<%BANNER%>
Weekly industrial record
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00087
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: September 2, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00087
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text







SEP 6 ; gju
For the Week Ending September 2, 1904 sD.atnt .Agr
*of krkuiwr&


WEEKLY


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

Adopted S5pt. 12trl 1902, y te ecutre Cemmftee ot tie rTrpeotMe Operators' AssmciatoM as Its Exclusive Offical ar e. and Adofpted Sept. f11t. 1902, it AImnal Com
uosM as as Omcfalj Orgas Also of the eaeral Associatieo. Adopted Sept. ltth, 1 0J, as e enely eaiMc Orm at tAe rcmrvpeame Operators' Assciatlioa.
Adopted April 27tf, 19. as the Oflcial OrgEm of te Ilter-State Came Growers' Assoclatilv. adeorsed by te Georgia SawmIfl
Associatioe. Official Orgam of the Southeasterm Stock Grower's Association.


VOL 9. NO. 9. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ATLANTA, GA.


SAVANNAH, GA.


$3 A YEAR.


ft-- 0* -..M*4*****.i*6**e*#,*..*e**.4A

Address Before Stock Grow-es' Convention

Mr. Cha- M. Conner, Prof Agriculture University Florida, ons
Growing and Feeding Beef Cattle in Florida.
80060668690- 08 4ro1 "Or"iiP,i


The following address was delivered by
Chas. M. Conner, Professor Agriculture,
University of Florida:


The growing of beef cattle in Florida
is not of recent origin. For many years
prior to the late unpleasantness cattle
were grown in large numbers and sold in
the West Indies or in the States to the
North. In those days and up to within
a very few years ago these cattle were
allowed to take care of themselves and
were rounded up once or twice a year, and
such as were fit for market were taken
out sad sold. They were allowed to in-
breed, and very little or no selection was
followed. Tnese cattle were small by
force of circumstances. If the calf was
dropped, say in the spring, it made a
fair growth before the pastures were cut
short in the fall by frost; but during the
coming winter it lost most of the flesh
and fat that had been gained during the
summer, and by the next fall it has just
gotten in fair shape, when winter comes
on and it suffers another setback. Its
condition reminds one of the problem of
the cat in the well, which crawls up two
feet during the day and falls back three
during the night; how long will it take
for the eat to get out of the well? Now,
if the cat had some sort of a prop which
would hold it up during the night and
keep it from slipping back, it would soon
get out. This part of the problem we
will discuss later.


The long continued breeding of these
cattle in this way and under these food
conditions has developed' breed (if you
will permit the use of the word here)
which has characteristics so firmly fixed
that it is hard to break them up. This
is the reason why all pure bred bulls do
not always make their impress on the
First lot of calves, when crossed on native
cows. The type of the native is more
Firmly fixed than that of the thorough-
bred. This living under adverse conditions
for so many generations has endowed the
animals with characteristics which enable
them to meet these conditions; or, rather,
it is the survival of the fittest. These
conditions, also, have made it almost im-
possible for the animal to consume large
quantities of food and make good use of
the same. I have found that no matter
how much you give the native animal
to eat, een if it is of the most fattening


kinds of food, the animal will not make
the gains that well-bred animals will
make.
These came conditions existed with the
range cattle of the West before the long-
horns were replaced by short-horns, Here-
fords and Angus.
If you go back in the history of Eng-
land 200 years you will find that-the av-
erage weight of a dressed carcass in the
Smithfield market was about 370 Ibs.,
while to-day England produces the finest
of beef and a large per cent. of it on
grass alone. Of course, the chalk and clay
hills present a different proposition from
a sandy plain when it came to the ques-
tion of making pastures, which is neces-
sary if beef is to be produced cheaply.
The beef situation to-day is rather pe-
culiar. Twenty years ago we thought the
range inexhaustible, and that it would
furnish pasture for countless herds for
years to come. But the restless settler
has pushed west and taken up that part
suitable for farming, thus reducing the
range area. the remaining portion was
soon overstocked and much injured there-
by. Large areas are being fenced each
year and the free range is becoming more


and more restricted as the years go by.
Cattlemen who are posted and know the
situation, say that cattle never will be
as cheap as they were during the last de-
pression. But in Florida we must remem-
ber that we have another factor to con-
tend with-the Cuban market. In a few
years we will find this market falling off.
so far as our native cattle are concerned,
owing to the fact that Cuba is propos-
ing to produce her own meat, and our
stockmen will then be forced to look for
a market at home. This brings us to the
question then, Are we going to raise good
beef or canners? We should ra'se good
beef and the following are some of the
reasons why we should have better blood:
The improved beef animal has been train-
ed for generation after generation, to con-
sume large quantities of food and turn
that food into flesh and fat. Not only
will he turn more of his food into flesh
and fat, but so place this flesh and fat
that it will sell for a higher price than
that from the scrub. This is proven by
extensive experiments carried on in Illi-
nois where car lots of the different grades
of cattle were fed under similar condi-
tions and a record kept of the rate of
gain and cost of gain. The grades used
were fancy, choice, good, medium, and
inferior. It was found that: More rapid
and much larger gains may be secured on
the better than on the more common
grades. The better the grade of cattle the
higher the percentage of dressed beef.
Low grade cattle carry larger percentages


SAll Turpentine Mer

SAre earnestly urged to be in Jacksonville on the
' 14th and 15th of September to attend the Annual S

S Convention of the Turpentine Operators Association.
% This request is made, not only upon the members of the


With that organiTation,-but upon all persons, of all se *
tions, who are manufacturers of, factors, dealers or work,
ers in naval stores. It is particularly important that all
Producers attend. Conditions just now, and conditions
i that are prospective, demand attention. Operakts must
Some together, and with the strength of numbers and the 3
Swidom of conservatism, meet and properly discuss and
act upon various trade matters that are at this time before *
the turpentine fraternity.
Let every operator in the South being now to pre o
Spare to be in Jacksonville on that occasion.


of internal fat. It does not pay to feed
the low grades through a long period.
Steers containing a high percentage of
beef blood possess greater capacity for
consuming larger quantities of feed than
steers of more common grades, especially
toward the end of the fatting period."
As I said before, the native turns a
greater per cent. into bone, etc., which
are waste products to the butcher. If a
large per cent. of the animal is made up
of bone, hide, neck, shank, hoofs, and
horns, etc., he is not so valuable as the
animal that only has a small percentage
of his total weight made up of these. The
bulk of the value of an animal is contain-
ed in the loin and round steak cuts. The
placing of fat has much to do with the
value of the animal. The scrub, or na-
tive, as men call him, and also some of
the dairy breeds place the surplus fat on
the inside of the ribs and around the
intestines and other organs of the body.
When so placed it brings only tallow
prices: but when this fat is placed be-
tween layers of lean meat as in the pure
bred animal, it sells for the price of the
lean meat, which may mean a difference
of 12 to 20 cents per lb. for the the fat
of the wellbred steer over ..at of the
scrub, as illustrated by this drawing.
(Here a drawing was exhibited showing
the location of fat in cut from scrub and
pure-bred.) The well-bred animal will
net about 60 to 65 per cent. of meat to
the butcher, while the native runs from
49 to 51 per cent.
There are two lines of live stock farm-
ing, and are best illustrated oy the terms
"low" pressure and "high" pressure farm-
ing.
Under the "high" pressure system the
animal is made to grow as rapidly as pos-
sible by feeding, and is fitted for the mar-
ket in a very short time; the other is to
allow the animal to use cheaper foods and
make slower gains and sell for much less
a price per head. The objections to this
latter method, as illustrated by growing
cattle on range, without any supplement-
ary feed, bring us back to the question of
better blood and the price of meat again.
Under the "low" pressure system the ani-
mal makes a minimum amount of mus-
cle. so that when he is three or four years
old and is ready for the fattening pen his
muscles are thin and flabby, never having
had a chance to develop. The muscles do
not grow much, if any during the fatten-
ing period, this is particularly, true with
old animals. Since the butcher considers
that carcass the most valuable which will
cut the greatest amount of high-priced
meat, lean meat, then. must be formed
during the growing period. The secret of
getting the cat out of the well is, don't
* (Coatimued ona Pae .)


mi m





2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
-&AA16106 0


C. B. ROGERS. PrsIDuxrT.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, VICH-PnESIDENTS.


C. H. HODGSON, 8uc, and Tazns'.


DILECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything In Heavy and Light Groceries,


Grain, Pro-


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Coasist of one Three-Story Blldlag, 70x200; one two-story belldlng. 50x390; one onc-story beldisg, 80x250,
maaklg the largest space of asy Company of the kied 1a the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola, Fla., and Seavnnh. Ga.

THE RECORD WILL BE WORTH DOLLARS TO YOU KEVER WEEK.
T= PLCMIM WILL BZ WORTHI DOLLARS TO YOU Zr=I W1J=






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 3


I J. S. chofield's Sons Company,
*,...o. ...o@* ,oo..oo*..*. O..Oo.*OOO@************@o0
Headqui ters for
Distiller's Pumping
o Outfit.
SNo plant complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
South Carolina. Write us for pdrticu-
lars and prices. We also manufacture
Engines, Belers and Nigh
*a Grade Machinery,
as well as carry a full and complete
---stockof-
Mill Supplies, Pipe,
Boiler Tubes, Etc.
Advise your wants.
SMacon, - Georgia.
'e or f a-
o *s to Tema Ww for Tveae Strse Pweg z
**O*O***** '*OO***.**eed:4 **@*************O ********

IIIIIllll ll t 1 lllll|lllll ItiIIt 1lt111 111i :|111 1 11 11
W. W. CARNES Pres. W. C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T DUDLEY. See. a Treas

Tarpa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
Hardware -


ntine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

e Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
nd Pullers on Hand.

FLORIDA.


rI I I I I I I I I II I II I I I I I I I I III I I I I I I I I I


... NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA.. U. S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
Present


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAU9sY.
S. A. ALFORD,


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J B PAInGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


H. L. KAYTON,
Secretary and Treasurer.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. T. CHESNU'TT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRIT EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.



W. R. THOMAS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA,
Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
CAPITAL $300,000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS $300o00
We issue Time Certificates of Deposit, which draw IMterest tt he rate f tree per cent per
anam, if held ninety days or longer. Take advatage of this ad let yer *avrlis be earni
semetMhg fr ye. Particular attention paid to Out-of-Town accounts. sending deposits by m.

"When the Leaves Begin to Fall"
Watch out for Chills end Fever.

Planters Tasteless Chill Tonic
is sure Cure-GUARANTEED TO CURE. BIG 4
We run no risk In making this guaranty.
Read this: lblan T-
Neeses, S. C. June 16. 1904. i Tm
I had been suffering with chills and fever for the
last five years, and had tried doctors' medicine, but got no
relief until I began to use Planters Chill Tonic. which, I i
am thankful to say, has cured me. Caa RWNK f


C. E. Bolin.
Write us for booklet and special prices.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO..


Chattanoogs..


en. Oil
Tenn.


B. R. POWELL, CHAS. 6. HARRIS. EHERY ASMIEY,
President. VIce-President ndm Treasurer. Secretary.
DIECrcORS:
3. f. Powell. Chas. 6. Harris, 0. W. McMllIa., P. L. Suthertad, V. Coerliton.

THE


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Cner .f Wet Bay aI Ma ibe Sts.
Jacksonville, florida.


Wholesale Drugs & Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices on
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and can save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.


Young's Female College,
Thomasville, Georgia,
CPENS SEPTEMBER-1IJta, 1904. Unsurpaeand Climate, Cultured Community, Splendid
Equipment, select associations, individual attention to each student, limited number of boarding
students; broad, comprehensive courses leading to A. B. and B S. degrees: Faculty of eight Chri-
tian specialists; Music. Elocution and Physical Culture Specialties; total cost from *$O to "5 for
ten months term. Write for catalogue to-
I. COCHK ANE HUNT. President.
"ill Sept. 1st. Richmond, Ky.


THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
NOW OPEN
under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
I H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Speciaty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggies. For Prt hllry Sl Us Yur Crmuirssry C Onrl .
THr aCORD is RH aouTa GRZ&T TRADE JOURnaL.


Turpe

LargP


SAMPA,









4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

The" advertisers are in this isue. If
you want anything, look through thia
lassified list and write to the firm ap-
pearing therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.

AUTOMOBILES
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Central National Bank, Ocala, Fla.
Mercantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK
Foster, Geo. R., Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
CARS.
South Atlantic Car & Manufacturing Co.,
Wayeroes, Ga.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fl.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Larendon, M. W, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
COOPERAGE.
Cannon Co., The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Cooperage Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
Quitman Cooperage Co, Quitman, Ga.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. S., Macon, Ga.
gusta, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. S., Macon, Ga.
FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY.
Florida Freight Claim Agency, Jackson
ville, Fla.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack
sonville, Fla.
IrU liTuKE.
Fetting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla
GENTS' FURWISHIRS
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Ellis-Young Co., Savannah, Ga.
Hargraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Johnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
White, Walton & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, FlI
HARDWARE.
Raird & Co., I. E., Jackskoknville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co., The, Jacksonville, Fl
Briggs Hardware Co., W. HValdosta, Ga.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocals, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co, J. D.. Savannah. Ga.
HARNESS.
MeMurray & Baker, Jacksonvile, Fla.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fl.


HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS.
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Macon, Ga.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co. Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, Fla.
Blum & Co., Chan., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville.
Fla.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jacksonville, Fla.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
MULES AND HORSES.
Thomas, W. R, Gainesville, Fla.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barnes-Jessup Co, The, Jacksonville, Fla-
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co., The, Savannah, Ga.
Independent Naval Stores and Export Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
PAINTS.
Baird & Co., I. E., Jacksonville, Fl.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PECANS.
Griffling Bros. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga
Campbell, J. R., Ocala, Fla.
. Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
i. White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham
Ala.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannal
Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
. Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tamps
Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fla.


Manatee County Abstract Company.
R. Jo ase, Abstracter.
Bradentows, Manatee County, Florida.
Complete and reliable books, titles perfected.
Taxes pid for non-resident property owner% in
Manatee County.
Loans negotiated for non-residents on approved
title with cilt-edged security paying interest
at I' per cent per annum, semi-annually.
Correspondence solicited.
References furnished


Frazier, W. W., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Ocala, Fl.
Southern States Land and Timber Co,
Jacksonville, Fla.
West-Raley-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville,
Fla.
SHIP YARDS
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville ,Fla.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cypress Tank Co., Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Council Tool Co., The, Wananish, N. C.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksonville, &ia.


IuxKPEBU.i PROCESS.
Pine Product Construction Co, TLh, r-
etteville, N. C.
Pine Belt Construction Co., The, ahl%
N. C.
Standard Turpentine Co., The, New Yrk
City.
TUKPE LIJna STILLS.
Baker, M. A, Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
TURPERTUNS STILL TUBS
Davis & Son., G. M., Palatka, FIh
TURPEa Tla VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Ixirzwiju.sS.
Gr;vot Typewriter Exchange, Jaeksoumrri
Pla.
VEHICLES
McMurray & Baker, Jackesoville, Fa.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Pl.
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksoville,
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, a.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fi.


MORTGAGES. RENTS.

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.

Ill W. FORSYTH STREET, JACKSONVILLE FLRIIM




H. A. Renfroe Co,


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at ReadyMade Prices Mail Orders Given Personal Attentio


439 W. Bay Street.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


-11? 111tII I I TItIl It T II[-ITIt I 1lTtI fIIItIIt tIt I a a


. J. P. WILLIAMS. President.
. T. A. JunNIlaU, 2nd Vice-President.
. H. L. KAroN, Secretary.


J. A. G. CAnsoN, Ist VIce-Pradest
J. F. DRalaaTv.3d Vice-Preddent
D. G. White, Treasurer.


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY, |

I11l SIORS I OiN FU ICIt I E i WBO .
Adain Office jAVA4NNX, GEORGIA.
SBrh Ofi PENSACOLA. FL. I Branh Grocery Hoem,
]Brannch Ofie: JACKCSONVILLE .FL. i COLUMBa, OA. o.

Naval Stores Producers arc Invited to Correspond With lis.
S illlllIlll tlltt1t1111 1lll ltt111 t111111111 llllll l lhIl


0. A. BAKER,


Irndlra d So

S Btrker Insom

Seewku Twpen4
tise stills.
Write me for prices a"d amis
F. O. B. any point in Georga. l -
ida. Alabama or MimImlasi. An
stills sold under a garaste.

Job work through the
country a specialty.

The Largest and Oldest Copper Brnsck Ga.
Works In Georgiauswc Go.
Id My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.


