<%BANNER%>
Weekly industrial record
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00086
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: August 26, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00086
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text





For the Week Ending August 26, 1904. Ry





WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECO A


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

.~Od Sept. 12tha, 102, by see Execmtlre Committee of tfie Turfrti e Operators' Assoclatios as Its Exclusive Official Organ, and Adopted Sept. Ilth 1902, in Amnual Ce
rertleC as an Official Orga Also of the general Associatloa. Adopted Sept. I lt, 1903. as the only Official Organ of tra Turpentine Operators' Associatiem .
Adopted April 271b. 1903. as the Offlcal Orlga of the Inter-Stare Case Growers' Assoclati..n. Endorsed by the Georgla Sowmill
Associateon. Official Organ of the Sotheasterrd Stock rower's- Association.


VO 9. NO. 8.


JACKSONVILLE, [LA.


ATLANTA, GA.


SAVANNAH, GA.


Address Before Stock Growers'Convention I

Dr. H. E. Stockbridge on: Why Can Beef Be Produced Cheaper in
the South Than in the North?
1----_-**--***--* -------------****


The following address was delivered by
Dr. H. E. Stockbridge before the Conven-
tion of the Southeastern Stock Growers'
Association, hekl in this city some months
ago:

Mr. President and Gentlemen:
The convening of this convention marks
an epoch in the development of an in-
duitry in which I have been actively in-
terested. and to which I have devoted
some effort, for several years. It is,
therefore, quite natural that I should
glaee, in retrospect. at the progress of
whieh this organization is the evidence.
It is only necessary to look back five
years, in order to recognize, by contrast.
the very great changes which a short
time has wrought in the condition of the
S live-stock industry in our section. Five
years ago, as our Chairman will remem-
ber, a largely attended convention of
stoekmen assembled at his home town
of Kissimmee. The leading breeders of
the State were present, representing hun-
dreds of thousands of head of cattle, and
millions of dollars of invested capital.
Almost the only subject discussed at that
convention, and the only one in which
those cattle-men seemed to have actual
interest, was the matter of cattle thieves,
and the suppression of cattle stealing.
Hee, five years later, this subject has not
been mentioned, and the program of our
two days' meeting is abundant evidence
of.-the change in conditions, and the pres-
ent state of development attained by this
live stock industry.
.Five years ago I published iln Bulletin
4f of the Florida Experiment Station,
results of some small experiments in
fading for the production of beef and
pork. One experiment showed 4S per cent.
of dremsed beef in the carcass of a Flor-
ida cow f ed on native feed-stuffs. I
ihb ti.Q .H task by critics, who never
fed anything hut themselves. Last night
a member of this convention. Mr. Ed-
wards. of Ocala. who now annually fat-
r"-""ilh several hundred steers as a business.
told me that he had relweatedly slaught-
ered animals dressing W per cent.. andl
that 40 to (45 per cent. was his~ regular
average, as a business, with native ani-
mals and feeds.
Five years ago there was proalbly not
t farm in the entire section represented
in this convention, which was in any part
devoted to the business of making native
hay for market. A few weeks ago I vis-
it a aerNsd farm on which there was
- p:dind last year 550 tons of hay for


market, in addition to the feed for the
hundreds of head of cattle maintained
on the farm. On this farm I saw 200 tons
of hay baled for shipment, in a barn 150
feet long by 100 wide. equipped with trol-
ley hay forks, hay loaders and all the
improved machinery characteristic of the
most progressive farms of the North.
Four years ago this farm now free from
.stumps and cultivated by the most im-
proved implenr-nts was wild wire-grass
land, dotted thickly with pine stumps
and strewn with the blackened tops left
by the insatiate sawmill.
With the indulgence of the convention
I shall venture to present two witnesses.


by me in March. 1W.)1. The correctness, of
I1mn assertion yv(:u caln easily see by cor-l-
paring the two publications. here in my
hand. There 's nothing specially remark-
able almiut the cut itself, nor the fact
that it should have lIe-n reprloduced with-
out permission, except th(e matter of its
or gin, andl the ,particular use to which
it is now put.
The piece of beef in iquestoin was unt
from the carcass of a commonii Florida
"piney wodns'" cow. fattened on native
Florida feedl-stffs: pea-vine. crab-grass
and velvet-lwan hay. cotton-seed meal and
cassava. Her regular ration of the latter
was 12 Ihs. per day. The use of the cut
is its most interesting featur-e. It wa.
used as a typical sample of lthe I-wst Chi-
cago beef. Armour & Co. issue a pami-
phlet to facilitate andl incerase tlu- sales
of 'Chciago beef. Tlo advertise the quality
of the article they are prelpar:d to sup-l
ply tlhir customers. they Ccoie to Florida
and take all illustration cut front a i mor


whose testimony will demonstrate the 'ld wuorn-oiut Florida range ow*,. fattened
changed sentiment as to conditions and on typical Florida feeds. Advertising is
possibilities relative to this industry. done for t he purlpse of increasing Ihusi-
My first witness is the firm of Armour ness. Armour & (o. latetmpt to increase
& Co.. to whom stockmen need no in- the: Ilbusiness, stake their reputation. and
production. The 'distributing headquar- I show as illustrating the best they e-an
ters for this firm. for this territory, are furnish. beef from a Florida ew.i fed oni
in .acksonville. From here a monthly Florida fieds on a FlHrila farmn. Arnourr
price list is issued, for distribution to the & ('o.are g"'( authority and here is
trade. The first page of this pamphlet their published assertion that the best
for February of this year was embellished beef in the world can le proldued in
with an illustration of a "Porter House Florida.
Cut" of beef. I wish to introldulce a single witness to
The original of this illustration was show the change which is taking place inl
published on page 30 of Bulletin 49 of public sentiment as to the possibilities
the Florida Experiment Station, issued of profitable meat making in our State.


i *
All Turpentine Menr

Are earnestly urged to be in Jacksonville on 'the
14th and 15th of September to attend the Annual
Convention of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
This request is made, not only upon the members of the
Association-those who have heretofore been identified
with that organization-but upon all persons, of all sec
tions, who are manufacturers of, factors, dealers or work,
ers in naval stores. It is particularly important that all
producers attend. Conditions just now, and conditions
that are prospective, demand attention. Operators must
Some together, and with the strength of numbers and the
wisdom of conservatism, meet and properly discuss and
act upon various trade matters that are at this time before
: the turpentine fraternity.

3 Let every operator in the South begin now to preo
Spare to be in Jacksonville on that occasion.
.- 13....---.i......S6r ^luv,**aeaser*- --*A i


A few weeks ago I was returning from
'eilssai.la. .\t hmonfay there boarded the
train ,in old alcuaintance engaged in the
turpentine business at that place. He is
a nilmlest inae. so I refrain from making
Irs name public. He immediately remind-
ed me that we haid not met since I held
a Farmers' Institute in his town two
years bt fore, and then said:
"D)o you remember what I told you
after that Instituter I said that either
'iloi m\re the biggest liar that I ever
saw. or e'Pe cassava was the best feed
in the wo:-ld. and I was going to work
and find out which supposition was cor-
reet.
"I got a little -assava seed and planted
a small patch near the house. The land
and eiltivtivation woilil probably have made
me 240 bushels of corn per acre. In the
Fall I put up s:x shots. and fed them
1 1-2 bushels of corn. Then I ordered
my man to feed them nothing but cas-
savai. I fed them in this way 42 days.
tiln ais goss killing weather came on
I had them all killed.
"'They dressed me an average of about
1.30 Ibs. each of as sweet. hard well-keep-
ingl meat as I ever saw. I then measured
the land frunl which the cassava fed had
been harvested. and found it to be one-
ighth of an acre.
MIv usual ration for fattening hogs is
I gallon of eo:n per day. At this rate
tlu six hogs would have used 31 1-2 bush-
els in 42 days. They were actually fed
I 1-2 bushels, leaving the cassava eaten
e(luivalent to :3 bushels of corn. My
actual feeding therefore, showed the cas-
sava frimu one-eighth of an acre equiva-
lent to :30 bushels of corn, or an acre of
cassava to be eilual in feeding value to
240 bushels of eiirn per acre.
"Sluppose that I am as bad a liar as I
mistrulsted you to be. and'divide this re-
sult in tlwe middle. Still an acre in cas-
-aila is f(lail to 120 bushels of corn. Di-
vide by 2 again, on the supposition that
I had unusually goiu luck, and still an
acre ofr ca-s.ava is equal in feeding value
to eirnl at the rate of 60 bushels per acre,
or just three times what. my land could
have yielded in a crop of corn."
I'The fact is. Mr. Chairman and gen-
tenen. that five years ago. I found it
neessiarv t o o 4 considerable talking to
'< nvince people of the correctness of my
opinion as to the possibilities and adva -
ta sof of r section for stock husbandry.
Now there are so many others willing and
anxious to give testimony, that I gladly
leave'-the talking to others.
T'he subject assigned me on our program
relqiires no demonstration. It aecpts a
fact as establishtdl. and simply demands
of me an enunnmer~tion of the reasons for
the existence of a fact aHeady accepted.
I am relieved. therefore of the necessity
of support ng any assertion by statistics.
This is perhaps a fortunate fact, since a


Ut\

on;


41111=1


$3 A YEAR.





2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
A-l6 M :4t O'

C. B. ROGERS. PKSIDewr.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, VICB-PREBIDENTS.


C. H. HODGSON, 8c, and TizAs'a.


DIRECTOILS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain. H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,0oo.


Co...
*
C
C


Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches in Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.


The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.
-


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Comsist of one Three-Story Bildlag, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; ore one-story belldiRa, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the klad la the Sath.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensecola. Fla., and Svann ah. Ga.

THE R-EORD WILL BK WORTH PQLLARS TO YOU EVERY WEE.
=z =C0" WM DZu WQR= WW"~I~ TO TOU ZVZRY WERIL


C


I







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 3


I.S chofinhI't Sons omgnafl
~-l~r~~1Iuur~lr~uu3_


0
*

i
4
0
*
0
0
0
4
0
*
0
4.


a.dqa.rt.rs for
Distiller's Pumping
Outfit
No plant complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
SFlorida, Alabama, Mississippi and
South Carolina. Write us for particu-
lars and prices. We also manufacture
Engines, Belers aMd High
Grade Machinery,
as well a carry a full and complete
---stockof--
Mill Supplies, Pipe.
Boiler Tubes, Etc.


.' Advise your wants.
4 ; Macon, Georgia.
isa or of a wf If Turpameusb # rw.
*aOO~o1oo*#OoO.*O.O.O.06*SOS*S*90*@S*OoSOO*SOS


W. W. OASNHS. Pres.W. W. THOMAS. magmser. T DUD'LEY. Seo.& Tres

Tampa Hardware Co.


Wholesale
Hardware
nine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

e Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
rnd Pullers on Hand.

-. FLORIDA.


JOHRN YOUNG,
Predmdea


J. WILUIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALORD,


A. D. COvINGTON,
Vice-President.


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGWtT.
J. R. YOUNG.


H. L. KAYTON,
Secretary aad Treasurer.


B. P. BULLARD
'*. C. POWEL.
VNEAMK AY,
Af: IL. COVINGTON.


J. R. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railway. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE POR PARTICULARS.




W. R. THOMAS


GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggies.


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
CAPITAL $304000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS $30000
We issue Time Certificates of Deposit, which draw Interest at he rate efttree cpr cent per
auums, if held ninety days or longer. Take advatage of tls aed let yeor *ris he earul
somethlfg tfr you. Particular attention paid to Out-of-Town accounts. sendina deposits by ma=.

"When the Leaves Begin to Fall"
Watch out for Chills and Fever.

Planters Tasteless Chill Tonic
s a sure Cure-UARANTEED TO CUR BIG 4
We run no risk in making this guaranty.
Bead this: -_-f . l in Tm


Neeses, S. C. June Il. 19H.
I had been suffering with chills and fever for the
last five years and had tried doctors' medicine, but got no
relief until I began to use planters Chill Tonic, which, I
am thankful to say, has cured me.


C. E Bolin.
Write us for booklet and special prices.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO..


Chattanooga.


lugida
Ct Wlilf
NMI oil
Tenn.


8. R. POWELL. CiAS. 6 HARRIS, HENRY ASHLEY,
PresMet. Vice-President and Treasurer. Secretary.
DIREcrORS:
a. R. Powell, Cass. 6. Harrs, . Mcllan, P. L. Sutherland, R. V. Covigster .

THE


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Cmcer of West Bay iam Mailse. Sts.
Jacksonville, Florida.


Wholesale Drugs g Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices on
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and 6an save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.


Young's Female College,
Thomasville, Georgia.,
SPrCES SEPrTEAMER Jte, 1904. Unsarpa.sed Climate. Cultured Community, Splendid
Equipment, select associations, individual attention to each student, limited number of boarding
students: broad, comprehensive courses leading to A. B. and H. S. degrees: Faculty of eight Chris-
tian specialists: Music. Elocution and Physical Culture Specialties; total cost from ~S to IS for
ten months term. Write for catalogue to-
I. COCHR.ANE HUNT. President.
'"1 Sept. 1st. Richmond. Ky.


THE ARAGON
JACKSONVIILE. FIA.
NOW OPEN
under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
-^ H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.



East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Speciaty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.

For Prm Delivery Seed Us Yor Commissary Chek riders.


MM RECOD U8 TME OVMW8 GM& TR=D" JOIURAJL


_-
; Turpe

- g
: A

= TAMPA,


I lliII llllli llll I IIIII I II I II IIIIIt II II I11IIIII


- -..NATIONAL..
*** *** o


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH. GA.. U. S. A.


V 1-VV1-l-1 1-1-1 ~v1


I
L
r
r
r
r










4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

Ths advertisers are in this issue. If
yeo want anything, look through this
dasaied list and write to the firm ap-
pearing therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.

AUTOMOBILES.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantie National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Central National Bank, Ocala, Fla.
Mercantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Foster, Geo. R, Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jackson
ville, Fla.
CARS.
South Atlantic Car & Manufacturing Co.,
Wayeross, Ga.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Reafroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Larendon, M. W, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
COOPERAGE.
Cannon Co., The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Cooperage Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Quitman Cooperage Co., Qitma Ga.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUG--WHOLESALE.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville.
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofeld's Sons Co, J. S., Macon, Ga.
gusta, Ga.
FOUNDRIES
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY.
Florida Freight Claim Agency, Jackson
ville, Fla
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack
sonville, Fla.
FURNITURE.
Fetting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla
GENTS FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Ellis-Young Co., Savannah, Ga.
Hargraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Johnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock. Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
White. Walton & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furehgott & Co., Jackson .ile. Flt
HARDWARE.
Baird & Co., I. E., Jackskoknville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co., The, Jacksonville, Fit
Brigg Hardware Co.. W. H..Valdosta. Ca.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville. Fla.
Marion Hardware Co, OQala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co.; Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D.. Savannah. Ga.
HARNESS.
fMeMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fla.


HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co.. H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS.
Aragon, The. Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
IRON WORKS.
Inombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta. (;a.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
%Murphy, T.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofierls Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
JEWELERS
Greenleaf & Crosby Co. Jacksonville, Fla.
less & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
*-Ilttelini. F.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Rlulnt & 'o.. C'has., Jacksonville, Fla.
lannc Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Speiler Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Southern .ilanlfiial 'i trying Co.. Jacksonville.
F,'la.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lomllard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, (Ga.
Murphy. T.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Scholielhls Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Sclhotields Sons Co.. J. S., Macon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jacksonville, Fla.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggsi Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
(Christopher, .John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion llardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Scholiehlq's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
MULES AND HORSES.
'Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, O a.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barnes-Jessup Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson
ville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co., The, Savannah, Ga.
Independent Naval Stores and Export Co.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock. Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga
SStandard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville.
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
PAINTS.
Baird & Co., I. E., Jacksonville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PECANS.
Griffiing Bros. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga
Campbell, .1. R., Ocala, Fla.
- Christopher. John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gilbert. Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schotiell's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
. White- Blakesle Mfg. Co., Birminghan
Ala.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannal
Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
tBeckwith. Henderson & Warren, Tampi
Fla.
Brobston. Fendig & Co.. Jacksonville, Fli
Biuckman. C., Jacksonville. Fla.


Manatee County Abstract Company.
R. S. Johnson. Abstracter.
Bradentown. Manatee County. Florida.
I complete e ;ani reliale tIww>.,.k titles perfected.
T:txe paid for imn-resident property owner% in
Manatee C ount v.
I l;AMIs n lWrkt.li;eatel for niuo-rsmident. oni approved
title witIt hilt-ttedigl Mseurity pay.inl interest
it I per cent per annum. semi-anniallv.
fI 'rre-pondence elicitedd.
I References furnished


Frazier, W. W.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Ocala, Fl.
Southern States Land and Timber Co,
Jacksonville, Fla.
West-Raley-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville,
Fla.
SHIP YARDS
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville ,Fla.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cypress Tank Co., Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son. G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
TOOLS.
(hristopher. John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Council Tool Co., The, Wananish, N. C.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jacksonville, r la.


The Larest and Oldest Copper
Works in Georgia.


