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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00081
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: July 22, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00081
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text
- -"' "'- ,--,^ "*


.1


SR a BRR YV
For the Week Ending July 22, 1904. loxRAr
JUL 27 W934




WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RE


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

Adoea Sept. 1. I2 192, by eome, as as OmI M ra Orga Alo o e Gseeral Associat Apted Sept. . I Ut, T3, as te emel OMal er f tae re emntie Operators'* Aue
Adopted Aprt 27t, 1 s as the OPla Orr s te later-Sae C-ame rors'* ssoc tlwe. Rsemsd mE e ry t a SeGe r i Sawmil
Associattk Official Orgam of the Seatheastern Stock Grewer's Assectatole. -

VL. N. 3. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ATLiAtTA, GA. SAVANNAH, GA. $3 A YEAI
mef


--&--------- -


They Decide to

The Flaria Railwro Cocdude
Regulating Lumba


SThe Record had been led to believe that
the railrads in Florida were endeavoring
b6 comply with the requirements of the
rown Act, prescribing certain necessary
equi to an all are used in the trans-
S Putatimm of number. It is with surprise,
therefore, that we learn of their decimon
not to do as
The flown letter from the secretary
of the Georgia Interstate Sawmill Assoia-
tiM tells the story so well that we print
it etire.
We hope the lumbermen in this State
will promptly comply with Secretary Har-
retW request and make a case for the
Rairoad Commision. If that body is not
Sempowered to enforce the law, let them
appeal to the Courts, and if, by reason ot
delfets in the law, there be no remedy,
the sooer the lumbermen know it the
better. It is safe to say that the coming
Legslatre, which meets next April, will
Sremedy any defects that may be found
in the present law. Mr. Harrell's letter is
as follows:


"Tifton, Ga, July 16, 1904.
"To Florida Mebe rsof the Georgia Inter-
tate Sawmill Association, and all
others concerned:
S"Gentlemen: It has been the purpose of
this Association to act with perfect fair-
'nss to the railroad mpanies operating
'in Florida relrding the Car Equipment
law, as seated by the Legislature of
Florida; ea two different occasions re-
questing the shippers to postpone the
elsertian of the penalty for the non-fur-
l*sing of ars equipped in compliance
with the law, in order to give the roads all
necessary time to arrive at some equip-
ment satisfactory to themselves and the
S sawmill men, this action being the result
of conferences had with a committee rep-
resenting the railroads and the commit-
tee representing this association. It was
thought al the time that the railroads
were acting in good faith toward the lum-
ber shippers of Florida, and the committee
From this association so reported at sev-
eral of our meetings, but we regret very
mech to say that we were badly mistaken.
At a hearing in Atlanta, Ga., on yester-
Sday before the Railroad Committee of the
Georgia Senate, attended by the Georgia
S ar Equipmeat Committee of this associa-
tion and the representatives of the rail-
reads, statement was made to the Senate
eamittes by Mr. John L Hall, general
emsld of the Georgia Southern & Flr-


Resist the Law. ,

Not to Comply With the Statut *
r Car Equipment

ida Railway, that at a meeting of the
railroads held in Jacksonville, Fla, on
May 6th, it was decided to resist the
law as enacted by the Legislature of
Florida, and that the same would not
bI complied with. Now, gentlemen, we
submit that in all fairness the lumber
shippers of the State of Florida should,
as an act of courtesy, have been notified
of this decision, inasmuch as the com-
mittee from this Association had in every
instance treated the representatives of
the railroads with every courtesy.
"In viw of the foregoing, I think it
proper for you to present your statement
to the railroads for the equipment fur-
nished for every flat car loaded by you
since January 1st, 1904 (when the law
went into effect), at $1.50 per ear, as pro-
vided for by the law of Florida. If pay-
ment is refused, immediately forward same
to the Florida Railroad Commission at
Tallahassee, with this explanation.
"Please let us hear from you immedi-
ately. Yours truly,


"E C. HARRELTJ
"Secretary."

RAILROAD CHANGES HANDS.
The northern 55 miles of the Gaines-
ville, Jefferson & Southwestern Railroad,
of Georgia, was bought at a Receiver's
sale by George J. Baldwin, president of
the Savannah Electric Company for a
syndicate. The price paid therefore was
$165,000, the upset price.
Mr. W. W. Mackall, who participated
in the purchase, reports that it was
bought as an investment. At present
the new owners are not prepared to make
any statement as to extensions of the
road in any direction. Any matters look-
ing toward the improvement of the roa('
will not be considered until after the per-
manent organization of the property. It
now extends from Gainesville, Ga., to Mon-
roe, with a small branch to Jefferson, all
in that State.
It is claimed to be one of the best pay-
ing pieces of railraod property in Geor-
gia, if properly managed. It runs througF
a rich and prosperous territory and touched
with manufacturing and other industries
It crosses the Seaboard at Winder, ane
touches the Georgia Railroad at Monroe
Mr. Baldwin says that important exten
sions will be made as soon as possible
one toward Dahlonega, another to Athens
and a third to tap the Central on thw
Macon and Covington Branch.


THE DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. b
f
Fleria's Part at That Great Natinal Oc- I
casio-Capt. W. J. Hlman.


i
I
r

<

]


er of the national committee as prd
or Judge Raney, and who was chose to *e
'arker conferences from day to day, as
returned to the city.
"A representative of the Times-Uni a
called upon Mr. Coachman for the pmpos
f getting his views as to the polite
situation and the impression made upie
he party by the nomination of Judge
Parker. "
"'Well, Mr. Coachman,' said the Times-
Jnton man, "I suppose that yoe retain
horoughly saturated with Parker eniths-
asm?'
"'He will be the next President, med-
stly replied Mr. Coachman, 'but.your 8t
Louis correspondent in last Sundays
rimes-Union paid me an over-sealous ea-
pliment, and gave me the edit tWat
should belong to others. While I eniar-
wed to do my part, I want to say to y4,
and through you to the Denocrats of FIr-
ida, that the large percentage of the erdit
given to me should fall upon the head of
W. J. Hilman, whose indefatgabe eer-
gy and work contributed as muek to te
success of Judge Parker as any individual
from the South; besides, be was the sp.it
and the inspiration of the deegation, lear-
ing nothing undone for their comfort ad
pleasure, and I believe that every one of
the six staunch and unfaltering original
Parker men of the delegation will attest
to this.
I never saw such a man in all my ife
-such endurance--o one knew when he
slept or ate. It was a great sight when he
!ed the procession of banners around The
pit-an incident that placed Florida bere
the country as one of the leading spirits
in the convention. No,' reflectively id
Mr. Coachman, 'I am willing to take C it
for. the small part I perfumed in at
eventful and historic conweation, be. I
want the people to know that it is to Mr.
Hillman that the Democratic party. of
Florida owes the great debt of gratiltud
and praise.'
"'Did Judge Parker have a very thor-
ough and active organization at St. La iis
asked the Times-Union representative.-
"'Wonderful,' said Mr. Coachman, 'm-
phati dly. 'We knew before thetvote was
taken, to a delegate, just the numba of
votes Judge Parker would ekve on th
first ballot, and mroghoum"te or.ni-
zation was complete, without j4 fr*io
or dissension.' -
"'What will be the nature and chahc-
ter of the national campaign!' Mr. Coach-
man was asked. "
It will be the most active, entslM tie,
aggressive and thorough campaign bever
known in this country. The whole at-
mosphere out there was filled with 6oe
and success in November.'" ,-
The members of the Florida delegation
at St. Louig. were the guests of Captai
(Comtiued oa Page Is)


I"


Florida's part in the National Democrat- c
ic Convention is yet the subject of com- o
nendable mention throughout the country. s
lTe press boys never tire of paying wor- t
thy tributes to Captain W. J. Hillman,
and other members of the delegation, for
the very spirited demonstration they led
on the convention floor when Judge Par- t
ker's name was proposed, and those in i
the South who are familiar with the con-
ditions, are equally an loud in their praise e
of Captain Hillman's-magnificent fight for I
an uninstructed delegation from Florida.
It was a brave as well as heroic fight, to.
For a long time and until within a fer
days of the Democratic primary in May, it
looked as if Florida would send a solid
Hearst delegation. Hearst's name was at i
the masthead of two-thirds of the newspa
pers in the State, and a convention had
been held at which a complete ticket oi
Hearst delegates, from the districts and
State at large, was named.
Captain Hillman, who is one of the most
popular men in the State, a large property :
holder and a potent factor in the indus-
trial life of the South, Was asked to mak,-
the race as an uninstrueted delegate. It
was then the eleventh hour in the cam-
paign. He yielded to the wishes of his
friends and announced his candidacy. A
complete ticket of uninstructed delegate;
was then proposed, and Captain Hillman
with that spirit of conquer which charae-
terizes him in every cause be espouses.
threw himself body and soul into the cam-
paign, not especially for himself, but for
a "safe and sound" uninstrueted delegation.
"What a pitiable attitude Florida will be
in if she sends a Hearst delegation to
vote for him, first, last and all the time,"
said Captain Hillman. "when Hearst has
no possible chance of nomination." How
true were his words, and his prediction!
Captain Hillman was from the first an en-
thus'astic Parker* man; he believed the
New York jurist would win; he went to
St. Louis to assist him to win, and nc
wonder it is that it was Captain Hillman
of Florida, with banner aloft, that led
that memorable procession around the
nit, when Parker's name was placed before
the Convention. Captain Hillman saved
Flor:da for Parker at the eleventh hour.
and now he is confident that the nomi-
nee will be the next President.
Mr. W. .oachman, who was an en-
thusiastic Parker man and whose advice
and energy were used to aid the unin-
structed movement, pays a very timely
tribute to Captain Hillman. The follow-
ing is from the Times-Union:
"Walter F. Coachman, who so ably rep-
resented the State at St. Louis as a mem-






2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
---- -*-^^^------------------tttf


C. B. ROGERS. PxaIDxIr.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, VICR-PIIaxIDIRv.


DIlECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


E


4
4


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches in Tampa, Pensacola, la.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Siores Company, of Pensaoola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and.prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Caeslst of O.e Three-Story BiMldig, 70x200; ore two-story buildig. 50x390; ose one-story blildiag, 80x250,
makg e lest space y o the t sp ay Crpy the kild Is the South.
*


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fela., Pensacolae. Fla., and Seavnnah. Ga.


THrE RCORD WILL BE WORTX PILLARS TO YOU EVERY WEEK.


CONSOLIDATED


C. H. HODGSON, SBc, and TRAs's.


rs--- -L-1-L~6~LY6~--


-~----- --_I1I1C----~------ --~C


---- II . . . --- e







THE WEEKLY lNutrJFrxrAL RECORD. $
I -


S-~gS,Oges*ge~ eggaa,*meeeeeeeaa.*e~a~e


S. Schofield's Sons Company,


Headqu.arters for
Distiller's Pumping
o; lnOutfit. *
SNo plant complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
SFlorida, Alabama, Mississippi and
SSoth Carolina. Write us for p .rticu-
Slars ana prices. We also manufacture
EMngines, Boilers ad nigh
4 Grade Machinery,
Sas well as carry a full and complete
-sockof-*
SMill Supplies, Pipe,
*G Boiler Tubes, Etc. .
Advise your wants.
i Macon, - Georgia. i
l A Lea snr Sp e fit o a l
f Tak 0 o ~ et fw Twuene tus * *"*****-************************** *****.***
SII IIII Iillu llltill Is lllllll I IIIIMttotllll ll i ii ll
1111 13I I3 3I I I I 1 I I I I I II I I3 I3 l I I 1 I I i I I II I I II
W. W. CARin. Press. W. C. THOMAS. ManUer. C. T DUDLEY. See. & Tres

Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
Hardware
Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
Wnd Pullers on Hand.

STAMPA, FLORIDA. *
111i3 1illlll 1 111 ll1 11 l 1 lli l i i11 1 I ill


...NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH. GA.. U. S. A.


i0N R. YosnG.
Preient.


J.. P WILL AMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
&L A. AL ORD,


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.
DMRCTORS:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


H. L KAYTON,
Secretaryand Treasurer.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER BAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. R. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanlkaare well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
-eonveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railway. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.


wo


R. THOMAS
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,


Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggies.,


3 35


This Space reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.


WhalmOele


Liquor Merchants


Proprietors


Jmcsuvlo Bohti Works


... Agent...


ACME BEER


EIgin & Hampden
Railrpd Watches.

SEE

RILES

At His New Store,


I 15 W. BAY STREET.


BOWEN & CO. OI N FARME W


Jacksonville, Fla.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,


from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866
Mount Vernon Pure
Whiskies


Fmpuainaa
They Aic I ortrl

GRIFFIN'S CATALOG

TW
'aammtal r mi hbsv
Alsor a soplet M 49Ift 411 Ow
)I h--- --


i .IAOWVULLd. PLA-

No. e s5e sS OS -o 4

BUILDERS AND DR&LEB8 IN


and
Rye


controllerss Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM S~ CO.
517 ad 519 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilizer, Oil and lee Ma-
chinery-Ad Supplies and Repais
CA lY FOR 300 HANDB-'.
Machine T s, Wood-Working MRB ,,
Shafting. Pulleys, Hangers, Ieather an
Rubber Belting and Hose, Railroad and
Mill Supplies a$p Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and
Hoiating Engines.
AUGUSTA. bA.
Send al orders for printing for ,th
turpentine and commismary trdes t the
Record office to insure a prompt dry.


THrI aCORD 18 TaL 80uTa GREAT TRADE JOURNAL


:J.,


C









4 THE WEEKLY INDUWIOKIAL RECORD.


I Lk ..r .p .. |1


The bottom has been reached, in the
opinion of several lumbermen in this
territory. The upward tendency of price
and the increased orders all go to show
this. Inquiries are improving, and big
orders are going west at prices from one
to two dollars higher than a month ago.
Let the sawmill men shut down if nec-
eseary. It will be much better for busi-
nem if they can for a month.

Florida is one of the leading wet bar-
rel producing States, yet cooperage pro-
duets are seldom quoted from this terri-
tory. The reason is that nearly all the
barrels made here are sold to local dealers,
who use them for turpentine an syrup.
If anybody wants to buy a first-celas
article, be it syrup barrel, or turpentine
cask, or if it be needed for any other
spiritual purpose, just refer to our adver-
tising columns and you can be supplied
in short order.

Red cedar shingles are selling in the
North Atlantic markets at from $3.10 to
$3.0. And laths are at about the same
agure. Florida cypress shingles are equal
to the redwood cedar of the West for
shingles and bltha, and the freight is
less from her. Therefore, some enter-
prising lumberman with a shingle and
lath outfit had better take the hint and
try the Boston and New York markets.

THE LUNBER MARKET.

