25
325
3.20
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.05
3.05
3.15
3.15


$335
3.35
3.20
3.90
3.20
3.20
3.20
3J.2
320
3.30
3.65
3.86
3.66
&80
3.80
3.86
3.72%
3.90
3.85
3.87%


$3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
3.20
3.15
.96
295
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.096
2.96
3.05
3.06


1904-06 1903-04 1904-0 19 -M


$3.30
3.30
3.15
3.15
315
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.25
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.55
3.56
3.55
3.50
3.65
3.55
3.57%


$3.L
&00
3.00
3.00
300
3.06
3.00
3.10
&310
&LO
3.0
2.9
2.85
.86
2.80
2J.
2.80
2.95
2.J6
2.6
2M36


$M
Im

Lao

am
2.88
3.6
3.0
3S.
3.10
um
3.3
3.30
3A4
sAB
3.4
3.30
3JO
3.-
3.32%


Lu
am



3.-

3.40
ni~i


2.S
234
2.S
2M70
Iu
Wee
2.50
2.M
2AD


Kohn= Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS OIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



Don't forget your subscription to the Record.

WvU WRITDIG ADVELISi= MENTION TH RECORD.







16 "E WTHE WEEKLY INIU TB IAL RECORD.
------------------------- -------- ---em--


Machinery

Bar ~Ie, Im Pie and nilnt, Belts,
fNts, Cut a" Cast Wasiers, WMak
smith's Tols, Lumber.an's Te*ls,
Padklt of all Kiis, Railread Material,
Palated a Galvanized Cawruated
I nwc*&.


and Mill


4



4
4
4
.

' 4


Supplies.

STATE AGENT FOIL
ATIAS EOS E ad E SMSOUMLE STEAM FE
Wa~rTImT STEAM PUMPS. JEKIMSU VALVE
mSSTOlrS SAWS. FrunTUTE PsmSa,
CUMRTI NMUFrACTUIu .'S M a MeMmy,
@urLCM SAW MIL.s crUEr Wm PULFLEYS
"ONrS LEATHER ELT,
SMEW JERSEY CAR SPRMS and fR M
(t and b r nae.
SOLVEMTWE RooR CLMPOMR,-
GE MF. CO.S Cast ihe SWrt Piss,
SMCAMFREY FES, MMAH EMERY WHEELS
MaIELr* PPP Stemn Pa &
A. LESCMEN & SON, Wire s.


forms. To-day a large proportion of the
wrld's troops are clothed in cotton. The
I(ftd States alone, which maintains a
mall standing force comparatively, has
within the last four years taken 13,000,-
0 ds yards of eight-ounce kaki cloth.
Great Britain uses an amount even larger,
ot including the inferior khaki duck that
is employed.for the uaiforms of the native
troops in India. The utility of khaki was
triumphantly demonstrated during the
Boer war, not only on account of its
color, which rendered a hostile force in-
distimet at a moderate distance, but its
lightness ad general serviceability made
it far more available for an extended
campaign. The Russian service uniform
in the far east is of cotton and Japan
aso laid in large supplies of khaki duck
ad has been making inquiries in this ity


for more.
As Cvering fr Tobacco.
Another demand that has sprung up
has been caused by the increasing use of
cotton eloth for growing tobacco under
shade. Seven hundred acres of tobacco
land in Connecticut are covered in this
manner. The Continental Tobacco Com-
pany uses 1,000,000 yards of cloth for its
shade culture in Florida and Cuba. As an
illustration of the fact that expansion
of trade in various lines brings increased
demand for cotton it may be stated that
this same company uses 4,000,000 yards of
cotton cloth annually merely for the pur-
pose of making bags for two brands of
smoking tobacco.
Cotton is extensively used in farm ma-
chinery. One company alone in its thresh-


3,000,000 yards of cotton duck weighing
from two to three pounds to the yard.
Paper mills also are enormous consumers
of cotton duck which they use for driers.
The material frequently runs twelve inches
wide and weighs from seven to ten
pounds a yard. Pottery establishments
use millions of yards of army duck an-
nually for the purpose of squeezing clay
to get the water out of it. The govern-
ment uses 3,000,00 yards of cotton duck
annually for making coin bags. Overcoats
of cotton duck, with blanket lining have
taken the place of the heavy wool and
fur garments in the northwest. It is
estimated that 10,000,000 yards annually
are consumed by this branch of the trade
alone. These garments are considered
warmer for out-door work and are water-


ers and reapers finds me annually for proof as well. Two million yards of duck


are annually used for cement ags. Two
million yards annually enter into the
manufacture of feed bags for horse. t
is estimated that 15,000,000 yards o. duck
are made into coal bags to be used whee
a chute cannot be employed to advaa-
tage.
Cotton is used exclusively in shoe for
linings and drills form the basis of rub-
ber shoes.
A heavy duck forty-six inches we is
used to the extent of millions of yards
annually for the purpose of filtering eol.
Four million yards of heavy duck are an-
nually used for the purpose of dranig
portions of mines that are difi lt of ae-
cess. A large outlet is found in the se
of cotton for making the asbestos jacket
used to cover steam pipes in lare buil-
ings.


