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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00083
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: August 5, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00083
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text






August 5, 1904.


THE


INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


e Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

A* J Sept. 12ta 1002. hr re EJcwutc e Commaitee e the T.rpeWtse Operators' AssocaeteM as Its Ezclsire 00fcta *rWm, ant Adepted Sept. fite. 19i0, i-m m 6-
res e as OacI argp AIse of tee neral Asseciatrli. Adepte Sept. l t, 1903. as the oely eucal Orp etthe arpeo te Operatersa' Asseitir n.
A depted Aprfi 27tA, 193. as the OffMcal Organ er te Iuter-State Case Grevers' Assecitleo. Medersed hy toe Geerfa SawmEll
Asseciatles. Official Organ of the Setbeasterm StLk Srorwer's Asseciatlme.


V1L 9. NO. 5.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


ATLANTA, GA.


SAVANNAH, GA.


$3 A YEAR.


Alabama. administration, and the validity of which
Lmber Company. Crabte had been disputed by the present munic-
Akro~ --Lmber Company. Crabtree
Lmber Co. has been incorporated by O. ipual authorities. The city recently voted
V. Crabtree of Soottaboro, Ala.; J. M. an issuance of $100,000 in bonds for the
S. H. Card and Fred Am, of Chat- construction of a system mof waterworks,
teaooga, Tenn.; capital, $10,000. to be owned and operated by the city, and
Mitchell and Weller have applied for an
Anmiston.-Real Estate.-Kate 0. Rob- injunction against this action.
crts, E. G. Roberts, Addie McKay and Huntsvlleh-Cotton Mill.-Lowe Manu-
ameiaates have incorporated the Chris- facturing Co.'s additional building, re-
tie Avenue Laud Co., with $9,000 capital. ported last week as contracted for with
Anminton-Electric Appliances.-South- T. C. Thompson & Bro., of Birmingham.
en Electric & Manufacturing Co., report- will be three stories high, 80x140 feet.
ed incorporated last week with $100,000 and is to hold 10,000 spindles and comple-
eaital, to manufacture electrical appli- mentary apparatus. Contract for ma
amsa, has acquired two acres of land on chinery also awarded.
which to erect machine shop, 96x00 feet, Jasper--Coal Mines.-Reports state that
equipped with the most modern machin- Erskine Ramsey and G. B. McCormack, of
ery and operated by electric motors, and Birmingham, Ala., and associates have
hree-story office building; structures to purchased several thousand acres of coal
have steam heat, electric lights, etc. lands in Walker County, which will be
Birmingham Cemetery.-Elm Leaf extensively developed. About $100,000
Cemetery Association has been incorpo- will be invested.
rated with Dr. F. D. Nabers, president, r Mines-ncorporate:
I Jasper Coal Mines.--Ineorporated:
vnd J. N. Gunnels, secretary-treasurer. Gayosa Coal Co., with $100,000 capital,
Obspany has purchased from Shaw & Mc- by A. S. Preston, Muna Cannon, H. P.
.Whorter the Elm Leaf Cemetery and 40 Gibson, L. B. Musgrove and others.
eres adjoining, which will be improved as Riverside- Brick Works. Riverside
meetery site. Lodge will be erected, Brick Co. has been incorporated with $44,-
mortuary and new roadways opened. Of- 000 capital and W. H. Thompson, presi-
4w, 312 North 20th St., Birmingham. dent and treasurer; T. C. Thompson, vice-
SBirmingham Coal Mines.-Crescent president, and B. A. Thompson, secretary,
Coal Co. has been incorporated with $100,- all of Birmingham, Ala. Company has
-U capital. Company has purchased the purchased large body of clay land, plant
-roperty of the Seloca Coal Co., near War- and equipment of the Coosa Brick & Man-
tier, Ala., consisting of about 1,500 acres. ufactirin- Co on the Coosa river in Tal-


with an output of 200 tons of coal per
S ay, which will be at once increased to
IS tons. Culpepper Exum is president;
^W. N. Malone, vice-president; W. B.
make, secretary-treasurer, and J. B. Car-
7. :igton, manager.
0lColmbiana-Telephone System.-Incor-
prated: White & Davis Telephone Co,.
., th .$10,000 capital, by N. Davis, W. F.
iavia, W. P. and J. R. White.
SDecatr-Light, Power and Fuel Com-
may. Chartered: Decatur Light, Power
,,.& Fuel Co., by Charles E. Mayer and

lasley-Chemical Works.-Semet-Sol-
S ,ey Company is erecting an addition, 20x
'-.40 feet, to plant.
Florence-Planing Mills.-A. M. Llew-
yan and W. C. Henderson, reported last
week as having purchased the Bellamy
tlnig Mills, which they would improve
I'Nt operate, will increase capital from
; 'U UAW to 25,000 and operate as the
.@rmy Planing Mill Co.
Oadden Waterworks.- The courts
pY decided in favor of the franchise for
granted to W. H. Weller and
SA. AMiehell by a previous municipal


ladega County. Plant will be remodeled
and operated; capacity from 40,000 to 60,-
000 bricks per day.
Talladega-Waterpower Electric Plant.
-Talladega Electric Power Co., reported
last week with $50,000 capital, has pur-
chased all the holdings of the Talladego
Company, including the dam across Choc-
colocco creek, and will finish the water-
power development and the construction
of powerhouse tofurnish electricity to
Talladega.
Florida.
Ocala-Electric Light Plant Improve-
ments.-City has voted the issuance of
$45,000 of bonds, a portion of which will
be used in improving its electric light
plant. Address The Mayor.
Gainesville.-Machine Shop and Foun-
dry.-L. P. Larson, who has been operat-
ing the Gainesville Machine Works under
lease, has purchased and will enlarge the
plant. Mr. Larson has leased property in
South Gainesville on which to erect found-
dry, thereby increasing capacity.
Miami-Starch Factory.-It is reported
that A. Jearnigan of New York has or-


ganized company and will establish plant
for the manufacture of starch.
Miami Extract Factory.-Manetto
Company has been organizide, with $100,-
000 capital, to take over, enlarge and ope
rate the plant of the Florida Extract Co.
E. C. Klipstein is president; A. Klipstein,
vice-president; M. Brown, treasurer and
Frederick Seymour, secretary. The Messrs.
Klipstein are members of the firm of A.
Klipste'n & Co., 122 Pearl Street, New
York, and Messrs. Brown and Seymour
are of Miami.
Miami.-Fish Preserving Company.-
Fish and Fruit Preserving Co., recently in-
corporated, is arranging for the erection
of building and the installation of ma-
ch'nery for putting up fish in packages to
market.
West Palm Beach-Street Improve-
ments.-City will vote August 23 on the
issuance of bonds for street improve-
ments. Address The Mayor.
Georgi
Atlanta--Mineral Water, etc.-Charter-
ed: Lith-Arns Company, with $15,000
capital, and privilege of increasing to
$100,000, to deal in mineral waters and
non-intox:cating drinks; incorporators,
A. L. (larkson, M. R. Wilkinson, S. J.
Elder and John R. Wilkinson.
Cartersville-Development Company.-
Etowah Development Co. has been incor-
porated, with $100,000 capital, by W. H.
Howard, Thos. Lumpkin, John S. Leake.
A. 0. Granger and John W. Akin.
Columbus-Cotton Mill.-John T. Ab-
ney, of Laurens, S. C.. will build, as re-
ported last week. a cotton mill at Co-
lumnbus. The plant will have either 10,
000 or 20,000 spindles No details have
been decided upon as yet, but the capital
is assured.
Columbus-Brick, Tile and Pipe Works.
-M. H. Tuggle Concrete and Hollow
Block Construction Co. has been organ-
ized, with $5,000 capital, to manufacture
hollow brick, sewer tile and drain pipe.
Elberton-Waterworks.--City has let
contract for construction of its proposed
$45,0000 waterworks. Address The Mayor.
Marietta Knitting Mill. Marietta
Knitting Co. is reported as to build an
addition to its mill; present equipment,
86 knitt'ng machines, ribbers, 22 loopers.
etc:
Marietta-Mercantile.-J. R. King Dry
Gords (o. has been incorporated by J. .1.
King of Marietta, .1. .'. Coggins, George
G. Roberts. Atlanta, Ga.. and C. A. Wood.
of Cincinnati, Ohio; capital $15,000.
Ocilla-Sawmill and Cotton Gin.-D. .1.
Hogan will rebuild sawmill and cotton
gin recently burned.
Stillmore-Electric Light Plant.-W. .T.
Lightfoot will erect building 20x50 feet
and equip as electric light plant.


Lineed Oil Price i the United Sttes
The announcement during the pat week
of a substantial advance in the price of
linseed oil caused some surprise among
buyers (says the "Oil, Paint and Drug
Reporter" as the general impression ap-
peared to be that market values would
remain near their former level during the
remainder of the season. This belief wae
based on the fact that there is a large
surplus of seed which was generally re-
garded as a menace to those who sought
to sustain the market value of oil It
has become apparent, however, that this
surplus, variously estimated at from 10,-
000,000 to 15,000,000 bushels, is controlled
by strong interests, as the price in the
principal seed markets has advanced
steadily. Despite this, however, it is
urged that the conditions do not warrant
the advance, as the new crop will soom
be harvested, and, admitting it will be
greatly reduced by reason of the smaller
acreage this year devoted to flax, there
will be fully as much to be carried for-
ward into another year, the contention
being that, admitting a probable decrease
of 40 per cent, there will still remain
a crop sufficient to supply the year's
requirements The impression is come-
quently quite prevalent that the advance
is only temporary, and that a reaction
will set in before the new crop is har-
vested. O nthe other hand, it is shown by
those who believe the advance is fully
warranted by existing conditions that the
ac:eage planted to flax is fully 50 per
cent. below that* of last year, notwith-
standing the late reports of planting this
month by growers who had been able
to sow wheat by reason of unfavorable
weather conditions. Just how much thi
late sowing of flax amounts to is, of
course, not known, but that it will have
some influence is conceded. Whatever
the growing crop will amount to it is con-
tended that as the flax crop has proven
so unprofitable to growers, as compared
with wheat and other cereals, that next
year will witness a further reduction in
the acreage devoted to flax, and that
therefore the control of last year's sur-
plus will prove a profitable venture. These
are the views of the differing interests
briefly outlined, and in the absence of
exact facts as to the actual extent of
the sowings and the condition of the
growing crop opinions as to the pros-
pects for the future must rest with tie
individual The foreign seed situation
need not be considered, as exports from
this side are only possible when 'he price
is lower than Indian or Russian seed.
As for Argentina, there is no prospect of
supplies coming from thence or the seed
there affecting the situation here, its ex-
port value to Europe being omsiderably
above even the highest price yet reached
by domestic seed at Duluth or (Ciecag


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Z THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY

Waycross, Ga.
.4 MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located in the heas t of the Lumber District gives ms a1vam-
tagie of eblsest material at lowest cost


WRITES OF J. P. WILLIAMS.

Well Known Naval Stores Man Doing
Big Things at Carrabelle.
A writer in the Times-Union from Car-
rabelle has the following to say of the
enterprise of one of the South's lead-
ing naval stores men:
"A new factor has recently been added
to the prosperity of this section in the
person of J. P. Williams of Savannah,
who recently purchased the Carrabelle,
Tallahassee & Georgia Railroad. He is
our Moses, who will lead us out of the
utter darkness in which this section has
been groping for at least seven long years.
"A few weeks ago Mr. Williams stood
on the wharf here and said: "I am here
for business." He then added: "We must
have deep water.'


the race for commercial supremacy.
"Mr. Williams has already linked Car-
rahelle to the great outer world by con-
necting the town with the railroad sys-
tems of Georgia.
"The pay car comes every month; his
trains run on time; he is putting in bet-
ter wharf facilities, driving new piling,
etc.. and has already stirred up the far-
mers along the line of his road to adopt
new methods and new crops, in return for
the refrigerator cars offered them.
"The town now has two daily mails;
Lanark Springs has been rehabilitated,
and there is already talk of moving the
railroad machine shops here.
"Mr. Williams has also been to Wash-
ington and interested the powers-that-be
in behalf of the channel here. Already a
Government engineer has been sent here.
and in consequence of his report, $8,500


"This Carrabelle has never had; and has been set aside from the river and
it is no wonder that even with a great harbor emergency fund for the harbor;
land-locked harbor, lying between Tampa and to-day a dredgeboat is at work here.
and Pensacola, the town fell behind in Rittenhouse Moore will also soon be


here with a dredge, to work out on the
outer bar the $20,000 that Congress vote
the harbor long ago.
"From all of which it may be seen that
Carrabelle has at last started upon the
way that leads to commercial and indus-
trial salvation."

Dun's Weekly Review.
New York, Aug. 5.-R. G. Dun & Co.'s
weekly review of trade to-morrow will
say:
Labor controversies are the most ser-
ious drawbacks to recovery in business,
most other important factors tending to-
ward improvement. Despite some reduc-
tion in the yield of wheat, crop prospects
are most encouraging, and the loss in
quantity of wheat promises to be full
offset by higher prices, so that the agri-
cultural communities will be in position
to purchase commodities. Delayed orders
for iron and steel products are being
placed, and at woolen mills there is a


notable increase in activity. Railway
earnings in July were only 2.4 per cent.
smaller than a year previous, and at many
cities there is evidence of returning com-
fidence, with a little improvement in mer-
cantile collections. But several strwaes
in progress and others under considera-
tion militate against a resumption of
normal conditions in trade and mana-
facture. In the primary market for eot-
ton goods the situation is without change.
Exports to China have been the best fea-
tures.
Failures this week in the United States
are 230, against 178 the corresponding
week last year.
"Hacking" and "chipping" trees for tur-
pentine mean the same thing. "Boxing"
is simply cutting a pocket to hold the
gum as it drops. The part where it sOws
from the tree heals over in a few days
and it is necessary for men to go through
the turpentine farm and "hack" or "ehipF
the trees just above where they have
healed to start the flow afresh.


JOHN HENDERSON, President.


J. A. CRANFORD, Secretary.


CHATTANOOGA POTTERY CO.,


Factory located Daisy. Tenn.


Jacksonville. Fla.


I Sole Manufacturers of


SThe Herty Turpentine Cups


If you expect to use cups next season place


I your orders now for future delivery, Prices and


Small information cheerfully furnished on


S...iY Cups; Gutters and all Tools
|i| 'Used in the HERTY system.

AddreM all communications

|5he Chattanooga Pottery Company,

Jacksonville, Fla.

THr RECORD WILL BE WORTB DOLLARS TO YOU EVERY WLE.


------- ----- ~r-~~;c~;~i~~i









THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


J. S. Schofield's Sons Compiiny,
'Ir~r~r~~~r- --~---~ Eh


H quarters for

Distiller's Pumping

Outfit.
No plant complete without one.
, Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
South Carolina. Write us for p-rticu-
4 lars and prices. We also manufacture
t Engines, Boilers ald nlith
Grade Machinery,
* as well as carry a full and complete
--stockof-
Mill Supplies, Pipe,
SBoiler Tubes, Etc.
Advise your wants.

SMacon,- Georgia.
SI A Le sa Sec alty of At
Sns of TItWorwk fWr Tetrptlse str-e -rseie


UIII~ll rll U U UUUUW9YYW9Y3lWRf V.V.r.VV.VWW V


W. C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T DUDLEY. See. & Tres


Tampa Hardware Co.


Wholesale

Hardware

Turpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks

and Pullers on Hand.
St


FLORIDA.


I IIII55 IIII II 15 11I I1:i 4 11IIIIIIIII IIII IIIIIIIlIIIII--



... NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA., U. S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
8. A. ALFORD,


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.
DIRECTOR:


C. S. ELI"S.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. YOUNG.


H. L. KAYTON,
Seeretarysand Treasurer.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL
WALTER RAY.
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. R. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.





W. R. THOMAS

GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggies.


- v---- v -- v--v v v v v


TEE RECoMr U= T=E WhnM GRZAT TRADE J0=RAL6.


b
: W. W. CARES. Press.


TAMPA,


SOUTHERN BY-PRODUCTS.

Cotton Seed Goods and Paper from Cot-
ton Stalks Will Bring Millions.
J. C. McAuliffe, of Columbia County,
Ga., writes the Country Gentleman as
follows:
"Twenty years ago cotton seed was con-
sidered of no value, and thirty years ago,
it was a rule at public ginneries for each
patron to remove his seed from around
the gin house .This was necessary in order
to keep it from getting blocked up by
the piles of seed They were sometimes
burned or hauled off to some gully and
dumped in. Last year this country ex-
ported $105,000,000 worth of cotton seed
products.
"That's the story in a nutshell, of one
of the greatest developments slowZ any
line that has been male *n modern .imeh.
The story by no means end just here, for
we can go into every walk of industry
and find evidence of the use to whicl
these products of the cotton seed are put.
Dairying has probably been benefited
more by the new uses of cotton seed
than any other industry. Indeed, many
authorities state that it is impossible to
produce better butter than that obtained
by feeding a judicious quantity of cot-
ton-seed meal in connection with other
foods. Certainly no cheaper feed can be
had, especially in the South, where the
manure from the dairy barns can be
utilized to advantage in bringing up the
fertlility of the soil. The farmers are
reaping rich rewards for this erstwhile
worse than useless product of the cotton
plant, and men who are manufacturing
the raw product into refined articles are
becoming millionaires.
"But great as has been the advance-
ment in this matter, there appears to be
another feature about cotton products
that promises to eclipse all records. I
refer to the making of paper from cotton
stalks. Missouri Yankees are making for-
tunes from corncob pipes. Illinois suckers
are doing likewise on the pitch of corn-
stalks, and why can't the Georgia Crack-
er work up the cotton stalks? Authentic
reports state that in Atlanta paper of a
grade that rivals the finest Irish linen
has been made in quantity from the cot-
ton stalk, and the manufacturing plant
will, it is said, be enlarged this season.
There comes a reliable statement that a
large factory will be established in Texas
to manufacture paper from cotton stalks.
One fellow grows enthusiastic and says
that in ten years the South will be rais-
ing $700,000,000 worth of cotton stalks a
year. What matters it, then, if the Mex-
ican boll weevil does exist? There'll be
money to burn, anyway. But taking
the thing as it exists, no reason presents
itself why cotton stalk paper will not be
a reality in a short time.
"Presuming that as much as $100,000,-
000 a year may be obtained from cotton
stalks, it forms a pleasant subject for
thought to the farmer of the future. The
prodigious figures arrived at by the en-
thuiast quoted were based on something
like 300.000,000 acres of cotton, with a
yield of two tons of stalks per acre, at
$10 per ton. That is a kind of fairy
dream, but "there are more things in
heaven and earth than are dreamed of,"
even by fairies, and we may see a goodly
part of it come to pass.
"So far, only extra-fine grades of paper
have been turned out from cotton stalks.
but the recent sugarcane growers' con-
vention in Florida brought out the fact


that heavy papers and cardboard have
been made from the bagasse of eae, L e.,
the ground-up pulp after the juice has
been extracted. This means that here in
the South we have two waste products
that are capable of supplying the world
with its needs in this line, no matter how
enormous they might become.
"To contemplate such a state of affairs
is exceedingly pleasant. The matter does
not rest alone on this point. The over-
shadowing feature comes to us in tae
light of the saving of forests, immense
areas of which have to be acrificed to
supply the demand for paper each year.
This will be universally considered as the
greatest contribution that. could result
from such an outcome as predicted. The
destruction of forests is fast becoming an
important matter worthy of the consider-
at'on of all. While the relation of forests
to rainfall is being questioned now by
eminent scientists, still the fact remains
that we need timber, and in the future
we shall need more. In the South much
of the vegetable humus necessary to suc-
cessful farming and the maintaining of
the fertility of the soil has been ob-
tained from the woodlands. They are
valuable for this purpose also.
"So here's to the cotton and came sad
ixie for their new products, and here's to
the continent in token of congratulations
for the preservation of the forests. 'ay
all do well!
Pensacola Port Business for Jaly.
Pensacola, Fla., Aug. 3.-Reports of cus-
toms officials of the port for July show a
small increase in the value of exports, the
valuation reaching a total of $1,001,316.
The report also shows that the imports
were valued at $44938, and that sixteen
vessels entered from foreign ports; four-
teen from domestic ports; thirty-two
cleared for foreign and two for domestic
ports.
The countries to which shipments were
made an dthe respective valuations were
as follows:
Belgium, $11,061; Denmark, $6,313;
France. $81,886; Italy, $63,914; Nether-
lands, $246,879; Spain, $27,402; England,
J380.013; Ireland, $35,330; British Hondu-
ras, $2,805; British West Indies, $330;
Cuba, $3.019; Argentine, $41,264; Brasil,
~5.3,i0; British West Africa, $5,=;
French West Africa, $30,587.
TO BOOM CARRABELLL

The J. P. Wiliama Company Arraes
for a New Orleans Line of Steamer
.1. P. Williams, of the J. P. Williams
companyy was in the city last Wednesday
and while here met Mr. Duesnberry and
T .A. .ennings and details of the com-
pany were considered and future arrange-
ments made for the good of the com-
pany.
Mr. Williams is just now enthusiastic
mn the prospects of his railroad, the one
that runs from Cuthbert, Ga, to Carra-
helle and also expects a great future for
the latter town. Already Mr. Saunders,
>f Pensacola, is running one steamship
between Carrabelle and New Orleans. Mr.
Williams is trying to secure another, so
that (arrabelle may have two steamships.
lie thinks that traffic will very soon jus-
tify the putting on of another. He is
agitating the question of improving tee
bar and inlet at Carrabelle so that steam-
ers of heavy draft may come into that
port. Already there is from 6 to 8 feet
over the bar.
Mr. Williams has other plans in view
for the development of Carrbelle.


