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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00082
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: July 29, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00082
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text






For the Week ErdIn July 29. 1904. AG


LY


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


. .PuWblsed Evere Friday,_ Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.


~-aE S 29t 1. #"2 D th Ls zocu Committee Of the TrmVOIts Operaters' AssOC*A80u as Oft ExciustlM owscai frgau, 4" Adapted Sep. RIM. 8902. iA Cou-
sdP, as so GI .t a. e me ermrgl Asssbotea Adapte epti. sits.. 9S3. as the oaly Oficial Orpra ofite Turpeutlae Operators. Asaecftenl .
d April2th WJ. a t29 0t6iat"O the Noter.-Staft C Growers' Association. endorsed &y the gina Sawm il
issocIallat. OfflctIa Orga o the Suothoasteri Stock Grower's Associata..


VWL 9. N. 4. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ATLANTA, GA. SAVANNAH, GA. $3 A YEAR.


Industrial Methods of the Modern Railway,

(y 1 NGRAHAM, Third VicPresident of the Florida East Coast Railway,
in the Railway Critic.)


- - - - ---


Aodgr railway, well-equipped, run-
aing mnmeros fast trains, both passenger
and freight, over a roadbed costly to build
an- iaitry to maintain, is much like a
yhie elephant to the East Indian, in that
it must be fed or there will be trouble.
h railroad's capacity for traffic is enor-
mos, its constantly increasing demands
for improvements in track, equipment,
permanent way, station grounds and
ahet is abnormal in a growing country,
ad What is good for to-day I' -utterly
imdequate for to-morrow, if the demands
of au-to-date methods in service are main-


S taned.
Not very many years ago the train ser-
vice in the South was the source of many
Sgood-natured jokes on its happy-go-lucky
.ways, Its slow runs, and long stops, at
stations where the entire affairs of the lo-
ealy just had to be adjusted daily, ere
the train with its few passengers could
proceed in its leisurely way. What was
good eanogh for yesterday Ys good
enough for to-morrow; to-day could take
care of itsef.
All these methods, however, have been
changed and the Southern service is just
aas fit, as good and reliable as that af-
forded in any other part of the world.
'Iadeed, the heaviest engines, the longest
S fast rus outside of California are com,
an in the South and during the winter
semasn the great centers of the East and
West aad that beautiful little old city
of Florida,St. Augustine, are. served by
numeroa s and costly trains de luxe from
S New York ad Chicago, thus uniting the
S mot ancient of our cities with the great-
eat and -moat modern. These fast, ele-
,; an tirmki make the 1,0b miles from
New York to St. Augustine in 25 hours,
ad the 1,076 miles from Chicago to St.
Augstine in 32 hours, a most wonderful
gain in time over the old schedules in ef-
S eet- in- the early '8s, -when it took the
writer one whole week to go from St.
S Lei to Jacksonville by rail and going all
the time, too. Excellent all the year
' rom svi e is also maintained, with
t- Pullman equipment of the best.
A\ ; a eating about for the reason for
S these marvelous improvements in trans-
S portation facilities, there can be found
only one gr64 one that has influenced it
more than any other thing. In 1887 Mr.
' Flagler finished and opened to the public
' that meat beautiful relation, the Ponce de
S Leo Hotel, in St. Aagutine, thus ehang-
ing in an instant the entire personnel of
* the travel to Florida. Prior to that time;
36~k


the "tourist" was a health seeker; if he
got well-as was usually the case if he
came soon enough-he took up orange
growing and used his personal influence
to bring other sufferers from pulmonary
diseases to the State to find the same
measure of relief that he had. In a word,
Florida wAs before the day of the Ponce
de Leon a great sanitarium; that, how-
ever, opened the way for the pleasure-
loving multitude, and Florida thus became
the playground for the United States and
Canada, being equally accessible from all
parts of the North, East and West, and


4.


L-4;


near enough to enable the business man pend less on the orange and more on
to take a run home within 48 hours from sand." The railroads had to find traffic;
his winter vacation in Florida, should they, through their connections, found and
his affairs require his presence. made markets for their "growers." The
SThe" business man, the capitalist, the traffic departments, that are the barome-
pleapure seeker, all bent on a good time, ters of a railroad's existence, demanded
brought with them numerous new require- and got for the shipper a living rate on
ments. It was found, generally at the his truck; they found buyers for his tim-
instance of some good railroad man, that ber; they brought in the turpentine "far-
vegetables could be grown, that cows mer," and they stood by with a helping
would give milk-if fed-that chickens hand, wherever help was needed.
would scratch for a part of their living, From the East Coast a handsome car
if given a show, and that there were loaded with the products of this section
other ways of making a living than from of the State was sent out under compe-
that oft-repeated combination, of "fish tent supervision as an object lesson. This
and Yankees." car was sent all through the Northern
Here is where modern methods of the States east of the Mississippi River; it
railways' industrial departments came was kept freshly supplied with good
into play. Traffic was necessary to sup- things to eat and see, all raised in Flor-
port the miles of railway that were built ida; every question was carefully answer-
to meet the demands of pleasure travel, ed; interesting illustrated literature, with
and gain the liberal land grants offered by reliable information, was issued where-
the State for railroad building; but there ever desired-I say reliable information, for
were no tourists in the summer and early in these days the average railroad of any
fall and during that period, as one early standing cannot afford to tell a lie; they
railroad manager remarked,. "a dollar have grown too big to make it even nec-
looked as big as a cart wheel." Something essary to do so to attract attention.
just had to he done the balance of the Careful newspaper advertising was had
year and every railroad man was expected and experienced men were sent north as
and required to do his best towards solv- "missionaries" to study the Northern far-
ing the question. Market gardeners were mer and to induce him to come South and
brought in-specalaists in their various see for himself that opportunities here
lines-money, fertilizers, water and brains existed that would afford him better
were mingled in suitable proportions, with chances to make money than in the North.
a little soil as a binder, apd4 results proved When he. came he was met by agents of
that good things' to eat couk be raled the company who gave him the help com-
with profit to the tracker andifruit4 grv- only necessary in a new country; found
er. from the apparent inert sandy wastes him a place to sleep and eat; people to
of the State; that Florida could, if braced talk with to whom he could explain the
up a little, grow many kinds of fruit and differencee between "Floridy" and Ohio or
the early vegetables, for the nation. 1 Connecticut, and who would take an in-
fisheries were taken up and it was found terest in him and see to it that his small
that markets all over the United States capital was not annexed by some smarty
could be reached by the expres,aervice ad' that he got a fair start. When he
for the Spanish mackerel, the pompano got to going and had something to ship,
and the rest of the long list of food fish his friends in the traffic or industrial de-
teeming in our waters. The nakve oysteriaL ment saw to it that he had help
.*. ... ... ,,.. "V'. .L, --.


was interviewed by "the doctors" from
the U. S. Fish Commission, who advised
how best they could be raised, and our
oysters to-day produce a large business.
Orange growing was nursed and foster-
ed to such an extent that in 1893 and 1894
the output was about five million boxes,-
gaining for it the respect due the king of
all fruit products, it being the standard
product in Florida. When the great freeze
with its terrible losses, struck the blow in
1805 and 1897, that cost the State upward
of 75 millions of dollars of loss to its
standard product, the orange, any other
State in the Union so afflicted would have
gone into bankruptcy; not so Florida.
Now the Industrial Departments said to
their friends, "Push your side crops;
make of them your principal business;
grow oranges as a side crop; cultivate
the other things that you can make grow;
make your living out of the ground; de-


^""'''"'""~'LCr~"


v


-7 77, -- 7 7 T7 r ---


i


PN1FW =;


in preparing his crop for market; that he
was made known to reliable men who
could and would handle his shipments in
his interest. If one market was too full
to make shipment there profitable, the
traffic agent used the wires regardless of
cost to find one that was open, and caemed
the shipment to be "changed in traitt,,
much to the grower's beeLt.
The railroads fostered associations of
growers, so that carload shipments at the
lowest rates, could be quickly and seees-
fully handled. They put in stop so cose
together, tofacilitate handling in see of
the fruit sections, that a fast train rm-
ning by would seem fenced in by many
miles of continuous platforms. They in-
stituted the "vegetable express train"
that carries vegetables and other perish-
ables in standard express ears, on fast
passenger train schedules and oft-times
with rights of that class. They brought
together in personal acquaintance the pro-
ducer and the consumer; they used every
means that their great capital and ac-
quaintance give them, to lay at the feet of
"their people" the best that science and
costly investigation could realize, in order
that their products might rank higher in
the markets of the world than aay other.
The industrial department of the mod-
ern railway resembles the service of the
physician in some of the Oriental eoma-
tries, who is expected to keep his patients
well. The grower's pulse must be con-
stantly felt, quick changes in markets,
methods, tastes and fashions in eropa
must be noted, and he mast be kept in-
formed so that his product is always at
the highest standard of excelleme.
To sum up, in the industrial department
of the modern railway, the settler, the
homeseeker, the trucker and the shipper
has always a friend to whom he can tan
for help, which is bound to him in ties of
the strongest, whose real interests are
identical, and when united, as they often
are, they become invincible in the mar'
kets of the world.
The Florida East Coast Railay's in-
dustrial department has had the cordial
co-operation of the traffic and the operat-
ing departments and the benefit of the lib-
eral policy of the management; otherwise
its usefulness would be nil. But more
than anything else, this railroad has had
in all its departments the aid of the mma
who is at the head of its system, who, aa
a greta philanthropist, has no equal, whose
l:fe is spent in helping his fellow man to
help himself, who is always ready to lad
the way, whose friendship has inspied hi
men to work hard to pleae him, whose
work has itself been a labor of love, and
whose kindly interest in the de-ivnmtam
of all the resources of his territory as
been the great underlying i"n1iK that
has produced results.


l ,-M


- '"* -Z1- 46






n THE .WEEKLY N"UarurIAL 20 OO0BD.


I C. B. ROGERS, Paumanrr.


r -(------i~iIfEfI~ If I 3 I t - - ttf


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, Vicz-Patssumm"


C. H. HODG0ON, &W,. .-l.. .
'* ^


DIRLCI ORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Chaplain, H. A. McEaehersaid J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonavie;
B. F. Ballard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, PenMcola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches la Tampa, Pessacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company..
of Jachmonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the.
Mutual'Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branh
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensaoola; thp
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.
-j


Will handle everything In Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro.
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt-
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Cosist of one r ree-Story Bwidigs, 70x200 ow two-story baildlg. 50x390; me ome.story talilgWr, ex29,4
Waklag the largest space of amy Comprmy d the kIdd I the Seuth.


CONSOLIDATED GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.


I- w 9 q q p 110


Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensaco*& FIla., and Stmvaneh. Ga.


T=a RaCORD WIaL =2 W SI 1 POLLAXS TO YOw XEv t WEX.


----- ---- ------ -------r---- --- ----- ---------- ---~


;-r-------


V----------- P99099"-vVV


:"1








THEM WEEVltY InfUbiLAL RECORD.


*L La ar a.*.araararaiaaahe*,Seeee*S Bes~c


S. Schofield's Sons Company,


-- - - ~~~.*aa.aa
V 9 Wy U 9W


a W1 OX Xe IL XX e RA w


neaftuarrurf sr
a atdutc ~


Distillers rumping
Outfit
No plant complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabm Misdappi and
Soth rite us lor p *rtieu-
*la and prices. We also manauactiare
E ginmes, Baelers aM ilth
Grade Machiery,
as well as carry a full and complete ,
-e--o ----Wokof- ,
z MNi Supplies, Pipe,
Beler Tubes, Etc.
Advise your wants.
SMacon, - Georgia.
* A Le i g ISe sMrum y f 3
O n-- aof -or wat w Irr f -"-IM


.V..W..U.W.W.UWI....W.WUU V.W V.VW.WWWr ~ VVWWl- W

1313133313333 ftll 3333333333IIIIII 331113311131111liii!


W. r. W.CAN S Prs W. C. THOMAS. Mleur. C. T DUDLEY. See. & Tres

Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
Hardware
Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate sAppiles.

Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
and Pullers on Hand.

TAMPA, FLORIDA.


ll l 5 5l 5 lll l l lll IIII I IIIII 5IIII 111111 1 111111111


... NATIONAL...


STank & Export Company
3 Of SAVANNAH, GA.. U. S. A.


io3n z. VodW


5.A. ALIF3D,


A. D. COVINDGTON,
Vlee-Preolat.


C. S. SZILS. B P. BULLARD
P. 1. SUTHERLAND. W. C. POWELT
J B PADGETT. WALTER RAY,
J. R. YOUNG. A. D. COVINGTON.


E. LKAYTON,
Seem-taerld Tremr.


J. I. cU~nuTT
G. W. DEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Owrtmak are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
eomvehiently sitted at the terminals of the 8. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WR BITBE eHER OF TilB AV pOR PARTICULARS.



W R, THOMAS
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,
.Turpentine. Log aia Phosphate Mules.


I 31


This Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.


WhBl..l,


Liquor Merchants


Proprietor*


Jackssioll Butlie Works


...Agents..


ACME BEER




BOWEN & CO.


Jacksonville, fla.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,

from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies


Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syr
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Ililwaukee Beers.
Prices on application

CHAS BLUM & CO.


. eavy Wagon-s Harness and Buggies, r7 AdE e LLe m.
TIB 3CO U TI= MU W1 i-N&T 2AUS FUUAL


Elgin .& Hampden
Railrod Watches

SEE

RILES

At His New Store,
15 W. BAY STREET.



S10 FARM "N M
A GROV E2

f o ca


SAPW
The* Anr@l ff9_&ri

GRIFFING'S CATALOG

*TWQ1YIAft fulete 4 tE

kssoa a ts n msow
I -"Alne r dfht




LW IN at C1.I ~lL


BU*MERS A" DEAL]= W -
I-5


ENGl NES ILiMS.
Cottom h Ail. a d lee Na-

lll1 Tools, sp,
Shyting, Pumlew ailLatsr am
Rubber Belting and l1Be, ioomad a"
Min Spplii iad Toe -.
Plans Mad estlttE td hiM foor Pwr
Plants and Steel Bricf
Steam Pu-, Feed Wat -Hmen adr
Hoisting C1rg08.
AUGUSTA. GA.
Senda an Oirs for yir t1a
patip e -andi P. 11R3 INm.f th
Recomd offic to hasar. a pa"Ot


J.


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u
4i
*I
F*


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. 1
"''


.1


gUgli


P


-----


L









4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


I I -". M

There has been a decided improvement
in the yellow pine market during the
past ten days. The demand is very
much stronger and there is a better tone
to the market. If the -emand continues
to improve as it has within the past ten
days, price will undoubtedly rise. The
dealers in Georgia and Florida generally
report that they have closed considerable
new busineaW the past week, and they re-
gard the situation as very hopeful.

Carg of Complete Housea
The bark Grace Deering was scheduled
to sail from Savannah for Porto Rico yes-
terday, carrying 356 cottages and a cargo
of other stuff to be used by Government
officials at a number of posts on the isl-
and. The cottages, are, of course, rep-
resented merely by the material, but as
this has all been cut to just the proper
sizes, planed, mortised and in every other
way prepared so that nothing will be
needed in the way of work except to fit
and fasten together the various parts,
they may just as well be considered com-
'Plete house.
How complete the outfit of each is may
be gathered from the fact that materials
include not only sashes, doors and blinds,
but picket fences as well, so that not only
will the cottages be complete, but th.-
inclosure of the grounds about each will
also be taken care of. Inaddition to this
cargo the bark is also carrying 10 tons ot
dead weight cargo, also consigned to the
officials ot thP United States Government
Sin the ism7
'The matewi for the cottages, fences.
Set. was prepared in various mills of
i iisa and assembled in Savannah for
shipment. Mills of Atlanta, Augusta, Ma-
eao and other points have contributed to
filling the orders.
SThe cargo is to be delivered .at no one
'point, bat at several, among them being
Culebra, Fardo, Nogobra, Humeoaw and
Punta Ysabel. The cargo is shipped by
the Pitch Pine Lumber Company, of New
York. through McDonough & Co., of Sa-
vamnah.

Create Lmber for Cube.
Messrs. Line & de Pool, Cuba 76 and
78, Havana, Cuba, want to correspond with
creosoting and lumber companies that
are debirm of entering the Cuban mar-
ket. They write the Manufacturers' Bec-
rd that they are continually called upon
to submit estimates for ereosoted ties
sad piles, as well as for common lumber,
and want to obtain the agency for relia-
ble companies willing to eater to the Cu-
ban trade.

PiNe at Liverpel.
The monthly timber circular tor July
of Duncan, Ewing & Co, of Liverpool
England, shows that in pitch pine from
the United States the hewn stock is very
light, and there is hardly any large prime
wood in the market at all. The import
of sawn wood has been heavy, 564,00(
cubie feet, but the consumption has been
42,0, and the stock stands at 790,00
To this mNst be added an import of 243,
0B .at Mancheter, where the conumptio
has ondy been 6,00, with the stock stand
ing at 3w7,p making total stock i
Liverpool and Manbchester 1,187,00. There


is no improvement in price and little in-
clination to buy. The import and con-
sumption of boards and planks have been
about equal, and the stock now stands at
331,000 cubic feet at Liverpool and 38,000
feet at Manchester.

LUMBER NOTE&
AImbermen in Atlanta and vicinity
have no cause to complain at trade urmng
the summer months. As previously indi-
cated, in speaking of the real estate con-
ditions, there is more building going on at
the present time than has been known in
some time. Naturally good sales of lum-
ber and building material are bemg made.
Dealers are all unanimous in saying that
the market is exceptionally good at the
present time.

The Dixon Lumber Co.. of Savannah.
state that they, in conjunction with the
(eorgia Lumber Co., have closed a con-
tract with the Western Steel Car and
Foundry Co., of Chicago, for 5,000,000 feet
of yellow pine, each company to furnish
2,500,000 feet.

J. J. McDonough, Jr., has returned to
Savannah, after a ten days' trip to Wash-
ington, Baltimore and Philadelphia. Mr.
McDonough says he found the lumber bus-
iness rather quiet in the North, as nearly
everyone seemed to be waiting on the out-
come of the Democratic National Conven-
tion.

The Shearwood Lumber Co., with head-
quarters at Shearwood, Ga., have an-
nounced that they have sold their inter-
est in their Pooler mill to G. M. and J. J.
Shearouse, who have removed it to Ex-
ley, Ga., and will operate it under the
style of G. M. Shearouse & Co. By this
sale G. M. Shearouse severs his connection
as president of the Shearwood Lumber Co..
and S. N. Shearouse has been elected to
succeed him.

The Eagle Manufacturing Co., of Sa-
vannah, who have lately embarked in the
wholesale lumber business, have an-
nounced that this department of the busi-
ness will be run under the style of the
Seaboard Lumber Co., with W. H. Dawson
in charge.

News has been received to the effect
that the big mill of the West Yellow Pine
Lumber Co., it Olympia, Ga., was re-
cently burned. The loss of the mill prop
erty, staving machine and shingle ma-
chines is complete. However, the plan-
ing mill and dry kiln were not burned.
This mill was one of the best equipped in
that section of the State, and was thor-
oughly equipped for protection against
fire. The loss on the plant was about
$40,000 and the insurance is about $20,0uu.
The fire occurred after a very hard rain
during the night and its origin is a mys-
tery. It is said the mill will be rebuilt at
once.

xooooo Saw Mill Blase.
A very destructive fire occurred Tues-
Sday night at the large sawmills of Squires
I & Son, of Omega, Fla.- The large plan-
i ing mill, dry-kiln; and over 200,000 feet
.of lumber were all burned. The greatest
Efforts were required to save the sawill
k and other property. The loss is estimated
- at $100.000. The cause of the fire is not
k known, nor h-" the amount of insurance
Syet been learned.