Tellw Pie.
St. Louis, Mo. Wholesalers report that
all branches of the trade show an in-
creased volume of business, more espec-
Sally noticeable in yard stock, and it is
in this particular trade where the great
et improvement has been needed. Foi
some months the larger cities have beea
buying freely of timbers and othei
clases of heavy construction material
imuDating that the city building has beel
up to the normal. Lack of country busi
ess has caused the slowness of the pasi
few months, and it is here that the im
proveent is beginning to be manifest
Nearly all of the country yards are buy
ing liberally and showing usually an in
edination to buy on an advancing market
Reports indicate that the mills ar
rigidly admering to their plan of reduce
ing the yellow pine output 331-3 per cent
The majority are merely operating their
plants four days a week, continuing thi
arrangement throughout July, Augus
and September. This far the effect of thi
has been more noticeable upon the out
look than upo nthe present situation, a
conidenee has been restored to the man
ufaeturers and none are willing to mak
serious coeessions in order to secure busi

Chicago. The city requirement has es
larged within the current month. Tb
continuance of building activity and it
tendency to increase and accumulal
building contracts, are influences in fav(
of putting in more stock than earlier i
the season. Dealers realize that there
to be a large sized local demand to tl
end of the year and therefore are le
timid than they were about expanding
their purchases with some reference I
the future. Besides they are aware thi


probably prices are at their lowest point, p
and that hereafter the tendency will be
somewhat upward if not considerably so.
Moreover, there is a probable coming car
shortage to take account of; now lumber
can he delivered from the mills with rea-
sonable dispatch. The finishing lumber,
the piece stuff, flooring, ceiling and the
timber that are sure to be wanted late
in the summer and fall trade might better
be ordered now, or a portion of it at
'east. There are some dealers who are
eating from this aspect of affairs.
A late feature of improved demand is
'he considerable number of timber and
factory flooring bills that have lately
been sold, and the number now on the
market, or Boon to be brought out when
pending contracts shall be let, the whole
aggregating four or five million feet. Not
all this stuff is being or to be used in this
city, but a large portion of it is and all
is being handled by Chicago dealers. The
yellow pine trade of this city is not only
greatly increasing on local building ae-
count, but this city is becoming a mar-
ket center through which product destined
for points in the middle west and even
in the east is sold. In another place in
this issue is a record of several important
sales which emphasize what is here as-
serted.
BuIalo, N. Y. Most yellow pine is lower
than last year, especially that from the
southwest, and slow of sale; it does not
very readily compete with white pine and
the north does not care for it inde-
pendently of that idea. It will be needed
for timber right along hereafter and prices
in that department are about as formerly.
Receipts by canal continue heavier than
last season.
Boston, Mass. Clear heart matched rift
flooring in 2 1-2 inch face is strong at $45
and several sales were made recently at
a somewhat higher figure. The trade
cannot understand why more mills do not
produce a comparatively larger quantity
of 2 1-2 inch face at $45, instead of 31-4
inch face at $37 to $38. A rift, 31-4 inch
t face, is holding at $28, with B n com-
k paratively better demand at $24.
r Philadelphia, Pa. The southern pine
men welcome the idea of curtailment by
Sthe mills and are satisfied that this is
. the one thing that will steady the market.
t The orders that are being taken are being
. given more freely, though the greatest
drawback lies in the almost immediate
. and impossible delivery demanded. This
- shows the state of the consumer, who
Shas no stock to draw upon because of
e light buying earlier in the season. Prices
- are growing stronger and some good fall
. business is looked for.
r
s Cypress.
t St. Louis, Mo. Stocks were seldom in
s better shape and while much of the lum-
- ber on hand is green there is an ample
s supply of dry, so all orders can be met
- promptly. No great amount of business
e is being transacted, especially with the
i- factories, but there is beginning to be
some improvement in the call for stocks
i- used by country yards.
ie Kansas City, Mo. There is a fair de-
;s mand from yards of the southwest, al-
e though from some parts of the territory
r orders have slackened up during the past
in week. Prices are very firm and manufae-
is turers claim to be well satisfied with the
he volume of business coming in, and say
a that they are shipping staok about as fast
ig as they are making ft.
o Chicaeo. Dealers who make this city
it the'r headquarters and sell cypress


UORTGAG(






13 W. viny-


S.

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.


n STWREE.


JaCuwSOuVui, FI- m


H. A. Renfroe Co.


Stetson Hats'


suits to Order at ReadyMade Prices Mail Orders Given Persos An e


439 W. Bay Street


JACKSONVILLE, PELA


Printing Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.




uladw a8m







Write me for praises a
F. B. any oint In0arsbr -
ma. Alabasa or Anomsoips Af
Ssolsid under a suaesmem
Job work through te -
country a spedalt.
The Larest and Oldest Copperrnsrict Ga
Work in Georgia. .
W My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not lek.


_4 III ll I I I i ll I I IIlll 1 t1 *"I I l111lllll i ll 11 1 *p


McMillan

Bros.

Florida Cop-

- per Works
:Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
SGeneral Metal Workers.
" Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
Patching through the country a specialty.
Orders by mail or wire will receive prompt -
attention at either of the following works
F= yetteville, N. C. SbvrnnAh, G I
SMobile. Ale. Jacksonville. Fli
2 2 i l *I I ll t e! I IIIIII III4 IIIII I Iol lll 14ollefs


DONT FAI To NKW9TION T=E ySCORD TO ADyzaKLSk
Ac C


TAILORS


W. n.RisNDERSON. 0.0. WUmo


W. I. BCKWTfH.


BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.

LARGE TRACTS OF TURPERTIIE AID MILL LAM
Rooms 1.2-3, First NatmlaI Basu Buldig.
TAMPA, : : : F LORIDA.


ggeag
*
g
** =


--~ l~ l~b-r__ -1


O.C1I1I


!


I


W. B.'HENDERSON.








( THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


throughoutt the middle west aa northwest
re t a considerable increase of demand
ad inqMry within the current month. In
the city the all for snishing lumber and
manufacturers' stock generally is ssum-
ing larger proportions as the season ad-
vances Prices of red cypress from the
l Io isas mills are well maintained
Thre is considerable of other kinds of
stock being worked in the trade, but this
soimptition is not sufficient to break
down regular market prices.
New ork. No improvement is noted
aad the belief prevails that July and Au-
Sgst business will remain somewhat dor-
mant The demand is light and while a
certain amount of stock is moving all the
time the market lacks a stimulus Fall
trade will undoubtedly be good and deal-
ers look for some good business when pro-
jeeted buildings get under way.
S Bston, Mass. Demand is slack and
argo stock is now coming in freely at
$40 to *41. Rail orders for dressed lumber
are selling at $44 and over.
Baltimore, Md. Cypress continues to
show somewhat more strength than was
the ease some time ago and dealers are
emes aged over the outlook. Demand
has been increasing and indications are
that the year will develop fairly good
trade. The larger supplies of lower grade
lmaber laid in shortly after the fire are
being reduced and dealers are again in
the market for stocks. It looks as though
the low water mark in prices had been
reached and that quotations will move


0EPONf1 OF TIMBER AND LUMBER

Pr Eleven Me th, Eding May, 9go3
aId 194, Compare, Same for May.
According to the Monthly Summary ol
Commerce and Finance of the United
States for May, 1904, there were exported
from this country for the eleven month
ending April 30, 190, 481,676,000 feet ol
sawed timber, worth $6,759,679, as against
a8m,6W 00f feet for the eleven month
eding April 30, 19, worth 7,04J 4
The May shipments were as follows:
May, 190, 4200,000 feet, worth (024,119;
as against 67,8,00 feet, worth $03,164
for May, 1904
Of the shipments of lumber, inchdin
boards, deals, planks, joists and antling
for the eleven months ending April 3X
15, the shipments were 997,635100 feet
worth $19,31211, as against 1,344,061,0
feet, worth $26,771,16, for the eleve
months ending April 30, 1904.
For the month of May, 1903, the ship
mets were 114,018,000 feet, worth $12
20s 80, as against 118,~8,000 feet, wort
eps464, for May, 1904.
It will be observed by a little figurin
that the pries for lumber exported i
May, 1903, was about $19.35 per thousa
feet, and for May, 1904, it was somewlu
more than $20 per thousand feet. A
the gures are general and taken froi
offeinal sources *t all the elading expol
oficl sources at all the leading expo
is that the price of lumber is gradually i
creasing, which must be the case as tl
demand is assuredly increasing, and mo
assuredly the supply is growing less.


SCscteastlia at Atlstic Beach, June I
SOffers-Snark, J. E. Borden; Seni
Hoo-Hoo, J. B. Conrad; Junior Hoo-Hc
G. V. Denny; Bojum, F. J. O'Hara; Scriv
moter, C. F. Flyn; Jabberwock, D.
Campbell; Custocatian, Harry F. Barke


Areanoper, Karl Fries; Gurdon, J. D. Me-
Eachern.
Initiates-Harry Crane Dodge, Atlanta,
Ga.; John Fry Eilenberg, Jacksonville,
Fla.; Harry Morris Graham, Brinson, Ga.;
Harry Alfred Grant, Jacksonville, Fla.;
John T. Hammond, Orlando, Fla.; William
Parker Holmes, Jr, Jacksonville, Fla.;
Samuel B. Hubbard, Jr, Jacksonville, Fla.;
Pierce Louis Laughlin, Fitchuarg, Mass.;
Augustus Lamar Ligon, Jacksonville, Fla.;
John Benjamin Mills, Doerun, Ga., owner;
Leuen Wales Norvell, Fargo, Ga, Supt.;
Lewis Littleberry Robert, Jacksonville,
Fla.; Herbert W. Savage, Jacksonville,
Fla.; Chris Stanton, Palatka, Fla., Pres.;
Phoeion Leo Sutherland, Jacksonville, Fl.;
Lime Member No. 18, John Garrison Chris-
topher.

PATENTS LATELY ISSUED.

Inventions that Should Interest the Saw-
Mill Men of the Country.
Reported specially for the New Orleans
Lumber, Trade Journal, by R. W. Bishop,
patent attorney, Washington, D. C.
762,303. Process of destructive distilla-
tion of wood. G. 0. Gilmer, New Orleans,
La., assignor to Illinois Investment Com-
pany, of West Virginia.


762,312. Stave-jointing and shaping ma
chine. B. G. Jayne, New York, N. Y.
762,423. Car-stake. James Lewis, Mont-
rose, W. Va.
762,563. Shingle-machine. R. J. Thomp-
son, Alpena, Mich.
762,653. Conveyor for band-saw mills.
D. C. Prescott, Chicago, Il.
762,677. Saw-clamp. Charles Berg-
strom, Lindstrom, Minn.
762,930. Carving-machine. Henry New-
house, Grand Rapids, Mich.
762,953. Auxiliary setting mechanism
for sawmill carriages. C. M. Smith, Port-
ville, N. Y.
762,963. Scraper. J. O. Wagner, West
Somerville, Mass.
762,991. Emergency stop-valve for saw-
mill carriages. D. R. Edwards, Orange,
Tex.
763,085. Dressing and filing appliance
for circular saws. J. W. Arnott, Callan-
der, Canada.
763,112. Steam-power cross-cut saw. J.
A. Reed, Gulfport, Mass.
763,155. Saw-set Emma Caywood, Pe-
oria, Il.
763,161. Pile-sawing machine. C. A.
Crum, Brunswick, Ga.
763,249. Cant-hook. Nicholas Blanchet,
Pendleton, Ore.
763,315. Machine for reducing wood. J.
M. Nash, Milwaukee, Wis.
764.095. Sawmill set-works. T. S. Wil-
kins, Milwaukee, Wis.
764,106. Lath-stripping machine. N. H.
Bolton, Minneapolis, Minn.
S 764,126. Saw-setting madM~e. John
SHegstrmn, Elcho, Wis.
S 764,168. Jointer-knife guard. Andrew
t Uetz, Eau Claire, Wis.
S 764,374. Saw. T. A. Remsen, Brooklyn,
- N. Y., assignor to Mary E. Remsen, same
e place.
t 764399. Cutter-head. Joseph Villiger,
Jr., Dixon, Ill.
764,460. Lumber-drying kiln. C. H.
Hall, Jacksonville, N. C.
764,484. Sawmill set-works. E. C. Mon-
r roe, Liberty, N. Y.
o, 764,492. Machine for making excelsior.
- W. H. Niemeyer and E. J. Godman, Balti-
L more, Md., assignors of one-third to W. D.
; Colt, Washington, D. C.


me e we orr0:41cee-1we seems 11-11--1111


i J.A. Craig Bro.

6 239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BOCK.
ol

Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
0 ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.

* C++~ CC~C II~Cb~+u"


For Saie:


Turpentine Location, of which 9,000 acres are now being worked
I with 11,000 Acres Round Timber. Price ........................$6500.00
13.000 Acre Liberty County Virgin Timber. Price per acre... 50
5.120 Acres Liberty County Virgin Pine. Price per acre....... 6.00
22.000 Acres Sawmill Timber on St. Johns River.
22.000 Acres Calhoun County, of which 7,750 acres are round.
p Balance now ready for the saw. Located on two navigable streams.
SPrice per acre ................. .............................. 3.00


Brobston, Fendig & Co.

SBRUNSWICK, OA. JACKSONVILLE, PLA.



"In the Good Old Summer Time"

Your customers will remain well, if you do
like Dr. Mathews of Thomson, Ga. He wrote
us 15th of January, 1904:
"I have been carrying Cuban Relief in stock for
several years, and have frequently used and prescribed
it. I consider it superior to any preparation on the
market for Cholera Morbus, Sick Headache, Colic,
and an infallible remedy for horse colic."
You write us for a supply.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga. Tenn.


T. MURPHY

JACKSONVILLE MACHINE ND IRON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Iroa
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARINE ENGINES AND BOILERS. PULLEYS AND SHAFTIG,
Agent for Stationary Engines, Boilers. Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden-
sers. Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting ad Rubber Goods
POMER TRAIISM All WATER MIS EIUHIT A HICILTT
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
e.*e: >eeft'ee ess 1 1iim --------**
i Cable Address. Florida


Standard Naval Stores

Company.

DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN


R.OSIN

AND TURPENTINE.

Jacksonville F1&a.


WHEN WRPREh ADVERTISER MENTION THE RECORD.


--3







6 THU -WZEEKLY iDUtriWAL R19ECOD.


u----------------------------~j~ ~~ 6~J

Prize Essays on Pies ving Our Forests, j

Two of the Best Written in Compeition For The Industrial Recod
SPrizes by Students at the Studenthelp Fair.
99Winw^ **^**r--*ww*-


Our readers will doubtless recall that fires." The annual loss in the United
there was recently held in this city a States from these fires is estimated at
Stuuenthelp Fair under the auspices of! rom $25,000,000 to $50,000,000. If this
several of the Florida institutes of learn- m uch money were spent annually to pre-
ing. There were many novel and attrac- f vent this destruction, it would, no doubt,
tive features included in that enterprise be thought a great waste.
and it resulted in much permanent bene- Fojest fires are regarded as almost in-
nit to the Florida students. 'evitable, and few systematic attempts
J. A. Hoilomon, of the Industrial Rec- I have been made to control them, but the
ord, offered a prize ior the best essay fact that New York, Pennsylvania and
on the preservation of the forests of Flor- Minnesota have efficient system for the
mia, and in competition therefore, there protection against forest fires is sufficient
were tour entries. The prize was awarded to prove that they are not inevitable, and
by the judges to MacQueen Auld, of St. that if necessary effort be put forth, they
Petersburg, Fla. We publish it herewith, can be controlled.
also another, written by A. E. Kunze, of Not only great care in the use of fire is
Bartow: required, but the forests should be divided
McQueen Auld is a lad about fifteen into blocks and compartments by roads,
years old. His composition has two dis- kept clear of underbrush, regularly laid
tinctive merits, one it is clearly a boy's off and crossing one another.
composition and therefore original, and the Running fires are sometimes beaten out
other, he has evidently given the matter with brush, checked by ditching, or by
considerable study. As we read his article counterfiring. Top fires may be stopped
we are impressed with the fact that one by felling strips of timber.
way to conserve our forests is to begin After deducting from the total area of
at the beginning, lay a foundation with the water surface, marshes, prairies, and hard-
youth of the State before they reach men's wood forests, approximately three-fourths
estate. Have them appreciate in all its of the State is found to be covered with
force the importance of our forests to pine forests. But it is very evident to
coming generations, and if this be done in lumbermen that at the present rate of
all the schools and colleges in the country, destruction the supply cannot last more
the forests will be appreciated, venerated than fifteen or twenty years.
and conserved by loving hands. The pine tree can be put to very many
Our first impulse, on reading this article, uses, and consequently is being rapidly
was to criticise and commend, criticise and wastefully consumed.
where we disagreed with the young au- The necessity of checking this rapid con-
thor and commend where we approved, sumption of the pine is evident. Florida's
but we deemed it best to say nothing, resources will be lessened to a great ex-
either way. A young brain that will tent when the pine is no more.
evolve this production should have a place In travelling in this State, fifty per cent
made for him when he becomes of age ,f the pines that are seen from the ear-
on the forestry commission, which the window, are being used to produce tur-
Record hopes by that time will be in full pentine. The amount of pine wood con-
and effective operation. sumed as fuel is enormous. Often when
a person buys a tract of land which he ex-
Sects to cultivate in a few years, he first
Prmerataia of ti Ft8 Of Fleta. kills the trees, and allows them to decay
(By MacQueen Auld, St. Petersburg, Fla.) and rot; of course this is not always the
Those who are residents of Florida, or ase, but it is a very common occurrence.
who have visited Florida, even for a short The pine tree is by no means the only
time, must necessarily have seen the rapid useful tree in Florida; there are many
destruction of our forests, and must have more, fully as necessary, but it would be
recognized the necessity for their preser- useless to name them and give their value
ovation. here. Because the pine tree is the most
The forests not only produce timber, numerous tree in Florida, it is given as
but also sunnlv material for manufatur- an example.


ing paper, textile fabrics, dyes, ink, fer-
tilizers, cattle feed, and many.other use-
ful and necessary things, so that one
must readily see that the richest of nat-
ural resources are found in the wealth of
the forest, which therefore calls for spec-
ial attention.
Probably the forests of Florida are not
productive of all of these articles, but the
fact that forty-seven per cent. of all the
varieties of trees in the United States are
to be found in Florida, also that two hun-
dred and two different varieties are pro-
duced by the Florida forests, is sufficient
proof that many of these articles are
Florida products.
An increasing demand for the various
productions at home and abroad is hasten-
ing the work of destruction, and the ar-
rival of a dangerous scarcity.
Probably the worst of the many obsta-
cles encountered by the growth of the
forests are what are known as "forest


Irrigation is a very important factor in
beautifying and increasing the growth of
the forests; this would not be a very diffi-
cult task in Florida beease of the numer-
ous lakes.
Not only trees that are found on Florida
soil should be given attention, but also
those that are not native should be given
a trial; if this prove a failure, then noth-
ing can be done; but if successful, then
they should be planted and helped to mul-
tiply. They should not be used up in
their infancy, but given a start and then
used to a moderate degree, providing for
the replacing of all that are used.
Another important subject to be consid-
ered is the forest reserves. The larger
and more numerous the forest reserves
owned by the State, the better for the
welfare of the State; when the land is
under private ownership it is a difficult
matter to get all to work in unison, there-
fore it is well for the State to own the


White Springs, Fla.
On the Suwanee River
The Great Health Resort of the South.
s.pe.r s-riSt 25,000 oead pe r Minte.
Healing Springs -- Forest Walks Slheetig & HlbI
0 NO MOSQUITOES. NO MALARJA.
The Healthiest Summer Resort in America.