When you


Visit Jacksonville


Call to see the Record and be at home.


TWI the Record all you know, that will Interest others.


Syou want to buy or sell advertise your place.


f you owe the Record pay the bill.


If you don't owe the Record make a bill.


Order your Printed Stationery.


Be sure and give the order for your Commissary Checks.


Call on the Secretary of the 7. O. A.




Call at the Industrial Record Office.
IF YOU ATR PaOGlUSaSaI, ADVyRTIS IM TUs aKCOD.


JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


~- -~ - -~" ~ ~9l~ e~~=P8,~ ~ ~~O~,)9~,~~'~;""'"O ,~~~~~ ,~0 ~------- --------- ----









tnu wRrgN myiNDifrI1Wx xCODM.


- IT


Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for the ben of the subscribers and advrtising patrons of this paper and no

charge is m de for any infotation supplied or ervce rendered. Fill in any one or moe of the blanks following, a

you may require clip out and mail to thi office and the same will hae prompt attention

rw TmrpIotimfm MI er Fatery Sppe orI Ma ery o Aug Sm. Tlbenr rr. orr w s Lamds.
DATF INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jackonville, tla.
In USTRAL RECORD, Maim O ,ce. Jaheonvilfle. 2 I am I. the market for lands for the purpose of
a the mrket for the fw Prefer in state of Please put me in eoommmlcatlo
with responsble parties and give me other lnformatio.

lease mtfy where sm es be seeed.
SSlZ

State spedeally the kind of meeblaery wanted and whether new or second-thaded. DATE
r Leeseefor TurpelhM ineel or Fastery, or fr Am iny e Estorlse. rFor ,mmissary. ofee or I eseubeM spp SawmIw or Turpnoeins Moes
DATE
INDUSTRIAL RBEORD. Jackseoville,. DATa
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jaekuouville, Fla.
Please adve the ndersigned regarding a good loctio lan (state or section of
tate) for In the market for
tether with fun aforation about labor eondltlons taxes, tMraportatio facilities
el eomreagemt etc.
|e b|- Pleas give me information as to beat places to bay, ete.

Si f Signed


be ye WaMst to 5;8 Seomn M 7? Are YTe TMhdst of ?in?
DATE DATE
]IDUSTIIAL BBORD., JacksoMville, FL. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville. Ila.
Have for sale the followln Can you give any information as to the reliability of the following arm or eorpora
tion

Can you suggest a purthaser? Rema
Stigned Sigaed


e YTme Wet to Emptog a Mam? as You Wet EgmpogNmet?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jackaeville, Fe INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksoville, ha.
Wat a n to a the potion of Want a portion a

with the following reuiretn Refer to the following

Can yea mugget samo a ma ? Can you an st me?
Signed Signed



CLIP THIS COUPON
TO AL. READERS OF THE RECORD
Vhmn ymu amre wi anlahuti. at from the columns of this paper, whether yo ae making an inquiry or plain an order, please adt out the eaup
bel and attach it to the letter k will pay you

COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen In the Inamtatial tooerd ilne dated

Signed


The INDUSTRIAL RE ORD of Jacksonville, na., and Savannah, a., Is the South's great
weekly trade Joural.


The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitiiixg one it hopes to benefit the other.


Tea mraCOD Xe PAC= WITH saUTHrma PQoIs9.









18 THE WEEKLY MNIDUrrKIAL RECORD.
IIs


Buyers' Directory



lemi BAt and write to the hm p-
r than. The T eI d -maantes
a pompt respao .

ABSTRACTS.
Realty THte and Trat Co.
AUTOMOBILES.
Gilbert, ted K., Jacksenvile, Fla.