MORTGAGES.

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.


III W. FORVSY STRIT.


JAOISSVULLE nft6e


H. A. Renfroe Co,



TAILORS Stetson Hats


Suit to Order at ReadlMd Prices Mal" Orden Gvca Pemosml Aamti
439 W. Bay Street JACKSONVILLE FLA.


P renting Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


The LarmSt ad Olde Copper
Works in Geora. -r


A. BAKE




11h)1W 11-w-




Idl. Alab" or Ai skmolu Aft
o obwk r a



wrunsiwieck G.


iW My specialty is large worms and heavy boUoms that do no leak.



W. BBCKWIT. W. B. HENDESON. G.. WA-rl.

BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.

LARGE TRACTS OF TURPERTIIE All MILL LAiM
S WiMs 1-.23, First Natlmml Bank BtailEm.
TAMPA, F: : : : : : rZLOWIA



- 1111111111111111113 IIII lI-I1 333 l 3 IE lllig .


McMillan ,7

Bros.


Florida Cop-

per Works.
Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
General Metal Workers.
Old tills taken in exchange for new omne
Patching through the country a specialty.
SOrders by mail or wire will receive pIp
attention at either of the following wks:
Fayetteville. N: C. Sv&nnrah. Ga
Mobile, Ala. Jacksonville. Fla
S.- - - - - - - - - - - - - I I I I I I I I U U U I U I I U I E


DO'T. FAML T0;XMI9Rr.TJ SECOND -TO, hbYx1IU5E


IIIIIIII. IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII- --''









THRE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


gth Tellew Pihs Timber.
bpeial knowledge in every liue is the
reward of the ma at the Ioiuamn Pur-
ha Exposition who takes pains to hunt
it up. If be be interested in science the
eid for investiptin is broader than
heretofore e has enjoyed. If it be art,
the works of the great artists of every
elvilied country may be studied. And
if it be lumber this special information
is alo to be had. A mere surface in-
spection is desirable, but beneath the sur-
face there is a wealth of information such
a ea be obtained at no other one point.
In the Forestry building there is an ex-
hibit made by the United States division
of forestry in which the strength of large
timber I being tested on a powerful ma-
chine. This machine catches the popu-
lar eye, Ibt in a frame standing near by
there are diagrams which tell a story
regarding the strength of timbers, con-
taiing various quantities of moisture,
whihe is here told for the first time. H.
Donald Tiemmaa, M. E. M. F., of the bu-
eam of forestry, who has charge of the
testing experiments at the Yale forestry
School, connected with Yale University,
Pgve much of the information herein em-
bodied.
These tests have never before been pub-
lmhed and no doubt will come as a sur-
prise to the building world, for how many
bulders win rssert that the strength of
a beam is so materially increased as it
become dry as is shown by these figures?
It may be a lesson to the builders in the
east who get their framing bills direct
from the saw and put them in place when
net only green, but water soaked, the
lgs being drawn from the ponds di-
retly n .to the saw carriages.
One test was made of yellow pine, the
black measuring 2x2 inhe. The vial
sntaining the liquid extracted from the
blocks in their different stages of dryness
are also exhibited, and it is surprising to
know how much moisture is contained in
wood that is called dry. The table reads
as folows:
Per eait of
mature based of raptre
on dry wdlgb. inonds,
per q. ine
Water soaked ....... 63.3 ,720
Green ............... 21.5 7T,
Fairly dry ........... 13.2 ,380
Dry ................ 11.0 10,630
Very Dry ............ 10.2 11060
Klna dried .......... 5.6 15,240
Thee .res are self explanatory.
riey, laying fractions aside, they show
that kiln dried timber is nearly two and
a half times stronger than that of like
dimensions that is water-soaked, and 60
per cent stronger than that which is called
dry. When it is very dry its strength is
increased nearly 35 per cent by putting
it through the dry kiln.
Tests were made with three yellow pine
sticks, 2x inches, there and a half feet
lng with the following results:
No. 1, very green, broke with modulus
of rupture at 8,764 pounds per square inch.
No. 2, dry, broke at 11,510 pounds per
a Ire inch.
N" 3, very cry, broke at 12,940 pounds
per square ein
It will be observed that the percentage
does not vary particularly from those
shown in the table. Although these tests
were with yellow pine Mr. Tiemann says
the law holds good with other woods.
From these figures it may be learned
that when estimating the strength of
wood its degree of dryness should be
taken into consideration, as a green stick
played where the strength is based on a


dry one would break. On the other hand,
we are taught that when green timbers
will support the required weight the longer
the frame stands the stronger it will be-
come up to the point where the timber
becomes thoroughly dry.

Activity in Timber Lands
Col. Edwin Brobton. member of the
well known firm of Brobston, Fendig &
Co., of this city and Brunswick, Ga., has
just returned trom quite an extended trip
through West Florida, where he has been
looking over the land and timber situation
in that section of the State. Col. Brob-
ston says the activity shown in real estate
and timber Lnes at this time of the
year, considering the falling off of lum-
ber shipments to the East and North,. is
remarkable. Capitalists from all over the
country are realizing the value of Florida
lands and timber more so now than ever
before and are buying large tracts of land,
not only for the timber but for the land,
which is enhancing in value every day.
In speaking of his trip to West Florida
CoL Brobston said, "I was very much im-
pressed with the tobacco industry there,
and when I tell you that those people
are making anywhere from $200 to $50
an acre clear on tobacco alone, it is no
wonder that our lands are going up every
day."
-Cypre Co.'s Afaia.
Among those who attended the meeting
of the creditors of the Red Cypress Lum-
ber Company, of Macon, Ga., the lumber
company involved in the Plant failure,
was Capt. Henry Blun, of Savannah. He
is confdent that the lumber company will
be able to settle all its debts in full In
speaking of the matter he said, among
other things:
"We found that the company was in
good condition, and in my judgment it
will be able to meet all the claims against
it in full. The creditors appointed a com-
mittee to look into the affairs of the
,company thoroughly and they will re-
port back to us. The indications are that
everything will be adjusted without loss."
As for the Plant failure the heavy in-
surance goes a great way toward liquidat-
ing the claims against it. More than
$730,00 is now being distributed The
Germania Bank, of which Capt. Blun is
president, was not a -direct creditor of
the bankrupt interests and will sustain no
loss.

COLSON IS TRUSTKZ.

To Close up Epaonla Lumber Co's Basi-
neas for the Creoiters
Mr. Perry M. Colson, 6f Gainesville,
Fla., was in Jacksonville yesterday.
At a meeting of' Te creditors of the
Espanola LuFiber Company, which was
held at the office of Hon. W. H. Palmer,
referee in bankruptcy, in Gainesville Fri-
day afternoon Mr. Colson was selected as
trustee of the property of the bankrupt
company.
The plant is located at Prairie Creek,
between Gainesville and Rochele, and is
one of the most valuable plants of its
kind in that section of the State. It was
built by J. L. Kelley & Sons, after their
old plant was destroyed by fire about
two years ago, but at the time of the
failure was owned by other parties and
managed by A. J. Patterson.
Trustee Colson will proceed as soon as
possible to sell the property for the
benefit of the creditors.


b~u"~~~~~ j~- ---------------------------

J. A. Craig (. Bro.

239 W. Bay Stre EVERETT BOCK.

D I,,aAer in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.
Iag C^ 99t9thg*r-411 99909#0 g--------- M




STurpentine Operators


S Open up a new location and get sta ted

i right for another year's business
S 20000 Acrm Round Timber, Volusia Co., on East Coast By.
20,000 Acree Round Timber, Manatee Co. Water transportation.
S 40.000 Acree Round Timber. Levy Co., 8. A. L. By.


I Brobston, Fendig & Co.


Jadksvik lirid&


Daruuswtdt4imrgi


**r 9SSSSS#gwl i9SS9S#@0v # 0 q @.- uUU- u. uu uuu;


"In the Good Old Summer Time"

Your customers will remain well, if you do
like Dr. Mathews of Thomson, Ga. He wrote
us 15th of January, 1904:
"I have been carrying Cuban Relief in stock for
several years, and have frequently used and prescribed
I it. I consider it superior to any preparation on the
market for Cholera Morbus, Sick Headache, Colic,
and an infallible remedy for horse colic."
You write us for a supply.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga, Tenn.


T. MURPHY

JACKSONVILLE MACHINE ANo IRON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Ira
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARINE EIINGES AND BOILERS. PULLEYS AND SHAFIMrG.
Agent for Stationary Engines, Boilers, Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden-
sers, Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Goods'
MrE TRAUSUII AM WATER WI EglPWIT A MERLTT
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


Cable Address. Florida


Standard Naval Stores

Company.

DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN

R.OSIN

AND TURPENTINE.

I _Jacksoniville. FlI.
*<---------- IMi m ii ii i -


WHr wRMTIm O ADVETISS MENTION THE nRCORD.









THE WEEKLY IMUU8TbIAL RECOD.


Smie mew Banka.
Andalusia, Ala.-The Bank of Andalu-
sia has been organized with $50,000 capi-
tal. S. B. Milligan, president; J. \V.
Shreve, vice-president, and George H.
Adams, cashier,
Byrdstown, Tenn.-A $10,000 banking
company has been organized here by 1. C.
Adair, of Fordsville, Ky., and others. A
new building will be erected.
Brundidge, Ala.-The First National
Bank, capital $50,000, has been organized
by A. G. Sesy and others.
Birmingham, Ala.-The Jackson Loan
Co. bas been incorporated by L D. JacK-
on, R. Edwards and C. E. Edwards.
Courtland, Miss.-The Bank of Court-
land has been organized here by A. F.
Oliver, J. M. Bailey, H. C. tarey, J. 8.
Burnett, W. D. Walker, L W. Herron and
others. Capital, $30,000.
Cowpea, 8. C.-The Security Bank, of
Cowpens, has been chartered with a cap-
ital of $20,000. The incorporators are J.
B. Williams, J. T. Walker and others.
Edwards, Missa-The Bank of Edwards,
capital, $25,000, has been organized with
A. C. Jones, of Jackson, president; P. C.
Bankston, first vice-president; Frank
White, second vice-president. The direc-
tors are: A. C. Jones, P. C. Bankston,
Frank White, J. J. Foster, Dr. A. McCal-
lam, D. Brichetto, B. F. Sutele, W. A.
Montgomery and Dr. H. P. Birdsong.
Elloree, 8. C.-The Bank of Elloree has
een organized with $15,000 capital. The
ineorporators are: T. W. Ulmer, J. M.
Weeks and N. F. Stack.
Greenwood, Miss.-The Bank of Com-
merce has been organized with a capital
of S20,0
Henderson, Tenn.--The Bank of Ches-
ter County, capital $25,000, has been char-
tered here. 8. B. Gannaway, of Hender-
son, is president; Roe McCallum. of Jack's
Creek, vice-president, and K F. Boon, of
Trenton, cashier.
Humboldt, Tenn.-The Farmer's Ex-
chage Bank, capital $20,000, has been or-
gaSmued. J. P. Stallings. president; J. S.
Craddock, vice-president, and M. B.
Charles, cashier.
Itta Bena, Miss.-Messrs. Thayer, Gard-
mer, Haley, Clower, Nabors, Holloman and
others are organizing a new bank to be
known as the Itta Bena Bank and Trust
Co, with an authorized capital of $250,-
000. They will open for business Sept. I.
Jackson, N. C.-The Bank of North-
a mpton has been chartered with a capital
of $5000. William H. S. Burgwyn is pres-
ident; J. T. Flythe, vice-president; Paul
J. Long, cashier.
Lexington, Miss.-The Merchants' and
Farmers' Bank, capital $100,00, has been
-c chartered here. The bank will be ready
for business about Feb. 1. Morris Lewis
and J. B. Cunningham are the chief pro-
moters.
McComb City, Miss.-The People's Bank
of MeComb City has been chartered by Dr.
W. W. Moore, Alex. Hyman and J. L.
Moyse, of Summit; Jdius Moyse, of Cin-
cinnati, and Abe Blum, of Greenville; to
be domiciled at Mdeomb City. The cap-
ital will be $50,000.
Newport News, Va.-The Newport News
Trust and Savings Bank has been char-
terd here, with F. F. Finch, president.
Capital $25,000.
SNorfolk, Va.-The Guarantee Invest-
ment Co., capital $30,000, has been ehar-
tered, with L B. Whatley. president; G.
K. Broderick, secretary and treasurer.
S Oneonta, Ala.-The Oneonta Trust and
SBanking Co. has been organized with a


capital of $20,000. F. G. Donehoo, presl-
dent, and T. H. Davidson, vice-president.
Rocky Mount, N. C.-The First Nation-
al Bank has been organized, to begin bus-
iness Aug. 14. W. H. S. Burgwn, of Wel-
don, is president; Dr. S. P. Billiard, of
this city, vice-president. Directors: E.
Broughton, Rich Square; Dr. A. J. Dixon,
Ayden; Col. Park Henderson, Col. Davis,
Washington, D. C.; Messrs. Ramsey,
Levy, Taylor, Sherin, Bobbins and
Vaughan, of Rocky Mount.
Thomasville, N. C.-A charter has been
granted the Thomasville Loan and Trust
Co., to conduct a commercial bank with
the savings feature, if desired, later. The
capital stock is $10,000. Robert L. Burk-
head and others are the stockholders.
Utica, Miss.-The People's Bank, capi-
tal $50,000, has been organized here. Dr.
G. E Ellis, president; G .W. Williams, Jr.,
vice-president; D. H. Laney, cashier.
Van Buren, Ark.-The First National
Bank, capital $25,000, has been organized
here.
Wrens, Ga.-The Bank of Wrens, capi-
tal $25,000, has been organized. W. 8.
Witham, of Atlanta, president, and S. A.
Agnew, cashier.

Some Recent Patents
761,670. Feed-water heater. Peter
Grassman, Louisville, Ky.
762,299. Receptacle for lirqids. Wes-
ton M. Fulton, Knoxville, Tenn.
762,300. Oil cag. Weston M. Fulton,
Knoxville. Tenn.
762,303. Process of destructive distilla-
tion of wood. George O. Gilmer, New Or-
leans, La.. assignor by mesne assignments.
to Illinois Investment Co.
762,314. Railway scoop-car. Lucius E.
Johnson, Roanoke, Va.
762,327. Wire-stretcher. William R.
Lott, Navasota, Tex.
762T377. Engine valve-gear. Seneca L
Berry, Nogales, Ariz., assignor to Arizona
and Sonora Manufacturing Co., Nogales,

762,510. Ice-conveying apparatus. Helge
Westergaard, Austin, Tex., assigor one-
half to Noyes D. Smith, Austin, Tex.
762.592. Wrench. Walter Leach, Hoxie,
Ark.
762,632. Truss-bridge. Joseph W.
Headley, Coopers, Ala.
702,635. Incrustation preventive. Lind-
say R. Hurst and George H. Beechum,
Louisville, Ky.
762,681. Machine for applying band.
or labels to cigars or other articles. Wm.
C. Briggs, Winston-Salem, N. C.
762,701. Lubricator. Oliver E. Gay,
Rocky Mount, N. C.
762,714. Cotton chopper and cultivator.
Galveston Harwell, Cartersvile, Ga.
762,780. Railway track gauge. James
M. Waggener, Fayetteville, Tenn.
762,808. Apparatus for maintaining a
continuous flow of sand-carrying oil from
wells. William T. Cushing and Horace
G. Jonnston, Corsicana, Tex.
762,842. Ground-anchor. Robert H.
Polk, Birmingham, Ala.
763,000. Piston-rod packing. Thomas
S. Inge, Danville, Va.
763,137. Implement for punching be.is.
Whitford W. Woodley, Elizabeth City, N.
C.
763,217. Insect collecting and destroy-
ing machine. Herman W. Steinmann,
Temple, Tex.
763,228. Flushing-tank. Benjamin
Walker, Jr., Austin, Tex.


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE.
Jackworill, RFa
CAPITAL S30000W SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS 3000
We issue Time Certificates of Depost. ich draw Interest at therate of ar er
cst per au-nn. It heMld aety days or longer.
Take advantage of tas ad t year avrtls e earelM metMg ye
Particular attention paid to Out-of-Town accounts. sending depoilts ba. maa.


Comparative Prices of Spirita at Svaunah for Five Years.
Comparative Pricesof Spirits at bavannah for Fire Taaa


April I ....................
April 8 ....................
April 15 ...................
April 22 .................
April 29 ...................
May 6 ................ ....
May 13 .................. .
May 20 ...... ..........
May 27 ...................
June 3 ..................
June 10 ..................
June 17 .................
June 24 ............... .
July 1 .. ..............
July 8 ................
July 15 ....................
July 22 ................. .
July 28 ..................


1904-05
ND
53
54%
54%
53%
55
54%
54%
53%
54
52%
52%

52%
52%
53%
53%


1903-04
ND
50
49%
47
45
45
47%.
47%
40
451/
46
46%
471/4
471%
47%
48
49%
5o0*


1902-03
45
42%
42%
43
42%-43
43
45
45
45%
45%
47%
48%
471%,
45%
44%
44
43%


NENRT AS WLWT.
a. N. POWELL. CadS. 0. EARNIS,


B. R. POWELL. CRAS. 6. NAR
preshod. VAice-Presldeat sad Treasorer.
DIRECTORS:
X. R. Powel. Chaug. 6. MrtS,, D. ff. XCAfiaa P. L. Sutherlan.


1901-02
34
32
32%
31%-32
132
32
31%
32%
32%
32
33%-%
34%
33%
34%
34%
33
32%


1900-01
53%
53%
4.
47%
46
47
48
4.
49
46

43%
42%
43%
44%
43
42


THE



Southern Manufacturing Co.,
Cgr of West Bay amMiaem Sts.
Jacksoville, Foridla.



Wholesale Drugs I Commissary Supplies
SWe solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote pr em
anything in the drug line. We make peeked drags a specialty and can eose you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.




Young's Female College,

Thomasville, Georgiaa,
OPENS SePTrMMaE IJtk. 1W04. Unsrpnsaed Climate. Cultured Cammaity, 81nllM
Equipr et, select amociato, Indaidual attention to ech student, limited amberof bosMl
students brroed comprehemdve courses leading to A. and B. S. degrees; Faculty of eight Ch5
Usa speelalst: !ucs flountad Phystcal Culture Specilaltes; total costroma to e Ioter
L COCHILANE HUNT. Preldent.
"TUl Sept. Is. BchmooN. Ky.



THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. I.A.

NOW OPEN
under new management. Tborou aly
renovated and repaired throughout, lo-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
14ft-H.e N. O'NEAL. Prop.




East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED


LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.



Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.

Steamer Shipmets a Specialty.

WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


ARE YOU A =UU1CaIuM TO THE.RzC=D?


I


Secretary

.V.cerabeete.


m









TH:E W'V LY -1N tn'WLIAL RECORD.


ggT UT OAulT l s.