THE PRITCHARD HOUSE.


An Ideal Home for Invalids, First-Class Table
ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES.
Write or particular ...
MRS, S. L PRITCHARD, Proprietres. WHITE SPRINGS FLA.


THE OAKS.

A Typical Southern Home


NEWLY BUILT and FURNISHED.


0 EVERY COMFORT


--Write lor particular -
MRS. M. C. SKIPWORTH, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


KENDRICK HOUSE.

Headquafters for Southern Families.
GOOD TABLE HOME COMFORTS
... Fr ptic dr * ...
MRS. I. B. ROBERTS, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA;


THE HAMILTON.


A New, Moderm HighClass Hotel


ELECTRIC LIGHTS and BELLS


HOT ad COLD BATHS


For ull information write
JNO. S, BOWEN, Owner and Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS FLA.


THE NEW PAXTON.

Commodious, HomeeLike Hotel.
ROOM FOR 100 GUESTS.


Table Unexcelled.


Every Attentio to Visitors


MRS. E. H PAXTON, Owner and Proprietress WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.



THE ARAGON
JACKSONVI.LLE. FA.
NOW OPEN
under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator and oar
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.

A.S. PENDLETO, W. I JOSON" JAS. LASSETER. W.W. STPMIMS
PresdMrt Vite Pres. Gem. MRmmg. lst TrmMarr

5he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,

Wholesale Grocers


WALA KILT1
n-TN.'?rr


ARM YOU A suuaCumZZ TO T=E RUCOR


402-404-406-40 East may Street. JacksesulMs. Fta.
DIRECTORS:
I. F. CAMP. A. S. PIE LETOU,
T OWLDW.
It. G. WARE, PlinY M.80L


M. W.8VW,








THB WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. .
i ,, ---I--


-inhabited or unused territory and it
a- decide upon any method that meem
bst of enring for the land and have the
m--thod card out.
It is ale well for towns and cities to
own r estv; the money that is expended
upon the reserves will be found to be
proftably spent. As an illustration of
what is being dome in some of the cities
the following extract from the "Forestry
and Irrigation" is given: "An interesting
piece of forest work has been begun on
the water-shed of the city of Hartford,
eL., under the direction of Mr. Henry
8 Graves. The water-shed is owned by
the city, and covers an area of over two
thumnds ares. During the past summer
Mr. Graves prepared a detailed working
plan, which is now being put into execu-
tion. The plan includes the necessary
thinnings in the forest, which covers about
one thoumia acres, and the planting of
about six hundred acres of open fields and


U--


pasture land. A resident forest ranger,
Mr. L E Goodrich, is employed by the
water board, who has immediate executive
charge of all the work. About fifty aerea
will be planted the first year, and about
one hundred acres of woodland will be
thinned for improvement. This is an ex-
cellent opportunity to demonstrate praeti-
cal forestry in all its phases
Forest work of the same nature is
being conducted by the Bureau of Forest-
ry on the water-shed of the city of Woon-
socket, IR I, and that of the Metropolitan
Water Board at Clinton, Mass.
It is not necessary or well to try and
get a number of trees on a small tract of
land as possible; the trees should not be
crowded, they should be a reasonable dis-
tance apart, taking into consideration the
fertility of the soil.
The necessity of introducing forestry
into our schools and colleges cannot be
too strongly emphasized. If the atten-
tion of the young people is called to the
destreution that is going on around them
and the need for checking this destruction,
they will go out into the world with a
broader view concerning our forests, aia
at leat be willing to lend their aid when
called upon, and others will voluntarily
devote a portion of their time in helping
to preserve our forests. Is it not neces-
sary to institute the study of forestry
into our Florida schools?
Laws should be made providing for the
protection of our forests and wardens for
the sole purpose of seeing that these laws
are enforced should be appointed.
What we do now will affect not only
the present but future generations.

He's Another.
Master Kunze's article, while displaying
moi finish in expression, is lacking in
grasp of all the conditions suggested by
the theme. His eulogy of the eucalyptus
is, in our judgment, a little over the
mark. However, the article has much
merit to it, and we believe, with the one
by young Auld, will be read with inter-
est and profit by our readers:

The PreseM atin of the Forests of Florida
(By A. E. Kunze, Bartow, Fla.)
The preservation and restoration of for-
ests go hand in hand and are, as the for-
ester uses the terms, practically synony-
Smous in meaning. This subject is of vital
interest to the commonwealth of Florida;
* the greater part of her resources con-
sists in forests and almost all of her in-
dustries are in some y connected with


Standard Turpentine

Company /


ness ip the Soeth. After three months of carefW4
testing our mac ikery at the Waycross, 6eorgla
Mim, we are now ready to sell direct amy size
plant aad gaarmtee results by oar mew KRUG
PATENT STEAM PRESSURE PROCESS. /


/


U


the forests; yet what has been more light-
ly and carelessly treated than these same
forests?
If changes, and radical changes, are not
soon brought about, then Florida, the
fair and beautiful Florida will be a desert
of blackened stumps, a soil parched, dry
and dusty, and a hot, quivering atmos-
phere over all.
I have seen a place covered with trees;
it was green, shady and pleasant; a little
brook ran under the trees and to the mid-
day traveler no shade seemed more pleas-
ant, no water was clearer or cooler. Some
birds were singing there, and insects were
busy everywhere. It was a scene of life
and beauty.
Years later I saw the place again. The
trees had all been cut down and a fire
had swept over the region, destroying all
that escaped the woodsman's ax.
There was no shade anywhere; there
was no running brook; the birds had fed,
all was silent and all was still, save the
cloud of dust that rose from the horses'
feet. It was a scene of death.
Dependent upon the forests as are the
lumbermen, turpentine men, phosphate
mines, all who use machinery and all who
live in towns; and more indirectly, the
fruit-growers, truck-raisers, and farmers
generally-it is to their interest that our
forest, should be protected in an efficient
manner.
The trees with which forests are to be
renewed should be of rapid growth in
order to yield a profitable return in a
short time.
Few of our native trees have a rapid
growth and few of them are valuable for
economic purposes. The pine, our most
valuable tree, is of slow growth; under a
century it is scarcely fit for the saw-mill.
The live oak is of still slower growth
and is limited in distribution, while the
cypress is still more limited.
Trees, other than native, that are rapid
in growth are practically valueless for tim-
ber; the catalpa, for instance; the uses to
which this lumber may be put are limited
and only trees of considerable age are fit
to be cut for lumbering purposes.


The outlook might seem hopeless were
it not for the Australian eucalyptus; this
tree is not a cure-all for the ills of the
forests of Florida, but it possesses proper-
ties which make it an exceedingly valuable
tree.
It is of extremely rapid growth; it
grows upon moist land and upon dry land;
upon rich and upon poor land; if planted
properly it yields timber that is the de-
libht of the saw-mill man. The wood is
tough in fiber, it rivals the oak in tough-
ness, and when dry is not quite so heavy;
it is elastic and it is durable. It may be
used for cabinet purposes as well as for
fence-posts. It is better than pine wood
for certain firing purposes, for it is not
resinous and does not clog the flues with
soot.
The eucalyptus, however, cannot with-
stand severe frosts in its earlier stages of
growth; this limits its adoption to the
more southern portions of Florida.
The growth of this tree is phenomenal.
1895 and partially killed by frost in 1898,
now has a circumference of five feet at a
height of four and a half feet above the
ground, and its extreme height is sixty-
five feet. Another planted at the same
time has a circumference of fifty-two
inches and an extreme height of seventy-
five feet. This is by actual measurement.
These two trees do not show a very
good trunk, having grown in the open;
but when planted closely, as is required
in forestry, they develop magnificent
clear trunks.
Even upon the poorest and dryest lanl,
where the scrub-oak finds it a task to
grow, :htse trees grow well. There is
one that was planted i- a scrub thicket
at the same time the two previously men-
tioned were planted, which now has a cir-
cumference of thirteen inches at four and
a half feet above the ground and twenty-
one inches about three inches above the
ground.
At the same age and under the most
favorable circumstances, pines are scarcely
ove twelve feet high, and have a circum-
ference of from six to ten inches.
All the land which has been denuded of


trees by sawmills, wood-cutter, turpen-
tine men and phosphate mines, could eas-
ily be planted with the eucalyptus aad in
a short time there would be a supply of
timber that would amply repay all ex-
penses for starting and taking care of the
plantation.
Phosphate operators how haul their
wood from five to eight miles with teams,
and in some cases nearly twenty miles
with the railroad. This great distance of
carriage adds an expense to the running
of the works tight might be saved.
All around the mines are miles of tim-
berless country lying u-.-A going to
waste-all its energy is takenout by the
sun and washed out by the rain for lnak
of protection.
Were this land planted with eaemlyptus
and a little care given to it the first year,
the mines would have all the timber they
might need growing before their doors, so
to speak.
In South Africa the British Govern-
ment is using exclusively eucalyptus tim-
ber for railroad ties. In Australia various
kinds of timber were tried for bridge
building; only eucalyptus withstood the
test: even oak was fod unsatisfactory.

Jaeksonvile Wholmale Lumbr Makrt.

(For week ending July 22)
Merchantab!L
iard schedules--10$ 0 to $13.S
Sound and square schedules, wE to
$12.00.
Merchantable ear material-
Average seheuule of sills, $ feet and
under, 10 inches and under, $1&00 to
$14.00.
Special schedules-according to msies
and lengths-prices steady.
K. D. Sape-"r and up 0 per est
clear, 9.50 to $1000.
Ilooring:
$11.50; No. 4. $8..
Cypre
First and seconds, 4 quarter base, ar-
load prices, $34; selects, 4 quarter has,
No. 1, $15.00; No. 2, $1350; No. 3,
$28; shop, 4 quarter base, $0.
Cypress Shingles-x8 A's, per 1000
pea., $s.2; primes, s; 4xlS, A's, M ;
primes, l 2.7
Cypress laths, 2 per 1,000.


READ THE ADS 19 THU RECORD.


STANDARD TURPENTINE COMPANY.

d


Kohn = Furchgott= Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT A'IENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


/


* T *







H THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


*- KBMAT~- (N i,- r-
" r HI w M -i. |-

Business is going right along, thank
you. The people refuse to be frightened
at the bogy set up by certain flannel-
mouthed agitators that if the Democrats
win the business of the country is going
to the demnition bow-wows. One thing
settled by the two parties in their last
Conventions was that whatever happened,
the business conditions of this country
would not be disturbed.

Money is easier during the month of
July in this year of grace, Anno Domini
1904, than it has been in a presidential
year for lo, these many years. The first
result of the adjournment of the Demo-
crati Convention in St. Louis on the 9th
was the jumping up of all securities, and
they are still sailing skyward. And
money talks.

Let every turpentine man set his face
against the custom of permitting others
to entice his hands away. Report all
such at once. We want a list of the
underhanded gentry who would ruin the
business of his fellow operator In order
to get his hands away from him. All
that is needed is a healthy, vigorous pub-
lie sentiment along these lines, and if this
be maintained the practice wid prove
abortive.

NAVAL STORES ZXPORT&

Prim an Quantity Shipped Abroad in
1903 and go04.
According to official figures given out
by the authorities at Washington the ex-
ports of naval stores, including rosin, tar,
pitch and turpentine for all the export
ports of the country for the eleven months
ending April 30, 1905, were as follows:
2,52,813 barrels, worth 4,467,796, as
against 2,428,497 barrels, worth $6160,924,
for the eleven months ending April 30,
1904.
For the mouth of May, 19030, the exports
were 19822 barrels, worth $444122, as
against 12428 barrels, worth $39,0S62 for
the month of May, 1904.
By dividing the May -shipments with
their value we get about $2.20 a barrel in
1903, and $280 in 1904, which shows a
very decided increase in the value of
naval stores in a year. While this is ap-
proximately correct, it is only approxi-
mately, for in the above figures turpen-
tine worth over twenty dollars a barrel
is lumped with rosin worth about two
dollars and a half a barrel.

Product of British Central Afri.
The people of America are indebted to
Uncle Sam for much valuable informa-
tion obtained through consular reports,
which are published periodically and keep
us informed of the products of other coun-
tries. Great Britain has a similar bureau
and the following is clipped from one ol
its bulletins:
"The second bulletin of the Imperial
Institute for the current year has bee
issued, and contains, amongst other arti-
les, an account of certain vegetable prod-
ucts from Central British Africa. Among
these are beeswax and gum. Three spec
imes of beeswax were forwarded, two
of which represented the product as ofer-


ed for sale by the natives, whilst the
third is a clrilfed sample. It is stated
that bees are extremely abundant in Ny-
assaland, and beeswax already figures
among the exports, but that much larger
quantities could readily be produced. Te
clarified sample was selected for commer-
cial valuation. It was in the farm of thin
circular cakes, about 6 inches in diameter,
and from a quarter to three-eights of an
inch in thickness, and was quite free from
visible impurities. The brokers report
that they consider it to be a genuine spec-
imen of purified beeswax, and that con-
signments of similar quality would meet
with a ready sale in the London market
at prices from 6 Js. 6d. to 7 per ewt.
They recommend that the wax should be
shipped in blocks of 90 to 100 bs. each,
eased in gunny, as such packages are pre-
ferred by buyers in this country. It is
evident from this report that clarified
beeswax from British Central Africa will
fetch good prices in the London market,
and there is no reason why the exports of
this product should not be largely in-
ereased. Gum is stated to be collected by
the natives from several different trees,
which have so far not been identified.
The sample examined consisted of about
1 lb. of small fragments of translucent
gum, varying in color from light yellow to
deep brown. It had a slight odour of
acetic acid, but posessed no peculiar
taste. On analysis the following results
were obtained: Amount soluble in water,
32.8 per cent.; moisture, 15.6 per cent.;
ash (magnesium and calcium carbonate,
with a*trace of ferric oxide), 2.57 per cent.
The portion of the gum insoluble in water
swelled up into a translucent jelly in con-
tact with this liquid. This gum resem-
bles those obtained from the Indian tree
Cochlospermum Gossypium and the Aus-
tralian plant Sterculia aerifolia in being
only partially soluble in water and in
slowly evolving acetic acid when exposed
to the air. A number of gums of this
type are at present being investigated in
the Scientific and Technical Department of
the Imperial Institute, with a view to the
discovery of a commercial method of utt
losing them. Insoluble gums of this clas
have at present no commercial value un-
less they can be obtained, like the well-
known insoluble tragaeanth gisir. almost
free from colour."