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


MORTGAGES. RENTS.

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.

III W. FORSYTH STREET, JACKSONV.ILE, FLOIA




H. A. Renfroe Co.


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at ReadyMade Prices Mail Orders Given Personal Attention


439 W. Bay Street


JACKSONVILLE, FLA


t11 T I T 1 li I 1tit ri 1t l 1--1-1= ll-1 llit l l 11-i li 1 11 -ll -
J. P. WIt.IIMS. President. J. A. (. CAssox, lst Vice-President
T. A. JasNINGs, 2nd Vice-President. J F. DUaXrBURY. 3d Vice-President
R H. L KAYTON. Secretary. D. G. White. Treasurer.


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

-1111 Siit U cOn FACTORS i HOiEStILE IGaRo .
MItlai Offlne BAVANNH, EOROmGIA. -
SPI ri SACOLA. FLX. i Branch Orocery Houe,
Branch Ofrrics:. JACKIONVILLE. ELA. 1 COLLIMBUS. GA.

SNava Stores Pmrodcers are Invited to Correspond With Us.
1ll tt111 in l t lll1111111111111 it1 11 1-141 111111 int l l111 -


U. A. BAKER,

SrflvetWr a t
Eamlacturrof thk


Baker Improved

Seemless Turpem O

tire stills.
Write me for prices and out f
F. O. B. any point in Geotria. Mor-
Ida. Alabama or MissisIPspi. All
stills sold under a guarantee.
IJob work through the
country a specialty.

1Wrunswicl, G0.


gW My specialty is large worms aid heavy bottoms lhat do not leak.


Send your order for general printing to the Record


DON'T FAIL TO MENTIQO THE RECORD TO ADVERTISERS.


TURPENTIE PROCESS.
Pine Product Construction Co, The, Fay-
etteville, N. C.
Pine Belt Construction Co., The, Raleigh,
N. C.
Standard Turpentine Co., The, New York
City.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
MeMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
Davis & Son., G. M., Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
TYPEWRITERS
Cr;vot Typewriter Exchange, Jacksonville,
Pla.
VEHICLES.
McMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fla.
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Summer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fl.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


preacher once in enumerating the differ-
ent kinds of lies. said: "There are three
kinds: White lies. black lies and the kind
they call statistics."
The financial success of any undertak-
ing depends chiefly on the cost of producing
its commercial product. The amount of
the investment required, and the cost of
the raw material used in the business to
determine the results. These fundamental
principles of business furnish the answer
to the question: "'Why can a pound of
beef be made more cheaply her*e than else-
where?"
Food is the raw material used for
making beef. ('heap food is the indis-
pensable requisite to success in this busi-
ness. I wish to particularly emphasize
the fact that cheapness of the food used
is the all-important factor. This is con-
trary to the preconceived ideas of many
people, who, recognizing the fact that
corn is the most common fattening ma-
terial of the world, and largely controls
the beef markets of to-day, suppose that
there must be some peculiar and special
qualities in corn which render it superior
to other feeding materials. As a matter
of fact corn is not an ideal fattening ma-
terial, and efforts are now under way for
improving its composition, by selection
and cultivation, so as to make it a more
Iwrfect substance for the purpose.
"'The roast beef of old England" gained
its fame centuries before the American
continent, with its aboriginal corn-fields.
was discovered. The famous London mut-
ton is a product of turnips and barley.
Thousands of steers are annually fattened
on the refuse from German beet-sugar
factories. As good betef and mutton is
prneuced every year from the "wheat
screenings" of the lied River Valley, as
the corn fields of Iowa ever produced.
The preponderance of corn an a fattening
material is dtle solely to the fact that.
over a large part of the American conti-
nent. the economy of its production makes
it the cliealest fattening material. Thert
are numerous other materials which pro-
duce equally satisfactory quality of prod
set. Where local conditions render these
feeds more economical than corn, they be
come the best, because tile cheapest, raw
materials for Ieef production.
With these facts established in mind
the reasons why we can in our section
produce lef more cheaply than elsewhere
may be briefly given numerically.
I In the growing and feeding of cat
tie. land is the largest single investment<
('heap lands. therefore, are indispensable
to the success of the business. This i
a historic as well as economic fact. Frot
Biblical days the cry of the herdsma
has been for cheap lands.
The cheapest lands now remaining i
the United States, adapted to the produi
tion of cattle food-stuffs, are the "cui
over" gine lands of the Gulf States. Ti
same economic conditions which hat
brought cotton mills to the cotton field
will in the near future, a.s inevitab]
transfer the great cattle industry fro
tile high-priced lands of the "corn bel
to the cheap, denuded forest lands of tl
"wire-grass" South. Millions of acres
these lands, perfectly adapted to grazil
and the growing of abundant crops, nc
lying in all the unattractivene
following in the wake of the despoilil
sawmill and turpentine still, are no
available to the stockman, at prices
insignificant as to be hardly worth qu
ing. Already large areas are being i
voted to this business, the center of whi
must eventually move from the West


the South.
2. The climatic conditions offered iby
this section are necessarily important in
controlling results. i
Among these conditions, that of tern-
perature is doubtless the most important.
Food is used in the animal economy for *
two purposes. First, for maintaining t
growth and supplying animal wastes.
Second, for keeping up the necessary *
heat of the blood. This latter function of
food is accomplished by actual combustion
The amount, or proportion, of food used
for this purpose depends on surrounding "
temperatures. In other words, the colder
the climate, tle more combustion. and use
of food, is required to maintain animal
heat, exactly as is the case with the con-
sumption of fuel for keeping any place or
article warm.
The practical bearing of this fact is
demonstrated in actual feeding experi- C
ments. which show that 70 days of feeding
in our climate accomplish essentially the
same results attained in 120 days in the 0
feeding sections of the Northwest. This 0
means that the time and expense of feed- 0
ing are diminished 41.6 per cent. by our
favorable climate alone.
In addition to this saving in food, must 3
be considered the far less expense for
shelter, and the saving in labor in the
matter of care and feeding.
3. Whoever is at all familiar with the *
disastrous results of drought in the West-
ern cattle sections, will appreciate the
blessing of adequate water supply. Ev-
erywhere in our territory, rivers, creeks,
springs and clear lakes supply inexhausti-
ble quantities of the.est of water. More-
over. in most parts of this entire section
the purest of artesian water is available
within easy reach of thle surface, furnish-
ing Imuntifnl supplies of flowing water.
No stockman among us need ever haul
water miles, from muddy. drying creeks.
nor exendl a fortune constructing dams
* and earth reservoirs for the husbanding of
Strain and inferior surface water. No cattle
Sooner in all the region represented in this
- convention need have before his eyes the
horror of seeing his herds falling dead
- around exhausted water holes.
S 4. We have now been in session two
lays. vet we have hardly heard mention
of tile existence of tile cattle diseases coin- q
nnon to all other stock sections. When
,asked by a st anger to mention the most
serious pest of our range cattue one of ourt
west informed stockmen can conjure up
nothing more terrible than the common
Black fly, prevalent wherever cattle con-
gregate in numbers.
As a matter of fact our section is ex-
Sempt front the more serious disorders of
nthe North. The healthfulness of our herds
is proverbial, our insects and other pest.
n are comparatively insignificant, and the
- tick fever," our only really serious in-
t- digenous disease, is to be dreaded only
le when attacking unacclimated imported
e animals, which may be perfectly protected
". by simple inoculation.
y 5. All thie other advantages enumerat-
n ed woull be of little use could we not
show the possibility of producing abun-
dant and economical supplies of feed-
of
Sstuffs. Here, again, those whose experi-
gence in the feeding of live stook is restrict-
ow
ed to the use of corn and clover hay will
*ss
meet surprise.
ng
w It is true that neither of these North-
o ern favorites is so well adapted to our
t- conditions. It should be borne in mind,
e- however, that these are simply two among
ieh the many thoroughly reliable feed-stuffs,
to the selection of which for any locality


** **..*.*........ 12 2.... . .. *B..*t.-tm-


J. A. Craig cf Bro.

239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BOCK.


Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap iand Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.







For Sale I

7,000 Aces Roumnd Timber, Walton Co. Turpentine priv-
ilege only. $1..4) per acre. Water transportation.
20,000 Aoeses Volusia Co.. Round Timber, on Rail trans-
portation. Splendid timber for turpentine. Price $3.25. Fee sim-
pie
22,000 Aeres Hillsboro Co. Water transportation. Splen-
did Turpentine timber. $3.00 per acre, fee simple.
We have several choice Turpentine locations in operation. Write
for schedules. Our No. 8 Bulletin will be mailed upon application.


Brobston, Fendig & Co. |

Jacksonvile. Florida. Bnmswick. Gewia.




The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE Q RETAAIL


HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints. Oils and Glass.
Stoves, Tinware, Country-Holloware.


0 WEST BAY STREET


Jacksonvlle. Fla.


T. MURPHY

JACKSONVILLE MACHINE AND IRON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat. Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Irea
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARINE ENGINES AND BOILERS. PULLEYS AND SHAFTING.
Agent for Stationary Engines. Boilers. Plumps, Feed Water Heaters and Coaden-
sers. Hydrants and Valves. (entrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Goods
POWER TRAISMISSIOI AID WATER WORKS EPIPMEIT SPECIALTT
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.



Cable Address. Florida


SStandard Naval Stores

* t-W


1D


DEALERSS EXCLUSIVELY IN


ROSIN

AND TURPENTINE.

Jacksonville, Fla. I


WHEN WRITING ADViETI SRS MENTION THE RECORD.


~I









6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY

Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Leated in the hemt of the Lamber District gives us advae-
tage of choicest material at lowest oist.


or condition must finally rest solely on
the relative cheapness of the material se-
lected.
In passing, it should perhaps be men-
tioned that our whole section produces
corn economically, though possibly not
in competition with the Central West.
When the value of corn land in Illinois
is compared with its selling price in
Georgia or Flor'da. when the initial in-
vestment stands perhaps as one hundred
dollars there against five dollars here, it
may possibly be reasonably urged that
corn is as economically produced and as
cheaply fed on many Southern farms as
on the western prairies.
Our Northern friends, however are de-
pendent on corn for their success. We'
are not. This is the chief difference ie-
tween us from the feeding standpoint.
We do not need corn because we have
something better.
For fattening materials we have cotton-
seed meal, which northern feeders setd
to our own fields and buy, cassava and


velvet Ieans. For concentrates, proteins,
we have velvet beans, cow-peas, and the
sa!me cotton-seed meal. For rouglha., or
forage. we have a numerous variety of
native grasses and hay crops. Bermuda,
crab-grass, carpet-grass, Japanese clover
and Desnodium may be mentioned as
among the best. The two last are le-
gumes, fully equal in feeding value to
the vaunted red clover of the North.
Like it, as are the velvet bean and cow-
pea, they are soil renovators, the culti-
ration of which improves the soils pro-
ducing them.
Not only are these feed-stuffs equal to
every demand, but several of them, like
the cow-pea. Desmodium and crab-grass,
are second crops which may be produced
annually on land from which cultivated
crops have already been removed. The
two last have the additional advantage of
being "volunteer" crops, coming in yearly,
after the land is once seeded, as soon as
working the cultivated earlier crop stops.


The importance of this fact should not
be overlooked. A full crop of corn for
feed, or a market crop for sale, may be
made, and then without further labor s
crop fully equal to red clover comes in,
and furnishes the best of pasture, with no
expense at all, or the best of hay for
simply the trouble of harvesting. More-
over, the longer this double cropping
is continued, if the crops are only fed on
the land producing them, the more pro-
ductive it becomes.
Mr. Chairman, these are among the rea-
sons for the faith that is in me. These are
my replies to the question I was given to
answer. These are the reasons for the
wonderful change wrought in the live
stock industry of our section during the
past few years. These are the foundation
facts on which a more wonderful develop.
ment. a veritable transformation, will
occur before this association celebrates ita
quarter centennial.
H E. STOICKBRIDGE.


BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN






ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilimer, Oil and lea Ma-
chinery, and Supplies and Repairs.
CAPACITY FOR 300 HANDS
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Madunrt,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hanger, amtrbw a
Rubber Belting and Hose, Railroad ard
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates frnied for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps, Feed Water Heaten al
Hoisting Engines.
AUGUSTA, CA.
chsMr Tbe Rectl plat m amb-
sary check than ta th1e Mthg I m
In tie Seuth ceLMib.


JOHN HENDERSON, President.


- HE-


J. A. CRANFORD, Secretary.


CHATTANOOGA POTTERY CO.,


Factory located Daisy, Tenn.


Sole Manufacturers of



The Herty Turpentine Cups


-I If you expect to use cups next season place

your orders now for future delivery. Prices and

all information cheerfully furnished on


Cups, Gutters and all Tools

O: Used in the HERTY system.

Address all communications


TShe Chattanooga Pottery Company,

Jacksonville, Fla.


ARE YOU A SEUSCRZIBR TO THE RUCCED?


Ifi~i3r~l~f~


-------------------------


---


J n-eksonville, Fla.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7
.mai


"eanuine" Liaeed Oil.
The commercial correspondent of the
"Mandhemter Guardian" recently in his
notes referred to a rather important mat-
ter-the question of the genuineness of
"genuine" linseed oil. By this term one
means linseed oil- nothing more, noth-
ing les--not one to which may have been
added rape oil or cotton oil or mineral
,oil. We think, however, that no respec-
table oil crusher would send out as "gen-
ine" any linseed oil to which one or
other of these oils has been added. But
the probabilities are that really genuine
linseed oil is an unknown article com-
mercially, and can only be got on a small
scale by one getting the linseed itself and
extracting the oil from it. This arises
From the fact that commercial linseed is
never quite pure. There is almost al-
ways a small percentage of other seeds,
such as rape, in it. Now, the question
is, would an oil crusher using a seed con-
taining 5 per cent of rape, be justified
in selling the oil from that as "genuine"
linseed oil? Certainly, he has not added
any oil to his product after extracting
it. Strictly it is not "genuine," for it
will contain 5 per cent. of rape oil. If
such oil can be sold as "genuine," then if
an oil crusher got pure linseed, crushed oil
from it, add 5 per cent. of rape oil to it,
could he sell the product as "genuine" oil?
The two oils could not be distinguished
from one another by the sharpest of ana-
lytical chemists. In the latter case, one
could say for certain that it is one of
adulteration, but what of the former
No thoroughly honest seed crusher would
rush such poor linseed as would be indi-
cated by its containing 5 per cent. of rape
and other foreign seeds. In these days
it is quite possible to bring the range of
impurity down to 1 per cent., at which
no one would cavil very much, for the
influence on the oil would be almost noth-
ing; but when the degree of impurity
reaches 5 per cent., then there is some in-
fluenee. This point is not, as a rule,
thought of in drawing up contracts for the
buying of linseed oil, but it is one that
would be well worth considering.


Has revolutionized the wood distilling basi- 4# W,
-m ,ess In the South. After three months of car fa d0
testing ear machinery at the Waycross, Georgia
mill, we are nOW ready to sell direct any size /
plant and guarantee results by our new KRUG 0 4e 4ko
PATENT STEAM PRESSURE PROCESS. o

STANDARD TURPENTINE COMPANY.





Kohn = Furchgott= Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Vessels Arriving and Shipments Continue
at Fernandina.
The schooner Harry Prescott reached
IMnrt Sunday, only thirteen days out front
New Haven, and Capt. Gray reported that
all the fleet could get by Hatteras then.
Only one vessel came in Tuesday, the
Robert A. Snyder.
Three arrived Wednesday, the Madeline
Cooney, Laura Mf. Lunt, and the large
Norwegian bark Blackadder.
More than ninety vessels, with a carry-
ing capacity of 70.000 tons, have drifted
up and down by Hatteras for over a
month, while sixty million feet of lum-
ber has Ieen waiting on the wharves of
the Southern ports. The wharves of Fer-
nandina were piled high with lumler.


though te 'mills were holding it back
;Is lluch as they could and were crowded
for y;rd room.
The outlook for naval stores for this
ia)rt is guodl, and the month of August
will show very respectable figures in that
eiim(sodity.
The shipments of phosphate will reach
20,000 tons.
Steamer (;airntoor sailed Tuesday for
,iamliurg, with 3,515 tons of phosphate.
The Altimira will sail this week for
Itillsia with 1.600 tons.
Eighty-nine carloads of naval stores, 65
of phosphate. 50 of lumber and 10 of
cross-ties were handled in the railroad
yards Saturday.


The bark (atherina is discharging 400
tons of salt, anti will load with naval
stores.


Quitman Cooperage Co.,
QUITMAN. GA.
manufacturers of

HI MDE SPIRIT IRRELS
According to specincalions of
Board of Trade,' Savannah.
Also make
Dip and Syrup Barrels.


- S--------i-----S-i--------------------- ------------S6XXXX--XSXXXX-S-9--i--X----


D. M. FLYNN, President


D. M. Flynn


Walter Ray


W. B. JOHNSON, Vice-President
DIRECTORS
J. W. Oglesby L. Horn


A. S. PENDLETON, Sec'y & Treas


N. G. Wade


J. L. Medlin


W. B. Johnson


Independent Naval Stores & Export Co.,


Jacksonville, Florida.