Sn M rty & sea giveten on-


i d it w stat by Ue who urn e c

-..-- OWmAy, FL.
Ium n- amech with the Mle aO
the mpmnty hw not bae given oat
but ft .tatd by those who am an-
estd wI the deal that all of the pre-
IrMe have been arranged, and that
the tnmfr-- of the road will be made in
the nar future. On good authority it
w stated last night that the road
wold be operated under the same man-
agemet as in the past, and that there
would be extenions and improvements iv
the interest of developing that part of
the State through which the road passes,
a well as the territory beyond its western
taermin
Sine* the building of this road the man-
agement has been carrying on an active
campaign of development along its line.
New industries have been promoted and
encouraged, and especially the fruit in-
stry, which has been making rapid de-
velopmemt for the past three year in the
eeties through which the Jacksoevile
Southwestern Railroad passes. It is
understood that thi policy of develop-
met i to be continued with enterprise
by the new owners.
In 1900 this road was constructed by
the Cummer Lumber Ccmpany, primarily,
with a view of giving them facilities for
gting their timber from that part of
the 8tate through which the road was
buPit. But in t &mstruction it was
built with a view of making it perma-
net, and the best material was med.
Th road is built of sixty-pound steel
rails, with the best equipment through-
out. The are a sufficient number of
lit and box ears for operating and there
are seven locomotives which were new
when they were brought here. Since its
esmeareti -the road has been a gooa
piece of paying property, tapping, as n
di, the best timber lands in the State
asd terminating in the very heart of the
Florida plhphate belt.
Under the new management the road
wil be of greater service to the people
plong its route and to the city of Jack-
somville than it has been in the past. It
wil plAce Jacksonville in eloser toucn
rtimngh Ibtter arrangements with the
Atlantic Coist Line in that part of the
8tate where the two roads meet. It will
give High Springs a better outlet to the
metropolis of the State and the schedule%
ma he arranged so as to give the peopir
in that part of Alachua county the bene-
it of a quick trip to this city, operating
in this way to the advantage of the busi-
me- interests of Jacksonville.
Mr. C. W. Chase became the owner ot
th Jackonville & Southwestern Railroad
in July, 1 purchasing the road and its
equipment from the Cummer Lumber
Company. The purchase of the road by
Mr. Chase did not interfere with its man-
agement, as Mr. S. Spencer, the gen-
eral manger, and the other officials were
retained. This same management is to
be continued under the new ownership.
and this insures the continuance of the
policy of development which has charae-
teried the road since its construction.


eaml ern r for printi fr the tur-
pIrne nea c-m m ry t as to the
ae- Msli itou i pmnre t a lscy.


Has revelutleoslzed the wood distillinag bsl- 4 *
mess Is the Sorth. After three moaths of careful
testing oer machinery at the Waycross, Georgia 4rt
mill, we are now ready to sell direct aay size 4
plant and gwaraatee results by oar new KRUG
PATENT STEAM PRESSURE PROCESS.

STANDARD TURPENTINE COMPANY.







Kohn= Furchgott= Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN

Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS OlVEN PROMPT ATTETION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Mveiht of Rice at New Orlean.
Secretary Fred Muller, of the New Or-
leans Board of Trade, has issued the fol-
lowing monthly comparative statement of
the rice movement at New Orleans:


1903.
35,042
1,810
36,852
13,259
23,593
865,173

888,766
878,428


Rough rice (aeks). 1904.
Stock June 1 ......... 48,747
Receipts during June 7,801
Supply during June .. 56,48
Distributed during June 14,652
Stock July 1 ......... 41,806
Distribt'd since Aug. 1 1,315,794

Total ............. 1,357,50
Receipts since Aug. 1 1,345,433
Left over from last
season ................ 12,251

Total .............. 1,37,690
Clean rice (pockets).
Stock No. 1, June 1 .. 64,936
Stock No. 2, June 1 .. 5,a
Reeiipts during June. 54,707
Ex. mills during June 70,805
Supply during June .. 196,317
Distribt'd during June 143,887
Stock No. 1, July 1.. 50,703
Stock No. 2, July 1... 1,727
Distr'b'd since Aug...2,016,802

Total ............2,019,322
Receipts since Aug. 1. *549,410
Ex .mills since Aug. 1.1,499,376
Left over from last
season, No. I ....... 20,394
Left over from last
season, No. 2 ...... 142


Total ............. 2,09,32 1,589,98

New Enterprisa of West Point, Ga.
Advices from West Point, Ga, state
that the West Point Manufacturing Co.
has awarded the contract for the con-
struction of a 1,100-foot cement dam
across Chattahooehee river at Langdale, a
suburb of West Point. It is stated that
the dam will furnish power to operate a
50,000-spindle cotton mill.
Another new enterprise secured by
West Point is the plant of the Lmag Man-


ufacturing Co., manufacturers of fancy
jacquard woven articles, towels, quilts,
portieres, lap robes, etc. The capital
stock is $150,000.

Bankers Elect Officers.
The Georgia Bankers' Association,
which held its annual meeting at Look-
out Inn, near Chattanooga, Tenn., elected
officers for the year as follows: Presi-
dent, Miller S. Bell, Milledgeville; first
vice-president, James T. Orme, Atlanta;
second vice-president, Joseph S. Iavis,
Albany; third vice-president, B. S. Walker,
Monroe; fourth vice-president, Frank
Spain, Jr., Whitman; fifth vice-president,
L P. Patillo, Buford; secretary, L. P.
Hillyer, Macon; treasurer, 0. K. Dooley,
Macon.


Wagea Makers in Conetin


38,87 The quarterly meeting of the Southeast-
14,144 ern branch of the National Wagon Mak-
10B,124 er' Association was held in Charlotte, N.
71,618 C., and the following officers were elected;
35,6 President, Mr. Max Robinson, of Martin-
917 burg, Va.; secretary, W. H. Russell, of
1,553,492 Clarksville, Va. The other members who
were here were: Messrs. John C. Har-
1,5899,8 ris, of South Boston, Va.; B. P. Thornhill,
643,856 of Lynchburg, Va.; C. F. Milburn, of Chat-
922,874 tanooga, Tenn.; Capt. W. B. Ryder, of
Charlotte; W. B. Waddin, of Atlanta,
20,598 Ga.; E. Lynn, of Florence, Ala.
The next meeting will be held in Rich-
2,670 mond, Va., on October 26.


Georgia Wool-Growers Sell Clip.
A dispatch from Donaldsville, Ga.,
states that the sheep-growers of that sec-
tion sold their clip for the season on July
15. The buyers came from Montgomery,
Ala.. Savannah, Ga., Albany, Ga., and
other cities. The entire cup of 40,000
pounds was sold to Messrs. M. Sabel &
Son, of Montgomery, at 25.63 cents. It is
said the growers are well pleased with
the price obtained, it being in advance of
last year's. The growing of wool is on
the increase in the Donaldsonville section.


NEW WHOT-eALB HOUSE.


The Miller & Mallar Grecery Cmany
Launched in Jackamvils.
A new wholesale Arm, having a capital
stock of $100,000 and composed of gmtle-
men who have an excellent standing in
the business circles of the State, was or-
ganized in Jacksonville this week by
Phillip Miller, of Gainesville, C. B. Mal-
lard, of Jacksonville, Ed. L Greer, of Lake
City, and C. N. Griffin, of Jacksonville.
The style of the company is to be the
Miller & Mallard Grocery Company, anm
its place of business is to be at 214 East
Bay Street, Jacksonville.
This firm was organized to succeed the
firm of O'Donald & Mallard, a irm which
has won an excellent reputation through-
out the State. Mr. O'Donald retired from
the firm a few days ago to devote his
time and capital to the hardware bumi-
ness, he being the senior member of the
firm of O'Donald & Taylor of this city.
In reorganizing the company men-of
well-known business qualifcatione have
been interested, and the working empital
of the company has been greatly increased,
with a view of materially enlarging the
business.
The officers of the company are to con-
sist of Phillip Miller, president; C. B.
Mallard, vice-president, and C. N. Griffin,
secretary and treasurer. The four gentle-
men comprising the firm will constitute
a board of directors. Ed. L Greer is to
be the general mailger of the company.

To Eatabdih Towns.
J. T. Holloman, W. L. Kemp and J. W.
Andrews, all of Atlanta, have made appli-
cation for a charter for a company to be
know as the Georgia Land and Immi-
gration company, the main oflice to be in
Atlanta, with a capital stock of $5,000
with the privilege of increasing it to
$500,00. The company will establish
towns.
S nd il your 4o fr Commim-ry
checks. The Record printa Rn ecmmi.-
er checks than an the Pin g lem
in the South cmbaiL


10,338

888,766


53,384
1,721


READ TUB ADS =- TuZ 1 3CsM


I


( .. The..

Standard Turpentine

Company


_ I~ ~___ ~


___ --~ --;










S - TE~C.RE WrW~Y ~dtNrfl~5mt A. --


AMONG THX OPERATORS
Mr; R. K. White, a prominent operator
of Claxton, Ga., was in Jacksonville one
day this week attending to business.

Mr. 8. J. Warren, who is one of the
best known turpentine operators in Geor-
gia, and also largely interested in the
turpentine business at Umatilla and Hig-
ley, Fla., was in the city several days
this week.

Mr. J. 8. Simmons, a leading naval
stores operator at Marietta, Fla., spent
some time in Jacksonville this week, at-
tending to business.

Mr. B. W. Blount, who is very largely
engaged in the naval stores business at
Rye, Fla, was here the early part of
this week.

Messrs. John Pope, of Belleview, and R.
S. Hall, of Ocala, Fla., were prominent
naval stores operators in the city this
week.

Mr. J. Hankerson, an old operator,
hut now engaged in the wholesale grocery
business at Daytona, Fla, was here this
week.

Mr. D. E. MeKeithen, of Baldwin, Fla.,
was here to-day. Mr. McKeithen leaves
the early part of next week for points in
North Caroline where he goes to spend
his vacation.

Mr. D. C..Stricklin, one of the most
popular naval stores operators in this
State, was in town to-day.

Camphor Factory Brned.
The camphor factory recently built in
Jacksoville by the Mellor Manufacturing
Company was destroyed by fire Satur-
day night, with an insurance covering less
than half the las on plant alone. Dr.
Meldrum, the chief chemist of the cons-
pany, says the plant will be rebuilt. This
plant was to manufacture camphor from
spirits of turpentine by an electro-chemn
ical process known only by the company.

The T. O. A. Convention.
It is earnestly desired that every tur-
pentine operator in the Pine Belt attend
the annual meeting of the Turpentine
Operators' Association in Jacksonville
during the week of the 10th of September.
The exact date of the convention will be
axed at the meeting of the executive
committee to be held early in August.
This convention will be the most impor-
tant held since the association was or-
ganised. Every operator owes it to him-
self and to his own interests to be pres-
eat on that occasion.

Mr. Sutherland Return
Mr. P. L. Sutherland, who attended the
National Democratic Convention as an
alternate, and who was one of the most
enthusiastic of all the Parker men on that
great history-making occasion, has re-
turned from West Baden, where he went
from St .ouis after the Convention. He


was met at the Indiana resort by Mrs.
Sutherland, who stopped returning at
their magnificent farm in Georgia until
the hot season passes in Florida. Mr.
Sutherland, though yet a young man, was
a prominent figure in party circles in St.
Louis. He was called upon to speak at
Lexington, Ky., en route to St. Louis, amn
was again in demand in St. Louis on two
different occasions.

OCALA SUB SPEAlS OUT.

The Question of Advancing Money and
Paying Account.
The Ocala sub. of the Turpentine Ope-
rators' Association is sending out the fol-
lowing letter (a very wise one) to all the
turpentine men in that territory. It is
to be hoped they will all enter heartily
into the spirit of doing things right, so
earnestly advocated at all times by the
Ocala organization. The letter follows:
Office of the Ocala sub. of T. O. Associa-
tion, Ocala, Florida, July 20th, 1904.
Dear Sir: At our last meeting the
question of advancing money and paying
accounts for hands was discussed by the
members present and the consensus of
opinion was that it should be stopped. In
no other business at the present'is this
done as it is in the turpentine business,
then why should we do so? To pay an
account at one place in order to get hands
and then loan them money before they
have done any work for you is one of
the causes of the demoralization among
the labor to-day. Most turpentine men
carry too much commissary stock, too;
when they do this their hands will trade
all you will allow, then wnen pay-day
comes there is nothing due them, they
want money, if you don't let them have
it your neighbor will probably loan them
all the money they want; simply if they
say they will come and work for him,
and at his first pay-day or before, the
same hands are in debt and want money;
if he refuses, they go somewhere eise.
Gentlemen, there never was a time when
organization was as much of a necessity
as at present and with the turpentine
people. One of the most successful tur-
pentine companies in the State is the
Clark-Ray-Johnson Company at Martel,
Fla. In their commissaries they carry
very small stocks, scarcely anything but
groceries, and every hand they have draws
money on pay-day and they do not loan
money either. Come to our meetings,
let's talk these matters over and we
think we can be of mutual benefit to
each other.
The annual meeting of Turpentine Op
erators will be held in Jacksonville in
September. We want our "Sub." to send
the largest delegation (as usual) that
goes to the same. so meet with us 2nd
Thursday in August. F. LANG,
E. P. THAGARD, Sec'y. President.

What Is Bone Pitch?
There seems to be a mistaken idea prev-
alent that this pitch is got from the dis-
tillation of bone fat for its fatty acids.
Although a pitch may be got in this way,
yet it would not be "bone pitch" in the
true sense of the word. The real bone
pitch is a secondary, or rather a tertiary,
product of the distillation of bones. Bones
when distilled yield a tar in the same
way as enal does, and just as coal on
distillation yields coal tar, so does bone
yield bone tar when it is destructively
distilled. But the analogy does not rest
here-both coal and bones yield illumi-


MERRILL-STEVENSgggg CO -


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.-


Boilermaking avnd Repairing

Stij Boilers and Pumpe.
SHIP BUILDING apnd REPAIRING.
Jacksonville, Fla.


*** 89~I1 l lll8 l 18 11 1 h i ll1i1 I I l ll5 t 4lt1 i I **

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.

Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paiat.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.



Cummer Ltmb er Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.

o**,.*.o,@*~*.~*ro~e*o*.* *eeseo**o***soeoes* so&*aal


Standard Clothing Company



One Price One Price
W1


S FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS
S7 and i9 West Bay Street, - Jacksovlle, Flrld
S Stetsen and Hawes Hats. Special Attentle Given to Mal Orders.
em e C A-- wuuuA- -A-w A-A- w -- u w -u-w. ..uw-Au A- w- n-


R. TOLAR.


..wtwmutueumwttlteu $|t


J. H. HART. T. H. iBLACHLY.
(EItablished 18T2.)


J. R. TOLAR, J


TOLAR. HART & CO.O
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.

Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Ordes executed for Cotton Futures.


JOBSPH D. WEED.


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.


MAKE A SPECIALTY OF "l"

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battin Et


Read the Record Adv't"s:.


THE RECORD K3KP8 PACE WITH SOUTHERN PROGRES.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON


.1


-A


l1111ggg11|t1t1t0t1t1


i








THR WEEKLY LUb~lksI-IAL RECORD.
C"'Y' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ *Q.~eeneee *-'-l- lllt ~ CL)UIU)),~U1~1~1~~1~tC~~ 4


Bar Is, ln Pipe and Fittings, Bolts,
NIts, Cut and Cast Washers Black-
so-th's Tels, Lumlberan's Tools,
Packlda of all Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Cerrugated


d#


JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER
JACKSONVILLE., FLA.


Supplies.
STATE AGENT FOR.
ATLAS ENGINES ad BOILERS, SOUL STEAM FEE
WORTHINGTOM STEAM PUMPS, JENKIUS VALVES,
SSTON'S SAWS, FUNTKOTE r OaFINS
CURTIS MANUFACTURING C.'S MS M aicimer.
DeLOAC SAW MILLS. GILBERT WOOS PULLEYS,
MO'S LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SPRING amd RUIBER CO.
SOLVENTINE B0LER COMPOUND,
DODGE MFG. C.'S Cast IreN Spt Pe ,
McCAFFREY FRIES MONARCH EMERY WHEELS,
DANIELS' PPP Steam Packdg.
A. LESCHEN & SON, Wire Ree.


~~*ffnva|yenewww wwww*ww wwwwwwn 9n-9#9@99ws9on


sating ga, a- both their tars yield nap-
thi ad pita when they (the tar them-
selves) a 4tilled. Bone pitch results,
thLcefo (am the distillation of bones,
mrst lnt.tpr, and then the tar into pitch.
BeAs pM smell of burnt feathers or
Ibmt .wI, and is easily recognized in
tY r, It yields an excellent Bruns-
wia bIek but, like most artificial
pirtpe, It b rather difficult to dissolve in
vanma shovents. Should the sugar in-
d"nf revive, the animal charcoal indus-
try *py liven up, and bone pitch become
e-W r. It ranks next to asphaltum as
Sour most valuable pitches.

Bys Hetel Pro y.
r. W. B. Myers, of Jacksonville, the
r- turpentine man in the South with
Ir exception, physically, and one of the
sst in the matter of operations, has
ght the Grand View Hotel property
(JEekaborille and will at once spend
leral thousand dollars in i.uy.._ i r whish he will lease to a good man
r


D. It. FLYiN, President

D. t. Flynn Wal





Independ<





Naval



The patronage of
Our interests and those o


Some M

All Pro


Motion Dened.
In the suit for $25,000 damages, for the
alleged conversion to the defendant's own
use of 4,000 barrels of naval stores,
brought by the Putnam Lumber Company
vs. the Ellis-Young Company, the motion
of the plaintiff to strike out certain pleas
of the defendant was denied by Judge
Call of the Circuit Court in Jacksonville
this week.

New Alabama Inusriss
Huntsville-Cotton Mill.-Lowe Manu-
facturing Co., recently reported as contem-
plating the enlargement of its plant, has
decided to erect a 10,000 spindle addition.
Contract for the necessary building has
been awarded to T. C. Thompson & Bro.,
of Montgomery, Ala. Company's present
equipment is 15,000 spindles.
Jacksonville-Cotton Mill.-Ide Cotton
Mills has awarded contract to Duke &
Journey at $36,000 for the erection of
cotton mill building. The company was
reported in May as organized, with cap-
ital of $200,000, for erecting a 10,000-spin-
die plant. George P. Ide is secretary.


KIRK & JONES
DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


H. ROBIN SON Press. H. GAILLARD. easier
W. B. OWIN. Vike-Pres.
Commercial Bank,
State Depsitory.
BAncacmS; Oesl. FLe.. Lake C lr. I
Jacksonville, - -IFrMa


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903,04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


Receipts
Spirits, mcad ................ .. .. .. .. .
RoSrirs bb ...............................


Ri casks ...............................
Rosins, bbis. ... .. ........... .
New York
Spirits, asks............. .............
Rosins, bbls. .... ..... ........ ...... ..
Sundries
Sp iis casks.. .. . .. ... .. .. .. .. ...
Rosins, bh... ........... .... ....


1908-04 1902-03 J 1901-02
193,647 292 496 814,846
650,988 940,5071,071,440
844,585 1,238,038 1,385,786


188,39a
752,270
98,884
888,171
35,658
87,853
59,351
826.744


296,43 975,428
206,10E
504,178
42,766
138,121
87,556
387.784


The receipts of spirit ae les than 190203 by 9549 casks, and of amins, 29,59


W. B. JOHNSON, Vice-President


ter Ray


J. W. Oglesbee


DIRECTORS
L. Horn


814,876
62,687
217,446
585,042
53,797
129,060
43,633
896,586


basIs


A. S. PENDLETON, See'y & Tram


N. G. Wade


J. L. Medlin


-W. B. Johnson


ent Naval Stores & Export Co.,

Jacksonville, Florida.