Athmtie National Bank, Jacksoaville, eFa.
iommrmIal Bank, Jacksonville, a.
OsCtral Natioal Beak, Oeala, Fa.
asn ls DBank, Jacksonvie Va-
Nationl Bank Of Jacksonville.
OXSm AMD CRATES.
Cner Lumber CO, Jacksonville ha.

r, Geo. ., Jr., Jacksonville, ra.
S herina Puel & Supply Co, The, Jackson-
vapm mla. o
CARS.
e th Atlam e 0ir & Manufactaring Co,
Wayeres. G ea.

n Bro, J. A, Jacksoville Fla.
eCo., H. A., Jacksonville, Flk
staard Clthing Co, Jackspnvie, a.
CLOTHI G-WrOLS&ALK
Koh, uBrehott t u i& Jacksonville, Fla.
C0SMNUO MERCHANTS.
Bailey Mmntgemery, New York City.
Inaweon, M. W, New York City.
Toer, Hart & C, Nw York City.
COVEYAINCINaG.
Realty Title and Tret Co.
COOPERAGE.
O(amO Co., The, Quitrn, Ga.
C s o., The, JacksoTnville, ,

f- op Coprase O, GJack.9, l
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jrom, Jaksonville, la.
DRUGS-WHOLESALIE
Sotheur M-ruf-iring Co, Jacksonville,
1k.
DRY -OODSWHOLEAfr
Oovingtor Co, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kea, FPrehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fa.

C toJ, aksoovi'e, Fla.
L lv orks & Supply Co, Au-
Msrrul-Stevo Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
*he-Yes o8n Co., J. 8., Maon, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.


F7 HE. T o CLAI AGEIKCT.
Fori Feig Claim Ageny, JadoM-


soflle, Fla.

Getting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GErTS .ruwmas"n*S
ri A Bro, J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
SCo., H. ., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCRS--WHOLKSALIE
olidatfd Groe try Co, Jacksonville, Fa.
nb-Young Co, Savannah, Ia.
Hargraves Co., C H, Jacksonville, Via.
bJolM Co, W. B, Jaksonville, Fla
ptasek, Hunt & West Co, Savannah, Ga.
United Grocery Co, Jacksonville, la.
White, Walto & Co., Jacksoville, Fa.
William Co., J. P, Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, wrehgott & Co., Jacksoville, Fla.
HAMRWARE.
Bairk Co., L BE, Jackhkokarille, Fla.
BWnd & Bos Co., The, Jacksoanville, Fla.
S1rdwam W. IlVadostat, Ga.
l John mG., JacuLovmnfle, HM.


Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co, Tampa, Fa.
Weed & Co., J. D., Sva h, Ga.
BARNEas&
MeMurray & Baker, Jacsoville,
Thomas, W. LR, Gainemvillse,
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksoaville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A, Jacksonville, F
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, a.
HOTELS.
Argon, The, Jacksonvill, ML-
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stena Co., Jaekmville, Fk.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8, Macon, Ga.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jaksonville, Fla.
Blum & Co., Chax., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hanne Bros, Jacksonville, Fla.
MKEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chtta a Tenn.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
XAPS.
Realty Title and Trut Co.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonvill, a.
Scholeld's Sons Co., J. S, Maeon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR J.uRPE lJLa PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. 8, Macon, Ga.

Kingan & Co, Ltd., Jacksonvile, Fla.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswiek, Ga.
MeMillan Bros, Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co, W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8, Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co, Tampa, Fla.
MULES AND HORSES.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fl.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barnes-Jemsp Co, The, Jacksonille, Fa.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co., The, Savannah, Ga.
Independent Naval Stores and Export Co,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co, Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala
PAINTS.
Baird & Co, L E, Jacksonville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
PECANS.
Grifling Bros. Co., Th Jacksonville, Fa.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Brigg Hardware Co, W. H, Valdosta, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Ocala, Fa.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tamp, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co, Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gilbert, Fred E, Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Aa.
STANK STORAGE
National Tank & Export Co, Savannah,
Ga.