.


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THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


j Lbr Dp J

Harvey Granger, of the Granger-Stubbs
Company, of Savannah, was in town last
Wednesday.

Yellow pine, owing to its great volume.
bears the brunt of every impaired de-
mand for lumber that arises.

Cypress. -hemlock, spruce and white
pine, being circumscribed in volume andi
habitat, readily adjust themselves to
shifting conditions.

The reaction against the abnormal lum-
ber trade in recent years is felt by the
yellow pine lumbermen before it reaches
the small fry.

The Hernando Lumber Company, with
a capital of $10,000, located at Brooksville.
Fla., was chartered last Tuesday. J. P.
Middlemas, E. Vandegrift and H. E. Wil-
liams are the incorporators.

Cypress is growing in supply and de-
mand, and what is most pleasing.to the
cypress dealer, the demand keeps steadily
in the lead. New markets open and wel-
come the increased output at good prices.

The meeting of the G. I. S. M. A., which
takes place in this city on the 9th inst.
should get to work on a new bill to be
submitted to the Florida Legislature at
its session next April to compel the rail-


Jacksonville's July Port Businew.
The records show the shipments of lum-
ber and other products of Florida through
the port of Jacksonville to have been as
follows for the month of July:
Feet.
Pine lumber. coastwise ........ 9,745,576
Cypress lumber. coastwise .... 340,000
Pine lumber. foreign .......... 1.547,567

Total lumler shipments ...11,633,143
Tie total shipments of lumber of all
kinds by vessels from this port since the
beginning of the present year amounts
to 114,081.141 feet.
The other shipments to coastwise ports
during the month of July were as follows:
('rossies. 46,900; shingles. 29.100 bundles
and 880.000 shingles in bulk; clay. 7.960
sacks: naval stores. 8,000 packages; to-
baeco. 380 bales; oil, 2.100 cases; miscel-
laneoms inruclanoise, 64.900 packages.
The freight brought to Jacksonville on
vessels from coastwise ports during the
month of July was as follows:
Corn, 12.500 sacks; sugar, 4,175 barrels;
hoots and shoes. 9.000 cases; bacon, 990
boxen: flour. 3.870 barrels, petroleum, 15,-
000 barrels: fertilizer, 4,091 sacks; sun-
dries. 63,350 packages.
The foreign imports for the month con-
siste dof one consignment of 1,500 cases,
containing 36.000 bottles of brandied cher-
ries. The consignment was assessed $1,-
534.32 import duty.
The foreign exports for the month con-
sisted of 1.547.567 feet of pine lumber;
264.000 shingles in bulk. and 200 laths.
The value of the foreign exports was $26.-
254.59.


roads to equip flat cars for lumber ship
ments. Gentlemen, find out what the rail IN THE PALMETTO STATE.
roads kick against and meet then half Suimter. S. C.-The Commercial Box
way in straightening it out if necessary. Manufacturing Company has just been
As the matter will soon be decided by organized at Beaufort, S. C., with a cap-
the Railroad Commission the association ital of $10.000 with Geo. E. Holmes, Geo.
can take its cue from that decision ani E. Danner and R. rLegree as corpora-
prepare accordingly. tors. They will manufacture crates, bar-
rels and other truck packages.
Whether or no lumbermen are better An order was issued by Judge Klugh.
at Charleston yesterday for the sale to
looking than naval stores men is still un- at h stn e day fr the
decided The former have a larger jury of the highest bidder of the Charleston Door.
decided. The former have a larger jury of
Sash and Lumber Company. This com-
inquest to pass upon their good looks for r -
the lumber journals of this country have pany has wben doing a large business in
this State for a number of years. The
half tones of them by the score. Con- th a mber of year Th
fidentially, we think that in the mattersale will be made by Master G. H. Sass
in about thirty days.
of good looks among the naval stores
men of Jacksonville, they can outlook Jno A. Safer who has been traveling
the lumbermen, but as they hide their for a number of years for the J. Scho-
field Sons Company. of Maeon. Ga., has
beauty under a bushel-that is, they fight Comany Macon. Ga., has
shy of the camera-their beauty is con- severed his connection with that concern
ined to personal friends. and will hereafter travel for the old and
one of the best saw and planing mill
machine manufacturers in the United
Lumber Burned. States, the Berlin Machine Works, of
What is reported the most destructive Beloit, Wis. Mr. Schafer has built up a
fire in Troy, Ala., broke out in the Hen large trade in the Carolinas and has
person & Minchener planing mills and friends throughout the South who wish
spoke and handle factory. Loss, upward him continued success in his new field.
of $100,000; insurance, $5,000. The saw mill plant of the Mallard Lum-
her Company, at Greeleyville, S. C., about
m r Road at Cryvile. thirty miles from this place, was almost
entirely destroyed by fire on July 21 and
Caryville, Fla., Aug. 2.-The Sanford it was only by hard work of the em-
Lumber Company has a party of survey- nloyers that the entire plant was not
or at work for a railroad to run in the burnt. The buildings saved were the store
direction of Godwin's turpentine distil- and the dry kilns and a few smaller
lry. in a southeasterly direction front houses. The amount of property detrov-
Caryville. ed was 1.40.000; insurance. $4.400. This
This company owns an immense body of is one of the oldest companies in this see-
iee timber, through which this railroad tion and they will begin preparations at
will pass. once to replace the old one with an up-to-
The work will begin at once. and it is date hand mill .
expected that Caryville and Vernon will The South Carolina Lumbermen's As-
soon be joined together, and that the association is in session in Florence. S. C.
whistle of a Sanford Lamber Company The full report of the meeting and a con-
engine will be heard in the county site. catenation there will be furnished later.


MORTGAGES. RENTS.

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,

Real Estate Broker.

Ill W. FORSYTH STREET, JACKS E



H, A. Renfroe Co.


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at Ready Made Prices Mail Orders Given Persona Attention
439 W. Bay Street JACKSONVILLE, LA.


P ri nt i ng Send your order to the Industrial
A Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


u. A. BAKER,









ThemmPr aae
k i knlabc ar Miel

Baker Impramve
Semless TurpeIa
ise stills.
Write me for primes sad ili







W My specialty is large worms ad heavy bottoms that do not leak.
~My mmmmn w* country a specialty.





W. H. BECKWITH. W. B.'HENDERSON. C. WABKUML.

BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.

LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTIIE AID MILL LARIS.
Rooms 1.2-3, First National Bank BalMIag.
TAMPA, F: : : : PLORIDA.


SAi Aall i a llllllllllll I


- McMillan

SBros.

E Florida Cop-

- per Works.
SManufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
SGeneral Metal Workers.
Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
- Patching through the country a specialty.
Orders by mail or wire will receive prompt
-- attention at either of the following works:
Fayetteville, N. C. Savannah. Ga
SMobile. Al.. Jacksonville. Flae
l**li Ill ll.11ll llllllll I I l ll 111111111111111111111 t i Il


DON'T FAIL TO MXTIOI THE RECORD TO ADVMMKISR


I


S 1 1111I1111 1 11 1 1 1 A1 11 !


L








THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


PINK AHD CYPIRSS AT THE NORTH.
Pine.
Boston, Mass. For 1x4 A rift $28 is
still about the average. As most of the
mills are sold months ahead at $45 for
1x3 clear heart this has increased the de-
mand for B heart, which is selling at
about $33. B rift is in better demand
at $2 and C at $21.
Philadelphia, Pa. Business has settled
down to a steady, hot weather standard
and there is not much to stir the ship-
pes. The most worrisome feature is the
demands for prompt delivery, which the
shippers are finding trouble in accomp-
lishing because of the mills' slow work
aMd the bothersome railroad movement.
Prices are still low and easy quotations
are being made.
Cypress.
New York City. Dealers assert that
the demand is improving and considerably
better than it was thirty days ago. Con-
tinned reports reach here to the effect
that numerous gulf mills are unquestion-
ably short of logs, and it is stated that
when the normal demand shall start in
prices are sure to reach their past level.
City stocks, for current requirements,
seem to be in good shape.
Buffalo, N. Y. Demand is not what it
should be and dealers call the prices weak,
though there is no break looked for at
present For some reason this wood has
not done so well in this market this sea-
son as formerly, though it was supposed
to depend almost entirely on the amount
that it would undersell white pine.
Boston, Mass. Cypress by rail contin-
nes to move on a basis of $44 to $4450
for inch ones and twos, though ship-
ments consist mostly of base. Water sales
are in the vicinity of $41. Green stock is
difficult to dispose of and good dry stock
is not plentiful.
Baltimore, Md. Cypress is rather lower
and those who have studied the condi-
tions carefully indicate that a further
drop is probable. A number of hardwood
men have taken up cypress as a side line
in the present emergency and have offer-
edy their stocks under the quotations
which at that time obtained in order to
get trade. Of course the manufacturers
cannot permit themselves to be outdone
and they will likely meet the reduction
thus announced, which may result in
still further cuts. Another feature which
affects the cypress business is the in-
troduction of spruce laths at prices which
the cypress men feel they are bound to
meet. The general trade conditions, how-
ever, are satisfactory.


Sothern Hardwoods in Growing Demand
New York, N. Y.-The local retail de
mend for southern hardwoods has assume
ed quite encouraging proportions during
July. A good many buyers pursued a
hand-to-mouth course during the first hali
of the year for some reasons not very ap
parent. This month a different spirit hai
taken possession of this market. There ii
more liberal Juying and in larger quan
titles. All kinds are sharing in the great
er activity. Prices are firm and fixed
There are no influences at work to un
settle values. The agitation for the build
ing of a railroad which will open up ;
large residence section continues. Build
era are figuring on a good deal of nev
work that calls for hardwoods, much o
this work being of a repairing and ren
orating character. The purchases for thi


class of work are small but they count
and good prices are paid.
Our subway opens September 1 and
there will be quite a celebration. New
Yorkers are sick of restricted facilities,
but at best all the means for expansion
now projected will prove of but tempo-
rary benefit.
A great deal of lumber is arriving from
the South and the inflow will continue,
and probably increase when the autumn
rush starts.
The business situation is improving
and banking people see an abundant bus-
iness during the latter months of the
year. Railroad managers tell us condi-
tions from their poitn of view are improv-
ing. Three or four big systems are in
the market for wooden freight cars.

The Georgia Lumber Market.


Atlanta, Ga.-The Georgia lumber mar-
ket shows much healthier conditions than
in several months and confidence in its
ability to regain good prices is steadily
growing. There is a general belief that
the period of stagnation is over and that
from now on the trade will pick up.
Lumbermen who a few weeks ago were
complaining of a lack of business are be-
ginning to grow optimistic and confidently
predict that September will see the bus-
iness in good shape throughout the State.
Among the local lumbermen, Martin F.
Amorous, president of the Union Pinopolis
and the Aripeka sawmills, is one of the
most optimTstic. He has just returned
from a trip through the East, where he
placed a number of big orders and closed
up some attractive contracts. Mr. Am-
orous says he has no complaint to make
and that he is getting the same prices
he got last year. He also predicted that
the present year would be one of the
biggest ever known and he is confident
that the fall business will make his pre-
diction good.
.1. B. Norman, Jr., of the Union Pinopo-
lis mills, whose home is at Norman Park,
Ga., was one of the delegates to the St.
Louis Democratic Convention.
W. S. West, of the West Lumber Com-
pany, Valdosta, who was some time ago
badly injured in a runaway, has recovered
sufficiently to be out again and has re-
sumed his seat in the House of Repre-
sentatives. Mr. West is receiving the
congratulations of his friends on his nar-
row escape.
The Barnesville Coal & Lumber Com-
pany, which has just been organized, will
begin business August 1. The following
are thie organizers of the new company:
John S. Simpson, W. D. Harper, of At-
lanta; W. R. Beard, James Burns, of
Barnesville; J. W. Gresham, of Griffin.
The company has taken on a large stock
to open up with and expects to do a
big business from the start.,
The mill of Betts & Burkett, at Wood-
bury, (a., came near being destroyed by
fire last week; 30,000 feet of lumber were
burned before the flames could be check-
ed. As a result of the fire the mill was
closed down four days. It has resumed
operation with full capacity.
Dlillon Akers has just returned from
Woodbury, where he visited the mill of
the National Lumber Company at that
place. Mr. Akers announces that the Na-
Stional Lumber Company has just closed
a contract with the Gate City Coffin Com-
pany of this city, for a big lot of lum-
b er. which will be used in enlarging the
s plant.


J. A. Craig Bro.


239 W. Bay Street


EVERETT DOCK.


: Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
* ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.
*
: Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.
... 99e9##,#99# 999, .g,.ggg#gggggg

WW******** *<***ft* ^*** -- --------



For Sale

S IS,00m A4es Timber, 12,000 acres Round, 5 crops Virgin, 6
* crops yearling, 3 crops 3rd year, 8 Mules, 5 Horses, Still and coum- *
Dlete Turpentine outfit, 30 Convicts. 12 year lease on Timber.
* Freight 7c and 14c per cent.- $D3,0001.
20,00 Aers Round Timber, Freight on Spirits 14c, Rosin
7c, on Railroad. Price $3.25 peW AGor.
We have several first-class Turpentine locations. Write or call
on us. We can deliver the goods. Send us a list of your property
if you want to sell.


Brobston, Fendig & Co.
0 JasoTvile. Mor UPa. Bni- G VaL



"In the Good Old Summer Time"

Your customers will remain well, if you do
like Dr. Mathews of Thomson, Ga. He wrote
us 15th of January, 1904:
"I have been carrying Cuban Relief in stock for
several years, and have frequently used and prescribed
it. I consider it superior to any preparation on the
market for Cholera Morbus, Sick Headache, Colic,
and an infallible remedy for horse colic."
You write us for a supply.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga. Tenn.


T. MURPHY

JACKSONVILLE MACHINE AND IRON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
L-comotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARINE ENGINES AND BOILERS. PULLEYS AND .SHAFFING.
Agent for Stationary Engines, Boilers. Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden-
sers, Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Goods
POWER TRAMNISMSII ll WATER WOMK EllIPMEIT A SPECALTT
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
m mwm2m nwu.::: wmn: m


j Cable Address. Florids


jStandard Naval Stores

C Comnpany.

DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN

j R-OSIN


AND


TURPENTINE.,

Jacksonville, Fla.


WHEM WRITING ADVERTISERS MENTION THE RECORD.


N


aggaggaggagagg


~--'---~l~s~~~,8,,,~~N,~-~L~-~LY-- -~Y-------4-- Ij


oaoamna UI~~,~~LII'~YYYYIIY1









6 THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


PNsacela Lumber CeitioMs.
Pensacola, Fla., Aug. 1.-While the
month of July has not been a very pros-
perous one for the manufacturer and ex-
porter of pitch pine, it, nevertheless, com-
pares more than favorably with the same
month of 1903, showing an improvement,
both in movement and price. The mar-
ket, while not one of large demand, has
nevertheless maintained fair prices, and
really much better than could have been
expected.
At no time during July were sales quot-
ed at less than 14 cents, and timber of
thirty feet and over in length was always
good for 15 cents, sometimes selling as
high as 16 cents per foot.
The outward movement has been fair,
considering the very slack market abroad,
and this month is expected to show an
improvement in these conditions. If such
proves to be the case, the local market
will be steady with a fair demand. Much
is not expected during the first week or
ten days of August for the reason that
few ships are under charter for loading
so early, but if the foreign market be
comes steady, exporters will feel justified
in chartering for latter month loading.
While these conditions are expected dur-
ing this month, the more conservative
dealers do not expect very much of an
improvement before September 1, and are
consequently holding off for a few weeks,
in order to enjoy the conditions when they
do arrive.
During the past week shipments were
not very heavy, although sales did not
show any falling off, either in quantity
or price. During the week quite a num-
ber of sales, three of which were of some
proportions, were at from 14 to 15 1-2 ets..
the lower price being secured on timber
under thirty feet in length.
The stocks at Ferry Pass continue to
diminish, although the copious rains of
the past ten days will probably have the
effect of floating quite a large amount of
timber to tne pass.

Louiville & Nashville Reported Buying
Lad Outside of Atlanta.
The Louisville & Nashville Railroad is
reported to be buying more land in the
vicinity of Atlanta for the purpose of
building a belt line from a point near
Ellen Junction along the western side of
the city to connect with the Atlanta &
West Point and Central of Georgia lines
into the Union Depot. The purchases, it
is stated, are being made through the
Louisville Property Co., which, it is said,
has just paid $120.000 for one piece of
land desired. It is expected that the
rights of way will reach a total cost ol
several hundred thousand dollars. The
company proposes to build extensive ter-
minals in the city between Central Ave-
nue or Lloyd Street and Butler Street.
This is immediately adjoining the present
union depot.


Wil Build at Columbus, Ga.
John T. Abney, superintendent of the
Laurens Cotton Mills, of Laurens, S. C.
will build a cotton mill at Columbus, Ga.
as was reported last week. The required
capital has been assured, but no details
as to the plant have been decided. There
will be either 10,000 or 20,0000 spindleF
installed Further announcements will be
made'later.


IN PHOSPHATE CIRCLES.