Stores Factors and Operators.

Capital Stock, $500,000.
turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal advances made on consignments.
f the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operative company.


oney and Some Timber For Somebody.

ducers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.


TB I RECORD IS THU "OPRATOIRS'* p.TAWe"


MLL?1%f


Machinery and Mill


"M --------~jj~~E i~iFir ~ S a~f~OSJriL;~ir;C;Lc~r









10 THE WEEKLY l)DUUTkTlAL RECORD.


J. R. PAInOTR, AlClm S. HUBBARD. ARraTB F. PsarT
President. Vice-President. ohhier.
The Mercantile Exchange Bank, ;
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
CLpitl., $200.000. Surplus, $100.000 S
STATE DEPOSITARY.
General Baking. Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes. 6.00 per Year.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week
Spirits for the Week at Savannah. Range of Turpentine and Resin at Savan-
Price Repts Sales Exp. 1903 nah July 2 sa Same Day
Mon., July 251531/.J 548 | 415 115 50
Tues., July 26j53%/1184 428 382 50 'uly 28 July 27 July 28
Wed.. July 271531 895 I 298 50 50 Sirit 104 1904 1903
Thurs., July 2653%1152-2 254 9554 50 Sl"rits .... 53% 53% 50
ReM for the Week at Savanna. Spirits .... Firm Frm Firm
Monday, July 25. Last year. Sales -_ __254 298 _54
WW ...... .. .. .. 4.521/, 3.40 Rto-in .....I Firm Steady irm
WG .............. 4.221/ 3.20 WW -. .. 4.521/- 4.5212 3.40
N .. ............ 3.82 3.05 ; ....... 4.25 4.25 3.20
M ..............3.721/2 2.95 ....... 3.82 3.821 3. 3.05
K ...... ..... 3.471/ 2.85 M ......... 3.72% 3.72% 2.95
I .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3.10 2.70 K ......... 3.50 3.50 2.85
H .. .. .. .... .. .. 2. 2 .20 I ......... 3.05 3.05 2.70
G ............2.50 1.75 1 ...... .. 2.65 2.65 2.20
F.............. 2.45 1.65 I; ......... 2.50 2.471/ 1.75
E ...... .... ... 2.45 1.60 F ..... 2.45 2.421/, 1.65
D ........ ..... 2.40 1.55 .........I 2.37/. 2.371/2 1.60
ABC............ 2.30 1.55 1) ......... 2.371/% 2.371/% 1.55
Receipts 2,050, sales 2,128, exports 5,305. (C. A .... 2.27'1/ 2.271/2 1.55
. .--- Sales ...... 5,051 1,758 764


Tuesday, July 26.-T!iere were several
changes along the line and the quotations
posted were as follows; A., B, C, *.2.30;
D, $2 5; E, $2.40; F', $2.45; G, $2.50; H,
$2.5: I, $3.05: K, $3.50; M, $3.721-2; N,
$3.821-2; WG, $4.25: WW, $4.521-2.
Receipts, 3.335, saies i.S52, exports 464.
Wednesday, July 27.-Quotations as
follows: A, P, and C, $2.25 1-2; D, $2.3'2
1-2; E, $237 1-2; F, $2.42 1-2; G, $2.47 1-2.
H, $2.65; I, $3.05; K, $3.50; M, $3.721-2;
N, $3.82 1-2; window glass, $4.22 1-2; wa-
ter white, $4.52 1-2.
Receipts 2,814, sales 1 758, exports 600.
Thursday, July 28.-Quotations au fol-
lows: Quote A, B, C, ?2.27 1-2; D. $2.32
1-2; E, $237 -2; F, $2.45: G, 52.50; H,
$2.65; 1, $3.05; K, $350: M. $3.721-2; N,
$3.821-2; \WG, $4.25; WWV, $4.521-2.
Receipts. 1,522, saics 254 export 954.
Savanah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 ........... 6,495 44,550
Receipts July 28 ...... 1,522 3,253
Receipts previously .... 82,987 212,030
Total ............... 91,004 259,83.
Exports July 28 ........ 954 2,226
Exports previously ..... 64,127 196,016
Total ............... 65,081 198,242
Stock July 2s .......... 25,23 61,591
8tock last year ........ 9,867 56,952


Bailey & Montgomery's Review.
New York, July 27, 1904.
Spirits Turpentine-Stock, 1,604 barrels.
11arket during the week has been quiet
andi sales small.
Thursday. July 21st, 57c. asked.
Friday, July 22nd.--7c. asked.
Saturday, J.ily 23d.-57c. asked.
Monday, Ju'y 25th.--57c. asked.
Tuesday, July 26th.-57c. asked.
Wednesday, July 27th-57c. asked.
Rosin-Stock, 19,990. -Market is very
dull, sales moderate.
We quote as follows: 4B to ABC, $2.70;
(1) to (')E, $2.70; F. $3.00; G, $3.05; H,
$3.10: 1, $3.40; K, $3.90; M, $4.10; N,
$4.30; WG, $4 70; WW, $4.90 to $5.00.
Yours very truly,
BAILEY & MONTGOMERY.

Tolai, Hart & Co.'s Review.
New York July 28, 1904.
Spirits Turpentine-The past week has
seen but little change in prices. Trade
is fair. Stock 1,581 barrels. We quote
Machines, 563-4 eta.
Rosin-The break in prices has demor-
alized the market, buyers have withdrawn,
and at the moment rosin has no friends.
We quote: BC, 2.70 to $2.75; D, $2.75;
E. $2.90; F, $3.00; G, $3.05; H, $3.10 to
$3.15; I. A3,50; K, $3.85; M, $4.10; N,
$4.25; WG, $4.70; WW, $5.00. Market
weak. TOLAR, HART & CO.


Impets of Turpentine to U. L
The following table is compiled by James Watt & Son, of London, from the
ofiial returns. For convenience of comparison we have turned ewta into barrels
-320 wt. equal 100 barrels.


Crops of Sprs and Rosins for Thr Yemw.
Chop 193-OL amop l34 cap Uhi4
Spirits. Rosin. Spirits. egle. Spirit. sht
i ington-.. ... ....: W,7 18,8 113 16, 1 1 A
Charleston.. ........ 2,46 31 3,07 1l 3a, t. 1
Savannah... ... 176418 60,=M 270T70 9*5W 313, 1
Bruswiek.. ........ 55,6 184,57 68,47 244106 73, M
Moile........ ...... 12is s0 18,6 7;,o72 I8fi snna
New Orleas.. ....... .. .,17l 133,1 33JO 11,03 2103 960
Oarrabelle...... ......dlosed closed 3,3m ,48 8a,? 7 4m
Georgetown.... .. ... 7,561 44,14 1 46 4a S3 MAU15
Pesaeola.. ...... .. 42,554 20e5,96 7 11M,15 37,711 51,S
JaL. & Fer1ndia.. .... 187,I10 1 630 9137e 9 T31 T706AW IMS
Tamp ...... ........ ekled dosed 13,15 4 65 *
Total...... ......6536,15 2M3,2 571,01 M3,184,18 3MSr 6 ,12,13

R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KIGoaT, See. su Tas.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.


Herbert A. Ford,
President.


Geo. H. Ford,
Vice-Pres.


F. L. Watse,
Cahie.


The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CA P TA L, $60,000.00.
DIRECTS: R. L. Anderson, R. 8. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Slicited.

C. n. BARNES, Pres. J. D. SHAW, Vce-Pres. RMALP JESUP, Ses.-Trea

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Stritly a Producers' Cominpy. GOmies
Grades amie Weligts Guaraeteed.
Deliveries at JacksMe Penaco, ernamd amd Sava
Cerrespendence Secited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

W. FRAZIER JONE.L C- 1. .ARNES. R. J.SVP. W. E. AaMtte
Pred Treaaurer. A's Trmes.

UNITED GROCERY CO.,

Importers & Wholesale Grocers
HAY, GRAIN and FEED.
Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
G. LASSETE.. JACKSONVILLE. FLA4,

v ,MAW, .br -r.f.
.e&.~ee..eee.e/ .eteeau'."~me ij


M. A. BRIGGS, President.
H. C. BRIGGS. Ist Vice-President.


HOMER BROWN, 2Na Vice-Ptsedlt.
J. C. McDONALD, See'y and Tre.


1897
From U. 8., bbls..... 152,652
From France, bbls.... 161
From other countries.. 1,494
154,307
Prom Russia .......... 2,815
Total Barrels .. 157,122


18i8
173,785
244
878
174,907
4,183
179,090


1899
149,375
517
50
149,942
4,998
154,940


1900
174,446
2,283
840
177,509
8,521
186,090


1901
193,429
859
53
194,341
6,861
201,202


1902
15566,122
1,656
904
157,682
8,711
166,393


1903
143,61
4,630
516
148,M997
17,595
166,592


Thus the import of Russian Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 1903 was double
that of 1902, and over six times as much as in 1897. It is interesting to see how
this import fluctuates with the price of American Turpentine.
Percentage of Import of Russian ..1.79 2.33 3.22 4.57 3.41 5.24 10.56
Av. Price Amer. Turp. in London ..21-6 24-6 34-1 35-4 27-1 33-1 42-2


FOR SALE.
50000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
ifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill. $~835 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in tte State.

C. BUCKMAN, .. o.. .atrmee
e g Jeooksonville, prie


W, H, Briggs Hardware Co.

n VALDOSTA. GA.


Sole Southern Agent for-

RIXFORD AXES.


They are the BCST. Others imitate but nose do-
plicate. They are made of the best steel, have the finest
temper, hold the keenest edge. cut better and last longer
than any other axe.
This has all been.proved by years of actual use.


Send us your orders.

W, H. BRI66S HARDWARE COMPANY,


VaMesta. Georia.


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T=K ULIDILITUHY OF OUR ADvZMILSKR3 VOUCND FOIL


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THE WEEKLY INDUT~TKIAL RECORD. 11


OWALITY P16T-PUIVUS R34T.


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P. HOLMES & CO.'S LETTER.
New York, July 29th.-The week's mar-
ket has been unusually interesting in that
it was o txact counterpart of the two
previous weeks. Again the ten cent point
was yreahed Monday and was followed by
a steady advance up to Friday. But per-
haps the most interesting part of the de-
velopments was the fact that this week'4
decline failed to reach as low a level as
that of the previous Monday, just as
the previous Monday's decline failed to
earry the market to the low record of two
weeks ago. -IA other words while there
has been no essential change in the fun-
damental characteristics of the market
itself, it has been a rising rather than
a declining tendency. We endeavored to
point this out last week as wearegarded it
a the key note of the situation at the
present time. Holding this fact in mind,


wise traders have avoided the short side,
and nave beer. courageous enough to buy
cotton on the breaks with considerable
profit. As the declines were not as severe
as heretofore, the advances have been
greater. Last week October ran up over
9.92, and then broke sharply without much
support. Yesterday October ran to 9.91
and this morning sold up over that fig-
ure, with buying of a character to render
the short interest extremely nervous. The
simple fact of the matter has been that
no one has believed in higher prices. Even
the conservative element has looked for
no more than a 30 or 40 point advance
at the most without some material change
in crop prospects. But it is very early
in the season, the world's visible supply
of cotton-American-is only 825,000 bales
as compared with "74,000 bales in 1900,
when there was the greatest cotton fam-
ine known since the Civil War, and as


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SPlKl i b OF TURPENTINE
Apr 1 Apr. 3 Apr. 1 Apr. 17 Apr. y My May 1 May 8 May Ma Ma
ND ND 40 47 I- 414 81-3 1- 4
Juame June June U June Jly Jul y July July17 July 2 July 21 Aug. 6
63-4 6 47 47 4PA 47-4 50 so 0 0
Au. M1 Aug Aug. Sept. 4 Sept. 11 Sept U Sept. Oct. 2 Oct. I Oct. U
ow .% M 6424 577 ND 56 67 14 5l-W -4
Oct. Z Ot. 36 NOW. 6 Nov. 2% NV. Dec Dec 10. Dec. 17, Dec. 3 Jan. 14
a 51-2 a I o 6 56 56 1-4 I 1-4 C 1-2-44
Jam 22, Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18, Feby. 25 Meh. 3 Mch. 10 Meh 24
h6 b 64 82 60 59 e0 68
MdL. 30
57
RLOSINS
WW WG N M K I H G F Z D C-A
Aprl1 ....... ..LM . Le L 460 .4 2LI 2.40 2.2 2.10 .6 2. 2.4
Apr 30 . ... L L4 63. L2 .23 2LO a 40 2. 2L16 L s 41 2.L
Ara r AM S U L2s IS.O 2.5L L 14 2. 2.0 5. L L2
Agrr . . 1 .52 .5 112 2.5 21. 2.5 I. U1 U6 LU
Ap 1 ... .. . U S L L. 9ls 2.5 15 2.6 1. L1E 1. LS
May I . . .a 1.5 1 1 L I8 1 S B 2. LB 1.3 1.7 L L1. LIW
May L . . . 3.5 L.S .16 19 L 2.X52 L L L7W 1.70 17 1. 70
May .. . U4% L17% 3.12% &W 287% 2is% 1o L. LI L7 1L.7
Maye . . U 53 L3S 3. LS & L2 L7 70 LW L LI
May a. . . a. S a 2s n Li 3 *6 2L40 LOI LM 1.5 1.76 L7
June 5 ..... 3. L L 1 U S UL 32.-6 24 LW LI. LI LUn LI

JuYe 1 ...... 3t.1 2.O 2 1 2 .20 LL 1.5 LU 1.75 1.
Jme ..... L. L0 atS L.5 2.70 2.5 L. 170 LI L1. Li
J-l- .......3. 3 .16 1.6 2*2 2.5 2.2 1.70 1.5 1.6 15 15
Jue0 . . .$ 0 3. .6 A2 2 2.6 2. L1. L Le LA1.L 1
Jly . .. .. S. L 2.0 2.75 Lt2 1.7 L7 LOS L
July t . .. UL3 3.3 L 2. 2.1 2L. Lb LI 1. LU I.6 L1
ly M. . .3.0 3.3 35LM 2.5 SL 2.75 S2. L L5 L1U L.U LU
JAuy u. . . 2. L Lis Le2.S 2 2 3 1.76 .L L 1. 1.7 1.6 L
JA-llt 7W . .* I , "o La > 3 12.70 2J0 .L L. LIS 1A. 1.S
Augut 14. . . g S. LIS LS LIS M 2.LI L. LO LW LO 1.7
Augut .. SJ L. LU X LI 2. 6 .1 2Ll LO LU 1.57
AU pt M ..... L.O 3L5 L. L 110. 1 L 2.L4 2 LI1 1.7 L 1.0
ugustmter 4.. &W L.S DJ &Z LS LIS 2.0 2.0 2O L.9 1.w 1.0 l.
September 1 . S 1.71 L L L .0 L2.3 2. 15 L2 1. L2 1.I
Neo-mbr 1 L76 LD LI L45 L a LIS Lis 2.4 L" 1. 1.10
September S. . 4.is 4.10 &S. s .0 L2.5 2. 2.a 2.26 2.10 2 1. l
Oe r S. . 4.46 4.4 4. 4. 4.3 4.15 L 2.70 2.46 2.6 .3L 2.5 L
October 8 ...... 4. 4 44.5 s &410 M 2 .7 2. to4 L .5 14 L
October 5.... 4. 4. 4-1 4O 2. .5 270 2.5 2. L 2.S *I
Oebr n ...... CI S 3 LIS &1 2. 2.6 2.40 25 &lS LSt
November .... .. 2 10 21.7 2.L 2.5 2.6 2. 2. 2
November ... .. .3. L26 .10 2.1 L 270 2 2.15 20 2. 10 2.S 2.
November l ......L0 1.5 2. I 2.70 2.5 2.4 2.5 2. 5 2L 2.15
November .. .. L. L .SLI 2 2.0 240 2.3 2. 32.10 1 2.10 2
nDeeber 8 .... 1 1s 2.1 2.3 2 2.0 2. 2.2 2.1 2.51 21
December IT ....2 S. L &S .MU SM 256 2 23.265 I 2.2 2.1 2.
Dee M .. .a a L.S LI2. L2. 2. 2.520 21 2.10 2.0 2.
Deembea .. .. 5 L L.M LI 2.6 2.I 2.4 2.3 2. 2.2 2.s 2.
January 14.. ..4.0 25 3.115 15 2.0 2.5 2.0 2.70 2.5 2.5 2.2
Jamr U .... .. 4.10 L5 l 3.15 2.1 230 2.7 2.t t2. 2.4 2.45
Janary .. .. ..n 4.10# LW.1. 3. 33 & 1. 2.-5 2.8 L2. l75 .Ws
February I ..3.75 3.45 35 3.30 3.25 3.20 2.85 2.85 2.80 2.75 2.70 2.70
February 18 ...3.65 3.45 355 3.30 3.25 3.05 2.70 2.70 2.865 2.60 2.55 2.15
February 25 ...3.70 3.50 3.35 3.0 3.5 2.95 3.60 2.55 2.50 2.45 2.40 2.40
Mare 10 ......3.80 3.60 3.40 3.35 3.30 3.05 2.75 2.70 2.65 2.0 2.55 2.55
M an h ...... 4.00 3.70 3.5 3J5 3. 2.95 2.70 2.65 2.0 2.55 2.0 2.50
Marc 31 ......4.10 3.80 30 3.35 3230 2.95 2.70 2.65 2.00 26 2.50 2.50


IMAIMh~h~MIIIIIIIIIIMh~L*,~u~n~CIMh~,~M


SPIRITS OF TURPENTiNE.


To United Kingdom, in gallons:
Month U03-04 192-
April.. ....... UI.81 1M.13
May .... .... 0.216 6.222
June ........ 7l.037 1,48.,1M
July ........ I.L75 20.M4
Augut ..... .. .M.0 1.767XJ4
September.. ... 77.211 4,27
October .. ....... 711.44 40.240
November .. 661,638 1,295,769
December .. 1.659.656 1.531,779
January. .. 228,850 373,240
February .. 116,452 38,200
March .. .. 3550 ......


161-62
3K.346
1.181.364

1.S09.76
0.7M0

922991
576.784
164,330
247,496
25,000


To Belgium and Netherlands. In gallons:


Month
April ......
May ......
June........
July .... ..
August.. ....
September....
October ..
November
December
January ....
February ..
March .

To Germany. I
Month
April......
May ......
June......
Tuly ......
August .. ..
September.. ..
October ....
November
December .
January ....
February ...
March ..

To all other I
Month
April .. ....
May. .. .....
June........
July ........
August ......
September...
October ...
November
December
January ...
February..
March ..