Malodoreus Ruian Turpetine.
The Industrial Record has already called
attention to the fact that the turpentine
made in Russia possesses an odor all its
own, which, like King Hamlet's offense,
is rank, and smells to heaven. T)ere is
something about elimttie condition there
which develop a baly smelling article,
and the problem of Russian turpentine
operators is to evolve a deodorier that
will enable a foreigner to live in the
same room with the turpentine without
Forever holding his nose.
Seriously, the Oil and Colourman's Jour-
,nal, of London, has taken in hand the
development of a deodorizer that will add
to the market value of Russian turpen-
I tine, and has invited correspondence among
Sits readers with that end in view. One
of them asks why stress should be laid
I upon the fact that dead resinous woods
i will give out a living exudant to resin. He
claims that an article distilled from the
Slater is not necessarily superior to that
Obtained from the former, if proper meth-
ods are used for purification. To quote
Shim further he says:
"It is very misleading to term Russian


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


SBoilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING end REPAIRING.
SiJacksonville. Fla.



Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.

Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Pains.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.



Cummer Lumbher Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER '

Long Leef Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.


.0 .0 5S .0. 0.5 0. 0 ..0 co


metsasn..s|euumemisie|-.-


Standard Clothing Company


One Price


B


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISIERS,
17 mnd i9 West Bay Street, Jacksoevoal FOrsd
Stetsn and Hawes Hats. Special Attentl Give to Nall Ordes.


a
-
a*esses**** *


IR TOLAR.


******9*6*6** e


J. H. HART. T. H. LACHLY.
(establinhed 1872.)


J. L TOLAR, aJ


TOLAR. HART & CO.,
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Navel Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVAMNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.


Read the Record Adv't's.
WB MU EaWB M W W Ww 0


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRINSON


THE RECORD KxEPS PACE WITH SOUTHERN PROGRESS.


--A


--













ta IreM, Irn Pipe and Fittinfs, Blts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Wasers, Black-
smMth's Tols, Lumnberman's Tols,
PacMka of all Kinds, Railroad Material,
Panltedd Galvanized Corruated




JOHN CHRISTOPHER
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


THE WEEKLY r NumsraltL RECORD.
-------Machiery ad Mill Supilies.

| Machinery and Mill Supplies.


STAft AGENT FORI
AuLA aIEs am em SO SutE sm noeE
WSTUIUTUSTEAM PUMPS JEKinS VU.VES,
cuna MAmCmin MS M Meaela'y,
OLsAOU SAW NULS, GLOMT UVWV-%U0W
NOT" LnAM WT.
WEW JERSEY CU SPS4 i RUU CL
Be and Rubber Ous.
MUS M CL'S Coo kWa sWK PulEWS
&16Cr r afl MrIU O EAMEr m..MA
A. LUCU1 a SW, WI R8W.


-- ------------ -- 9##@0*rL#. ;Os #eoo:OO0USWUS9 US 9WUS-oo S-o


w -
turptie wooed pirie) h Rat wood spir-
I Mr e d et yl aleodl A4,W no rep-
Utbe ManufactuPrr Oll* I tar-
-ti Amriae, ail Vt the most
Ibmst reder would Ald It difficult
s 1 wfood spirit as American
ae'lLp"
We should may o. The "living" Rus-
aru tIpestimie hI absohdrty de-odorln,
fr a attempts to deodorie it have killed
it. The dead rtule, that made fro 4da
wood, while not so ofeasive, is suffileiey
- to kin it as an article of cnommereN
in th Amria market.
Semeswe ams* qebammse aor nw
eaasm m d eou afa Sssee -
Ae be les a so e ea week.


ZINC NAILS

Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the oar st which will not injure
saws when left in the trees.
a-em- Nail G0.

dq for Galvanized and
SBoat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron n Etc., Slating and Roofing
Nai Tools, Copper Nails and
Taek ugL


'The" PAINT LORE,
1. E. BAIRD 4L CO., J 'diwiille, rla,
1as pp, apem. frumes, pafiting ad sad exterior dasrrwt-
ll&mwa "eta If yo ae building a Igr t Bair & Ca. toe d
v- st it M y be in kbspig with tiV ding. et sad a" s-
hsa


STHE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILIAL

We iane Time Cardficates of Deposlt. Mek draw Ierest t the rate af trew er
4 cestupern. If bewd ninety days or lomr,
wP9rrtrrrrr r r

SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 190304 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YARDS
Receipts 1908-04 119002-3 190146-
Spirits,casks.......................... 198,647 29 496 814,846
Rosins, bW............................. 60,98 90,6071,071,440
Totl ...... ........................... 844,66 1,2S ,a ,387 ,
Exports
Spri cass............................. 188,398 296,480 814,876
Rns, bbl.............................. 752,270 95,428 62,687
Foreign
*Sp* cirits k.... ..... .. .. 98,84 206,109 217,4W
s" lbb...... ........................ i88,171 04,178 3 K.
New York

ri bca ls ............ .................m I
Jis mi bb ...................... .........


Tin ,


1. M. ILYTN, Preident


W. B. JOHNSON, Vice-Presda"


J. W. Oglesbee


DIRECTORS
L. Horn


at Nava Stees &


Naval Stores Factors t

Capital Stock, -


-a ------- -------a

J. 1.. ests W$k. Wlimme




Export Co.,




I arto rs.


The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal i--s1 ta l-a tum-4ena nts.
Our interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operthwI-W ar y


Some Money and Some Timber For Sonm .
All Producers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.


incen 18TUD WU4U DU&S3.


it


D. M. Flynn


Walter Ray


N. 0. Wa4e


i


-.1w -1 -P


II I


sk.. PC-










1@. -... TliT WVEZLY fr41NmtIAL RECORD.


SJ. I. PAOrr, AC siu S. HuuBARD. AmrTsu F. PmaTr
S Preei ent. ; Vice-President. cOhier.

S The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
SCapittl. $200.000. Surplus. $100.000
STATE DEPOSITAR Y.
oeaemrl Baaia. Interet Paid on Saving Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes. a O per Year.


lReview of Naval Stores for a Week


G, $320; H, $330; I, $3.60; K, $3.95; M,
$4.16; N, $4.35; WG, $4.75; WW, $5.05.
TOLAR, HART & 00C.
Savanah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 .......... 6,495 44,50
Receipts July 21 ........ 1,111 3,767
Receipts previously ...... 77,549 195,60
Total .............. 85155 243,98
Imports July 21 ......... -330 765
Exports previously ....... 62,502 183,446
Total .............. 2,83 184,210
Stock July 21 ........... 22,323 59,776
-Stock last year ......... 12,790 64,24

Ran of Turpentine ad Rosn at Savan-
nh Jly ai am Same Day.
Last Year.
p July 21 July 20 July 21
spirits 1904 i190 19M


Spirit .... % I| 3% I 9%
Spirits .... Firm r arm |Firm
Sales ......I .468 847 -- 8
Spirits .... Steady Steady Fi
WW ...... 4.52% 4.57% 3.45
WG ....... 4.22% 4.2, 325
N ......... 3.82% 3.87% 3.10
M ........ 372% &77% 3.00
K ......... 3:47% 3.52% 2.90
I .......... 3.15 320 2.75
H ......... 2.70 2.75 2.30
G ......... 2.55 2.60 1.85
F .......... 2.50 26 1.75
I ......... 2.4 2.50 1.70
D ......... 2.40 2.45 1.65
C, BA, ... 2.35 2.40 1.65
BI^a ...... .1,825 ( 2,11 2382


uaUey a Mentgemryas review.
SThursday, July 14-67 ets. steady.
Friday, July 15-57 eta. steady.
Saturday, July 16-57 1-4 dts asked.
XMonday, July 18-571-2 et. asked.
Tuesday, July 19-57 cts steady.
Wednesday, July 20-7 cta. asked.
Rosin-Stock, 17,020 barrels.
This market during the week has been
rather dull, and all grades have been
-ather sluggish. We quote the market
quiet:
AC, $290; D, $3.00; E, $3.05; F, $3.10;
G, $3.15; H, $3.20; I, $3.60; K, $3.95; M,
$4.5 to $4.20; N, $4.; WG, $4.70; WW,
*$6JM


Spirits for the W4ek at Savannah.
Price'Rcpt Sales Exp. 1903
Mon., July 1 7 161235 9%
Tues., July 19 53%- 1 101 12 %
Wed., July 20153% 9 I7 847 7 66 %
Thur., July 2113% 330 %
Fri., July 22153% 625 411 185 49

Rosin for the Week at Savannah.
Monday, July 18 Last Yer.
WW ........... 430 3.10
N ...... ........ 3.90 3.00
M .. ........... 3.80 2.9
K ............. 3.55 2.80
1 .. ............ 3.2 2.6
H ........2.2...... 2.80
G .............. 2.65 1.80
F............. 2.00 1.76
E ............. .2.55 1.70
D .............. 2.50 1.65
ABC ............. 2.4 1.60
Receipts 2,638, sales 2,437, exports 5,6 4.
Tuesday, July 19.-No change in quo-
tations.. Receipts 2,731, sales 2,615, ex-
ports 170.
-9-
Wednesday, July 20.-W. W. to K m-
clusive declined -1-2 cents a barrel and
I and below declined 6 vests a barrel. Be-
ceipts 3,037, ,ales 2,311, exports 3,10.
Thursday, July 2L-Another general
decline of 5 cents a barrel from Monday
quotations all along the line. Receipts
3,738, sales 1,95, exports 765.
Friday, July 22.-he rally tast marked
spirits failed to reach the resin market,
however, on the contrary, there was a still
further decline. The market opened firm
at a decline of 5 cents on the entire list.
The sales were 1,925. The receipts were
3,767 and the exports 765.

olar, Hart a Co.'s Review.
Spirits Turp-In sympathy with higher
prices South our market has been firmer
during past week. Orders are coming in
quite freely, business being very fair for
midsummer. Stock, 1,728 barrels. We
quote Machines 57 ets.
Rosin-Business continues dull. No
special inquiry for any grade. Market
easy. We quote:
BC, $2.95; D, $3.00; E, $3.05; F, $3.15;


Imports of Turpentine to U. K.
The following table is compiled by James Watt & Son, of London, from the
ofieial returns. For convenience of comparison we have turned ewts into barrels
--320 ewt. equal 100 barrels.


1897
From U. S., bbls..... 152,652
From France, bbls.... 161
From other countries.. 1,494
154,307
From Rumia .......... 2,815
Total Barrels .. 157,122


1898
173,785
244
878
174m07
4,183
179,090


1899
149,375
517
50

4,998
154,940


1900
174,446
2,283
840

8,521
186,090


191 .
193,429
859
53

6,861
201,202


l1!m
156,122
1,566
904

8,711
166,393


1603
143,851
4,630
516
148,397
17,595
166,59


Thus the import of Russian Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 1901 was double
that of 1902, and over six tine as much as in 1897. It is interesting to see how
this import fluctuates with the price of American Turpentine.
Percentage of Import of Rusdia .. 1.79 2.33 3.22 4.57 3.41 5.24 10.56
Av. Price Amer. Turp. in London ..21-6 24-6 34-1 35-4 27-1 33-1 42-2


ScFOR SALE.
50,000 acres tilb6r land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
f1 million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
11ll. $:3 per aore. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
prehaued. One of the best opportunities in tk e State.

'-" U CK 1 AN, .A NEaonw Pwe,


Crops of Spirits and Rosns for Three Years.
Crop M190-0 Crop 18m-0B Orp MIRM
Spirits. Rosin. Spirits. BOai. 81in re
Wihmingtm ...... ....16,11 897 18" 83 11336 I 16"
Charlesto.. .. .. .... 2,48 32,16 3,007 11,365 3B3,00
Savannah........ .. 176,418 65068 270,670 940,1 33,M 'JL
Brunswik.. ........ 56,0m 184,27 68947 244,106 79,
Mobile................ 12.21s o50,80 18s 79,272 21,m
New Orleas.......... a3,017 133l,1 33s, 0 108,03 21, .. *0 ,
Carrabelle.. .......eloed closed 3,39 3,148 8,17? 4
Georgetown........ 7,515 44,14 10,3 48,A 4 -
Peacola,.. ....... .. 42,564 205,a8 3s,7 1938.06 37,7 8
Jax. & Feradin.. .... 187,10 663,210 91,978 375,211 70M
Tamps ...... ........dosed closed 13,566 40,64 16
_** _- -----
Totals.............35,15 2,00,25 571,006 2 184,18s 53,R SA1

R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KwrIHT, Sc se- alreea


MARION HARDWARE COs


HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.

Herbert A. Ford, Oeo. H. Ford, F. L W.t
President. Vice-Pres. C rhier.

The Central National Bank of Ucala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITAL, $50,000.00.
DIRECTORS: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Gte.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford. Herbert A. Ford.
Accoupts of Turpentie Operators and Saw Mill Men Soliited.

C. n. MARnES. Pr.. SHWIAW, VIec-Pros. RALPH SU ,, S.-Tr

BARNES JESSUP COMPANY,
AVAL STORI FACTOR. R.

Exporters ofPure Turpentines and Resins
Stritly a -*it"cers' Cmpmay. agmes,
Grades aln Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksmnvl, Pensaela, FerntA l.a m
Correspende nce Sielited. JACKSONVILE. LA.


W. FRAZIER JOG .


C. H. bARIMES
Treasurer.


3. ~Vp
Ass's T~ua


W.z3. 3AKW


UNITED GROCERY CO..

Importers & Wholesale Grocer
HAY, GRAIN and FEED.
Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
B. G. LASSETER.
B.Vce Pr.. ama nS Mgr. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

M. A. BRIGGS, Preddeot. HOMEs BROWN, 2d. Ver-i4'ent.,
H C. BRIGGS, Ist Vice President. J. C. McDONALI, Secretary imJT;roa



W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CuI
HARDWARE, MILL and TUKPfN II Nb SUPPLIES

Council Tool Co., & Holmes' Tool Co., Tools,
Brigg's Sterling and Perfection Hacks and Pullers,
Cutters, Files, Whetters, Glue, Batting, Strainer Wire,
Turpentine Wagon Harness and Collars,
Hoop Iron, Coopers' Tools and Rivets.

Everything in Turpentine Supplies,

Send us your Mail Orders

W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.,
VALDOSTA. GA.