Voluntary Reduction in Rates a Mot
Welcome Announcement.
The following from the American Fer-
tilizer, will be of interest to all who are
in any way interested in the phosphate
industry in Florida:
"The startling announcement by the
phosphate-carrying roads of their volun-
tary reduction in phosphate rates was the
most exciting hut welcome news that has
come to Florida hardrock miners in a
long time. The rate, as we understand it,
is about 50 cents net per ton less f. o. b.
vessels at ports. Whether it affects the
pebble districts we were unable to ascer-
tain, but hav our doubts about it, never-
theless it is a considerable relief to the
hardrock miners, who have always been
burdened with an exceedingly heavy in-
land freight. The rates went into effect
July 14.
"On July 1 the announcement was made
of the leasing of the vast interests of the
Camp Phosphate Company to Messrs.
Clarence and Jack Camp, sons of Mr. Wm.
N. Camp. the principal owner of the stock
in that concern. The lease, which took
effect on that date, affects one of the
largest hardrock companies in the State,
and in point of acreage the largest. The
company owns and operates some of the
best deposits and at present has seven
plants in operation, and contemplates the
ercetion of several others soon.
"Below is a comparative statement of
the shipments of phosphate for the first
six months of this and last year:
Florida Hardrock.
1903. 1904.
Savannah .... .. .. ...79,073 69,178
Brunswick .... .......26131 14,487
Fernandina ........... 56,750 48,157
Port Inglis .........39,419 66,252
Tampa .......... ..26,555 41,677

Totals........ ..227,928 239,751


Charlotte Harbor Phosphate Shipmenat
The following are the shipments of
Peace River phosphate rock, made through
Charlotte Harbor port by the Peace River
Phosphate Company:
Steamship Shawmut. for Philadelphia,
1,985 tons; schooner Calumet, for Balti-
more, 1,920 tons; schooner Medford, for
Philadelphia. 2,145 tons; schooner Fannie
Palmer, for Baltimore, 2,835 tons; schoon-
er Paul Palmer, for Baltimore, 2,695 tons;
schooner Edith G. Farrell, for Cartaret,
X. J., 1.820 tons; giving a total of 13,400
tons; previously reported this year, 28,-
1.95 tons; giving aggregate of 41,895 tons.

Georgia's Property Incree.
Eighty-nine counties in Georgia show
in increase in tax returns this year of
410.022,218 over the returns of last year.
Forty more counties are yet to be heard
frcm. and it is the general belief now
that the increase will go over $15,000,000
n real property alone. The returns will
probably be in by Aug. 15.


Manatee County Abstract Co.
Attention is called to the advertisement
elsewhere of the Manatee County Ab-
stract Company, of Braidentown, Fla. Mr.
R. H. .lohnson is the abstractor. It will
Spay interested readers to look up this
Advertisement and read the announcement
of the company .


5 THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
Jacksonville, Fla.
CAPITAL 30M0000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS S300m
We issue Time Cerificates of Deposit. which draw Interest at the rate of tree pr
I cent per ammnn if held ninety days or longer.
S Take advantage of tis ans let your t lsais be earning som-etaMg ftr yen.
Particular attention paid to Out-o-Town account. sending deposits by mall nsaRs.


COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVANNAH FOR FIVE YARBL


April .....................
April 8 ...................
April 15 ...................
April 22 .....................
April 29 ...................
May 6 ....................
May 13 ...................
May 20 ................... .
May 27 ...................
June 3 ....................
June 10 ...................
June 17 ..................
June 24 .... ..............
July 1 .... ..............
July 8 ..................
July 15 ....................
July 22 ................. .
July 28. ................ ..
Aug. 4 ....................


B. R. POWELL.
President.

B. R. Powell. Chas. 6. Iarris,


1904-05 1903-04
ND ND
53 50
54% 49%1
54% 47
53% 45
55 45
54% 4714
54% 47%
531/ 49
54 45%
52% 46
52% 47%
521/_ 47%
53 47%
52% 47%
52% 48
531/ 49%/
53% 504r%
52% 49%


1902-03
45
42%
42%
43
42%-43
43
45
45
451/%
45%
47%
48%
47%y
45%
45%
44%
44
43%
43%


CIAS. 6. MARRIS.
Vice-Presldent and Treasurer.
DIRECTORS:
D. N. McMlan P. L. S therlanm,

THE


1901-02
34
32
321%
31%-32
32
32
32%
321/4
32%
32
33%-%
34%
33%
34%
33
32%
34


1900-01
53%
63%
46
47%
46%
47
48
49
49
46
44%
43%
42%
43%
43%
44Y,
43
42
39%
rr




c e
39


BERRY ASLEV.


i. V. Ca.rl~.


Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Cermer of West Bay amin Maiseoa Sts.
Jacksonville, Florida.



Wholesale Drugs Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote price on
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and can save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.



Young's Female College,

Thomasville, Georgia,
OPENS SEPTEMBER 3th, 1904. Unsurpassed Climate. Cultured Community, SpleMnd
Equipment, select assoiations, individual attention to each student, limited number of boadig
students: broad. comprehensive cous1is leading to A. B. and B. S. degrees; faculty of eight Chr
tian specialists: Music. Elocution and Physical Culture Specialties; total cost from $O toRI for
ten months term. Write for catalogue to-
I. COCHILANE HUNT. President.
'Tll Sept. lst, Richmond, Ky.



THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. fLA.
NOW OPEN
under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.




East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.

Steamer Shipments a Speciaty.

WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


.. ARE YOU A SUBSCRIBER TO TBH RECORD?

!_








THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


Never Fret.
If, old. boy, you strike a day,
When things don't just come your way,
Never fret.

Hold your head up, be a man,
If you will, you know you can,
Never fret.
If you know a man down town,
Mean enough to turn you down,
Never fret.
Things like these will pass away
When the sun shines out next day,
Never fret.
Next time give him a warm hand
His respect you will command,
Never fret.
Smiling's good and proper bait,
You will catch him soon or late,
Never fret.

lee before the fire can't stand,
Coldness melts in a warm hand,
Never fret.
When it's melted you may swim,
Feeling good and full of vim,
Never fret
-"Canadian Dry Goods."


Giaers of Georga in Convention.
The convention of the Georgia Ginners'
Association was held in Macon, Ga., July
27, with delegates representing sixty
seven gins.
A resolution was adopted in favor of
placing twenty-seven-pound bagging and
ties on each bale of cotton, and fixing the
minimum charge for ginning at 30 cents
per hundred pounds.
Offers elected for the ensuing year
were:
President-A. J .Baldwin, of Dawson.
Viee-president-J. S. Jossey, of Forsyth.
Secretary and Treasurer-C. C. Hanson.
of Atlanta.
The executive committee is composed of
W. J. Oliver, Shellman, Ga.; Frank Har-
rell, Bullards ,a.; and Col. John M.
Stublm, Dublin. The other two members
of the executive committee are the presi-
dent and secretary.


Buiness Opportunities Abroad.
These suggestions are offered by Unite,
State Consul-General Guenther, in a re-
port from Frankfort, Germany:
New harbor works are to be construct-
ed at Rosario. Argentina, which are es-
timated to cost $11,600,000 gold.
A new harbor is to be built at Nelilla.
and one on the Chafarinas Islands, in Mo-
roeeo. The Spanish government will grant
a subvention for said objects.
Various expensive public works (in-
eluding drainage of the city and erection
of market halls and government build-
ings) are to be carried on in Konstanza.
Kingdom of Roumania.
The city of Cape Town, South Africa.
is about to extend its waterworks at an
expenditure of $10,000,000.
The introduction of electric traction on
the Tranvia Rural, city of Buenos Ayres.
is contemplated.
An experimental dairy is to be astab-
lished by the Spanish government at Val-
ladolid, Spain.
New floating docks are to be erected
at Bordeaux, France For partiulars
apply to the Chamber of Commerce of
that city.


K


Forty Years of American Progres.
A contributor to American Exporter
gives these figures of American progress.
from 1863 to 1903:
From $174,000,000 to $873,00,000 in
agricultural products exported.
From $41,000,000 to $407,000,000 in
manufactures exported.
From $6,000,000 to $39,000,000 in mining
products exported.
From $9,000,000 to 58,000,000 in forest
products exported.
From 33,000,000 to 82.000,000 popula-
tion.
From $17,00000000,000 to $100,000,000,-
00u total national wealth.
From 2,100.000 to 6,000,000 farms.
From $8,500,000,000 to $22000,000,000
total value of farm property.
From $1,500.000.000 to $4,5000,000,000 an-
nual value of farm products.
From 10,000,000 to 250,000,000 tons ot
coal produced annually.
From a few thousand to over 10,000.-
I00 tons of steel produced.
From 23,000)000 to 2,900,000,000 gallons
of petroleum produced.
From less than 1,000,000 to over 14.-
)00,000 tons of pig iron produced.
From 7,500 to 275,000 tons of copper
produced.
From less than $200,000,000 to nearly
$1,100,000,000 total worth of minerals
produced.
From less than 150,000 to 525,000 fac-
tories.
From less than 1,500,000 to over 6,000.-
(00 factory workers.
From .4W00,000,000 to over $3,000000,-
030 factory wages and salaries yearly.
From $2,000,000,000 to over $14,000,-
(NPi.000 in factory products yearly.
From $47.000,000 to $82.000,000 worth
of gold produced.
From a few thousand dollars to over
$75,000,000 worth of silver produced.
From 4,800, (1860) to 10,000,000 bales
of cotton produced.
From $115,000,000 (1860) to nearly
$400,000.000 worth of cotton goods manu-
factured.
From $525 to $1,300 national wealth


per capital.
From $1,250,000,000 to $2,500,000,000 to-
tal value of farm animals.
From $204,000,000 to $1,025,000,000 to-
tal imports.
From $2A3,000,000 to $1,420,000,000 total
exports.
From $2,248,000,000 (1867) down to
$914,000000 public debt.
From $146,000,000 (1866) down to $25.-
000,000 annual interest charges.
From $4.12 (1862) down to 32 cents an-
nual interest charge pereapit.
From $25,000,000 to $782,000,000 gold
and silver in the treasury.
From $595,000,000 to $2,367,000,000 total
money in circulation.
From a storm-tossed, war-swept, dis-
united country to a peaceful, progressive.
glorious united union.


Texas Oil Wells Dry.
The Oil Investors' Journal, of Beau-
mont, Tex., has made a careful canvass
of the once famous Spindle Top oil field,
which reveals some very striking results.
On the last of June there were ninety
nine wells being pumped in the territory
made famous in 1901 by the strike ot
Captain A. V. Lucas, and the aggregate
production was but 7,100 barrels a day.
In addition there were twelve wells that
were being cleaned out, and five new walls
that were being drilled. Of the wells
'that were pumping, sixty-nine were own
ed by five large producing companies,
which controlled 5,135 barrels, or about
72 per cent of the total output. At least
600 wells all told have been drilled on the
200 acres that comprise the entire area
of the Spindle Top oil field. Nearly halt
of these were drilled on the Hogg-Swaync
tract of twenty-five acres, where only
four wells are now yielding oil. The ris
mainder have been pulled out and aban-
doned. The J. M. Guffey is the largest
producing company in the Spindle Top
field at present, having thirty-eight wells.
with a total yield of 2,500 barrels a day.
The average yield of all the wells is less
than seventy-two barrels a day. A few


y.


years ago, when the oil promoters were
getting in their work in behalf of Texas
oil companies, 50,000 and 70,000 barrel
wells appeared to be common affairs of
every day happenings. The entire out-
put of the Texas oil fields at the present
time is less than one day's yield of the
Lucas gusher in January, 1901."

Savings Banks needed in the South.
"One of the most interesting questions
in connection with the situation of the
Southern States to-day is, what are the
people going to do with their money?"
declares the Chattanooga Tradesman.
"This may seem a strange question to
one who is not conversant with the var-
ious channels from which money has been
coming into the South, but it is an im-
portant one. partly for the reason that
outside of the large cities there is prac-
t'cally no system for husbanding the sur-
plus money of the people which they have
accumulated from the agricultural indus-
try and other vocations. Within the last
few years, and especially since the law
allowed national banks to be organized
on a capital of less than $100,000, the
banking facilities of the South have in-
creased very rapidly. A conservative es-
t'mate shows that daring the last five
years this increase represented over 100
per cent. in the resources of the national
banks alone, a considerably larger per-
centage than in other parts of the coun-
try. The total, resources of the various
banks in this section probably aggregate
to-day at least $1.000.000,000, an increase
of fully 25 per cent. in the last four
years. But by far the great bulk of this
money is in the national and State banks
and trust companies, for the number of
savings banks is no small outside of the
larger communities as to be insignificant."


Bell Goes to Waycroas.
Mr. A. W .Bell, a wealthy turpentine
operate rof Berlin, Fla., has moved to
%Waycross. and will reside on Lott Street.
Mr. Bell is a partner of Mr. Geo. W. Deen,
who has recently made several large in-
vestments in Waycross property.


UZAD THR A98 13 T= RECORD.


.. The..


Standard Turpentine

#44Company

s rvostlolied the wood distilling basi- 4*
ness In the Solth. After three months of caref -** s
testing r machinery at the Waycross, Georgia %
mill, we are now ready to sell direct ary size
plat an gartc e results by oar new KRUVG 0
PATENT STEAM PRESSURE PROCESS.

STANDARD TURPENTINE COMPANY.


ohn = Furch ott = Compan
WHOLES DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.








8 THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Captain John R. Young, of Savannah,
will leave early in September for an
extended trip to the Pacific coast.

Mr. J. W. Ward, Jr., of Floral' City.
was in the city this week Mr. Ward is
a good turpentine man and is making the
success he deserves.

Capt. W. J. Hillman is building a beau-
tiful residence at Live Oak, and some of
his friend there claim that they are going
to entice him to move his home from
Jacksonville to that place. His Jackson-
ville friends must be consulted, however,
and they are not going to yield.

Col. A. D. Covington, of Quincy, presi-
dent of the Turpentine Operators' Asso-
eeation and one of the best operators in
the business, was in the city this week
attending first the marriage of Dr. Ed-
ward Munroe to Miss underhill, and af-
terward, the meeting of the T. O. A. ex-
ecutive committee.

Mr. H. A. McEachern, vice-president of
the Consolidated Naval Stores Co., of
Jacksonville, is the happy father of a fine
week-old boy, a faithful chip of the old
block. He will be Hugh, Jr. This is the
first time the stork has been knocking
around McEachern's home in about ten
years, and, of course, the father is not
entirely responsible for hts conduct just
now. Mr. and Mrs. McEachern have the
congratulations and good wishes of the
Record and thousands of friends through-
out the South.

-Might Doesn't Make Right."
Col. T. J. Appleyard publishes in his
paper the following as a "little unwritten
history of the St. Louis convention. Each
of the uninstructed delegates, except one,
thought that the unit rule ought to be
adopted. After several States had been
straightenedd out' by a decision of the
chairman of the national convention,
Capt. Hillman said to the writer, 'Might
does not make right. The people of the
State of Florida-a portion of them-
chose these four delegates, and it is but
right that they be allowed a chance to
express the views of those who sent
them. For one I will be opposed to forc-
ing on a respectable minority anything
that I would consider a wrong and usur-
pation if I were in their place.' This
shows the calibre of the man. And agaim
we say, Capt. Hillman would grace any
position, and the people would have a
faithful and true public servant."


NAVAL STORES OPERATIONS.

A DeLand Company at Banta Lake. NM
Commissary.


DeLand, Fla.-The DeLand Naval
Stores Company has decided to locate its
plant at Banta Lake, east of the Boule-
vard, one mile north of the city. The
company has about 4,000 acres of land
near there, and will begin operations at
once. This concern will not run a com-
missary, but will pay in cash every Sat-
urday night. The company probably has
enough land to run it ten years or more


NAVAL STORES EXHIBIT.

This Feature at St. Louis Fair Attracts
Great Attention.
In regard to the exhibit of the naval
stores industry at the St. Lquis Exposi-
tion, the Savannah Morning News recent-
ly contained the following, which will
prove of interest to all persons engaged in
the naval stores business:
"Few, if any, of the exhibits at the
Louisiana Purchase Exposition illustrat-
ing the various industries of this country
have attracted the attention that has been
drawn to that representing the naval
stores industry of the South. This was
prepared and sent by the Savannah
Board of Trade. The attention given it is
not very remarkable, when it is known
that it is the first and only complete ex-
hibit of its kind ever assembled and that,
aside from the interest that attaches to
it as illustrating a great industry, it is
also most attractive from an artistic
standpoint.
"With what favor and interest the ex-
hibit bas been received may be gathered
from the fact that the Board of Trade
has received offers from several persons
who wish to secure it for use in other
fairs and exhibitions, and at least one
offer of as much as $500 has been made
for it.


"The exhibit, which was planned and
assembled under the direction of Mr. John
R. Young, now president of the Board of
Trade, shows the work of securing eur-
pentine and rosins from the time the vir-
gin tree is cut until the finished product
.s ready for tle consumer. It consists of
a specimen of the pine tree showing first
the virgin timber, the old style of boxing,
the newer plan of getting gum by means
.f the Herty system of metallic gutters
and an earthenware pot, all of the tools
used in the various operations, every im-
plement that is used at any stage of the
manufacture, and, most interesting of all,
practically every product that is secured
from the pine.
"These consist of the crude 'scrape' and
gum, all grades of the rosin, artistically
arranged in a frame so that the light can
penetrate them, and display the beautiful
range of color from the pale amber of the
water white, through the rich reds of the
middle grades and down to the ruddy
blacks of the bottoms; all grades of rosin,
oil, tar, pitch and other oils.
"Along with this exhibit, and forming
a part of it, Iere sent several specimens
of Georgia woods, hardwoods, pine and
cypress, contributed by various members
of the Board of Trade, and intended to
show not only the variety that the State
produces, but their adaptability to vari-
ous uses.
"That the exhibit has accomplished the
purpose for which it was prepared is
shown by the high praise that has been
accorded it, not only by the general pub-
lie, but also by many citizens of this
State and Florida, men engaged in the
naval stores business and therefore the
better able to pass on the merits of
such an- exhibit."

Wood Turpentine Plant Burned.
Tifton, Ga., Aug. 4.-The retort dis-
tillery, belonging to Ross Brothers, near
Waterloo, in Irwin County, burned yes-
terday. The fire broke out shortly after
noon, and in a few minutes the still and
shed, with about four barrels of wood
turpentine, were destroyed. The loss was
total, there being no insurance.


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

9 Still Boilers and Pumps.
: SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
JEcksonville Fla.
9 l I 9 tl 8 8 9 I t SS l( 9 6 S9 I 4 88 ill iOill l l

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.

Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime, Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.



Cummer Ltiumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.


. MIso Nsi IF *e e ] e I 1.]s


WuwuuWmVw U wWWwW UWUUwVwsU


Standard Clothing Company



One Price One Price



f FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and i9 West Bay Street, - Jadcksovile, F
S Ntetsen and Hawe Hats. Seelal Attention lGven to Mall Orders.


bea -05t 0- 05assese a esaLae


R. TOLAR.


J. 4. HART. T. .. LACHLY.
(Establithed 1872.)


+~r~~~r~r ~ sear


J. TOLAR, 4t


TOLAR, HART & CO..
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


Commission


Merchants


and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.


Read the Record Adv't's.


THUE RCOD mIs Mom= wITH sE OUTW PEOG11Z8S










THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9
I I -


CONVICT TrMD TO 3lmCAPs.

Wa= Klled by Guard at a FrliMa Tur-
peati PMla
Garield, Gaul, State convict No. 6336,
colored, was shot and instantly killed
near Hogan, Fla, at 10 o'clock Tuesday
morning by a guard at the Skinner camps.
The convicts were at work about nine
miles from Hogan chipping pine trees
While the guard's attention was drawn
in a different direction, Gauls attempted
to make his escape. He had gone some
distance whm the guard saw him and
wa running fast. The guard put his
Wichester into play and soon brought
Gaus down.
Mr. Ski r came to Jacksonville as
aom as possible after the killing, in order
to secure a coroner to hold an inquest
over the body. He secured the services of
Judge Willard, nd he, with Constable
Jmon, west to the scene of the killing
at 6 o'clock Tuesday afternoon.
Mr. Skimer has played in bad luck
with his convits in the past few months,
a he has lost several men. Last week
Will DeBoe, a fifteen-year negro, made
his escape, and is still at large.


Between 2,000 and 3,000 barrels and
casks of naval stores are coming into
Jacksonville daily. The receipts wre
not so great for July as for June.