Send your order for general printing to the Record


DOW'T FAIL TO MENTION THU RECORD TO ADVERTISERS.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


Contiamed from Page I.
lose the calf fat. The western breeders
recognied this years ago, and now nearly
every ranchman provides food for the win-
ter season, and as a result they are send-
ing cattle to the corn belt which are
equal to or better than those raised in
that section, while 20 years ago their cat-
tle did not bring as much as Florida cat-
tie. Keeping the animal constantly grow-
ing and finishing him well before sending
him to market makes the difference be-
tween high and low priced meat. This
helping the animal need not be to the ex-
tent of keeping the animal growing rapid-
ly at all times, but help should be given
to the extent that the animal will never
lose in weight.
Can we do this? Most assuredly we
ea. There is no section of the United
states where protein and carbohydrates-
e essential digestible products-can be
grown cheaper than in this section of the
South. Protein is essential to flesh forma-
tion in the growing animal. It is a
strange fact that protein which is used to
form flesh, can also be used to supply heat
and energy to the body and may also be
turned into fat; but this is not true of
carbohydrates, they being used to supply
heat and energy. They cannot supply ni-
trogen to form muscle.
aI the corn belt, where the bulk of cat-
tle are fattened for the market, they find
some difficulty in raising enough protein
to balance their rations. When corn alone
is fed, it is too wide, or in other words,
it contains an excess of carbohydrates for
growing animals. This is also true when
the animal is fed on timothy hay; so that
in order to narrow the ration, it is nec-
essary to feed clover or alfalfa hay; or it
may be done with mill stuff, such as lin-
need meal, or cotton-seed meal.
In Florida we have as a source of pro-
tein, the cow pea, beggar-weed, velvet
bean, soy bean, cotton-seed meal and somn
other commercial feed stuffs.
For supplying protein the following1
erops may be mentioned in order of imn
prtaance:
Velvet bean, beggar-weed, cow pea
soya bean, alfalfa.
By referring to the table we find thas
from one acre of velvet beans we can ge
500 Ibs. total protein, about 80 per cent
digestible. This plant also furnishes 12
Is. of carbonaceous matter which is use
for fat formation and supplying heat an
energy to the body.
An average crop of cow pea hay wil
furnish 216 Ibs. of digestible protein an
772 lbs. of digestible carbohydrates.
An average crop of beggar-weed wi
furnish 339 lbs. of protein, about 80 ps
cent. digestible, and about 808 lbs. (
carbohydrates.
Beggar-weed and cowpeas will furnish
protein cheaper than velvet beans, pout
* for pound, because these can be grow
in the cornfield after a crop of corn, am
thus no expense incurred for seeding (
use of land. In case of the cow pea yc
have cost of seed and cost of sowing, bi
the beggar-weed, after it is established
costs nothing, if it follows some culture<
crop. Our method of sowing hay is 1
gather the corn if we have not alreat
cut it, and start the mowing machine b
hind the wagons, cutting cornstalks an
all. In this way we saved on average I
tons per acre for 50 acres. We expect
do better this year. The two crops cot
bined (corn and beggar-weed or cow p
hay), give us just about a balanced ratio
Z In the case of the velvet bean the be


method of hanalng seems to be to provide
something for the beans to run on to
keep them off the ground, and then allow
them to stand in the field until wanted,
and pasture as your stock require. The
cost will depend on how much culture you
give the bean.
The soy bean has not been grown ex-
tensively in this section, but it did fairly
well with us at the Station last year, and
we are going to try it more extensively
this year.
In regard to alfalfa I would say that
good alfalfa hay is about equal to wheat
bran as a food for live stock, and it only
remains for us to make it grow success-
fully in the State to solve the problem of
stock feeding.
If the crops above mentioned could be
saved and fed out to the animals as
wanted, there would be enough of protein
in the velvet bean to last a 1,000-lb. ani-
mal 280 days, or 10 animals 28 days. A
glance at the table will show you that
velvet bean hay is not a balanced ration
and there are only enough carbohydrates
to last about 90 days. In order to make
it clear, I will state than an animal of
1,000 Ibs., live weight, on full feed, re-
quires 2.5 lbs. of protein and 14 lbs. of
carbohydrates, and a small amount of
ether extract per day. This makes what
we call a balanced ration. If the animal
is turned in the field of velvet beans and
not given any carbonaceous or starchy
food, he will consume more than 2.5 lbs.
of protein. This extra amount of pro-
tein might have been used by some other
animal and the heat and energy supplied
and fat formed from a cheaper, starchy
food, such as cassava, sweet potatoes or
something of that sort.
Table I is calculated on the basis of
an average yield per acre, and shows the
total amount of dry matter, total amount
of digestible protein, carbohydrates and
Sfat one acre of these crops will yield.


Table L
One acre will furnish
CROP Av. Yield Dry 'arbo-Eth-

Ibs Ibs lbs lbs
Sw t Potatoes 4 Tons, 312 72 1776 M
Corn ......... 20 bu. 99.8 88.48 747.0442.16
Corn Stover.. 13*) Ibs. 720 20.4 388.8 8.4
Cow Pea Hay. I Ton 176 216 772 23
Bermuda Hay. I 1720 138 7.) 16
Red Clover.... I m94 13 7116 34
Timothy .... 1737 .5 86m 2
Sorghum. gr'n 4 1648 48 976 32
Table II contains those crops for which
there has Iten no reliable digestion co-
efficient determined. The table shows
the chemical analysis only. The sweet
potato was left in this table in order that
cassava nay be compared with it.
Table .


0R i
CHOP.


One acre will furnish

ks" I R.. V-,L,.j6


Cassava............. 4 2 85.6 146.4l419.2 12
Sweet Potatoes.. 4 231210 104 1976
Begger Weed..... 17901331.6 433.8 8 8.8 49 8
Velvet Bean Hay oy38M, 150 1224 72
Teosinte ..........5 Uoo10 2313. #9 122
Ibs
Mexican Clover... 1.5Q J76 84 416.8 740 7 43.35
Velvet Bean Pod. IS(0 I.x !56 M9 85.5 71, 8 0.15
In the case of the cow pea we have
enough protein from one acre of land to
last one animal 84 days, and enough car-
bohydrates to last 55 days.
In case of beggar-weed there is enough
protein from one acre to last 104 days,
and carlshlydrates to last about 58 days.
So that you see all the above rations
are deficient in starch or fat-forming
foods. As a supply for these, we have
cassava, sweet potatoes, teosinte, corn,


Ic.*****4*= = = = = = = = =-r------ ---M-


J. A. Craig Bro.

239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BOCK.

Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings. I

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.







I For Sale

0 7,@0 AtpaS Round Timber, Walton Co. Turpentine priv-
ilege only. $1.50 per acre. Water transportation.
20,000 AemeS Volusia Co., Round Timber, on Rail trans-
portation. Splendid timber for turpentine. Price $3.25. Fee sim-
ple.
Zt000 Aemaw Hillsboro Co. Water transportation. Splen-
did Turpentine timber. $3.00 per acre, fee simple.
We have several choice Turpentine locations in operation. Write
for schedules. Our No. 8 Bulletin will be mailed upon application.


Brobston, Fendig & Co.
Jacksoovile, Florida. Brswid Gewgia.
###e0 9* som\eSW m. 9 oI



The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE RETAIL


HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints, Oils and Glass,
Stoves, Tinware, Cou ntry-Holloware.


10 WEST BAY STREET


Jacksonville. Fla.


T. MURPHY

JACKSONVILLE MACHINE ANo IRON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Iren
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARINE ENGINES AND BOILERS. PULLEYS AND SHAFTING.
Agent for Stationary Engines, Boilers. Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden-
sers. Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Goods
OWER TAISMISSIN All WATER WKS EPIIEIIT A SPECIALTY
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


Cable Address. Florida


iStandard Naval Stores:

Company.

:DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN*


SR.OSIN

AND TURPENTINE.

Jacksonville. Fla.
*- . . . . . . .--


WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS MENTION THE RECORD.


I I


- --









6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY


Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located in the heart of the Lumber District gives us advan-
tage of cheicest material at lowest Cast.


sorghum, grass and many other plants.
In case of cassava we have enough
starchy matter to last about 173 days and
protein in cassava to last 25 days.
If we add the nutrients from one acre
of velvet beans and one acre of cassava
we have enough protein to last one ani-
mal 305 days and enough carbohydrates
to last 263 days. Thus you see that about
1 1-4 acres of cassava are required to bal-
ance one acre of velvet beans. In re-
gard to feeding these two crops on a large


scale, I think the best plan would be to
give the cattle a feed of cassava by pull-
ing what they will consume in one day
and either hauling it to them or turn the
cattle in the field and allow them to fill
up on cassava before turning on the vel-
vet beans; following method each day.
By reference to the table you will
see that sweet potatoes are about as val-
uable as cassava, being a little under in
carbohydrates but higher in protein.
It has not been determined yet which
will furnish carbohydrates cheaper, the
the cassava or sweet potatoes. In some


feeding tests at the Florida Experiment
Station, I found it takes a less number of
pounds of cassava to make a lb. of gain
than it does of sweet potatoes, but the
sweet potatoes made a more rapid gain.
We have not collected enough data, as
yet, to make positive statements.
Teosinte, which gives such large quan-
tities of carbohydrates and protein, has
not been used extensively. It is valued
principally for green feed. No digestion
work has been carried on with it, hence,


we do not know just how much digesti-
ble matter an acre would yield.
In some sections. Mexican clover fur-
nishes a source of carbohydrates, but is
rather low in protein.
Crab-grass and sand-burr should not
be left out of the list of grasses furnish-
ing a supply of carbohydrates.
By comparing the yield per acre of di-
gestible nutrients of the common crops of
the North and those of the South it will
be ueen that we can grow more digestible
protein and carbohydrates per acre and at
ess cost.


The combination of crops that can be
grown on the same piece of land in one
season is not shown in the table; e. g.-
a crop of cow peas or beggar-weed can be
grown in the corn and this saved for hay.
Many other combinations may be made
where the crops are to be saved in the
silo.

Mr. J. R. Kenly, fourth vice-president
and general manager of the Atlantic Coast
Line, Wilmington, N. C., writes the Manu-
facturers' Record, sending further infor
nation about the 500 ventilated 60,000-
pound capacity "ox cars ordered, as re-
ported last week from the South Balti-
more Steel Car & Foundry Co. The cars
will be 336 feet long, double-felt lined, with
side and end ventilators, and are designed
for the handling of perishable fruits and
vegetables. They will all have steel trucks
and steel body bolsters, metal brake
beams, Westinghouse air-brakes, Thorn-
burg tandem draft-gear attachments and
Tower couplers.


all IN go 130 ik
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES. BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilizer, Oil adl Ile Ma-
chinery, and Supplies ald Repair
CAPACITY FOR 300 HANDS.
Machine Tools, Wood-Working IMaelhiy,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hangers, Leather am
Rubber Belting and Hoe, Bailroad sad
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Pbw
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps, Feed Water Heaters an
Hoisting Engines.
AUGUSTA. CA.
Semd = ye om yo r C ma00rh
cheha. MThe necei pata mo eM -
n7y d eck tha an thla piatig bhu
in the South embim-- .


JOHN HENDERSON, President.


J. A. CRANFORD, Secretary.


CHATTANOOGA POTTERY CO.,


Factory located Daisy, Tenn.


Jacksonville, Fla.


Sole Manufacturers of


The Herty Turpentine Cups


If you expect to use cups next season place

your orders now for future delivery. Prices and

all information cheerfully furnished on


Cups, Gutters and all Tools
Used in the HERTY system.


Address all communications


I he Chattanooga Pottery Company,

Jacksonville, Fla.

AR1 YOU A SUBSCR13a TO THIE RCORD?


~:~S L~lc~r~ii~---- - - -rrrr







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


INVOLUNTARY BANKRUPTCY.
PetitiM Fl ed Aaia t J. J. McDoImeh &
C4.--4Lialim about $swooo.
On August 18th there was filed in the
office of the United States Court in Sa-
vannah an involuntary petition of bank-
ruptey against J. J. McDonough & Co.
The petition was filed by E. A. Weil and
others. The papers were forwarded im-
mediately to Judge Emory Speer, of the
Southern District of Georgia in Macon.
Yesterday morning Mr. W. L. Wilson, of
the frm of the firm of W. L. Wilson &
Co., doing a general insurance business,
was appointed receiver of the property.
The petition was filed by Messrs. Gar-
rard and Meldrim representing three cred-
ftors of Mr. McDonough and McDonough
Co. The amounts due the creditors were
not stated.
Messrs. McDonough and McDonough are
largely interested in different enterprises
throughout Georgia, South Carolina and
Florida, chiefly lumber lands.
The liabilities of the alleged bankrupt
firm will amount to between $250,000 and
$300,000. There are two banks in Savan-
nah interested to the extent of $17,000,
between them. It is stated that the as-
sets are large and varied and it is thought
that the preferred creditors will be paid
a large per cent. of the amounts due
them. There are some who believe that
the property can be so handled as to pay
out much of the indebtedness.
In an involuntary bankrupt petition the
alleged bankrupt has under the United
States law ten days in which to file an
answer to the proceedings against them.
It will probably be several days before the
answer is filed. The case will be set for
a hearing after the answer is filed.
This comprises all that can be obtained
from any source up to this time. Mr. M.
(YBryne, of the firm of O'Oonnor, O'Brynne
& Hartridge, attorneys for McDonough &
Co., said that they were not yet in a po-
sition to give exact figures and therefore
they could not talk about the matter.
When asked if they would make any
general statements in regard to the filing


S02VStandard Turpentine

a sCompany

Has revolutionized the wood distilling busi-
S ess in the South. After three months of care fa
testing our machinery at the Waycross, Georgia %
mill, we are now ready to sell direct any size o
plant and guarantee results by our new KRUG 0 4
PATENT STEAM PRESSURE PROCESS.
STANDARD TURPENTINE COMPANY.





Kohn= Furchgott= Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


of the petition he remarked that it was HIochelle and Grove Park, 8,000 acres of
just an ordinary failure. \iwhlch are now being worked with great
Mr .McDonough has been in business, profit.
chiefly in the lumber business, in Sa- Messrs. Hobbs & Holder purchased this
vannah for many years. The filing of the property from M. L. Moore about eight
petition came as a great surprise to the months ago, the consideration being $45,-
business world there. 000. They have been working the place
regularly ever since, and have succeeded
Big Deal in Turpentine Lands in marketing several hundred barrels of
Mr. J. L. Hobbs, of the firm of Hobbs products, which brought good prices.
& Holder, has disposed of his immense in- Mr. Pope, who is a thorough and com-
terests to J. D. Pope, of Ocala, the con- patent naval stores man, will take charge
sideration being $22,000. of his interests at once, and in future the
This property is one of the finest and firm name will be Holder & Pope. It goes
most extensive in the State of its kind. without saying that inasmuch as both are
The firm controls about 15,000 acres of fine business men, the venture will prove
finely timbered lands in the vicinity of successful under their management.


D. M. FLYNN, President


D. M. Flynn


Walter Ray


W. B. JOHNSON, Vice-President


J. W. Oglesby


DIRECTORS
L. Horn


Independent Naval Stor

Jacksonville, FlI


Naval Stores Factors

Capital Stock, $5
The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invi
Our interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is


Some Money and Some Tin

All Producers are Requested to Call Or


A. S. PENDLETON, Sec'y & Treas

N. G. Wade J. L. Medlin W. B. Johnson




es & Export Co.,

)rida.


and Operators.

0oo,ooo.
ted. Liberal advances made on consignments.
purely a co-operative company.


iber For Somebody.

Sor Correspond With Us.


TH= RECORD IS THE"OPERATORS' RELIXANC."


.. The..


/


Avrewtlatmu ey (ehambss or now
advewtlneiemts) skoew weem urm
tuesday me-lu to Immue aimertle
Ia the tmme of the mme week.

Quitman Cooperage Co.,
QUITMAN. GA.
manufacturers of

HIGH COR SPIRIT BAIR LS
According to speeifieatios of
Board of Trade, Savannah.
Also make
Dip and Syrup Barrels.


p













30


_ _


-------------- ~i-~i-~i-~i-~ii~ r~mr~c~mcscscSSarSESSSaffSE3U~-~?s~+~+~*


uu_~s~_~s?r?~*?+~u~~u ~n*JIn~n~ ~mrcl---------------


-1 0-11111ir -








8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


REDUCTION YELLOW PINE OUTPUT.

Policy of Curtailment Kept from Market
1751000,000 Feet Durin July.
Thle reduction in volume of output of
the yellow pine mills of the South is
having a good effect.
The Southern Lumber Manufacturers'
Association decided that reduction at this
time was a wise policy, and it was also
considered a wise course of action by the
(eorgia Interstate Sawmill Association.
These two powerful organizations, cover-
ing as they do, the entire yellow pine
belt, greatly reduced the output, for to-
gether they represent a big majority of
the yellow pine lumber which is produced
today. Following their lead many of the
yellow pine mills not affiliated with eith-
er association decided to reduce the vol-
ume of their product.
Many of the mills were running a night
and day turn. The night shift was cut
off. Mills that were running six days in
the week closed down their mills two
days of this time. In addition to this,
many mills whose plants needed repairs
took advantage of the time to shut down
entirely.
The clearing house of the Southern
Lumber Manufacturers' Association shows
that during July 131 mills, members ol
that organization, curtailed their produc-
tion 106,000,000 feet, and that out of a
total of 223 yellow pine plants the cur-
tailment amounted to 144,000,000 feet.
The clearing house also shows by the
report of fifty mills that they had ship
ped 13,000,000 more feet than they had
cut. This will probably show, when all
the membership of this association has
reported, that the reduction in stocks on
hand is probably over 25,000,000 feet.
Couple this with the fact that the 150,-
000,000 feet of stock was left of the log
rather than put on sticks, and it demon-
strates a relief to the market of 175,000,-
000 feet. It is calculated that two months
more of equal reduction to that of July
will put the supply below the demand
and cause values to assume the place thai
they held earlier in the year.
By states the reduction for the montl
of July has been estimated as follows:
Arkansas, over 34,000,000 feet; Missouri
over 5,000,000 feet; Louisiana, over 39,
750,000; Texas, 31,500,000; Mississippi
and Florida, members of the Southern
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, re
duced their output over 3,724,000 feet.
To this should be added the curtail
ment of the Georgia Interstate Saw-mil
A.\ssociation, from which no report ha:
yet been received.-Southern Lumber
mlan.
Georgia Sawmill Men Intend to Renev
Efforts to Secure Car Equipment.
Savannah, Ga., Aug. 24.-The lumber
men of the Georgia Interstate Sawmil
Association have not given up their figh
to have the Georgia legislature pass :
flat car equipment bill, despite the fac
that after several years of effort to se
cure such a measure, it is still a thing o
the future. The bill was reported on ad
versely by the Railroad Committee of thi
House on the last day of the legislative
session just ended.
Mr. William B. Stillwell is for the milli


standing to their guns. He is still sat-
isfied that the desires of the lumbermen
as set forth in the measure they chami
pioned are so just that it is but a question
of time when they will secure they law
they want. Discussing the matter, he
said:
"Yes, we failed to get our bill through,
but this is only another delay-only a halt
on the march. The work will proceed,
using the knowledge and experience we
have so far gained when and where it
can be used to best advantage. It is
needless to talk meantime, except as our
purpose may suggest and require.
"We will say that our bill was not
.illed in the legislature by the adverse
-eport of the Railroad Committee, but by
manipulations of the railroads that de-
ayed this report to such time as made it
impossible for us to get a vote on the
Jill in the House. We feel sure that had
the report been promptly made we could
mave gotten a vote and have passed the
jill in the House over an adverse report of
the committee, just as we did in the Sen-
ate.
"We discovered the enemies' strong
point and our weak ones, and will profit
by the discovered in our future work."