REAL ESTATE
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa,
Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fa.
Frazier, W. W., Jacksonville, a.
Livingston & Sos, J. O ala, a.
DOWt FAIL TO MhTIOS


Southern States Land and Timber Co,
Jacksonville, Fla.
West-Raley-Rannie Co, The, Jacksonville,
Fla.
SHIP YARDS
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fa.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLSALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville ,Fla.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cypress Tank Co., Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. S, Macon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville,. Fla.
Council Tool Co., The, Wananish, N. C.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS
Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksonville, Fla.


lulzrib a PROCnx
Pine Product Comtruoefl (b6, TW1 11
ettevilk, N. C.
Pine Belt Constrnetion Co., Th, 2anil
N. C.
Standard Tmpentine C, gh NSt Tt
City.
L UPlk al u STILLS
Baker, M. A., Brmiunid, G
McMillan Bros, Savannah, Ga.
TUiRPER la STILL TUB
Davis & Son., G. ., Palatka, Fla.
TUnPEBTlUS VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Paathka, FI
t YPSWirrS maY .
grirot Typewriter Excdsage, Ja u
Pla.
VEHICLES.
McMurray & Baker, Jacksonville,
Thomas, W. R., Gainesrlle, Fl.
WATCHES
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jackeaik, la.
Hess & Slager, Jaeksomille, Fla.
YELLOW PINK LUMNI3.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jackeonwvil
East Coast Lumber Co, Watertwni.


MORTGAGES. RIEfS

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.

111 W. FORSYTH STREET, JACKSONVKEL A




HA. Renfroe Co.


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at ReadyaMmde Prices Mail Orders Given Perom l Altms


439 W. Bay Street.


JACKSONVILL, FLA


I f I IfII IIII ItItIIIII I IlIt It- IIt-? I I It I33 III 3322 11JU .


o J. P. WnrrtTmAs President.
ST. A. JalI nd VicPresident.
SH. L. KATo, Secretary.


J. A. o. CA mon, Ist Vice-P"ldea
J. Dosma~ mxT,3Vitlce-PdU4i
D. G. White, Treasrer.


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY;

IIl STRES o I m WON f1l m I Ia If EB S.
- Main office jV vMnnXH, BORGIor.
SPanh o~frrfee P NInXCOLA, FLX. I Brshse Garery aea..
SBranch aOrnee
SNaval Stores Producers are lavlted to Correspoed With s.
I 1t i tll 11tIII lllt i11 it llt fit 111 1tt1ttttl llilllll t ll l

A. BAKER,
nalmmdw a


Baker Impr'ved E
Seemless Twpm-
tiae sItli.

Write me for prices a oI
F 0 B any point In Oeogia
Is. Alabaima or Minwt. An
stils sold under a sumra se
Job work through the
country a speil
The Larget and Oldest Copper runs c
Works in Georgia. frunswicl G .
Or My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that doJ-io leak.


Send your order for general printing to the _g
Ti RECORD TO ADvmaiamLA .
--






THU WEEKLY UmfbridAt RECORD.


Special Notlce.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are


Mc NILLA N


BROTHERS'


Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in roein made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loes by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS.


SAVANNAH, GA.
MOBILE, ALA.


JCKSONVILLE. FLA.
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.


*.-


TI AcOmraWS aAM H A 2W MeUNT VALUT.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF- -

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc.

I lI It 1i E KOF M, ElTN UM IE l W EMIMUl IGI ME.
IN WRmTNG OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCUPTION OF WHAT I WNTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED

A Florida Enterprise. Try It.


*




TH NTHE WEEKLY INVUSTI9AL RECORD.
-18 i *i 1( 1101*141414I c10 1I1101110 *r1m1r 101m e1^i1*1ro1910|19t 111t W 9t *I*****************@****:9 *
Pmdrrlmt. W. C. POWI.:; Viee-Premdet S. who with the Preident constutt the Directory rad Board at Mage W. P. COACHMAN. L. BaI-
LARD. H. COVINTr ON. H. A MeRACHERN, JOHN B. YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMITAN, C. DOWN-
INO, J. BAUNDERS, C. B. ROGOR; Auditor. JOHN BHNDRBSON.


NIDAD NAVAL TORE MANY


Jacklnv iloe, Flo.


SMvolln, l .


P nsl col, 1I.


NATAL STORES FA TO RS.

al i 1aill 31C1, P2,500.00. 01w al oli P Rtciol o li rsi
n AnII 0i Sloc Ylo ir Resere Io Sell 10 0tnifors WhO CI g rne 0o
ll C11011 1 I IIN ll 0, 'W 11019lWoIol. II 01101a 010 1110 I 10

1Tie olidle is ilrel l Co eraile l ompan. Ill Inleril Ge Ien IIIcol tl s
I lie P reduces. Ie Patronage l Il Tu eine Operalos eeilere l t I
PI P 01o Miy and Peilnl 01 lilber 101 [till.

YAIRS IT JACKSONH LLE, S AVINAI, FER NNDIA llii PENCOil .