Strog Turptiame hrues.
A singular state of affairs existed for
a short time during the discharge of bar-
rels of turpentine from the hod of the
steamer "Magdala" at Mavisbank Quay
om Monday. It was observed that the
men were acting strangely, and on inves-
tigatios being made it was discovered
that some of them had become stupefied
by the fumes of turpentine. Latterly
the squad had to be discharged and anoth-
er engaged A similar incident occurred
at Glasgow Harbour a few years ago.-
Ladon Oil and Colourman's Journal.


Gergia Turpetine Me Sed.
A dispatch from Valdosta, Ga., to some
of the Southern daily papers is as fol-
lows:
"A sensational suit has been entered in
the United States Court in Valdosta, Ga.,
againt J. D. Hicks, W. E. Coleman and
other prominent citizens of Thelma, Ga.
The suit is brought by B. B. MeDuffy, of
Mimeola, Fla., and is for $10,000 damages,
which he alleges to have received one
night in May at the hands of Hicks and
Colem and others.
"MeDffy claims that he came from
his home in Florida on business and was
spending the night with a Mr. Holcomb,
near Thelma, when the parties came to
the house, called him out and adminis-
tered a beating. He says they fired their
pistols at him and treated him in a way
to humiliate him.
"It is understood that Hicks and Cole-
man and others, if they admit the beat-
ing at all. will claim that MeDuffy was
luring away their hands. The scarcity of
turpentine hands in this section forces
the turpentine manufacturers to use he-
roie measures to keep them when once
they get them. McDuffy anticipates this
plea and declares that he was not luring
away hands at aL."


Duty Free Spirita imn R ia.
The reported Russian law to the effect
that the use of duty-free technical spirit
would be given a three years' trial, is
confirmed, the matter being no- in the
hands of the Minister of Finance. The
Minister called together In February at
St. Petersburg, a congress of distillers
who were to make themselves individually
conversant with the progress in the use
of technical spirit, and express their opin-
ions as to the best method of organization
for the sale of the spirit. The Minister
proposed the formation of co-operative
associations of distillers for the sale of
technical spirit and for promoting the use
of such spirit. These associations would
be responsible for the observance of the
strict regulations drawn up by the Min-
ister for the sale and control of the
spirit. The Congress declared themselves
generally in agreement with the pro-
posals of the Minister. They considered
it desirable that each association of dis-
tillers should be limited to a definite rad-
ius; that the associations should com-
bine to form unions and that periodic
"union congresses" be held; and, finally,
that a permanent board, with full powers,
should be formed in St .Petersburg. The
responsibility for the observance of the
regulations as to the sale of the spirit
could only be undertaken by the associa-
tions, if they were granted exclusive
rights with regard to the sale of the
technical spirit. The Congress elected a
committee for the defence of the inter-
ests of the spirit distillers, and this com-
mittee was charged with the drawing up
of rules for the new associations to be
formed for the sale of technical spirit.
The also resolved to petition the govern-
ment: (1) To remit the customs tax on
engines, burners, lamps, etc., designed for
the use of denatured spirit, provided sim-
ilar goods are not manufactured in Rus-
sia; (2) to reduce the tariff for the trans-
port of denatured spirit; and (3) to dis-
continue the inspection and control of
manufacture in the case of agricultural
distilleries, and to introduce a scheme of
obligatory mutual insurance of such dis-
tilleries. The Minister is continuing his
efforts to discover a suitable denaturing
process. Apart from the prize of 50,000
roubles offered for this purpose, the pro-
fessors of the Kiew Polytechnicum are
experimenting with ketones. The Minis-
ter of Agriculture is also interesting him-
self in the use of technical spirit, and
in conjunction with the Imperial Russian
Technical Society, has resolved to organ-
ie in the course of the year an exhibition
in St. Petersburg on the lines of the one
held in Vienna.-London Oil and Colour-
man's Journal.
Jack vil Whlesale Lumber Market.
(For week ending August 5.)
Merchantable.
Yard schedules-410.0 to $13.00.
Sound and square schedules, w.50 to
Merchantable ear material-
Average schedule of sills, Z6 feet and
nnder, 10 inches and under, $13.00 to
$14.00.
Special schedules-according to sizes
and lengths-pries steady.
K Sap-"6" and up 80 per cent
clear, $.50 to $10.00.
Flooring:
$1150; No. 4. $8.50.
Cypress.
First and seconds, 4 quarter base, car-
load prices, $34; selects, 4 quarter base,
No. 1, $15.00; No. 2, $13.50; No. 3,
$s8; shop, 4 quarter base, $20.
Cypress Shingles-6x18 A's, per 1,000
pe., $6.25; primes, $4.25; 4xlR, A's, $3.50;
primes, $..7- .
Cypress lath, $2 per lO00.


Report on odition of the Cotton Crop.

Washington, Aug. 3.-The monthly re-25, 1903, 81.9 on July 25, 1902, and a tea-
port of the chief of the bureau of statis-year average of 8.7.
ties of the department of Agriculture will The following table shows the condition
show the average condition of cotton on by States on July 25 in each of the last
July 2 to have been 91.6, as compared three years and that on June 25, 1901,
with 88 on June 25, 1904, 79.7 on Julywith the ten-year averages:


July 25,
State. 1904.
Texas ........ ........ ........ 91
Georgia ...... ...... ...... ...... 91
Alabama ...... ..... ..... ...... 90
Mississippi ..... ............ .... 92
South Carolina .................. 91
Arkansas ...... ...... ...... .... 93
Louisiana ...... ...... ...... .... 93
North Carolina ................... 93
Tennessee ...... ...... ...... .... 92
Indian Territory ...... ............ 91
Oklahoma ...... ...... .......... 95
Florida ...... ...... ...... ...... 94
Virginia ...... ...... ...... .... 90
Missouri ...... ...... ...... .... 90
United States ........... ........ 91.6


June 25,
1904.
89
85
85
80
88
90
90
90
89
87
92
92
87
89
88.0


July 25
1903.
82
77
79
83
76
76
76
78
82
75

85
76
78
79.7


July 25,
1902.
77
83
77
80
88
92
92
86
92
95
94
84
91
96
81.9


10-Year
Ave.
8s
84
84
83
84
83
83
85
86
88
89
86
87
87
8SL7


AUTOMOBILES, PUMPING OQU0llT
AM)
GASOLINE ENGINES.
Moa Complet Amon of SuppAs ti the SoW. i


Fred E, Gilbert
29 and 37, 39, 41
West Forsyth Street







Wanted and For Sale


DEPARTMENT.

Advertlsemets WIN be Inserted e ris srtme nt at the f1iw:so states:
For one week. 0- cents a line.
For two weeks. 35 cetsa line.
For three weeks, o cents a line.
For four weeks, 5 cents a UHe.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accopanl the order. No extra charge for copies or paper
cotainug advertisement.Copy must be i this office not later than Thamrsy
norsnig to secure inserti on id ay's paper.
I I I iinof


Tarpentile Mem.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your stilL No. I outfit pumps 2,000
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 cents and
requires no attention while running
Started in one minute. J. P. Campbell,
Ocala, Fla.

For Sale.
Six seven-menths-old blood hound pups,
well trained for their age. They will take
a man's trail and follow him to the tree.
Also we have bought convict camps out
and have several suits convict's stripes at
50c. to 75e. each, also about seven dozen
blankets, cost $9.00, worth about $4.50, as
good as new: 21 single mattresses, cost
$3.75 wholesale, worth $1.50, as good as
new ticks; 12 single bunks, cost $2.00,
worth $1.00, as good as new. and a few
tents. We would be glad to give any com-
munication our prompt attention along
this line. B. F. McCall, Jr., & Bro., Jen-
nings, Fla.


Stiller Wated.
Prefer a young man who has a very
good education and a fair knowledge of
turpentine business. L. T. Hardee, Mulat,
Fla. 2t.
Stiller Wasted.
An experienced turpentine stiller want-
ed Man with family preferred. Address
Fletcher & Murrell, Altman, Fla.

Posltior Wasted.
Accountant, twenty years' experience in
New York; wants position South on ac-
count of long and cold seasons of the
North. Address H. Lefevre, 533 West
145th St., New York, N. Y. 4t
Wasted.
Wanted--nmall turpentine farm of 5 to
10 crops, with additional timber for 20
crops. A. O. Wright, Industrial Record
office, city.


P rin tin g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Promptand satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


T=E DECOED 3 T=5 -ffguAT.I uN ITTANCI


~ s -~e~-yy~LLP~a~


I









THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SJ. PANUm, A S.R HUMBAD. AnmnUn F. Piay *
Pre dent. Viee-President. Cshier.
S The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
e JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
CApiftl. $200.000. Surplus, $100.000
STATE DEPOSITARY.
eeral Baonkia. Interest ald on having Depoits. Safe Deposit Boxes. .0 per Year.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week


Spirits for the Week at Savanmah.
Price Rcpts Sales Exp. 1903
Mon., Aug. 1 !53% 8371 284 270 49
Tues., Aug. 2 53%' 1119 473 156 49
Wed., Aug. 3 13 745 395 175 49
Thur., Aug. 4 152% 904 735 87 49

Rem for the Week at Savannah.
Monday, August 1. Last Year.
WW ............ 4.65 4.30
G ............. 4.40 3.20
N .. .. .. .. .... .. 3.95 3.05
M .......... 3.87 2.95
K ..... .... 3.60 2.85
I .............. 3.30 2.70
H ............ 2.75 2.20
G .............. 260 1.75
F .. .. .. .. .. .. 255 1.65
E ...... .. ... .. 250 1.60
D ............... 2.45 1.56
ABC ........ .... 2.40 1.55
Receipts 2278, sales 3,400, exports 4,594.

Tuesday, Aug. 2.-K and WG advanced
21-2 cents a barrel each. All other grades
unchanged. Receipts 4,386, sales 1,340, ex-
ports 400.

Wednesday. August 3.-WW advanced
2 1-2 cents, N 5 cents and M 21-2 cents
over Monday. Other grades unchanged.
Receipts 1,977. sales 1,662, exports 267.

Thursday, August 4.-Quotations on all
grades as follows: A, B, C, $2.35@$2.40;
D, $2.40*$2.45; E, $2.50; F, $2.55; G,
$2.75; I, $3.30; K, $3.65; M, $3.90; N,
$4; window glass, $4.42 1-2; water white,
$4.67 1-2. Receipts 2944, sales 1,947, ex-
ports 5,985.


Range of Turpentime and Roin at Savan-
nah August 4 and Same Day
Last Year.
| Aug. 4 I Aug. 3 Aug. 4
Spirits 1904 1904 1903
Spirits .... 52% I53 __ 49_
Spirits ..._.- Firm |-.-rm |p iF


Sales ..... 7- 3
Rosin ..... Firm
WW ...... 4.67
WG ....... 4.42%
N ......... 4.00
M ......... 3.90
K ......... 3.65
1 .......... 3.30
H ......... 2.75
S .......... 2.60
F ......... 2.55
E ......... 2.50
D ......... 2.40@2.45
C, B, A, .. 2.35@2.40


Firm
4.671/,
4.42%
4.00
3.90
3.65
3.30
2.75
2.60
2.55
2.50
2.45
2.40


Sples ...... I 1,947 1,662


Firm
3.40
3.20
3.05
2.95
2.85
2.70
2.20
1.75
1.65
1.60
1.55
1.55


Bailey & Montgomery's Review.
New York, Aug. 3, 1904.
Spirits Turpentine-Stock 772 barrels.
Market for the week has been very dull,
bwiiness slack. Thursday, July 28, Fri-
day, 29th, Saturday, 30th, 57c.; Mommy,
Aug. 1, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 563-4 c.; Wed-
nesday, Aug. 1, to-day, 561-2c.
Rosin, stock 17,000 barrels. Market
has reacted some on improvement in the
Southern markets, but sales have been
small.
AC, $2.70; D, $2.85; E, $2.90; F, $2.95 to
$3.00; G, $3.00 to $3.05; H, $3.10 to $3.15;
I, $3.50 to 3.55; K, $3.95 to $4.00; M,
$4.20 to .$4.25; N, $4.25 to $4.30; WG,


Savannah Naval Stores Statement. $4.75 to $4.80; WW, $5.00 to $5.10.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 ........... 6,495 44,550
Receipts Aug. 4 ......... 904 2,944 Matee Cmuty Abstract Compay.
Receipts previously ..... 88,878 232,485 I. S. Jhs, Abstracter.
Total .............. 96,277 279,979 Bradeatewn, Masatee Cmty, Flrida.
Exports Aug. 4 ......... 87 5,935 Complete and reliable books, titles perfected.
Exports previously ...... 66,738 206,520 Tas p for resident property owners in
Losms negotiated for non-residents on approved
Total .............. 66,825 212,45 title with ilt-edged security paying interest
at I per cent per annum semi-annually.
Stock Aug. 4 ........... 29,452 67,524 Correspondence solicited.
Stock last year ........ 12,63 52,579 References furnished
Imprts ef Turpentine to U. K.
The following table is compiled by James Watt & Son, of London, from the
official returns. For convenience of comparison we have turned ewts into barrels
-320 ewt. equal 100 barrels.


1897
From U. S., bbls..... 152,52
From France, bbls.... 161
From other countries.. 1,494
154,307
From Russia .......... 2,816
Total Barrels .. 157,122


1086
173,786
U44
878

174,p07
4,183
179,090


1899
149,375
517

50
149,942
4,998
154,940


1900
174,446
2,283
84
177,509
8,521
186,090


1901
193,429
859
53
194,341
6,861
201,202


1902 1903
15,122 143,61
1,66 4,630
904 516
157,682 148,997
8,711 17,596
166,393 166,592


Thus the import of Russian Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 1903 was double
that of 1902, and over six times as much as in 1897. It is interesting to see how
this import fluctuates with the price of American Turpentine.
Percentage of Import of Russian .. 1.79 2.33 3.22 4.57 3.41 5.24 10.6
Av. Price Amer. Turp in London .21- 24-6 34-1 35-4 27-1 33-1 42-2


FOR SALE.
50,000 aeres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill. S2 3 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in tLe State. 0

C. BUCKMAN, Jeoonvill, Ptle


Crops of Spiit
Crop
Spirits.
Wilmington ..........16,511
harleston.. ......... ,409
Savanah........ .... 176,418
Brunswick.. ......... 5,002
Mobil ................ 12,15
New Orleans.......... 36,017
Carrabelle...... ......cosed
Georgetown........ 7,515
Pe-ameola.. ...... .. 42,554
Jaix & Ferndina...... 187I,2
Tampa ...... ........dosed
Totals............535,15


and Rosins for Thee Year.


195-04.
Rosin.
89,W67
3,159
650,938
184,527
50l80
133,126
dosed
44,214
205,982
653,210
closed

tes..


Crop N1m-038
Spirits. Roain.
18,83 113,69
3,007 11,836
270,670 940,507
68947 244,106
18,969 79,272
33,103 108,03s
3,394 32,14
10,3=7 46,A9
38,75 192,20
91,976 375,011
13,065 40,664
571,056 2,184,18


Crop 1911-8,
1lt%- 10 I "
16AM la.
31, 13,00
313,06 IUlj-
793, 2 m16M
21,60 sos
21,038 943M
81r77 *4 7
37,78 1 5,M
70,I Sum
u A. .-..
-aAAA 2,$1M I3


R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KNrIHT, See. ad Treft


MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.

Herbert A. Ford, Geo. H. Ford, P. L Wata.
President. Vice-Pres. Cashier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPI TA L, $50,000.00.
DIRECTORS: R. L. Andersrn, R. S. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Me Soicited.


C HARNES, Pres.


J. D. SHAW, Vice-Pres.


RALPH JESSUP, See-Treas


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosils
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonville. Pensacola, fernandmia and Savema.
Corresponmidence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE FLA.

W. FRAZIER tJONS. C. H. BARNES. R. JESSUP. W. H.
sie Tresur. As't Taea. see mr.

UNITED GROCERY CO..

Importers & Wholesale Grocers
HAY, GRAIN and FEED.
Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
V.G. LPres aGe Mr. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

*******ftftft* eeftef 6 **e*** essensees 4


M. A. BRIGGS, President.
H. C. BRIGGS. 1st Vice-President.


HOMER BROWN. 2nd Vice-PresWkiat
J. C. McDONALD, Seey and Treas.


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

VALDOSTA. GA.
Sole Southern Agent for-


RIXFORD AXES,

They are the BEST. Others imitate but none du-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the finest
temper, hold the keenest edge. cut better and last longer
than any other axe.
This has all been proved by years of actual use.
Send us your orders.

W. H. BR66GS HARDWARE COMPANY,
Valdesta, Georga.


FFF I _71 r01TTTTTTTFiTT~ FA i9l 1 7 -


TEE W"!A3wT 011P OMR JrVsWluSS VOUCER IOM


10.


~OF~OC~00~3i0;OF0;3;3i~9~~


I ...










THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11

S$111 414 Many traders have been surprised at the
a -UALITY PlRST-PRICES RIGHT. failure of the future market to decline
C this week. This failure hau been due
S. to unusual support by prominent inter-
A ests and the South seems to have sold
About all the cotton they care to sell at
S this date. Because the market has failed
to decline under the high figures front
St" Washington it does not signify that cot-
"o ton is going higher within the next -few
Seeks. There is likely to be a market
similar to that of the last two or three
4 weeks, though it is doubtful whether the
S.. ..advance will carry October as high s Sam 'l P Holm es&C .