TIM vw TAun iT 01 OUR AlDVIRTMSE VOUCUD FOIL


--.. P


g









THE WEEKLY INDUWrRIAL RECORD. 1 .

rrr^ cC~m;;? :;: ^ ^ ; ^ ^ ~- --------- -- --------RJ
QtUALITY FIRST-PRICEvS e T. tanescted. Under these conditions, it has
needed no change of prospects to render
-2 shorts nervous and force covering. To

been due our unwillingness to advise short
Selling except on extreme bulges and our
inclination to the buying side whenever
-- the market became weak. Weather con-
Srditions have continued all that could be
". desired, and it is now more than likely
That the coming Bureau report will be in
e% the neighborhood of 90. This will make
%be% % % at o one of the best averages in years and
holds out the promise of a bumper crop. Sam 'l P "oim s&
P. OLMSI & COMPANY'S WEEKLY the.enormous shortage, and the compawa- But it must not be forgotten that, as the P. H lm es Co.
tively limited amount of contracts availa- crop East of the River is somewhat late, Stocks, Bods. CtteM ,
UMN LrTT=ZB ble for its circulation. Everyone knows the really critical period is just beginning Graln and Previ eMs
New York, July 22nd.-The market has that the New York market has of late and it is almost certain that a shading
b;e treated this week to the most exten- years grown to be the big speculative of reports will take place during August.
market of the world and the trading here Under these conditions, it is hardly ad- NEW YORK GOTTON EXCHANGE
& in pries that has taken p&lae .is along liberal lines at all seasons of the visible to anticipate a decline on prices CHICAGO BOARD Of TRADE
thi month. In fact, not since the reac- year. The South has been selling freely until after something more defnite is Direct private wires to all exchanges.
tim immditdly following the June re- and speculators have been aggressive on known regarding the out-turn of this most Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
pert when Otober ran from 9.50 to 10.10, the bear side of the market. All this important crop. Bell Pione 853 BaMwIa Bltck
howev, prices advanced a rapidly and cotton has been taken by Europe and has
r hh a level as drig passed out of the reckoning as far as the
reached s hih a level s during the ability of shorts to get contracts back is The Exports of Turpentine and Rosla.
urent movement. Yesterday, October concerned. All the while this been going SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE. ILOSINS.
ra up to 9.92 on an extensive short cov- on, the actual stock of cotton in New To United Kingdom. in gallons: To United Kingdom, barrels US Is:
Sin, assisted by the buying by profes- York has been slowly dwindling until Month 101-04 190-a Ir-a Month 1Su-e Ism. I Ua4
e op to o to lp along now it amounts to but 37,000. In the last April.. .... ... lM1 1l.12 lI 3 21. April .... .. 9S S M,
al -operators, anxious to help along Ma .. .. .. ..0 1.1S.264 May .. .. .. .. .uas a0i
the rie d make a turn on that side analysis, of course, business must be done June .. .. .. .. 71,17 .4a.1M l.9 June .. .. .. .. 4.74 C s a
Srie make a on the amount of cotton held in store July .. .. .. .. 9V13.1 21.ss4 i.s1r. July... .. .. ... ae du n
of the market. It has been known for here. The short interest has become alto- Aus t ...... .. .0 1.7I.m 4 August .... 74.S gigl
September.. .. T.l 3S 910.741 September.. ,4 11 1111 ,
sme time that the technical position was gether too unwieldy for the amount of October ......... 71t1.4 4a. 1.m.s October .... .. L.4a -. 1g m
ne of comparative strength, owing to contracts upon which business has been November .. 681,638 1,5,700 92,991 November .. 71,107 95,73 8
December .. 1,0.656 1.531,779 576,784 December .. 61,455 64,455 T72
January. .. 228,850 373,240 164,330 January ... 53,0 42,700 g0,
Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets. February .. 116,452 38,00 247,406 February ... 28,51 37,32 91,18
1903- .1904. March 35250 ...... 25,000 March .. 39,015 354,9 48,7
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE
Apr. 1 Apr. 3 Apr. m Apr. 17 Apr. M May 1 May 3 May 15 May 2 May 2 To Belgium and Netherlands. In gallons: To Baune m sherinds, bar:
l ND MD 0 40 40 4 1-61 41112 4K-2 41f Month 11a-04 is" u10- Month M4
Jume Ju ne IS June June 2 Julya July1 July 17 J 7 uly July 11 Aug. .. .. .. .. In
3- 4? 4a, o 4 5 41- 8 April.......... 12 .44 Included April .........". I us
Aug. 14 A. 4 Se Au Spt I se Sep t. 5 O Oct. 2 Oct. Oct. 5 May .. .. .. .. in all other May ...... ... rMS I.uI1 an oth
AS a a1 A g.4 Au ND 1- a 1- I June.. .. .. ..... .M as7 Europe Juno .... .. a,.N amg Barp
Oct. Oa 6. o Nov . .5, Dec. Dec. 10, Dec. 17 Dec. 33 Jan. 14 Julyt ........ m 7 m. m July ...... .. 2g s 1 ,37 ,S
S 51- 0 6 M6 56 1-41-4 6 1-4 1-2-64 August... ....2. .. 8 ,01 August ..... Spte m
Ja. 22, Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18, Feby. 25 Meh. 3 Meh. 10 Mch 24 etober .. ... 0. 21 25,I eptember .. ... ISj
October.........14 1.0 ILSOa October ..........11pi 64.0 3
S t 64 60 59 00 58 November .. 133,695 349,726 381286 November :. 3,1 0,00 31,04
Me. 30 December .. 100,372 58,50 672,164 December .. -37,W0f 13,36 2m0,J
57 January .... 168,879 241,150 174,37 January .... 0,73 24,19 1I
RIOSINS February ... 5,130 372,444 36,580 February ... 9,849, .25,2e 8 18,
WW WG N M K I H G F E D C-A March . .... 8713 18,474 March .... 10,192 32,121 11,14
AMr 1. ......... .* S i.M W.4 1 pu 2. .s 2.2 s 2.1 I5 ---6-
ApI . ... LI 2. L3. L4 1 32. 25 .40 2.2 2.1S0 t 2.5 2. To Germany. in gallons: To Germany, barrels M lb.
AprM . L L6a L 0 2 .46 L4 26 266 Ls 2.6 Month U190- 19"-M 1 1- Month 1M-M U1s-a ItM-
April 1 +S LM 3 S 5 to. e 2 2. 2.M 1.J6 1J6 I April .. .. .. ......... 114.06 11 April .... .. .. SA I,4 Mg
Apr MS . . .s UL is .l1 L 2.5 2L.5 2* 2 1. 1 May .. .. .. .. .S 6. Ma 2a May a .. .. .. .. 41m 1 R.f
ay 1. ...... . a LIS Li. L. 2 t L 25 L Ln L 1.5 June....... 101.066 1. 12 10.6a* June ...... .. 41 M.03 a.
May a. . . LE I.5 .15 .16 &a 2t.5 2 B5 1 1.75 1.I6 17 1.76 uly .. .. .. .. sMuns 18,412 7.1787 July ...... .. S 3.14 n SA
Maa .... ... .4%1% .17% & 12% IA% 2.11% 227% 1.S0 Lw 1.16 1.70 August .. .. .. 51.M 579,417 August ...... 78.3
May a . LE 3W L5 2. &.10 3.0 2 1. 1.7 L. L 1.0 September.. .. 23I.S 1.21l T13.S7W September... 1. I1.M Mw US
May W. . . .. .. .& 3. L3 1 2 6 2. 2.40 L5 1. 1.15 lo7 1.7 October .. .. .. X7.31c6 .6C 10.5W7 October .. .. .. .S2.5E6 .54 1.S
Jun . . .. &. L2. .2 .15 LOS 3.9 2. LS. 1.5 LN La. 1.5 November 179,010 110,153 81,780 November .. 56,763 42, 41 7
June t. ...... &4 s 2G. 2 2.3 t L 1.5 1.0 1.75 1.70 December -- December 15,407 39,171 4M
mun ...... .. .3L .16 2 70 25 L.6 17 L. LA I 5 January .... 132,6000 54,1 153,898 January .... 34,762 545 9,3
Jrne n. . . ..... 3Lis&SO 2..5 26 2.5 L25.701.1.S 561. 1S
J-- 2 ... ... 2u 3 2 2.6 2.5 2.1 15 17 1 L l, February ... 220,182 15,838 67,174 February... 172,135 40,915 5,
Jil t .. ... .S LS M S 1.5 LL 1.. L.. LL L0 March 65,256 ... 94,600 March .... 49,962 60,90 41,
J .. 1 L L3."* L. .- 2.S 5 2.5 1. 1.79 L.7 L- LO ----- ----- ----- -
Jly ML ..... L5 .1 2.1 2-.715 2.3 L5 1.75 L7 1.5 Le To all other Burope in Gallons: To all other Europe, barrels S ls:
July 3. ...... ..0 .5 L 2 2 2. L7 1.7L 1.5 1.0 1. 1. Month 1S- 16-" 1 1a M-U Month :2a-64 12-41 2M4
Angt I .. . L .L 2 I s i 1270 2. L7 L6 1. l 5 1.5 Apri .... ...... 610 1.471u.5 1.015 April .... .. .. ~5.8 614 5.
Aant 14 . &3 15 .5 2.5 2. L .0 L 1.W L 1.76W 1 1 7L May.. .. .. .... .,8 1.6MT 574.211 May .... .. .... T,1 41.71
A3LO 3 11052. 5 N 2. LI6 L. L L78 1.70 June ......... l 4Ls L0M MA June.. ....... 14.*04 S.m1
*A .. . L" &. 2. LI tie a 2.40 2..0 12 1.La 1.N 1.6 July .......... 12a.2 4.4 July .. .. .. .. .51 14r
apS mbr 4.. Li L 0 3. 3. & 3.00 2.50 2.1 2.5 2. 1. LU Augus ........ .. Ms August .... .. S.5 ,11m
September I. &. 5 & 46 2 1 23 .50 0 L2. 1.5 1.90 15 1.6 September.... 4a. 2@0 21.0M September.. ... 7.4 ITJ WMa
p0 mn-1r 1 9 L& &M I2 t.46 .5 L 2.L 2.15 2. 2. 1. L1. October ..... 10.S 4. 17.50 October .. .. .. .L4M 1546 2M
a ptembr . 4.5 4.16 3 2.I 22.s 2 2.10 2.0 1. November.. 32,00 17,800 94.87 November.. 13,328 6,415 25,
Otober L. ... 4. to4 4. 5 4 Li 2.7 + 2.30 2.0 IS L9 December .. 47,306 89,51 2,000 December .. 25,299 48701 3981
October 8 .. .....W 4.76 4 4. 10 t .O 2L70 I.5 2.* L 2 LI January ... 11,000 -- January ... 17,124 7,148 14,0
October .. .. ..44i 4..4 4J5 4. 86 &2 2 570 2.55 .5 L 3 5 Li February .. 15,471 44,502 February ... 38.184 42,654 56,931
Oter ...... 4.A1 S 0 L2 .W 16S ZS 2.80 2.46 2.40 2.55 & 1S March 14,189 12,275 36,000 March .. 33,687 51,949 71,9
October 0 ......... 2.1101 0 3. 3L.& 2.70 6" 2.65 2.56 2.5 I.15 ....--1--
November 6 ... ..2. 3 .10 2.M9 2. 276 2.6 2.5 2 366 2.2 2.2
Noeveaber .... ...S s.5 3.10 2.0 L 2.70 2.5 2.30 25 2.10 2L05 25 Total Forelgn Exports, in gallons, includ- Total Exports of Rosin, barrels UM poords.
TNoveber ...... & 2L5 3 L20 S 2.70 2.46 2.5 23. 2.5 2.15 215 ing everything outside of the United Including Asia, Africa and America out-
November ... .. m 210 21 9 .4 240 2.0 2.10 21 2.16 states: side of the United States:
eembe1r I .... I3 3. .25 2. 0 2. 65 2-5 2.2 2. 21 215 I3 Month 1Sm-44 U-t l1- Im Month 1303-0 1B-4 1614M-
-Deceber 17 ....l . t2. 2.90 2.0 2.5 25 2.5 2.2 2.26 2.26 2.2 April ......... 614.0 e6.1215 g.mri April........ 1.M1 1 t.123 E1lM
December 1 .. . 2 5 IN 2.55 2.5 2.2 2L3 25 20 26 May .. .. .. .. lm. M.144 2,61. May .. .... .. 1.3 3M1144 A
Decem ar ....UB 6 I .1 265 2. 2.0 2 2.2 1 2 s 2.15 T5 TJune ........].I.0 2.2S.5 3 2.98.l June ...... ..17.M 216.01 Im.1
January 14 .. .4.6 2. S 3.S 15 3.95 .0o 295 2. 0 2.70 2. 2.6B 2.6 July .. .. .... ..1M.90 1,51.015 2.4L.W July ...... .. 3L.E9 111 U11.
Ja my 3 .-... 4. 4 I 9 L.10 5 5 .10 26 2.7 2.5 2.6 14 2.4. 2.SM. Astugust .. .. .. 23.1%5 238.3
Jaary S ......41 4.10 .S & ~W 1 3.0 t.15 2.90 2. 25 2. 2.1 Septenber... .. .L44,14 114SCW .t.30 September... 33.. 6 21,01 .4
February 11 ..3.75 3.45 356 3.30 3.25 3.20 2.85 2.85 2.80 2.75 2.70 2.70 October .. .. .. 1.4M1 1.0.WI 1.W.32 October .... .. 3M.83 .0 i1.1I
February 18 ...3.65 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25 3.05 2.70 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 255 November ..1,851,068 1,932183 1.652,574 November .. 184.860 231,543 22,479
-February 25 ..,.70 3.50 3.35 3.20 325 2.95 3.00 2.55 2.50 2.45 2.40 2.40 December ..1,93,529 1,794.336 1,859.175 December 210,457 202,064 191,4A
March 10 ......3.80 3.0 3.40 3.35 330 3.05 2.75 2.70 2.65 2.00 255 2.55 January ... 700292 80253 629,990 January ... 192,471 170,9M8 27A-
March 24 ......4.00 3.70 3.50 3.3 3.30 2.95 270 2.65 2.0 2.55 2. 2.50 February .. 47.577 531.46 855,476 February ... 306.090 189,32 257;4
Ma ch 31 .....10 3.0& 0 3 335 3L. 2.95 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.50 March .... 298,488 11174 285,958 March .... 171,548 204,433 14,91
THE RECORD CIRCULATES AiLL OVER TK WOULDi.
-- -










^^^^^^^^^^^---g__





flou...mo.

'Th. Pkso "and lf PWre*S.
ABI u ssooM be mdbasoom
otd l t aco, as paeraa"


~ de Sept. rf, the


reek I

-opM^ (p Iu s Mann al o te



Adopted Aril Ft, 19U, anTs W
association. Ai@ Sept. 11, 19M, p the
only official trp of the T. 0. A.
omaimeshied g lamber people by *i
resolutM adopted by the Georgia ll
Aasoeistitt

COPT FOR ADVRTni


Seeing to Jlar iniertion ia te ies ho
the tame t we.u

THE zECORD'8 OPMM
The paM hing pwt ms t h Win a -
cas of the latastritl lbed PKin *
Co. are locater at a ath HGa
Street, JackaoesWle, very hra
oT the grnat ely ftthm fe-
idestries. w
The AOWta Ga. it the
XMtabe RuP&Ada in
the center
f Trade of the tlehd-


fg open naval b fte wah e


The Industrial i- J JO in receipt of
a letter from a rN *f ( pentine sa
doing business is iW emp 4 towa
in- Florida, p letter
written by 4 sW in
another place, to eg rg-
ing him to quit tWlhs e,, to him,
alleging that the # p a..a better,
the ground drier, pad Nos tY er than
where he now TwaV Th | goes fur-
ther ad assr to M t with
sevral of his a ad induce
them also t s bad enough
i a ala eion g eM met stop here.
The letter p ta t( the a aMr-
e s at l~ Oas) ia the
way ofS 's U U f. W
too pm -
will ferl g r


Thr s a free country. Me Y ae i
bety to hire themselves .6 to whom
tSey plo-m, and no man can say them nay
"- when men have entered e senitracto
j4oa stated period, and tIr aployers
ae undertaken to dato -gtla 0ounat oa
waeh, relying upon SIes to eary oat thekl
qplaoets, for other ean eo in and
liveigle them away sim those eon
tracts expir, just Wre their employee
naed their services megp. rvices for which
they have paid, seal secure whi
-oe sacrifice has bwpjw4s, it is tei
-ar the honest men ina th beusinea t
Isire some action to MM o-n1aen -eye


THE WREMLY INDUBlTKIAL BBCORD.


handed sad detetable methods.
Probably there is no matter or more
vital interest to the turpentine men in
this territory today than this one of in-
veigling away help. We, therefore, aug-
get that when the operators meet in
September strong action be taken against
it, sad a committee be appointed on leg-
islation which should bring it before the
legislatures of the various States within
it territory.
Mu d has been aid against peonage.
The crime again the fraternity of tur-
p ntine me by such men as the who
write letters lie the one above alluded to,
is much worse tan peonage, taken at its
worst


CA&ADIAN CROW TImER, LANDS.
During the past few years the timber
limits of Onario have been rapidly taken
up, a a va7y marked increase in the
value of m. property has resulted.
The (-g--p ier of Provincial Crown
lads from time to time makes explra-
tios ad estimates of the ngranted tim-
ber IId e as to enable him to ix, for
his ~O gdance, reserve bids, whih are,
hows, unannounced. The aes be
dispoed of are then cut up ito small
bofK, er limits, and ae wtmtied in
the i pres; the seg ilaees, or
are put up at p uW isen and
pro bidding the sum a
per square mile declared the
,if the price is above the "reserve
k.S What is called bonus is the price
t pur -haser pays for the rigb toI ob-
tain a license to cut the timber upon any
limit, subject to paying in addition such
annual rents and stumpage dues as may
be fixed by the Government. Prior to
lat December the highest charges were
$3 per square mile a ground rent and
$1.2 per ,lAW feet 9 X. as st p.
The IsAt al e O eoro oren bWO
was ield O ee u ea groerasor
bhr 0, I Mgp for th pnpo16 M Ht
adol thp O-g1 Pat was adv e to
Per saR si and the st we "aes
to pwr )lo feet M.
In s*eO ao "on vIns the priae
brought were mueh n ea as of any pre-
viously resaied by the government sad
they emphasize the fact that the days of
cheap lumber, in that provide, at least
are past. The character of m t of the
timber sold at this time, hwevr, was
specially valuable, and nwedy all the lad
is tributary to the Ottawa River, which
affrds an easy and inexpens mode of
taking timber to market.
The sale of December 9 included 86
square miles of standing timber, for which
was realized the -m of APSW77. The
average price per square me was $4.4,
while the highest prim paid for any berth
-a $3Sm per square mile.