All Roducers oe ia vil e lo Cill or ClesIond


:' I9* 1ages gi e > I I. IeTI. ,I I e uiIT81 T= *M .IO *, * m1 >=*m
"THZ PINE AnD rTS PRODUCT&*


r~r~)r~~E~j~B








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 21


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Cozanmi y Trades)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec"
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese

A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 21
A. C. Creamery, 80" .. 22
S10 .. 25
A C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream........... 11

Lard

Compound Tin.
o 50-lb til.... 64
"' 50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-lb tin ............. 84

Vinegar
Bed Apple Cider bbl........ 36

Sugar
Granulated Sugar, bbls..... 6 85

Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb.................. 22
-itmon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
ase, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 12
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 81
Artmokles Roasted Coffee, 1
Ib packages.......market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
age .............. market price
Roasted, 100lb. drum....... 17
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 b .... 27
English B'fast, 10 lb.. S7
Formoa, 10 lb....... 27
SPagoda Tea, 5 and 10c size
10 Ibs to case, per pound-.. 40


Salt
200-lb sack...............
100-lb sack...............
lee Cream, 200-lb sacks.....
"" 100-lb sacks.....
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-lb....
"' 2-lb ....


100
50
100
50
265
275


r Pepper
-Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lbtin...... ........ 17
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box
sifter top, per doz...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and 80

Corn


1oo Sk
Car Lot Lot
SW.Corn,llOlb, 1 38 1 40
S 1001b, 1 24 126
, Mddoorn,1101b,1 88 1 85
l00b,l21 128


Lees m
Sk


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


100 Sk
Car Lot Lot
W clip'd,1251b,2 10 2 12
S 1001b,l 75 1 77
White 1251b, 200 202
White 100lb. 1 60 1 62
Mixed 1251b
1001b,


Lem 100
Sk Lots
215
180
205
165


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice..... 1 65
. a a fancy..... 1 65
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 5 60
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 lb sack.........5 60
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............. 5 65
Pillsbury's Best ..... 6 25
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 5 15
bbl .......
Flour, Boss,.............. 6 00
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 3 50
92-lb sacks...........1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel............ 8 60
92-lb sacks....... 1 60
Rice
Good ...................... 4A
Choice...... ............ 6
Fancy Head ............... 6
Broken ................... 2
Canned Vegetables
Doz.


Tomatoes, 8s, Chief........
Tomatoes, 2s ........
Clayton, 3s................
Clayton, 2s ............,..
Sifted Peas, 2s ............ 1
Rose L. J. Peas ..........
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s........ 1
Lima Beans,2s ............ 1
String Beans, 3s...........
String Beans, 2s ..........
Baked Beans, 3s..........
Baked Beans, ls...........
Corn, fancy, 2s............
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets, 3s...........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ...........
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s .............
Hay


car lot


1 48 Choice.... 1950
1 29 No.1 Tim. 18 00
1 88 No. 2 17 00
126 No.1 C1ler 17 00


100 bale
,2000
1850
1780
1750


85
65
80
60
40
80
15
00
90
70
90
45
40


85

90


quantity
2050
1900
1800
1800


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 45
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 45
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case.
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 6)
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
lb.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
per lb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 6.


Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 81
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice " "
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 i-lb. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. case 8 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
b(.x, 40-50............ 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 50-60............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 3 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box .......... 1 50
Peanuts


Fancy, H P, per pound.... 6
Extra H P, ....
Seed Peanuts, ....
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ ..... 18
Brazils ................... 12
Peaans.... .............. 12
Filberts................... 12
al0 nuts.................. 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 LesslO
lots Sk. Lot Sk. Lt
Cottonseed Meal 27 00 27 50 28 00
S Hulls 12 00 12 50 18 00


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop.......2 20
4" 8 hoop.........
Nest Measures,5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per do .......1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
nested....... 2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per dos 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per dos.. 00
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per dos.. .1 20