Naval Stores Factors and Operators.


Capital Stock, $5oo,ooo.

The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal advances made on consignments.
Our interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operative company.



Some Money and Some Timber For Somebody.

All Producers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.

THE RECORD IS TIE OPERATORSS RELIANCE"


Standard Turpentine

Company /


pr


__ ____


--~---- --- ------ ---- -----


- ------:~e


/


.. The..










S THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


L,-, -. 5
Lumber Department.


SAWMILL MEN MEET.

Regular August Meeting of the Interstate
Association.
The Georgia Interstate Sawmill Asso-
ciation met Monday in regular session in
Jacksonville. the auditorium in the Board
of Trade building being placed at the
disposal of the members.
In the absence of President II. II. Tift.
i' B. (. onrad. of the mond Lumllwr (Com-
pany, of 4 to preside. There were two sessions held
yesterday, one in the forenoon and
another in the afternoon.
The greater part of the morning session
was devoted to the discussion of ear
equipments. this subject being of great
interest and co siderable imllportance. As
it was stated at the meeting that the rail-
road companies had refused to co-mpl:y
with the law on this matter and :AS thec
law had been ilassed at tie last session of
the Legislature that therefore a conm:it-
tee he appointed to take up this matter
and report at as early a date as possible.
The members appointed on this comi-
mittee are: A. 1G. Cummer. B. F. ('amp
and F. .I. ()'Hara. This committee was
instructed to secure legal advice as to
how would be lest to proceed toward(
the enforcement of the law and the .-ol
election of the penalty.
In the general discussions during I't'
sessions, it was stated that there is IL-
ginning to manifest itself a marked de.
mand for lumber since the sawmills in
Georgia and Florida have been running
short time. and have reduced the output
one-third. Priees. however, still remain
low. and are not at all satisfactory to tlhe
millmen.
Considerable routine business was tran-
sacted te eserday by the association. which
had a fair representation of members pres-
ent. considering that it is just the time of
the year when so many sawmill operator.
are away. W. B. Chaplin. chief inspector
for the bureau of inspection at this Iort.
made a verbal report. From this it was
readily seen that tile bureau here is in
very good andl satisfactory working order.
and especially so as it has only been es-
tablished for a short time.
Before adjournment it was decided ,to
hold the mext nmeetin_ on (Otoler II. at
Savannah. (;a.


Pine at Liverpool.
The monthly timber circular for August
of Dluncan. Ewing & ('o.. of Liverposl.
shows that the import of hewn pine was,
74.INN) tahic feet. tile consumption ;H8.0 Ki
cubic feet and the stock. i66.000 cubic feet.
large average wsodl Ieing in good demand
and priceis firmer. The import of sawn
timber was 92.4.)m cubic feet into Live;-
pool aml .3.5.0H) cubicfeet into Malnhes-
ter; the consulptio n was 4i5.W)00 culei,"
feet in Liverpool and 155,000 cubiic feet
in Manchester. leaving stocks of 1.034.000
cubic feet in Liverpool and I W10.000 cubic
feet in Manchester. A cargo was put up
at auction early in the month. but only
very few lota were sold. though eventu-
ally it was cleared out privately at low
prices. The importation of lmrards and
planks has exceeded consumption by 28.-
1OIM feet. the stock being 359,000 feet if
Liverpool and 36,W00 in Manchester.


Nut Trees and Hardwood.
I, ay ,i f th.e II- third annual I-onventiomn
of the Natiolal Nlut-(Growers" Association.
to lie hehl at St. Ilois in October, is as-
.ignedto o tile discussion of nut trees in re-
lation to forestry operations and for the
production of hardwood timber. To this
session all the organized forestry and
lunilIer associations will ie invited to
s mnd representatives.

Mexican Tree Cotton.
"'In a recent issue.' says thie American
(Co toni" iainllufaict rer. "we gave a brief
description of a few samples of Mexican
tree cotton h\\ich had been sent to this
ollice lhy one of our correspondents in the
( it % of Mexico. A closer examination of
rlhe foulr speiimnens sent reveals a quality
that can IM- considered as a commercial
tilswr.
W\V a;re informed that tie cotton wias
Iitakel fromll trees which are found grow-
illg % ilhl inl tlhe State of .1alisco, which
I es oII tile west coast of thel country,
being one of tile central States. At ai
few planes the product of the trees is be-
. g1 made into coarse cloth liv tie natives.
The yieil :s continuous and everything
indicate. that this arboraceous variety
may V lie made a -omnimercial success, not
, nly in its native habitat but in thl
I'nitel States. sine it is said that not
only i thle yield continuous. but that
tli-e ree %sill stand lith frost and drought.
"lThere are four distinct samples; two
are very white and silky, while others
are rather harsh. one being evidently
umiil stained. The staple of tie four lots
runs from one and one-sixteenth .inches
to oni- and a quarter inches; one sample
(contained aii abn normal alnount of waste.
liut time others were remarkably uniform
in length. Thle strength of the fibers is
a prominent characteristic. being, if any-
tling. stronger than a "peeler' cotton of
thle sane length. All tile samples would
make excellent yarns and goods with one
exception. which was weak and only suit-
ailile for the making of tilling yarns for
fabrics which -require a soft oozy thread.
The seed is smooth and black, resembling
InInh that of tile American sea island
varied ty.'"


Pitch Boiling.
A ,orreslondent writing on the subject
,f tar lpavilngl sas: "Hot pitch" is often
uli-el before being thoroughly tempered
and tested. This defect often occurs when
tlle man is not practical. It is necessary
that authorities should emplloy men that
are practical for this kind of work. It is
essential that the coal pitch and creosote
oil should Ibe thoroughly mixed in tile
jir before put to boiling. so that the two
sulllstan es -can In thoroughly boiled to-
g -their. an il should ibe t te-ered nd uted
lieorl, being ms-ed for bIinding purposes
after the paved stones are laid. tile inter-
ltiees thoroughly crallmmed and filed in
solili. afterwards the surface of tile paving
tI le lightly screened over with fine
shingle or gravel.


KIRK & JONES

DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. PLA.' .


"U' 5 Stb hh 33 IA ID EAE335 N E iE3ErOa EW


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


SBoilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
Jaecksonville, Fla.
4,,,,_, ---------....,,.,, ___


SI I I I # I I II f ri I t 1 r l W I I Il iill I 8 r Im *

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.

Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla- 4



Cummer Lumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES end CRATES.



SStandard Clothing Company
*


One Price


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonvile, Florim.
~tetron and Hawrr Hats. Special Attlention Given t* Mail Orders
aa** a*aaaae


R. TOLAR. J. H. HART. T. H. BLACHLY. J. R. TOLAR, J
(Establiahed 1872.)

TOLAR. HART & CO.,
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


If)S1




J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEOIRGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.


[SON

0


MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.



Read the Record Adv't's.


THN nRCORD 0 aPS PAC WrITH SOUTHMNI MOGM SS.


r


S--


2..a.Anans Am .


-


e * * * e e s a


-1


---


_ _L










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


Among the Naval Stores Me.
Mr. J. M. Sullivan, manager of the log-
ging department for the Hillman-Suther-
land Co., was married last Sunday to Miss
Eva Roebuck, at Cochran, Ga. Mr. J. M.
Sutherland is a brother of Mr. P. L.
Sutherland. The bride is a charming and
accomplished young lady and is well
known throughout the southern part of
IGeorg'a. The Record congratulates Mr.
and Mrs. 8utherland and wishes them
a prosperous and happy life.

Mr. .1. C. Little, secretary and treasurer
of the Consolidated Naval Stores Co., is
in North Carolina, spending his vacation
with his family.

Mr. Wilson, of the Callahan Turpentine
Co., was in the city last Wednesday.

Mr. C. M. Silcox. county commissioner
from (lay County, was in the city last
VWednesday attending to business.

Mr. W. X. Mattox. of Cartersville, Fla..
and a prominent turpentine operator of
that section, was in Jacksonville last
Wednesday and Thursday.

Mr .Walter Ray, of Ocala, was in the
city Wednesday. Mr. Ray is a director
of the Independent Naval Stores and Ex-
port Co., of this city, and a prominent
turpentine operator.

Mr. Goss Mattox, who is identified with
the Hillman-Sutherland Co., at their place
at Orange Park, Fla., was in town several
days this week.

Capt. W. J. Hillman paid a flying visit
to Live Oak Tuesday.

Messrs. D. G. Crenshaw, Monte Visto,
Fla., D. H. Meloud, of Riverland, and H.
E. Pritchard. of Maxville, Fla., prominent
turpentine operators from their respec-
tive sections were attending to business
matters in Jacksonville this week.

Mr. T. C. Hall, of Ocala. was in the
city to-day.

Mr. E. E. Edge. Taylorsville, Fla.. reg-
istered at the Aragon Hotel to-day.

Dr. T. M. Edwards amd Messrs. J. C.
and F. P. Edwards, of Green Cove Springs
and Waller, Fla.. were in the city last
Monday.

Mr. W. C. Jackson, a leading turpentine
operator of Green Cove Springs, was in
the city last Monday.

Mr. J. J. Phillips, of Dinsmore. spent
last Saturday in Jacksonville.

Mr. P. L. Sutherland returned last Mon-
day from Georgia, where he had been to
visit his wife, who is under the care of
her physician.
Mrs. Sutherland will return to her home
at Green Cove Springs as soon as her
health will permit, which we trust will
be at an early date.

Mr. .. F. Dougherty. of Fargo. Ga.. a
leading naval stores man of that part of
the State. was in Jacksonville last Tues-
day.

Mesrs. R. W. Mattox and J. B. Long,


of West Tocoi, were in the city last Tues-
day.

Messrs. C. W. Deen, of Baxley, Ga., and
George W. Deen, of Waycross, Ga., two
of the best known turpentine men in that
State, spent last Tuesday in Jacksonville
attending to matters of business.

Mr. J. R. Maxwell. formerly of Medart
and Tallahassee, Fla., has located at An-
derson. Fla. Mr. Maxwell was in the city
last Tuesday attending to business.

Mr. F. A. Coleman, of Cambon, Fla., was
among the leading naval stores men reg-
istered at the Aragon Hotel last Tuesday.

Dr. Charles II. Herty, the inventor of
the Herty Turpentine Cup, was among
the prominent men interested in the naval
stores industry, visiting the city this
week.

Mr. D. E. MeKeithen, who is interested
in the naval stores business at Baldwin,
Fla., was in Jacksonville last Saturday.

The friends of Mr. D. H. McMillan will
be glad to learn that he is back at his
desk with the Consolidated Naval Stores
Co. Mr. McMillan is feeling much bet-
ter after his week's sojourn at Lithia
Springs, Ga.

Mr. D. IL Edwards, of Lawtey, Fla.,
spent one day in the city this week.


Cypress Prices Current F. O. B. New York
Market. Lumber rough or dressed:
Tank stock, 11-2 to 3 inches, $48.75 to
$56.75; Firsts and Seconds, 1 to 3 inches,
$44.25 to $52.75; Selects, 1 to 3 inches,
$38.25 to $45.25; Shop, 1 to 3 inches, $29.25
to $40.25.
For prices on 8 inch add $1 per 1,000 ft;
on 10 inch add $2 per 1,000 ft; on 12 inch,
add $3.50 per 1,000 ft.
Bevel siding, 1-2x6 inch clear, D to A,
$11.75 to $24.25; ceiling, 3-8x4 or 6 inch
clear, D to A, $13.25 to $24.25; 1-2x4 or 6
inch clear, D to A, $1800 to $27.50; 5-8x4
or 6 inch clear, D to A, $2225 to $32.25;
Flooring, drop siding and ceiling, 4 or 6
inch. D to A, $27.75 to $43.75.


CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Best in the World.
For delivered prices write,
Cypress Tank Co., MobhUeAla




L0. R. FO8mR JR.
MANUFACTURER OF



BRICK.


KRITE FOR PRICeS.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.


'm E. 90.


AUTOMOBILES, PUMPING OUmIIS
AND

GASOLINE ENGINES.
Mat Complete Amortment of Supplies n the South.



Fred E, Gilbert
29 and 37, 39, 41

West Forsyth Street

--Pl

COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVANNAH FOR FIVE YEARS


April 1 ....................
April 8 ..... ..............
April 15 ...................
April 22 ..................
April 29 ...................
M ay 6 ....................
M ay 13 ............... ....
M ay 20 ....................
May 27 ...................
June 3 ....................
.une 10 .................
June 17 ..................
June 24 ............. ...
July 1 .. ....... .......
July 8 ................
July 15 ....................
July 22 ................. .
July 28 ....................
Aug. 4 ..................
Aug. 12 ................. .
Aug. 19 ...................


1904-05
ND
53
541
54%
53%
55
54%
541
534
54
52%
52%
52%,
53
52%
52%
53%
53%
52%
531/
541/


1903-04
ND
50
491/,
47
45
45
47! ,
47%
49
451/.
46%
46%
47%1
47%
48
49%

4914
52
52


1902-03
45
42%
421/.2
43
42%-43
43
45
45
451r
45%
47%
48%

451/4
44%

43%
43%
44%
441/4


1901-02
34
32
32%
31%-32
32
32
31%
32%
32%
32%
33%-%
34%
331
34%
34%
33
32%
34
33
34


1900-01
53%
53%
46
47%
46%
47
48
49
49
46
44%
43%
42%
43%
43%
44%
43
42
39%
39%
38


Wanted and For Sale


DEPARTMENT.

Advertisements Will be Inserted In Tras Deprtmetr at the rFaleWrva Rates:
For one week. 2 cents a line.
For two weeks, 35 cents line.
For three weeks. 50 cents a line.
For four weeks, -65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Thu day
morning to secure insertion in Friday's paper.


Stiller Wanted.
Prefer a young man who has a very
good education and a fair knowledge of
turpentine business. L T. Hardee, Mulat,
Fla. 2t.
Stiller Wanted.
An experienced turpentine stiller want
ed Man with family preferred. Address
Fletcher & Mnrrell, Altman, Fla.

Wanted.
Woo(dsman and stiller wanted. Must be
well recomTendlel. sober and industrious.
address s Producer, care Industrial Record,
.lacksonville. Fla. 6t
Wanted.
Wanted-Small turpentine farm of 5 to
10 crops, with additional timber for 20
crops. A. O. Wright, Industrial Record
office, city.

For Sale.
Six seven-menths-old blood hound pups,
well trained for their age. They will take
a mnan's trail and follow him to the tree.
Also we have bought convict camps out
and have several suits convict's stripes at
50c. to 75r'. each. also about seven dozen
blankets, cost $9.00. worth about $4.50, as
ootl as new: 21 single mattresses, cost
$3.75 wholesale. worth $1.50, as good as
new ticks: 12 single hunks, cost $2.00,
worth $1.00, as good as new and a few
tents. We would be glad to give any com-
munication our prompt attention along
this line. B. F. McCall, Jr., & Bro., Jen-
nings, Fla.


Wanted.
WANTED-Position by experienced
Iookkeeper or storekeeper. Especially ex-
perienced in naval stores business. Can
furnish all references required. Address
Position. care Industrial Record.
8-12-04-3t

Position Wanted.
Accountant, twenty years' experience in
New York; wants position South on ac-
count of long and cold seasons of the
North. Address H. Lefevre, 533 West
145th St., New York, N. Y. 4t

Turpentine Men.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. I outit pumps 2,00
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 events and
requires no attention while running.
Started in one minute. J. P. Campbell,
Ocala, Fla.

Wanted.
A partner, with 18 to 25 thousand dol-
lars to put into lands, turpentine and
sawmill timber with a turpentine place
already in operation and large tract of
good timber adjacent that needs to be
bought. Healthy country. Freight rates
*heap. Best opening in the country for an
investment. Not necessary for party to
Ie ani experience operator. Address
"'Tiilwr." care Industrial Record, Jack-
sonville. Fla. 4t

Send all orders for parting for the
turpentine and comniary trad to the
Record office to insure a propt delivery.


THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."


__ __


- -~- ---









10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


-....................- --.-_ -_----- $.e.* .. *..4o
SJ. Rl PAnOTon, Ammmam & HuntauaD AnarnT F. Panr
President. Vice-PresidenL Cashier.

:* The Mercantile Exchange Bank, :
* JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
I Capital. $200.000. Surplus. $100,000
ESTATE DEPOSITAILY.
G Nerall Baan g. Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes. W.00 per Year.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week


Spirits for the Week at Savamnah.
Price Rept Sales Exp. 1903

Tues., Aug. 23 53y 118 927 150 154%
Wed., Aug. 24 53% 408 392 50 54%
Thur., Aug. 25 53% 647 171 252 152%

Reek for the Week at Savanah.
Monday, August 22. Last Year.
AW. ...... .. 4.621 3.70
WVG 4.......... 435 3.50
N ............ 4.00 3.25
M ............ 3.85 3.15
K............ 3.57% 3.10
I...... ...... 3.32% 2.90
H ........ .... 2.75 2.40
G .... ....... 2.50@2.521/ 2.00
F ...... ..... 2.452.47 1.90
E .......... .. 2.40@2.421/ 1.85
D ............ 2.35 1.80
ABC .......... 2.300a2.321% 1.75
Receipts 1.523. sales 1,749, exports 3,169.