M13 POU KAMiM MO Th OOT-
AtI.


r

h
kr

4
I
I
i
i
s
e
o


A few weeks ago we published an edi-
torial devripive of what had been done in
Franse during the 19th century along the
nes of reforitation by the growth of
the pin maritime. A few lines should be
added to show where it fourisbes and
other details. .
The pin maritime is now planted in
large quantities as a matter of profit by
the owners of sandy lands in Franc,
which are proper yloeated As its name
implies, It peters an expomre to the
sea air, ad doe not object to a subsoil
having a bL bhh impregnation. Thus it
A6* an "NW .


is just the pine tree that cold be culti-
vated to great advantage from Fernandina
harbor, all round Florida's southern coast
to Perdido Bay over against Alabama. It
does not succeed where it meets a tem-
perature below zero for any considerable
time, thus adapting it to our entire South
Atlantic seaboard. Nor will it prosper in
a climate that is continuously dry. A
location subject to severe drouths, with a
dry subsoil in a climate like that of the
northern part of the United States, is
not likely to prove suitable for the growth
of this tree.
There are now 7000000 acres of pins
maritime growing in France, one-third of
which is under control of the government,
and two-thirds in private ownership. The
trees are usually grown in nursery rows,
carefully protected by mulching of some
sort of low, growing shrubs or grain for
two or three years, and then set out in
the plantations. Those who have recently
purchased seeds of this variety of pine
for cultivation in the United States would
do well to consider the essential charae-
teristics of its habitat; also the fact that
in removal from the nursery the roots
must not be exposed so as to become dry
even for the briefest period.
After twelve years they become, under
ordinary circumstances, large enough to
be tapped for resin, which they continue
ot yield for thirty years, and are then
cut for timber.
The lesson of this wonderful one hun-
dred years of experiment is not restricted
to reforestation by means of the pin mari-
time alone, but extends to all woods used
for that purpose, and is that the condi-
tions of the natural habitat must in all
cases be observed in order to secure sue-
case.

TM W1sr AT ST. LOUIS
It js Meraly conceded that the exposi-
tim of the world's development and its
industries now crystallized at St. Louis
is the greatest thing of the kind ever wit-
essed. Other expositios have been more
uniue, more ompact, and more striking,
b nose some up to this one when we
sme to siM and variety.
Every Southerner who visits it has
cause to be pou of the E ctmer of
the displays from Dixie. True, our own
State is not in it, even a little bit; true
the great State of Texas failed to appro-
priate a sum for a decent exhibit, but her
citizens raised $175,000 by popular sub-
scription, and Texas is proud of her snow
there.
Southern exhibits consist of cotton, corn,
timber, oil, coal, iron, steel, the various
commercial earths, etc., and they are dis-
played so tastily that they are attract-
ing the world to our microcrosm of thrift
and resources. An the event which the
exposition celaates was brought about
by a Southern man, and the object sought
was at the time of greatest importance
primarily to the South, it was fitting that
leading Southerners have so heartily taken
part in the enterprise, and though it
would have been a grievous fault had not
the South so nobly responded, it is never-
theless most creditable that our whole
people came eagerly forward in a great
effort to make the fair a great success.
What the South shows is vastly iter-
eating and in themselves are spldd ad-
vertisements of our vast and varied re-
sources, which never fail to impress all
visitors.

DYUgS3 I THRE 3COm.


ANOTHER AUSTRtUIAN mM.a
A Pssile Rival to the Austtatln Smd-
rae for Shekl.
Our readers will doubtless remaam
the article which appeared in the las-
trial Record a short time ago, deeaipiv
of the Kauri resin, of Polynesia, and M
peculiar development as a basic for do-l
lac. It seems that quantities of a ga
have been found in Quaeesland, Antrli
possessing some of the baracteritaes of
the Kauri resin. We quote from the le-
don Oil and Colorman's Journal, of July
9:
"A sample of a supposed Kawl rem
from Queensland was recently forwarded
to the Imperial Institute by the Agas-
General for Queensland with the euest
that its commercial value might be ameer-
tained In the letter accompanying the
sample it was stated that the material
was 'thought to be a species of Ka ,'
and that it was obtaiable in fair quasi-
ties in Queesland. The resin as beae
examined in the Sientifi ad Tesaml
Department of the Imperial Institute, ad
has given the following results:
"The sample consisted of a ml O"
rounded block, weighing about 3 a., ea
posed of a bright yellow tra spait r-e ,
with a number of dark streaks ad opaque
patches scattered throughout its
The material had a pliasat, aremMa
odour, especially when freshly breob R
was almost completely soluble in aleshNl
and ether, slightly soluble in beasie, and
very slightly so in chloroform. The s-
eifie gravity of the resin was 1.M54, it
furnished on ignition 0.13 per ent of ash,
and its acid number was 13&6. These
sults indicated that the material w
quite different from New Zealand Kari
resin, since the latter is only partiaBy el-
uble in alcohol and ether, and a general
has an acid number in the neighbourbee
of 101.
"No information regarding the botamial
origin of the Queensland product was far-
warded with the sample, but the imiity
in the chemical properties of this oe-"
rial to those of the resin known eo er-
cially as 'Australian sandarae' Nmdiat
that these two products might hde a
common origin. Australian samleare so-
curs in commerce in the form of smal
light yellow tears, and is obtained frm
various species of Callitri, the meet b-
portant of these being Calitris cahrato
and Callitris verrueoes This similarity
of the Queensland resin to Australian e-
darac is shown by the following compara-
tive statement of the principal emstants
of the two resins:
"Queensland resin: specific gravy,
1.0543; acid number, 13&6; soluble in al-
cohol and ether.
"Australian sandarac: Specifie graitty,
1.000; acid number, 135.8; soluble in ale-
ho land ether.
"The chemistry of the resin of Cilitri
Verrucos was made the subject of a seq-
ial investigation in the Scientific and
Technical Department of the Imperial In-
stitute in 1901, the results of which were
published in the Journal of the Chemseal
Society, 1901, p. 1144, and this work has
no been repeated on the Queensalnd resin
The quantity of the latter et fur a-
amination was too small to permit of aa
exhaustive examination of i ts om-i
ents, but conclusive evidene ben n
obtained that, like the resin of afiln
verrucosa, it consists e-entialy e of
aric and callitrolic acids It may, sn-
fore, be assumed provisionally that the
Queensland resin is derived from a species









THE W3KLtY frjbUbkjIWAL oZWRD.


UNIHTD aTAT-E E1mPOaITOvN No. 0**0.
*-- -- aftkomw a c I o
THE ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
MARoH R" 1904.


Bammonca LaiLuni
Do-- M ss.... ............. St,3 Capital Stock paid la..........
t :: : i i Surpl S... ..... ...................
Vds mat tres.................. .M. Undived Proflts., ..................
V-. S. Su ........................... M.a7.Jot Circula.on......... -............
-0I5 1a1Oty BoD ................ l. .6 Deposits....................
3M ".r U.S. Trmarer........... .00000 Totl............ ...........
O s andor DueB otro r E ar ..... 5s es.7l
Tetl............................ *.0ow6.


of Caitris, and that it may be regarded
as a sandare., Sandarae resin is prin-
dpaly employed in the manufacture of
varnishes. For this purpose African s a-
drae obtained from Callitris quadrivalvis
is regarded as the best of the commercial
varieties, and is worth from 00s. to 70s.
per ewt. Australian msadarae, which is
stated to be principally obtlatne from
New South Wales, occasionally appears on
the Eglish market, and recently, owing
to a sareity of the African product, as
been in slight demand at about 356. per
ewL


The Afriaea and Australian sandarae
so far met with in commerce occur in
etateristie elongated light yellow tears,
quite different n appearance from the
large bock form in which the Queensland
resin was sent. The latter, owing to its
unual form, would probably not be
asles at quite so high a price a the
ordinary tear form of Australian eanda-
rwe, and at first it is likely that moe
than ISs. to 30s per ewt. could be ob-
taied for it. It may be pointed out that
thee is practically no difference in com-
position between the Australian and Afri-
an mandarae resins, and the lower prices
obtained for the former are to be aeribed
prinlpally to the irregularity of the sup-
ply from Australia, and the consequent
want of knowledge of this product among
mbscaf.tu.. a using sandarae in this
nmntry."
If the new fnd should develop into an-
ther Australian sandarae, commerce will
bave been enriched by a supply that will
power prices of shellacs, and improved
by a quality that will add variety to
stocks now on the market. As the specific
gravity, aid number nad solubility of this
new andidate for commercial favor va-
ies but little from the other Australian
madaraes, there is no reason why it
hould not fulfill all the conditions of a
Aret ea shellac.


A JOsaING DWG COMPANY.

Te a8mutanM *-anufari C. mpaay, of
Jahemovills alar Its asianes.
The southern Manufacturing Company.
of 755-7-3 West Bay Street, in this city,
hl been incorporated since January 1,
191, ad its business has steadily grown
ever sine. It started out with a capi-
tal of $1200, and the business has in-
resd so much that Mr. Charles G. Har-
ris, its manager, found it necessary to
increase its capital stock. It has, there-
fea, bee reorganized with a capital stok


Woftm
&P O.W
590 0.00
Um)r .00
l.2W.US.I0


of $50,000, with the following officers ad
directors:
B. R. Powell, president.
Charles G. Harris, vice-president and


treasurer.
Henry Ashley, secretary.
The following are the Board of Di-
rectors: B. R. Powell, Charles G. Harris.
D. H. McMillan, R. V. Covington and P.
L. Sutherland.
A reporter went through the estab-
lishment with Mr. Harris this morning. It
fronts on Bay Street, and runs back on
Madison Street about one hundred and
fifty feet. The rear end is two stories
high and is well stocked with drugs, medi-
cines, etc., in fact everything that is to
be found in a wholesale drug store. It is


divided into several departments, among
them the stock rooms, the laboratory and
packing rooms. All medicines known to
the U. S. Pharmaeopia, of approved com-
bination and needed in this latitude are
compounded here. Besides, the frm have
a number of proprietary medicines, among
which may be named Pyne's Chill and
Fever Tonic, which they guarantee will
cure, or money refunded. This they put
up and sell by the cartload.
This is exclusively a wholesale house
and no retailing is allowed. It proposes to
cover the territory embraced in Florida
and South Georgia. With three experi-
enced travelling men on the road the es-
tablishment is kept busy trying to supply
the trade.
In its list of medicines and medical sup-
plies, it proposes to eater especially to
the drug and commissary trade. The In-
dustrial Record commends this house to
its commissary patrons. A number ol
leading turpentine operators and factors
are interested in this company, some of
whom are shown on the Board of Diree-
tors.


A SHERIFF OPP IATOR.
J. W. worthro of Lake County, nSapes
in Trpentie Busaines
Sheriff J. W. Northrop, of Lake County,
has become a naval stores operator and
will hereafter be classed among the mag-
nates of Florida.
Yesterday he closed a deal for the en-
tire plant of C. H. Decker, of Clermont,
Lake County, the transaction taking place
in this city.
The plant is located on the south side
of Lake Louisa and is a valuable property.
There is considerable timber in the vicin-
ity. that is still virgin pine.
Sheriff Northrop is quite sanguine of
success a a turpentine operator and no
doubt he will soon be at the head of the
ladder, for the sheriff is a climber.


Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.


I PRESS TANKS, TUBS,

AVP vTs.
AgLsize, Any ie Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
DAViS9 a UBOPf, PALA.TIA, rLA.


The West.Raley.Rannie Company.

114 W. rorsyth Street, Jackw.vIle, Fla.
A. 9. Wsr. As. AE. Wem. Fa e v ;. W. a. am ei. Vice.l.. N. V. arer. Se. rres.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in
her Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your pwt
Write us and when in the city make our off
headquarters.


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, TgsmtM ON 0 AnTH.

Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. O WB*ill at lowet mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully soliestad. iS quotation*--
thispaper.
KINOAN & CO., LAd.. E. BAY ST., JAPEUOWWII VLA.


Wi


PMveThm


THi CRB


Wells-



5FW


OI amd Ttre


mlYI


it SOWu TVI t IMT 1 I




C. H. HAR.GOAVES CO

WHOLESALE G ROCc

Grain, Hay, Feed

Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men Requir
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORINANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY siLe.L.
Jacksonvlle, Frla


W. J. L'ZUNGE.
Preslbent


J. W. WaDIL
Vloe-Pnrudeat.


IL Gk RYoUS,
Scey a" Tese


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBLE, ALA.


P04SACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.

DCAIERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.

A 01S KEY.esa


----- ---


--






14 THE WEEKLY INMUSTaAL RECORD.


SOUTH


ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY
Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF
; Freight and Caboose Cars,
Brass and Gray Iron Castings.
CAPACITY: TEN CAR. PER DAY.
Located in the heat t of the Lumber District lives us aiva.-
tage of choicest material at lowest cost.


Bethure ": Trae Checks
App arat us. ^ FOR THE
Appara s. IM IDV lll1
The New Process. ( uUMIon mIlo
sr s irt. without oum troyiat the THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
Sftwt r o out. a :b- i O imarnuf "cttres more of them
awty-rwv r 'bi of- o' t.Sl, ati the printing and office
sao Sr 0' ie oplr oses in the South
mmola reatimm- te. a -prt-.. -,w t o mb -e be ,
a oty omoe after comae ftrom o-.
tt : Send all orders for Com-
- .-i sary Checks any color, any
arm a froin> w. o nw oa e denomination, padded or loose
r sWtM produced a" that U lin- I
ABuOLUrr O omDAnMR rMax nR to the
It O m ate by -
.'^ e ,1 ,, ,',h..sa l1destria Record Co.,
tIMAMa!e : l. ,
We an e comprimn o t o tt hae -'.
qnlty or predev. We s-atera output mwJ .r .^ t**==me= es ars
*ad q1upity. ME. .r6g If 00a *N. b atag *f-
The Ve. S.itomUSu t gwuw aC Wv* -t U W*
1, 0."<[
P. 0. Box RALta.GH, N; et lnye i ar_ .ia _
-tela1 g 0tf oUr want..-


I> II I IsIIII I I eIrI I *4 1m11 1111i 11 ernt1 1111144
PEARL WlGOT. P. T. .I MIcARITY. ViWee-Pr. M"ARI STEN. Trn.

SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.
mtvIMs I. wtELC. Mmra.

= florida Timber, Grating &

S UAgricultural Lands.
*
S401-404 LAW EXCHANGE, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
liI I4ISI IIIIllI IIl6 *62111llS IIIIU lIUtln ll

For Prompt elinry SMa Us Yur Crissary CMl Orlms.
KXXXXXX%3C~k 3-------- -


JOHN- HENDERSON, Pre e t. .. THE J. A. CRANFORD, Secretary.

CHATTANOOGA POTTERY CO.,
r actry loc*siadv. Tenn. Jacksonville. Fla.
.Sole Manufacturers of

S. The Herty Turpentine Cups

YOIf you expect to use cups next season place
y our orders now for future delivery, Prices and

S~ information cheerfully furnished on

Cu. C ps, Gutters and all Tools
-i:. .. ..-.. Used in the HERTY system.
Address all communications
he Chattanooga Pottery Company,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Paaguz fiioh '9p + gi---- -trsm


- -4 %L









I4.


THX WEMKLr iz4uDTh1M RRACOiD.t


THE DEIMCRATIC COaVujles0.