8. P. hOLM tS & CO.'S WEEKLY COT- the past two years. As far as the cotton 10 cents this time. Until cotton begins '
TON LETTER. market itself is concerned, prices held to move freely and some of the many $t e0, S Ii Ctt1.
remarkably steady after the report was holes to be filled in with cotton are filled, Gra am PrSevSISM
New York, Aug. 5th.-The regular received, a result due to the fact that there is not likely to be any great change.
monthly report was, of course, the feature there is a deficient supply of actual cotton timent in most sections i
of the week in cotton circles. The fig- at the present time and it will be several Sentiment in most sections is inclined to NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
ure of 91.6 proved to be somewhat higher weeks before sufficient new cotton is avail- the view that later on we will have a CHICAGO BOARD Of TRADE
than the majority expected and taken able to weigh on the market. It must not lower range of values with a steady and Direct private wires to all exchange.
from the standpoint of trade, and the cot- be forgotten that the price is a reasonable somewhat erratic market in the mean- Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
ton grower of the South, the outlook is one and that the crop has not been gath- time. BeN Plbme 853 Baldwin lck
now one of exceptional promise. Only ered. All that can be said at the moment
once in the last 15 years have these fig- is that a conservative view of the situa- The Exports Of Turpentine and Rosin.
ures been exceeded-that of August, 1894, tion leads one to believe that the cotton
wma the average condition was placed at crop this year will be a large one. With- SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE. ILOSi.
91.8 As compared with the outlook in out disaster that hardly seems probable To United Kingdom. in gallons: To United Kingdom, barrels I11m:
Month 18 1- 11- Month 911e 105- Ism42
recent years it now seems almost certain from the condition of the soil in the April .. .. .. ... I12 Wt April ........ 13 143 n,4.a
that we are to raise a good cotton crop. South. recent surroundings in the way May .. ....... 15 .6 1.13. May ........ I 415 513 MU
The importance of this can hardly be of bountiful rain and moderate tempera- Jun .... .... 7114 1,2 40, 1, Jne ...... .. ,721 3 m
July .. ..... 37,20 1.s. 1,6.l July .. .. .. .. 9,01 41131
overtimated. There is abundant oppor- ture. the season is more than likely to Augut........ .. 1.M 3r.4 August ...... 7.4,.6 1,64
tunity for money to be made in a specu- continue favorable to growth. With this September..... TIS1 46.57 SWM September.. ..K. S ..1 I1 =.M
native way without a cotton famine and outlook there is certainly very little in- October ........ 1.411 1 3,6 Otomber .. 4 710 W.
November .. ,1,638 349,70 3 1 2 November .. 3,91 W OR3" 3,S,
manipulation such as have been seen in ducement to buy cotton for higher prices. December .. 1,5,666 1,531,779 57,784 December .. 61,455 644 1 i
January ... 2, 373,M40 164,330 January ... 53,6 4,7 i' -MW
Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets. February.. 116,45 380 247,4 February ... 28.351 37,3 26 ,1
1903- .1904. March ....35, ...... 25s, March .. .. 39015 35,4 48611j
brIK t b OF TURPENTINE
Apr I Apr. 3 Apr. 10 Apr. 17 Apr. 2 May 1 May S May l May S May To Belgaum and Netherlands. in allow: To um d Neterlands barrel
IND 1 6D a 44 1-4 41-2 41-2 pounds:
JAme 5 3 Juo 1. June X July a uly 16 July 17 July July 1 Aug. 6 Month o6344 1 I-4 13-14 Month 1-t 15-6 2-48
S1 4B l 4 47- 34 44 60 if 4 April ........ 1.81,2 9447 Included April ..2.....1.. 19,6 I h ae
Ag. 14 Aug. Aug. S Se pt. 11 spt 1 SBpt 5 Oct. Oct. I Oct. 1 May .. .. .. .. ,W R In all otbr May .......... 2.W41 Ia all other
aPr. 1 1 M 1 64 3-4 57 ND a 67 1-2 a 1-0 8-4 June... ....... W1.MI 3 rt10 Europe Juneo ..... 5.6 m ,E ree
O@. &. OcL Nov. 6. Nov. I I Ne kDec. 3. Dec. D 17 Dec. 1, Jan. 14 July ...... .. .. IMM 81JUl7 ,. July .... .. M 19,r" aJM
m 51-. 2 a U a 6 56 5 B -4 1-4 1- -244 Augst.. ...... ,8W 1 .LM August ...... 4.MM 41.3
Jal. 22 Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18Feby. 25 Mch. 3 Meb. 10 MYh 4 Septmiber.. .. IS M.1 September..... 45 Il 3 2I
65 64 60 o 8 6 October .... .. I.14 21*4 m1 October .. .. .. .,3 tiM .
November .. 13, 349,726 381,2I November .. 3,991 ,6A0 31,6A
Meh. 3 December .. 100372 58,65 672,164 December .. 37,077 13,5 3.9
57 Jamry .... 118,879 2J41,1 174,W2 January .... 40,730 W4) 15,51
RIOSINS February ... 5,130 372,444 3,501 February ... 9,849 25,6 186,R
Ww WG N X K I H G F 1 D C-A March .... ...... 8,713 18474 March .... 10192 32,12 11,814
Aprt 1. ......3 6 B .4 3 WM N .*- 5 2.4 2. 2.104 l.5 .O --- - ---
AprM . ... ..6 L L. 2.35 L E0 2.S L10 LOS L. L. To Germany. In gallons: To Germany, barrels I Is.
April 0 . .. LO L46 2.6 2.7 2.5 L. L. to 2L I Mon&th 1-44 Im-8 1 8-4 Month 12-4 1I8-8 1uN-4
A l . 4.5 &L S. LI. 3. 2. Ls 0 to 10.5 t.o l.5 1. 15 AprIl .. .. ........... 114.44 112. April ...... .. aM48 *w,
Apr .... . .16 LS l 2. 2. 2.L5 25 L. L1. 1.5 LIS May .. .. ...... a 41.6 4.61 May .. .. .. .. .M 4, 18 W.I,
may 1...... . .5 8. LS .1 tL 0 2.8 2. 13 t15 1.7 LW7 LW June.. .. .. .. .1,1.12 6, 0 0,46 June .. .... .... 41.5,4 4. 6,
May .... . 2.5 L 2 15 1 2L 2.5 L0 L LW 1. 1.7 ly .... .. .. M,11 U 1,412 It Jul .. .. .. .. 1.68m N.6 3=14611
MayS .... .4 % L2% .17% L~.1 L % 2.87% 221% L7 L.W 1 L1 August .... .. M g, 3 427 August .... .. 7.u s,88l
May U ..... . s a3. a2. 210* 3&0 25 L275 L. LO L. LW September.. .. s, ulu TI. September.. .. 4.1' 1 &.- ,s
Mar ...... & 3.u 3.5 L2 IS 2 o 1.5 1.M 1.7 1. 1.W Oetober ...... ..76 91.4 I 4W October .. .. .. 3L6 M3. .-1.
Junme . . .6 &.2 to .15 a. 3.0 2.4 L2 1.05 1.0 1.3 1.5 November 179,010 116,153 81,780 November .. 56,73 42,~ 1 2,3
June 1=. ..... 2 3.14* 2. .5 2.5 2. 2. 0 L16 LM L2. L 1.70 December December 15,47 39,71 ,MR
J e10 ........3 3.1 t. 2.2i .05 .70 2.5 175 1. 0 L ... -..
Jme 3 ...... . L .10 3.6 2 2. .5 1.7 1.5 1 1. U January .... 13, 153, January .... 34,702 54,~B 99
Jle 38 ...... .. L S .6 & 0 o 23. 2t 2.5 1.7 1.7 LO. 1.L 1. February ... 20,18 15,88 67174 February ... 172,135 40,915 56,1
July 1 ...... 2 L.3 10 L . 2.2 2.5 .1 1.75 LW L1 LI March .. 65, ...... 94,00 March .. 49,962 60,990 41,d
July 11 ..... & S. 3 .10 L.402 2.1 275 2. L1.8 L7 LS L-O L
-Jly s2..... . LI. L. .10 D 2.M 2.75 2.30 1.05 L75 L2 1.5 L. To all other rope in Gallona: To al other Europe. barrels I Ibm:
iV e. . . 3. L3.1 2. 15 2 2.G7 2. 2 L75 1.5 L 15. L Month I sM- IM 1-U 1-M4 Month IM-4 198 W U.r
A IT 7 . . 2 2. LT70 2.3 L.7 L L. 1.5 IU Apr ......... R..10 18,45 MW.0 April .. .. .... M 6 3816 ..31
August 14. . 2.53 .IS 2.1.5 5 25 S.0 2.20 L1 L7 LW 1.17 1.0 May.. ............, 1a, 74.11X May ........ J1,16 6W11 122.,
Ausat .... . 3. L LA 2L 2. 2.60 230 L5 1.75 1.1 .1 1.10 June......... 15.3 1 tLM 6 M40 June.........., 14.044 %.M4 1k. .
August .. .. 2.3 5 L .1 2.16 2.90 2.4 2.00 1.S0 1.25 1.6 1 July .......... 11, I13 4L I July .. .... .. 51 51M12 .24 '3-1
Spt.omber 4 . t e 3 .3 3.3 .00 2.5 .0 2. 1 2 .5 s 1.S LO August ...... .. 2. 2. August .. .. .. Ls 321
September 11 . 3. 3.5 3 3.L 3. 310 2.0 2.06 .1.5 1.90 L5 1.75 September. 4. 31, 3OO .B6 SGeptember.. .. .l 1 3 2.2,4.
September 13 . 2I. 75 L 6a 2.. L6 2.26 2.10 2.15 2.05 2.0 1.5 1.0 October ... ....1 43 ,17. October ....... 1S4L .4
September 5.. 4.s 4.1*0 .a 8 5 L1 1 .3M 2.5 2.0 2.20 210 .6t 1.0 November 32,500 17,800 94.37 November 13,328 6,415 35;1.
October 2. . 4.0 4.0 45 4.0 4.15 2.5 .0 25 2 .46 2.24 tL2 1.4 December 47,306 89,01 23 ,00 December 2,26 48,701 23,8 1
Ocobr .. .... .. 4.40 4. 5 45 4.10 3.50 2.7 2.5 2.66 2.4 2L 5 15 January .11, January ... 7,124 7,148 4,
October I .. 4.6 4.4p 4.X 4.6 2. 2.3 .25 2.73 2.56 2.50 LK 9- L
Oeteber ..... .. 4.0 6 30 15 2. 2.6 2.6 2.60 2 2S 2.5 February .. 15,471 445 February 38,184 42,654 56,31
oarct ...... 4. 0 3. 0 3.0 20 & 3. 2 22.70 2.0 2.5 2J. 2 March .. 14,18 275 36,00 March ... 33,687 51,949 71,9
Novermber i......3 .L .10 L. 2.1 2.70 2.60 2.500 5L 2.5 2.2. -3 t
NeqwmbIer ...... 5 .5 .10 2.90 2. 2-70 2 2.0 .5 2.10 2.5 2.5 Total Foreign Exports, in gallons inelud- Total sports of Ruin. barrels 0 poE.
November .. ....LO 2& .50 2. 2.0 2.70 254 2.4 2. 2. 2.5 2.15 tag everything outside of the United Including Asda Africa and America eso~t
November 8.... .L LS 31 3.M 23 20 240 2. 2. 2 2 2.10 L10 5 .1 States: aide of the United States:
Decembr .. .. 3 .5 29 3. 2.0 2.80 2 2.5 2.30 3.2 2..5 31 1 Month 2664 133-4 11-4 Month 11264 124 1 2 .-14
Doe.cmber 1 .. s. Ls Le ge 2. 2 5 2.35 2.5 2. 2 2 .20 Ami .. .. .. .. 514., 5 April ...... ..A1pri1 1313 In .SAM
em mbI ..L..5 L 0 2.14 2. 0 2.56 2.5 2.30 .26 2. 2 May way ..... . 1..12 2W.144 % m May ..2........13.36 144 s .
December, a ..a... 10 .1 5 2.5 10 2L 2.L3 I.5 2.5 I 5 June ...... .... 81,g 2.3 2.31g.8a June ...... ... 13.3 2161 211.
January 14 ... .4. .5 .15 3.00 2.96 2.30 2.70 2.4 2.L 2..50... 111
Jn ..4. &S &35 .IS 2. 0 2..7505 &a & 15 L45 July ........ $.1lLg05 L,051,0 2,494,110 July ..... ,,
Jmmary ...... 4.10 ( L U 3.515 L. 2. August ...... ..1.73tL 2,263.43 August .. .. .. 2.01 28.M
January I .. .. .. 4.0 4 .59 2 L" .5 Z .2&0 2.15 I2.0 2.5 2.5 N1 2.S September.. 1.474.145 154.5 2*4.M September .. 3. 33M 36.3 211.04
February 11 ..&75 3.45 3.5 3.30 3.25 320 2.85 2.85 2.80 2.75 2.70 O2.70 otob ... .. LA1 1.6m.A 1.4. October .... .. .33,3 =1411 1 --6t
February 18 ...305 3.45 3.35 .30 3.25 306 2.70 2.70 2.65 2.0 '2.55 2.55 November ..1,851,8 193,183 152,574 November .. 184,00 231,643 25479
February 25 ...3.70 350 3.35 3.20 325 295 3.60 255 2.50 2.45 2.40 2.40 December ..1,995,29 1,794,M6 1,99,175 December .. 210,457 20 19144
Mareh 10 ......3.80 3.00 3.40 3.35 3.30 3.05 2.75 270 2.65 2.60 255 2.55 January ... 700,3 M 3 MA,M January ... 193,471 170,363 IT7,4I4
Ma ......4.00 3.70 3.50 3.35 3.30 2.95 270 2.65 2.600 2.55 250 250 Februar .. 487,577 531,46 155,476 February ... 306,000 1800,2 257,Am4
arek 1 ......4.10 30 3.60 3,5 3.30 2.95 2.70 2.65 .00 2.5 2.50 2.50 March .... 298,488 118,174 285,358 March .... 171,548 204,33 214,913
THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER' TIM WO~L.










THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
* n


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

JAMCS A. NOLLOPION.

PiAhl ed vrr lrrdLy.
t (Doms he) ---.03 0 Per Annum
Foreign) ....so 8.
*Tho P*n and he Produame -
AC eemmudeatm should be adessed
The Indamtrlial recordd Company.
Jackenvill. Fira.
Irmb Edel l mad Duhnmms oaeofflos at
Aoanr~t. Ga avanmbLh. Ga.

Entered at the Poetoffice at Jacksoanvile
Fla., as second-elas matter.
Adopted by the Executive Commtte of
the Turpentine Operatorn Assoetin,
September 12, 10, a its exclusive official
rgn Adopted in annual convention
September 11, an the organ alo of the
-eneral Amociation.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the official
organ of the Iterstate Cae Growers' An-
ociatio. Adopted Sept 11 1190, as the
only o ial rgan of the T. O.
Commemled to lumber people by special
resolutio adopted by the Georgi Sawmill
Amociation.
COPY FO 'ADV RTISING.
Adverting COpy (chg Or new a-
rtimr-rrnt) should rech Tusuay
m- ogi to in aiertiom i the ie of
th me m weekL
THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The pulishig plat nd the mai e-
iems f the Indl trial Recor Punhimg
C. ar located at N. xx Seuth Bean
Street, Jackeaville, Fla, in the ery heart
of the great turpentine and yellow e
imastrie.
The Atlanta, Ga., e4e s located i the
quita Bfuling, MN. M73. Atlanta is
the center f the great mnufacturi
tade f the tire SOeth
The Savannah, Ga, odce i in the Beamd
of Trade bldhg gSamvahn i the l"l-
hg ope saval stoes market i the rl.

SUllMERIG AT HOME.
There is les flitting to the Northern
watering places this year by business men
than formerly. They are realizing in
many instances that they are paying too
dear for the discomforts they buy while
cooped up in little 10x10 rooms suffering
all the inconveniences to be found there.
It is not recreation. t is not rest. It
is simply allowing qne's Belf to be bound
hand and foot, being robbed at many
places, and calling it "an outing."
Instead, the business man is wisely
staying at home this summer. A few
hours at Atlantic Beach, at Pablo, at
Tybee, or at Ormond Beach, within a few
hours reach, afford him a sufficiency of
salt air. Jacksonville and other cities of
the Southeast, are just as cool, thank
you, as many of the high-priced aggrega-
tion known as "the springs," and when it
is accompanied by all the comforts of
home, it beats them all hollow.
And the business man of the Southeast
has at his doors all the recreation he
needs The South Atlantic Baseball
League is now playing fine ball in the
cities of the Southeast. And the game
is steadily growing in favor with the bet-
ter class of people. Go out to the Jack-
sonville baseball club any afternoon when
a game is on, and you will be surprised to
see the keen enjoyment the game affords
to from five hundred to a thousand of
our leading merchant princes and their
families. And you will find solid business
mn there from the inland Florida cities
and towns, who take a day off and run
down here to enjoy a day's genuine sport.


The Fourth Annual Convention, September 1415, Turpntiac
Operators' Asodation.


The executive committee of the Tur-
pentine Operators' Association met in
regular session yesterday and decided
upon September 14th and 15th as the
dates for the Fourth Annual Convention.
The convention, therefore, will be held in
the Board of Trade auditorium, Jackson-
ville, Fla., on the dates named. The pro-
gram of business and the entertainment
to be provided for the operators during
this convention will be announced in due
time in the Record.
It is very important that every tur-
pentine man in the South, whether he has
ever joined the association or not, be pres-
ent at this convention. In many res-
pects it will be the most important meet-
ing ever held, and it is to every person's
individual interest, if he is in the tur-
pentine business, to take part in the de-
liberations at that time. They will be
far reaching; and upon the wisdom of
that meeting will depend, in a great meas-
ure, the success of those who are to en-
gage in the naval stores business during
the year 1904-06.
There is no necessity of dodging the
situation; unless there is a check to the


TREE PLANTING IN ILLINOIS.
The Bureau of Forestry will this sum-
mer pursue in Illinois a study from which
it is expected material advantage will
inure to the vast agricultural interests of
that State. Planted timber will be made
the subject of careful examination to
determine what kinds of trees make the
most rapid growth, and are most valua-
ble commercially and for use as wind-
breaks, under the prevailing conditions
of soil, moisture and cultivation. The
topography of Illinois is such that a for-
est cover is not usually needed to protect
the soil from erosion. The land for the
most part is rolling or level prairie, rich
and admirably suited for agriculture. A
farmer reaping large harvests from his
lands naturally will not consider putting
those lands to a less profitable use. But
experiments have proved that shelterbelts,
in protecting the lands from wind, in-
fluence a larger crop yield.
Shelterbelts are invaluable in protect-
ing crops from the damage frequently
resulting from the full iorce of destructive
winds, but possibly their chief value is
in conserving the moisture so absolutely
essential to crop growth. Wind is a
strong ally of evaporation. It is estab-
lished that as the velocity of the wind in-
creases evaporation is very rapidly aug-
mented. Shelterbelts, in opposing the
wind, effectively retard evaporation, and
thereby save to growing crops the soil
moisture necessary to keep them thrifty
during dry, windy times. These facts are
especially pertinent in a treeless, level
agricultural country, where the wind has
an unobstructed sweep for miles and gets
constantly drier in its course. The strips
of land that farmers in Illinois might di-
vert from agriculture, in creating shelter-
belts, would be put to better use than if
continued in crops, because the remainder
of the land would be so much benefited by
the change. Nor is protection from the
effects of the wind the only advantage
that would be secured from the creation
of shelterbelts. If composed of suitable
kinds of trees, shelterbelts can be made
to answer the purpose of valuable wood-
lots. furnishing all the fuel, fenceposts,
and farm repair material the farmer may


wild and impulsive trading that is going
on, and unless operators calmly and with
good judgment review the true conditions
and act with that same good judgment,
the prospects for another year look
gloomy. The production must be held
down. It is the only salvation.
Again, there are many things for the
mutual good of all operators that will
come up to be threshed out, and acted
upon at the September Convention. In
this progressive twentieth century age no
man will claim that an individual can ac-
complish what an association of men,
with the same object in view, can accom-
plish. It is a day of organization and
co-operation.
The Record is very frank to claim that
there are very few things too big for the
Turpentine Operators' Association to ac-
complish if the association goes about it
properly. It devolves upon the operators
now to come to this September convention
and become an active and acting part in
the work of those two days.
To attend this annual convention is a
matter of business necessity for every
turpentine man.


need. The two uses will admirably go
hand in hand, and between them will ma-
terially improve the value of the land
and the comfort of the farmer.
To promote this end the Bureau of
Forestry has assigned to Illinois for this
summer a field party of five experts, un-
der the supervision of Mr. R. Kellogg.
They will study both native and planted
trees to gain a full understanding of the
rate of growth and reproductive powers
of the trees which are the most valuable.
for the State. Data will be collected rel-
ative to the cost and methods of plant-
ing and the time required to grow timber
to the size required for usefulness. When
the study is completed a full report on the
subject will be published.


VALUE OF GUM RESIN IN PAINT.
It is a gouq many years since Profes-
sor Russell and Sir William Abney es-
tablished the fact that the question of
preserving oil paintings and pictures in
general resolves itself into keeping out
moisture. More recently, Professor A. P.
Laurie, in a paper before tne Society of
Arts, directed attention to the power of
different painting media for preserving
the colours mixed with them and the
surfaces on which they are applied. The
essential fact that Mr. Laurie established
(and the point has been confirmed by
other experimentors) is that linseed oil
in the form of a skin or film, no matter
how pure or well refined, cannot be de-
pended upon to protect a surface from
moisture. Mr. Laurie's experiments,
which are classic, need not be gone into
here, and they are probably familiar to
everyone who has bestowed any attention
on this subject. This permeability of lin-
seed oil to moisture is at the root of a
great deal of "perishing" of paint and con-
sequent corrosion of the under surface.
The presence of a tangible quantity of
gul resin (introduced in the form of oil
varnish) in the paint appears to enable
the linseed-oil film to prevent the pene-
tration of moisture to a considerable ex-
tent. It is this action, and not the mere
mechanical hardness of the resulting film,
that is at the root of the preservative ac-
tion of paints containing gum resins. Of


course, gum rsim vary in their p
of communicating this resistive action,
and the moral of this a that in maki
up a varnish paint or a protective p t
containing varnish, the ingredients of the -
latter should be known and should e se-
lected with the greatest eare.