Tuesday, Aug. 23.-Rosin firm. Prices
unchanged except on F, G and I, which
advanced 2/2 rents over Monday's quo-
tations. Receipts 3,625, sales 2,638.

Wednesday, Aug. 24.-Rosin firm. A,
B, C and E advanced 21/, cents a barrel.
D and G advanced 5 cents a barrel. Re-
ceipts 2,004; sales 1,823, exports 1,891.

Thursday, Aug. 25.-Rosin firm. Prices
advanced 5 cents a barrel on all grades.
Quotations to-day are: A, B. C, $240;
D. $2.45; E, $2.47'/z i $250; F, $2.521%C(
*2.55; CG, $2.00(00$2.65; H. $2.75(&$2.90; I.
$3.40; K, $3.62/%; M, $3.90; N. $4.05; WG,
$4.40; WW. $4.62'/,2fr$4.671/2.
Receipts 3,413, sales 3.071. exports 1201.

Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Review.
New York. Aug. 23. 1904.
Spirits Turpentine-Business has been
very light during past week. with but
slight changes in quotations. Stock. 1.183
barrels. We quote Machim-s 57 1-4 to
1-2.
Rosin.-Nothing new to report. All
grades dull. We quote:
BC, $2.65: D. $2.70: E. $2.90(a95; F.
1_2.95(v$3.00; G4.$3.00($3.05; H. $3.15: 1.
$3.50: K. $3.95: M, $4.25( $4.30; N. $4.35
r,$4.40; WG, $4.75&$4.80; WW. $5.05.
TOLAR, HART & CO.


Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 ........... 6,495 44,550
Receipts Aug. 5 ....... 647 3.413
Receipts previously ..... .102,016 277.897
Total ............. 100.158 325,860
Exports Aug. 25 ........ 252 1,201
Exlmrts previously ....... 85i.433 252,496
Total ............. 85.,685 253.697
Stock Aug. 25 ......... 23,473 72,163
Exports last year ...... 20,378 55,406
Range of Turpentine and Rosin at Savan-
nah Aug. 25 and Same Day Last Year.
Aug. 25. Aug. 24 Aug. 25,
1904 1904 1903
Spirits .31% 531/% 54%
Spirits Firm. Steady. Steady.
Sales 171 392 483
Iosin Firm. Firm. Firm.
WW . 4.62 /.,( 4.67/] 4.621/2 3.70
S.... 4.40 4.35 I .50
N ..... 4.05 4.00 3.25
M ..... 3.0 3.85 3.15
K ..... ..3.62' 3.57% 3.10
:.40 3.35 2.90
H 1 .. 2.750i( 2.8 2.75 2.40
G .... 2.60rin 2.t65 2.60 2.00
F a.... a2.2.r 2., th2.50 1.90
E ...... 12.47 %a 2.50 2.45 1.85
1) .... 2.45 2.40 1.80
C. I. A. | 2.40 2.35 1.75
STales ..I 3t .071 1.8-2 ik2.969

Bailey & Montgomery's Review.
Spirits Turpentine-Stck, 1,1.33 barrels.
Market during the week has held very
steady, bat business has been very light;
in fact. has Ieen almost entirely of a
jolbbing character.
Thurd.ay. August 18th-57 1-2c. ask.el.
Friday. August l1)th-58c .asked.
Saturday. August 20th-589c. asked.
Monday. Ai.ino.t 22nd-57 1 -2c. asked.
Truesda y. August 231--57 1-2c. asked.
We'dneslay. August 24th-57 1-2c. weak.
Resin-Stock. 1S.680 barrels.
,is market has also lwen very quiet
andl sales zmslerate. We quote the mar-
ket dull for a11l grades. A('. $2.60. D.
*2.75. E. $2!.90: F. .2.9.4: (;. $3.00: H.
I3.10 to $3.15: I. $3..-0: K, .IT3.90 to $3.95:
NM. $4.20 to $4.25. N. $4.30 to $4.3:i; WV;.
*4.75: WW. $5.00.


Imports of Trpentine to U. K.
The following table is compiled by James Watt & Son, of London, from the
offeial returns. For convenience of comparison we have turned cwts into barrels
320 cwt. equal 100 barrels.
1807 Im8 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903
From U. 8., bbls. .... 152,62 173,785 149,375 174,446 193,429 155,122 143,851
From France, bbls.... 161 244 517 2,283 859 1,656 4,630
From other countries.. 1,494 878 50 840 53 904 516
154,30 174,907 149,942 177,509 194,341 157,682 148,997
From Rumia .......... 2,815 4,183 4,998 8,521 6,861 8,711 17,596
Total Barrels .. 167,122 179,090 154,940 186,090 201,202 166,393 166,592
Thus the import of Russian Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 1903 was double
that of 1902, and over six times as much as in 1897. It is interesting to see how
this import fluctuates with the price of American Turpentine.
Percentage of Import of Russian ..1.79 2.33 3.22 4.57 3.41 5.24 10.56
Av. Price Amer. Turp. in London ..21-6 24-6 34-1 35-4 27-1 33-1 42-2


FOR SALE.
50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill. 89.85 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
be parehased. One of the best opportunities in the State.

C. BUCKMAN, m" or .tro.t
Jamokomonville, P'le


Crops of Spirits
Mop
Spirits.
Wilmington .. .. ....16,511
Charleston............ ..
Savannah........ ..176,418
Brunswick.. .. ..... 56,002
Mobile.. ...... ...... 12,215
New Orleans.......... 36,017
Carrabelle.. .. ........elosed
Georgetown.. ...... 7,515
Penueola.. ...... ..42,554
Jax. & Ferndina.. .... 187210
Tampa ...... ........d eoed
Totals...... ......55,391


and Rosns for Three Years.


1M03-OL
Rosin.
9a,667
3J6e
3,150
0660938
184,527
50,50
133,126
doMed
44,214
206,982
653,210
2-,
ebU


Crop 190-03
Spirits. Rosia.
18,83 113,681
3,007 11,83
270,670 940,5W
68,947 244,106
18,969 79,272
33,103 108,033
3,394 3,148
10,37 4,M
38275 192,95
91,976 375,211
13, 6 40,4
571,096 2,184,818


Crop 191-4
Spirit. Nesi
16,M1 10L.49
S04I 13u7
313,065 ln,144


8,177 4774

7S,000 45,000.
15,424 UIm
693A22 2XA13


R. S. HALL. Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KNIGHT, Sec. and Treas.

MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.


Herbert A. Ford,
President.


Oeo. H. Ford,
Vice-Pres.


F. L. Watnem,
Cashier.


The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CA PITAL, $50,000.00.
DIRECTORS: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men elicited.


RALPN JESUP, SMn-Trr


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonvile Pensacola, fernandin and Savamsah
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?

: You Want any Kind of Florida Land?

F* You Mean Business?
* Call on or Write to
SJ. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS.
* Ocala, Florida *

o ++++~~99~~~9~06~+++~


M A. BRIGGS. President.
H. C. BRIGGS. Ist Vice-President.


HOMER BROWN, 2nd Vice-Pre-deat.
J. C. McDONALD. Sec'y and Treaa.


W. H, Briggs Hardware Co.

VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-

SRIXFORD AXES.

STley are the BEST. Others imitate but none du-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the finest
temper. hold the keenest edge, cut better and last longer
than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual use.
Scad as your orders.

W. H. BR166S HARDWARE COMPANY,
Valdosta Georgia.
WWWWWWWW 9 W9P~9109W999W9999S :


THE RELIABILITY OF OUR ADVERTISERS VOUCHED FOR.


C. ".BARNES, Pre&.


J. SlAW, Vie-Pres.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


11


hardly expect to stop trains running nine general good discipline is to be found. In
miles an hour in this manner without any event, the propriety of building ex-
some shock, and very probably, some pensive buffers to absorb the shock of
damage. carelessly handled cars has frequently
"In th's country the idea quite generally been called in question, Should we build
prevails that good discipline is a better one above described, it would, perhaps, be
safeguard for the ends of stub tracks just as well to avoid publishing its stop-
than buffer devices, hut, of course, mis- ping capacity among the men who handle
takes will happen occasionally, even where the trains."


W. T. RILEY,
President.


American and English Railway Methods
"On the question of bumping posts the
views of American and English railway
men differ. We read in Engineering,'
says the Railway and Engineering Re-
view. "of an official test of a buffer stop
* erected by the Great Northern Railway.
This buffer was of the hydraulic type,
having pistons of seven-foot stroke, and
it was put to test by sending against it
a 64-ton locomotive and train, the total
weight being 360 tons, striking the buffer
at a speed of 9.4 miles per hour. The
shock was successfully withstood, and
persons sitting in the coaches experienced
no discomfort from the sudden stopping
Sof the train in this manner, the diagram
showing that the resistance of the buffer
was practically constant throughout the
long stroke of the pistons. This is cer-
tainly careful treatment for the train.


Course of the Savannah
1903-.
SPIRITS OF T
Apr 1 Apr. 8 Apr. 10 Apr. 17 Apr. 2 M
ND ND G 40 47
June June 12 June 1 June I July 3 J
68-4 4 47 47 7R%
Aug. 14 Aug. 2 Aug. 2 Sept. 4 Sept. 11
tA-8 11% 61% EC St64-4
Oct. Oet. 21 Nov. 6, Nov. 1, Nov. .
51-2 U a U
Jan. 22, Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18,
65 bL 64 62
Meh. 30
57
R- OS
WW WO N M K
April 1 ....... S...M S 3.0 3I S 3S.M
April . ... 1.... O 3. 13. & 3
April 1 . .L L45 UL 320 XLO
April 17. .... 4.0 L. 3.5 .15 L.
April ML.. . L4 L2. &16 19 LSD.
May 1. . .. .. 15 3. 16 .165
May 8. . . S. U 15 3.10 L u
ay ... . t.4% 3.1% &17% L.S% L.
ay, ..... 3. 35 U S S U 3 .U
~J-m I . . -. L.O 16 3 3.5 *
J el 1 ....... 1.40 LS.10 3. U .5
Jlm 1. ..... .3 tLOO 2.l L.
J .i. ..... U SU .10 O 3. UK 2
July . . . LIDU LXO L9 2 S.
July 1 ...... L S.M 1. 0 UL UI
July 1 ..... 4.0 3.10 3.00 U2
July . . . 1.45 LU 0 LM 10 U
JZy S31. . . O4 L .5 f.5 .1S
AMIat T . LO JUO 25 .I
Au st0 14. . L LS 15 L L S3
August 1 .. .. L9 &.15 L(.5 L.
August 3.. .. .70 LS. tU15 .10
September 4. L.I L O V.0 L3 3
September U . D 3.5 310 L46 L0
September 18 . 3 & 5 L3 La. L4
September ... 4.5 4.10 3. U35 L.n
* October . . 4. 4.0 4.15 4. 4.15
October ..... 4. 4.4 4.i 4.5 410
October ....... 4.0 4.4 4l0 8
October ......41 315 3 L &.15
October ........4. 3L .I 3a L .&
November .... .W. .10 UU.O LiM
November 1 .. ....3. 15 L3. L .0
November 1 .. ....L .5 3* L O *
November 5 .. .. LU L30 23 S2
December 3 .. ..150 L26 LS. 2.L 2
December 17 .. .. 3 LS W I. D 2. 1 S0
December 10 .. S Z LI &3 2. 2.80
December U1 .. ..5 L S10 L1 5 LS 1
January 14 ....4.00 L.0 15 15 l 3.9
January .. .. .. 4 4.10 L5 S. .15
January 4 .. .. ..4. 41M SI &.5Z
February 11 ..3.75 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25
February 18 ...3.65 3.45 3.35 3.30 325
February 25 ...3.70 3.50 3.35 3.20 3.25
March 10 ......3.80 3.00 3.40 3.35 3.30
March 24 ......4.00 3.70 3.50 3.35 3.0
March 31 ......4.10 3.0 3. 3.35 3J


and a refinement in ear stops which the Jacksonvlle
average American railroad man would not
be likely to appreciate. The idea in in- MANUFACT
stalling humping posts in this country is
to place an obstruction at the end of the DEST W HITE OAK
track to prevent cars from overrunning BEST WHITE OAK
the same at slow speed, as when they
are accidentally bumped, or when the M machine and H
brakeman or engineer has overestimated 8th Street R.
the efficiency or power of the brakes. We
-- JACKSONVILLE.

Sam'I P. Holjnes&Co. The Exports of Tur
Stock, Bends. Ctton, SPIRIT S OF TURPENTINE.
Grain and Prevoisins. To United Kingdom, in gallons:
MEMBERS Month 13-04 1902-60 1S01-4
April ........ . 11u81 18U,1 a M4,3w*
NEW YORK GOTTON EXCHANGE May ...... .. .as3 a16.m 1,s.10
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE June .. .. .. .. 75.7 1,4a.s 1.s5s0
July .. .. .. .. 3,75- 2W,4 1,5M..01
Direct private wires to all exchanges. Augut.. .... ..MU. 1,71',874
Local stocks and bonds a specialty. September.. .. 773,1S1 C25I7 1,
October .......... 711.4 0 .14rs 1, Lm
Bell Phoe 853 Baldwl Block November .. 661,638 1,295,769 922,991
- December ..1,659,656 1,531,779 576,784
Naval Stores Markets. 'January. 28,850 373,240 14,330
February... 116,452 38,200 247,496
.1904. March .. 35,250 ...... 25,00
IVRPENTINE -
ay 1 May 8 May 15 May 22 May a
0 1-3 41-2 1-2 47 To Belgium and Netherlands, in gallons:
July 1 July 17 July 24 July 31 Aug. 6 Month 101-44 13M-0 1S01-0
47 3-4 48 i 0 40 April .... .. .. 2M,812 0,447 Included
Sept 13 Sept. Oct. 2 Oct. Oct. 15 May .. .. .. .. ,70s ,1SUin all other
57 ND U 57 1-2 I 1-29 -4 June........... S07r., 27,210 Europe
Dec. 3, Dec. 10, Dec. 17. Dec. 31. Jan. 14 July .... .... B76,188 812.217 1M o
6C S 6 1-4 56 1-4 63 1-2-4 August. ....... .4 M,37 153M
Feby. 25 Mch. 3 Meb. 10 Mch 24 September.... 25,456 r501 41.6C1
60 59 60 58 October .. .. .. ,3.14 21.1l 132L40
November .. 133,60 349,726 381,236
December .. 100,372 58,669 672,164
INS January .... 16879 241,10 174,J7
I H D C-A February .. 5,130 372,44 306,601
.15 20 2.L O 2 1 2.D La March .... ...... 8,713 18,474
LaO L40 L2 L2 L6 La2 2.5
.15 240 321 L LW ta 2.1 To Germany, in gallon:
2.5 L3.0 e 2.0 L 96 LO Month 10M4 13M 11-
2.5 2a L L.e 1S 1 Aprk.. .... ........... 1140 1123
2.5 2.15 s8 1 i.L5 1.5 L.5 May .. .. .. .. 3 6,41g 2,~W
2.5 2.5 L 1.75 1 1W 1.70 June.. .. .. .. 1040 31,2 M0,042
16 2.15 r L LS L1 1.7L 1.70 Iuly ......... .3,116 4412 3. 7w1
LO 2.L5 1.25 La LS L15 L0 August ..... ... 1,s ms,4
3.065 .4 L1 L 1.1 1.75 L7. September.. ... 54 9, 01 -1 i,3
240 24. L U I.m LN LS L3 S October .... .. .31 1,64 10
2.3 2330 1.S L 3 LN 1.75 L73 November 179,010 110,153 81,780
273 2.- 1.7 1.70 1_ L 1 3. L. December ..
2.a 2.5 1. 1. L. 1.s 1. January .... 132,00 54,07 13,88
2.S 35 La 17 L L 1 LO February ... 220,182 15,838 67,174
L2. L2. 1. LS L7 L1a Le March.. 6,256 ...... 94,00
275 2. Lo L LS La L- -
L27 L 1. L 1.7 1.05 LU To all other Europe ln Gallons:
L2.70 L15 L. Le 1.5 1.L Month 196-04 190248 101-42
L27 2.X L S L LO 1.5 1.5 April .... ...... 10 18,475 3.056
2.30 L3 L. 1 LW L7 1.70 May.. ........ 68.58 S31,017 74,11
2. 2.2 L3 1.57 L 170 L7 June........ 14L.2 1.OW M6I
2.S 2 2.00 1.30 1.85 1.80 1. July .... .. .. 124.28M1 4.41
3.00 2.6 2.15 L 2.65 1.0 L1 August .. .... .. 2.0 2.
.10 2.56 2. LI LM L1 L17 September.. .. 4.L 38,040
3.20 2.10 2.15 1 2.0 1.5 1.a October .... .. 10.000 4. 17,a0
3.5 2. 2.36 2.10 .0O 1.5 November.. 32,500 17,800 94,87
3. 92.7 2.6 La U O La December .. 47,306 89,91 23
23.50 L70 2. 2.0 uD 2 6 L96 11,00o
&s 2.7 2.7 2LIS 2Lin 2.5 2S.1 January '4J
2.1 2.I 2.46 2.40 L &. L. February 15,471 ... 44.,5
2.70 2M. 23 2.s 2 2.15 March .... 14,189 12,275 36,000
2.70 2.16 2. L S 2.S .I LI
2.70 2.5 2.3 2.15 2.10 2.6 2.6 Total Foreign Exports, In gallons, lnclud-
2. 27 .45 2.4 .L L. 2. 1 Ing everything outside of the United
2.0 .40 2.3 2. 0 2. 10 216 States:
2.I 2.30 2.0 2.5 2.15 2.15 Month 1908-04 1902-1 1 1-4
2.1 2.5 2.1 2.n1 2.3 2. 2.23 Anril ...... .. l14, 611 6.11 m94.1
2.56 2 2.30 2.2M 2.3 213 m May ...... .. 1m.73 2.144 2.318.
2. 2.40 2. 2.25 2.15 2.5 2 June...... ....1838,00 2.223.26 2.91,82
2. 2.5 2.S 2.70 2.6 2.5 2. July .. ..... .. 3.1*180 1,41015 2.41.a
3.10 1 2L.70 S 2.0 2. 2. August .... .. 1.74.151 2.JI.4
3.0 3.15 2. 2.a 2. 2.15 LI. September.. .. L47145 2 ,154.15 3.330
3.20 2.85 2.85 2.80 2.75 2.70 2.70 October ...... L1.412 LOM.r1 L J.382
3.05 2.70 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.55 November ..1,851,088 1,92,183 1,652,574
2.95 3.60 2.55 2.50 2.45 2.40 2.40 December .. 1,993.29 1,794,336 1,859,175
3.06 2.75 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.55 January ... 700,292 8N0,253 6t0
2.95 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.5 2.50 2.50 February.. 487,577 531346 855,476
2.95 2.70 2.65 2.0 2.55 2.50 2.50 March ... 298,488 118,174 286,98
THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.