SBeacham
Comialm from Pae 1.
Hill--e.a the Nal 8torm Special g WE ARE IN THE MAR
iag ad returning. One or two of them
could not ago the peal train, o k lublies w e Lk.ds Desirabl
oat of business or other interfereess,
but a majority.of them w t. Captai COURSE OF PALE AND MEDI
Hillman looked personally after their com-
fort. The Florida headquarters were at W.W. W.G.
the St. lNchola Hotel, where reserea-
tions had been made weeks in advance. DATE 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04
Al the mem rs of the various committees April 1......... $4.10 $3.90 $3.80 $3.00
from the Florida delegation were elete April 8......... 3.95 3.60 3.75 3.45
by the delegation, o motion of Deleate April 15........ .80 3.50 3.00 3.35
Beard, and the minority member, 6at is, April 22........ 3.80 3.40 3.0 3.25
the for Harst deeges, t of the e- April 29....... 3 0 335 30 3.25
e four d te, ot of May 6........ 3.80 3.35 3.50 3.25
tire delegation of tea, received three of May 13........ 3.80 2.42% 3.50 3.27%
those committee places. The two moat May 20........ 3.85 3.65 3.55 3.35
important committee places, Platform sad May 27........ 3.95 3.65 3.65 3.35
June 3........ 4.35 3.60 4.05 3.30
Crmdetials, went to members of the six June 10........ 4.50 3.40 4.10 3.10
ai d.meted delegation, as was maem- June 16........ 4.60 3.30 4.15 3.10
mrily tlh ea, as they brought to issue June 23........ 4.65 3.30 4.25 3.10
political Auestions involved in their very July 1 ........ 4.75 330 4.40 3.10
elecn in te P July 7 ........ 4.75 3.30 4.40 3.10
eleta in the m y. July 14 ......... 4.70 330 4.40 3.10


&Shacketton

KET TO BUY ROUND TIMBER.


e Tracts For Sale.


.515 Waetdhi~w J


r ROSINS AT SAVAHNAH FOR TWO YEARS.
N 1 1901-0 10 .- l- I.
1904-05 190M-04 1904-05 193-04 1901-05 1904-" 190t-w5 1ib44


$3.60
3.60
3.45
3.45
3.45
3.35
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.85
3.85
3.85
3.90
4.00
3.96
3.90


$3.50
3.35
3.25
3.5
3.15
3.15
3.17%
3.25
3.25
3.20
3.00
-3.00
300
3.00
3.00


$3.35 $
3.35
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
330
3.5



3.80.
3.85


3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
.12
2.95
225
295
2.90
2.90
2.90


$3.30
3.30
3.15
3.15
2.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.25,
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.55
3.55
3.55


3.00 2.9
3.-O .sa



3.05 310
3.10 3.0S
3.10 3.0Q
3.06 3.10
2.85 3.3
2.85 &30
2.85 330
2.80 3.45
2.80 3.45


2MU
2.5
Ln

Lo.5
Lee


3."
I.*
L74,
2.70
2.5.~
2.5

*' 2.


The Ilstrial Record is very proud of '.
Captain llman; proud of his first politi- -._____ M_____A_0_____aALL___b____,t
eal battle ad predicts for him a mosat W ow mr, W 'W 1 W W 1 K
promoting future in the great political


STHE IOVINGTON COMPANY,


wxv Ja^ch .tklle, U 5jla.
Mtg iry, Al., Jiy 17.-Fre ly 2IEW TOI 2-: r UI l
to-day edipletely desroyed the pleat of W S M erchants O '
t? We Sell Merchants Only.
tailing a loss of $200,00, wMly partially
e s .ane. A.& All
The plant has been completed and in
oeration les than a year. The property
ord s- .- d .sid of KIRK & JONES The Bond & Bours Co
thr age dry kiln, a dust hose and a DRUGGISTS. WO.ESA1E ILETAIU
. boiler bouse. There were 300,000 feet of 107 E. BAY ST.
dressed lumber in the sheds and 48,000 1AA
feet of rough lumber in each of the dry MAIL ORDERS SOLI0ITER. H AKfARE
JACKSONVILLE. PLA.
The Alabama Rift Flooring Company -__ Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints. Oils and Glas.
.wM owand by Pennsylvania apitalists. Ar~ ---4re r Stoves, Tinware, .Couintry-Holowamre.
, W. Hogsih,^f Samto9f in.prdi.- a 4o w
dent of thie am*iy, al Thou Palmer, a ,W"T ,AY ,T J;W
formerly of New York, in resident m=an- .
=. "Tailor-Made ShirtsI W __WWWWI W7
,M '*A FIr AT ... --Oi'mm>BAKERi. C W. BAKIUTTsON V, tes BAER &BAA. P.E '
The many valuable bulletins insued by THE KMI- tn nfT FIT D ( Lm..) (CV. E..rMM Co) Gco l .tCo S.T
mal der Stavamot. W-.L. "';"" F LORIDA FREIGHT CLAIM G E0Ii
Ithe agricultl department at Warsing- FOE 301M
tm, en, b the various State experiment-LAIM fl i
.1 stataiek, should have a more general irB S O OAT6.)
nition among the farmers. Tht they f We can collect year Freight Claims agal
~e aet is often the fault of the fme r. Railroads and SteamshIp Compafarmes
Je e in failing to apply for them. Cha 's prasba6kt1 Yoar Mewbershl#p
bWe saee y a worry aime tble. Earsed Wh a ll
the agricultural department are free to iW. II I r t City aed Transportteaee Cmpai es..
j. requesting them regardless of where 216 Dyal-Upchurch Bldg JACKSONVll
They live. The State experiment station 1 | 1 i
bulletins are restricted often to the limit. MS TK
of the tates wherein they are published, I M ;
but thes also go Inally to Washington I | i '| **.y*****g*4g9-g
a ae compiled by the department into W a
ow large volume and are for general You a
gratuito distribution. o r $ Y Want a Sawmill Loation?

a. moMNo Prs-on. H. AILLAD. acMer s L Youou -- You Want any Kind of rleria Land?
W. OWXN. Vie-Pres.
Commercial Bank, ... = Me,, Bus.e s
Lake Cy. Caa *A r Wr"e -
State Depiry. F. S. BLANK J... H. LIVINGSTON
S.BAcm: osl, Fa.. Lare Ctr. rM OOLUMMA, a C.
- - TKl LEAI PsTOa SmaT mE. IsE m t u 1111111 n**ii** 111 >i*





y
-~
u




~BriJ


WHRE WRITINe ADvakIramiS METIOI THE RECORD.


~. *








16
'S 'Ul


TSB WEEKLY INDuIJUwraAL RECORD.


F- S- .


tI Phat at T9-


Istil iC00 ftr dead word is
no new roam. Years before America
was MUtM -ms wm being got-
by the -MM from dead wod ad
limIP IA truth, it is hard to d ay-
thing w which s ma be dy de
omelem by omses,
A low years age things g e e-
meuend to realse the Imelet de mee
in th e ipu ofL turpeatine ad maturall
'prmeeed to see wlet euld be doe to-
wank upplk agoien.
Sei.e.t t *ese s6w hat the Russian
moethda g g rade. Amser-
-imm lfragdwJuw aMld os im a-
-powe 40 t itessmyaking the



Wh -10W what different ways of r-o
leg Via smae end; al uing the
medium for ebtaiing os best;
pe lmp e, te, shualm
The smeeod system-so far am the writ

valves the mention of the turpeime
se, e i company having
patented systems for rP a tIL
The $plt which the wihr N
at Tifts. was bult S a* i
YS pe Met md the

SI OMU e i
* m | a .the *atm d mem l Oa
enmi-ng their --ad tier -ul, ps -
cz'kiiC-CI JC


ing is plant to th Ples Bet Co.strbWto
Company, of ilaBg N. C. A higher sa-
plient or a better advertisemet for this
company enold hadly be imagined than
gaming this eostret, as Captain Tifts
judgment i business matters i highly
valued by the trpentine and sawmill
men of the Southeasterna states.
The buldig is sitated oa the Tift
RailwroS between the Tift Lumber Mll
and the Tftoa Cotto MiD, ad i a sub-
stantially ometrueted edifee two and a
half stores high.
On the ground Soar are the battery of
retorts, eight i number, the kesiving
tanks and a tank asuk In the grat with
a capacity of a thousad gaploe, Which
receives the turpetine from the tak
ad from which the trpretine is pampe
to the still
The tst thing which a visitor mot
is a machine, aknn fs a hag, whilth li
rally eats up large eordwood and daivere
It dhreds a an eadles beHt wJi em.
e the raw material to the tp ef the
- g fea which it am be pIred into
il aretesrt eeds neloaag. By this
'9tm a Wrest can be led in a few
UMMngve_ aeummal eat. The seane
- Nwed for carrying away the

46i0F@ Tift has found an addi-
- K, wich han ot as yet bee
gmlin% bay any turpeatle enstractio
iam, to the writers knowledge. He has
sold his treated material to the TiltM
otton Mills, thus absolutely having a
waste at alL
Oce loaded the retorts an doed4 ad
steam taroed i. Jes at this point dMe
the Bethune appuseis emea into play.
The retort is ed with dry steam from a
Mam-i h pipe wrthoMt ay presmn VI -
am'


It is this point that Mr. Bethune claims
makes the turpentine produced by is ap-
paratus superior to any other. When
the Doctor took up the study of turpen-
tine production he had retort after retort
made and made experiment after experl-
ment, spending years in the search after
the very best system. He found that by
the destructive process a certain amount
of the tar products were infused into the
turpentine and so delicate is that product
that experiment showed that with dry
beat any pressure would to a more or
les extent contaminate the spirits. There-
fore he determined that to produce an ab-
solutely pure spirits of turpentine, ae-
ceptable to the trade and able to stand
any inspection, it was necessary to de-
vise mean by which the turpentine could
be extracted from the wood without any
pressure being used. After many and
laborious experiments he finally achieved
his desire and the Bethune Apparatus is
the reeul
As before stated, there are eight retorts
in the Tift plant. Each of these olds
three-quarters of a cord, making six eords
of wood for a full charge. Running a day
and night foree three full changes wold
be worked through, using e4 Am mos
of wood. The quantity 1ofe i-
of turpentine produced er .-a-immi
naturally with the gsra of W oed --
eassed, but twenty Sma as im wary lar
estimate. Taken dh d me di-
eighteen cords M
dred and sixty gmBo
outlay of the eat *of *te
wages of the two ifn ef Ba--


esmm to go t= -de. A is a
Sea@MlA 1hIt 40a0 m A ma O mdr
-_lig a sages As- i se
Ii i


wineg o@1 lime s. TM
volos AsWm SNO Is SI OO O
wL ha-
- M m


-1 i i - -- -- -- -T _I


- - -l - -I- - - - M A a aA


a. s@WtL. Phfuosul GCRs *P1i0
a ScUS--5 i. Pa. r d. 4~me I







S South ern M



I Com

Corner ot WON OW

SJacksonville,




Wholesale Drugs



, W teComn

w s -c tlhe Twrpelme r Mail tnrae am wll a
h sI' we make pclke a fuaga a SA ec
"- Mari oreners aro 6t


pakmeb -r mr.


mEr AI-o. AmM-O.


e ***


fwutactsnl*g


pany.


In lift


and



nissary Sup

C glad to qgote prices os auythllg I the
Ialty mad cam save you mofty.
es prompt attentlos.
** *tt*tatn a t t t.n__ t t*t*


plies.

drog Hue.



5* **~ti**** a a a a


555555511 5.55Sl553n S 555,,5 95r 1


ai
.4,


--


found to turn into mmmy w ld. an
stumps that have always been lbhd e
an worthless waste.
The Bethune Apparatus i exatdei
controlled by the Pls Belt Oi _mr il
Company, of Raleigh, N. C. The a- l
of the company are A. C. Bethani, pnt-
dent and superintendent; W. C. Dgm)a,.
business manager and treasurer, sn W.
B. Douglass, vice-preideat. Captain Em-
son is ehing agent for Iloria sad Oeer-
gi and may e addressed at Tilf OG.
It should be stated tha this pinn, -
tirely complete with maehiury, depiit
light plant and everything meer ry en-
stalled, can be built for $1E480~, a m
which it should elear with a year pe-
ration.
Intending purchase. of turpeanne W
dueig plants re invited to ingot tg
Bethune system. Th7 prieipal psits
in favor of the Bethme method w e:
Simplicity of construction, eeomomial ar-
rangement, whereby the eost 9f klber i
minimized, rapidity of extraeti the
spirits, the p-ity of the perodet pe
duailty ard dety fom S.9

"" "tb, Paa i
the mesm Mo b pb
mm JAW A sha t r a" -aIer at
era has Amens m M g A-ge -r


-~~ s~~I~- -I-~- l I~_~~~I~~------------ --- ---- -- __ __ __ :: -: :_ : -- - 7-


I


if i is"11h Aild NO 01


-J*.
*, -s
*wei~


7r


s&-~





THE WEEKLY mIUUWIsrIAL RCORD. IT
*nn- -nnrr~in^~iii~^n^nnr^^n^^^n^^^^^ iY^^^ ^^niiinn^i^^'niiiiiiiii


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels

Capital $100,000.
SJACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.

OFFICERS:.
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWEL


DIRECTORS:
C. H. BARNES, J.
L, W. F. COACHMAN.


V. WEST,


W. J. KELLY


Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Arc

McMILLAN BROTHERS'
Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
lose by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS,


SAVANNAH, GA.
MOBILE, ALA.


J 4CKSONVILLE. FLA.
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.


SOFT=H WOBLD'8 LARGLST TRKAK PAPrMa


I. -, I?-IS


J. C. LITTLE,









8I THE WEEKLY IN 1USrKIAL RECORD.
a


Buyers' Directory


Thee advertisers are i this issm. If
you want anything, look through tl
elsmifed list and write to the Arm ap-
aring therein. The Record grantees
a prompt response.

AUTOMOBILES.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlatie National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonvile, Fla.
Central National Bank, Ocala, IFa.
Mercantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Ila.
BRICK
Foster, Geo. R., Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co, The, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
CARS.
South Atlantie Car & Manufacturing Co.,
Wayeros, Ga.
CATTLE.
Palmetto Park Farm, Ocala, Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Larendon, M. W, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
COOPERAGE.
Cannon Co, The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jaksonville Cooperage Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
Quitman Cooperge Co, Quitman, Ga.
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS--WHOLESALE.
Christie-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Sehoeld's Sons Co, J. S., Macon, Ga.
gsta, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
Murphy, T, Jacksonville, Fa.
Sehofeld's Sons Co, J. S., Macon, Ga.
FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY.
Florida Freight Claim Agency, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, FLa.
PJall UkE.
Grand Rapids Furniture Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
GENTS FUV IiSHCBDS_
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Bafrue Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co., Savannah, Ga.
Hargraves Co., C. H, Jacksonville, Fla.
Johnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fa:
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
White, Walton & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co, Jackson;ile, Fla.
Bond & Bourm Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
HARDWARE
Baird & Co., L E., Jackskoknville, Fla.
Bod & Bours Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Brigg Hardware Co., W. H.,Valdosta, Ga.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Oa1la, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co, Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co, J. D., Savanah, Ga.


HARNESS.
MeMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas, W. ., Gainesvile, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro, J. A., Jacksomville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fl
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS.
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fia.
Hamilton, The, White Springs, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
Kendrick House, The, White Springs, r.m
New Victoria Hotel, Jaekoville, Fla.
New Paxton, The, White Springs, Fla.
Oaks, The, White Springs, Fla.
Pritchard House, The, White Springs, Fl
Zahm's European Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Macon, Ga.
JEWELERS
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
Riles, R. J., Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, iFa.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Bowen & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gornto & Co., J. E., Valdoeta, Ga.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jacksonville, Fla.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co, W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. S., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co, Tampa, Fla.
MULES AHD HORSES.
Thomas, W. R-, Gainesville, Fla.
HAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barnes-Jessup Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co, The, Savannah, Ga.
Independent Naval Stores and Export Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
PAINTS.
Baird & Co., I. E., Jacksonville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PECAHS.
Grimfiing Bros. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Ocala, F.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Oeala, Fla.
PUMPS
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
TANK STORAGE
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
RAILS
Joseph Iron Co., Isaac, Cincinnati, O.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa,
Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fia.


Fraier, W. W., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H, Oeala, Fla.
Southern States Land and Timber Co,
Jacksonville, Fla.
West-Raley-Rannie Co, The, Jacksonville,
Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville ,Fla
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cypress Tank Co., Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G, Jacksonville, la
Council Tool Co., The, Wananish, N. C.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jacksonville, ila.