Washboards P,
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay...............8 00
175 Diamond Glass .........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per dos 1 06
Clothes pins, five grosw to box 75
Canned Fish
Oysters, is, 2 dos to case, per
doz. .................. 9
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 800
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 66
Salmon is, Tale 4 dos to cas
per doz Alaska......... 00
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to case,
per dos Col. River ... 2 38
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per dos
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 60
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
bs to box............. 240
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge .... 143-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avge .... 141.-
"Reliable" Hamn, 12-14 avge .... 141-4
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge .. 1 -6
"Reliable" California Hams, 6-8. 101-2
Breakfast Bacon, light a. ...... 15-2
D. S. Bellies, 16-18 av. .......... 9.4
D. S. Bellies, 20.22 av. .......... 1-2
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 a. ........... 1-4
D. S. Plates ................... 7
Bacon Plates ...................
D. S. Butt ..................
Bologna asa8 e ............... 7
Sausage La il ................ $U
Batter aml Chees
"Strawberry" Creamery, 00-Ib tubs b2
30-b tubs 201-2
Kirganz Ld.
"Reliable" fut cream cheese .... 11
Kipa's atr.
"Indiana" Pur Leaf ...........
Sea-Foamz Oompou&l .........rt=tn
Kiugaws Candl Iamt.
"Reliable" Coned Be, I ...... us
COwned Bee, b ...... LI
Roast Bee, Is ........ UL
Roast Bee, ........ a
Potted Ham al Tomme
-4s .........................
Sliced Bee, 1-2 .. .. LS
Viena Sausage, b ..
STripe ...........*...*


GZT A COPY OF THZ NxVAL STORK8 BLUE DOO.


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= TMH WEEKLY JusTIAUL RNCORD.


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The job printing department
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. It is reason-
able to suppose you will get
better and more satisfactory
printing supplies-letter heads,
envelopes, commissary checks,
pay-roll reports, etc., by having
us make them.

Industrial Record Co.,


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IMAD THM ADS I1 TEX IWCOEDM


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To the Readers of the Record:


- 111~~~1111111111111 -~-~--- -


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THE WEEKLY IDUSTK&IAL RECORD. 4


Printing Send your order to the Industrial N
Record. Prompt and satisfactory T- l'
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla. |

of this
McMURRAY & BAKER, I .,e IMIm.
t to Iswa pIeasuret. ^
Sit I wo Tuoelefne Hwaress m .
A W ib"M S' iu T U i w i--- .<--, mm c
The Wear Industrial Record of Jack-
We ame see o dvan teesand b nmans n etlm.a seaville ad Savanna h as taken its ace
S I n0 Vtt bmraa ea ~ r I we have a mawo PFil amomag the leading trade journals the
w e--- a mlit in. T"arItam w xagos am orm a t olmr. Damt United btad, and as u authority oa hlm*"
Sa et w beat be wer en am d-ma anS rd her and Mva store It betrI quoted mot
only by the best and most careullty add lt
mi i B 1A0 203 Ye1 papeIrs in this country. but by those o I
2n Surope also. A London trade paper Il
M Y o~aeing this olee yesterday gives i br
JI ,10 to the Record' views on imarot con- Uv
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. e a r
ThI weet's tae of the laetrtial e- .on
w4 is ean better than usnal and t is 'T
a mtroe aad aentetatait general la tral
trial newsaper. In addition to its value no
as the charpion of the tw@ spefic Indus- vs.
The Clyde Steamship Company l -_--'- ex I... I-- "i ", -.
stoaresr Oat d*Popmt la tho Nktt. pbft
-Omg them beg the story Ot a has-mal. l- fe
e-60a- r eiorratton or gastud in J ak- G3
Es vUllTe e erdw an e the Oanaon or I. 2
s ev? aeweral otlr earporations during te ad
.Week In sorg& and Vloridi WL
It has set the ya for nterprbIe and It Wan
YO demrves the gCnat AmOrIe of LeE ses wick
it is removing, both in ts mbcription and
advertioWgI deartments.carrylng as It does,
p aehaps. o a o the largest advertising pat-
t0nae Itve to sny or the soutber trae .
ou als.