GEO. J. SC@VEL,
Sec. and Trns.


ooperage Co.

URERS OF


SPIRIT BARRELS

and Factories,
R. Crossing.

rFLORIDA

pentine and Rosin.
LROSINS.
To United Kingdom. barrels 2 Ibs:
Month M14 134 1g-1
April .... .. .. 7,2t 53 ,1 I0
May .. ....... 16 95 sm6
June ........ 0.74 8 .64 .6M
July .... .... 22.3 51 ILrM
August .... .. 74,6 c8
September.. .. M,471 a41 11
October ..... 4.641 a4llM MA
November .. 71,107W 9736 8363
December .. 61,455 64,455 ,66
January ... 53,506 42,7 fr
February ... 28351 37,326 91187
March .... 39,015 365948 46,7
To Belgium and Netherlands, barrels 1s
pounds:
Month 189-3 11-6 1M1-M
April .... .. .. 1.W Ia6 Incdwled
May .......... 3.5M 5163l a lotlr
June ... .. .. .. ,u ,ct 1 op
July ........ 3.6" 1.6ff7 41
August ...... 4,15 7.a1
September.. .. 46,3 if .tW
October .. .... .121 64.41 1L0m
November .. 3991 696M 31,5
December .. 37,077 13,25 2s
January .... 60,739 2,1 JASi
February ... 9,849 25,288 1856
March .. .. 10,192 3221 11,14
To Germany, barrels S lbs.
Month 218-M 1 I- 19114-
April .. .. .. .. ST 7,84 .M
May ........ 41S 1,1N 1 ,1.
June ...... .. .4, 1.,S .g=
July ...... .. m6 3,14 am
August .. .... I4w 13B3
September.. .. 1j,17 *
October ....... ,%6 g.54 IM1
November .. 5,763 441 3
December .. 15,407 71 A
January .... 34,7f2 5465
February ... 172135 40,16 56
March .. .. 49,M92 6020, 41,6m
To all other Burope. barrel I :
Month 1384- 1U-948 gM-
April .. .. .. .. -j 3.1a .13
May .... .. .. 413 sJpi
June.. ........ 14,0.14 3,6 aUm
July ........ 5.,u 51 1,2 14.J1
August ... ... 3.5 3.11
September.. .. W.4t 17,J3 I-
October .. .. .. .404 540 21"U
November .. 13,328 6,415 3,1
December .. 25,99 48,701 39,M6
January ... 17,124 7,148
February... 38,184 142,654 5
March .... 33,687 51,949 71,
Total Exports of Roain, barrels S pounds
Including Asia Africa and Amerikc out-
side of the United States:
Month 198M 13848 1 l-41
April .... .. .. ,mm 1334 3.6R
May .. .. .. .. 1W.13 NMe144 SU5
June ...... .. 173.1 21636M 1U.
July .... .. .. 3M M ,1M.1 1a.3,
August .... .. S..1 23,63
September.. .. 31 35 Sw.a U.54
October .... .. 33M3B m.1 2 U
November .. 184,860 231,543 22,479
December .. 210,457 20',61 191A40
January ... 192,471 170,JM 3t7,66t
February ... 306,090 189,63 257,224
March .... 171,548 204,433 214,913


J. A. 6. CARSON,
VIce-PresideMt.


_ _


I









. THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

JAMES A. ROLLOMION,
EJdtr ad anaaer.
Pubsahahed Evrry PvMy.
mwiorrron" -(Domestec) .3 0 Per Annum
S(Foregn) .... 3.s an. m
"Tho Pino and I Productsa.
A eommmaleamtema easo be adirmes
The Indautrl. IRecord Company.
JLckaonvill.. Fla.
*mes Edgebrial and" B in eOffies. at
Atlanta. Ga.. & avannah. Ga.
Entered at the Postoffee at Jacksonville,
Fla., a second-elass matter.
Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association,
September 12, 1902, as its exclusive official
organ. Adopted in annual convention
September 11, as the organ also of the
general Association.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the official
organ of the Interstite Cane Growers' As-
sociation. Adopted Sept. 11, 1903, as the
only official organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Asociatioa.

COPY FOR ADVERTISING.
Advertising copy changess or new ad-
vertisemnt) sould reach us Tesday
morning to iure iaertioa in the uim of
the -mo weeL
THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the maain f-
ces of the Indutrial Record Pablishing
Ce. are located at No. z South Hog
Street, Jackaeovlle, Fla, in the very heart
of the great turpeatiae and yellow pine
idtatrim.
The Atlanta, Ga, efice is located ia the
Equitable Building, N. 723. Atlanta is
the center of the great manufacturiag
trade of the entire South.
The Savaah, Ga., office is in the Board
of Trade building Savannah is the lead-
aig open naval stores market in the world.

DEATH OF MRS. COVINGTON.
The Record is deeply pained to learn of
the death of Mrs. A. D. Covington, the
wife of the president of the Turpentine
Operators' Association, at their home in
Quincy, Fla. Only a few weeks ago Mr.
and Mrs. Covington were among the part.
of Florida turpentine people who visited
St. Louis, and she was so well then that
it eems almost incredible that in so
short a time she should be called away.
Mrs. Covington was a young woman
of genial disposition and most lovable
character. She had a friend wherever
she had an acquaintance. As Miss Daisy
Munroe before her marriage she was one
of the most popular young ladies in West
Florida, a social favorite wherever she
was known.
The thousands of friends of Mr. Coving-
ton will grieve with him in this hour of
his sorrow. He was a devoted husband
and this loss to him is irreparable. There
are three children, too, to mourn the loss
of a mother.
May God, in His infinite mercy, com-
fort the bereaved!


JULY FOREIGN TRADE
It is customary for foreign commerce
to reach ebb tide during the summer
months, and exports are always smallest
just before the crops are harvested, but
the decline has attained exceptional pro-
portions this season, calling for more than
casual comment. Moreover, the generally
h'gh level of prices emphasizes the loss in
quantity, particularly as to the outgo of


foodstuffs. As to the range of all com-
modities. run'ss Index Number showed
scarcely any difference between August
1. ]W04, and the corresponding date last
year, although on July 1 there was a fall
of about 2 per cent. This is explained
by a fall of about that percentage during
the month of July last year, as there was
little alteration in the level of prices in
July, In4MM. First in importance, it ap-
pears that exports of all merchandise
during the month were valued at only
$84,883,431, which is the smallest aggre-
gate for any month since August, 1898,
or exactly six years, and it is necessary to
go back to February, 1902, to find a month
in which the value of imports was as
small as the figures of last month, which
were $71,123,520, a decline of $11,064,303
as compared with the same month in
IL93. This matter of imports is less sig
nificant, however, as the current move-
ment of merchandise is above the average
for any year, except the last two or three.
and was such a sudden decline from the
months immediately preceding as to sug-
gest special conditions that may prove
to be of a temporary character. It will
be some days before the final official
statement appears, showing just where
the losses occurred, and it may prove that
the wave of conservatism in domestic
trade has contracted purchases of all com-
modilties, but it is more probable that
special conditions contributed largely to
make the July figures small.
As to exports, it appears that July ship-
ments were valued at $6.929,834 less than
the corresponding month last year, but
evidently the outgo of manufactured prod-
ucts was actually larger than a year ago,
because exports of farm staples were $9..
ti;1.754 smaller. This loss occurred chiefly
in breadstuffs, the difference amounting
to $7.(033.937 in these products alone. Not-
withstanding the advance in price, or per-
haps Ibeause of it, the value of wheat and
flour exports declined $4,900,000 supplying
most of the loss as compared with the cor-
responding week last year. Apparently the
improved methods of manufacture or dif-
ference in rates of transportation have
nade flour a much more attractive com-
modity than wheat to the foreign pur-
ehaser, for wheat exports were only 114,-
180 bushels, compared with 3,884,972 bush-
els in the same week last year, while the
outgo of flour was only reduced about
one-half, 683,961 barrels being compared
with 1.263,191 Ibarrels a year ago. Reduc-
ing the flour to wheat on the basis of
4 1-2 bushels wheat to each barrel of
flour. the total exports in July were 3,-
192.004 bushels wheat, which compares
with 9.633,399 bushels a year previous,
and 34,130,380 bushels in August, 1901, the
banner month. The July shipments were
even smaller than those of the preceding
month, which held the low record lor
recent years. Next in importance in Loe
gra:n class was corn, with a movement
of only 2.080,101 bushels, as compared
with 5.155,671 bushels in 1903, which ill
turn was an exceptionally light month.
Next. turning to meats, the loss is also
large. $12,245,245 comparing with $16,172,-
142, a loss of $3,926.897. In this deficit
the strike of packers was a factor of im-
portance. as prices and conditions were
much too unsettled to appeal to consumers
abroad. In live meats the loss was less
than a million dollars, but in provisions
there was a difference of over $3,000,000.
establishing a new low monthly record
for recent years at $9,256,990, and it is
necessary to follow the history of pro-
vision exports back over a long period


to find as poor a showing. Considering
the high level of prices, this makes the
contrast in quantity even more striking.
The outgo of lard is fairly well maintain-
ed, little loss appearing in comparison
with last year's figures, but the decrease
in ham and pork is large, while butter
and oleomargarine are shipped more free-
ly. The quantity of mineral oils was not
unusual although about ten million gal-
lons larger than in the preceding month
or the corresponding month lass year,
but the higher level of prices mad. the
July figures much larger than the average,
and about $900,000 in excess of the same
month in 1903. ;_'oton experts were val-
ued at $5,455,022, against 5,'37,068 a year
previous, but the increase in quantity
was much greater than the difference in
value, 99,457 bales comparing with 72,978
bales in 1903. This was due of course,
to the fact that exports this year were
valued at an average of 10.9 cents a pound,
against 13.8 cts. last year. In 11 months
of the cotton crop year exports were val-
ted at $368,940,441, against $30-,i 4,444,
despite a loss of over 700,000 bales in
quantity, as the average cost was 12.6
cents a pound, against 9 cents. This ad-
vance of over a third established a rew
record of annual value of cotton exports
and will be difficult to excel.
Balance of trade on merchandise ae-
count shows a gain to this nation of
$13,759,911, against $9,625,422 in July,
1903, and about the same amount two
years ago, but a net loss on specie ac-
count of $4,700,000 more than mn.ike up
this difference, for in the earlier years
there was a net gain of considerable size
on Balance of gold and silver moa-ement.

AT SOUTHERN PORTS.
The following figures of the value of
exslirts in groups of customs districts
for 1903 and 1904 are the means for a
study of conditions at Southern ports
compared with those at other ports:

District 190 1904 Increase
-er .


Gulf. *: VAY62 krs=..;d- SO 4.w_ 1fif
S Atlantic 201.814.,M 23M300342 '1.45j4
N Atlantic 72.M72.,11 W.W4.461i aS.@e,7n


Total ... 1.420.141.67l 1 40eo lthl 40,7.,AOt z.s
*Decrease.
Of these divisions the Gulf ports were
the only ones showing as a whole an in-
crease, their total being $52,459,629, or
*11.733.123 more than the increase for all
ports.

RECENT LEGAL DECISIONS

Bankruptcy-Chattel Mortgage Refer-
ence.
The Supreme Judicial Court of Massa-
chusetts held, in the case of Tatman vs.
Humphrey, that permitting a mortgagee
to take possession of mortgaged chattels
after the mortgagor had become insolvent
under an unrecorded mortgage which had
I;een in existence a long time was an act
of bankruptcy under the act of Congress
of 1898, and that the preference thereby
secured was defeated by the institution
of bankruptcy proceedings within four
months after that time.

Insurance-Policy--nterstate Law.
The Supreme Judicial Court of Mas-
sachlusetts held, in the case of Johnston
vs. Mutual Life Insurance Company, that
a proviso in a statute dealing with in-
surance policies issued in the State, that
every policy containing a reference to the
application must have a correct copy


thereof attached to it, had no bearing on
policies issued by foreign companies in
other States, although they were upon
lives of persons domiciled in the State
where the statute was passed.

Draining Surface Water-Negliguae.
The Supreme Court of Nebraska held,
in the recent case of Todd vs. York
County, that an owner has the right to
protect his land from surface water, and,
in the interest of good husbandry, to
drain lagoons or basins thereon of a tem-
porary character by discharging se sur-
face water by means of artificial channels
into a natural surface water drain on
his own property, and through such drain
or channel on and over the land of another,.
provided such person acts in a reasonable
and careful manner and without negli-
gence, but that for negligence in the man-
ner of accomplishing the improvement the
owner will be accountable to those in-
jured by his negligent acts. The court
further held that an owner's right to dis-
charge surface water from his premises
does not extend so far as to permit him
to collect in a volume, and by means of
an artificial channel discharge it upon an-
other's land contrary to the natural course
of drainage, to the latter's damage and
detriment.

Expenses of Family-Husband's Clotbhi
The Court of Appeals of Colorado held,
in the recent case of Gilman vs. Mat-
thews, that the phrase "expenses of the
family" used in the section of the Colo-
rado statutes providing that the expenses
of the family are chargeable on the prop-
erty of both husband and wife, is not
limited to necessaries, and that what shall
be included in the term must be determin-
ed by the facts of each case, subject to
the limitation that the articles must have
been purchased for and used in or by the
family or some member thereof. The case
arose on an action against a husband and
wife for wearing apparel bought by the
husband, the complainant alleging that
the clothing was used as a part of the
family expenses of defendants. The court
held that a judgment against the wife
authorized by the section of the Colorado
statutes, making the expenses of the fam-
ily a charge on the property of both hus-
band and wife, could not be rendered in
the absence of proof that husband and
wife were living together as a family and
that the goods were on account of family
expenses.

Telegraph-Railroad-Right of Way.
The Supreme Court of Georgia held, in
the recent case of the The Atlantic Coast
Line Railroad Company vs. Postal Tele-
graph Cable Company, that a telegraph
company acquires an easement in the
right of way of a railroad company con-
demned for the purpose of constructing
and operating a telegraph line thereo-:
that the easement acquired embraces ine
land actually occupied by the poles sand
fixtures for guy wires, and the right to
stretch the wires upon the poles and to
enter upon the right of way to construct
and repair the telegraph line; that the
only exclusive right of occupancy the
telegraph company acquires by condemna-
tion proceedings is the occupancy of the
land occupied by the poles for telegraph
purposes; that the measure of damages
in such cases is the value of the land ac-
tually taken, and the extent to which the
use of the right of way by the railroad
company is diminished by its use by the
telegraph company; that the right.of way
of a railroad company has no general mar-


IF YOU ARE PROGRESSIVE, ADVERTISE IN THE RECORD.


-








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY NO. 6888.
Co"s' --im rmw--rt op T- COw-w-O" OP
THE ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
A OL... ....T. OOSTOLL. OP s lW.CAT aT- L ..* OP U *-
MAnoRCH 28-. 1904.