190-034 190- 101-18
.. 2W.812 90.447 Included
2. 27M6 imSin all other
5... 013 7,10 Europe
6.. 7188 8U.217 860.16
.. 41.37 8.460
2. 4E6 7S8.201 42.C21
.. 30.914 210.001 / 121.40
133,695 349,726 381,226
100,372 58,&859 72,164
168,879 241,150 174,367
5,130 372,444 366,501
...... 8,713 18,474

in gallons:
12N-04 16M-3 131-46
......... 114.084 112.33
.. 3L. .43.s 230,6M
.. 104.000 231.72 4.042
.. M.116 1a.412 73,77
51. 5.8 5G78.437
22.950 56.m1 71.987
.. 21.S6 1.M.44 14.S07
179,010 110,153 81,780

132,000 54,607 153,898
220,182 15,838 67,174
65,256 ...... 94,609

lurope In Gallons:
19-04 12M24- 1201-42
. .. 510 18.475 2.(
.. 53s 11.o47 574.311
14L.S 1.@" .,4m
00 124.284 4g.43
.. 066 2.5 X
4.21S 3.040 21.00
.. 10.00 4.2 17.05A
32,500 17.900 94.837
47,306 89,591 23,000
--- 11,000 -
15,471 44,502
14,189 12,275 36,000


Total foreign Exports. in gallons. includ-
ing everything outside of the United
States:
Month 190m-04 14-84 131-02


April ........ .. 14.0n
May .... .. .. 19.78
June.. .... ...1.2I.00M
July ...... ..2.1M.ms
August...... 1.74.10U
Septmnber.... .1.474.145
October ...... 1.40.s31
November ..1,851.068
December .. 1.003.529
January ... 700.92
February .. 487.577
March .. .. 298,488


M.81S
M21.144
3.22L.5
1.051.15
2.9t.468
2.154.5fi
1.0M.w7
1,932.1813
1.7944R38
820,253
531.346
118,174


9".6m6
2.26&M
2.947.M81
2.63.3.2
2.224.900

1.652,574
I.859.175

855,476
285,958


compared with prices for two years past,
cotton is selling at very reasonable fig-
ures. It is too early yet to attempt to
estimate the value of cotton. With an
extensive short interest in the future mar-
ket and the crop just at the stage where
deterioration :- inevitable, a conservative
policy seems to 1i to play the long side on
any decline. It is difficult to see how
prices can be depressed very much before
there is an abundance of new cotton. In-
terest is now centered in the government
report next week and unless it shows an
improvement, we car expect an extremely
steady market for the next two or three
weeks.

Halls on Vacation.
Mr. R. C. Hall, of Ocala, left last night
for Waynesville, N. (.. where he will
spend several weeks. Major T. C. Hall,
a brother, is spending a few weeks in
South Carolina. Both of these gentle-
men recently returned from St. Louis.


R.OSINS.
To United Kingdom, barrels Mi lbs:
Month 12i-44 9"- U -1
April ........ 7I.24 6.= .I
May ...... ... 0.15 W,21 M
June ........ D.74 S15, 401
July ...... .. ..W J" *,C
August ....... 74.6 s l
September.. .. 471 4 1, t
October ...... 4.416 4.M 5M
November .. 71,107 95,735 88,63
December .. 61,455 6445A 72T~,
January ... 53,508 42,76 4418
February ... 28,351 37,36 91,187
March .. 39,015 35,946 46,5

To Belgium and Netherlands, barrels 13
pounds:
Month 19U-01 13 0 1C-014
April ... .. .. 1. 1. 3. Inclau
May ..... .... 2I .7 ClsJU an l t
June ......... 3. Es.C B*
July ........ 2.I4 1I.47 4
August .. .. .. 4S.3. 47.6
September.. 4 1.19 LyN
October ...... 7.11 64.4M K.O
November .. 3,991 00,0 31,54
December .. 37,077 13,35 209
January .... 00,739 241J 15 1
February ... 9849 25,68 18,35
March .... 10,192 32,121 11,814


To Germany. barrels M Ibs.
Month 192- 19034
April ........ 4,5 S.A44
May .. .. .. .. L2 a.4
June ........ 41.54 40.
July .. .. .. l.a1 3.874
August .... .. 78.834 SCL.
September.. ... UD11S7 S,41
October ...... 82.56 3 .4
November 56,763 42,841
December 15,407 3,171
January... 34,762 54,02
February ... 172,135 40,915
March .... 49,962 6020


190142
W011
W.70

64LN
ZL=I




99X3
56,337
41,M0


Te all other Europe, barrels Ibs:
Month 101-4 1904i 911M-4
April .... ... .5841 3,14SM .1a
May ...... .. M17 467o slim
June.. ........ 14,M44 9.40 4a
July ...... .. 45,51 51.12 141.
August .. .. .. .95 .119
September.. . .4 17.63 I-3
October ...... S4.4M 1.44 1
November .. 13,328 6,415 S2,014
December .. 25,299 48,701 39,816
January .. 17,124 7,148 24
February .. 38,184 42,654 56,931
March ... 33,687 51,949 71,P

Total Exports of Rosin. barrels 10 pouMlan
Including Asia. Africa and America out-
side of the United States:
Month 1M-04 192- 13141
April ........ 193I1 1.1ia 5.1
May ........ 198.2S 3,144 U4,S
June ........ 17832 21.3 231ma
July .. .. ... .3.00 117.19 12,838
August .. ... 239.15 236.32
September.. .. 33L.85 .02a 21.24
October ...... 20.2 215.7 3i.1
November .. 184,860 231,543 222,479
December .. 210,457 20,06 191,440
January ... 192,471 170,966 247,684
February ... 306.090 189,632 257,24
March .... 171,548 204,433 214,913


THE RECORD I TCULAT ALL OVXE THE WORLD.


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.


Sam'I P. Holmes&Co.
Stocks, Beods, Cott.n,
Grain and Previsles.


NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Bell Phoe 853 Baldwh Block


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12 THE WEEKLY INmDUTuIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

JAMES A. HOLLOMOM.
Ediar a"d Maniger.
Pubalek d Evek PrAidy.
rm (Domes1tic) )...3 .o Per Annam
EMMPIMro (Foreign) .... 83.50 .. ..

-"The Pin and Its Pgdwnots."
AC co-onnn tto- should be addresd
The Irnd mm1rl Record Company.
Jcx.o nvill. Fla.
Irmhn UEdMial anld Buasinss OffIBe at
Atldata, Ca.. Savannah. Ga

Entered at the Postoffice at Jacksonville,
Fla., a second-ches matter.

Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association,
September 12, 1902, a its exclusive offical
orga Adopted in annual convention
September II, as the organ also of the
general Association.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the official
organ of the Interstate Cane Growers' As-
sociation. Adopted Sept. 11, 1903, as the
only official organ of the T. 0. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgr Sawmill
Association.

COPY FOR ADVERT1ANG.
Advertising copy (change or new ad-
vertisemets) should reach u Tuesday
amoing to inure insertion in the issue of
te s e week.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES
The publishing plant and the mmn at-
acee of the Industrial Record Publishing
C. are located at No. x Soth Hoga
treet, Jacksamlle, Fla, in the ry heart
at the great turpetine ad yellow pne
indstries.
The Atlanta, Ga, eff is located in the
quitale Bailing, o. 723. Atlanta is
the center of the great manufacturing
trade of the tire S~oth.
The Savannah, Ga. Office is in the Bard
of Tade building Savannah is the lead-
ig open naval stores market in the worMd.

JACKSONVILLE CARNIVAL.
The Jacksonville Trades Carnival Asso-
ciation will hold the second ot their great
annual trades carnivals in Jacksonville
this fall, possibly the last week in Octo-
ber, along the same lines of last year's
carnival. As a trade journal the Record
unhesitatingly endorses this movement
anl hopes that the occasion will be equal-
ly as successful as that of last year, and
nothing more could be desired.
As a business developer on the highest
and most satisfactory basis, there is noth-
ing that excels the carnival. It brought
thousands of the best people in Florida
and Georgia to Jacksonville last year, en-
tertained them in a dignified, pleasing way
and sent them home happier for the trip.
These men and women spent thousands of
dollars during that week in Jacksonville
and made business connections that have
been satisfactory to all parties ever since.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS.
United States Consul-General H. Clay
Evans has forwarded to the authorities
at Washington from London, a statement
of imports and exports from which a most
interesting comparison may be made.
It is shown that for the five years,
1899-1903, the imports into Great Britain
exceeded the exports by $4,298536,880.
For the same period in the United
States the total imports were $4,299,302,-
023, and the total exports $6,911,132,455,
or an excess of exports of $2,11,830,432.


THE SOUTH AND IMMIGRATION.
Commenting editorially on this subject,
the New York Commercial says:
"Some of the local boards of trade and
other commercial organizations at the
South are adopting a new plan of attract-
ing foreign-lorn immigrants to that sec-
t on. They are raising money in order
to help pay the cost of transportation of
immigrants from northern ports to points
in the South and their efforts in this
respect are being supplemented by the
action of some of the railroad companies,
in offering concessions in passenger rates
to intending settlers. If this work is fol-
lowed up by bringing to the attention of
immigrants the opportunities for employ-
ment at the South, it ought to result
in putting an end to the 'labor famine'
that exists in that quarter of the coun-
try.
"It is a noteworthy fact that of the
5,100,000 foreign-born persons of voting
age that were to be found in the United
States in 1900, only 358,251 were credited
to the Southern States. Indeed, if Texas
and Missouri be excluded from the list, the
number of this class of persons in the
South was less than 160,000-only about
one-fifth as many as New York State
alone contained. In North Carolina there
were only 2,530 foreign-born persons of
voting age in 1900, while in South Caro-
lina there were only 3,104; in Georgia
only 7.012, and in Alabama only 8,264-all
of which States are now largely interest-
ed in manufacture as well as in agricul-
ture. As a considerable portion of this
population must have consisted of wo-
men, it will be seen that the amount of
foreign-born labor to be found at the
South available for manufacturing and
other industrial purposes was, compara-
tively speaking, pretty nearly equivalent
to zero.
"There can be no question that such
immigrants as are now admitted willingly
to our shores would constitute a valuable
addition to the population of the South.
Many of them come from southern and
southeastern Europe. and are habituatel
to working under climatic conditions not
dissimilar to those prevailing in the South-
land. They come alike from farming dis-
tricts and from manufacturing centers,
and, where they are able to secure em-
ployment, they are usually thrifty, in-
dustrious and self-supporting. From such
crimes as frequently lead to the lynching
of negroes at the South they are prac-
tically exempt.
"Moreover, an influx of this sort of
population would mean the addition of an
army of consumers as well as producers.
It would mean a larger demand for the
products of the South-more mouths to be
fed with the products of Southern gar-
dens and orchards and farms, and more
backs to be clothed with the products of
Southern looms. It would enable South-
ern farmers to diversify their crops with
a greater degree of assurance of success.
In a word, the addition of a goodly number
of immigrants of the right sort to the
South's population would be equivalent to
the opening of new markets for the pro-
ducts of that section.
"It is gratifying to observe that the
South in beginning to take this view of
foreign immigration. A fair admixture of
these newcomers to the population of that
section would probably contribute mate-
rially to solving the colored-race problem,
besides furnishing Southern industry with
a much-needed supply of labor."


A GOOD PROPOSITION.
A visit to Cuba and Porto Rico will be
made during the early fall by prominent
business men of Brunswick as guests of
Col. C. P. Goodyear, of that city, who was
instrumental in clearing the harbor of
Brnswick and who is now promoting
trade between the southeastern states and
Cuba and Porto Rico. In this he is helped
by Secretary W. G. Cooper, of the At-
lanta Chamber of Commerce, who is now
sending out letters to prominent business
men of Atlanta, inquiring whether they
are likely to have freight for shipment to
either of the islands in the near future.
Col. Goodyear is an indefatigable work-
er and is, as usual, working along the
right lines. The Record will render him
all of the assistance possible in this last
undertaking.


FAILURES DURING HALF YEAR.
The record of commercial failures for
the first half of this year is not pleasant
reading, but in view of the fact that this
is presidential year, with its proverbial
dullness, there may be some excuse for
the discrepancy shown. A summary of
reports received by Dun's agency shows
that commercial insolvencies in the Uni-
ted States for six months of 1904 were
6,214 in number, and $79,490,909 in
amount of defaulted indebtedness. In tne
first half of 1903 there were 5,628 fail-
ures with liabilities of $66,797,260. Man-
ufacturing suspensions numbered 1,463,
and involved $27,418,992, against 1,280
failures for $26,135,144 last year. Trad-
ing insolvencies were 4,482 in number and
$34,270,584 in amount, comparing with
4,038 defaults for $30.544,443 a year pre-
viomu. Other commercial failures not
properly included in the two principal
classes were 269 in number and $17,801,-
338 in amount, against 310 insolvencies for
$10,117,673 last year. In addition to these
commercial suspensions there were bank-
ing failures numbering 59 that involved
$17,057,176, compared with 44 suspensions
for $6,495,716 in the corresponding months
of 1903.


Fertilizer Company Wants a Charter.
Application for a charter has been filed
in the Superior Court at Columbus, Ga.,
by the Georgia Fertilizer Company, capital
stock $50.000. The incorporators are 0.
C. Bullock and John T. Fletcher, of Co-
lumbus and J. W. Howard and J. H. Car-
penter, of Murray County, Tennessee. A
site for the plant has been secured just
outside the city limits of Columbus.


Adulterated Spirits Coafscatel
The Savannah News of this irurning
says:
"Another lot of adulterated turpentine
has been shipped to Savannah and has
been discovered and confiscated for the
State by Mr. R. P. Register. State in-
spector of naval stores for Georgia. In
this case the adulterators have abandoned
the old plan of using kerosene in their
efforts to defraud buyers and have used
wood spirits ir-tead. This is a dangerous
adulterant because of practically the same
specific gravity as the pure spirits, and,
when refined, of almost the same color.
As the inspectors have a certain method
of discovering it, however, there is no
possibility of any of the mixed spirits
getting by th-m. The lot seized by Mr.
Register consist of sixteen casks."


.THEIR NEW LOCATION.

The Coe liMated Cempanla to Haw -
East Bay Staet BMiNdi
The readers of the Industrial RBm
will recall that last summer we plihid l
a description and drawing of a hanbo--
building to be erected for the Comolidad
Naval Stores and Grocery Companes of
this city. But at the last moment it wV
discovered that the titles to the prepeLt
they contemp'ated btymg for tt pr-
pose were defective and they wee s
pulled to abandon the project.
As they were desirous of having aLnt
with full railroad and river facilities, the
set about trying to buy the property an
the southeast corner of Bay and Osms
Streets. The deed has just been efeeted
and the plans are out for a building. The
property measures seventy-two feet a
Bay Street and runs back to the rir, in
elusive of riparian rights. In fact there
will be three buildings, one on Bay Sket
six stories high and running baek em
hundred and fve feet to an alley. The
middle building will be one humired and
five feet square and three stories high.
This will face on Ocean Street, with a
alley north and east of it and the raB-
road track on the South. South of this
will be a large warehouse one story hig
also one hundred and five feet square. It
will extend to the river, and a wharf be-
yond it will measure one hundred aad
fifty feet, thus enabling vessels whef
room on the east, west and south aides o
it. The railroad track will Pl!o e
through the warehouse to the water.
It will thus be seen .,bst the Coo l-
idated will have unequalled facilitie :-r
handling their naval stores and grocery
shipments and receipts. Their arrsge-
ment with the railroads is seuh th.
freights will be handled at the loullt
possible cost, either by rail or by walr.
The wharves 'will extend sunffient!r far
into the river, so that the largest vesees
coming to this city can load alongside
of them, and when necessary, direct from
the cars.
The Bay Street building will be of mar-
ble and fire-proof brick, handsomely ap-
pointed throughout. The ground 1oor
will be occupied by the Consolidated
Grocery Company. The upper stories will
consist of offices and the second, third ah
fourth stories will be occupied by the
Consolidated Naval Stores Company, the
Consolidated ind Company and T*'
Cooperage Company. The offices in the
fifth and 'sixth stories will be for ret.
The middle building will be one hunmh~
and five feet square, and treg- st wie
high. It will be built of, the wvry be-t
fire-proof brick, and will be used by the
Consolidated Grocery Company for ware-
house purposes.
The warehouse will be a one-stomy irn
building and will be used for storage ans
transient goods, naval stores, barrels etc
Carload shipments will he made I..
their customers from this warehon.1 the
cars being loaded inside the building.
The plans are now in the hands of the
architect, and as soon as all detaUrs am
completed the Record will publish a rom
plete story, showing the plans an a c tw
of the building, etc.

H. W. Raiford, a prominent turpentine
operator of Raiford, Fla, accompanied
by Mrs. Raiford and Miss L. V. Perry
and Miss Nora Hendrieks were In tam
city and the guests of the Hotel Windle
this week.


3 VIM ALR P2b0%A&41way, AD)VERTU IN T=E RUNC


4










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 1s


UNITED STATUE DEPOSITORY No. ****.
"06mm... yar& 4 oun Comws op
THE ATLANTIO NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
s 0 1 6MARC H 2"rm.W 1904. *
MARCH 26". 1904.


Rsomuncs LramnILITrr
I s D s.... ..... ... 1,3 0.0 Capital Stock paid in...............
OIerdraft" 34.38 . 1
r ...... ...........................................
Valt8a1111t1re8.................. a15.SWL.9 Uu vided Profits...................
u.B Bo s ............................ o2W7.5o Circu-ati o .......................... .
C d t B d ........ ... 13.0 7. Depo ts.............................
De from U. S. Teanrer........... 10,000.0 Total.............. ...............
O ad Due from other Banks ...... S.e.71
TOI .A ............................ Iiwa wWo


BIG LAUD COMPANIES ACTIVE

naM Devdtlsmet of death Florida
Aing the Glf.
Irving H. Welch, manager of the South-
ern States Land and Timber Company, of
Jacksonville, has been making a tour of
South Florida, along the Gulf Coast.
The Consolidated Land Company and
the Southern States Land and Timber
Company have a corps or engineers unde-
Mesrs. Jenkins, of Atlantic Coast Line
Railroad and Captain Hendricks, field
agent of the Southern States Land and
Timber Company, now running levels in
De 8oto County, with a view to locating
a drainage canal and laterals to drain
the country between Arcadia and Oke-
ehobee lake, and between Lake Istokpoga
and the Caloosahatchie River. This ter-
ritory imeludes seom of the most fertile
agricultural lands in the United States.
If the investigations continue as favorable
as present indications, inside of three
years it is expected that territory will be
oequpied by 6,000 to 10,000 new inhabi-
tants of Florida, and a country now oe-
eupied by a half dozen cow men will be
settled by one of the thriftiest German
colonies in the United States.
At Fort Myers Mr. Welch joined Walter
Langford, of Fort Myers, and W. EL
Caldwell, of the United States engineer
corps at Tampa, for an investigating trip
to Indian Key, down in the Ten Thous-
and Islands. Mr. Langford is joint owner
with Mr. Roach, the Chicago street rail-
way magnate, in a 200-acre grapefruit
gure called Deep Lake, which is eight-
een miles northeast of Everglade post-
office, at the mouth of Aliens river, and
is also the promoter of the cypress mill
plant on Russells island and the railroad
thence into the interior ol ree County.
Mr. Caldwell reports one of the best
harbors at the mouth of Indian Key pass
that there is between Tampa and Miami


samaoojno
4, 0-00
xiOaO .00
l.25.35.OL
W.'RK Am-Los


except Key West, there being twelve feet
of water now. Mr. Langford's mill and
railroad enterprises have the backing of
well-known Chicago, Pnlridece, Phila-
delphia and New York capitalists, and
there is no doubt that work will at once
begin on a 100,000-foot per day cypress
mill, with two billion and a half feet of
timber in sight, and the Deep Lake Rail-
road company will be pushed rapidly as
the weather will permit. Mallory Line
people say they will at once run up to
Indian Key, and a few weeks win see
active work in Lee County and in a part
of Florida hitherto given but slight at-
tention.