BUT LITTLE SglHREIKAG
The New Orleans Lumber Trade Jour-
nal, during the month of July sent out
circular letters to its subscribers who are
manufacturing yellow pine lumber in the
States of Arkansas, Texas, Missouri, Im-
isiana and Mississippi, and out of about
forty replies three-fourths showed that
the present season's business is away
ahead of that of last. Half a doan re-
plied that it was about the same and a
few reported a smaller output. While
these reports are confined for the much
greater part to trans-Mississippi manufa-
turers, it shows that, as usual the great
West is still on a boom.
Replies were received from several
places in the Southeast, all of which
showed a slight deeresse in output.

TRADE CONDITION IN NOUTEXAT.
There is a general improvement in trade
conditions in the Sotheast. Angt
opens with better prospects than Om
year ago. Crop prospects generally mr
largely responsible. The Record compiles,
from various reports received by thi
paper, the following from the lading
trade centers in the Southeastern terri-
tory:
Savannah.-In all jobbing lines there
has been improvement in buying, bat eel-
lections are still backward. The erop
outlook is favorable, all conditions being
good. Cotton is steady but dulL flc-
tuations in naval stores occurred, hut
trading was not noticeably retarded. I-
cal retail trade is dull.
Augusta.-Crop prospects continue e,
especially cotto, which shows the result
of late rains. Trade is fair for the sea-
son, but collection .are slow.
Atlanta.-Trade continues to show mi-
summer dullness, and collections cores-
pod. Crop orts continue favrabl
and the present outlook is above the av-
erage at this season.
Jacksonville.-Raimn have improved
crops; prospects are encouraging. Trade
is somewhat better than average for the
season. Collections are fair.
Birmingham.-No concessions in the
price of pig iron have been made in the
past ten days. One conern thought to
have undersold the market is now report-
ed holding stiff at $9.0 and is overall.
,Montgomery.-Trade, jobbing and re-
tail, is of moderate volume. Srltise
rain has fallen to practically assre a
successful year with farmers, and pros-
pects for a good fall trade are encorag-
ing. Collections are fair.
Chattanooga.-The weather remains a-
vorable for farmers and. an extra lage
crop of corn and wheat is anticipated for
this section. No decrease has occurred in
fruit shipments and growers are realizing
large profits. Retail and wholesale trade
is satisfactory and collections are fair.

Messrs. Jennings, of Pensacola, and
Dusenberry, of Savannah, members of the
J. P. Williams Company, met Mr. -Wl-
liams here last Wednesday. Later Mr.
Williams went to Tallahassee. Mr. Da-
senberry to South Florida and Mr. Jem-
nings returned to Pensaola.


I FTY AM 1W*LSMIVA, ADVEETIC N T= 33C0









THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 1n


UNWTfD STATES- POrrTONY NO. 6466.
Co...o .vm or Syo Rovmr or
THE ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
oALML So VT- -.m .MAur o2r TA.ouv AT W *~ OLOO O
MARCH 20m. 1904.


5,0 06uG
40,199.98
ucree .eo
1.794 .510
=,310J018.6


The Hamburg to Hamburg shipment is
the largest of the kind ever ordered from
abroad and will doubtless be followed by
calls for more. As fast as a new-to
them-American wood is shipped to Eu-
rope, it is but a short time when a diffi-
culty of supplying the demand is en-
countered here.
Met one of the largest lumber dealers in
New York at the Piedmont and he states
that the present dullness in the market
will be followed this winter by the best
and most active market the trade has
had for many years So may it be.
There are only about forty trade jour-
nals here and still the number is to be
increased by the advent in two weeks ot
the "Spirits. Wine and Beer Journal,"
which will defend the liquor trade inter-
eats.
The legislature, besides spilling ink, has
increasedd the Governor's salary, so that
he will be able to exist without running
nto debt, and is going to recuperate by
attending a barbecue at Gainesville on
Saturday.

Jackanille Bank Clearances.
Jacksonville hank clearances for the
week ending August 5:
Saturday ..............$114,42.92
Monday ................ 123,003.86
Tuesday .... ...... .. 112,190.5
Wednesday .............. 110,805.56
Thursday ........... .. 14,440.00
Friday .. ...........145,063.52


Atlanta, Ga., Bureau,
July 27, 1904.
A compromise has been effected by
which athe railiroads in this State will
mot have to equip any cars for sawmill
men, but will allow them to deduct not
exceeding 500 lbs. from the expense bill
of eah car to pay for the equipment.
Hardly a satisfactory settlement for the
mills, but at any rate a step in the right
direction.
The Union Depot here-much adver-
tined and long expected-is now begin-
ning to look all right. It will not be
ling before the train sheds are up and
the depbt in use.
The Hardwood Lumber Company, of
Augusta Captain A. T. Twiggs, president,
Shs accepted an order for half a million
feet of cottonwood lumber for exporta-
tion
The sale was made through a New Or-
leans brokerage house and the lumber is
destined for Hamburg, Germany. The lum-
ber will be gotten out as quickly as pos-
sible by the plant which, curiously enough,
is Iested at a postoffiee called Hamburg.
The plant of the company in old dead
Hamburg, just across the river from Au-
kgusta is growing as if by magic So
eat is the demand for its output that
the millwill have to be enlarged.
The material for the plant is plentifully
found along the Savannah River and is
easily gotten at. It is but a short time
since the real value of the hard woods
in the neighborhood of Augusta has been
realized. Surely in these times of tem-
porary depression in the Yellow Pine
trade, good hard woods-eottonwoon, oak
and walnut-which are to be found all
over this section, might be worked up to
advantage. They fetch a fancy price.
The cottonwood lumber, on account of
its Ightness and hardness, is extensively
ased in the manufacture of furniture.


The West.Raley-Rannie Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksoevile, Fla.
A. N. WTS,. Pres. f. Z. West, Vce-Pres. w. a. asrmi. rsce-Pr. X. V. aier, sec. a erre.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINGAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Plavins T. Crhlss,
PraoidsL


Fna C. Groover,
Vi1-Prea.


Yaflu W. Swrt
111 and Tils



THE GHRI E-GROOER DRUg O.


Wholelle lOgLl.


Joclsoile,


A alu.


It 0D1 MI WiL i MlI bofifi DTurnm

ml wMil. m nmREN M.ft MI Tum


C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,


Total ..........730,12641 WHOLESALE GROCERS


Messrs. Timmons. of Tifton, Ga., and
(arraway, of Putnam County, Fla., are in
the e!ty. Mr .Timmonr is attending a
meeting of the executive committee of the
T. O. A. to map out work for the Sep-
tember meeting of the association.


Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.


Grain. Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requir...-..a
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516- 518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY b KLma
Jacksonville, Fla.


CYPRESS TAKS, TUBS,

AND VATS.


Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
a. .. I DrAVIS j so1N, PALA..TX, FrL..

a. a JETM W .L JOmsU4 Ja. LAsCT. W. W. STmIPUN
PrIesiet. ae pres. ufjee. r. ast Treasurer
he W. B. JOHNSON CO..


Wholesale Grocers


02-404-406-00 East &V UrVOL JebAsua Vb

%m 9*M. CP A. & PENWETO1,
TU~J ~ W.inS ~Jesi
IL a PAW. em"


W. W. swtm
MS. LASrtE


W. J. LENGLE,
President.


J. W. WADE,
Vice-president.


EL HUGHES,
See'y a Treas


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.

DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


Rmoa. csm LABMIUT.IB
Ts aSd Disoeemt.... ............ 1,3,410.0 Capital Stock paid in...........
O st rft...... .......... ............. S Surplus.......... ..............
Vadts m d ixtures ................. 15 Undivided Profits...............
U. S. Bo ...... ................... 3=o, .o01 Cirulation .... .............. .
C r y aU City Bola......... ... 11.0u.5o Depol tl................ ..
omr U.. .Trmr.er .......... Tot.....................
Cass Due from other Banks ..... W5 a
To l ........................ ...... M8 .8 B8


News From The Record's Atlanta Bureau,


My rnDUUT AND PUoGnsSIVK









THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Crop Condition of the Country.

Another week of good weather has oats in head and turning, little
greatly improved prospects for a very sue- having occurred, but there is som
cemful agricultural season. At a few plaint of short straw. In Ohio th
points rainfall is excessive, and else- "s estimated as ten per cent. alx
where other cLmatic conditions are not average and rapidly approaching
exactly satisfactory, while some loss from rity. Oats are well headed in
insects is threatened; but, taking the but the st:aw is short. Indiana
country as a whole, says Dun's, the out a large crop of good quality, cuttir
look for the principal crops is very bright, ing begun. Iowa reports three-
In a few cases the harvest is in full prog- crop, which is practically all
reas, and, as to winter wheat especially, Much damage has been done in p
the past week has put a large quantity Kansas and the yield will be sma
beyond danger. It will only require a few crop is a little short in Tenness
more weeks of high temperature to bring about all harvested.
the tardy crops to a normal position, and As to cotton, there are rep
in the meantime the early cotton will cloudy weather in parts of Texas
be picked and ginned. Latest dispatches shedding has commenced, and th
as to winter wheat make the situation plaint of insects increases, but
much better than indicated by earlier seasonable. Rain is needed over
statements, and there seems now no good area of Georgia, but no serious
reason for anticipating less than 600,000,- has occurred, and on the whole the
000 bushels of wheat, while a little im- er is favorable for a larger cro
provement in the Red River Valley might last year. Hot weather and copiol
raise the figure still higher. Although have facilitated growth in Alaban
the total production of wheat will fall matic conditions in Louisian an
short of last year's yield, it is almost factory and the outlook was never
certain that the cotton crop will be much Similar reports are received from I
larger, while the minor cereals will show In South Carol'na there has bee
a gain. As to potatoes, hay, sugar beets damage front hail, but prospects
and other miscellaneous crops the pros- bright for a large crop. The se
pects are brighter than average for the good in (;ecrgia, plants fruiting
season. and a big yield is expected. A
From the winter wheat States reports complains of too much stalk, an
indicate that harvesting and threshing are fields are still in grass, but labor
well under way. Dry weather is needed dant. and the plant is strong thou
in Nebraska as the harvest is in progress,
but conditions are fairly favorable.
Threshing is being done in Missouri under U. Bensime Exports.
satisfactory weather conditions, and the A despatch from Philadelphia tP
quality is up to the average. In Kansas cago oil and paint journal says tl
the harvest is about completed, with the eral large concerns in France hav
yield above expectations, but quality be- orders in America for 800,000 ga
low normal. Wheat is about all harvested benzine, and that Philadelphia h
in Illinois. quality fair, and yield some- selected as the port of shipment
what less than last year. Winter wheat first full cargo of its kind ever 4
in Michigan is about one-third cut, and from America will be taken out
the remainder is almost ready, with British steamship "Lux." The "
weather favorable for harvesting. Dis- specially adapted for carrying hi)
patches from Ohio indicate wheat ripen- plosive cargoes, and no danger i
ing rapidly under favorable weather, ipated by her officers or crew in
threshing well under way, but some parts the Atlantic. The present rush o
of the State will secure only half an av- for benzine is in striking contras
erage crop. Weather has been satisfactory condition of the market several


o a Chi-
hat sev-
e placed
llons of
as been
t. The
exported
in the
'Lux" is
ghly ex-
s antic-
crossing
f orders
t to the
months


in Minnesota; heads are of unusual ago, when the British steamship "Cir-
length; conditions favorable for a large cassian Prince" arrived from France with
yield, except in the Red River Valley. 500.000 gallons in bulk consigned to pri-
Fall wheat threshing in Oregon is result- vate parties. It was sold at a much lower
iilg better than expected and heads are price than the product could have been
:orge. but the yield of spring wheat will purchased for at the time in this country.
be small, although recent rains have im
proved the outlook. .A .11 r.n -. -n6 ri ..e -


Corn grows rapidly in Michigan, but i-
sti!l late, and the only recent damage was
caused by hail over a small area. Hot
weather has improved prospects. Illinois
reports the color good and growth rapid,
while in Pennsylvania almost a full crop
i expected. The crop is doing well in
Ohio, and is beginning to tassel. A large
yield is expected in Tennessee, and con-
ditions are fairly good in Arkansas, but
there is still too muen rain. More mois-
ture is needed in Indiana, yet prospects
are for a large crop. A large yield in
indicated for Iowa. Cool weather has re-
tarded growth in Nebraska, but no harm
has yet resulted. Weather conditions are
most desirable in Missouri, and the crop
is growing under favorable conditions in
Kansas; the corn is hearing in southern
disatricts.
Oat% are tall and well headed in most
parts of New York, more than an average
yield being indicated. Michigan reports


turpentine and commissary tndes to the
Record office to insure a prompt delivery.


PEARL WIOIIT. Pres.


Trade Checks


FOR THE

COMMISSARY BSIC)S.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Industrial Record Go.,


Ift ye are tinkkim of opyaL a
P*ae, selling the one YOn ha. ar
Iradilnirt If yyu e thinin :r in-2t
venlnx in any ldisuy It you an
to buy aehlnery Orf any 0m-
the lndstrstal Rooeea. a pem og,
telling of your wan.L


I. n. MCARTHY. Vice-Pres


MAURICE TERN. Tres.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.

IRVING N. WELCH, Manaer.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA. .


41, YE 'I tU IIU4tSI)tIII miiuuIwiissisuiu
PATRON=Z YWCM11PTI AT1ERTIR3 "IO tT"TWACROSY DEALIGA.


lodging
.e com-
e yield
ove the
matu-
Illinois
reports
ng hav-
fourths
secured.
Parts of
ll. The
ee, and

)rts of
, where
re cola-
that is
a small
damage
weath-
)p than
us rains
na. Cli-
e satis-
better.
Virginia.
In some
are still
ason is
rapidly,
rkansas
d many
is abun-
igh late.


Theya ADrM 7S2M
IGrIFF'S UCTAOG


*otns. imad"ig thi at fPtom
Also a emplete o dW =As
a ft, lr a" blt/ os hs.
.. 7.&O N00"T"T.. -

Agenc forLew ins 1866an
* Ai.



Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,

from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs. Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.


CHAS. BLUM & CO.

517 and 519 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE,, rL :


I


Typewriters

All Make--.10.O0 Up.

GRIVOT "iMA

The Worid-beater. OLIVCER writes in sight.
The JEWETT, King of double-board ma-
chines.
$10 t $60 Saved a Amy Make of Typewriter.

TiH

Bethuxne

Apparatus.

The New Process.
Iztracts the spirts without destroying the
wod fibre. Runs out a charge In lat than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-five gallons from curd of wood.
Makes pure water white spiri free from
the odor of tar or creosote. No chemiealm
used In refining the spirits. Needs to be
distilled only once after coming from re-
tort.
No trouble with bi-prodocts, the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
duced and from wood. Only one grade
of spirits produced and that the highest
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGER FROM PIRE
Built of finest material by hlh-cad
workmen. The cheapest machine oered t
the public.
We challenge comparison of output and
quality of product. We guarantee output
and quality.
The rim Bldt Cemstctiml Cmapy
P. 0. Box US. RALEIGH. N. C.


111111111~1111~1()1)I(~~rrr:IIIC+tllllll


_


__


This Spae Reserved for



Gus Muller & Co.





Liquor Merchants


Proprietors


j(ksovlea Bitt% WMu


...Agtent...


ACME BEER





NO FARM -
I 0 FARM "WBif


I








THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


THE FITZGERALD COMPANY.


P. L. Sutherland, a Prominmeat Turpentine
Man, i Vice-Preside.
Fitzgerald Company is the name of a
proposed new corporation which has made
application to the Governor for letters
patent, and which will have its principal
place of business in Jacksonville.
The incorporators of the new company
are DeSoto Fitzgerald, P. L. Sutherland,
Edward Anderson and S. A. Marshall, of
Jacksonville. and J. S. Bond, of Savan-
nah. The general nature of the business
to be conducted by the company will be
the buying, selling and dealing in wood,
coal and other fuel, land, timber, wood
and timber rights, all kinds of building
materials, crossties. lumber, shingles, etc.,
also to-act and do business as manufactu-
rers' agents, merchandise brokers and
forwarding agents, and to construct and
maintain, lease and operate, docks, ware-
houses and vessels, make charter parties
and do a general shipping and ship chand-
lery business.
The first annual meeting of the comn-
pany will be on the first Monday in Oc-
tober, and until the first election of di-
reetors the following will constitute the
officers of the corporation:
President, DeSoto D. Fitzgerald; vice-
president, P. L Sutherland; secretary and
treasurer, Edward Anderson. All of these
gentlemen are well-known in business
circles, and it is believed that the busi-
ness of the company will prosper from
the start.
The new itzgerald dock, at the foot of
Newnan Street, which is just being com-
pleted ,will be used by this company in
the transaction of its business. This is
one of the largest and best docks in the
city of Jacksonville. The pier extends
out four hundred feet from the bulkhead
line. There is thirty-five feet of water
at the end of the pier, and sufficient depth
fpr any vAsel that can cross the bar to
go alongside the pier up to the shore end.
Coal bins and other conveniences for the
transaction of the business of the com-
pany will be constructed on this pier.

Tola, Hart & Co.' Review.
Spirits Turpentine-The market has
been very quiet during past week, with
very slight price fluctuations. Stock, 800
barrels. We quote Machines 56.% ets.
Rosins-We are unable to report any
increased demand, the break in prices
seems to have frightened any possible
buyers. We quote: BC, $2.70 to $2.75;
D, $2.80; E, $2.95; F, $3.00 to $3.05; CG,
$3.06 to $3.10; H, $3.15; I. $3.45; K. $3.95
to $4.00: M, $4.30; N. $4.40; WO, $4.75;
WW, $5.00 to $5.05. Market dull.
TOLAR, HART & CO.
sea all orders for printing for the tur-
peatie and commissary trades to the
sRe d office to imnre prompt delivery.


ZINC NAILS
mi

Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
atronm but soft light metal. They are
the & arMMO which will not injure
Saws when left in the trees.

AenM Nail Co.
aa Pnat Sa. nw vras*, f. r.
Also HmadqErter for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, opper Nails and
Taeks.


Beacham & Shackelton

WE ARE IN THE MARKET TO BUY ROUND TIMBER..


hndue 16ing Bt r wOn Lads


Desirable Tracts For Sale.


515 Wed kIid J Aeuh, Fla.


COURSE OF PALE AND MEDIUM ROSINS AT SAVANNAH FOR TWO YEARS.
W.W. W.G. N M K I
DATE 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-0


April 1............
April 8.........
April 15........
April 22........
April 29........
May 6........
May 13........
May 20........
May 27........
June 3........
June 10........
June 16........
June 23........
July 1 ........
July 7 ........
July 14 ........
.uly 28 ........
Aug. 4 ........


$4.10
3.95
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.95
4.35
4.50
4.60
4.65
4.75
4.75
4.70
1.52%
4.671/.


$3.90
3.60
3.50
3.40
3.35
3.35
2.42%
3.65
3.65
3.60
3.40
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.40


$3.80
3.75
3.60
3.60
3.60
3.50
3.50
3.55
3.65
4.05
4.10
4.15
4.25
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.25
4.42 /.


$3.60
3.45
3.35
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.27%
3.35
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.20


$3.60
3.60
3.45
3.45
3.45
3.35
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.85
3.85
3.85
3.90
4.00
3.95
3.90
3.82%
4.00


$3.50
3.35
3.25
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.17%
3.25
3.25
3.20
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.05
3.W


$3.35
3.35
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.65
3.66
3.65
3.65
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.72%/
3.90


$3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
3.20
3.15
2.95
2.95
2.95
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
2.95


$3.30
3.30
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.25
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.55
3.55
3.55
3.50
3.65


$3.20
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.02%
3.10
3.10
3.05
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.80
2.80
2.80
2.85
2.95


$2.95
2.95
1a80
2.80
2.80
2.80
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.10
3.25
3.30
3.30
3.45
3.45
3.45
3.05
3.30


2.85
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.87%
3.00
3.05
3.00
2.80
2.70
2.70
2.66
2.65 ,
2.65
2.70
2.80


THE COVINGTON COMPANY,


hlsl SHOES AND DRY GOODS. 635 "o 641 Wt Ste.