During July 12,488,138 feet of lumber,
49,460 crousties and 21,550 casks of tur-
pentine were shipped from Fernandina,
Florida.

The Industrial Lumber Co., of Beau-
mont, Texas, Ihas been given a contract
for 2,000,000 feet of lumber to be used
in stocking new yards in central Texas.

The Lumber Storage & Wharfage Co.,
recently incorporated with a capital stock
of $50,000, has applied for pier No. 6 of
the new city docks to be constructed in
Baltimore's burned district, where it may
naugurate a system of warehousing per-
mitting the use of storage receipts as
collateral.

Shipments for the month at Savannah
are 3,123,570 feet, steam; 3,161,938 feet
sail; total shipments since July 1, 11,-
870,251 feet steam, and 11,483,060 feet
sail.

Mr. T. .I. Dinkins, formerly president
and general manager of the Andrew Han-
ley Company, of Savannah, has left that
concern to take charge of the general sup-
ply business and building materials de-
partments of the Savannah Lumber Com-
pany, which he did August 1. Mr. F. H.
Morse, recently with the Georgia Car and
Manufacturing Company ,is now in the
East selecting machinery with which the
Savannah Lumber Company will equip a
large plant for the manufacture of doors.
sash and blinds, office and bank fixtures,
interior finish and mill work of all kinds.

Mr. Harvey Granger, of the Granger-
Stubbs Company, is taking in the St.
Louis Exposition this week.


KIRK & JONES

DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
OACKSONVILLE. FLA.


. 1lit tro I ti tt t1t liut t 1 ti el t t ti l i ttl u ttttttl

: MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

S Still Boilers anrd Pumps.
SSHIP. BUILDING and REPAIRING.
4. Jcksonville Fla.
*III3Iiii<,IIIIIItIII31r*IIII3 *tI3II*In 41 111111 31

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuiel and Supply Oo.

Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


Cunmmer Lumher Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leeaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES end CRATES.

**Standard ClothiSo***n**S** CompanyOs* s Is

. Standard Clothing Company.


One Price


D


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
i7 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksowvle, Fler.
N tetsen and Hawes Hats. Speelal Attention Given to all Orers.


he*- aE.*e~sUsOUSUUssemCeUmOU


R. TOLAR.


J. H. HART.


swomememUsUs u 55m US eUC


T. H. BLA.CHLY.


J. R. TOLAR, -J


(Established 1832.)

TOLAR. HART & CO..
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


Commission


Merchants


and Jobbers of Navel Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futnres.


J. D. WEED L CO.,
SAVANNAK. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.


Read the Record Adv't's.


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


THE RECORD KEEP8 PACE WITH SOUTHERN PROGRESS.


W. D. KRENSON









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


AMONG THU OPERATORS.
Mr. U. C. Durham, a prominent turpi
tine operator of Middleburg, Fla., was
visitor in the city this week.

Mr. W. W. Stewart, of Conway, F
spent several days in Jacksonville t
week attending to matters of business

Mr. R. G. Skinner, a leading na
stores man from Hogan, Fla., was reg
tered at the Aragon Hotel this week.

Mr. L. A. Reeves, late of the Venat
Reeves Co., Kanapaha, Fla., passed throat
the city this week.

Mr. W. A. Sutherland, of Green 0
Springs, Fla., spent several days in Ja
sonville this week.

Mr. W. E. Carraway, one of the le
ing turpentine men of the Palatka seeti
and located at Carraway, was in the <
attending to business matters this wi
Mr. .. A. McDonald, who recently I
chased the turpentine interests of
K. Boson, at Denver. Fla.. was in tc
this week.

Mr. J. M. Deaton, one of the larF
naval stores and timber men in the St
was in the city to-day.

Mr. W. B. Conoley, Enville; Mr. T
Hall. Ocala; Mr. J. J. Phillips, Dinsmn
and Mr. S. Smith, manager Bostwick
val Stores Co., Bostwick, Fla., were
Jacksonville this week.

Mr. (oss Mattox, of the Orange F
Naval Stores Co., Orange Park, Fla.,
in the city last Monday.

Mr. O. .S. Olmstead, of Julia, Fla., sl
one day in town the first part of
week.

Mr. Pattison, of the Julington Ni
Stores Co., was in the city this week

FLORIDA'S CUBAN CATTLE TRA

Impresive Figare Given out from
Sote County.
An idea of the immensity of S,
Florida's cattle trade with Cuba ma3
gained from the following article re
duced from the Arcadia News, shol
the recent shipments from the one oe
ty of DeSoto:
On July 8 the News published a
tailed report of shipments of cattle a
through the port of Punta Gorda by
Moto County cattlemen up to and in(
ing the shipment of June 17. These
tie were purchased by Captain Ji
McKay, and the report showed that
head of cattle had been shipped, for w
Captain McKay paid cattlemen in
county in round numbers the sun
S 75,512.
J. G. King kindly furnished the N
this week with a detailed statement
the cattle sold by King Bros., R
Whidden, R. C. Hendry's heirs am
N. Parker & Bros., all of Arcadia, to
tain W. H. Towles of Fort Myers
shipped through the port of Punta R
The report aggregates 6,028 head.
which Captain Towles paid $91,66
The following is the detailed report:
Date. No. V
April 5 ........... 399 $6,0
April 18 ............ 12 8,1
April 22 ............ 554 8,
Nay 5 .. ....... .. 501 8,0


May 7 ........ .... 436
May 27 ...... .. .. .. 669
May 27 ............ 592
June 5 ........ 997
June 17 ........... 562
June 18 .......... 520
July 8 ...... ......... 286


6,38.90
9,962.00
7,625.00
11,756.50
8,992.00
4 82.00
4,576.00


Totals ...... .....6,028 91,662.40
The total number of cattle purchased
by Captain McKay, added to those pur-
chased by Captain Towles, will aggregate
10,959 head, for which cattlemen received
a total sum of $167,174.40. Since the
report rendered by Captain McKay more
than a month ago, several additional
boatloads have been shipped through Pun-
ta Gorda, sufficient to bring the above
sum in round numbers to not less than
$200,000, which is a pretty good showing
for a summer business in one particular
line.
The foregoing is only one evidence of
the solid basis upon which the prosper-
ity of DeSoto County is fixed. The fact
that it is also the largest orange pro-
ducing county in the State and a large
shipper of vegetables, fish, phosphate,
lumber and naval stores, places it upon
the most substantial basis of any coun-
ty in the State.

Cypru.
Cypress Prices Current F. 0. New York
Market. Lumber rough or dreed:
Tank stock, 11-2 to 3 inches, $48.75 to
$56.75; Firsts and Seconds, 1 to 3 inches,
$44.25 to $52.75; Selects, 1 to 3 inees,
$38.25 to $45.25; Shop, I to 3 inches, $.25
to $40.25.
For prices on 8 inch add $1 per 1,000 ft;
on 10 inch add $2 per 1,00 ft; on 12 inch,
add $3.50 per 1,000 ft.
Bevel siding, 1-2x6 inch clear, D to A,
$11.75 to $24.25; ceiling, 3-8x4 or 6 inch
clear, D to A, $13.25 to $24.2; 1-2x4 or 6
inch clear, D to A, $1800 to $27.50; 5-8x4
or 6 inch clear, D to A, $2225 to $3225;
Flooring, drop siding and ceiling, 4 or 6
inch, D to A, $27.75 to $43.75.

U you are thminkIa of buylar a
eo .ell3m the one yo havwe or
11di0m$ If you mr tlnkting of so-
Ivttin in mny IS& try I you w 1
to hy mmehi nry oft ay krd. dro
the industrial Reeo D. a yoefal -.
tellina of your wantmm.


cat-
imes CYPRESS WATER TANKS
4,931 Best in the Word.
whichh
this For delivered prices write,
Iof Cyrea TaMk Ce., M0beeAi

zews

. FOiE.
I Z.. I9 J.
Cap- MANUFACTURER OF
and

for
2.40.

value. NfITE F IR K1ES.
09.00
8800 Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.
64.00 PT .
0600. *.


McMurray Livery, Sale and Transfer Co.

HORSES AND MULES.
We carry the largest stock of any stable In the city, and have alway.
on hand 100 to 150 head of an kinds and prices. If in need of aay, tgi
us a call. or write -for what you want.
I. B. DALTON, Manager. JackaomavI.


COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVANNAH FOR FIVE TrWIS


1904-05
April 1 .................... ND
April 8 ..... .............. 53
April 15 ..................... 54%
April 22 .................. 54%
April 29 ................... 53%
May 6 .................... 55
May 13 ................... 54%
May 20 ..................... 54%
May 27 ................... 53%1
June 3 .................... .54
June 10 .................. 52%
June 17 .................. 52%
June 24 ... ............... 52%
July 1 ... .............. 53
July 8 ................... 52%
July 15 .................... 52%
July 22 .................... 53%
July 28 .................... 53%
Aug. 4 ................... 52%
Aug. 12 ...................... 53%
Aug. 19 ................... 54%


1903-04
ND
50
49%
47
45
45
47%
47%
49
45%
46
46%
47%
47%
47%
48
49%
50m. %
49%
52
52


1902-03
45
42%
42%
43
42%-43
43
45
45
45%
45%
47%
48%
47/,
45%
45%
44%
44
43%
43%
44%
44%


190143
34
32
32%
31%-32
M.
32
31%
32%
.1U%
32%
32
34%
33%
34%
34%
33
U2%
34
33
34


19"M
63%
53%
46
47%
46%
47
48
49
49
46

43%
42%
43%
43%
44%
43
42
39%

38


Wanted and For Sale


DEPARTMENT.

Advertisements Will be Inserted s t' s aDeartmeat at the fWi brt ates:
For one week. cents a lie.
For two weeks, 35 centsa lie.
For three weeks 5 cents a lime.
For four weeks, cents a lie.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings an be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of amer
containing advertisement. Copy must be in this oice not later tan Thmday
anorming to secure insertion in Friday's paper.
m


Stiller Wasted.
Prefer a young man who has a very
good education and a fair knowledge of
turpentine business. L. T.Hardee, Mulat,
Fla. 2t

Stiller Wanted.
An experienced turpentine stiller want-
ed Man with family preferred. Address
Fletcher & Murrell, Altman, Fla.

Wanted.
Woodsman and stiller wanted. Must be
well recommended, sober and industrious.
Address Producer, care Industrial Record,
.laeksonville, Fla. 6t

Wanted.
Wanted-Small turpentine farm of 5 to
10.crops, with additional timber for 20
crops. A. O. Wright, Industrial Record
office, city.


Wanted.
WANTED-Position by experienced
bookkeeper or storekeeper. Especially ex-
perienced in naval stores bus cas. a
furnish all references required. Address
Position, care Industrial Record.
8-12-04-3t.

Position Wanted.
Accountant, twenty years' experience in
New York; wants position South on ae-
count of long and cold seasons of the
No-th. Address H. Lefevre, 33 West
145th St.. New York, N. Y. 4t

Tarpestlne Men.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pusi OuCt-
fit for your still. No. I outlt pump 2JM
gallons per hour at a eat of 3 1n -ad
requires no attention whil r' .
Started in one minute. J. P. Capb
Oeala, Fla.


For Sale. Wanted.
Six seven-menths-old blood bound pups, A partner, with 18 to 25 thousand dol-
well trained for their age. They will take lars to put into lands, turpentine ad
a man's trail and follow him to the tree. sawmill timber with a turpentine place
Also we have bought convict camps out already in operation and large tract of
and have several suits convict's stripes at good timber adjacent that needs to be
50c. to 75c. each, also about seven dozen bought. Healthy country. Freight rates
blankets, cost *9.00, worth about $450, as cheap. Best opening in the country for an
good as new: 21 single mattresses, cost investment. Not necessary for party to
$3.75 wholesale, worth $1.50, as good as be an experienced operator. Address
new ticks; 12 single bunks, cost $2.00, "Timber," care Industrial Record, Jack-
worth $1.00, as good as new. and a few sonville, Fla. 4t
tents. We would be glad to give any com-
munication our prompt attention along
this line. B. F. McCall, Jr., & Bro., Jen- for Sale.
nings, Fla.


Position Wanted.
By experienced man as woodsman or
distiller; married and can furnish best
references. Address A. J. T., care In-
dustrial Record, Jacksonville. Fla. 4t


.I5,000 acres 9st. .lons and Volusia; 13,-
000 acres. DeSoto County; 14,000 acres
DeSoto County; 30.000 acres, Calhoun
County; 20,000 acres Hillsboro County;
80,000 acres Manatee County. All round
timber. D. T. Doughtry, Room 22 Bald-
win Bldg. 4t


THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."


--








10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


3L 6 An s. Hinunan. AraUm P. Pnr *
Presldeas. Vioe-President. Cashier.
The Mercantile Exchange Bank, d
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA,
Capital. $200.000. Surplus, $100.000
STATE DEPOSITARLY.
Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Sae Deposit Boxes. 100 per Yer.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week
f


2' Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Price Rept Sales Exp. 1903
Mon., Aug. 29 153%i 614 i 1 2 5%
Tues., Aug. 30 (531/ 757 192 190 56
Wed., Aug. 31 153%1 649 93 056%
Thur, Sept. 1 152%1 748 563 510 56%
ic fo. the Week at Savanah.
S Monday, Aug. 29. Last Year.
......... .... 4.80 3.70
WC.;............. 4.55 3.50
N.'- . .. .. ... 4.20 3.25
M%!s.. .. ... .. 3.95 3.15
K .... ...... .. 3.60 3.10
I .............. 3.30 2.I
H ..............2.75 2.40
G ..............2.70 2.10
F ............. 2.60 2.00
E-. ............. 2.55 1.95
D ............ 2.50 1.85
AB." .... 2.45 1.80
Ieipts 21327, sale 983, exports 3,450.
Aug. 30.-Rosin firm. Priced
Receipts 2.628, sales 2,888, ex
p 1,270.
Wednesday. Aug. 31.-Rosin firm. Re-
ceipta and sales continue good. A, B, C,
D. E and. F grades advanced 2 1-2 cents
a barrel. K, N and WW advanced 5 cents
a barrel. M advanced from $3.95 to $4.20.
Ree'pts 2,008, sales 2.112, exports, none.
hursday, Sept. l.-4osins firm. All
gr s from H to WW advanced 5 cents
a nrrel over. Wednesday's quotations.
Receipts 4,687. sales 2,034, exports 3,83,6.

Svamna naval Store Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 ........... 6,495 44.550
Receipts Sept. I ........ 748 4.687
Receipts previously ......106,333 293.322
.,.._Tqtal .............. 13,576 342.559
Exports Sept. 1 ........ 510 3.836
Exports previously ..... 86,976 262,757
Total ..........8.... 7.486 2665.93
Stock Sept. 1....... 26.090 75>.96
Stock last year ......... 19.603 61,00

Sed all orders for printing for the
turpeatie and cmmiary trades to the
mpcra ofice to insure a prompt delivery.


Range of Turpentine and Rosia at Savan-
nah Sept. i and Same Day
Last Year.
Sept. I Aug. 31. Sept. 1
1904 1904 1903
Spirits 52% 53% 56%
Rosins Steady. Steady. Firm
Sales 563 93 339
Rosins Firm Firm. Firm.
WW ...... 4.90 4.85 3.70
WG ........ 4.65 4.60 3.50
N ......... 4.30 4.25 3.25
M ......... 4.05 4.00 3.15
K .........I 3.70 3.65 3.10
1 .... .. 3.35 3.30 2.90
H ......... 280 2.75 2.40
G .......... 2.70 2.70 2.10
F ........ 2.621 2.62% 2.00
E ......... 2.57% 2.57% 1.95
D ......... 2.52% 2.52% 1.85
C. B, A. ... 2.47% 2.47 1.80
Ipales ......I 2,034 1 2,112 1........

Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Review.
New York, Aug. 30. 1904.
The Industrial Record. Jacksonville, Fla.
Spirits Turpentine. Business continues
very dull; large consumers are not in evi-
dence, while jobbing orders are very light.
Stock, 1.158 barrels. We quote Machines
56 1-2 cents.
Rosin.-There is a fair inquiry for all
grades. F to I being especially scarce. We
quote:
BC. $2.70: D. $2.75; E, $3.00; F, $3.05
to $3.10; G, $3.10; H. $3.20; I. $3.60; K,
$4.00; M. $4.40; N. $4.50; WG. $4.85 to
$4.90; WW, $5.15 to $5.25.
TOLAR, HART & CO.
New Sub-Association Organised at Perry,
Florida
In a recent letter from Mr. W. F. Ted-
der. who says: "The Taylor County Sub-
Association was organized at Perry, Fla.,
on the 22d. with a good membership, and
that the association will attend the an-
nual convention in a body on the 14th and
15th of September." This organization
w bll he one of the strongest "subs" in the
T. 0. A. and the Record wishes them
much sucer cs, which will no doubt be at-
tained with the able assistance of Mr.
Tedder. who is secretary and treasurer,
and with the c ,-o"peration of the members
who are all good turpentine operators.


Crop df Spirif
Oop
Spirits.
Wilmingtom...... ....1 ,ll
Charton..... ..... ...240
Savannah...... .. ..176418
Brnswiek.. ........ 66,008
wMobs.. .. .. .. ...... I.121s
New Orleam...... ..... 38617
Carrabele...... ......dloed
Georgetown. ..... .. 7,516
Pemacola.. ........ 42554
Jax. & Ferndina .... 187,210
Tampa ...... .........dod
Totals.. .. .. ...... 6301


Sand R ins for Three Years.
1-0-OL Crop 190E-03 cep 19op -f
Rosin. Spirits. RoBsi Spirit. 1- a
89,a67 1,883 113,98 1,31 1M.4
3,159 3,007 11835 3,004 12
60,938 270,670 940,507 313,06 1,rl,
184,527 68,947 244,106 79,060 2,15
50s,80 180I 9 79,372 321,M6 m s
133,132 33,10 3 106,03 21,03 8 9
dosed 3,34 32,148 8,177 4I*
44,214 10,07 46,8m MSA 6lk5
205,982 38765 182,05 27,7 154,3
653,e 1 91,976 376,211 70,00 m3ji,
cloed 13,56 40,m4 154N *u
2,60,325 571,0906 2,184,818 6s324A ,1,


R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KNIOHT, Sec. and Tress.

MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.

Herbert A. Ford, Geo. H. Ford, F. L. Water,
President. Vice-Pres. Cashier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CA TA L, $50,000.00.
DIRERons: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicited.

C. H. BARNES, Pres. J. D. SHAW, Vice-Pres. RALPH JESSUP, Se.-Trea

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonvile, Pensacola, Fernandia and Savaummt
Correspondece Solicited. JACKSONVILL. FLA.
.*9+#6 4 96+ ++++- :-;-.ne.~M-946 }**909489 *,o++-9++t**
You Want a Turpentine Location?

* You Want a Sawmill Location?
9 You Want any Kind of Florida Land?

| You Mean Business?
0 CAIl on or Write to
Cal J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS.
* Ocala. Florida


***-ft*A~ft6**ftdtdftftdft*ft*ftfbft~ft* ft*


f, .(, .lmpeots of Turpentine to U. K.
,^ The" following table is compiled by James Watt & Son, of London, from the
4Ml' returns. For convenience of comparison we have turned ewts into barrels
a'2S ewt. equal 100 barrels.
1897 1 8 1899 1900 1901 1904 1903
From U. ., bbls. .... 152,652 173,785 149,375 174,446 193,429 1622 143,61
From France, bbis.... 161 244 517 283 850 1,56 4,J30
From other countries.. 1,494 878 50 840 63 930 616
154,7 174,907 149,942 177,569 194,341 157,i8A 148,9
From RuIik .......... 2,815 483 4,998 8,521 6,861 8,711 17,06
total Barrels .. 167,122 179,090 154,940 186,090 201,202 166,393 166,92
i, --Thus the import of Russian Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 1903 was double
4hat 'b 1M00, and over six times as much as in 1897. It is interesting to see how
A4lh 'import lcnetuates with the price of American Turpentine.
fPemiitag of Import of Russian ..1.79 2.33 3.22 4.57 3.41 5.24 10.56
Av. Price Amer. Turp. in L oa ..21-6 24-6 34-1 35-4 27-1 33-1 42-2

FOR SALE.
50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
milL. s 5 per aere. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
bepreha= l. One of the best opportunities in t e State.
. IBU KMAI N, mnaon mtretn
:'* OUV pVPr I l J nok eornvlll, IP'l


M. A. BRIGGS, President.
H. C. BRIGGS, Ist Vice-President.


HOMER BROWN, 2nd Vice-Presdent.
J. C. McDONALD, See'y and Treas.


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

* VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-

I RIXFORD AXES.

They are the BEST. Others imitate but none du-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the finest
Temper, hold the keenest edge, cut better and last longer *
* than any other axe.
S This has all been proved by years of actual use.
g Send us your orders.

W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE COMPANY, d
SValdosta. Georgia.
t * ~39ri9iF9i999999g9 y


THE RELIABILITY OF OUR ADVETISERS VOUCHED FOLR










THE WEEKLY 1NmnJWiMhIAL RECORD.


RAILROAD NOTES. of a switching engine being obliged to --
Big Freight Yard. push each car into its particular siding, missioners of this country will meet at Washington, Bolivar, Sharkey and Yasoo
The Industrial Record learns that the a number of cars are hauled up on the Birmingham, Ala. and subsequently visit counties. The incorporators are J. 4 -..
Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Rail- hump and started off one by one, running Pensacola and Mobile on their way to Thompson, of Atlanta, M. M. Rijehe, of
road and the Washington & Southern by gravity to their respective positions on Mexico. The commerciall Club of Mobile Birmingham, W. W. otdoe And 3JeMi a
Railway expect to construct quite an the side-tracks, the yard hands merely will provide for the entertainment of the Skinner ,of Greenville, and David MeMul-
S extensive freight yard near Alexandria, operating the switches to guide them to visitors in that city. len, of Evansville, 111.
Va. It will have a capacity of about 2,000 their proper places.
ears per day. -The Delta Southern Railroad is reported Construction is reported begun on the
This yard, according to a report front In November the State railroad com- to have field its charter in Mississippi to extension of the J.Dubii t ,S4,tiweem
Washington ,is for the purpose of facili- build a line about 60 miles long through Railway.
stating the interchange of through freight Sam 'lP. Hol es& Co.
between the Pennsylvania, the Baltimore a The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.
& Ohio, the Atlantic Coast Line, the Stf tkS, BeSlf Cottn, SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE. ROBIN .
Southern, the Seaboard Air Line, the Grain and Previsions.
To United Kingdom, In gallon: To United Kingdom. imbarreli' 11'16i '
Chesapeake & Ohio and other railroads. E Month 1-04 1-: 1101-a Month 34 dIM1-- Im.b
The construction of the yard on the gray- NEW YORK GOTTON EXCHANGE Apr.. .. .. ... 6, 181. s SM3 April.. .. .... 3 m :a m
ity plan will result in economy of expen- C AG BOARD T DE Jue .. 1 1 Jne ...... ... 4u n
diture in money and effort. Under this JCHICAGO BOARD Of TRADE 3.3 .0 Jul ......... am 5 Lr
plan a hump is made, and from it rad Direct private wires to all exchanges. Aust .. .... .. Mm ,Ist.14 August .. .. .. 74AI a
late a number of tracks and switches to Local stocks and bonds a specialty. September.. ... T7721 6W,5 mM September.. .. . 4l 641 .1
different sidings. In drilling cars instead Bell Pbooe 853 BaiWMi Block october ..6 1,638 1,2,7 21 oto ber. ..... 707 2 a
N o v e m b e r . 6 6 1. 38 1 2 36 7 9 L O, 3 N o v e m be r . 41 0 -, = 9
---- December .. 1,659,6856 1,531,779 576,784 December .. 1;46 i
Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets. ,anuary. .. e,4 37340 7,6sO Jnuary ... s2as5 33 a
1903- -1904. February... 116,45 38,00 247 February ... 28,361 37 dl
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE March.... 35,50 ...... March ... 3016.5 ,d4
Apr 1 Apr. 3 Apr. 10 Apr. 17 Apr. 2 M ay 1 May 3 May 15 May 2 May 2 To Belgium and Netherlands, be eqf m
ND ND S 4a 1-32 4-2 41-2 41 To Belgium and Netherlands, in gallons: pounds:
Jae 6 June 1 June 1 June 2 July 3 July 1I July 17 July A July 31 Aug. Month 1-06 18 1c1 Month 136:1 -Il
OcL4 1 47 7 4% 48 April ........ ,SU12 0.447 Included April .... .. .. ISn i jii I
Aug. 14 Au 1 Aug. 2 Sept. 4 Sep 1 Sept 18 Sept Oct. 2 Oct. Oct. .. .... .. a, a1 in alIothr May.... .... 21? 8 N
B% 13% N5% 64 3-4 57 ND U 7 1-2 U 1-2 3-4 June...... ..... im ,1* Europe June .. .. ...... , St tree
Oct. 8, Oct. 32 Nov. 6 Nov. I, Nov. Dec. &1 Dec. 10, Dec. 17. Dec. 1. Jan. 14 Jul .
1 M1-2 6 5 f i 56 U 1-4 61-4 6 21-244 July ........ I -- 3 21 26 July.. ......... ..2 146 -
Jan. 22, Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18, Feby. 25 Mch. 3 Mch. 10 Mch 24 Septembe.... w5. 4515 7 4,sk eptember.. ... Rs MW
6 64 62 60 590 0 58 October .. .. .. a.14 214u.1 12aL Otebe. .. .. .ja 64.4a 2.M
MeS 30 November .. 133,68 349,726 381,26 Novemer .. 3,391 w 31,S
57 December .. 100,372 58,650 672,14 December .. 37,077 1336 3,4
R.OSINS Jaauary .... 16879 241,150 174,Ms January .... 0,73 KA 1is 1
WW WG N M K I H G F E D C-A February ... 5,130 372,444 366,501 February ... 9,840 ,3f 't,36
April 1. . .... N 883.6 S.0 W40 $3. 3 2.85 2.40 L 110 256 1. March .. .. ...... 8,713 18,474 March .... 10,192 32,121 11,814
Aprw .. ..... .75 &I.6 0 I.& L20 2.86 2.40 2 2.1 2.6 2. S M
April 10 . . 2L4 L3 L.0 2.0 2.5 2.4 3.10 20 3.0 3.0 23.& 0 To Germany, in gallons: To Germany. barrels Ihe.
April 17 . ..50 X3 3.2 .15 00 2.85 .40 2.05 1. LIS LO L6 Month 1983-04 1M12- 1un1-8 Month 104W 1M4I U-
April M. . . .40 26 L16 L2.10 M 2.6 21 2.5 L 1 6 1.u Apri .. .. ........... 114.0 2 April .. .. .. .. 4aU nt 864 S
May 1. . .. 2& S16 3.10 LM 2. 2. L85 L8 1.75 L76 175 May .. ...... 9... 3 6.4M U 0.a May .. .. .... ...m 3. .-4 I,
*[ay L. .... ..6 .15 L210 2.3 2.85 2.6 LO L75 1.7L L7 1.76 June.. ... .. 1006 21.3 4m0,02 June .. .. .. .. 4154 46
Ar . . .1.4% L.T% &17% 3.1% L.% 2.87% 2.27% LM 1.75 L17 L L70 rul.. ... .. ,118 13I412 7.M37 July .. .. .. .. 146. V8A 3. M
Pay . ... 26 235 L8 1U 3.00 2.36 1.7 1.70 LO La L0 August .. .. .. 51,S 2,4 August .- ..... .. L SI. ,, .
La .. . . 3.5 3.5 3.2 LO. 2.5 2.40 L I 1.76 5 L L7 September.. 235 a61 713 .1a Septemner.. .. 3 3.04 a ms
5 .. .21 .0 .15 6 30. 0 2.40 1 0 0 1. LW LW L7 October .. .. .. 7 L44 14 October .. .. .. .
Jue Is..... . LI0. .3 2.35 2. 2.80 2.30 1.0 L 1.8L LI7 LO November .. 179,010 110,13 81,780 November .. 56,76 -43,81~U .3,
Juje 1. ..... 3.10 t0 2.3 2. 2.70 2.2 1.75 1.70 1. 1. L.s December .. December .. 15,407 .39..A
June 21 ..... L.. &10 l.o0 21 2.L 2.5 2.5 1.7 1. L LI 6 L. January .... 132,600 4,M07 153 January .... 34,742 ~
.J3y ..... .. L1 2.1 .m .0 2O I 2.5 1.2 1.Li 1.1 LS LU Febuary ... 220,8 15,838 67,174 February ... 172,135 40,15 6M
J fy W...... Si. r. M Z"e 5 L4 .' L t; LE ( March .. .. 4I,1 ...... s MSare .. .. 4,tref M oW 414M
31y 11 .... . & a am Lt L2 .b 2.1W3D lo I 1a L -
S. . . l. Z 1. 10 0G0 t2# 1-75 2M L. 1.. L70 .I. L To all other Europe Ia Galoen: To all other Bardpe, barrel I m:
July . ... L . 4 L 2. 2. 2.7S0 2. LM1 L86 L8 16 u.s MoLth 18fr- 11-8t6 1=- Month 186- 1Mo-t a480
A sgt I . . 3.6 2. .S 2. 8 s. 2.70 2.0 LI7 L6 L48 L 1s AIgri .. .. ...... aS 1L .4 ms A, April ........ 35At M.1 I.M
Augst 14 .. .. M. 2.1 2.165 2 2. 2. 28 230 L 1.5 Lw L7 1.70 May.. .. ...... 58,468 s1,a0 574,11 May ........ .1M 4k .1 JIM
A.gst -a. . 2.S .15 L. LM 2M 2.M 1.5 1.. LII LI L8 June .... ... .. .. .. 14,644 I. M
August. ..... 7.W 3 1 .15 3.10 2.90 24 2.00 1.901.0 .85 L3r LN July ..... ... La 15.L0 4 ,4 July .. .. .. .. 46 1,s "Ut
September 4. .L70 L2 &4e 3. &3. 3.00 29. 2.16 2.6 LS 1. L August .... .. &. n U8 August .. .... 8.. 5 -3T* t
eptember 11 3 1.5 2.50 46 1.40 3.10 250 1 .5 L L L3 1. epteL mber.... M 18.00 002 September.. ... 2. 11 ,
SSeptmber 1 .. 3.50 1.0 l L 2.4 2.0 2.15 S.6 3. 1.16 1. October .. .. .. 1.,M 4,33 17.0 October .. .. ..
S eptember 3L. .4.36 4.10 s.35 Ms .w .35 2.6 2. 23 3.1t 2.- 1.6 November.. 32,500 17,800 94,7 November .. 13,38' s
October .. 4.46 4.40 .5 4.6 4.16 3.50 2 2. 46 2. 2.20 2.6 Lt December .. 47,306 89,51 23,0 December 2.. UW, 4SV '4 i M S
OctoberI ...... 4.7o 4.40 4.6 4. 4.19 3.50 2.7 2.4 0 2. LW n J ary 11,000 January ... 17,13 7,148 S4
October .. 4.6 4.40 4.5 4.00 1. 3.25 2. 0 2.56 2.30 .6 U26 2.5'
October n .. .. .. 4. .16 & 3 2.0e 2. 26 2.46 24 2.36 35 February .. 15.471 ...... 44, February ... 38,184 42,54 56I1
October .........20 .0 3 6L 3. 0 3.0. 2.70 2.0 2.6 2.50 2.6 2. 2.16 March .... 14,180 12,275 3600 March .. 33 687 51I,94 71T,
November m.... ..3.10 .30 1.10 2.L 2.70 2.0 2.5 2.50 2. 5 2.3 2.- --- -
November 1 .. .... .0 15 3.10 .90 2.80 2.70 2.36 2.30 2.2 2.10 2.6 2.6 Total foreign Exports, in gallons, inlud- Total Exports of Rosian barrels 31 paonds,
November t .. ....3. 3.6 3S L. 2.90 2.70 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.5 2.1 2.15 tag everything outside of the United Including Asia Africa and Ameriea out-
November b .... 0 3.5 110 2.0I 2.80 2.0 2.401 2. 2.10 2.1 2.10 States: side of the United States:
December 3 .. 3.25 2.M 2. 2.80 2 35 2.5 2 2 2.5 2.1 2.15 Month 19M4-M 1M-4l 1i81-. Month 1 u"4 8 'i "IM4
December 1 .... 3.1 2. 26 20 2.52 2.35 2.5 2.2 2.W 23 2.9 Aril .. .... ... 34,ma 6 5,8 MI.C7 April .... .. ..Ma .... 43.,,
December 1 .... LSD3. S I. 2. L 2. 2.5 2.5 2.1 2.0 2.20 2 2.2 May .. .. ....1,711 2M.144 2.38.65 May .... ..... .1I
December a ... 15 2.30 3.10 2.5 2.4 2.6 2.40 2.31 2.5 2. 2.5 25 Jn........L 2 ,, June .. .. .. .. 17.MI23 3 4 J
January 14 ...4.60 23.6 15 3.15 2.9 2.00 2.360 .t 2.7 5 2.30 2. July .. .. .. .. 2.181,8B 1.51,016 2,41,18 July ... ... .. 13 M
January 2 .. ....4J 4.10 23. 6 3 .15 2.10 2 E 2.70 2.6 2.0 2.4 2.1 August .. .. .. 1,73T.6 2M.6 August .. .. ..2.16 t, .,,
Jan~m rMy .. .. 4.. 4.10 3 3.3 S. 2.6 3.15 2.D 2.5 12 2.15 2.7 Septenber.... .L474,16 I4 5.85 6 3SM September.. .. 3.Ml0 6
February 11 .3.75 3.45 3.36 3.30 325 3.20 2.85 2.85 2.80 2.75 2.70 2.70 October ...... L4.2uI 1.1 8 o1.I.6i October .... .. 2.8Ju .'1
February 18 ...3.85 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25 3.05 2.700 2. 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.5 November .. 1,51,068 1,932,1 1,652,574 November .. 184,800 231,543 2M,479
February 25 ...3.70 3.50 335 3.20 3.25 2.95 3.60 2.55 2.50 2.45 2.40 2.40 December ..1,93,529 1,794.336 1,85,175 December .. 210,457 206 ,5 1A1,
Marh 10 ......3.80 3.00 3.40 3.35 3.30 3.05 2.75 2.70 2.65 2.60 255 2.55 January ... 700, 2 80,253 M,36 January ... 13,471 170,36 347,6M
March 24 ......4.00 3.70 3.50 3.35 3.30 2.95 2.70 2.65 2.0 2.55 2.50 2.50 February .. 487,577 531,34 855,470 February ... 306,000 189,532 257,2j
March 31 ......4.10 3.80 3.60 3.35 3.30 2.95 2.70 2.66 2.60 2.6 250 250 March .. .. 298,488 118,174 285,98 March .... 171,548 204,433 214j,91
THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.