Florida does not stand out conspicuous-
ly as a poultry State, but her poultry
products make a creditable showing in
comparison with other leading farm prod-
ucts. The value of the poultry on the
farms was $394,557, while the poultry
products disposed of were worth $1,128,-
227, of which $553,524 was for eggs and
$574,703 for poultry.
Jacksoville Wholesale Lumber Market.
(For week ending July 22.)
Merchantable.
kard schedules-$10.50 to $13.00.
Sound and square schedules, ~J.5O t,
$12.00.
Merchantable car material-
Average scheule of sills, 6 feet and
under, 10 inches and under, $13.00 to
$14.00.
Special schedules-according to sizes
and lengths-prices steady.
K. D. Sape-"6" and up 90 per rent
clear, $9.50 to $10.00.
Flooring:
$11.50; No. 4. $8.50.
Cyprea
First and seconds, 4 quarter base. ear
load prices, $34; selects, 4 quarter bse,
No. 1, $15.00; No. 2, $13.50; No. 3,
$28; shop, 4 quarter bae, $20.
Cypress Shingles--0xl A's, per 1.000
pe., $5.25; primes, $4.25; 4xlA, A's, $350:
primes, $2,75.
Cypress laths, $2 per 1,000.


Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.



CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS,

AND VATS.
Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
S1W. (~. DAVIS & 01ON, PALATKAr. FLN.


The West Raley-Rannie Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
A. N. WEST, Prs. c. West. lVce-Pres. W. R. RMale, Vice-Pres. M. V. Ri iey Sec. Tre"s.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.

Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINOAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Flavm T. Crbhtisk
Prosidesst


Frank C. Groover,
Vie-Pre.


Marsal W. 86e00r1
SeL and TtGEM


THE HNRI8TIE-ROOEwR DRUG gO.


Wholeole DiagiSlS


daCkSonrnlle,


. DiR


Ne SolklTe In Lme on Tute GmI ll D0iW .

lOllNlSVNSKlMI. Nroel SMC.ITl. I T nnll


C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS


Grain. Hay, Feed


Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requiremente
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516- 518- 520- 522- 524- 526 EAST BAY bIKLLI
Jacksonville, Fla.


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


J. W. WADE,
Vie-President.


E. G. HBUO,
Secy and Trees


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


a. S, 11mL3el@U
PmMio


W. S. JOW180.
Wee pros.


JAS. LA aTKa. W. W. STRUFLBUO.
Oem Shingm'. Last. Trouauew


6he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers


402-40"IEW406 CKelnt ft Ur Jmsbsouift rI..
SECTORS:
WiRJM S. PInETOK
U. Sa WPAC. rc.AKN Xa


W.j.IIU
JAS.UITL


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.

DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


0AIl,7Ak Mipaln mm AND POGISSIVL


-- -- --- --


H rLen~#~








14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY
Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,
Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located in the heart of the Lumber District gives h advam-
tage ft bchoiest material at lowest cost.


THE
Bethune
Apparatus.
The New Process.
extracts the spirts without destroying the
wood fibre. Runsm out a charge in les than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-fe gallon from cord of wood.
Makes pure water white spirits. free from
the odor of tar or creosote. No chemicals
-ued It refinin the spirits. Needs to be
datled only once after coming front re-
tort.
No trouble with bi-products, the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
dued and from wood. Only one grade
of spirits produced and that the highest
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGER FROM FIRE
Built of finest material by hihg-grade
workmen. The cheapest machine offered ts
the public.
We challenge comparison of output and
quality of product We guarantee output
and quality.
TMe re sedt Cnsctietau Caom
P. O. Box 54. RALEIGH, N. C.


Trade Checks,
FOR THE

COMMISSARY BUSIN[S. =
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD 0
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office *
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the
Industrial Record Go., :
If yeu are thmakln .f btol ng a
place, uelliag the eOe you have, or
1radlng t If you re thliklI- of Ik -
v.etl I n y In** mt*y; 1 you wat r1
to bay mac*iery oe ny kIdd. dr e t
the laduMtrial Reeord. a potal esr
telllla of your want.


mu manam anum.. nman. m ma .muua... UUU MnU HU uni


w--- m-- w-- vww- --- wwm ...- ..-- ------------------------------ -,--
PEARL WIGHT. Pros. T. I. MCARTHY. VIe-Pres. STER. Tres.

SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.
1Vmin M. WELci. Maomater.

Florida Timber, Grazing &

Agricultural Lands.

401-404 LAW EXCHANGE, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


I ProW DeIvery St od U s ltYhI ur uUUIsIury CIuuuuure


ir PrInPt Uds~wr Slrd Us Yur Cinmlssry) Ihwl Sriws.


-I ---- -- - -

JOHN HENDERSON, President. THE J. A. CRANFORD, Secretary.

CHATTANOOGA POTTERY CO.,

Factory located Daisy. Tenn. Jacksonville, Fla.

Sole Manufacturers of

S: The Herty Turpentine Cups




your orders now for future delivery. Prices and

all information cheerfully furnished on


+ Cups, Gutters and all Tools
I i- I Used in the HERTY system.

Address all communications

She Chattanooga Pottery Company,
Jacksonville, Fla.

PATRONIZE prrIcow ADnVIRTlS.S VO SATISFtCTORY DIWALImn


r









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


Arisea Desert Lds.
There is a new town in Arizona which
for its size is probably the busiest in the
Southwest It is called "Roosevelt," and,
although it is not down on the railroad
maps as yet, or known to exist outside
the Territory, no "boom" town of the old
days is busier than Roosevelt, Arizona.
It is the center of the work now un-
der way under the direction of the Gov-
ernment for the building of the immense
Tonto basin irrigation project, which is
to reclaim 100,000 acres of desert land
in this territory and make it blossom like
Iowa or Illinois.


At Roosevelt 500 men-and a few wo-
men-have located, most of them employ-
ed on the preliminary work which has
been under way for some time under the
direction of L C. Hill, the Government
enginer .
The site of the immense dam which is
to retain the water to be used in the ir-
rigation scheme is near Roosevelt, and
already a cement mill for grinding the vast
quantities of cement to be used in con-
strueting the dam, a waterworks system
and an electric light plant have been con-
structed by the Government for the work.
Hundreds of cabins, little hotels, and
teats house the workingmen, and the in-
vitable accompaniment of saloons, gamb-
ligs house and dance halls make Roose-
velt a lively town.
It i thirty-six miles from Phoenix and
the rails of the Santa Fe Railroad have
not yet been extended tht far, although it
is understood here that a branch line may
be run from Phoenix long before the
Torto basin dam is finished.
Work is to be commenced on the im-
meme canal which is to furnish power
for the work on the dam as soon as con-
tracts are signed in Washington and a
rt road from Phoenix to Roosevelt is
be.ig constructed by the towns of Phoe-
nix, Tempe and Mesa.
All this work is preliminary to the first
actual construction work undertaken by
the United States Government in the vast
irrigation scheme which is to reclaim the
arid lands of the far West, and the coun-
try near Phoenix was selected because of
the natural advantages offered by the
Tonto basin for the storage of water and
the exceptional transportation facilities
of the Santa Fe Railroad, which brings
supplies and material Ito Phoenix from
which the haul to the site of the dam is
ea compared to the problems confront-
ing the engineers at other sites selected.
When the reservoir is constructed it
will be capable of flooding 100,000 acres
of lad to a depth of three feet if neces-
may, and the reclamation of this vast
tract of land will be of incalculable ben-
eft to Arizona.


ZINC NAILS


Tur ;ntine Cups


Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strnm but soft light metal. They are
thi g gfl which ill not injure
saw when left in the trees.

Naiam Nail 0o.

AS2 Pwmn S&. Alw Tefk, H. W.
Alo Heaiarters for Galvanized and
Tised Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Ihm Rods, Etc, Slating and Roofi
nafi BSater Tools, Copper Nails
Tak.


Beacham & Shackelton

WE ARE IN THE MARKET TO BUY ROUND TIMBER.


1111 hll 1t o 0 11 Lohd


Desirable Tracts For Sale.


s515 Wedt n.. Jnlan.u, Fa.


COURSE OF PALE AND MEDIUM ROSINS AT SAVANNAH FOR TWO YEARS.


W.W.


W.G.


DATE 1904-06 1903-0 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04 190-06 1903-04


April 1.........
April 8.........
April 15........
April 22........
April 29........
May 6........
May 13........
May 20........
May 27........
June 3........
June 10........
June 16........
June 23........
July 1 ........
July 7 ........
July 14 ........
July 28 ........


$4.10
3.95
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.95
4.35
4.50
4.60
4.65
4.75
4.75
4.70
4.52%,


$3.90
3.60
3.50
3.40
3.35
3.35
2.42%
3.65
3.65
3.60
3.40
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.40


$3.80
375
3.60
3.60
3.60
3.50
3.50
3.55
3.65
4.05
4.10
4.15
4.85
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.25


$3.60
3.45
3.35
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.271%
3.35
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.20


- - -



THE CuV~I


$3.60
3.60
3.45
3.45
3.45
335
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.85
3.85
3.85
3.90
4.00
3.95
3.90
3.821/r


NG


SWhise SHOES AND DRY

NEW YORK: 256 Chrch St.

We Sell I
> da 06At n ,Ia L10 M 0It 0 dt n It
-W -W W -WWW -W W -


The Santa Fe Railroad now reaches all
of the territory which is to be fructified
and the transportation and climate prob-
lems, so common in this country, will
therefore be solved for the owners of the
land.

Awes au.me ndws eabrtnes or mew
advr.tlaementa sheld4 wemehk -
'Mueeda msermaln to isUa e Inmertlao
rt ther Iume of teo amm week.


Tailor-Made Shirts

THE KIND THAT fIT
R ash a l







Ug Ma
]llnrr n


" nl r11MI-TI-fRT
SiillILI

-,. e' r s

..-.,
.S Or stas-.
ph am IU-



F. S. BLACK
GOLUMMA, '. C.
TE LiEM Calml sT 0il0 E T L


$3.50
3.35
3.25
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.17%
3.25
3.25
3.20
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.05


$3.35
3.35
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.65
3.65
3.65
3.65
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.72%


$3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.121/
3.20
3.20
3.15
2.95
2.95
295
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95


$3.30
3.30
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.25
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.55
3.55
3.55
3.50


$3.20
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.02%
3.10
3.10
3.05
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.80
2.80
2.80
2.85


$2.95
2.95
&80
2.80
2.80
2.60
3.00
300
3.10
3.25
3.30
3.30
3.45
3.45
3.45
3.05


LSL
2.85
2.8
2.87
3.00
3.65
3.00
2.80
2.70
2.70
2.66
2.65
2.65
.70


TON COMPANY,


GOODS. 635 to 641 West Forsyth Sret.
Jacksonville, Fla.


merchants Only.

^^^,r^ ^^^^^.^^


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE & RETAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Rlinds. Paints, Oils and Glass.
Stoves, Tinware, Country-Holloware.


10 WEST BAY STREET


JacKsonville. Fla.


SSS a a a a S S S S ..a~ a a S S S S a a a S .5 fl


SJH D. BAKER. Pr. C. V. BARTIEON Vice-P BAKI & BAKL P. 1K X
(.llUer a Hl. Cs) (C W. Ilad Co.) GeOane C.d. Sec. & TIT

FLORIDA FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY
S(ICORPORATEO.)

SRailroads and Steamship Compaiees.
Charges Reasonable. Your Membership Selcited,
We vmre yv all worry mla trmulelr P dnredl by all PNIIc dies


r


a You Want a Turpentine Location?

You Want a Sawmill Location?

SYou Want any Kind of florida Land?.

SI You Mean Business?

Sr J. H. LIVINGSTON A SONS,
Ocala, Florida
e .*t* 4,t**0t, #,r*i* tO* e o** *** ************** s


WHE WRITING ADVERTISKS MENTION THE RECORD.


Twlv


MP


I - - - - --- - - -


- - - - - - - - - -









18 THE WEEKLY IDUS'rTlAIl RECORD.


Alabama.
Abbeville-Electrie-light plant and Wa
terworks.-City will vote on August 8 on
the issuance of $20,000 of bonds for con-
structing waterworks and electric light
plant; Robert Newman, mayor.
Anniston Electrical Appliances.-
Southern Electric & Manufacturing Co.
has been incorporated with $100,000 capi-
tal to manufacture electrical appliances.
Frank G. Lake is president; R. W. Munk,
vice-president; W. L Goodhart, secretary
and manager, and E. H. Goodhart, treasu-
rer.
Anniston-Car Plant.--Dspatches state
that an agreement has been reached
whereby the Illinois Car & Equipment Co.
has acquired possession of the Southern
Car & Foundry Co.'s Anniston plant, and
it is also reported that negotiations are
in progress for the resumption of opera-
tions under J. M. Elliott, of Gadsden, Ala.
The Manufacturers' Record reported Mr.
Elliott in January as contemplating the
operation of plant.
Birmingham-Iron and Steel.-Birming-
ham Storage and Warehouse Co. has been
incorporated with G. H. Schuler, of Gads-
den, Ala, president, to do a general store
age business, especially in iron and steel.
Birmingham Coal Mining.-G. B.
Crowe, E. P. Gaines and J. L. Davidson
have incorporated the Yolanda Coal and
Coke Co., with $300.000 capital to develop
coal and other mineral properties near
Yolande, Ala.
Dora Station-Mining.-Buell Mining
Co. has been organized, with D. T. Buell,
of Birmiagham, Ala., president and treas-
urer, for the development of coal and ore


lands near Dora. Output will be 300 tons
of coal and 250 tons of ore daily. Office,
IooMni 20, Steiner Building, Birmingham,
Ala. '. F. Wheelock, Jr., is engineer in
charge.
Enterprise-Novelty Works.-J. P.
:iwls. E. T. Peddy and R. H. Jones have
incorporated the Enterprise Mills and
Novelty Works, with $10,000 capital.
Florence-Manehine Works.-Goorge L.
Hoxie and Allen H. Kells, of Adrian, Mich.,
have purchased the plant of the Florence
Machine Works, which* they will thor-
i;ughly equip and operate.
'lorence-Planing Mills.-A. M. Llew-
ellyn. of Huntsville, Ala., and W. C. Hen-
will improve and operate the Bellamy
Planning Mills in East Florence.
M ontgomery-Sawmill.----Alabama Rift
Flooring Co. will rebuild sawmill, recently
burned at a loss of $100,000; Thomas
Palmer. local manager.
Ozirk-4'anning Factory.-It is reported
that (:. P. bowlingg contemplates estab-
iishing canning factory.
'Failadiega-Electric Plant, Cotton Gins
and (rist Mills.-Talladega Electric Co.
has Leen incorporated with $50,000 capital,
to construct and operate cotton gins and
grist mills and to furnish electric power
for them and other enterprises; incorpo-
rators, (Geo. W. Chambers, Joe S. Cham-
hers and George 0. Chambers.
Yellowp:neLumber.-E. W. Gates
Lunmlwr Company has increased capital
from $.200.000 to $500,000.
Florida.
Jacksonville--Sloe Factory.-Finkel-
stein & Son contemplate establishing a


New Enttrprises in the Southeast,


plant for the manufacture of shoes.
Key West-Ice Plant--Consumer's Ice
& Cold Storage Co. is being organized for
the erection of ice plant. A. L Whitaker,
A. P. Ferguson, F. H. Ladd and E. E. Lar-
kin are interested.
Lakeland-Artificial Stonework.-Name
of company reported last week to manu-
facture artificial stone and building mate-
rial from white sand should have been
the South Florida Supply Co., and not the
lakeland Supply Co.
Ortega (P. O. Jaeksonville.)--Electric
Plant, etc.-Jacksonville-Ortega Town Co.
will construct a bridge over McGirt's creek
conmeting Ortega with Jacksonville. Com-
pany also contemplates the erection of
electric light plant for furnishing lights
and power to town. J. E. Butts is super-
intendent of construction.
Palatka-Ferry.-County commissioners
of Putnam county and the city council of
Palatka have decided to establish a ferry
line from Palatka to East Palatka. Mr.
Fearnside, chairman board of county com-
missioners, can be addressed.
Georgia.
Atlanta Real Estate.-. Clinton
Smoot, William S. Ansley, C. W. Ansley,
Glenn Facor and William Clayburn have
incorporated the Georgia Industrial Realty
Co., with $50,000 capital.
Bremen-Cotton Gin and Grist Mill.-
J. T. Copeland & Son are having plans
prepared by J. W. McClendon for rebuild-
ing cotton gin and grist mill recently
burned; structures to be 20x62, 24x40 and
20x60; M. A. Turner, engineer in charge.
ColumbusM-rocery.-J. M. Britt, J. T.
Carson, J. J. Cox, W. J. Cox and associate,.
have incorporated the Georgia Grocery Co.
with $35.000 capital and privilege of in-
creasing to $100,000.
Columbus-Cotton Mill.-It is reported


Half Tones=Zinc Etchings





Illustrating and Engraving Department


OF



THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.


Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc etchings made to order in the most improved

and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.


I WtEILT i IIDE i IIM S ElMIIM ElSK ImI PmE.


IN WnTING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED

GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED


A Florida Enterprise.


NOTUIG evoums LINN"m
Vr= UCZGLZSCXL


that John T. Abney, superintendent of'
the Laurens Cotton Mills at Laures, 8.
C., will build -a cotton mill in Columbus.
Columbus-Cotton Mil-J. F. Hamom,
of Macon, Ga, is negotiating for a tract
of land at Columbus, and it is reported
the property will be used as the site for
a cotton mill to be erected by the Bibb
Manufacturing Co., of Macon, of which
Mr. Hanson is president. The company
already operates mills at Columbus, Ma-
con and Covington.
Dublin-Waterworks.-C-ty will build
system of waterworks. Address The
Mayor.
Macon-Laundry.-S. Guthman, J. W.
Crosby, W. M. Shinholser and WL I.
Stotesberry have incorporated the Troy
Laundry Co. with $10,000 capitaL
Moultrie-Planing Mill.-Crecent Lum-
ber Co., E. S. Nance, president and treas-
urer, will rebuild planing mill recently
reported burned at a loss of $,000.
Oconee-Hardwood Mills.-Reports state
that William Kloppert, William F. Bruea-
ger, E. J. Harth and H. F. Russell, all of
Cincinnati, O., are investigating 10,00
acres of timber land on which they nave
an option, with a view to establishing
hardwood mills at a cost of $100,000;
plants to be equipped with band saw.
Savannah-Wood Distillation.-A. J.
McArthur, of Gainesville, Fla, is investi-
gating with a view to establishing rena-
ing plant for wood spirit*.
Wayeross-Planing MilL-J. P. Lide aad
W. A. Sweat of Fairfax, Ga., have pur-
chased site and will erect shingle milL
Wilcox County-Timber IandL-Dr. J.
C. De Laperriere and W. B. McCants of
Winder, Ga.. have purchased 3,000 acres of
timber land in Wileox County, and ar-
rangements will at once be made for its
development.


4_


i


Try It.






r-'--; = -I-- TI VnflLY ThaLJ:1tAL KUCRD.


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade
Western White Oak Spirit Barrels

Capital $100,000.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.

OFFICERS:,
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


DIRECTORS:
JOHN E. HARRIS, C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST,
W. C. POWELL, W. F. COACHMAN.


W. J. KELLY


Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are

McMILLAN BROTHERS'
Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
S condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
lose by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS


SAVANNAH, GA.
MOBILE, ALA.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
FAYETTEVILLE, N C.


OX O THI WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PAPSIE


_ ...... TH E' ....LY.N.-ist..TAT. B.ECOKD.


S1.-









U THE WEEKLY uINUDIJ~AlAL RECORD.
I I I I _


Buyers' Directory


Ths artie e in twi s ue If
7y w t am tuns look through thk
lonh liHt and wrie to the am ap
So thia. ThLe Beorl g a
a rempwt response.