RieoUaKCS LIAsBlIrTI3
Laans and Discounts.... ............ 1,3B,4e0.01 Capital Stock paid in...............
Ov rdrafts ...... ..................... 34.3 Surplus................ ........ ..
Valts and Fixtures................. 15,5t. Undivided Profits..............
U. S. Boads............................ 3D0,7.50 Circulation................ ......
on ity and Lty Bonds ............... 131.097. Depoits ..........................
Due from U. S. Treasurer......:..... 10.000.00 Total.........................
Cash and Due from other Banks..... 549.g.71
Toal ............................ s 31UU,U.IW.


ket value for other uses than that to
which it is applied; that the appropria-
tion to public use amounts to a withdraw-
al of the right of way from any use ex-
cept that which is necessary or auxiliary
to the operations of the railroad; that
peculiar advantages and benefits accruing
to a telegraph company from its use of
the railroad's right of way cannot be con-
sidered in the assessment of damages, and
* that remote or speculative damages can-
not be recovered. The court held that the
bare suggestion that at some vague time
in the future the railroad company may
lay additional tracks or build structures
for railroad purposes is too remote to
authorize the admission of evidence of
the damages that might result from such
possible contingencies.

Agent-Declarationa-Evidence.
The Supreme Court of Georgia held, in
the recent case of The National Building
Association vs. Quinn, that declarations of
an agent as to business transacted by
him, in order to be admissible against his
principal, must have been made while
representing the principal in the transac
tion in controversy, and must also have
been a part of the negotiation and con-
stituting the res gestae; that evidence
that a letter was written to a given per-
son does not authorize a presumption that
he received it unless the evidence alsi
shows that such letter was properly ad
dressed, duly stamped and mailed, and]
that it was erroneous to admit in evi
dence over proper objection by the party
against whom it was offered, an adver
tisement published in a newspaper bk
a person while acting as his agent in :
matter to which it was claimed such ad
vertisement referred when it appeared
that such person made the publication ii
his individual capacity, and there wa
no evidence to show that the party against
whom it was offered authorized the put
location. or by subsequent ratificatio
adopted it as his own.


A


SM0000.00
.30.0tDu10
5,0 0.00
40,1W90.9
I.,794,MS4.10
W3141.41J5A5


Sale-Conignment-Title--Notice
In the case of The National Newark
Banking Company vs. Delaware, Lacka-
wanna & Western Railroad, decided by
the New Jersey Court of Errors and Ap-
peals, it appeared that certain cars of
grain were consigned to one Archer, at
Newark. Before their arrival he contract-
ed to sell them to different purchasers
and surrendered the bills of lading to the
local freight agent at Newark. Upon the
surrender of the bills of lading he pre-
sented orders directing delivery of the
ears to the several purchasers, "or our-
selves or order on presentation of this
order." Upon these orders the local
freight agent stamped the words "car to
be delivered on this order same as B. of
L., B. of L taken up at Newark." Archer
retained the orders thus certified, drew
upon the purchasers for the price of the
grain payable on arrival, and obtained
advances from the plaintiff bank upon the
drafts accompanied by the certified orders.
The court held that the contract between
the purchaser and Archer was an execu-
tory contract and not a present bargain
and sale; that the transaction with the
bank transferred to it a title to the grain;
that a carrier must deliver goods to the
True owner claiming under the consignee
when it has notice of the true owner's
rights and the bill of lading has already
Seen surrendered; that the certified order
in this case amounted to notice of the
bank's rights, and that notice of the
rights of a person claiming title under
Sthe cmnsignee to have the goods delivered
. to him when given to the agent of the
carrier charged with the duty of deliver-
Sing freight is notice to the carrier.


H. ROBIN SON Pres. H. GAILLARD. Cashier
W. B. OWEN. Vice-Pres.

Commercial Bank,
State Depository.
BBaACHes: Ocal. Fla.. Lake City. Fla
Jacksonville, - lorida


Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.



CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS,

AND VATS.

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
M. L*. DAVIS & si ON, PALATnr FLA.

A4 PENETOM. W. B. JOIIMSO. JAS. ASSETEI W. STRIPLImG.
PrkMt. Vse Pre. Gse. Mager. Asst. Treasurer

5he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers

a402-404940-40s est a. Street. Ja.eswmrie. rem.
MEECTORS:
a.L rT. U. Fr. CAMP. A. P. PStTO W STRIPLJN
T. w. a.... .I. 4LPR CO L N.


The West.Raley-Rannle Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksoaville, Fla.
I. WEST. Pres. E. E. West, VIce-Pres. W. R- Ramre. Vice-Pres. M. V. MaJer, Sec. a Treas.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.

Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINGAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ii,IIteuIIuI I**III llll IIIIII It11iii1t111iIIIl

McMillan

j Bros.

3 Florida Cop-

Sper Works.
SManufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
O 5General Metal Workers.
Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
40 Patching through the country a specialty.
Orders by mail or wirewill receive prompt
attention at either of the following works:
:Feyetteville, N. C. Skvennah. Ga =
SMobile, Ala. Jacksonville, Fla. X
SlCet. H. HARGRAVES CO.,


C. H. HARGRAVES CO..


WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY SIKLLI
Jacksonville, Fla.


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


J. W. WADE,
Vice-President.


E. G. HUGHES,
See'y and Treas


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.

DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


"FAIR, INDEPENDENT AND PROGRESSIVE."


L -.4 -









14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Important Railroad Extensmio from New-
berry to Fort Faaai.
Gainesville, Fla., Aug. 24.-That the
Atlantic C(oast Line proposes to extend
the recently acquired Jacksonville &
Southwestern Railroad from Newberry to
Fort Fannin, on the Suwannee River,
there is no further doubt.
Parties arriving in this city yesterday
have been with the surveying and engi-
neering corps for the past three or four
days, running lines and otherwise map-
ping out the proposed extension, and it
may be said with impunity that the grad-
ing of the extension will begin as soon a-
this survey is submitted and properly ap-
proved. It is safe to say that grading
will begin within the next two weeks,
as the Atlantic Coast Line is anxious to
finish the work and invade the new terri-
tory.
The distance from Newberry to Fort
Fannin is about twenty miles. The ex-
tension will open up one of the finest anti
most fertile countries in all Florida. The
country traversed is heavily timbered with
pines, among which are some of the rich-
est ph.(phate deposits in the United
States. The extension of the road will
mean the establishing of extensive naval
stores and phosphate interests, the es-
tablishment of sawmills, the improvement
of farms and the general upbuilding of
that section. It will mean for the At-
lantic Coast Line a direct connection with
deep water at Jacksonville and an out-
let for all products along the Suwannee
river, which is alive with turpentine and
sawmill camps, and which will be more
developed than ever.
The naval stores men and lumber man-
ufacturers have been compelled heretofore
to haul their products a long distance
by steamer to Branford, where they have
been transferred to the railroads, and
again transferred at Brunswick or Savan-
nah. if they were to be transported by
steamer. The extension of the Jackson-
ville & Southwestern means that they
can then load them on the train at Fort
Fannin and transport them to the steam-
er's side in Jacksonville a great deal less
in distance and with but one transfer.
The people of the went end are elated
over the prospects of the extension, and
there is 1:ttle doubt but that the Jackson-
v:lle & Southwestern will enjoy a finer
business than ever.

SOUTHERN INDUSTRY.
Geogia.
Bainbridge-Electric Light Plant.-'ity
has voted the $20000 bond issue previ-
ously reported, and will purchase the
electric light plant of Nussbaum Bros.
Fogartyville-Jelly Factory.-Reports
state that William Hanson will establish
a jelly factory, guava jelly and guava
paste being a specialty.
Savannah-Shoe Factory.--M Wilen-
sky will install additional machinery for
doubling the capacity of shoe factory
Savannah-Coffin and Casket Factory.
-Chatham Casket & Coffin Co.. previously
report-d incorporated with $10,000 capital,
has purchased site on which to erect fac-
tory building.


MlI[ i M0101I1
Commission Merchants,
Naval Stores & Cotton
Liberal aIvaces ase against dip-
n*wra Co-*irr---nt Lbdt
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
NEW YORK CITY.


Business Directory.

FIRE INSURANCE-Lowet rates. I-
ren I. Green & Co., 9 ad 10 Park Blg.
Jacksonville, Fla. 6mn.
JOHN ZAHM'S EUROPEAN HOTEL
128 Es Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant Nicely FurnishMd
Rooms. Open day and night. Bettillars
old Stand.

THE CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barrels hold and will pass the ws
verest Americanannd European inspection.

Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, OUITMAN, GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address orders to home office,
QUITMAN, GA.


J. P. OAMPaxU,
am. f-m, oEf--, -OSU, FrA.



Trade Checks
FOR IHE


COMMISSARY BUSINESS.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Industrial Record Go.,


ZINC NAILS


Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the emf muaM which will not injure
saws when left in the trees.
alIen Nail Co.
279 Pwl St. New yT*, N. V.
Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc, Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.



Typewriters
All Makee--S0.OO Up.

GRIVOT "'.*

The World-beater. OLIVER, writes in sight.
The JEWETT, King of double-board ma-
chines.
$10 to $60 Saved oe Aay Make of Typewriter.

THE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
Extracts the spirts without destroying the
wood fibre. Runs out a charge in les than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-five gallons from cord of wood.
Makes pure water white spirits, free from
the odor of tar or creosote. No chemicals
used n refining the spirits. Needs to be
distilled only once after coming from re-
tort.
No trouble with bl-products, the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
duced and from wood. Only one rade
of spirits produced and that the highest
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGER PROM FIRE
Built of finest material by high-grade
workmen. The cheapest machine offered to
the public.
We challenge comparison of output and
quality of product. We guarantee output
and quality.
The re Belt Cesturtimi C pm y
P. 0. Box Us. RALEIGH. N. C.


Tailor-Made Shirts
THE KIND THAT FIT









tpe dE f SW
A I TO-FIT
..


Pis ua sa
.- -^ Sa surle



F. S. BLANK
OLUNMA, S. C.
TE LEUIC 0RT* hUT Ull U TE 1. S.


This Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.


Whelem.eo


Liquor Merchants


Proprietors


Jukisu" Nmg Waks


...Agents...


ACME BEER






SNO FARM "m
A GROVE OF

''.F Val^ IUJDDCD


TheyAre I SU"AP

GRIFFING'S CATALOG


Twso a leadin lbWes se FM n

msmc*-Crml bum r
* asom Uses am U
* Addsm
T TIEN NUPPNO gO". 01.
dAJlo0VIL&E. P*.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,


from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866
Mount Vernon Pure
Whiskies


and
Rye


"ontrollers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.


CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 and 519 West Bay Stret,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


PATRONIZE RECORD ADVERTISERS FOR SATISFACTORY DEALINGS.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15







THE COVINGTON CO.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Wholesale:


SHOES


- -


DRY GOODS.


"Success For Our Customers is Success For Us."


CAMBRIA SOUTHERN.

A New Link in the Louisville & Nashville
Route to Atlanta.
The incorporation of the Cambria South-
ern Railway Co. is reported from Knox-
ville, Tenn., and the purpose, it is said,
iw to build a new and shorter line for the
Atlanta, Knoxville & Northern Railroad
from Wetmore, Tenn., to Cartersville, Ga.,
to avoid the grades and curves of the
present route between those points. This
will mean the construction of about 75
miles of new line. The incorporators, ac-
cording to the report from Knoxville, are
officers of the Knoxville, Lafollette & Jel-
lico Railroad, which, like the A., K. & N..
is in the Louisville & Nashville system.
The new road will start from Cain creek.
between Wetmore and Cambria. It is
said that large shops will he erected at
Cambria and a new town made there. The
road will cross into Georgia at a point
near the Conasauga river.
W. J. Oliver & Co. of Knoxville are re-
ported to have been awarded a contract
to rebuild the Atlanta, Knoxville & North-
ern from Knoxville to Wetmore, about 60
miles. This work, it is said, will cost
between $1,500.000 and $2,000,000. and it
will be done under supervision of J. H.
Peyton, chief engineer of construction at
Madisonville, Tenn. About 2.000.000 yara
of work will have to be moved, and it in
ataled that this construction will begin
immediately, to be completed in 10
months. Some heavy cutting w:ll be
necessary.
The Knoxville. lafollette & Jellico Rail
road. which, in connection with the At
lanta. Knoxville & Northern. will form
the new route of the Louisville & Nash-
ville between Cincinnati and Atlanta, has
begun operating freight trains between
.lellico and lafollette, Tenn.. 26 miles.
that much track having been completed.
It is expected that the entire road to
Knoxville will soon be finished.
The Mentor Southern Railway has also
applied for a charter to build a line front
Mentor to McGhee for the Atlanta, Knox-
ville & Northern. This line will start
from Mentor, on the A., K. & N., and run
through Blount. Ioudon and Monroe coun-
ties. about 20 miles. It will pass through
Maryville. The incorporators are J. 11.
Ringgold, W. H. Oliver, W. L. Pomeroy,
J. B. Wright and .1. H. -Frantz.

Cottonseed MeaL
The consumption of cottonseed meal as
fertilizer in the Southern States, as well
as the large demand in all sections for
cottonseed meal as cattle food, is evidence


COURSE OF PALE AND MEDIUM ROSINS AT SAVANNAH FOR TWO YEARS.


W.W.


April
April
April
April
April
May
May
May
May
June
June
June
June
July
July
July
July
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.


DATE
1. .......
8 ....... .
15 .......
22........
29........
6........
13........
20 ........
27 ...... .
3. . . . .

71 ........
16 ........

21 ........
23. .......
14 .. . .. .

12 ........
18 ........


1904-05
$4.10
395
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.95
4.35
4.50
4.60
4.65
4.75
4.75
4.70
4.52%1
4.67%
4.60
4.62%


1903-04
$3.90
3.60
3.50
3.40
3.35
3.35
2.42%
3.65
3.65
3.60
3.40
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.40
3.50
3.50


W.G.
1904-05 1903-04


$3.80
3.75
3.60
3.60
3.60
3.50
3.50
3.55
3.65
4.06
4.10
4.15
4.25
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.25
4.42%1/
4.35
4.37


that the cotton plant is not only cloth-
and feeding the epople, but also assist-
ing in increasing the wealth of the soil.
('ottonseed oil is used in the preparation
of lard and other oils. and it is one of
the purest foods known. The large pro-
portion of protein in cottonseed meal
makes it one of the most valuable cattle
foods, and when we consider how exten-
sively it is ussld. we can truly (laim in
it' favor that all the discoveries of gold
ever made have not added as much to
our national wealth as the utilization of


$3.60
3.45
3.35
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.27%
3.36
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.30


1904-05
$3.60
3.60
3.45
3.45
3.45
3.35
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.85
3.85
3.85
3.90
4.00
3.95
3.90
3.82%
4.00
4.00
4.02%


1903-04
$3.50
3.35
3.25
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.17%
3.25
3.25
3.20
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.05
3.05
3.15
3.15


1904-06
$3.35
3.35
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.65
3.65
3.65
3.65
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.72%
3.90
3.85
3.871/


1903-04
$ 3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
3.20
3.15
2.95
2.95
-295
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
2.95
3.05
3.05


waste product of the cotton plant that
was once as great a mnslanic as the culln
piles of the coal mines. Cottonseed meal
has reduced the cost of fertilizers, and
with such a source for plant foods there is
no liability of our country being impov-
erished in soil if farmers will resort to
fertilizers and thereby augment their rev-
pitie.


1904-05 1903-04
$3.30 $3.20
3.30 3.00
3.15 3.00
3.15 3.00
315 3.00
3.15 3.00
3.15 3.02%
3.15 3.10
3.25 3.10
3.40 3.06
3.40 2.85
3.40 2.85
3.40 2.85
3.55 2.80
3.55 2.80
3.55 2.80
3.50 2.85
3.65 2.95
3.55 2.95
3.571/. 2.95


1904-05 1906-04
$2.95 $.85
2.95 2.85
280 2.85
2.80 2.85
2.80 2.85
2.80 2.85
3.00 2.87
3.00 3.00
3.00 3.05
3.10 3.00
3.2 2.80
3.30 2.70
3.30 2.70
3.46 2.65
3.45 2.65
3.45 2.65
3.06 2.70
3.30 2.80
3.30 2.80
3.32% 2.80


M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

Commission Merchants.
ROSIN, j.uxrt1&la, TAR, PITCH,
GUM THUS, RIMC, ETC.
138 Front Street, NEW TORN.


Send al orders for riin for the tur- ere yoeu rm i a o w
pentine and commissary trades to the or oe berr ed emr wae *-.
Mde loter be srbe pa. write to-SL
Record office to insure prompt delivery. .


WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS MENTION THE RECORD.








16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.




| Machinery and Mill Supplies.


Bar Iron, Iron Pipe and Fittings, Bolts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tools, Lumberman's Tools,
Packing of all Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corrugated
Roofing.




JOHN C. CHRISTOPHl R


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


STATE AGENT FOR.
ATLAS ENGINES aln BOILERS.SOULE STEAM FEED
WORTHINGTON STEAM PUMPS, JENKINS' VALVES,
DISSTON'S SAWS, FLINTKOTE ROOFING,
CURTIS MANUrACTURImNG C.'S M Mnasdimey.
DLOACH SAW MILLS, GIET WOOD PULLEYS,
HOYrS LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SPRING a RUBBER CO.
ReCt ani Rbbecr Itm.
SOLVENTINE OLER COMPOUND,
DODGE MG. CO.'S Cast 11m SPrlt Peys.
McCAFFREY FILES, MONARCH EMERY WHEELS.
DANIELS' PPP Steam Packdlg
A. LESCHEN & SON, Wire RIe.