12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
iimomom


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

JAMES A. HOLLOMON.
EriIor md Mamager.
PiMiahled Every rridny.
wmmmo ta..A 4rAnnum
M(oal"m) .... 0.5 "


_Tk.4 Ph~ aff Iti tPs aiata."


AE emuenasim sheul be adaressd
The lnadIearim RIecord Company.
Jackeenvlll. Fla.
mDasi Edh erlalad is emusese OfBees at
Adantm. Ga., avanni.h. Gae
Entered at the Postosee at Jacksonville,
Fla., as second-elas matter.
Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Aociation,
September 12, 190, as its exclusive oeffial
organ. Adopted in annual convention
September 11, as the organ also of the
seral Association.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the official
rgan of the Interstate a Groers' An-
seiation. Adopted Sept. 11, 1903, as the
enly oeial organ of the T. 0. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Almoeistion.

COPT FO ADVERTISIRG.
ivertilang copy (chages or new ad-
vertineensets) hud reach Tuesday
meenaig to iue inerties in Uthe e o O
Ate weeWO
THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The pubhin plant a n the main o-
4ea at the Industrial Recrd Pubishing
Cm. are located at a Iz South Beg a
Street, Jacknville, Fla., i the very heart
fa the great turpentie ad yellow pie

The Atlnta, Gea., e in located In the
Kquitale Buildin, e. a3. At lata i
the center of the great manufacturing
trade f the Ietire Seth.
The Savannah, G., eiee is in the Beard
f Trade building Savannah is the led-
ng open naval stems market in the wora.

ON THE LABOR PROBLEM.
Ocala, Florida, Aug. 30, 1904.
Mr. Editor: I read very carefully Mr.
Conoley's proposition on settlement of
the labor problem, and it presented the
following questions to my mind.
First. The average turpentine negro,
when he gives his note for an obligation
to pay feels that the debt is then settled,
and that it is not as binding as an ac-
count on the commissary ledger.
SSecond. Say a new man comes to a
turpentine place to work, and, as they
all do, wants to purchase some supplies
to start off with, he must first have a
tool to work with-we will say a hack,
for which most operators charge $1.50,
then a few groceries, cooking utensils,
etc., which in all ll l amount to $4 or $5.
You take their note for this amount, and
more than likely you will never see the
negro again. Right here is where the
whole trouble begins. We all let them
get in debt before they do any work.
I will try to state in a few words just
what we all should do, and if we all stand
to it, we would not have any labor
troubles.
First: At the end of this season, give
our hand all we have them charged with
on our commissary books-just balance
their accounts. Make them a present of
that much. Then never again let one
Sowe us for anything, except the tool he
works with. Then give him a check
every Saturday for his work for that
week, and if necessary when he first
starts and after he has done some work
give him a cheek for the amount of work


---- -- --- - -


IF YOU ARE PROGRESSIVE ADVERTISE IN THE RECORD.


done--and no more--so he can buy enough
on which to live until he can get a start.
There is hardly a place in the State at
which the unpaid accounts of hands who
have "jumped' will not amount to enough
to pay the salaries of a woodsman and
stiller for the whole season.
We operators are trying to maintain
those methods employed by the first ope-
lators who came South several years ago
--so far as letting hands get in debt, for
getting that the old operators had a pay-
day only once a year, and that the first
negroes brought out South did not have
as many places to go to, and the Peonage
Law was unknown in their day.
All of us want some law passed by the
next Legislature, by which the negro call
ue put into the chaingang if he does not
pay his debts, but runs away to avoid
the payment of same. If we had such a
law on our statute books, and it was en-
forced, we would not, under the present
way of managing labor, have negroes
enough in Florida out of the chain-gang to
work a decent turpentine place in twelve
months.
Now, Mr. Editor, there is another as-
pect to the labor problem, which is this:
All the good old woodsmen have under the
present prosperity gone into business for
themselves, and the new woodsmen, as a
rule, are not as industrious as the old set
were, and a great many of them know
nothing about handling labor. The writer
of his personal knowledge knows of some
who think if they saddle up their horse
and go to the nearest town or post-office
and spend the day that they have earned
their salary. They will probably ask
their nands Friday night if they chipped
out, or how many barrels did they dip
that week. This kind of management has
cost the operators thousands of dollars
in the last few years and has ruined the
labor for people who have tried to keep
up with their business. When this writer
first began to work turpentine seventeen
years ago, he had to walk thirteen miles
on Sunday to see his sweetheart. No
horse was permitted to go out of the lot
on Sunday, except for the use of the
owner. Now you cannot find a turpentine
still in the State that hasn't from two
to five buggies on it, and as a rule the
owner uses them less than anyone else on
the place. This may seem foreign to the
subject, but any good operator knows
that if the woodsman neglects his duty,
the hands get careless and wial neglect
their work. Also there is no incentive
under the present way of managing a
turpentine business for the hand to work.
He can borrow all the money he wants
to spend and buy on open account all
the groceries from the commissary he
needs. Then why should he work during
this hot weather when he has "big meet.
ings" to go to and his lodge duties to
perform? The negro is not to blame, it
is the operator and the woodsman. I
would say factor, too, but they are all
operators now.
If some of our brainy brothers can
get at these points and devise some way
by which we can all go into an agreement
tuat will be binding, they certainly will
do not only a brave thing but will de-
serve the lasting gratitude of every ope-
rator in the business.
It has been but a few years ago that if
a negro failed to chip out the other hands
would laugh at him and tease him so that
he would leave the place. I am working
a few now that would slip off and chip
out Stnday morning rather than let the
woodsman report that they failed. Now


it seems that the less they do the higher
their standing among their own race.
It certainly seems that if we do not do
something more than pass resolutions,
which are only nice to read, that we
might just as well quit talking about the
labor problem, and cut enough boxes to
bring the price down to less than 40c.
for a couple of years. That 1 know would
solve the problem for us without any
resoluting on our part, and our colored
friends could seek other employment, of
which there is plenty; to-wit: the saw-
mills, tie camps, phosphate mines, truck
farms and the cotton and corn fields-
enough by which every one in the State
could make a living, including those
u hom our cooks maintain and support.
his letter is not intended as a reply
to Air .Conoley. The writer is heartily in
lavor of any plans or suggestions that,
"ili better present conditions and solve
Lie labor problem. That is the only ex-
cuse we can raise now for not paying our
deuts I ie prices have been and are good,
and it we uo not make money, we are
either no good as operators, or it is the
tabor problem that is .the matter with us.
Now for the last and closing: I do not
believe there is an operator m the State
that has not made every barrel of turpen-
tine he could without getting out and
rAding the woods himself. If he had done
Utat, and managed his labor as well as
tie did ten years ago, what would the
prices of spirits and rosin be to-day?
A Member of the Turpentine Operators'
Association.


LETTER FROM MR. J. B. SUTTON ON
"HANDLING FREE LABOR."
Harris, kla., Aug. 29, 1904.
Editor Industrial Record, Jacksonville.
Dear Sir: 1 see a letter in your paper
of the 19th inst. from Mr. Conoley, sug-
gesting a plan to work free labor. 1,
for one, think Brother Conoley's sug-
gestions are good so far as they go. But
my experience with the labor at this
time leads me to think that he has not
covered the whole ground by any means,
and it seems to me that it is more diffi-
cult to control the operator than the la-
borer, and if the good brother or some
other brother will answer the following
questions to my satisfaction, I will then
tell them how to control the labor.
Question: What steps can be taken to
get ...e operator to carry out their agree-
ment with the association? This ques-
tion, it seems to me, is the most impor-
tant question that is before us. But,
again to the labor question. It seems to
me from the reading of his letter he pro-
poses to work under a cash system. He
does not propose to run any credit after
he has furnished the week's supply and
taken the proposed note.
It is a question in my mind that any
operator can adopt a cash system and
carry it out to the letter. And every
time we attempt it and fail it injures the
Business, and for that reason it seems to
me that it might be well to carefully
consider that matter before attempting
it.
I infer from the reading of Brother Con-
oley's letter that his checks will be pay-
able on demand. It is my opinion that
if checks are issued that are due and pay-
able on demand, that the majority of the
single men will draw on you each Satur-
day for the face value of the check issued
that day, thereby causing a pay-day
every Saturday, and there are plenty of


good hands that would draw on you for
the money and would spend every cent
one way or another and Monday would
find him without either money or cheek
to buy rations with, and-in such eam he
would have to get rations on a credit or
he could not go to work. In my opinion
it would be better to adopt a pha of
holding back some time on the hands to
warrant us against any los on accounts
opened up after they have been paid off.
To hold a week, I think, would be suf-
ficient.
I for one ,am in favor of a four weeks'
pay-day the year round; and, if it would
not be too hard on the factors, I favor
every operator paying off on the same
day. I only offer those points as my
views, and not as any suggestions. No
one will lose anything by them, if they
will only let them alone.
With best wishes for success, I remain,
J. B. SUTTON.

LETTER FROM MR. L. THUS.
Eunola, Ala., Aug. 25, 1904.
Editor Industrial Record, Jacksonville,
Fla.:
Dear Sir:
Seeing Mr. Conoley's suggestions will
only ask if he thinks by taking those
notes will help hold the negroes, or be of
any benefit in getting more work done.
In my view those notes will be of mo
value; don't consider they would be worth
recording. So far as making them a
check for their week's work and not al-
low them to trade beyond same, I think
that a bright idea, as that saves consider-
able work ,though how many operators
in the industry will even stick to that
Dare say there won't be 10 per cent.
While it seems as if something is neace-
sary to be done in that respect, yet I will
make this suggestion, that we make as
little advances as necessary and in ease of
such advancement that we not take a note,
though we take a legal laborer's contract,
something that the laborer will realize
that if he fails to comply with said con-
tract that there shall be personal re-
striction brought against him.
Another suggestion is, stop so many
recruiters; keep them off the road; let
the negroes hunt you, instead of you
hunting them. I think if every operator
would keep his recruiters at home and
at work there would be considerable
money saved. Work those that come and
those that did not come let alone. 1
made up my mind last winter that I
would not pay any negro's railroad fanm,
and I have stuck to it and I am proud
to say I had to turn off hands, have not
spent one dollar during the entire year
for recruiting expenses, and have had ev-
ery one 1 could work. I havr decided to
adopt the same plan this winter.
Another suggestion I will make, let all
the operators come together and affirm
that they will not pay any accounts for
anyone or move any family from any
man's quarters after Ist of March.
Yours truly,
R. LI THEUS.


The projected Kansas City, Oklahoma
& Houston Railroad, according to rumors
in circulation in the West, is part of a
plan of fames J. Hill to have a through
line from the Pacific coast to the Gulf of
Mexico. Surveyors are reported at work
on the line near Honey Grove, Texas, and
South MeAlester, I. T. It has long been
said that the proposed line was a Burling
ton scheme.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13
A i


UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY NO. 6888.
Co..--a. oS- T n r m Co-.nw or
THE ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
A. .at.* &v W e"N 6OfLbt OT T. ou- 6 *T T 6LOSE OP *SuSES
.MACH 2 .... 1904.
ReounCes LIABIIrTInR.
ams and Discounts.... ......... l,3M,40.01 Capital Stock paid in............... M3,000.00
)vrdrafts.............. ....... 34.38 Surplus.... ............ .......... 5,0 W00
Vaults ad Fixtures ........ ........ 15s6B Undivided Profits.... .... 40,19.
. S. Boss......................... 3,7.50 Circulation.................. 00 .
Doe aty Ud ity Bonds......... .... 131.097.50 Deposit ........ ....... ... i,7948 .
= lrtmm U. S. Treasurer ............ 10.0.0 Total .......... ........... I 3. .U0W.0


Cash and Due from other Banks..... W.mr.71
To ............................. i.aM.o- .08


New Corporations.
A. M. Young, of Fort Worth, Texas, is
reported to be making arrangements to
open a bank at Big Sandy, Texas.
The charter of the Bank of Lexington,
of Lexington, Miss., has been received by
the governor; paid-up capital $100,000.
The First National Bank of Martins-
ville, Va., a conversion of the Farmers'
Bank, has been authorized to begin bus-
iness.
It is reported that Lieutenant-Gover-
nor Joseph E. Willard, of Virginia, will
establish a bank at either White Hall or
Arvonia, Va.
The Florence Deposit Bank of Boone
county, Kentucky, capital $15,00, has
filed incorporation articles with the Sec-
retary of State.
The First National Bank of Piedmont,
Ala, is to begin business October 1. The
officers are J. W. Hawke, president;
Walker Sharpe, cashier.
The East Fourth Street Bank has be-
gun business at Owensboro, Ky. John
Thixton is president; S. Petit, vice-presi-
dent, and Dr .A. B. McCarty, cashier.
The Waurika Investment Co., of Wau-
rika and Shawnee, O. T, capital $50,000,
has been incorporated by O. IL Slover, Ar-
thur P. Slover and J. M. Langston.
The First National Bank of Newport,
Tenn., capital $25,000, has been approved.
The organizers are John M. Jones, W. I1.
Robinson, J. S. Susong, H. W. Taylor and
RI C. Smith.
The Bank of Camilla, Mitchell county
Ga, has applied for a charter; capital
$30,000. The incorporators are George C
Cochran, J. C. Wilson, G. B. Boggs and
F. M. Davis.
The North Texas Loan & Investment
Co., of Dallas, Texas, capital $20,000, ha,
been chartered. The incorporators ar
J. D. Bright, R. S. Pickett, G. E. Fay
and W. H. Buchanan.
The Caddo National Bank has organ
ized at Caddo, I. T., with $50,000 capital


and the following officers: F. C. Million,
president; Edw. Walters, vice-president,
and James Hudspeth, cashier.
The First National Bank of German,
Texas, has been approved; capital $30,-
In). The organizers are W. H. Eddleman,
W. J. Eddleman, W. A. Waldrop, Harry
\. Kuteman and others.
The First National Bank of Rocky
Mount, N. C., has been approved; capital
$25,000. The organizers are Wm. H. S.
Blrgwyn, president; Sidney P. Hilliard,
vice-president; Wm. K. Battle, cashier.
The Columbia Building and Loan Asso-
ciation, of Columbia, S. C., has received
its commission; capital $200,000. The
incorporators are Washington Clark, John
If. Bollin, G. M. Berry and Wm. Elliott,
Jr.
The First National Bank of DeFuniak
Springs, Fla., capital $35,000, has been
approved. The organizers are W. H. Mil-
ton, Marianna, Fla.; M. M. Morrison, E.
W. Thorp, Daniel Campbell and W. 1.
Daniel.
The People's Bank of Summit, in E-
mianuel County, Georgia, capital $40,000:
Ias applied for a charter. The incor-
porators are Dr. J. A. Jones, George J.
Itountree, John T. Roberts, Ben L. Roun-
tree and Allen Jones.
The First National Bank of McLean,
STexas, capital $25,000, has been approved.
The organizers are R. H. Collier, Ama-
rillo, Texas; C. M. McCullogh, C. F. Ran-
dall, S. H. Madden, W. E. McLaughlin and
Fred Odell.
The State Bank of Elm Grove, W. Va.,
has leen chartered with $25,000 capital.
The inncrporators are D. M. Thornburg.
('. S. Tenill and Henry Stein of Elm
(.rove, .1. N. Vance, F. C. Hoffman and
t B. Hart. of Wheeling.
s The Bank of Leesville, with $30,000
e capital, has been incorporated at Lees-
y ville, S. C., by A. P. Bouknight, H. F.
Hendrix, J. P. Matthews, .L R. Bouk-
night. C'. D. Barr, E. J. Etheridge and B.
I H. Hendrix, all of Leesville.


Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.



CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS,

AND VATS.

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
1W. G. D.AVIS &a SION, iPALATI A, FLA.


A. P LETon., W. i. & jnst JA. LAWTER,I W. W. STY LI.O,
Prest VIe Pres. Gen. Mtamager. Asst. Treasrer

Whe W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers


402 e04 40 r0os Eart sy Street. Jaetsulleie. na
SIRCTO S:
n. w. S. P E jl
...war. pra". W


W. W. STRIPIUN
JA. LABETER


The West.Raley-Rannie Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
1. WES. WEST e E West, Vice.Pres. W. R. Ramsle, Vice-Pres. M. V alY. l Sec. & Tres.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.

Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINOAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Io it*9 *01 1f1t 11 lovle## 111111 giii*i 4###410i ievei s

McMillan 7

Bros.e

Florida Cop-

* per Works.

Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
SGeneral Metal Workers..
Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
* Patching through the country a specialty.
Orders by mail or wirewill receive prompt
* attention at either of the following works:
SFayetteville. N. C. Savannah. Ga,
SMobile. Ala. Jacksonville. Fla.



C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514 516 518 520-522 524 526 EAST BAY S IK L L
Jacksonville, Fla.


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


J. W. WADE,
Vice-President.


E. G. HUGHES,
See'y ad Tress


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.

DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.

Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


"FAIR, aDKEPEalDa AND PROGRESSIVE."


I
C
C
I


T. M.unk


_ -1 ~----


II~ `I


A









14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Trade Reports in the Seth.
The following telegrams show trade con-
ditions at the cities mentioned for the
week ending Aug. 26:
Charleston.-Trade in all lines quiet.
Crop reports continue favorable. Collec-
tions are slow.
Wheeling.-The settlement of differ-
ence% between miners and operators in the
eastern Ohio field has revived business
considerably in this locality, although
many of the miners are operating but par-
tially. Jobbers report a better outlook,
and shoes, dry goods, hats and clothing
are now being shipped in goodly quanti-
ties. Building material is in steady de-
mand, and hardware, drugs and queens-
ware dealers claim a satisfactory volume
of business. Glass and pottery manufac-
tories are resuming, with very fair pros-
pects. Collections continue rather slow,
with clearings decreased from last year.
Augusta.-Cotton in some sections is
showing the effect of excessive rain, but
crop will be large. Trade is quiet and
collections are slow.
Atlanta.-Business is about normal in
volume. Crop reports are mixed, varying
from very poor to very good, the poor
section having been damaged by rain.
Summed up, there appears in sight a fair
to good corn crop, and a prospect of a
cotton crop rather better than last sea-
son.


Macon.-New-crop cotton is coming iii
and trade is brightening. The condition
of the plant is unfavorable, owing to hot
weather and rust.
Birmingham.-The iron market is very
dull. Inquiries are few, but as sellers are
not anxious, no offerings re made below
$9.50 for No. 2 foundry. In one instance
No. 3 brought $9.25. The situation is un-
settled by the miners' strike.
Montgomery.-Being stimulated by sev-
eral days of very warm sunshine, together
with high fertilization, cotton is opening
very rapidly, and in some sections of the
State two-thirds of the crop is ready to
he picked; still the gathering of the crop
in progressing very slowly on account of
the scarcity of labor. Incessant rains for
four weeks preceding are believed to have
lowered the yield of cotton in this State
30 to 40 per cent. The Alabama corn crop
is reported to be the largest in many
years, the crop having practically matured
before the rainy season. Lumber trade
continues fairly active, with a silght in-
crease in prices Jobbers report a fair
volume of business, while retail trade
is quiet Collections are slow.
Chattanooga.-Trade in all lines contin-
ues to show an increase The season so
far has been successful and profitable for
planters. Collections continue to show im-
provement.
Knoville.-Business is fairly good in
all jobbing lines, though it is quiet in re
tail. Several of the largest jobbers claim
an increase over last year. A large crop
of wheat has been harvested at an aver-
age price of $1 per bushel.
Memphis.-Retailers are offering sum-
mer goods at reduced prices to make room
for fall stock. Wholesale business is
gradually increasing. Collections range
from fair to good. Inquiries for lumber
are increasing, but sales are slow. Weath-
er conditions are favorable. Cotton is
making good progress and a good crop is
anticipated; first four bales were received
Thursday, four days ahead of last year,
but one week behind the average.
Little Rock.-The weather during the
week has not been very favorable to eot-
tAn, but a good yield is anticipated. Re-


Business Directory.

FIRE INSURANCE-Iow- t rates. Io-
ren H. Green & Co., and 10 Park BLMg
Jacksonville, Fla. 6mo.
JOHN ZAHM'8 EUROPEAN HOTEI
128 R. Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant. Nicely Furnihed
Rooms. Open day and night. BettlUnl's
old Stand.

THE CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barrels hold and will pass the se-
verest American and uropean inspection.

Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, OUITMAN, GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address orders to home offie,
QUITMAN, GA.


gJ. P. OAMPBOLE




Trade Checks
FOR THE


COMMISSAR BUSINESS.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Industrial Record Go.,


ZINC NAILS


Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the l-y --ft which will not injure
saws when left in the trees.

Safem Nail Co.
S79 PM 8l. NOwr rw*, N. r.
Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Et Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
'"acks.



Typewriters
All Makes--S 0.0 Up.

GRIVOT "'""

The World-beater. OLIVER. writes in sight.
The JEWrCTT King of doable-board ma
chines
$0 to $60 Saved a Any Make of Typewriter.

THE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
Ixtracts the spirts without destroying the
wood fbre. Runs out a charge in less tha,
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-five gallons from curd of wood
Makes pure water white spirits, free fro
the odor of tar or creosote. No chemniCaKl
used in refinin the spirits. Needs to be,
distilled only once after coming from re-
tort.
No trouble with bl-products. the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
duced and from wood. Only one grade
of spirIts produced and that the highest
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGIRK FROM FIRE
Built of finest material by high-grade
workmen. The cheapest machine ofered to
the public.
We challenge comparison of output and
quality of product. We guarantee output
and quality.
The rime Bet COMUt0tim COamy
P. O. Box st RALEIGH. N. C.


Tailor-Made Shirts.
THE KIND THAT FIT


F U

Mal I &-ftg




FITT& TUnE
Bi1-TI-FITI
-

*Sm U r s-asa
=1, pfit we MW



F. S. BLACK
OLUMBI S. C.
TnE LEMICS mTU UMT Mr I TE L


This Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.


Whblsamle


Liquor Merchalts


Proprietors


Juldswftk httl Wwb


ACME BEER





NO FARM I HWP i
j A GROVE OF
Ed njI I W2 l


They Arnt swv-S&

GRIFFIN'S CATALIM
I"tlA AOTr T L
Twey han vmod ese t Ium
Also a sompleate se ra ae"S 4&

* O1Calogia Whei

* dAWrveMuaIA. FL.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,

from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
* controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Ciiin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.


CHAS. BLUM &O CO.
5s7 awd 519 West Bay Steer,
JACKSONVILLE, FA.4


PATRONIZE RECORD ADVERTISERS FOR SATISFACTORY DEALINGS.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15






THE COVINGTON CO.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.




ah SHOES -

Wholesale: DRY GOODS.




"Success For Our Customers is Success For Us."


Stail trade is poor, though jobbers report
business about equal to last year's. Col-
lections are only fair.
New Orleans.-The wholesale and retail
business of this section has shown some
improvement during the past week, and
collections are said to be fairly good.
Crops have been benefited by the fair
weather, and planters are seemingly en-
couragd-
Fort Worth.--Reports concerning the
cotton crop this week are not so favor-
able as heretofore, especially in the mid-
dle of the State. The country northwest,
west and southwest of Fort Worth is in
good condition and will produce a large
crop. The plant is throwing off on ac-
count of hot weather, following the wet
spell of two weeks ago. Trade is improv-
ing.
Dallas.-Many sections report serious
damage to cotton from dry winds and
hot weather of the past week, though
little complaint is heard on account of
insects. Rain is badly needed for all
crops. Cotton is from ten days to two
weeks earlier than last year, and pro-
ducers are beginning to market it rapid-
ly. General trade conditions are quiet.
Waco.-Cotton is deteriorating rapidly.
Predictions of last week concerning only
grown bolls being safe have been fulfilled.
Nothing is putting on, and at least 50
per cent. of the young bolls has been
affected. The crop is being picked and
marketed rapidly.-Bradstreet's.

Mr. George J. Baldwin. of Savannah.
O(a.. president of the Gainesville Midland
Railway Co., is reported as saying that
the company will consider the advisability
of widening the guage of the entire line
and of building entensions northward to-
ward Dahlonega and southeasterly toward
Athens.

The Georgia Southern & Florida Rail-
way. it is reported, is considering the con-
struetion of a short line to Melrose, Fla.
H. ROBINSON Pre s H. GAILLARD. Om~aer
W. B. OWIN. Viee-Pre

Commercial Bank,
State Depoesitry.
BaucHa: Ocala. I.. Lake City. vla
Jbeks9uvW fe, -- FlAdfa


illY I OH101TORY,
Commission Merchants,
Naval Stores & Cotton
Lbw.I saneamm. mebast
COTTON XCHANMGZ ULDING,
IL~ YORK CXXf.


COURSE OF PALE AND MEDIUM ROSINS AT SAVANNAH FOR TWO YBARS.


W.W.


DATE
April 1........
April8........
April 15........
April 22........
April 29........
May 6........
May 13........
May 20........
May 27........
June 3........
June 10........
June 16........
June 23........
July I ........
July 7 ........
July 14 ........
July 28 ........
Aug. 4 ........
Aug. 12 ........
Aug. 18 ........


1904-06
$4.10
3.95
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.95
4.35
4.50
4.00
4.65
4.75
4.75
4.70
4.52%
4.67%
4.60
4.62%1


W.G.


1903-04
$3.90
3.00
3.50
3.40
3.35
3.35
2.42%
3.65
3.65
3.60
3.40
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.40
3.50
3.50


1904-05
$3.80
3.75
3.60
3.60
3.60
3.50
3.50
3.55
3.65
4.06
4.10
4.15
4.25
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.25
4.42 /.
4.35
4.37


1903-04
$3.60
3.45
3.35
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.27%1
3.35
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.30


1904-05 1903-04
$3.60 $3.50
3.60 3.35
3.45 3.25
3.45 3.15
3.45 3.15
3.35 3.15
3.30 3.17%
3.30 3.25
3.40 3.25
3.85 3.20
3.85 3.00
3.85 3.00
3.90 3.00
4.00 3.00
3.95 3.00
3.90 3.00
3.821/ 3.05
4.00 3.05
4.00 3.15
4.02/% 3.15


1904-05
$3.35
3.35
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.65
3.65
3.65
3.65
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.72%
3.90
3.85
3.87%


1903-04
$3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12/%
3.20
3.20
3.15
295
2.95
295
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
2.95
3.05
305


V. T. WILEY. J. A. 6. CARSON. GEG. .1. SCOVEL,


W. T. MILEY, J. A. S. CARSON, 6EO. J. SCOVEL,
Presldet. VIce-Presidet. Sec. and Tres.


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS

Machine and Hand Factories,
8th Street R. R. Crossing.
JACKSONVILLE. N FLORIDA
WHEN WRITING ADVE TISKS MENTION THE RECORD.


1904-05 190-04
$3.30 $3.20
3.30 3.00
3.15 3.00
3.15 3.00
315 3.00
3.15 3.00
3.15 3.02%
3.15 3.10
3.25 3.10
3.40 3.05
3.40 2.85
3.40 2.85
3.40 2.85
3.55 2.80
3.55 2.80
3.55 2.80
3.50 2.85
3.65 2.95
3.55 2.95
3.57% 2.95


1904-05 1903-04
$2.96 .85

180 2.8
2.80 2.85
2.80 2.85
2.80 2.95
3.00 2.87%
3.00 3.00
3.00 3.05
3.10 3.00
33. 2.80
3.30 2.70
3.30 2.70
3.45 2.65
3.46 2.66
3.45 2.66
3.05 2.70
3.30 2.80
3.30 2.80
3.32% 2.80


M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

Commission Merchants.
ROSIN, iutPEZll1zm, TAR, PITCH
GUM THUS, RICZ, TC.


I 138 Front Stret,


MaW Yro


Are you rdml v n-g M wpa
no oe bere W& 94= e **
iI the letter be the -m. write to. O1
a r o iibenmb,,


---








16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

g!t *a*Machinery and Mill Supplies. *


I Machinery and Mill Supplies. j


Bar Iron, Iron Pipe and fittings, Bolts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tools, Lumberman's Tools,
Packing of all Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corrugated
SRofing.




JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


d


STATE AGENT FOR.
ATLAS ENGINES aMi BOWLERS,SOU LE STEAM FEED
WORTHINGTON STEAM PUMPS, JENKINS VALVES,
DISSTONrS SAWS, FUNTKOTE ROOrFIN
CURTIS MANUFACTURING CO.'S ME MachMry.
DeLOACH SAW MILLS, GILERT WOO PULLEYS
nOY'S LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SPRIIING RUI ER CO.
1net mad Ruafer liace
SOLVENTINE BILER COMPOUND,
DODGE MFG. CO.'S Cast Ire Sprt Pu1eys,
McCAFFREY FILES, MONARCH EMERY WHEELS,
DANIELS' PPP Steam Packlng
A. LESCHEN & SON, Wlre Res.


WIT" i Wr WrSWW


GEORGIA INTERSTATE SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
Minimum Coastwise Price List for Merchantable Rules 90o4. Adopted at Tifton,
Georgia, July 2, 1904.


I x10 to 2x10...
2%xl0 to 8x10...
84x10 to 10x10...


SFeet Feet | Feet Feet Feet Feet Feet Feet Ieet Feet
20& U 21-25 26-30 31-.35 36-40] 41-45146-50 51-55 56-601 61-65
S12.50 $13.5014.50 $1.001 8.00 $20.50 $23. 50 $260 $32.00 $40.00
12.00 12.50 13.50 14.00 15.50 17..0 20.00 23.00 28.00 35.00
12.50 13.00 14.00 15.50 16.50 18.50 21.00 24.00 29.00 37.00


1 x12 to 2x12.... 14.00 15.5C
2%x12 to 10x12.... 13.00 13.5(
10%xl2 to 12x12.... 13.50 14.00


1 xl4 to 3x14.... 16.00 19.00
3%xl4 to 12x14.... 14.50 16.5C
12/4xl14 to 14x14.... 15.50 17.01]
1 xl6 to 4x16.... 20.50 22.0(
41,xl6 to 12x16.... 19.00 20.00
12%xl6 to 16x16.... 19.50 20.54
2 xl8 to 6x18.... 24.50 25.54]
61%x18 to 14x1 8.... 21.00 22.0(
141,4x18 to 18x18.... 23.00 24.0(


S16.50 18.00| 21.00 24.00 28.00
S14.50 16.501 18.50 21.00 24.50
15.50 17.501 19.50 22.00 25.50
20.00 22.001 24.50 27.50 32.00
18.00 20.501 22.00 24.00 28.00
19.00 21.00 23.00! 26.00 30.00
24.50 27.501 31.00 34.001 38.00
22.00 25.501 29.00 31.001 35.00
23.00 2; 50! 30.00 330.00137.00
2895O 31..-0| 35.00 39.001 43.00
) 26.00 29.001 33.00 37.00' 41.00
I 27.00, 0.001 4.00 38.00 42.00


32.50 38.00
28.50 34.00
30.00 36.50
37.00 44.00
32.50 40.00
34.50 42.00
42.50 52.00
39.50 48.00
41.00 50.00


49.00
43.00
46.00
57.00
52.00
55.00
66.00
59.00
62.00


49.00 62.00 79.00.
45.00 57.00 69.00
48.00 59.00 74.00


Terms: Net Cash.
Prices are F. O. B. Cara Savamnah, Brunswick, Fernandina and Jacksonville.


NOTICE.
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Association, held at Jacksonville,
VIa., March 15, 1904, the following Classi-
fication and Rules for Inspection of Yel-
low Pine were officially adopted, effective
.lulv 1. 1904:
Clamacatioa and Inspection of Yellow
Pine Lumber.
General Rules-All lumber must be
'Ound, well manufactured, full to size and
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;
through shakes, or round shakes that
show on the surface: square edge, unless
otherwise specified. A through shake is
hereby defined to be through or connected
from s'de to side. or edge to edge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken:
less than one inch thick shall be measure:!
as one inch.

CLASSIFICATION.
Flooring.
Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: 1x3,
4, 5 and 6; 11x3, 4, 5, and 6.
Boards
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
inches and up wide, including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: 1. 1. 1 and It/ inches
thick by 7 inches and up. wide.
Scantling.
Scantling shall embrace all sizes from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2.
2x3. 2x4. 2x5, 2x6, 3x3. 3x4. 3x5, 3x6, 4x4.
4x5. 4x6, 5x5 and 5x6.
Plank.
Plank hall embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness.
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1%, 2,
2/.. 3. 3/.. 4. 4%, 6, 5%, 5%x7 inches
and up in width.