AUTOMOBILES.
Grt, Frd Jacksiff, Fa.

Adotis National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commereili Bank, Jacksonville a
Oatral National Bank, Ocals, Fla.
MeaantiL Baki, Jacksonvle, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cumer Iambe r Co, Jaconville, F.
BRICK.
Father, Geo. R, Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
Southern FPel & Bapply Co, The, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
CARS.
Soth Atlantic Car & Manufacturing Co,
Wayroms, Ga.
CATTLE.
Palmetto Park Farm, Ocla, Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro, J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
free Co., H. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kdhn, Furehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Leadon, M W, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co, New York City.
COOPERAGE
Cannon Co, The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Ja nville Coopeage C, Jaksonwrie,

Quitman Cooperage Co, Quitman, Ga.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS--WHOLESALE.
Chritie-Groover Drug Co, Jacksonville,

DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Cvington Co, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furehgott a Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Chritopher, John G, Jacksonville, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
Mrrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fa.
Sehodeld's Sons Co., J. 8., Maeon, Ga
gusts, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
Murphy, T, Jacksonville, Fla.
aoi'lds Son Co, J. S., Macon, Ga
FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY.
Florida Freight Claim Agency, Jackson-
vile, Via.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
snvaille, Fla.
arual.n uREK
Grand Rapids Furniture Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
GENTS' FUWrISNK&
Cra Bro, J. A., Jacksonville, Fa.
fdroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROC RS-WHOLESALE.
Commoidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Elli-Young Co., Savannah, Ga.
Hargraves Co., C. H, Jacksonville, Fla.
Johnon Co, W. B, Jacksonville, F.
eacoek, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
United Grocery Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
White, Walton & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. ., Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESAE.
Kohn, Furehgott & Co, Jackso~wile, Fla.
Bond & Bourn Co, Jacksonville, Fa.
HARDWARE.
Baird & Co., L E, Jckskoknville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
SBriggs Hardware Co., W. H.,Valdota, Ga.
Christopher, John G., Jackonville, Fla.
Maion Hardware Co, Oala, Fa.
Tapa Hardware Co, Tampa, Fa.
Weed & Co, J. D., Savannah, Ga


MeMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fl
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, H.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonvile, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonvile, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksrvie, la.
HOTLS.
Aragon, The, JacksoMvie, F.
Hamilton, The, White Springs, FlM.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
Kendriek House, The, White Springs, Ja.
New Victoria Hotel, Jacksonville, a
New Paxton, The, White Springs, Fla.
Oaks, The, White Springs, F
Pritchard House, The, White Springs, F.
Zahm's European Hotel, Jacksonvile, Fa.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works &. Supply Co., An-
gusts, Ga
Merrill-Stevns Co., Jaksowa le, Fla.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Croeby Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
Riles, R. J, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, la.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Bowen & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gornto & Co., J. E, Valdosta, Ga.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co, Chattanooga, Tenn.
MACHINE WORK&
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fa.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Macon, Ga
MATERIALS FOR luRPR jilaz PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. 8., Macon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jacksonville, Fla.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co, W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. 8., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co, Tampa, Fa.
MULES AID HORSES.
Thomas, W. R, Gainesville, Fla.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barnes-Jessup Co, The, Jacksonville, Fl.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co., The, Savannah, Ga.
Independent Naval Stores and Export Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
PAINTS.
Baird & Co., L E, Jacksonville, Fa.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PECANS.
Griffling Bros. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H, Valdosta, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Ocala, Fa.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fa.
Marion Hardware Co, Oals, Fla.
PUMPS.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksoville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. ., Macon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co, Savannah,
Ga.
RAILS.
Joseph Iron Co, Iesae, Cincinnati, 0.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa,
Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fla.


Fraie, W. W., Jaesoonvile, a
Livingston a. Boo, J. H., Oasla, la.
Southern states Lad sad Timber Co,
Jacksonville, mFla.
West-BRal-Ramio COL, The, Jaekamile
FI.
SHIP YSARD
Cunmer IEmber CO, Jacksvilse, Fla
Meril-OStevs o. JO inv i% ia.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covingto Co, The, Jacksovlle, lM.
STEAM1HIPS.
Clye Steamship Co The, New York City.
STOCK BROKER..
Holmes & Co., Samuel P, Jacksoville ,Pn.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co, H. A., Jacksoville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cyprem Tank Co, Mobile, Al.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatk, Fla.
SchoAeld's Sons Co, J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville, Fla.
Council Tool Co, The, Wananish, N. C.
u. uarEA ms APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksonville, ia.!


Sli lll11 lltlitlIll31 ,!ilttlllit l tllll3l3ll3 11 l l3
- J. P. WILLIAMS Presidet. J. A. G. CAisow. it Vice-Pnrlden
- T. A. JNarNas, S2nd VIce-President. J. F. DUIUliWar.adV.ic-PleOMedt
- H. .KATY N, Secretary. D. G. White, Treasrer.


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

1111 =Sm IN ED fox IM I=
- Hil I IC OT FAI IHOEU Ei
- Main orCree SAVANPIKXH., OoMILA.
S raneh Offree: PINALCOLA, FrL. I Urane Onrf Bmeas,.
JACKOnVIasL.3, fLI. f COLUMVa OL.
= Naval Stores Producers are Isvited to Correspo. With Us..
- Illt liit i tiltIII II Illllll I I IIIIII itl lll llll lll '

TAMs C Represeuts the Famms

"Blakeslee" Gasoline Pump Rig
ppr
IrrIgatlon, Tauk Supply a"d Drailage Service.
a T o : : ' "' .
.i ?, ~i


o .
'' v"_


No. I Outfit has eapeaity of 45.000 galls in hours.
No. 2 Outfit ha a capacity of 11(,U0 galfos la M hours.
Write today ~r prices t--
WHITE-BLAKESLEE MANUFACTURING CO.
BMlr fMgem, Aa.;


BETTELINI'B SPECIALTY.
I wil send by ezx pre prepaid. the tolwg:
aour full quarts Lieoln County, Sunnybrook Ry or B Ha B .. m *
Sanle Bottles ............
I wll sen tfor full quarts of Somers' Corn, Melwod Rye, G a Wee-
ding Rye, Holland Gin. Ton. in. Peach Brandy. Peach snd Homey
Whiskey, Gin and Manhattan Cocktals--any of the aboe fr........
O e bottle of any of the above ......................................... ............
rour bottles of the following Cafiornia Wines: Snrry. Pert. Mneat.
Catawba .......... UL
Single bottles ......................
Slnge bottles .......................................... M
Four bottles Wilson W key, caed ......
Single bottles ...... .
Five bottles Dufly's Malt ............................. US
Bulk oods of all kinds. Special Priees on appliation. All hina at
liquors in jugs from H I to 5. to. b. Jacksovilla
F. BETTLINI W Bay St, epp. Upeio Dept, JacksviMe, Frl


THE RECORD IS THE'OPMRATORS* wr= ,ACE"


Pie. Product C0atrad.umn f-% IFo
atevile, N. C
PiM Bet Omstruegm O, The, adeai.
N. C
Standard TrpenINC oa,l 4 BAm M101
City.

Baker, M. A, Brnmmwi 6B.
MeMoIan B.rm, 8ana, O.
lurPaau STarU. TIIL

1 UEPS ZEUS TATE
Davis & Son, G. M., Paletha, lh.

Grivot Typewriter E-ai. J- k
Ms.

McMurray & Baker, Jaweko_ _1 11
Thomas, W. ., Ganesille, ia.
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co, Jaekswoil, 1La.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
Riles, R. J, Jacksoville, l.
YELLOW PIE LUMBL.
Cummer Lumber Co., JaekoiaL, h
East Coast Lumber Co, Watertown, Via







TEE NWVUUK DEDWBTRAL 3UOORD. 1$X
-- -p


NEw Tom MARE=
kem, Yn (.4mg Logsf).
By Sal
BaIKIng arera 12 in. ad der W0.
to p0C;- D nBilitg orders. 14 in. and up,
MUObe ao i; yMal orers, ordinary a-
.atmmC PsSL to Se"; hIm- stad ,
ay srhoa, i. to $220; Wsip 4tat
4 ft.aver o0O to ."00o; kart fte
aieng 1 in ad 11-5 in., 4.501 to M2LM;
1 i. wMie boards, heart faCe, POM to
6M,00; 114 ad 11-2 Im. wide boarAd,
$ea1 (ea4S ; 2 in. wide plak, heart
fas,Mto A0e 1; kil-drihed ap Ie-
4-4, $SUM to S1a0; ktnried p Ailn
O4 J'lm4 )D Ur.H]Dk I1140; box
6-4, 1Ma.4 to On"i; ow pe bx
hrais (knotty), U1IO to ci. yellbor
.. topping, W to $406l
By stea., add to s10.
g.4 Lesf Yreaw PI.S rNseuieg.
Clear heart fees rift DMAHBk, 13-lt
21-4 eoated 1m S 400M to *.m-s "A"S
rift r&ak l-lwe2 1-4 counted 13,
MOM to LMUO; 9r rift IM&IB 13 u-
X2-4 eouted 1xz2, SUBM to $VAR; "A'
F lt IiAHk 13-1z214 eatm d IIb,
S(BMto S-MS ; "N Miat Dn&EU I-
sa 1-4 i--td xim, $10 to 0b m ; No.
1 dimek DM&BkU-lA 14 eounted
1% $IM
Fr 1.1-8 in. add aJI0. Steamer siep-
ae ae 'A" grain Soaring $1 les pr
timemid than saboe pr....


Ma tow T Ce .. ,, a 8:
CyweeAPr iesarrnt P. 0.3. New York
Tanktek, 11-2 to 3 ince., 4075 in
$5L75; t. ad Secmia, 1 to 3a ibes,
04L25 to ag.75; Salrta, 1 to 3 iaesa,
PtR to $4L5a SBp, 1 to 3 inches, m.5
ar price on 8 e h add $1 par 1,006 ft;
as 10 eadd pr 00 iM ft 12 ineh
amd a per 'mP ft
SBe- aiding, 1-z inmb elsar, D to A,
# .76 to 226; elng, 3-x4 or 6 inh
* ear, to-.<$325to PB4S; 1-2 at
e derxjD. to A, $1S6 to 57.5O; 5-
or 6 ineh eeaw, D to *A, pt 1 to P35;
Flooring, drep aiding and ailing, 4 ar
D, to A, 57.75 to *43.7

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Bemt inthewarLd.
For deiered prion wlie,
Yprb Teak Ca, MW- sAIM




MArNUPACTURER 01


BRICK.



Capaity of Yard 800,000 Per Mouth.

m0 U.


TE CANNON COMPANY
CAPITAL PAID
p IN O19o600.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Ow Spih Barrels h-ld aadwill po the se
vend Amic- and iee nspection.

Plae MUEIGS CAIRO, OUT MAN GA,
and ONTICELJU FLA.
Aan QUITMA hN office,
QUITMAN. GA.


Business Directory.

FIRE INSURANCE-Low~t rats. I-
ren Green a Co., ad 10 PRek BUI.,
Jaeksor ille, Fla. .
JOHN ZABM DUROIALZH OUm.L
a X. Say Street.
snalen ad Restaurt. Nledl rarn
RAem Open day ar 14sat BmttWar


M. W. LARENDON,
Naval Stores
Commission Merchants.
OSI0M, zuzP.ui.s, TAN, PITCH,
GUM T=US, mC ETC.
133 ret Street, KIW TOMK


BIlY i NOIIIGMERY,
Co.uiaisson Merchants,
Nikval Stores & Cotton
masts, -h=r== adholtbL
Tftasi a-mme-ma ete t .
COWTONM XCHAsnG NUILDI G,
NEW YORK CITT.

New Victoria.
Corer Main -a1 Adm,
opposite oward of Tnia aunalg.
Jacksnvile's Rew HeteL
Rates U.o to *4ka
L. mBIELR, Pepriter.


Typewriters
All Ma--10.IO.0 Vp.

GRIVOT --_

The Word-beater. OLUVr, writes Ia sight.
The JEWrFT. Kisg of doble-board a-
$0 to $4 Saved A Make of Typewriter.

Quitman Cooperage Co.,
QUITMAN. GA.
Manufacturers of

HIIH cRAol SMT BIMRLS
Aecordi to pecifocatio of
Beard of Trade, Savannah.
ADio Bake
Dip and Syrup Barrels.


J. E. GORNTO & CO.
Shipping Trade
SSpeciaty. .
hi $3 Ori am Exqm hqrW
WHISKIES
FROM $1.50 TO $6 A GALLON
Sole Agent
OM Sanrte RY $6 Ga
O Baker Rye, $6 Sal.
OM Westmreand Ry, $4 Gal.
HB les Rye, 3 Gal.
J. L GORNTO & CO.,
VaMlsta, Georia


h"aaua -,ulI-v ------
Pumping Outfits 5

Turpentine Stills
WITH FIRE PRO z.s ON CONNECTIONS.
Best PUMP in the World
From 40 to 700 Gallons of Water per Minfte.
Write or canl aO
FRED E. GILBERT,
SAutomobile He-dquartenr
29 West orsyth St.. Jacksonville. FIa.
hb%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% 't %%%%%%% %%%%
awa---- -------w----m



.Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

dfrfoaeats WIN f ainrf Is Ms rewtmant at the Pw Igbr ates.
For e week, eoea saline.
for two wee, 35 eeats a lie.
Forthree weem, DemaM liae.
For four 5 ees a e.
Nine words of ordinary Ienthk make oe line.
BH onats as two liae.
No ar except the headings can be admitted.
emittaance to aecempany the order. No extra charge for copie of pr
a adettitemet. CO s be ina ohi c a later tan Thnnay
aori"ia tuo ecaa e re r th ]iday paper.

Wasted. Stiller Wasted.
Wanted-mall turpentine farm of 5 to Prefer a young man who has a vary
10 crops, with additional timber for 2 good education and a fair knowledge f
rops. A. Wriht, Industrial Record turpentine business. IT. Hardee, Mult,
offie, eity. Fla. 2t
Twrpeutle Men. Stiller Wamted.
.p -..o.a.l ~o- - --
it f a yDar NoGM. I e Pm pon 2,M An experineed turpentine stiller want-
galom pr hor at a eot of a d and ed Man with family preferred. Addre
requires atonason wbil ue Fletcher &t Murrell, Altman, Fl.
smrtte in m ninuta, J. inpLL= ,
rOer6 Me Position Wasted.
For Sa. Accountant, twenty years' experience i
Six aevea-menthb-old blood bound pups, New York; wants, position South op ae-
well trained for their age. They will take count of long and cold seasoms o the
a man's trail and follow him to the tree. North. Address I. Letfre, 533 Wes
Also we have bought convict eamps out 145th St., New York, N. Y. 4t
and have several suite convict's stripes at
50e. to 75e. each, also about seven dozen ihe Registered ShortrM BMO S
blankets, cost $.00, worth about 4.50, as
good as new; 21 single mattresses, cost One is ilf brother to "Beauty Boy,"
$3.75 wholesale, worth $1.50, as good as who was champion at three Texas showAs
new ticks; 12 single bunks, cost $2.00, Another is half-brother to our 1800-pound
worth $1.00, as good as new, and a few cow, "Mary Spears." All good and ready
tents. We would be glad to give any con- for immediate service. Prices $100.00 to
muniation our prompt attention along $175.00, subject to previous sale. Palmet-
this line. B. F. Ca, Jr., Bro, Jen- to Park Stock Farm, Z. C. Chamblim &
nings, Fla. Co., proprietors, Oala, Fla.

"The" PAINT STORE,
I. E. BAIRD 4 CO.. Jacksonville, Fla,
Wall paper, pietres, frames, painting and all interior and exterior decorate.
Hardware, glass, ete. If you ae building a fne home, w t Baird A Co to d,
the decorating tat it may be is keeping with the building. Oldest and most e-
periceda houe. in Florid


W. r. RILEY,
President.


J. A. 6. CARSON,
VIce-President.


SCo. J. SCOVEL,
SMc. ME Wean.


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.

MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS

Machine and Hand Factories.

8th Street R. R. Crossing.


JACKSONVILLE.


FLORIDA


THr REmCOD'S 8PAC HA A 3W MOnZE VALVE.





** I1n rir1 t,* I01 *igaI legagIe 1*1t 1S SI *I I 1O I l 1lllI4 *******o ************:* >******
rlS*. W. C. C. Pow rL.; IMs-PrfmMIf wo t the PrMeeat t maltte tBh DcreOenrr a" Deat or Mamarm W. F. COACUMANr 3. 1. UI<-
LAXm. M. .^ COvmrOT ON, H. A. MeKACnRN, JOHN I. YOUNG. J. A. CMANWO"D. a. MMI.LAX. C. DOWN-
S--LW." INo. J. UR. aUnE, C. B. ROOGES; Auitor. JOHN H=WDMMRON.


~NSOL1DATED MVII ~ORE8 ~MPINY,


tdc livliR FI.i


.~vuab, ~.


Peusal, I.


SAL HORES FAVORS. __ _

m i 01 81d t. 0,1wo iM N Mi II Now ROO OhIIM
Sw oil o IM Yli e1 Io 10 10 0.ls 0 Cn i iN tolIe OR

imd COaMWimi is Mll if Wl01io. it lolida Ir gIII t 1
I Pilke Pnes. ie PoiOe ll i Iuwone RIruIo ellleM INi
Plow o1 mil oln Plea 01ol T[iiN 1r veibov.

YAIDS AT IKS NWLE, M NAH, H Il RNI D IA an PE SI OIM.


A1Ploducers ole vile d I ol l of olesand


TH PrIN AND ITrS PRODUCTS.*


I2~-
-Il


~b


THE WEEKLY INDUbT JlAL RBBORD.








-, -. . r


THI WUUKLY mo4UgsTwubAL RZOORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goodst

(For the Regular Retail and Comnmaary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Sec"
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 21
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 22
10 .. 25
A C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
ancy Full Cream.......... 11

Lard
Compound Tin.
S "' 50-lb tin.... Market
60-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
60-lb tin. ............

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 16

Sugar


Otnmulated
-'' |


Sugar, bhls.....
5 bbls..
10 bbls..
sacks..


680
525
525
580


Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb ................. 80
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
eae, per lb ............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 12
Gr e Cofee, medium ...... 11
GOme eoffee, common....... 10
Arbuakles Roasted Coffee, 1
b packages......market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 Ib pack-
a .............market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 12
Ground coffee, 10-Jb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
S Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 60
S english B'fast, 10 lb.. 46
S Formosa, 10 lb....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 6 and lOc size
10 lbs to case, per pound-.. 40

Salt
S l00b ack.............. 100
100-b sack ................
lee Cream, 200-lb sacks..... 1
100-lb sacks.....
Pocket Saltin bble., 8-lb.... 26
44 6"4 2-lb.... 275

i Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin.............. 15
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box
sifter top, per doz...... 40
S Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per dos ......40 and 80

Corn
11bk La-mm
car Lt Let Sm
W.Corn,01b, 1 38 1 40 148
l00lb, 1 24 1 26 1 29
Mxdeorn,1101b,1 8 185 188
101b,1 21 8 126


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


ar Lot
W.clip'd,1251b,2 20
1001b,1 75
White 1251b, 200
White 100lb. 1 60
Mixed 1251b
S 1001b,


US Sk
Lot
2 22
177
202
1 62


Lea 100
Sk Loa
225
180
205
165


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sck prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat


Wheat, 100 lbs., choice.....
6 fancy.....
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..