NEW YORK: 256 Church St. Jc onvlle. .

We Sell Merchants Only.


The Santa Fe Railroad now reaches all
of the territory which is to be fructified
and the transportation and climate prob-
lems, so common in this country, will
therefore be solved for the owners of the
land.

AArerttaloa eopy (ebanlge or now
aivertl-ementa)p nhoald weahk a
sroay mornala to Iaure Imnert*lo
* the I.ts. o tao arUo wtek.


Tailor-Made I

THE KIND THAT


Il - __ _


F. S. BLAN
o.LUM IA, S. C.
TIE LEIMC aT= S1T 11MM


~hirtsi


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE @ RE TAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints. Oils and Glass.
Stoves, Tinware, Country-Holloware.

10 WEST BAY STRJEET Jacksonville. Fla.


FIT AIH D. BAKiL Pm. C V. BARTLSO. Vice
(Bhr- & Hohna C4) (C V. rbdeson Cm.)

SFLORIDA FREIGII

(IICoMIOI
We can collect your Fr
Ila H re ar Railroads and Steamsl
Charges Reasonable.
W1 ab" a| We save you all worry amd trouble.
fi the City asu rraspl
Spetml 216 Dyal-Upchurch Bldg.
FITTI TIE
NARD-TI-FIT
0***** t**t**** 09+0of- z* **>*<

f You Want a Turpe
S lr :f You Want a Sawm

You Want any Kind

I. i F You Mean Busines
Call on or Write to
CK H. LIV

0 TIE I. S. 0 0 # ta + .9 9+.-M>+<+< f99.


- a a.a a- a.sas.s


.*fr4*0 ****************
nine Location?

ill Location?

Sof lorida Land?

s?

INGSTON & SONs.
Ocala. Florida
*#C+90*******0**0*6*a.at


I


WHE WRITIQg AoDVERTISERS M TION THE RECORD.


*fP. BAK & BABL P. E FCK.
Genera Coml. Sec. & Teres

CLAIM AGENCY
MATED.)
eight Claims against
lip Companies.
Your Membership Solcited.
Endorsed by all Public dies A
ortatlou Comlmsles.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. (


---~


l






16 THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


I

To the Readers of the Record:


The job printing department
of this company is conducted
for the exclusive benefit of the
naval stores, lumber and man-
ufacturing trades. It is reason-
able to suppose you will get
better and more satisfactory
printing supplies-letter heads,
envelopes, commissary checks,
pay-roll reports, etc., by having
us make them.

Industrial Record Co.
Jac~ ike Frida.


wOTHrmG SUCCaup =S SVCCZS&!-






THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17
S-*?u*eMa?**hinery aee n*d M*ill Supplies.***** ****--- -

NMachinery and Mill Supplies. i


* Irn, I ron Pipe and fittings, Bolts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tools, Lumberuan's Tools,
Packing of all Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corrugated




OHNC. CHRISTOPHER
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


STATE AGENT FOR.
ATLAS ENGINES aIM BMLRS,SOULE STEAM FEEB
WORTmINGTON STAM PUMPS, JENKMI VALVES,
mSSTWrS SAWS, rFUTKOTE ROOFMS,
CURTIS MANUFACTURING C0.'S Mi Mascby.
DeUOACH SAW MILLS, Gn.EIRR WOn PULLEYS
OYrS LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SPRING ad RBER CO.
melit asi a mbber ianMtP
SOLVENTINE BOILER COMPOUND,
DO[GE MFG. CO.'S Cast ree SWrtt PuAsys
MCAFFREY FrLES, MONARCH EMERY WHEELS,
DANIELS' PPP Steam Paskm.
A. LESCMEn a SON, Wire Res.


Patents Lately Iued. 764.961. Shingle-sawing machine. A. L. SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903.04 AND TWO
Reported by R. W. Bishop, patent Shaw, Whitecastle, La., assignor of sixty- PREVIOUS YEARS.
agemey, Washington, D. C. one-hundredths to R. H. Dowman, New Rc1908-04 11902-03 J 1901-02
764,s60. Step-bearing for shingle-ma- rleans, La Sprits, casks........................... 198,647 292 496 814,84
chine armors. F. A. Cloudy, Startup, 765,294. Hacksaw. H. A. Mosher, Du- Rogins bb............................ 650,988 940,5071,071,440
Wash. bois, Pa., and E. E. Free, Ithaca, N. Y. Total ....................... ...... 844,585 1,238,0381,385,786
764,577. Ax-head. L. L. Gilks, Patten, 765,313. Machine for facing tenons of Exports
Me. spokes George Hansen, Seattle, Wash. Spirits casks- C '.. ............ ............ 188,398 296,430 814,876
764,612. Stave-jointing machine. J. A. 765,601. Multiple-spindle boring-ma- Rosins, bb. ........ .. ................-.. 752,270 975,428 62,687
Moore, Peachland, N. C. chine. Charles Seymour, Defiance, Ohio, Foreign
764,24. Barrel dressing and boring ma- assignor to The Defiance Machine Works, Spirits, casks.... ..................... 98,884 206,109 217,446
chime. Frank Pfluger and Emil Christen- same place Rosins, bb ...... ........................ 888,171 504,178 585,042
sew, Portland, Oreg. New York
764,742. Clamp. Abraham Martens, Spirits, casks ............ ..*.........** 35,658 42,765 53,797
New York, N. Y. Tampa's Trade Growipg. Rosins, bb.............................. 87,853 138,121 129,060
764,20. Chamfering-machine for mak- Tampa, Fla., Aug. 3.-The report of the S5,351 7,556
ing idne-ties. T. B. Price, Cresco, Pa. customs and internal revenue collections Spirits casks...........................351 87,5
764,&8 Saw-setting machine. J. S. here for July show a gratifying increase Rosnsb$ ........... ......... 826.746 387,784 898,586
Mason, Santa, Ana, Cal., assignor of one- over those of the same month of last The rvipt f d *trf ae les than 102-03 by 9 c and of rodi. 29,56w ba
half to J. S. Trew, same place. year.
_7,sr2. Pnce, of treating wood. J. ^K IR K & JO N ES ..o=IM ,S. ^ o.M-er
76,872. Process of treating wood. J. For the month of July, 1903, the cus- K K OWN. Vk Ls-r
H. Stewart, Williamsyort, Pa. toms collections were $114,797.63, and for
76,873. Sawing-machine. W. W. and the months just passed, $120,476.61, an DRUGGISTS. Commercial Bank,
F. N. Trevor, Loekport, N. Y., assignors increase of $5,678.98.
to Trevor Mfg. Co., same place. The internal revenue collections show 107 E. BAY ST. State fDePStry.
764913. Solution for preserving lum- an increase of over $12,000 for the month MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED. B~aaanc oas. la.. La..Lete t.
ber. S. B. Chapman, Abbeville, Ga. of July, 1904. JACKSONVILLE. FLA. JakS ,ll, -- - .k


D. M. FLYNN, President


D. M. Flynn


Walter Ray


W. B. JOHNSON, Vice-President
DIRECTORS
J. W. Oglesby L. Horn


A. S. PENDLETON, See'y& Tress


N. G. Wade


J. L. Medlin


W. B. Johnson


Independent Naval Stores & Export Co.,

Jacksonville, Florida.


Naval Stores Factors and Operators.

Capital Stock, $5oo,ooo.
The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal advances made on consignments.
Our interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operative company.


Some Money and Some Timber For Somebody.
All Producers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.


ON OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PAPIRl


i


NX


__


- ------ ---------j; U SLj~ SaaO~aEaa~-~i~+;i~;;


~,~_~i~*`~rf~I~EZ~JII)rl~~;SaffSaffSafSES ~aESSaffSL~UII-~i~i~;~~;~;~~~crrrrrc ~Jf~lrEIEE~F30iSl~rr~iS%%SII)rI~C~'~ irC~E~r~,~;~;w;r;r;rr~rrr~,~lii;;,,~~









in THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory


The advertisers are in this issue. If
ye want anything, look trough th
ulsemiid tt and write to the rm ap-
pearig thrin The Record guaratees
a prompt respoe.

AUTOMOBILE.
Gilbert, Fred E, Jacksonville, Fla.

Atlantic Natioal Bank, Jacksonville, Fa.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonvile, Fla.
Central National Bank, Ocala, Fla.
Mercantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fa.
National Bank of Jacksonviile.
BOXZS AND CRATZLS
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, a.
BRIC.
FeAter, Geo B., Jr, Jacksonville, Fla.
atba uel & Supply Co, The, Jackson.

CARS.
Sooth Atlne COar & M---(s. mg Co.,
WayrWae Ga.
CAXTL
Palmetto Park Frm, OsCeL F
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jaseonville, Fla.
Benfroe Co., H. A, Jacksonville, Fa.
Standai Clothing Co, Jacksoville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Frchgot & Co., Jacksonvile, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Moitgu .j, New York City.
Lareddon, h. W, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co, New York City.
COOPERAGE.
Coauon Co., The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonvil Cooperage o, Jacksonvie,
Fla.
quitma Cooperage Co., Quitman, Ga.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jon acksonville, Fla.
DRUGS--WHOLESAL.
Christie-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESAL.L
Covington Co, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGIHES.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fla. .
Sehofeld's Sons Co, J. 8.n,Maon, Ga.
gasta, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
Murphy, T, Jacksonville, Fla.
Sehoeld's Sons Co, J. S., Macon, Ga.
FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY.
Florida Freight Claim Agency, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
FURL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fla
ruuixL URE.
Grand Rapids Furniture Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.


GENTS' FURWiSH RS
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS--WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co., Savannah, Ga.
Hagraves Co., C. H, Jacksonville, Fi.
Johnson Co, W. B., Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
United Grocery Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
White, Waton & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
HARDWARE.
Baird & Co., L E., Jackskoknville, Fla.
Bond & Bourn Co, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Brigg Hardware Co., W. H.,Valdost, Ga.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Oeala, Fa.
Tampa Hardware Co, Tampa, Fla.
Wind & Co., J. D., Savannh, Ga.


HAJK .sS.
MeMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas, W. R., Gaineville, Fa.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonvile, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jasouf Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS.
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hamilton, The, White Springs, FL.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
Kendrick House, The, White Springs, la.
New Victoria Hotel, Jacksonville, Fa
New Paxton, The, White Springs Fb
Oaks, The, White Springs, Fla.
Pritchard House, The, White SprFi ,
Zahm's European Hotel, Jacksonile, Fls
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Steves Co., Jacksoville, Fle.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8, kacon, Ga.

Greenleaf & Crooby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonvil, Fla.
Riles, J, Jaksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, ia.
Blum & Co., Chas, Jacksonville, Fla.
Bowen & Co, Jacksonville, Fa.
Gornto & Co., J. E., Valdosta, Ga.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINBS.


Spencer Medicine Co, Chattanooga, Tenn.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonvill, Fa.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. ., Maeon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR J uUPE -aTL PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. S, Maeon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jeksonville, Fa.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswik, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Svannah, Ga
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co, W. H., Valdoet, Ga.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co, Oeala, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. 8, Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co, Tampa, Fla.
MULES AND HORSES.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fla.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barnes-Jessup Co, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.4
Ellis-Young Uo., The, Savannah, Ga.
Independent Naval Storm and Export Co
Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co, Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
PAINTS
Baird & Co., L ., Jacksonville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PECANS.
Griffliing Bros. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. ., Valdosta, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Oeala, Fa.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Oala, Fa.
PUMPS.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co, Savannah,
Ga.
RAILS.
Joseph Iron Co., Isaac, Cincinnati, 0.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa,
Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fla.


Frazier, W. W., Jaeksonville, Fla.
Livington & Sons, J. H., Oeaa, Fa.
Southern States Land and Timber Co,
Jacksonville, FIa
West-Raley-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville,
Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALI.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co, The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville ,Fla-
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jaksonville, Fla.
TANKs.
Cypress Tank Co, Mobile, Ala
Davis & Son, G. L, Palatka, Fla.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G, Jackanville, l a.
Co nril Tool Co., The, Waanh, N. C
TuPgZ aurs APPARATUS
Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksonville, la.


Luniir& asU PKOCM8&
Pine Product Construction Co., Th Fay-
etteville, N. C.
Pine Belt Construction Co., The, Raleigh,
N. C.
Standard Turpentine Co., The, New ork
City.
ULPEsl as STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswiek, Ga.
MeMillan Bros., Savanah, Ga.
TUPEa ans STILL TUB.
Davis & Son., G. IL, Palatka, Fia.
z.uxPKajU m VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fla.
Irrwxjlnr ,FB.
I XV5WEJusaS.
Grivot Typewriter Exehange, JaaenMWi
Pia.
VEMlCLES
MeMurray & Baker, Jacksonvie, Fl
Thomas, W. B, Gainesville, Fha
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonille, FD.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonvile, Fa.
Riles, R. J, Jacksonville, ia.
YELLOW PI E LUXNER,
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonile, Fi
East Coast Lmber Co., Watertown, Fin.


lI lit I -IIh I t I I Itui i 1 ltI I I I I A a ft I Ia111


SJ. P. WII AMS. President
T. A. JxrxNNos.ad VicePresident.
SH. L. KAv. secretary.


J. A. G. CAmaOw, Vice-Pb les
J. F. DUsanT,a.3 Vice-Prsident
D. G. White, Trmmrer.


- J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

- IiEd U M I [ IIIU m MUlS.
-" a~iM Oflee axVraNNmH, OGORGIK.
r* neah Ofrrfm.: PICNOJCOL, FrL. Braneb Oroenryr Hrn..
m r .I JAC KeONVIL LA. f COLUIM Bu GOA.

SNaval Stores Producers are aIvited to Correspond With (is.
- Ill I ll lll ll IIl ll I 1111llll .llll11111 l11111 l "I

This CMt Represents the Famem

"Blakeslee" Gasoline Pump Rig
For
Irrigatlos, Tank Supply and Dralsge Service.


No.1 Otft has a capacity or f 45,0 gos in s hoUrs.
No. 2 outfit has a capacity of 1soo gallons in Sa hours.
Write toeuy for prices to-
WHITE-BLAKESLEE MANUFACTURING CO.
BIrmingham, Al.


BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will send by express, prepaid, the following:
Four full quarts IAncoln County, Sun nybrook Rye or Big Hor Rye .. tL
Single Bottles ................. ......... ......... U
I will send four u quarts of Somers' Corn, Melwood Rye, Goen We-
ding Rye, Holland Gin, Ton Gin, Peach Brandy, Peach and Homey
Whiskey, in and Manhattan Cocktails--ny of the above for........
One bottle of any of the above ............................. ................ ....-....
iroar bottles of the following California Wines: Sherry. Port. Musoat,
Catawba ............ .................................................. SLM
Single bottles ......................................
angle bottles ............................................................... sM
Four bottles Wilson Whiskey, cased........... .
Single bottles ....... ........................................ ..
Five bottles uffy's Malt ......................................................
Bulk goods of all kinds. special Prices on applicatio. All kinds t
liqurs in ugs from LSa. to AL4 f.. o. b. Jaksonville.
F. BETTELINI W Bay St. ep. Union Depet, JaUkseuville, F


THE IRCORD IS THE OPERATORS' wrLTACW-"








THE JIMUUtrrFIAL RECORD. 19


NW TOmK LUMBER KMARt.
Pi Tdeow (Long Leaf).
By ail.
Bniling orders, 12 i. and under 200
to $5.0; building orders, 14 in. and up,
au600 to $.00; yard orders, ordinary as-
uortment, $a0M0 to $22.00; :hip stock,
easy schedules, $20 to 7.50; ship stock,
40 ft. average, 0.00 to $35.00; heat face
siding, 1 in and 11-2 in., e0.50 to $21.0;
1 is. wide boards, heart face, $26.00 to
$2.00; 11-4 and 11-2 in. wide boards,
&800 to $30.00; 2 in. wide plank, heart
fae, $30.00 to $31.0; kiln-dried ap siding,
4-4, $1.00 to $18.50; kiln-dried a siding,
6-4, $19.00 to $20.00; yellow pne box
boards (knotty), $13.0 to $14.0; yellow
ple stepping $3.00 to $40.00.
By te add $1.00 to $150.
Leg Lef YeTow Pine Fiosing.
Caar heart face rift DM&HBk, 13-16x
21-4 counted 1x3, $44.00 to $40.00; "A"
rift DM&HBk 13-16214 counted 1x3,
$32M to $3300; "B" rift DM&HBk 13-16
x2 14 oe nuted lx, $2.00 to $27.00; "A"
1at DMA&Bk 13-1x2 1-4 counted a3,
$21J0 to $8.50; "B" Flat DM&HBk 13-
16 1-4 counted lx3, $19.50 to $20.0; No.
1 C imnw DM&HBkI3-x21-4 counted
lx3, $18L
Par 11-8 in. add $250. Steamer hip.
met n at grain flooring $1 less per
thomand than above prices.
Cypress.
Cypress Pri Current F. O. B. New York
Marke. Lumber ragh or dressed:
Tank stock, 11-2 to 3 inches, $48.75 to
$6.75; Finrst and Seconds, 1 to 3 inches
$44" to 7; Selects, 1 to 3 inches,
$385 to $46.5; Shop, 1 to 3 inches, $2.25
to $40-W.
For pries on 8 inch add $1 per 1,000 ft;
n 1 inch add $2 pr 000 ft; on 12 inch,
add $3 per 1,000 ft.
Bevel siding, 1-8 inch dear, D to A,
$11.76 to 8$2.2; ceiling, 3-8x4 or 6 inch
eler, D to A. $13.2 to $246; 1-2x4 or 6
ine l dear, D to A, $18.00 to $27.O; 6-8x4
or 6 inch clear, D to A, $2.25 to $3.25;
Flooring, drop siding and ceiling, 4 or 6
inch, D to A, $7.75 to $43.75.

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Bat In the World.
For delivered prices write,
Cy"rew Tdk Co, MIMeMleA



10. RI R, A.
MANUFACTURER OF


BRICK.


WIIEHRIo ES.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.



TIE CANNON COMPANY
CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Brrs hold and will pass the se-
erest American ad European inspection.

Plants at MEGS, CAIRO, OUITMAN, GA.,
and MONL~E LO,, FLA.
A rm orders to home office,
QUITMAN, GA.


Business Directory.

FIRE INSURANCE--Lowet rates. Io-
ren H. Green & Co., 9 and 10 Park BU.
Jacksonville, Fla. 6mo.
JOHN ZAEHMB wUROPMAN HOTaL.
128 E. Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant. Nicely Fhraiohe
RIoom. Open day and night Bettlla's
old Stand.




Commission Merchants.
ROSIN, TUPi FIlA. TAR, PICH,
GUM THUS, L I TC.
x38 Frost Street, N]W TORK


BAllY MONTlIOMERY,
Commission Merchants,
Na.vSl Stores & Cotton
Liberal advances mae against dcp-
ments. Conignmeta sriidt.
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
CEW YORK CITY.


Quitman Cooperage Co.,
QUITMAN. GA.
Manufacturers of

HIGH GR E SPIHT BARRELS
According to specifications of
Board of Trade, Savannah.
Also make
Dip and Syrup Barrels.