Dimension.
Dimension sizes shall embrace all sizes
6 inches and up in thickness by seven
inches and up in width, including six by
six. For example: 6x6, 6x7, 7x7, 7x8, 8x9
and up.
Stepping.
Stepping shall embrace one to two and
a half inches in thickness by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1, 1%.
1'%. 2 and 2/.x7 and up, in width.
Rough Edge or Flitch.
Rough Edge or Flitch shall embrace all
sizes one inch and up in thickness by eight
inches and up in width, sawed on two
sides only. For example: 1, 11/, 2, 3. 4
and up thick by e;ght inches and up wide.
sawed on two sides only.

INSPECTION.
Standard.
All lumber shall be sound, sap no ob-
jection. Wane may be allowed one-eighth
of the width of the piece measured across
face of wane. exl.nding one-fourth of the
length on one corner or its equivalent on
two or more corners.
Merchantable.
All sizes under nine inches shall show
heart entire length on one side or edge;
sizes nine inches and over shall 'show
heart the entire length on two opposite
sides. Wane may be allowed one-eighth of
the width of the piece measured across
face of wane. and extending one-fourth of
the length of the piece on one corner or
its equivalent on two or more corners.
Prime.
Scantling sha!l show heart on two faces
the entire len-tlh: other sizes shall show
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
cent. of the pieces. wane may be allowed
ome-ei)hth of the width of the piece ineas
uril cross face of wane and extending
one-fourth of the length of the piece on
one corner or its equivalent on two or
more ~'ruiers.


SAVANNAH


NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903,04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


Receipts 190-04 11902-03 | 1901-04
Spirits, casks........................-.. 198,647 292 496 814,846
Rosins. bbls.............................. 60,988 940,507 1,071,440
Total.......................... ....... 844,585 1238,038 1,386,786
Exports
Spirits casks. ........................... 188,398 296,430 814,876
Rosins, bbls. ............................ 752,270 975.428 62,687
Faeign
Spirits, casks........................... 98,884 206,109 217,446
Rosins bbl l.......... ................... 88,171 504,178 585,042
New York
Spirits, casks............ ................. 35,658 42,765 53,797
Roai, sbbls................ ............ 87,353 138,121 129,059
Sundries
Spirits, casks........................... 59,351 87,556 48,633
Rosins, bbs............ ................ 826.746 337,784 898.586
The receipts of spirits are las than 1902-03 by 98849 cass, and of remain, 289,569 ba

WMan Te re In JArese NU M Ste Ato -


WOLFE'S EUROPEAN HOTEL.
Corner rug me Bay Streets.
Rates 50c. 75S and $1 00 per day. First Class Restaurant In Connection. J. I. WLFE. Magar


n n


: PtAm WIT. ftr.s,


T. n. McCARTHY. Vice-Pres.


NMARI VITEEN Tria


a.
5.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY,

IRVING M. WELLCH Manager.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


*1


ll(iametlIeulllllllulum uumullI I I lll l
5 W. H. BECKWITH- W. B. HENDERSON. G. C WARREN.

SBECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.


t LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE AND MILL LiNeS.

O Rooms 1-2-3, First National Balk building.
. TAMPA, : : : FLORIDA.
il IIII**ll* *llt*el*l ileIIIIMi- re1Ii 1r l itA1D


"NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIKE SUCCESS."


SIZES


am MEEBE5WDIU5EUEEWUEE %MUIEN *UEE3EEEEE


_I_


1111~Is 111411111111118414111 level III


)I<






THE WEEKLY tINDUsTRlAL RECORD. 17


Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are


McMILLAN


BROTHERS'


Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
lose by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS.


SAVANNAH, GA.
MOBILE, ALA.


J ICKSONVILLE, FLA.
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.


Half Tones=Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of ommer cial Work, Pamphlets. etc.
I SPECllT IS OF IISIGIIN, M1 RETiM II1 It FMEUSI PHIOTPIW S II PIC IIIES.


WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED

A Florida Enterprise. Try It.


IN



L '.-"*


OUR OF THE WORLD' LARGEST TRADE PAP E


C_ ____


1- -







186 THE WEEKLY INJUbII IAbL RECORD.


I

To the Readers of the Record:


The job printing department
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. It is reason-
able to suppose you will get
better and more satisfactory
printing supplies-letter heads,
envelopes, commissary checks,
pay-roll reports, etc., by having
us make them.
Industrial Record Co.,
Jakds.va R Fkrida.


READ THE ADS IN THE RCORD.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 19


.wA ww Akw AhL w A AM w w 0 6w w w -w w


10 D. DAK. Pre. C W. BARTLESOW. Vkc-Pre. BAKER & AKR. P. Pa .
( br& -lia Co.) (C. V. -iEon Co.) General Coma See. & Tmre

FLORIDA FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY
(ImCORPOIATED.)
We cam collect your Freight Claims agalast
Railroads and Steamship Compalces.
Charges Reasonable. Yowr Membership Solicited.
We save ye all werry w trfmble. Eadersed by all Pablic 1dlJes
in te CItyr al rnsportatio Compasdes.
216 Dyal-Upchurch Bld JACKSONVILLE. FLA.



BETT ELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will mend by xmpS, prepaid, the following:
our full quarts lAnooln County, aSnnybrook Rye or Bi Hor Rye .. Mn
ngle Bottles ............................ P T
I wil smed four fun quarto of Somers' Corn, Meiwood Rye, oden Wed-
din Rye, Holland Gin, Ton Gin, Peach Brandy, Peach and Honey
Whiskey. Gin and Manhattan Cocktallny of the above for........ m
One bottle of any of the above .............................. ..............1....
four bottle of the following Caifornia Wines: Sherry. Port, Museat.
Cataw .............. ..................... .
Stna le bottles ......... .................. .
agle bottles ........................................ .............
Pour bottles Wison Whiskey, ased......................................... (.
nge bottle .......................................................... ..... ....
Five bottles Dufy's Malt ......................................................
Bulk goods of al kinds. Special Prices on application. All kinds o
lquors in Jung from L. to UL. f. o. b. Jacksonville.
F. BETTELINI, W. Bay St., pp. Unoln uepot, Jackseville, fla




Album of Florida Views

FREE.

One Hundred handsomely engraved views of Florida, compiled in a magnifi-
cent souvenir writing tablet. Beautiful present for an absent friend, or an ap-
propriate method of writing to those to whom you would recall Florida memories.
Sent pgtpaid for 30 cents or given free with one yearly subscription to the Week-
ly Industrial Record at the regular rates. Send ;W0 cents and get the album sent to
any address, or send 3.U00 and get The Record weekly for one year and the
album, sent to any address, free of cost. Address,
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.


SOUTHERN INDUSTRY.

Florida.
Bristol-Timber Lands, Sawmills, etc.
-1. G. Patterson, of Ocklocknee, Ga.; S.
1'. Memory, of Blackshear, Ga., and T. J.
Ball, of Thomasville, Ga., have incorpo-
rated the Patterson-Ball Lumber Co.
They have purchased 5,120 acres of land
at $55,600, and will develop the tract,
first extracting the turpentine and after-
wards building sawmills to cut the tim-
her.
Jacksonville-Grocery Company.-The
Arnold-O'Donald Company will be incor-
porated with a capital stock of $10,000
and privilege of increasing to $100,000:
E O'Donald, president; John S. Arnold,
vice-president; R. T. Arnold, secretary.
Jacksonville Waterworks, Sewerage
and Electric Lights.--City contemplates
enlarging and extending water-works,
sewerage system and electric light plant.
I. N. Ellis, superintendent waterworks,
will submit estimates.
* Jacksonville-Real bEtate.-Americus
V. Smith, Milton Edwards and X. M.
Smith have incorporated the American In-
vestment & Realty Co., with $10,000 cap-
ital.
Kissimmee-Electric Light Plant.-The
city has sold the bonds which -were re-
cently issued for the enlargement aad im-
provement of the electric light plant, and
is now ready to receive bids for the con-
struction of building, for which the plans
and specifications. About $19,000 will be
expended. Address The Mayor.
Miami-Waterworks, Sewerage Sys-
tem, Bridge and Street Improvements.-
J. H. Tatum & Co. have purchased 160
lots on the west side of the river and


will construct roads and walks and es-
tablish water and sewerage systems.
They have also applied to the War De-
partment for permission to erect a steel
drawbridge over the river at the foot of
12th street.
Miami Starch Factory. Biscayne
Starch Manufacturing Co., with a paid-up
capital of $50,000 has been organized and
is negotiating with J. H. Tatum & Co. for
the purchase of ground upon which to
erect a starch factory; C. W. Jernigan,
of Lake Mary, Fla, president; J. W. Jer-
nigan, vice-president; Oscar L. Jernigan,
of Lake Helen, Fla., secretary.
Omando-Boiler Factory. Cin &
O'Berry, boiler manufacturers, will erect
another plant near the crossing of the
Atlantic Coast Line and Seaboard Air
Line Railroads.
Pensacola-Lumber Mills, etc.-William
S. Keyser, James Muldon, of Pensacola,
and Wm. Rudolf, of Biloxi, Miss., have
incorporated the W. S. Keyser Company
with $100,000 capital to manufacture lum-
ber, etc.
Pensacola Real Estate.-L Hilton
Green, Lee Donnell and C. L Wiggins have
incorporated the Home Investment Co.
with a capital of $12,000.
Georgia.
Atlanta Steam aundry.--Wilson &
Harris will erect steam laundry after
plans and specifications by R. H. Carpen-
ter, architect, Austell Building. Strue-
ture is to be one story high with base-
ment, 93x110 feet; brick with granite
base; stone foundation; cast-iron col-
umns; slag roofing. Plumbing, gas-fit-
ting, heating system and electrical work
not included in contract. Estimates are
now being made on the construction by


selected builders, among whom are Mor-
row Bros, 212 Clay street, Baltimore, Md.
Atlanta-Cotton MilL-The Exposition
Cotton Mills' additional building, referred
to last week, has been planned by A. F.
Walker, engaged as the mill engineer in
charge. Contract for erection has been
awarded to William BenseL Contract has
also been awarded for the 9,000 spindles
and about 250 looms, the additional ma-
chinery to be installed.
Bainbridge Electric Light Plant.-
City has voted the $20,000 bond issue pre-
viously reported, and will purchase the
electric light plant of N esbaum Bros.
Bainbridge-Telephone System.-It is
reported that local capitalists have pur-
chased from W. W. Collier at $15,000 the
Bainbridge telephone exchange, which they
will operate.
Carrollton-Electric Light, Water and
sewerage Plants.-The city has named
Messrs. W. F. Brown, E .W. Wells and L
C. Mandeville as a commission to arrange
the construction of the proposed water-
works, sewerage system and electric light
plant, for which $45,000 was voted, as re-
ported in June. O. Perry Sarle, of Atlan-
ta, Ga., was previously noted as con-
sulting engineer for the plants.
Columbus Water-Power Dam.-The
City Mills has awarded contract to B. H.
Hardaway & Co. for the construction of
a dam across the Chattahoochee river;
structure to be from 20 to 30 feet high,
granite laid in Portland cement, 600 feet
long, 12 feet wide; cost $75,000, and be
completed in two years, etc.
Columbus-Cotton Mill.-John T. Ab-
ney has located on Broad street, and will
endeavor to organize the company to
build his proposed cotton mill, recently


reported, of 10,000 or 20,000 spines. Pre-
vious references to this enterprise stated
that capital had been asmurm. Eleetric
power will operate the nill
Cordele-Artesian Well.-City has let
contract to John E. Cole, Wenona, Ga.,
for sinking proposed artesian well.
Girard-Cotton-seed Oil Mill. Giram
Cotton Oil Co., previously reported incor-
porated with $20,000 capital, has com-
pleted organization with J. C. Burrus, of
Atlanta, Ga., president; W. R. Buxton,
of Girard, vice-president; J. R. Odom, of
Girard, secretary; G. W. Mobley, of Gi-
rard, treasurer, and H. B. Neihon, of
Carrollton, Ill., manager. Work has be-
gun on the two-press 20-ton cotton-seed
oil mill, which the company will operate.
-.
Macon-Steam Laundry, Dyeing Plant,
ete--J. B. Phillips, Edgar H. Middle-
brooks, Matt. E .Elliott, R. L. Garrett and
associates have incorporated the Union
Steam Laundry, Pressing & Tailoring Co.,
with $8,000 capital, to conduct a steam
laundry, dyeing and tailoring establisk-
ment
Tennille-Cotton MilL-T. N. & J. W.
Smith, reported last week as having pur-
chased and to expend $15,000 to improve
the Tennille Cotton Mill, will organize
the Tennille Yarn Mills to continue the
plant named. Details will be decided in
about 30 days.
Waycross-Cigar Factory.-Fain Bros.
have organized a company and will estab-
lish cigar factory in building alrey
erected.

Send an orders for printing fr the tar-
pentine and commisary trades to t
Record oice to inmre prmpt adiveey.


THi RECORD'S SPACK H" A BIG MONEY VALUE.


_ ___ ~_ __


- -m~B


A A A


m ........... A A


P hinting Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.



NEW CHOICE BOOK COLLECTION O


"Old Favorite Songs" "
[copyrighted.]
COVERS AND 32 PAGES 6 x 9. BOOK OPENS FLAT. JUST THE
THING FOR HOME, LODGE*, SOCIAL OCCASIONS, ETC.
Our beautiful booklet of "Old Favorite Soag" words and mase) ki
a long-felt want, because it is a cllection of the that b
wants, which cannot be had otherwise, without purchasing eeral book at
a considerable expense, but in this ooklet they are supplied a a tri a g
cost. Thee songs are the delight of every home. Every family wans
them. Lodges want them. The appeal to everybody. Suhe good old soap
a: Aice, Where Art Thout, America, Ane Laurie, Ad La Byne
Aunt Jemima's Plaster, Battle Hymn of the Republic, Ben Bolt, Bird of the
Greenwood, Blue Bells of Scotland, Breeze from Home, Colmbia, the Gem
of the Ocean, Comin' Thro' the Ry, Cradle Song, Darling Nellie Gray,
Dip, Boys, Dip the Oar; Evening Beu Far Away, Flag of the Free, Flee a
a Bird, Flow Gently, Sweet Afton; Go Down, Moses; Good Night, Ldies;
Home, Sweet Home; Last Boa of Summer; Lead Kindly Light; Lfl
Dale, Long, Long Ago; My Old Kentucky Home; My Maryland; Old Black
Joe; Old Folks at Home; Old Oaken Bucket; Robin Adair; Rocked hin te
Cradle of the Deep; Roll, Jord, o ; Sen that Are Brightet; Star
Spangled Banner; Star of the Summer Night; Sweet and Lw; Swing
Low, Sweet Chariot; Suwanmee River; Thou Art My Roe; Thees Made
in the Air; Those Evening Bells; When the Swallows Homeward Fly;
Won't You Tell Me Why, Robin ; Yankee Doodle; Dixie; and many
other.
Place Order Quick. Sample Copy, postage prepaid, 25


S Industrial Record Publishing Co.,
Book Department. JaksvIe a.
To the Boys and Girls: Send $1.00 for eight copies. ell them to yea
tonpeop and Mfrids ad mae $1.00 "pia money" for two or t
hours' work.L -- j




r THE WEEKLY INUUI'uTIAL RECORD.


Prilent. W. C. POWLLAT; ae-PrO t s, whb with the Preident eomutlt the Drectory and Boad at Mauagm W. r7 COACHMAN, F. BUL-
LARD. L. L COVIGTON, H. A. MecACUERN, JOHN R. YOUNG. J. A. CRANFORD. D. .E MeMtLLAN. C. DOWN-
ING. J. R. SAUNDERS. C. B. ROGERB; Auditor. JOHN HINDERSON.


'j


iCMkO Fi.


SvoIno Go.


insaMl, fi.


NAtAL OREI FACTORS

ad i fl l K, 2,00.0IO. Own IU Con 01el bi Pra i col e oltl
M Imul Io l11 k IY see 10 ell t O1pI ors tWo CuI luaoe l Ii .

Tite ntOlied i Pillil a Serae lite Co ma In In lerls ore nelilcl ilt M e
SIIie Piolie. Te Pdlonai l I Tlenilne IeitorI eItewli le InMI
PIW 01 i Money and Plil y01 Tier 1or B eliml.

IYR IA dlACISONlLE, ,AIANNAM, FERNANDIIA lli PESCOIA.
n I


Ill RPodcers re il t ol or COflespnd


"THIE PI AND ITS PRODUCTS."


4



4


-CK INS 4199 1*IIf i rI6 rrrr m 0 @ISmIS4 Ir iii *I 9 If If *It If If I a v If


WNilLIDATED NAVAL TOE 1 MPANY,








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commisary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese

A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 21
A. C. Creamery, 80" .. 22
10 " 25
A C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 11

Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... 64
50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
'* 50-lb tin. ............ 84

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 36

Sugar
Granulated Sugar, bhls..... 5 85

Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb ................. 22
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 12
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 81
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages....... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 Ib pack-
ages ........... market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 17
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea


Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb.....
SGunpowder, 10 lb....
English B'fast, 10 lb..
Formosa, 10 Ib.......
Pagoda Tea, 5 and lOc size
10 lbs to case, per pound*..


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


Car Lot
W clip'd,1251b,2 10
S 1001b,1 75
White 1251b, 2 00
White 1001b. 1 60
Mixed 1251b
1001b,


10D Sk
Lot
2 12
177
202
1 62


Lea. 1io
Sk Lots
2 15
180
205
165


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice ..... 1 65
S. fancy..... 165
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 5 60
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 lb sack.........5 60
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-1b sacks............ 5 65
Pillsbury's Best ..... 6 25
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 5 15
bbl ........
Flour, Boss .............. 6(00
Meal
Meal, per barrel........... 3 50
92-lb sacks........... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 8 60
92-lb sacks....... 1 60
Rice
Good .................. 44
Choice...... ...........
Fancy Head.............. 6
Broken................. 2}
Canned Vegetables
Doz.