160
165


Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 5 65
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 Ib sack.........5 65
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb acks............ 5 65
Pillsbury's Best ..... 6 00
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... .... 75
bbl ........
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 3 60
92-lb sacks........... 150
Grits
Grits, per barrel.. ........8 60
S 92-lb sacks....... 1 60
Rice
Good.................. .... 5
Choice...... ............ 1
Fancy Head.............. 6
Broken................. 8
Canned Vegetables
Do.


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 dos
to case, per dos........1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 dos to case, per
doz................. .. 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two dos to case,
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, 8s, two dos to case
per doz............. 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz.......... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
mase, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case.
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 7
66 10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
lb................ 7
French cream, 80-b pails,
per lb........... .... 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
absorted, per Ib........ 8
Sticks unwrapped,.25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.

25-lb box, per Ib....... 8J
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice " "
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Iv. Apples, 48 1-lb. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. case 8 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned l2-1b
bl.x, 40-o............. 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb


Tomatoes, 8s, Chief........ 85 box, 50-60......
Tomatoes, 2s ...... 67 Prunes, Calf cleaned
Clayton, 3................ 80 box, 60-70......
Clayton, 2 ............... 65 L. L. Raisins, 8 croV
Sifted Peas, 2s ............1 40 L. L. Raisins, 4 crow
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80 Seedless, 1-lb package
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........1 20 Citron, 10-lb box ...
Lims Beans,2s............1 00
String Beans, s. .......... 90 Peanut
String Beans, 2s .......... 70 Fancy, H P, per pou
Baked Beans, 8s.......... 90 Extra H P,
Baked Beans, ls........... 45 Seed Peanuts, "
Corn, fancy, 2s ............ 1 0
Born Tomatoes, 2s......... New Nu
Beauty Beets, 3s........... Mixed, 25-lb boxes..
Sauer Kraut, 3s ........... 85 Almonds........
Sauer Kraut, keg.......... Brazils .........
Pumpkin, 3s .............. 90 Peacans....
Filberts............
May al0 nuts..........
car Wota N Osble baf m
lefts quamt, Cotton See
Choice....19 50 2000 20 50
To.l Tim. 18 00 18 50 19 00 oa
No. 2 1700 1780 1800 Cottonseed Meal 27 00
No.1CI'ler 17 00 179 18 09 Hulls 11 50
aXr A corr oT W sZ A&VAL gSO T LO E BOOK.


. ..... 7..
d 25-lb
...... 8..
n..... 1 75
n ......1 80
s .... 11
...... 150
s
nd.... 64
5

ts

18
.12
12
12
14
I Meal
100 LessOO
Sk Lot Sk. Lt
2750 2800
1200 1250


Matches
Atlantic, per grss......... 47
Wooden ware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
S 8 hoop.........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces...., 80
Twine, boxes, per dos. ...... 1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18.'...1 00
Snested.....-2 00
Bucket ,2 hoop pails,per do$ I 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per dos. 00
Ax Handles ;
T1wo dos crates per do.. 1 20

Washboardks .n
78 Crown Combination ....2 20
178 Blue Jay.............. 00
175 Diamond Glass ....,...8 2
O.W. D., 17 inch, per do* 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to bq 76
Canned Pis *-
Oysters, is, 2 doz to case, per
dos. ................ 95
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ......... S 60
Sardines, 5 ease lots....... 8 66
Salmon ls, Tale 4 doz to case
per dos Alaska........ 90
Salmon, ls, 4 doz to case
per doz Col. River ... .2 86
Salmon, 4 dz to cas, per do .
Beardley's Shredded Cod FuP 90
two dos in tins....... 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel;
20-lb pails............. a 60
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box........... 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" HamE, 8-10 avg ... 1'414
"Reliable" Ham, 10-12 avge .. 14
"Reliable" Has, 12-14 ave ..'. 1.
"Reliable" Soubldm, 7- amp.. 1.4
"Reliable" California Ham. 4
ireakfat Baeo, light ..... 1I.
D. & Bellies, 1-1 av. ......... 84
D. 8. Bellies, 0-22 a. ..........81
D. & Bellies, 5-30 av.......... 814
D. 8. Plates ................... 71-
Baeo Plates .................... l-
D. Butte .................. 3s-
Bologns Sauge ...............7
ausage ia oil ................ L T
Butter as Chem.
"Strawberry" Creary, WSlb tuba
0-b tabs 51-t
000, Us... 261-2
"Ladybird" full reaa eee 1.. 114
Kiaga's ar.
"Indiana" Pure Leaf .........muwht
"ar-Foam" Compound ........r.msb.


Ki s's Cannse Nm.t :.
"Reliable" ored Beef, Is ......
Cored Beef, 9 .......
Roast Bee, Is .......
SRoast Bee, s ...
Potted Ham aad Tang
1-4 ........................,
SSiced Beef, l- ....
Vienna ausage, If
Trip .................


LAS
LU
LU
is
LIS
As
LAW


I i--









S-- r- -. TH'B WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.






Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and adt tising patrons of this paper and no
charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention

Iar Tir'ntlUO.5.wUalN w Iateary Umppuesr em eeary of AIe IuinI. VaT jg. Famelag I. Rmo e IL
DAT' INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main OUe, Jacksovlle, Fl I am in the market for lands for the purpose of
In the market for the fioowlir Prefer in State ofr eas t m I
tPrefer l State of Pleaee put me ha eommunicatkom
with responsible parties and give me other information.
Remarks
Pleame notify where same can e secured.
Signed
85-e

State speciicaly the kind of meblhiery w e am wtbther new or seo4mlhanded. DATR
Lostlr eS fr Tirpetin. Som lM i r fetoy. Or for Agy riMd Etoerto. F oT I Cmhlsary O ne or oaleeM Supps S.wmU e ra Tramptr Mohe
DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacsoeaille, FIt. DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksoevlme, ia. .
Please advise the Ilderdigned regardin a good locatea In (smate or section of
1at.) for In the mmket for
tagethet with full Informatio about labor deoditioM, taxes, transportation facilities.
hmal enaorageenat, ete.
S*mi-k Please rive me information as to best places to by,. etc.

Sigs4 Sn4le.
.<5''


as YT Woath ISM SalltMl?
DATI
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, JaekonuTille, Fla.
rave for sale the followhir


Ca you suggest a purchaser?
a.-


Are Ter Tiaill eq lwaUl I?
DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonevlle. Fla.
Can you givre any Information as to the reliability of the tollowlag rm or eoa
tSm


so Tem Wa to m'pl-es a m? I3 Te Waet tmlog ea ?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jackneaatve. its. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonvlle, Fla.
Wantaimtonll the po5tio ot Wama a poeltion al

with the followho requiremets Refer to the fow

Cam you ear eacha am ar e me ?
Sined Signed



CLIP THIS COUPON I
TO A.L READERS OF THE RECORD.
When o are awering an er,....nt from the crlum o this upper, whether you are making am inquiry or placing an order, ple ct ou the oumpe
below and stach it as the ler. It will pay you.


I The Record takes a personal inte-ret in every Reader and 1i

Advertisr,eand in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other. -


w too rent m XT or TaI aucoD unm .s. a


-- '- ,- *- -


_aC"IP- I


*a-


gne~









THU2 WUILGT *D n-14 V2002D. z


,-eMU ARRAY & BAKER,


UIn iTii I"M INm. U

Zawuesm wam am a muse SgmA U te am* a 0t ma frtss
me ignel in Woo* wiM el. Tespetime w"els; a" Sm a masuft. -emmt
Sbsest we beat Ms wesmi em ahen-made hmsa.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHAIRLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
"a maalmt m om- f tisf ane ant appolted to sa as fellow, cali
t 4t-o &8. C. et ways.


Das No~ Tek,
~ as NewS saver).


raM J1a0ksemvino for
SriUmk W. Calemet an:104 NOW Yob.


.'l T y, June 14, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ....Sunday, June 19 at 9:00 am
Wednesday, June 15, at 3:00 pmu-x'ONEIDA ......Monday, June 20, at 9:00 am
; Wedmdsay, June 15, at 3:00 pm. .AIGO NQUIN ..Tuesday, June 21, at 11:00 am
Frlay, Jme 17, at 3:00 pm ..APAC E ....Wedneday, June 22, at 12:00 na
M -sEMI NOLE ..Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'a
"l Monday, Jume 0, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Saturday, June 25, at 1:30 pm
Wed-day, June 2, at 3:00 p..OOM ANCHE ..Monday, June 27, at 4:00 am
**xHURON ........ Tuesday, June 28, at 5:00 am
Friday, Jm 24, at 3:00 pm ....IOQ UOIS ..Thursday, June 30, at 6:00 am
Tuesday, June 28, at 3:00 pm ....APACH E ..........Sunday, July 3, at 8:00 am
x'ONEIDA .Monday, July 4, at 8:00 am
Thursday, Jun 30, at 2:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE .... Tuesday, July at 9:30 am
Saturday, July 2 at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ....Thursday, July 7, at 11:30 am
"ixSMINOLE ....Thursday, July 7, at 11:30 am
STuesday, July 5, at 3:00 pm ..IBOQUOIS ......Sunday, July 10, at 1:00 pm
friday, July 8, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE ......Wednesday, July 13, at 4:30 am
**xHURON ......Wednesday, July 13, at 4:30 am
Saturday, July 9, at 3:00 pm ..AIONQUIN ......Friday, July 15, at 6:00 am
Tuesday, July 12, at 3:00 pm .OMANCHE ......Sunday, July 17, at 7:30 am
'zONIDA ........ Monday, July 18, at 8:00 am
.: Friday, July 16, at 3:00 pm ... .IROQUOIS ......Thursday, July 21, at 11:0 am
**SEMINOLE ... .Thursday, July 21, at 11:00 am
;Tesday, July 19, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ......Sunday, July 24, at 12:30 pm
Wednesday, July 0, at 3:00 pm .AIAONGUIN ....Tuesday, July M8, at 4:00 am
iFrly, July 22, at 3:00 pm ....OOMANCHE ..Wednesday, July 27, at 4:30 am
T. u ax"HURON ....Wednesday, July 27, at 4:30 am
.Tuesday, July 2, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, July 31, at 7:00 am
*z'ONEIDA ......Tuesday, Aug. at 8:00 am
SWedums July 27, at 3:00 pm ..IBOQUOIS ......Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 8:00 am
Friy, Jly 29, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ......Wednesday, Aug. 3, at 9:00 am
S uady, July 31, at 3:00 pm .... "dAIONQUIN ....PFriday, Aug. 5, at 10:30 a.n
IxEMIVOLE ....Saturday, Aug. 6, at 11:30 am
-Wahlt ewuy. --Boston via Charleston ad New York.
4-st. m via BNrmewwk ,-w Charles tom. --Boston, via Charleston.
MTE CLYDE NBW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
mest Us e toeweem A m vse, aesa ma an"d em es e a" an ml e.
em Pess. COaetS at C1arsefeom etk Wayn.
Inn-WEl KLT IAll, i.
..- --mm.. ................................ .. n. rom Le WhartL BDote
.- Mrt...... ...... ........ .... ...o toot of the~ne Street. Jatr ksa.
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER INE
between juanmevE and seanel.
S .M--g at Pastkha Astor.. t. mPas. Derferd (Do La) ada hateramete
nims n 1t. JeM r.er.
S STEAMER "CITY OP JACKSONVILLE"
Sas speed to sue ao fews: Leave Jacksfeolle, S mmda Tuesdays and Thrs-
wp dns amS m. aDtura t i Ismae baUtrd.d Mondaes, Wednesday a PriMays 9: a. m.
., mlaumusI MOz~rBOmLuoD,
*ed ews. 1I Read up.
ago= = V sm.l...... ........ ..... m.......nvlle................... Arrive M a. m.
lav, kS pU. es..................P, ...... Leave .40 p. m.
jsae. :: :::::::::.:..:" ....* *:.::::::.I'"' ZSS1 ." p
sl a IL ............ -t ......or ....... Leave 2:0 p. M.
L oeave s. i .........t. .- ......... ... Leave l1 p. .L
S..................... .... erersord (DeLand)....................... Leave n:- noo
AntveJi a. ....... .................aord........................eave =a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m.............. ...ti-rTse .................... L. 10:00 a. m.
eaSLanAL PAWI S AmND iON oPrCI ICa. et4 w. ay st., jmeis*Ue.
P. L Iamro omrW U .. J. At.. A GeL Pas. Agent. s1I W. Bay t.. Jaoksnvlle. 1a8
W. C. c0 mR.. R. Loa Frt. At. J ad*'vie. C P. LOVALL At. .upt..Jaerkr
SFoot Hoan Street, Jeksonville.
A. a L -M 1 T. o. P. A.. nLew Tork, C LTDF U QM 0 A.. New TedL
w .me. ean, w . CLTDI a 00.
f.iera smsager. General Agents.
.. Cbms eug Bulddlag. U State Street. New Teri.


se orf this
The mes will be
he oees of th sport arm
tIa ttsto with pieammor
war r .s iusuvto u = dc s.
-- -- lt
Jaekeaortfle the eme ef 4ne -1 ge
Aumege.'s Ledlag Trade JlOa e ale.
The Weoly Industrial Record of Jack-
onville and Savannah has taken Its place A
eame leading trade Journals In the
nUltl 8Utad and as an authority on him- R
=ber .ad nav l tores It I being quoted not
only by the best and most carefully edited
e aes papers in this country. but by tho sef
toa Burope also. A London trade paper ""
reacAid this offlee yesterday gives Uberal I 1t
Space to the Record's view on market aon*-
0 SMSI. lotI
0 This weeks asse of the Industrial Reo- *a
ord is even better tRan usual, and It is I
a strong and entartalntng general indus. trWia
trial newspaper In addition to Its value Efu
s the champion of the two specfe ndus- *.
tried It represents. It o brimlul of new Johb
S stories of development ta the Southeeat. plat
emon the b tba he story t at half-mll- fed
Skollar corporation orgailaed i Jack- G
S *-e le eeteray. sad the organt aton of H.
S several other eri corporatioons during the and '
eek t Geoegi and flora. W'
It eas at the pace for eterprle, and It Walt
el dee.mrre the irt merM of ce- lck
t I rseadying both In Ste mboeerptkm and
Sadertlein departmenta.earryla as It doe.
peoap. one et the largest advetrlns pat-
"oesa gave to any of t .Soutbr r.

earty
gleams etree
**f*we. who This


I ^%%%%%W%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%^%%%%%%V'

ASl9J.,JJUJJSL9-SLS.StJLSJfJR^jJJ.3 ,LJ f9^fJ'JJJJIgJJgJJ JJJ
SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
I. 30 YEARS RELIABILITY.

i Hess 8, Slager,
SDiamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry
CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND 11 & 13 MAIN.



Naval Stores Market

and StocK Report
Published Daily in The



Jacksonville Metropolis,
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.

$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.


BIG PRIZES:

A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposition, to
Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.


Carter & Russell Publishing Co

Jacksonville. Florida.


WRIT T=E ESCORD 103 ArT IMOOUXATION DNSn=.





j,- -
I:' ;


S, d ..


TOR wxwqbTY I0pUmW&L


- 1.3I caniv.


ow *vv3*m, Ys..Wsaiem


Pon ""


rn-v s.um,~


Greenleaf 6

Crosby Cmany


Dfia nmom& and O dkv. ;


Fine Gold jewer

A me c '11t9
and Clocks


3ftbxkr aMb

bbe&.zan11tb


Sterling Silverware


41 West Bay Stret



Us lwo* and Ew a siL Im as part of ae
bse otihs. %m slsean mtai I


Electro PMied Ware

Choice Cat Glass

Fine China Dinner .-i*.*&


Fancy Pieces


Write for Cot-loede


European Novelties


-cf

5ii- -


E-> IE,, "YIf-I--f....... --------- ------------


THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
of Wananlsh, N. C.,
Frmedty oe Coel. stattol. n. C., ae .tll elinamg Diamoad Bde
Umnd at .4 Black Joe are Btaldard at SLI. Old Style ad Patent
PamRs at SLO a dses. Tiy boaed average a Uttle better than ever.
We have brong out at new brand, the Blue IUe Racks at .LS and Pon-
ers at as wbil ar warranted. All wholesale deaklr In naval store
snm Oa rrT Usesr and sa hoMld ~mply operators

Di G. ErrTHAN, Pidaet ALFRED A. MKETHAN, Lt U. & N.
,Ja..aiu. e, Ja. .et'd See'y and Tre.s, Co.ntruotW.
Enlaeer, fayetsteiDfle, N. G.

Pine Product Construction Co.
Fayettoeill, N. C.
Mt t TrpeMtlme, 0i of Tar C, re te. Tar, Dionfectants; Wood Prmatl
Pte. Wooed Stai. Etc., and Chaeroal. from Ightwood Stumps, Box-factla
Pestm inereasd. Tume or dtallatlet rdedced. Coade ematio controled at wiL
ke dani frt fire. Plant erected complete, and men taught the proe. ur-
M Ienfarmslon. write Alfred MaeKethaa. general manager, FaLetteile. C.

SII Ez *MEMiIORIALS II ARBLE, STOLE AND BRONZE
LFrm the simple Tablet to the most elaborate Mausoleum
Write, or come to ee u-or designs will please you.
SOUTHERN MARBLE AND STONE CO.
In i rMelag cRE E. LAMANCE. Master.
ati b e-.mr k midha iete. 4 st, "now StreeLt
ft j g di S ltoe IMTMe. MeaoJs sas.U TiaL.
Ae Ssne. NarhI, 4e. Mosaic en Tile.


------ seems1 .0111


--I- ---+u- -----


fATFI nARTI LM OOADWAY A w, ST1 .., !
HOTEL BARTHOLDI, NEW YORK CTY.
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout.
Near all Big Stor and Places of Amusement. Uars Pas
the Door for all Railrod Stations and Steamboat Landings.
Lre sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
ad so grand and nifieent decorations: no luxurious
S grander; mo awe-inping surrouadings; no elaborate bill
Sftrse, priatd in French; no detrk that will disdain to
Spea to YOr Neo J ployees Is ATy Way IaatteCtatlve.
St jaot a coW. home-li lie title hotel that will appeal to the
he irt a t ewo a lm l for solid comfort. Good.
phis Asirun eookins .ad sale and courteous treatment. I
main m sur re..
o~e ~RhME htmw~l-I


John R. Young. Predelet. C. S. EKll. Vle-Pftee. 4
J. W MtM. Jr. Secretary and Trmamar.


I ^ ELLIS-YOUNG CO. I

Commission Merchants
NAVAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.


J.W. HURT. Pres st.
P. L. PaACOCK, Ist V. P


J. AL LEASES. N V. Pree .L Um U *'g
W. J. KM.Lv. 31 V. P. D. IL WnjjA A Ls"p


Peacock-Hunt & West


GenerOal Office: y rW ,JF SoSIN O. M
rWest 8l0u1, Jiaseeme, .

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are striecty Factor Our interest and the pretode rs h ,U
never take to secount, nor are we interested in any calpamy tha-t hs-is-
Turpentine sad resin.)
WHOLESALE GROCERY, |
Hay Grain and Heavy Harness.
CMoors' Tooei ami iaval Steres Hrdware Our si
---OLE AGENTS FOR- .
The Celebrated Unien ir pentine Axes and son imL:

4- -
Naval Stores Received at Savanash, Ga., a. Jai
Mand Femanmaid, Fla.


-$


,t.


-.

"4


I '


rWl