~00~I~Oi)OFCOF~;;3 ~ ~n~r;3~~i~i OFS`~F;COi~rOF3~0 ~ ~~ C~i~+~9~ii)~;FP~~~9~i~.3,. ;


GEORGIA INTER-STATE SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
Minimum Coastwise Price List for Merchantable Rules 9go4. Adopted at Tifton,
Georgia, July2, 1904.
SFeet Feet Feet Feet Feet Feet Feet Feet Feet eteetet eetFeet Feet
SIZES 20&U 21-25 126-30 31-35) 36-40 41-45 46-50 51-55 56-60 61-65
1 xl0 to 2x10.... $12.50$13.50$14 50E. 98.00$120..1$23.50 $26.50 $32.00$40.0
2%x10 to 8x10.... 12.00 12.50 13.50 14.00 15.50( 17.. 20.00 23.00 28.00 35.00
81/4x10 to 10xl0.... 12.50 13.00 14.00 15.50 16.50| 18.50 21.00 24.00 29.00 37.00
1 xl2 to 2x12.... 14.00 15.50 16.50 18.001 21.0" 24.00 28.00 32.50 38.00 49.00
2%xl2 to 10x12.... 13.00 13.50 14.50 16.5.0 18.501 21.00 24.50 28.50 34.00 43.00
10/4xl2 to 12x12.... 13.50 14.00 15.50 17.50! 19.501 22.00 25.50 30.00 36.50 46.00
1 x14 to 3x14.... 16.00 19.00 20.00 22.001 24.50| 27.50 32.00 37.00 44.00 57.00
3%xl4 to 12x14.... 14.50 16.50 18.00 20.50 22.00 24.00 28.00 32.50 40.00 52.00
124xl14 to 14x14.... 15.50 17.00 19.00 21.00) 23.00] 26.00- 30.00 34.50 42.00 55.00
1 x16 to 4x16.... 20.50 22.00 24.50 27.501 31.001 34.00 38.00 42.50 52.00 66.00
4%x16 to 12x16.... 19.00 20.00 22.00 25 50 29.001 31.00 35.00 39.50 48.00 59.00
12%x16 to 16xl6.... 19.50 20.50 23.00 26 50! 30.001 33.001 37.00 *41.00 50.00 62.00
2 x18 to 6x18.... 24.0 50.5 0 2.50) 3!..50 35.001 39.001 4.0-49.00 62.00 79.)00
6%xl8 to 14x18.... 21.00 22.00 26.001 20.001l 33.001 37.00' 41.00 45.00 57.00 69.00
14%xl8 to 18x18.... 23.00 24.00 27.00 30.00 :14.00.001 001 42.00 48.00 59.00 74.00
Terms: Net Cash.
Prices are F. O. B. Cars Savannah, Brunswick, Fernandina and Jacksonville.


NOTICE.
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Saw Mill Association, held at Jacksonville.
Fla., March 15. 1904. the following Classi-
fication and Rules for Inspection of Yel-
low Pine were officially adopted. effective
July 1. 1904:
Claisiftinm and Inspection of Yellow
Pine Lumber.
General Rules-All lumber must be
sound, well manufactured, full to size and
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;
through shakes, or round shakes that
show on the surface; square edge. unless
otherwise specified. A through shake iN
hereby defined to he through or connected
from s:de to side, or edge to edge, or side
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken;
less than one inch thick shall he measured!
as one inch.

CLASSIFICATION.
Flooring.
Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: 1x3,
4. 5 and 6; 1%x3, 4, 5, and 6.
Board.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses
under one and a half inches by seven
inchess and up wide. including one and a
half inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: /4. 1. 1% and 11% inches
thick by 7 inches and up. wide.
Santling.
eSantling shall embrace all sizes from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2x3. 2x4. 2x5. 2x6. 3x3. 3x4. 3x5. 3x6. 4x4.
4x5. 4x6, 5x5 and 5x6.
Plank.
Plank shall embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness.
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1%, 2,
2%, 3. 3%, 4. 4/, 5, 5%, 5%/x7 inches
and up in width.


Dimenion.
Dimension sizes shall embrace all sizes
6 inches and up in thickness by seven
inches and up in width. including six by
six. For example: 6x6. 6x7. 7x7, 7x8. 8x9
and up.
Stepping.
Stepping shall embrace one to two and
a half inches in thickness by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1. 11%.
1 /. 2 and 2'/2x7 and up, in width.
Rough Edge or Flitch.
Rough Edge or Flitch sliall embrace all
sizes one inch and up in thickness by eight
inches and up in width, sawed on two
sides only. For example: 1, 11, 2. 3. 4
and up thick by eight inches and up wide.
sawed on two sides only.

INSPECTION.
Standard.
All lumber ;hall be sound, sap no ob-
jection. Wane may be allowed one-eighth
of the width of the piece measured across
face of wane. extending one-fourth of the
length on one corner or its equivalent on
two or more corners.
Merchantable.
All sizes under nine inches shall show
heart entire length on one side or edge;
sizes nine inches and over shall show
heart the entire length on two opposite
sides. Wane may be allowed one-eighth of
the width of the piece measured across
face of wane. and extending one-fourth of
the length of the piece on one corner or
ith equivalent on two or more corners.
Prime.
Scantlinu sha!l show heart on two faces
the entire len-rtl: other sizes shall show
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opplisite sides. )n not exceeding 5 per
cent. of the pe:e s. wane may he allowed
o,,e-eialith of the \i iredl across face of wane and extendinLr
one-fourth of the length of the piece on
one corner or its equivalent on two or
more e 'rners.


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD
PREVIOUS YEAR
Receipts
Spirits, casks ....................... ......
Rosins. bbls............... .........
Total .............. .... .. ......
Exports
Spirits casks..........................
Rosins, bbis..... .....................
Foreign
Spi its, casks... ............... . .
Rosins, bbls . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New York
Spirits, cass............ ............
Roins, bbls........... ..........
Sundries
Spirits, casks............. ...............
Rosins, bbs ........................ .


FOR 1903404 AND TWO
S 0 11 10
1908-01 1102-03 ) 1901-02


l198,647
650,9w8
844.585


292 496
940,507
1,238,033


188,398 296,43C
752,270 975.428


98,884
338,171

35,658
87,853

59,351
826.746


206,109
504,178

42,765
138,121

87,556
387,784


814,846
1,071,440
1,386,786

814,876
62,687

217,446
585,042

63,797
129,069

48,633
896.586


The receipts of spirits are les than 1902-03 by 9,849 caks, and of mrins, 29,569 lbarm

When YT Are In Jackseaile S a t-a-


WOLFES EUROPEAN HOTEL.
Caeer rWge and ray Streets.
Rates Wie. 75e and 31.00 per day. First Class Restaurant in Connection. J. L WOLFE. M aN r

Ia a I *aamallllla 11 asstaiassaam s sao masaems aaamaa


PEARL WIGHT. Pres.


T. n. McCARTHY, Vice-Pr


MAMRICE STER. Tr


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.

IRVImG H. WELCH. Musa er.


ml'
4
4

4
4


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


S401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4


1te44 I1 I$t$ iil824# 1lt4#1 le t1446 siiiiiiiellOe


W. H. BECKWITH. W. IHENDERSON. G. C. WARREN.

SBECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.


| LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE AND MILL LINS.

; Rooms 1.2-3, First National Bank Building.
TAMPA, : : : : : FLORIDA.
aIItullltiltl*ill iual aI11111I I AII iImAhirmiummll gml


"NOTHING SUCCREES LIKE SUCCESS."


d


I~8it.*~ .~/~ipl~-C-C-~I~L~





THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are

McMILLA N BROTHERS'
Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS.
SAVANNAH, GA. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
MOBILE, ALA. FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.



Half Tones=Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.
I SPEWIlMT IS MI M OF HS118, REITOKllG ll UmIBISHIIN PMOTOIlPHS PICTURES.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED

A Florida Enterprise. Try It.
o0 OF TrH WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PUAPIR.




18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. ___



I I
U 5
t3 5.


READ THE ADS IN THE RECORD.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 19


o ne RAKEr. re. C w. ArneLESON. Vwee RAER BAr M. E.r X. P.
(aer & HOlm Ca) (C V. Anso CIa) Gemneral Coa Sec. Tree

SFLORIDA FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY
We can collect yoar Freight Claims against
Railroads and Steamship Comapales.
Charges Reasoable. Yror Membership Solicited.
We sare ye allff worry tremble. Erdersed by all Public Wolies
It the CIty ad FraIsportatlow C lles.
216 Dyal-Upchurch Bldi, JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will send by express, prepaid the following:
Pour ull quarts Iincola County. Bunybrook Rye or Big Horn ey .. m.
l Bottle ......................... am
I will ad four full quarts of Sower Corn, Melwood Rye, Qoedg Wed-
d a Rye, Holland GOi, Tom Gnl, Peach Brandy, Peach and omey
Whtakey. Gin and Manhattan Cocktalls-any of the above tr ........ (M
One bottle of any of the above ............... .......... ........... ... .....
oar bottles of the follow California Wine: Sherry. Poet, Mmat,
Catawba ...................................................... LIm
n le bottles ................ ...... ..................... e.
siatle bottles ............. ......................................... SLO
Por bottles Wilson Whiskey, eased.......................................... *
Single bottles ..... ... *L
Fve bottle Dffy's Malt ..................................... Sam
Bulk goods of all kinds. special Prices o a ppicatkl. Al kinds of
lquors in ngs from "m to 5,6 t. o. b. Jacksonville.
F. BETTELINI W Bay St., pp. Union Depot, Jackenville, fla


Album of Florida Views

FREE.
One Hundred handsomely engraved views of Florida, compiled in a magnifi-
eent souvenir writing tablet. Beautiful present for an absent friend, or an ap-
propriate method of writing to those to whom you would recall Florida memories.
Sent postpaid for 30 cents or given free with one yearly subscription to the Week-
ly Industrial Record at the regular rates. Send H0 cents and get the album sent to
any address, or send $.00 and get The Record weekly for one year and the
album, sent to any address, free of cost. Address,
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonvlle, Fla.


Pri ntI n Send your order to the Industral
Record. Promptand satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.

_.~~- --------- -M_ ------------%5
NEW CHOICE BOOK COLLECTION OF

| "Old Favorite Songs" *m
[Copyrighted.]
COVERS AND 32 PAGES 6 x 9. BOOK OPENS FLAT. JUST THE
THING FOR HOME, LODGES, SOCIAL OCCASIONS, ETC.
Our beautiful booklet of -Old Favorite Songs" (words aad naaeo) 21k
a long-felt want, because it is a collection of the sogs that everybody
wants, which cannot be had otherwise, without purchasing several book at
a considerable expense, but in this booklet they are supplied at a triiAg
cost. These songs are the delight of every home. Every family wa~
them. Lodges wnt them. The appeal to everybody. Such good old sogp
as: Alice, Where Art Thou?, America, Annie Laurie, Auld Lang Sye,
Aunt Jemima's Plaster, Battle Hymn of the Republic, Ben Bolt, Bird of the
SGreenwood, Blue Bells of Scotland, Breeze from Home, Columbia, the Gem
of the Ocean, Comin' Thro' the Rye, Cradle Song, Darling Nelle Gray,
Dip, Boys, Dip the Oar; Evening Bell Far Away, Flag of the Free, Flee as
a Bird, Flow Gently, Sweet Afton; Go Down, Moses; Good Night, ILdis;
Home, Sweet Home; Last Rose of Summer; Lead Kindly eight; Li
Dale, Long, Long Ago; My Old Kentucky Home; My Maryland; Old
Joe; Old Folks at Home; Old Oaken Bucket; Robin Adair; Booked in the
Cradle of the Deep; Roll, Jordan, Boll; Scenes that Are Brightest; Star
Spangled Banner; Stars of the Summer Night; Sweet and Low; Swing
Low, Sweet Chariot; uwannee River; Thou Art My Boe; There's MX
in the Air; Those Evening Bells; When the Swallows Homeward y;
Won't You Tell Me Why, Robin?; Yankee Doodle; Dixie; adl my
S others.
Place Order Quick. Sample Copy, postage prepaid, 25c.

Industrial Record Publishing Co.,
Booe" DepartmenLt. JackFsovlle L
To the Boys and Girls: Send $1.00 for eight copies. Sell them to yw
townspeople and friends and make $1.00 "pin money" for two or
hours' wrk.
n^(9L 5g(f55C!CXf%^^


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade


Western White Oak Spirit Barrels


Capital $100,000.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.


J. C. LITTLE, President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager.


JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


DIRECTORS:


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST,
W. F. COACHMAN.


W. J. KELLY


THE RECORD'S SPACE HAS A BIG MONEY VALUL.


1










4
4





4
4









*

.
.
4
*
*
*


I_


- ------- - "" """ '~"~" U ----- -------Y


r(lh ~ ~ lh~- -- -~ U U h U- -


OFFICERSpt,




20 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


.xm a A sl A a a Ul A a A a a N a Iw3


i1eet 1 a 4 i iit6116 ett61 1 # 91 1 41 t161 ISl Io *IO **** 9***o t ** ******** O


Prtldent, W. C. POWLL: Viee-Prwdent a. who with the Prweident contitute the Directory and Board of Managers, W. r COACHMAN. B. i. BUL-
UARD. H. IU COVINGTON, H. A. McEACHERN, JOHN R. YOUNG. J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN. C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS. C. B. ROGERS; Auditor. JOHN HENDERSON.


OON~LIDAT[D NAVAL STORES COMPANY,


Jck nvmille, Fla.


ovannah, I .


PeacoIlo. Fi.


S- i NAVAL STORES iTORS.

S llll Sok, 5,5000. AOWl oN Col olll by Procil oiaots
S l r mo 01O Sloci Ye i Resge1e 10 Sell 10 0il ols Who C an rllg n 10 le.


The Consolit ed11 is Purely I o eraie1 Compan. 1s Inter1es ore
o Ie Producers. The Pallio nle l T enillpne t 0 ll ors eveil
PN l 01 Moey and Plenl o01 limer 1or iv oll.


Identcol Wih ose


here Imil


YADS AT JACIKSO LE, AII. lAH FERANIHINA o PEISAOIlA.


All Producers le Invled 10 Cll or Clreson


Il *t II -t I I "THE PIIE AI D ITS P R ODU CTSI "
"THMB PIX W ITS PRODUCTS."








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 21



The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commisary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese

A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 21
A. C. Creamery,30 .. 22
10 -. 25
A C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 11

Lard

Compound Tin.
5 0-1h tin... 64
S 50-lb tuh....
Leaf Tin.
S50-lb tin ............ 84

Vinegar
RJd Apple Cider bbl........ 36

Sugar
Granulated Sugar, bbls..... 5 35

Coffee

Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb.................. 22
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 12
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 8
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
Ib packages....... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ages............. market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 17
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea

Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 Ib..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 27
English B'fast, 10 lb.. 7
Formosa, 10 lb....... 27
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 1Oc size
10 lbs to case, per pound .. 40


Salt
200-lb sack................
100-lb sack................
Ice Cream, 200-lb sacks.....
100-lb sacks.....
Pocket Salt in bbls., 3-lb....
.' 2-lb....


100
50
100
50
265
275


Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin...... ....... 17
Ground 1-8 tin, 3 doz to box
sifter top, per doz...... 46
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and 80

Corn
te1 Sk Less 100
Car Lot Lot Sk


W.Corn,101b, 1 38
.. 1001h, 1 24
Mxdcorn,1101b,l 33
# 1001b,1 21


1 40
1 26
1 35
1 28


1 48
1 29
1 38
1 26


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon....
Oats


10o Sk
Car Lot Lot
W clip'd,1251b,2 10 2 12
S 10011,1 75 1 77
White 1251b, 240) 202
White 1001h. 1 60 1 62
Mixed 12511)
4" 1001b,


Less 100
Sk Lots
2 15
180
2 ,05
1 65


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices, Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 Ihs., choice. .... 1 65
t" i fancy..... 1 65
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour


Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 5
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
12 or 24 lb sack.........5
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks........... 5
Pillsbury's Best ..... 6
S Pillsbury's Best bbl
Flour, Gold Medal ......... 5
" bbl .....