Salt Tomatoes, 8s, Chief.......
Tomatoe, 2s ........
200-lb sack............... 1 00 Clayton, 3s................
100-lb sack................ 50 Clayton, 2s ...............
Ice Cream, 200-1b sacks..... 1 00 Sifted Peas, 2s ............ 1
100-b sacks..... 50 Rose L. J. Peas ...........
Pocket Saltin bbls., 8-lb.... 265 Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........ 1
S. ." ". 2-lb.... 275 Lima Beans,2s ............ 1
String Beans, 3s...........
Pepper String Beans, 2s ..........
Baked Beans, 8s...........
Whole Ground Pepper, Baked Beans. ls...........
10-lb tin.............. 17 Corn, fancy, 2s........... 1
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
sifter top, per doz...... 45 Beauty Beets, 3s...........
Ground 1-16 glass pepper Sauer Kraut, 3s ...........
boxes, per doz......40 and 80 Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s ..............
Corn Hay
Is S Lea. M
0 s car lots 100 bale
Car Lot Lot sk lots qu


2050
1900
1800
1800


W. Corn,llOlb, 1 38
1001b, 1 24
Mxd corn,1101b,1 88
S 1001b,1 21


140
126
185
128


1 48
1 29
188
126


Choice.... 19 50
No.1 Tim. 18 00
No. 2 1700
No.l Cl'ler 17 00


2000
1850
1780
1750


85
65
80
60
40
80
15
00
90
70
90
45
40


an
aatity


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz .................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 45
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 46
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case.
per doz..............
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 61
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
lb.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
per lb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 61

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per Ib....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per Ib....... 81
Fancy Apricots 25 Ib boxes. 18
Ex. Choice " ...
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 l-lb. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. ease 8 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
bx.x, 40-50............. 6..
Pruies, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box. 50-60 ............ 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box ......... 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy. H P, per pound.... 6
Extra H P, .... 5
Seed Peanuts, ....
New Nuts


Mixed, 25-lb boxes.......... 11
Almonds................. 18
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Peacans.... .............. 12
Filberts ................... 12
al0 nuts............ ..... 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car e10 Lemslo
lots Sk. Lot Sk. Lt
Cottoneed Meal 27 00 27 50 2800
S Hulls 12 00 12 50 1800


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Wooden ware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
S 8 hoop.........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz .......1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
S nested......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doe 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per dos.. 00
Ax Handles
Two dos crates per do.. .. 1 20
Washboards P-
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay...............8 00
175 Diamond Glass .........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per do. 1 06
Clothes pins, five gross to box T7
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
doz. ..................
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 00
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 5
Salmon Is, Tale 4 dos to case
per dos Alaska........ 90
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to ease,
per dos Col. River .... 2 86
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per do .
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fsh 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............ 8 50
Sea Sides, l&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box............ 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge .... 143-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avge .... 141-2
"Reliable" Hamq, 12-14 avge .... 141-4
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge .. 115-8
"Reliable" California Hams, -8. 101-2
Breakfast Bacon, light av. ...... 151-2
D. S. Bellies, 16-18 a. .......... 93-4
D. S. Bellies, 0-22 av. ........... 1
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av. ........... 1-4
D. S. Plates ................... 7
Bacon Plates ................... a
D. Butts .................. 83-
Bologna Sausage ............... 7
Sausage in oil ................7 .
Bstt aid Cess.
"Strawberry" Creamery, 0-Ib tubs a
30-lb taub 201-
Kingan's La.
"Reliable" ful cream cheese .... 11
Kiubans ai.
"lndiana" Pure Maf ........... UNAb.
*ea-Foam" Compomd ......... mieat.
Kiagana Cannel 3asts
"Reliable" oned B Is ......
Corned Bee, as .......
Rast Beef, l ........ Lo
SRoast Beef, 2 ........ 20
SPotted Ham mnd Tes
-4s .......................... i
Sliced Beef, I-2b .. .. UL
Viea Smange, ls ..
t Tripe .................. 1


G=T A coW OF T= NAVAL nTRZ3 BLUI BOOL


J









22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.






Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertising patrons of this paper and no

charge is ma for an information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention

For Truntme.Sa 8wMl or tFatery wupples or Meumeuy af Any KImL F or Timber. Farml l or Rani Lotus.
DATP INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main Office, Jacksonville, Fa. I am in the market for lands for the purpose of
In the market for the following Prefer in State of Please put me in communication
with responsible parties and give me other information.
Remarks
Please notify where same can be secured. Signed
Signed

State speeifcally the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or second-handed. DATE

c Letlr n for TurTa-ti. SawaM r Fatrya or for Amy ldustria Enterprise. For Cnomm ary. Offte or M- seelM SpIes, SawmMl or Trpaentl e Male
erses, Wags, Etc.
DATE
DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, JacksonvIlle, Fla.
Please advise the andersigned regarding a good location in (state or section of
state) for In the market for
together with full information about labor conditions, taxes, transportation facilities,
local encouragement, etc.
p^.., Please give me information as to best places to buy, etc.

Signed Signed


m yes Wrntat to e SemetidSe? Are YV Tddl of ld ?stti?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Have for sale the following Can you give any Information as to the reliability of the following firm or corpora
tion
Remarks
Can you suggest a purchaser?
Signed signed


o You Wat to Emple- a Man? Be Yo Woet Eml4atmMt?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, pa. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Want a man to fl the position of Want a position as

with the following requirements Refer to the following

Can you suggest such a man? Can you assist me ?
Signed Sined




CLIP THIS COUPON
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD
When you we answering an ~letinnt from the colamm of this paper, whether you are making an inuiry or placing an order, please cut out the coupon
below ad attach it to the letr. h will payyou.

COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the InuWameral ReIo.d, issue dated

Signed


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonville, Fla., and Savannah, Ga., is the South's great
weekly trade journal.



The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.


1w rOU iMnrT rED ITa Ti H 3eMORD WVI V.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 22


McMURRAY & BAKER,


Sa ill IIn TiiinIne Homess. Sfted





.Ameesv Leadle_ Trd_ Jern als.
IWm Wms, w ba irm and barnS wo urn a rs" Ilu
in terU b with alL m r w lp mmt i n w ag aa0e D e al r" t
-e ers w ges world hnld-mad. I n with .m l-t ..



JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Th We, Industrial Reord of Ja.-
aonvlle and Savannah has taken its place
mog the leading trade journals in the
United :St jan am an authority onel.m-
baad nrds tores it Is being quoted no
The Clyde Steamship Company .4; as I o
only by the beat and most carefully edted
cas papers in this country. buIt by tho= 8
in Europe alo. A London trade paper
teaching this olle yesterday gives Uberal a
eape to the Record s views on market coan- fi
S- s week ssue of the ludratrlil Rand- a
ord is even better tMwan usual and It In 'h
t. ea s tr on and entortainlug general indus, trial
trial newspaper. In addition to its value He
am the champion of the two speeo nadus- vs..
tried It represents. It is brmtal of ew Jobsh
Store of development In the Southeast. plah
mioug them being the story of a half-mill, fend
km-dollu corporation orglanlld it Jack- G'
ar is FsWteerdd. and te orcaalaUtion of ff 1
several otiler V orporaIone during the and'
week In ciorp and Florida.
It as e the Da for enturpi aned It Wan
neW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LInes w demsr the gre" Measure or pc s
it is reoolvring. both in Its sabsripton and
Te miasma e 2stsmHas at this 5i ae appoite to say as fello, cailm artsveruing deprtmentscarrylng as t does
at Chadenta, 8. C. both ways. perp one o the largest advetling pat-
Prem NWw Ted,*r Peona l ma, vloe few womasges gaves to sany of the soutlarm~n.
(lr m oeth R ear). rANMER. Charleon and NOw Yeok. ournal tloCe
Tuesday, June 14, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS .... Sunday, June 19 at 9:00 am 11 .
Wednesday, June 15, at 3:00 pm-x ONEI DA ...... Monday, June 20, at 9:00 am wo .t t ; am u
Wednesday, June 15, at 3:00 pm..AIBO NQUIN ..Tuesday, June 21, at 11:00 am n "'" i 1 la !!Mree
Friday, June 17, at 3:00 pm ...APACH E .... Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 a 'n -t., wi r Thls
"eSEMI NOLE ..Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'a ad
MoTday, June 20, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE .... Saturday, June 25, at 1:30 pm
Wednesday, June 22, at 3:00 pm..COMANCHE ..Monday, June 27, at 4:00 am
**xHURON........ Tuesday, June 28, at 6:00 am
Friday, June 24, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS ..Thursday, June 30, at 6:00 am
Tuesday, June 28, at 3:00 pm .. APACHE .......... Sunday, July 3, at 8:00 am 1. Rj_.9j_ 9 AJS 9 I99JJ tI3J 2J.9.J SJJeJJ JJJ.JJSJ. L. 00.Jt.P a
x*ONEIIDA ..Monday, July 4, at 8:00 am
Thursday, June 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE .... Tuesday, July 5, at 9:30 am SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
Saturday, July 2 at 3:00 pm ..COOMANCHE ....Thursday, July 7, at 11:30 am m0 YEARS RELIABILITY.
zHxEMI NOLE ... Thursday, July 7, at 11:30 am
Tuesday, July 5, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ......Sunday, July 10, at 1:00 pm H e t lag er,
Friday, July 8, at 3:00 pm .... APACH ......Wednesday, July 13, at 4:30 am H e s
8atrday, July 9, at 3:00 pm APHOUIN ......Wednesday, July 13, at 4:00 am a
Tuesday, July 12, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ......Sunday, July 17, at 7:30 am CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STV. AND It A 13 MAIN.
xONEIDA ........ Monday, July 18, at 8:00 am CONRBY-sA-NsD CEAR-SS. AD- 11 & 13" t- m A
Friday, July 15, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUI ...... Thursday, July 21, at 11:00 am aT l ai
"xSEMINOLE ....Thursday, July 21, at 11:00 am
Tuesday, July 19, at 3:00 pm APACHE ...... Snday, July 24, at 12:30 pm
Wednesday, July 20, at 3:00 pm ..AIIONGUIN .... Tuesday, July 26, at 4:00 am
Friday, July 22, at 3:00 pm .... MANCHE ..Wednesday, July 27, at 4:30 am
x HU RON ... .Wednesday, July 27, at 4:30 am e o
Tuesday, July 26, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, July 31, at 7:00 am
xONE IDA ...... Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 8:00 am a d Sk
Wednesday, July 27, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ......Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 8:00 am
Friday, July 29, at 3:00 pm .APACHE ...... Wednesday, Aug. 3, at 9:00 am Published Daily in The
Sunday, July 31, at 3:00 pm ... "AIGONQUIN .... Friday, Aug. 5, at 10:30 am
!.SEMI OLE .... Saturday, Aug. 6, at 11:30 am
--refght only. *-Boston via Charleston and New York.
LB--Bto via Brunswlsk -.d Charles ton. -- Boston, ir Carleston.
T CLYDE NW INLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.Metropo s,
Dwaet soorvse between J eoeanvle, iWestom a=d Proemovi ee an ll ao-
earm 11im01 sahs-c at Charlestom Both Ways.
sa m-wmannslrn sAtn m Wa Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
.. .......... ........ ........... rom T W. aorf daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.
wrooora... ........ ........ ..From to oft aterC ..e street. Jacaksonvmll
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LUNE
.- ,,- A-. T .--. onr..o -."$5 A YEAR; $2. 50 SIX MONTHS.
Stepping at PIatha. Astor St. Francis. Berestord (De Laud and intermediate
landis oem I t. Joh rsver.
STEAMER "'CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
is appointed to sell as follows: Leave Jacksonville, Sundays, Tuesdays and Thur-
days. :0 m. Returning, leave Sanford, Mondays. Wednesday & Fridays 93 a. m. B IG P
.uua, nuoiuU l NORTH BOUND
dowr. Read up.
Le."e p. RI ...... ...............Jacksonvll.............. ....... ....Arrive m. A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposition, to
La:: .... ...... ...... .... ... a Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Leave 4 a...... m... : ... ............St. Frac..................... Leave 111 p. mS
.................. I ... .......Beresfor (DeLanad....................... eave 3-S noeo Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
iriwrvS a. m....................... Sanford ......... ... ....... ...... ILeve t a.
Ar. 10:00 a ..................... rpris ..................... .L. 10:00 a. m. scription contest. Write for particulars.
IMUw A16, PAwwQUNo AND TrICIKrT ol9ICE. 312 W. ay St.. Jsek. mo.
P. TRONVONGTP, JR. Asat. Gentu Pass Agent. MS W. Bay St. Jacksonvilte. Pls
W. G. COOPR, JR, Local Frt. Ant., Jackvite. C. P. LOVWL. Ast. supt.Jackwvite
rt.Hogan treet. Jac onvi O. Carter & Russell Publishing Co.
A. C. NAGOURTY G. L P. A.. New York. CLTDU IfILNE. 0. F. A.. New TeIl
TEn . . i3n, W F. CITDDS a o0.
.,rbr Buiadr. n o tael Yor.. Jacksonville. Florida.
wsesh ClWd=n. TM Otate MteM MIOw er. D
VmS THI RUCOD1 3 ANY IMnoRMATIOn DnsUU.








MS THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
,r ,I,


43 NCaainv Pboogestima


C N FULLER. Voe.-Pteasldet


JAB F LANE. OSe- Tsem


DeparmenIa


Greenleaf

Crosby Company


Di&aonds
Stones


and Other Preciou


Fine Gold Jewelry


3baetirk anb


American and Foreign Wachdm
and Clocks


41 West Bay Street

'acksonville

M e-V asod feat" is part of as
Bsomste01 048& e atEmia tom ordem a


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


Fine China Dinner Sets and
Fancy Pieces


THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
of Wananish. N. C.,
Fer..rly Counela Sttion, C.., am atm selli. mond fCa.
Heaks at I.,1 Black Joe and Standard at (Sk, Old Style and Patent
PauDee at SM a doen. They should average a little better than ever.
We -hve brought out a new brand, the Blue Line Hacks at 1. and Pul-
er at LO whieh are warranted. All wholesale dealers in naval stores
Inc w arry our uIne ad sdu supply operators.

D.G.mr lEHAN, Prdasi. ALFRED A. McKETHAN, Lt U. S. N.
Jaemoamrle, fFla. Bet'd Sec'y and Treas Constructing
Engineer, Fayettetlle, N. G.

Pine Product Construction Co.
Fayettevlle, N. C.
Spirit of Turpeatlne Oil of Tar. Creoote, Tar. Disanfectants: Wood Preservatie,
Pants, Wood Stains. te., and Charcoal. from Lightwood Stumps, Box-facing
Proalts -lreased. Time of distillaton reduced. Condensation controlled at will.
no damrr frm flre. Plant erected complete, and men taught the process. Fur-
otr latfermrtlon write Alfred MaeKethan. general manager, Fayettevme. C.

SI SWmm MEMORIALS II MARBLE, STONE AND BRONZE
From the simple Tablet to the most elaborate Mausoleum.
Write, or conm to see us--our designs will please you.
SOUTHERN MARBLE AND STONE CO.
ire remcang ICD C. LAMMOr. Ma Ter.
Cat Ste..f r BdIiines Ne. 4 *-ot M adam St reet
aAnyths e S r d
Anthinbse inBeano. Marbios Mgase and Tule.


HOTEL BARTHOLDI, B OWAY OD ST..
Pacing Wadion Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughoat.
Near all Big Stores and Places of Amusement. Cars Pass
the Door for all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landing.
Large Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
ind no grand and magnificent decorations: no luxurious
grandeur; no swe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fae, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
rSpea Te .. No Employees Is Any Way Iatteatative.
Bet jIt a cosy, homne-like little hotel that will appeal to the
beert.a o thoae who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plain Ameorian cooking, and affable and courteous treatment.
A- ----- ------------------------


European Novelties


!r-
,1
5: i~
t72_l;j
._I -


.-5L Z---
c


John R. Young. Preldent. C. SKn. Elli Ve-Pret.
J. w. Msotto. Jr., Secretary and Treasrwr.


Th ELLIS-YOUNG CO.

I Commission Merchants

| NAVAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

SSavannah and Brunswick, Ga.

^A~ m i~ lU--------------------- =U A 1UA- i ii -ii


JW. HUNT. President.
P. L Psucoca, Ist V. P-


J. S. HnARRI, md V s.Pr. L. RICE.MOnD. B. a jTs.
W. J. KILLY, 3d V. P. D. R. WILLIAr Am See*'pJEWa.


Peacock-Hunt & West Compay,
General Ofces: 20 Bay Street, I,. Savamia. Ga. ai
SWest srMildng. Jacksavine, FIa.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mIltaL We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that buys Ii
Turpentine and reinn)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,

Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Teols and Naval Stores Hardware Our Spedlal
-SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wilse. & M 'i
Philadelphia Wagns.

Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga., and JackasemI
and ferandina, Fla.


---.w


1 4 "


Ieema,'


Write for Catalogue


^'YT yC ~ ~~L1~-'' U11


~rarcJ~,,,,,~,uelowC