erty.
~5Streel
NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES .
nomag Sepst 9 atsis 3 m tLI We Nue a ppledt d to m 14 an fello aUw fli --- --
at Charmdtm ., S C. bot way&
From INw ek1 owm Jahmi aoVUe JIM
mrw N 11wetr L wer). ISWEUAl. leatweesoa and e Nw Toew.
Friday, Sept. 2 at 3:00 pm .... O RHE .... Wednesday, Sept. 7, at 1:00 m S PECIAL BAiR AINS IN DIAMONDS.
aturday, Sept. 3, at 3:00 pm . AxNCEW YORK ..Thursday, Sept. 8, at 4:00 am MO
Monday, Sept. 5, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Saturday, Sept. 10, at 4:30 am 30 YEARS RELIABILITY.
Wednesday, Sept. 7, at 3:00 pm ... IROQUOIS .... Tuesday, Sept. 13, at 6:00 am
Friday, ..Sept. 9, at 3:00 pm .... ALGONQUIN ..Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 7:30 am Hess & la er,
saturday, Sept. 10, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ....Thursday, Sept. 15, at 8:30 m
SxxHURON .... Thursday, Sept. 15, at 8:30 am a Diamonds, Slverware, Watches and Jewelry
Trday, Sept. 13, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE .... Sunday, Sept. 18, at 11:00 am v, es ad J lry
'lsrdsay, Sept. 15, at 3:00 pm .....ARAPAHOE ..Tuesday, Sept. 20, at 1:00 pm CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND I A t13 MAIN.
*xNEW YORK ..Thursday, Sept. 22, at 4:00 m am'a TTT-- "-'T Y-' a'a
Siday, Sept. 18, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS .... Friday, Sept. 23, at 4:00 am
Tpsday, Sept. 20, at 3:00 pm ..ALGONQUIN .... Sunday, Sept. 25, at 5:00 am
Wednesday, Sept. 21, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE .... Monday, Sept. 26, at 5:30 am N a
Friday, Sept. 23, at 3:00 pm ....COMANCHE ....Wednesday, Sept. 28, at 6:30 am aval St res M arhet
xHURON ...... Thursday, Sept. 29, at 7:00 am
'Saturday, Sept. 24, at 3:00 pm ..xxMOHICAN .. .Thursday, Sept. 29, at 7:00 am R eport
Meiday, Sept 26. at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ......Saturday, Oct. 1, at 8:30 am
Wesdmeoy, Sept. 28, at 3:00 pm. ..IROQUOIS ......Monday, Oct. 3, at 10:30 am
Friday, Sept 30, at 3:00 pm ..ALUONQUIN ....Thursday, Oct. 6, at 1:00 pm Pmbleshed ly I The
NEW YORK .... Thursday, Oct. 6, at 1:00 pm ly n
Satuday, Oct. 1, at 3:00 pm .... .APACHE .... .Wednesday, Oct. 5, at 12:30 pm
--Boston via Brunswick and Charleston. xFreight only. *-Boston via
BruswielL
E CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES. Jacsonvlle Me op s
oot 5* ServkSe Detweem Jhiae tueIo, mesteom ad Prweviaee ad an mes.
ri resltma, cOaf at Charlestem Botk Wayv.
S aE -wmCI KLT CaUles a. Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
Ii .. ............ .......... ............. t or CLYDE ST. JOINS RIVER LINE
zkm . .ea .. Muds..e.l tand oe anfe.
at Pta CLAsDto. It.a ,Fos.nv, ay M u I, and ,turse $5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.
s 11,1- I t tasste. Astor, s. Frael., Bweresd u e t aa au d leltr.eanl. *I
Ila e GL SA river
STEAMER CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
I .,., to soa aM follow: lMre J.ackonmine, unday. Tds a Turs- B IG P R IZ E
Sp. m. Returning, leave anaford, Mondays. Wdnesdays & Prldays 9: a. m. B ^
usuJausMuJl NORTHBqOuM.,
ma 71 em. ( Read B"p.
r t r .- ..i..................... ..jacaoni...................... Arri s a. E. A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposition, to
10 s6 : m. ........ .. ........P znt, ...... ...... :'L ave 8:. p. m.
.SS ......... .......... t.......................... ."- ...S Saratoga, to New York and to Ashevile N. C.
Iomm 411 a ....... .... .... ...... t. Fraed............................ LZ ave p. m.
....:... *... ... *i ...........'.a~. md) .............. ......... "r n0o no* Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
~Ar. I .a:.. . .... .............. antordi......... ............ILeave 9*: a. s c
Ar. 10:00 ,4 .................. terpri ..................... RL. 10:00 a. m. scription contest. Write for particulars.


WRAl. ]PAW-NGm AND EICat oWrac, Ws w. ray, S.. Jeb..wflm.
3. M. IROMONIOMUR JR.. Ant. Gent. Pass. Agent. 1M W. Bay St., Jacksonville. ia.
WF. 0. COOPR, JR., loal Prt. Agt., aek'ville. C. P. LOVELs Asat. Supt.,.aJak'vIll
Aoot Hgma Street. Jacksonvlle.C
A. C. AGORrTT. G. P. A., New York, OLYDU WIREN, G A., MNw Te W1.
I l. o. gis'R, wm.. ssell PubAhn C
Me.. oslem. Cle..t A. nW
.enre a.s NM~. a tats rl S l ww Y ar. Jacfaonville, Florida.
WRITE THK ECORD fOR Ay IMF llOMTION DLSIRID. Ui





wi 'r -.