J. E. GORNTO & CO.
Shaping Trade
a. Specialty...
01 $3 Orers ad mr, Eprm PrepaM
WHISKIES
FROM $1.50 TO $6 A GALLON
Sole Agent
Old Saratoa Rye, $6 Gal.
Old Bker Rye, 6 Gal.
Old Westoreland Rye, $4 al.
Bi Horn Rye, $3 Gal.
J. E. GORNTO & CO.,
Valdosta, Georgia

L lw hi wao ISII 4I.
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN





ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilizer, Oil and Ice Ma-
chinery, and Supplies and Repairs.
CAPACITY FOR 300 HANDS.
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting. Pulleys, Hangers, Leather ana
Rubber Belting and Hose, Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and
Hoisting Engines.
AUGUSTA. CA.


McMurray Livery, Sale and Transfer Co.

HORSES AND MULES.


We carry the larw t stok e any stable in the
on hand 1a to MS hea o a ll hs and pries.
us a call, or write for wat yea want.
L B. DALTON.


W. T. RILEY,
President.


J. A. 6. CARSON,
Vice-PrsMeldt.


city, and have always
If in need of ay, give
Manager. Jacksonlle.


eam J. SCWCL.
SMc. mEd rfi@.


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.

MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS


Machine and Hand Factories,

8th Street R. R. Cirsing.


JACKSONVILLE.


F4LORIDA


SNEW CHOICE BOOK COLLECTION OF


Wrds
an
kesat


"Old Favorite Songs"
[Copyrishbted.]


4 eloses
or


COVERS AND 32 PAGES 6 x 9. BOOK OPENS FLAT. JUST THE
THING FOR HOME, LODGE%, SOCIAL OCCASIONS, ETC.
S Our beautiful booklet of "Old Favorite Songs" (words and muie) fills
a long-felt want, because it is a collection of the songs that everybody
S wants, which cannot be had otherwise, without purchasing several books at
a considerable expense, but in this booklet they are supplied at a trailing
cost. These songs are the delight of every home. Every family wants
them. Lodges want them. The appeal to everybody. Such good e songs
as: Alice, Where Art Thou, Ameria, Annie Laurie, AM Lag By e,
Aunt Jemima's Plaster, Battle Hymn of the Republic, Ben Blt, Bird of the
Greenwood, Blue Bells of Scotland, Breese from. Homea,olbI, the Gem
of the Ocean, Comin' Thro' the Rye, Cradle Song, Darling Nellie Gray,
Dip, Boys, Dip the Oar; Evening Ben Far Away, Flag of the Free, Flee as
a Bird, Flow Gently, Sweet Afton; Go Down, Moses; Good Night, dies;
Home, Sweet Home; Last Rose of Summer; Lead Kindly Light; Illy
Dale, Long, Long Ago; My Old Kentucky Home; My Maryland; Old Black
Joe; Old Folks at Home; Old Oaken Bucket; Robin Adair; Rocked in the
Cradle of the Deep; Roll, Jordan, Roll; Scenes that Are Brightest; Star
Spangled Banner; Stars of the Summer Night; Sweet and Low; Swing
Low. Sweet Chariot; Suwannee River; Thou Art My Rose; There's Music
in the Air; Those Evening Bells; When the Swallows Homeward Fly;
Won't You Tell Me Why, Robin?; Yankee Doodle; Dixie; and may
others.
Place Order Quick. Sample Copy, postage prepaid, 25c.

Industrial Record Publishing Co.,
Booeek Department. Jaeksenvlle, Fla.
To the Boys and Girls: Send $1.00 for eight copies. Sell them to your
townspeople and friends and make $1.00 "pin money" for two or three
hours' work.




Album of Florida Views

FREE.

One Hundred handsomely engraved views of Florida, compiled in a magnifi-
cent souvenir writing tablet. Beautiful present for an absent friend, or an ap-
propriate method of writing to those to whom you would recall Florida memories.
Sent postpaid for 30 cents or given tree with one yearly subscription to the Week-
ly Industrial Record at the regular rates. Send :0 cents and get the album sent to
any address, or send $3.00 and get The Record weekly for one year and the
album, sent to any address, free of cost. Address,
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksovllle, Fla.

Send your order for general printing to the Record


THE RECORD'S SPACE HAS A BIG MONEY VALUE.


-- --


- --- __ __




U THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF
THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.
I PE CT l 1 I IF IlM, REOI, 1 E a tlu R I alS M II W.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED
A Florida Enterprise. Try It.
J_

When you Visit Jacksonville

Call to see the Record and be at home.
Tell the Record all you know, that will Interest others.
If you want to buy or sell advertise your place.
If you owe the Record pay the bill.
If you don't owe the Record make a bill.
Order your Printed Stationery.
Be sure and give the order for your Commissary Checks.
Call on the Secretary of the 7. 0. A.

Call at the Industrial Record Office.
TH" PIe AD M 8 Raos DUCTS







a


THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD. a


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commisary Trades)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 21
A. C. Creamery, 80 ".. 22
10" '.. 25
A C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream .......... 11
Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... Market
50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-lb tin. ..........

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 16

Sugar


UJranulated


Sugar, bls.....
5 bbls..
10 bbl..
Sao"


580
525
525
580


Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Jva, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb.................. 80
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 12
Green Coffee, medium ...... 11
Green coffee, common....... 10
Arbackles Roasted Coffee, 1
b packages...... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ages.............. market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 12
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 Ib..... 40
Gnpowder, 10 lb.... 50
English B'fast, 10 lb.. 45
Formosa, 10 Ib....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10c sise
10 lbs to case, per pound'.. 40

Salt
2O0-lb sack................ 100
100-lb sak................ 50
lee Cream, 200-lb sacks..... 1 00
S 100-lb acks..... 50
Pocket Saltin bbls., 8-lb.... 265
" 2-lb.... 2 75

Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin...... ........ 15
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 dos to box
sifter top, per dox...... 40
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per dos ......40 and 80

Corn
Sk Len l-
Car Lot Lot Sk
W. Corn,lllb, 1 38 1 40 1 48
1001b, 1 24 1 t6 1 29
Mxdcorn,1101b.l 88 185 188
1001b,1 21 128 1 2


New
Ga and Fla,
barrels, per


Syrup
in cypress
gallon.....


Oats


Car Lot
W.clip'd,1251b,2 20
S 1001b,1 75
White 1251b, 200
White 100lb. 160
Mixed 1251b
1001b,


upa sk
aot
2 22
177
202
1 62


Left 100
Sk Lots
225
180
205
165


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice..... 1 60
fancy..... 165
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
perbbl................ 5 65
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 lb sack... .....5 65
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 5 65
Pillsbury's Best ..... 6 00
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 5 75
6 6bbl .... ....
Meal
Meal, per barrel............3 50
92-lb sacks ........... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 8 60
S 92-1b sacks....... 1 60

Rice
Good................ ... 5
Choice...... ........... 65
Fancy Head............... 6
Broken ................... 81
Canned Vegetables
Dos.
Tomatoes, 8s, Chief........ 85
Tomatoes, 2s 1" ........ 67
Clayton, 3s................ 80
Clayton, 2s ............... 65
Sifted Peas, 2s ...........1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s........1 20
Lima Beans,2s .......... ..1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2 .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8s........... 90
Baked Beans, Is........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets, 3. ...........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ........... 85
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s ............. 90
Hay
car lowts uale Ies1
lots qmatit
Choice.... 19 50 20 00 20 50
No.l Tim. 18 00 18 50 19 00
No. 2 1700 1780 1800
No. Cl'ler 17 00 17 50 18 00


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3., 2 doz to case, per
doz .................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per dos............... 1 90
Peaches, 8s, two dos to case
per doz................ 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ase, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case.
per doz..............
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 7
10-lb '" 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
Ib.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
per lb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per Ib....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-1b box, per lb....... 8J
Fancy Apricots 25 Ib boxes. 18
Ex. Choice " "
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes......4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lh. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. case 8 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
lt.x, 40-50............. 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 50-60............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box ......... 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 61
Extra H P, .... 5
Seed Peanuts, ....
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ .... 18
Brazils ................. 12
Peacans.... ............ 12
Filberts................... '12
al0 nuts.................. 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 Lessloo
lots Sk. Lot Sk. Lt
Cottonseed Meal 97 00 2750 2800
Hulls 1150 12 00 1250


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
8 hoop .........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per do .......1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
6 4 " nested......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per dos 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 00
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. 1 20

Washboards xL.
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay...............3 00
176 Diamond Glass ........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per doz 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75
Canned Pish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
dos. .................. 95
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 60
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 55
Salmon is, Tale 4 doz to case
per dos Alaska......... 90
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 36
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fsh 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
Ibs to box............ 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 argn ... 1414
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avg .. 14
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avg .. 11-
"Reliable" Shoulds, 7-9 avg.. 1-4
"Reliable" California Hams, 68 9
jireakfast Bacon, light a. .... 181-
D. 8. Bellies, 16-18 ar. ........ 8-4
D. S. Bellies, 0-2 ar. ......... 81-
D. Bellies, 25-30 ar. ......... 81-
D. 8. Plates .................. 71.-
Bacon Plates .................. 81-2
D. 8. Butts .................. 63-
Bologna Sausage ............... 7
Sausage i oil ................ 175
Battn sa Chss.
"Strawberry" Creamwery, 0-ib tubs U
S 30-lb tuba. I1-2
Ob, Is... 261-2
"Ladybird" full ream ceese .. 131-3
Kian's asr.
"Indiana Pure Let .......... minark
fesa-Foam" Compound .........mrkt.
Kinga's Cand Iests.
"Reliable" Cod Beef, Is ...... $SL2
ore Bee, as ....... 3
SRost Bee, Is ........ LI
Roast Beef, 2s ........ .U
SPotted Ham ad 7Wqft
1-4& ........................... .
SSliced Beef, l-s .. .. LUs
Viemna Sausag, It ..
T" O .--......-....-.....-.


=T A coW or TIM X&VAL -1 338s aLfE moot


J-









Ur -. v


THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertising patrons of this paper and no

charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention

Fr Twrsouue. SwmI or Factory SuiSas w Mahausry of Amy Kd.L For Timber. Farmain or Range Lou".
DATr INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main Office, Jacksonville, Fla. I am in the market for lands for the purpose of
I am in the market (or lands tor the purpose of n s
In the market for the followingI
In the markefor the folowi Prefer in State of Please put me in communication
with responsible parties nd give me other information.
Remarks
Please notify where same can be secured.
SiSiggnened

State specifically the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or second-handed. DATE
Lcatlr for FTurpeml. SawmiI w Factory, r for Amy Iiastrim EAtorpre. Fr C hommsary. Office or loesehoId Suppie, SawmM or Turpetine Males
DArancs, Waseas. Etc.
DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla. DATE -
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla.
Please advise the undersigned regarding a good location in (state or section of
state) for In the market for
together wi(h full Information about labor conditions, taxes, transportation facilities,
local encouragement, etc.
TrhMrm Please give me information as to best places to bay, etc.

Signed Signed


mo VYa Wnat to Sel S-omet- ? Are Ys Thimadu of ltvIesttg ?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Have for sale the following Can you give any information as to th" reliability of the follow' firm or corpora
tion
Remarks
Can you suggest a parchaser?
Signed Signed


we Yen Want to E mpy a Man? Do Yoe Wert Emwpymenlt?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jackasnille. Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Want a man to fill the position of Want a position is

with the following requirements Refer to the fe owing

Can you suggest such a man? Can you assiL ne ?t
Signed Signed




CLIP THIS COUPON I
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD s
hen you ae answering an adverti ent from the columns of this paper, whether you are making an inquiry or placing an order, please cut out the coupon
below and ttach it to the letter. h will pay you.

COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the In lsltrla Record, issue dated

Signed


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonville. Fla., and Savannah, Ga., Is the South's great
weekly trade journal.



The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.


16 | 0NT
IF YOU Dwar VamD EC TI XXr THB D jOZK Us


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THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


McMURRAY & BAKER, --------
CF.,N y Ed q|wul- *U
SI All ianl i wi HneS. Libetj SftWe
We a meoi -a Wate pleasure s ead bmam vehsle 1s. s th -
ImarebI. oft bmrne, a nd buegs Isrlittag, we haw a Nebby Mwa PVte The men wtil be
ma goo13 to tch with al. Tarpeatlie wagons and hrrns a spedalty. Deot -he 49" of th sport are n
ftret we s best the world ba had-made hrness t nts with pleasure.

IRMI !I BfE, 41 4Q BIT 9. Iae-mae me _me o o. Det o
AWmele&sL Lemedtas Trade jorumga.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Th* We*kl Industrial ecord of Jack-
aviOlle and Savannah has taken its place
amBnr the leading trade journal in the t
UnltetaI 5 6and as an authouityOn.- RS
only by the best and most carefully edited
The Clyde W StS I shiS Company RW ieds views UMtsd cmfn
el- papers in tis country. but by th Is I
to Europe also. A London trade paper I
teaching this ooe yesterday gives liberal
as to the Recorda' vie. w on rtet con- t
This week's &ao e of the ladetril Ree.,- and
rd is even better than usual. and it is
ra trong and enttrtaln1nt sgeral lat. trail
a ~trl Mnewspaper. i addition to its value RE
as the obaapion t te two spec~al tnadu- .
s3 t it repreOent It Is rItafai of new Jobh
stories of devOf opsent in the Southeast. plain
mleng them being the st orl a half-mill- tend
So-dollar crporratio org a.,ed in Jack- Gb
sevl yesterday,. ad the oorganiatlon Of if. I
several etlr I corporatons during the and
Inweek Geor am lorida. W
It ha set the aIme for enterprisI and It wr m
NE W YORK, CHA RLESTON ANWD FLORIDd A LINES 'w" adte. t)r ngr. e m or O 00
it is rJlvie2g,, both In Itps sserlption and
Te nsamturtu e 22e b ad tis Oa ae pappoited to =sal as follows ,calli atverwtins department.carrying as at does.
at Charlestem, 8. C. both ways. IpeahaPpe. of the largest advetlbing pat-
reue Nowrm JaInceksouet eo r nafte she to any of te am oatbr ,gI
(Per as NWorth Swver). TRAUMEL Charleston am.d New York. joIunals. tem
sew,
Tuesday, June 14, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ....Sunday, June 19 at 9:00 am .l.
Wednesday, June 15, at 3:00 pm-x*ONEIDA ...... Monday, June 20, at 9:00 am weo at u IU #
Wednesday, June 16, at 3:00 pm..ALGO NQUIN ..Tuesday, June 21, at 11:00 am Sa .E I Bsi IM
Friday, June 17, at 3:00 pm ..APAC E ....Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 nin .tw. who This
"xSEMI NOLE ..Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'n ef t
Monday, June 20, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Saturday, June 25, at 1:30 pm
Wednesday, June 22, at 3:00 pm..COM ANCHE ..Monday, June 27, at 4:00 am 4+%a| f9%
"xHURON ........ Tuesday, June 28, at 5:00 am
Friday, June 24, at 3:00 pm ...IROQUOIS .Thursday, June 30, at 6:00 am
Tuesday, June 28, at 3:00 pm ... APACHE .......... Sunday, July 3, at 8:00 am R JJJ.J.oJTJ U-J.J2L.J..JJ .JJJJJJJL.JJ9JJJJJJ ..
x*ONEIDA ..Monday, July 4, at 8:00 am
Thursday, June 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Tuesday, July 5, at 9:30 m SPECIAL BAR AINS IN DIAMONDS.
Saturday, July 2 at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE. ....Thursday, July 7, at 11:30 am 80 YEARS RELIABILITY.
"xIEMINOLE .... Thursday, July 7, at 11:30 am *
Tuesday, July 5, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ......Sunday, July 10, at 1:00 pm H ess f Sla. er'
Friday, July 8, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE ...... Wednesday, July 13, at 4:. am as
xHuON ......Wednesday, July 13, at 4:0 am Dlamonds, SIlverware Watches and Jewelry
turday, July 9, at 3:00 pmi .A4ONQUIN ...... Friday, July 15, at 6:00 am
Tuesday, July 12, at 3:00 pm .COMANCHE ......Sunday, July 17, at 7:30 am CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND II A 13 MAIN.
*xONEIDA ........Monday, July 18, at 8:00 am o Tf-sf rrsvrr"r-0-t v-sv-.66
Friday, July 15, at 3:00 pm .... IROQU ....Thursday, July 21, at 11:00 am
m xSEMINOLE .... Thursday, July 21, at 11:00 am
Tuesday, July 19, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ...... Sunday, July 24, at 12:30 pm N a
Wednesday, July 20, at 3:00 pm ..ALONGUIN ....Tuesday, July 26, at 4:00 am
Friday, July 22, at 3:00 pm ... .COMANCHE .Wednesday, July 27, at 4:30 amv
.HURON .... .Wednesday, July 27, at 4:30 m o
Tuesday, July 26, at 3:00 pm .ARAPAHOE ..... Sunday, July 31, at 7:00 am
xONEIDA ...... Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 8:00 am
Wedn"esdy, July 27, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ......Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 8:00 am
Friday, July 2, at 3:00 pm .APACHE ..... Wednesday, Aug. 3, at 9:00 am Published Daly in The
Sunday, July 31, at 3:00 pm .... .ALONQUIN .... Friday, Aug. 5, at 10:30 am
LxBEMI OLE .... Saturday, Aug. 6, at 11:30 am
z--P:e.t snay. *-Boston via Charleston and New York.
LBe1t via Brunswick Charles ton. **&-Boston, via Charlestoa.
TTlI CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Let Serv .e. etwee. Je.. me SMe, Datete t anom d Preyt .mee m"d an Iam..
ews rP fiss, OmuC at Charleston Both Ways.
o mi -w..m Y SAat Crarito t e Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
A a................. ..... .......... ... ...n wL Whart a daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.
ertmd. ................... .. ..Prom toot of Cather Street, Jacmov
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jasekauvitl an& santfw.
ag at Palat a, Ast ,- I-c. B. W.$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.
Slanedigs em t. Johns river
S STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
i" aMet to M- Abows: Leave iJaksonville. Sunday Tues ns td hur- B I P R IZ E S :
a, tM XI m. Retiring. leave aford. Monday Wednesdar & Friays 9 a. .
1In muWuI NOwrnO uumu,,.
Sea = "l Read u.
,-,- . .. ................. ..............je........ .............. rrive Ma. m. A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Expositicn, to
.0m" P. : :. .. ....... .. .... -p.%.*- .... e ...... : oave 8-01 m.
i......................... ............... ............Leave 2 Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
ave 4 a. m.I.............. .........t. 1 ac .............. .......... Lave 1:1 p. m.
.............. ....I ......... .... .............. ........ n Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
Arrh a 8s. l ......................... banor ......... .......... ...... ILe.v o 11 a. E
Ar. 10:00 a. m4..................te rise.....................Lv. 40:00 a. i. scription contest. Write for particulars.
elNw A6 FAU N6ERML AND IICKET OrIrlCE, se W. any 5t.. JaCk'hllle.
P. 2. TROMONl4WP. TR.. Anst. Oent Pass Agent. S W. Bayf St.. Jacksonville. Pi a
W. 0O.COOPER JR.. leAl Frt. AJt., Jaek'ville. C. P. LOVELL. Am t. SuptJackvilkle
root Hogan Street, Jacksonville. Ca r & hing Co
A. C. HAGOURTT. O. Z. P. A.. New York. CLTDE ILNE. G. r. A.. New York
Tigwen. eas, wm. P. CLYDI a CO.
C ru ildng a state Street. Now kers. JacIsonville, Florida.
War3T FT Rn ORD FOR Ar Y INFomATION DnneIM.,




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. TH INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Cooperage Company

Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spi-it Barrels

Capital $100,000.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.

OFFICERS:
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


DIRECTORS:
JOHN E. HARRIS, C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST,
W. C. POWELL, W. F. COACHMAN.


W. I. KELLY


Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are
J.

McMILLAN BROTHERS'
Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
S and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last' month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS. |
SAVANNAH, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
MOBILE, ALA. FAYTTEVILLE, N C.
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