Flour, Boss,..............
Meal


Meal, per barrel.. ..........
92-lb sacks...........
Grits


6


65
25

15

00


350
150


Grits, per barrel........... 60
S 92-lb sacks....... 1 60
Rice
Good ...................... 44
Choice.... .. ............. .5
Fancy Head................ 6
Broken ................ ... 2


Canned Vegetables
Dm..
Tomatoes, 3s, Chief..... .. 85
Tomatoes, 2s ........ 65
Clayton, 3s................ 80
Clayton, 2s ............... 60
Sifted Peas, 2s ...........1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........1 15
Lima Beans,2s ............1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 3B........... 90
Baked Beans. is........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............1 40
Born Tomatoes. 2s.........
Beauty Beets, 3s ..........
Sauer Kraut, 3s .......... 85
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s ............. 90


Hay
car lots 100 bale
lots
Choice.. .. 19 50 2000
No.1 Tim 18 00 1850
No. 2 1700 1780
No. Cl'ler 17 00 1750


less
quantity
20 50
1900
18 00
1800


Canned Fruits I
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
tocase, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 45
Peaches, 3s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 45
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case.
per doz.............
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy
Mixed 30-lb pails, per lb... 64
10-l '" 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
lb .................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
per lb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box.
assorted, per lb........ 6-

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 84
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice "" "
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-1h. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lh. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 36-lb. case 8 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
b<.x, 40-50 ............ 6..
Pru.les, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, O-6O ............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70 ............. 8..
L. L. Rais'ns, 3 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron. 10-lh box ......... 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy. H P, lwr pound.... 6
Extra H P .... 54
Seed Peanuts, ..
New Nuts


Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ ..... 18
Brazils ...... ........ ...... 12
Peacans.................. 12
Filberts................... 12
alO nuts........... ...... 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 10i LesslOo
lots Sk. Lot Sk. Lt
Cottonseed Meal 27 00 27 50 28 00
S Hulls 12 00 12 50 1300


Matches
Atlantic, per gross.........


47-


Wooden ware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
3 8hoop. .....
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz....... 1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. ~i...... 1 00
nested ......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 60
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. .. 1 20

Washboards D
78 Crown Combination..... 2 20
178 Blue Jay......... ......3 00
175 Diamond Glass .........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per doz 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
doz ................. 96
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 60
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 55
Salmon is, Tale 4 dos to case
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon, is, 4 doz to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
Ibs to box..... ....... 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge .... 143-4
"Reliable" Hams. 10-12 avge .... 141-2
"Reliable" Hams. 12-14 avge .... 141-4
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge .. 115-8
"Reliable" California Hams, 6-8. 101-2
Breakfast Bacon, light av. ...... 151-2
D. S. Bellies, 16-18 av. .......... 93-4
1). S. Bellies, 20-22 av. ........... 91-2
D. S. Bellies. 25-30 av. ........... 91-4
D. S. Plates .................... 7
Bacon Plates ................... 8
D. S. Butts .................. 63-8
Bologna Sausage .............. 7
Sausage in oil ................ $.75


Butter and Chee.
"StrawlIrry" Creamery, 60-lb tubs
30-lb tubs
Kingan's Lard.
"Reliable" full cream cheese ....


20
201-2
11


Kinga's ard.
"Indiana" Pure Leaf ........... market
.;ea-Foam" Compound .........maret


Kingan's Caued Meats.
"Reliable" Corned Beef, Is ......
Corned Beef, 2s ......
Roast Beef, Is ........
Roast Beef, 2s ........
Potted Ham and Tongue
1-4s ...........................
S Sliced Beef, 1-2 .
Vienna Sausage, 12 ..
Tripe ..................


*1.25
3.26

.36
1.15
.8
III


GET A COPY OF THE XAVAL STORES BLUE BOOK.


I








22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.






Industrial Record's Department of Information



This d&pai~nct is conducted for the benefit the subscribers and advertising patrons of this paper and no

charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more o the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attentions


Fr Turpeuti .S miH or f.a.try S.lenks r inMna li of Ay Kia.eL For Tilmo rFanr.ai or a Itrls Lau.
DATF INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Pa.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main Offce, Jacksonville, Fla I am in the market for lands for the purposes of
In the market for the following Prefer in State of Please put me in communication
with responsible parties and give me other information.
Remarks
Please notify where same can be secured.
Signed
Signede

State specifcally the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or seoad-handed. DATE

LaUVe r TmarpetUe. SawmMI er Facstry. r for Any lndustrb EnterprIbe. or Commisu sary, Offlee or .MessebeO SuppUS, .Sawa r Tmrentine Mues
DATE H W Et
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla. DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Please advise the undersigned regarding a good location in (state or section of
state) for In the market for
together with full information about labor conditions, taxes, transportation facilities,
local encouragement, etc.
Rn rVrks Please gie me information as to best plas to buy, etc.

Signed Signed


D Yen Wamt to se SemetMig? I Are Ye TlMia of Im estitS?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonvlle, Fla.
Have for sale the following Can you give any information as to the reliability of the following firm or corpora

tin
Remarks
Can you suggest a purchaser?
Signed Signed


o Yee Wanet to Em-pey Man? bD Yeu Want Emplimeit?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Want a man to fill the position of Want a position as

with the following requirements Refer to the foi:owing

Can you suggest such a man Can yon assist me ?
Signed I Signed




CLIP THIS COUPON!
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD
When yo ame answering an advertisement frm the columns of this paper, whether you ae g an inquiry or placing an order, please cut out the coupon
below and attach it to the leMer, It will ay you.


COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the Industral Recore, issue dated

Signed


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonville, Fla., and Savannah, Ga., is the South's great
weekly trade journal.



The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.



F Yro DON'T rD IT 1 TMH RECORD W urI UVa







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 23


WRITE TEE RECORD "OR ANY I UORKATION DEsIR=.


McMURRAY & BAKER,


So ilN 1 1 HOlMliIII h1. M ut
We ame retlw da s-e leasm a bumem ve i s t s of this
Ifmrebe I n arm Ibes trnul mla we have a nbby I Psm The me wl b
and ge0 teah wtit a. TL hretle wema ad tMram spedatt. Demot he es th sot arn
target e eas bet eo world ma hmad-madoe h t s with peanere.

llf-DIV I M DUTED Al E BIV WT .L*wa~igwa rica sc s. Ewt
Ii iYT I BEft, 41 1 413 E BIST 1. eek...e the ,, a 0..o ot
AumeArl'e Leadtmlr Trade Joumalas.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Th We-ly In.dutrial Record of Jac-
sonville and Savannah haa taken its place A
among the leading trade journals In the
United Staf and an ap thorilty onlum-
The Clyde Steamship Company ei n quote not
only by the best and most carefully edited
olam papers in this country. but by those
to Europe also. A London trade paper
aes~hing this oMiee yesterday gives liberal Ie
P ae to the Record. views on mrtret con- five
This weeks Issue of the Induargil Rea. &"
Ord oI even better tfan usual. a"d it isn t
Strong and enta-taining general indus trial
trial newspaper. In addition to Its value r
te the champion of the two specific Indus- Vs
trles It represents. It Is brietut of new Joht
stores or development ia the southeast, plaih
Sa -dollar corporation orgasd In Jack-
smarole yesterday. and the organt ation of H I
severall otDir corporatMou during the and
Sweak In and Florida. w
It ha set the pace for enterprise ad It Wal
NEW YORK, CHA RLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES -.n 4-. te, g. ft. crtpk O ,, d
St Hs receiving, both In its subsem ptou and
Ti m nfrt z amh ip at thbi m ar appoited to sal as follow calling advertising department.carryina as It does,
at ChaDrlst, 8. both ways. Pe one of the largest advetIaing pat.
Nrrm Nw Tr, rmnw Jakmeavr toee 1` womagea 0stve to any ot the Soutlhera. n
(Pier s- Werth ml r). iTMAMER. Chaurlstem and New York. Ioeunalb. sNw
'- "-- -- - In-
Tuesday, June 14, at 3:00 pm ..I(OQUOIS ....Sunday, June 19 at 9:00 am DI III W A %. In
Wednesday, June 15, at 3:00 pm--x'ONEI DA ......Monday, June 20, at 9:00 am eWrn at m m t.
WedMaoday, June 16, at 3:00 pm..ALGONQUIN ..Tuesday, June 21, at 11:00 am ;na T l m
Friday, June 17, at 3:00 pm ..APACH E ... .Wedneday, June 22, at 12:00 nn *WR. who This
xES1MI NOLE ..Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'n ne
MoYday, June 20, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPA HOE .... Saturday, June 25, at 1:30 pm
Wednesday, June 22, at 3:00 pm..COM ANCHE ..Monday, June 27, at 4:00am m 'NWWth WHAN WW ^WAASW V -
**"xHURON ........ Tuesday, June 28, at 5:00 am
Friday, June 24, at 3:00 pm....IROQ UOIS ..Thursday, June 30, at 6:00 am
Tuesday, June 28, at 3:00 pm ... APACH E .......... Sunday, July 3, at 8:00 am ~ ~.tJL.JJJJ9JA9 Pei OJ.J(JjJ.J..JU 19A )!L JJt.J.J.Jt.9JJJ.J... JJJ
x*ONEIDA ..Monday, July 4, at 8:00 am SPECIAL BAR A I I A M
Thrday, June 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARA PAHOE ... Tuesday, July 5, at 9:30 am SPECIAL BARGAINS IN IAMONDS.
Saturday, July 2 at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ....Thursday, July 7, at 11:30 am 30 YEARS RELIABILITY
xSKYMI NOLE ....Thursday, July 7, at 11:30 am
Tuesday, July 5, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ......Sunday, July 10, at 1:00 pm Hs lr
Friday, July 8, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ......Wednesday, July 13, at 4:30 am H e s Slag
, HURON ......Wednesday, July 13, at 4:30 am DamJewelry
Saturday, July 9, at 3:00 pm .. OQUIN......Friday, July 15, at 6:3:00 am Diamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry
Tuesday, July 12, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ......Sunday, July 17, at 7:30 am CORNER BAY AND CEDAR ST8. AND I4 A 13 MAIN.
fxONZIDA ........Monday, July' 18, at 8:00 am --6--6-.8e--.Ff 6 W--- -- - -
Friday, July 15, at 3:00 pm .... IROQUOIS ......Thursday, July 21, at 11:00 am
"xSgMINOLE ....Thursday, July 21, at 11:00 am
Tueday, July 19, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ......Sunday, July 24, at 12:30 pm N M
Wednesday, July 20, at 3:00 pm .AIGONGUIN ....Tuesday, July 26, at 4:00 am
Friday, July 22, at 3:00 pm ....OOMANCHE ..Wednesday, July 27, at 4:30 amava S tos
-xHURON ... .Wednesday, July 27, at 4:30 am t
Tuesday, July 29, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, July 31, at 7:00 am
*zONEIDA ......Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 8:00 am a d Sk
Wedleday, July 27, at 3:00 pm ..IUOQUOIS ......Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 8:00 am
riday, July 29, at 3:00 pm ..APACUE ......Wednesday, Aug. 3, at 9:00 am Published Daily in The
Sunday, July 31, at 3:00 pm ... AIGONQUIN ....Friday, Aug. 5, at 10:30 am
.I.EMINOLE .. Saturday, Aug. 6, at 11:30 am
---Tielt Seaw. -Boston vat Charleston and New York.
-B8setoa via lVMDr lek d Charles ton. --Boston. via Charleston.
"IW CLYDE NBW ENCRAAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
age~s serste. *S*tw -a ..Mu o, ian .m e rsanM a"e an a&*-
am waisbVosgnes at cb da.a... Mom ways.p.
S mI S-wS n SC an a NF Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
k..thbr a ................... .. . ... .o. Prom Lewis Whara Bos daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.
Werthbs.........................Prm ~foo t o Catherline Street Jacksonvill.
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
seS. JaheanvS l an tam $5 A YEAR; $2 50 SIX MONTHS
ShppiN at Palatkha Astor, St. .raHmns, Berestord (De Land) and intermediate
Seal~ as St. ;onar.
STEAMER "CITY OP JACKSONVILLE"
is a-ipta to san an toeOws: eare Jacksonville. Sunday Tuesdays and Thurs. IG
ds, MSa p. m. Retrnstnfg leave Sanford. Monday, Wednesdays & Fridays 9 a. m.
u)u zLV.tuU ,1j JNORTUBOUND,
ed 6 own, I Read up.
Le ..se ... ....... :............a n ............... ....... Arrie1a. m.A A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposition, I
Los",,:4115 P. m. : -' ...... "k ""ft ....... ........ -,ev , -.
Leave S ...... .......... .... ..... ...: .::::::.. ........,. Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N.(
L rave 4 a. .......... ............ t. Fran ........................ ILave 1i p. m.
.................. ... ... ...... eraord mam ......... .......Le ..... a noo Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Su
Arri o8 av : .. ...... ...................... .......... Leave 9 m.
Ar. 10:00 a. ............... se.........................L. 10o:oo0 a. m. scription contest. Write for particulars.
eawiiAL PAsAWDIM- AND TICKl T OFFIC. I (04 W. any St.. Jeekrllle.
r. M. IRNMOi maP.. JR. AAst. Gent. Paln Agent. 1M W. Bay St.. Jacksonvlle. Pina M
W. a. OOPER, JR.' Local rt. At, Jaklle. C. P. LOVELL. Aset. 9upt..Jaek'vilTl
Foot Hogan street Jacksonvillt.
A. IC. HAGOIRTT. L P. A. Now York. CLYDB InI . A.. New Yer L
Time. 4. miian, wi p. CLID a CO.
-..s nm.. A.W T.tc. JacKsonville. Florida.
~ar-dr~nr- _1 allt~ta atv 1mr srr_


b-




ll'


0
a

S
5
U
5
C
C
C


~-


~ I--~CI-----~~ ----- --s~-


t










~g





>'>


24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J CILOSSY President


C M FWuER, Vice-president


JAS F LANR See- 0 Tness


Deparlncnts


Greenleaf &

Crosby Com


3toders anbtt

bilbe rnlftfis


41 West Bay Street

Jacksonville

Th eaet snd r.edt ..L as ra nf m
Soaeuern se..s Pr..1 a.ilon o 1a ordeman


Write for Catalogue


Di&monds and Other Precio
Stones


Fine Gold Jewelry


American and Foreign Watchb
and Clocks


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


-7-.
4L


Fine China Dinner Sets and
Fancy Pieces


European Novelties


I [>**IHI *********------------lU -*-- ^*-

i THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
of Wananish. N. C.,
S Formerly of Council's ia n C., ar still selling Diamond dge
Hacks at LO., Black Joed Standard at $LtM Old Style and Patent
S Pullers at 10.0 a dosen. should average a little better than ever.
S We have brought out a ner brand, the Blue Line Hacks at SL and Pul-
S er at 1.00 which are warranted. All wholesale dealers In naval stores
S supplies carry our lines and should supply operators.
---iii w-----ii---------------- _- w ------

D. G. MKETHM, Prudent. ALFRED A. kcKETHAN, Lt U. & N.
Jaclksovile, Fla. Ret'd Sec'y and Treas, Constructing
Engineer. Fayetteville, N. C.

Pine Product Construction Co.
Fa.yetteville. N. C.
Spirits of Turpentine. Oil of Tar. Creosote. Tar. Disinfectant;: Wood Premerative.
Paints, Wood Stains. Etc., and Charsal, from aJghtwood Stumps. Box-facings
Profits increased. Time of distillation reduced. Condensation controlled at will
No danger from fge. Plant erected complete, and men taught the process Pa r-
ther information, write Alfred MacKethan. general manager, Payetteille, N. C.

WE 3 f f nEC MEMORIALS II MARBLE, STONE AND BRONZE
KF Ti IIST KKER,m
From the simple Tablet to the most elaborate Mausoleum.
Write, or come to see us-our designs will please you.
SOUTHERN MARBLE AND STONE CO.
Iron Fenclng E E. UAMANIC Mueder.
Cut Stone for Builings 4 sth* Nga Sreet,
AytnJa ka asr nwMar Mele TF.
Anything in Stone. Narbhe. Moseic end Tile.


meaeT~ 1111!!1inee1


HOTEL BARTHOLDI, ROADWAY AND 1. ST.,
Facing Wadison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout.
Near all Big Stores and Places of Amuseme,,t. (cars Pass
the Door for all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings.
Large Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
find no grand and magnificent decorations' no luxurious
grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fare. printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
paeak re X1 No Employees In Aev Way laatrentatlve.
But jidS a cozy, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the
hearts of those who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plain American cooking, and affable and courteous treatment.
st7 Jm1 EE PJe tdw..


I
S


ww


John R. Young. President. C. S. Ellii. Vice-Presidst.
B J. W. Mott. Jr.. Secretary and Treasurer.

The ELLIS-YOUNG CO.

W Commission Merchants

NAVAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.

flmmm mm m -- -----mmm---------


J.W. HUNT. President.
P. L. PRaCOCK, 1st V. P-


J. E. HARRIS, 2a V. Pres. H. L. RcaxmoD. See. &. TI a
W. J. KaLLY. 3d V. P. D. R. WuA.rAnA, Asat Seely-*jT sa.


Peacock-Hunt & West


Lori.a in


General Off : 20 Bay Street, f,, Savanma, Ga. and
SWest iuUdinig JackseavilM, Fl.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors Our interest and the producers' is mutual. We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that bays spirti
Turpentine and rosin.)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our Specialty
--SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wilson & MI'T
Philadelphia Wagons.

Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga., and Jaciks-e-e
and Fernandina, Fla.


kwpearsmffd
ft'


0- ------ w---- 0600ww ww ww


mw


Z _7_1 111:1 -Z Cj~=ZjZI 1-1T