TB~U WUUKLY JJIJJIJ&SIAL K0PD_


T I -


C n FVLLE. Viose.pWidant


JAR3 F LA*U3JO5Vw 4& 1~ssa






Diamosd mad Odmer Predk
Stone


Fine Gold Jewery


American ad Foreign Wa sil
and Clocks


41 West Bay Street

JacksonVIle

.mea bowag mi su" in ab"A of
8afslt m. arrest. ndIt S. se ord"Ea


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


Fine China Dinner Sets ad
Fancy Pieces


Write fsr Catalogue


European Novees


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THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
of Waaaalsh, N. C.,
fmembr oaf Cow staette N. c.. are stM sedla Dia io Afs
l| at 1 a N me eo -ed tsdamr at s. n ON lEw amd Paent
rs at SL a domem They chouM average a lttl better tlha ever.
We have ilht oat a mew brad. the la ue Zao Back at asd Pul-
er at IU which are warrante. All wbleas dealers In naval sto
wUmb rm ra sr sdslw Nogwl omers"


-------------------------------- --

0D G. darK n rHAN, ALFRED A. MdKETHAN, Lt U. S N.
Tlenime, Bet'd Seey ora Tros.. Comarettn
Bgineer, ayettevfe, N. G.

Pine Product Construction Co.
IOOTPOSATE
Fy.tta.vile N. C.
N adn Torp unet 00 of Tar. Cremoto, Tar. Dn-*te: Wood Parmerative
PrasileS Wd s eS.. te. ad Charo& talfrom uIgtwomd tumpn. DBox-fetang
Preta hererase. Time of dastimauo. roedueo. Coaensmtion eoatroled at wil
Me dnerm t re. Plam t ereted complete, and men taught the process. Pr-
thr ~iatlam wto Alfled MaMKethan. me ral manager. F&Yoettevl e N. C.

EM Enm MNIEMORIANLS II MARBLE, STOE All MONZE
Irm tie bmle Tasbet to the most elaborate Mausoleu
Write, or come to see us-our deslgns will please you.
SOUTHERN MARBLE AND STONE CO.
Ir qit0Ne. L L UC.. Na mer.
W foa r Didhw m Oft 4 000 fml= obvt.
A slng Aft gfatne. lames. Mdajo md Tie.


I


* u------ __ __-__,_ ,--


John IL You. PI ll. nt. C. S. Eie, Vkmr e 3
J. W. Motao. Jr- Socrirey aid Tfrawriw.


he ELLIS-YOUNG CO.1

Commission Merchants

NAVAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

L Savannah and Brunswick, Ga. I

WIN -M------ ANNAi um lluil iujui n ii


L.W. HUNT, Prealt.
P. L. PSA&OCK .lt V. P,


J. IL HAMMI. Id V. Pree, LU A1ileft Saw &a
W. J. KLJY, X V. P. D. B WULlam. Am& smplhm


Peacock-Hunt & West Compm,
General Offimes::. I ry So nlet,. Sawmn Ga. med
We st U JmSkeaN, ra
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strict Facuo Our interest and nhe p tmm' I We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any comepy tha b-v k*id
Turpentine and roin.)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Cepers' Tels and Naval Stores Hardware Our Spef
-SOLE AGENTS FOB--
Tle Celebrated UnIle Turpente Axes and Wilmse & i,
Philadelphia Walams.

Naval Steres Reseved at Savamal, Ga., aM Jams--
and rrem-ein, Fta. _


e m nu oMer rvememw.


hmrlrsd
*6


Greenleaf &


Crosby


Con'any


3fbtkns anb

.b6fbteitub


dlll BI~R~nOT ) I, BlhlWAY A114D 23i Sr.,
MOTEL BARTHOLDI, "E YORK 'y.
.Fn g VBdia o Square Park. Newly Fuminhed Throughout.
ear al Big Store and Places of Amusemeot. Usa Pass
~ te Door for afn ailrt Stations and Steamboat Landings.
Ig.. Sample Boomi for Commercial Travelers: Here you
S.' :"d d and us aifoent decorations: no luxurious
S eadsr; 0o ao-inorin g saroundiaM; no elaborate bill
lr ta, priated in French; no ers tat will disdin to
*ft rec. NM Employees In Amy Way IsattetatlIve.
BaJ oiWr, sme-likh little hotel that will appeal to the
Sh are looking for solid comfort. Good.
gle oiirna, aand affable and courteous treatment.
--C; ii .....................................


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