TuxPEg Alms P1ROCO
Pine Product Constrntio C., Ta, 91 *
ettevile, N. C.
Pine Belt Constructiom Co, Thl, AAW
N. C.
Standard Turpentine C, Th, JWr TYd.
City.
TuPEl ris STILL
Baker, M. A, Brunswick Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savanah, Ga.
IltUPzIrauls STILL TUBM
Davis & Son., G. M, Palatka, Fm.
TUERPAIjUS VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, la.

Grivot Typewriter Exchang Jaerbm M
Via.
VEINCLESU
McMnrray & Baker, Jacksownilm, ltb
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fl
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jaaekmrilik h
Hess & S1ager, Jacksonville, Fla
Riles, R. J., Jacksonville, Fa.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksoville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, bi.


S_ I! t r I I 11 11 1 1 IItnitl tLI I 111 11 >iII l I 1t ll tll|J|
J. P. WITLaMs. President. J. A. G. CAmon. 1et Vice-PrMeen"
T. A. JaxNImNG, 2nd Vice-President. J. F. DusaNuaT, 3d Vice-Prvaaest
SH. L. KAYTON. Secretary. D. G. White. Treasurer.


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

i IIlL mRES COTTO Fi TO II Oi I R
Main Office SAVANNXHI, GEOR0IA.
Ofric PBIENACOL&A, FLX. r Branch Groeery Homne.
-- anne orre-.e: JACKmoNVILL., FLA. i" COL>MBmUe, OJ.

: Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspeod With Is.
. n1111 111i II inII 1 11 t !Ii1 i111 1-1 11 11111111 ( 1'lll .

This CEt Represests the Famss

"Blakeslee" Gasoline Pump Rig
For
Irrigation, Tank Supply and Drainage Service.


No. I Outfit has a capacity of 45,T gallons in 24 hours.
No. 2 Outfit has a capacity of 1i ,000 ganos in a hours.
Write today tor prices t--
WHITE-BLAKESLEE MANUFACTURING CO.
Blrmisghai, Ala.
-4-
BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will send by express, prepaid, the following:
Four full quarts Lincoln County. Sunnybrook Rye or Bi Horn Rye .. M
Single Bottles .......................... ..................... aU
I will send four fun quarts of Somers' Corn. Melwood Rye, Golde We-
ding Rye, Holland Gin. Ton. Gin, Peach Brandy. Peach and Homey
Whiskey, Gin and Manhattan Cocktails-any of the above for........ SU
One bottle of any of the above .............................. :... ......... ..........
Vour bottles of the following California Wines: Sherry, Port, Mumcat.
Catawba ......................................... ........................... .
Single bottles ...................................... a.
Single bottles ......................................................................
Four bottles Wilson Whiskey, cased.......... ........... (
Single bottles ......................................................................
Five bottles Duffy's Malt ....................................................
Bulk goods of all kinds. Special Prices on appliHation. All kinds
liquors in jugs from SL6S to I.S. f. o. b. Jacksonville.
F. BETTELINI W Bay St., pp. Union Depot, Jacksvmile, FI


THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS RLTAW"CE"







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 19


]1W YORK L93 MARlIKEKT.
Pin, TYrlw (Leag Leaf).
By Sail.
Building orders, 12 i. and under $20O0
to $BM; Builing orders, 14 in. and up,
$M.00 to $200; yard orders, ordinary a-
eortment, $00 to $22.00; ahi stodk,
easy msedules $2S60 to $27.Z0; ship stoek,
40 ft. average, PM0 to $35.00; hert face
siding, 1 i ad 11-2 in, $0.50 to $21o0;
1 in wide boards, heart face, 26.00 to
$8.00; 11-4 and 11-2 in. wide boards,
200 to $30.00; 2 in. wide plank, heart
face, 0.0 to $31.60; kil-dried ap siding,
4-4, $18.00 to $1860; kiln-dried ap ding
6-4, $19.00 to 20.00; yellow p box
boards (knotty), $13.50 to $14. ; yedow
pine stepping, $3800 to 40.00.
By steam, add $1.00 to $10.
Le.g Laef Yellow Pea Fleodag.
lear heart face rift DM&HBk, 13-16
21-4 counted z3, 44.00 to $4.00; "A"
rift DMHBk 13-l 1-4 mounted 1x3,
$3.00 to $3.00; "B" rift DM&HBk 13-16
2 1-4 eouuated 13, $26.00 to $27.00; "A"
Flat DM&HBk 13-16I21-4 counted Iz3,
$21 0 to $250; "B" Fat DM&HBk 13-
ls2 1-4 counted lx, $19.50 to $050; No.
1 Commsi DM&HBkl3-1x2 1-4 counted
lx3, $18.50.
or 11-8 in. add 2.50. Steamer ship-
ment o last grain fooring $1 less per
thouam d than above pries.

Cypress Price Current F. 0. B New York
Market. Immber rough or dressed:
Tank stock, 11-2 to 3 inhes, $48.75 to
$65.75; Firsts and Secoas, 1 to 3 inches,
$44.5 to $8.75; Selects, 1 to 3 inches,
$85 ft $45.2; Shop, 1 to 3 inches, $9.25
to $40.2.
For prices o 8 inch add $1 per 1,000 ft;
on 10 inch add $2 pr 1,000 ft; on 12 inch,
add $3 pr 1,000 ft.
Bevel ii 1-2x inch lear, D to A,
$11.76 to $24.5; ceiling, 3-8x4 or 6 inch
clear, D to A. $1325 to $24.5; 1-2x4 or
inch elear, D to A, $18.00 to $27.0; 5-84
or 8 inch clear, D to A, $2P25 to $3.265;
Flooring, drop siding and ceiling, 4 or 6
anch, D to A, $27.75 to $43.75.

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Best in the Werd.
PFr d"iveapri write,
Cnresa Tak Co., Mobe.Ala




MAuERACTUREB 01


BRICK.



Capacity of Yard 800.000 Per Month.

IE3 MJ.

TRE CANNON COMPANY
CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Ow Spirit B MeAb hald ad w pW a the se-
.vet A.a.ica med a unopean in.pectio..

Plats at m GS, CAIRO, OUTMAN, GA.,
and MONTICELLO. FLA.
Adm. aordea R f haome ofi*o,
QUITMAN, GA.


Business Directory.

FIRE INSURANCE-Lowet rates. La-
ren H. Green & Co, 9 aad 10 Park Bldg
Jacksonville, Fla. Sme.
JOHN ZAHM'B RUROPAN KOTBZIE
1 1. Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant. Nicely urndaed
R*oms. Open day and abnht. Bettll's
old stand.

M. W. LARENDON,
Naval Stores.
Commission Merchants.
Rosnr, luPtP .uir TAR, PITCH,
GUM THUS, IC, TC.
138 Frsat Street, NEW YTORK


ILlY MOITIOMIRY,
Comntmissiton Merchants,
Naval Stores & Cotton
IJbeal avanem male agait ap-
menata. Consigments nsit.
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
NEW YORK CITY.

New Victoria.
Corner ain ad Adams,
Opposite Board of Trade Bilding.
Jack vie's New HeteL
Rates $sao teo $.50.
BIXLZE, Proprietor.


Typewriters
All Makes--10.0 Up.

GRIVOT I-U"ln""

The World-beater. OLIVHr. writes In sight.
The JEWC T. King of double-board ma-
chines.
SM to $60 Saved a Amy Make of Typewriter.

Quitman Cooperage Co.,
QVITMAN. GA.
Manufaturers of

HIGH CIDE SPIRT BARRIOS
According to specifoations of
Board of Trade, Savannah.
Also make
Dip and Syrup Barrels.

J. E. GORNTO & CO.
Shipping Trade
a. Specialty...


Pumping Outfits
Turpentine Stills-
WITH FIRE PRO s C a iON CONNECTIONS.
Best PUMP in the World
From 40 to 700 Gallons of Water per Minute.
Write or call on
FRED E. GILBERT,
Automobile Headquarters
29 West Forsyth St. Jacksonville, Fa.




Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advertisemets Will e Iaserted As Thrs aDertment at tim raieowsr Itg s:
For one week. 2 ets a line.
For two weeks, 35 oaeesa le.
For three weeks, So ents a Ule.
For four weeks, - Gents a Ule.
Nine words of ordinary length make one lie.
Headi counts as two linen.
No dis y except Lthe headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of pa r
containing advertisement. Copy mut be in this offce not later a Thmn dy
morning to secure Insertion in Friday's paper.
ME


Stiller Wasted.
An experienced turpentine stiller want-
ed Man with family preferred. Address
Fletcher & Murrell, Altman, Fla.
Wasted.
Wanted-Small turpentine farm of 5 to


Tarpeatlue Mea.
Buy a Blakeeles Gasolnl Pn~pig Ot-
fit for your atil No. 1 otrt pumps 2,P
gallons per hour at a eat of I eate md
requires o attationm while rnnu
Started in oa miint. J. OapbAl
Oeal, F a


10 crops, with additional timber for 20 Fltre R legstered S AortAer Blls
crops. A. 0. Wright, Industrial Record
office, city. Oe is half bhar to "Barty By,"
who was elanpled at tsie Taesa dew.
AStillr ih s alJf-hnsther to -r IS pald
Stiller Wasted. cow, "Mary Spear" All god and ready
Prefer a young man who has a very for imnmns serves. h-Pi $18 to
good education and a fair knowledge of $175~., mb hj to farf s Ml
turpentine business. LI T. Hardee, Mulat, Palmetto Park Stock Farm, Z. C. Cham-
Fla. 2t. bliss & Co., proprietors, Oeak, Fla.


W. T. RILEY,
President.


J. A. 6. C"RsoN,
Ycke-President.


6E@. A SCOVEL,
Se.mE Fdress.


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.

MANUFACTURERS OF

BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS

Machine and Hand Factories.

8th Street R. R. Crossing.


JACKSONVILLED


FLORIDA


f $3 Orner aol nr, Ezr Prop


WHISKIES

FROM $1.50 TO $6 A GALLON
Sole Agent
Old Sarato Rye, $6 Gal.
OMl Bier Rye, $ Gal.
OM Westimrelaid Rye, $4 Gal.
Big Hrn Rye, $3 Gal.
J. E. GORNTO & CO.,


Vallesta,


Geeria


East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a specialty.

WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


THX RECORD'S SPACE HAS A BIG MONIY VALUE.




U THE WEEKLY 1NMUUtr)lHAL RECORD.
Pi ;Aem l W. C. POWEJLL: Vie-Preddemtsu who wi th the Presdent eomdtat the Dtrectory and Board of MIaraa, W.. COACHMAN. B. 7. BUL-
tLARD, H. L COVINOT ON, H. A. McE CHKRN, JOHN R. TOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD. D. H. MeMnILAN. C. DOWN-
ING J. SAUNIERB. C. B. ROKG R; Auditor. JOHN HENDERSON.
* -


OON IDAT[D NAVAL TORES 1 PANY,


lacksonvill, fla.


SIvann, 1 .


N0 wA1a [i.


~~ NRAtAL STORES FACTORS.~


m ii fa S1c ,0W.


Ow I Coirllold Pi Ra ical oais


i bmu l Ol ilc Ytl R teel Io 0 ill to 0 is Wo 0ol Ome l I bi.


1Te Colioldu is Pl el n aCootier l COimwpn.


I fli Piducers.


1ls In ore1 enhcal With ihMs


he Palronaoe I ITuenline Operalos eItfdllere laM


PIM O01 MIMN anI Plen ol llmr or EveuItoOU .


YAoS AT JACK SOIVLL, SAVANNAH, FER ANDINA \n d PENSION AI.


All Pobcers are i tnv ild o Col o Coieso


"THB PIN AND ITS PRODUCTS.








THE WEEKLY mIDUUb'rlAL RECORD. 1I


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Comm-inary Trades.)

The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 21
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 22
S10 .. 25
A C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 11

Lard
(Compound Tin.
60-lb tin.... Market
S 50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
5 -lb tin. ............

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 16


sdranulated


Sugar
Sugar, bhls..
5 bbls..
10 bbls..
sacks..


580
525
525
580


Coffee
S Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per Ib.................. 80
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
ease, per Ib............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 12
Green Coffee, medium ...... 11
-Green coffee, common....... 10
-Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
Ib packages....... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
agfl............. market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum ....... 12
Ground coffee, 10-lb pail.. 15

^ Tea
Extra fine quality.
- Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 50
English B'fast, 10 lb.. 45
Formosa, 10 lb....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10c size
10 Its to case, per pound-.. 40

Salt
200-b sack............... 100
100-lb sack................ 50
Ice Cream, 200lb sacks..... 100
S 100-lb sacks..... 50
Pocket Saltin bbls., 8-lb.... 265
46" " 2-lb.... 275

Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin.............. 15
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box
sifter top, per doz...... 40
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and 80

Corn
10 Sk Lees me
Car Lot Lot Sk
W.Corn,llOlb, 1 38 140 1 48
1001h, 1 24 126 129
Mxdcorn,ll01b,1 88 1 8 188
1001b. 21 128 126


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


Car Lot
W clip'd,1251b,2 20
S 1001b,l 75
White 1251b, 200
White 100lb. 1 60


100 Sk
Lot
2 22
177
202
1 62


Les 1M00
Sk Lots
225
180
205
165


Mixed 125lb
100lb,
Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice..... 1 60
t " fancy..... 165
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 565
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 lb sack.........5 65
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 5 65
Pillsbury's Bet ..... 6 00
S Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 5 75
bbl.... ....
Meal
Meal, per barrel............8 50
92-lb sacks...........1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 8 60
" 92-lb sacks....... 1 60
Rice
Good...................... 5
Choice...... ............ 5.
Fancy Head............... 6
Broken................... 81


Canned Vegetables

Tomatoes, 8s, Chief........ 85
Tomatoes, 2s 6...... 67
Clayton, 3s................ 80
Clayton, 2s ............... 65
Sifted Peas, 2s ...........1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........ 1 20
Lima Beans,2s ............1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2P .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8 ........... 90
Baked Beans. s ........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............ 1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets. 3s...........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ............. 85
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s ............. 90
Hay
car lots 100 bale less
lots quastit]


Choice.... 19 50
No.1 Tim 18 00
No. 2 17 00
No.1 C'ler 17 00


2000
1850
1780
1750


2050
1900
1800
1800


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
tocase, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case.
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 7
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
Ib.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
aborted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 81
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice " '"
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lh. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. case 8 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
bt.x, 40-50 ............ 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, F0-60............ 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 75
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 80
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 11
Citron, 10-lb box ........ 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 6)
BstraHP, .... 5
Seed Peanuts, "
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes........ 11
Almonds............ ..... 18
Brazils ............. 12
SPeaeans.................. 12
Filberts................... 12
alO nuts.................. 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 Lesso00
lots Sk. Lot Sk. Lt
Cottonseed Meal 27 00 27 50 2800
S Hulls 1150 12 00 12 50


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Wooden ware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
8 hoop.........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per do. ......1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 0O
4 nested......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. a0
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. .1 20

Washboards
78 Crown Combination..... 2 .
178 Blue Jay...............8 00
175 Diamond Glass ........8 5
O. W. D., 17 inch, per doc 1 6
Clothes pinsa five grow to box 16
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
doz. ................. 95
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per came ........ 3 00
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8
Salmon ls, Tale 4 do to cae
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to case,
per doz Col. River ... 235
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fsh 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 8 0
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
Ibs to box............ 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge ... 141-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avg .. "4
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avgp .. 1l1.-
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7- avg.. *-4
"Reliable" California Hams, 6-8
Breakfast Bacon, light av.. .:.. I-
D. S. Bellies, 16-18 ar. ........ 34
D. S. Belis, 20-22z ar. ......... 1-2
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av. ......... 81-
D. Plates .................. 71-2
Bacon Pates .................. 81-
D. S. Butts .................. 4 -
Bologna Sausage ............... I
Sausage in oil ................ .75
Butter aud CMSS
"Strawberry- Creamery, W-lb tbae a
3-lb taas U41-
Sera, Is... Wl-S
"Ladybird" full aram chees .. 11-t
Kiangaa arL
"Indiana" Pure Leaf ...........
6ea-Foam" Compond .........m am t.
KiBna's Cannm MIeta.
"Reliable" Corned Beef, la ...... IJ.
Corned Beef, 2a ......
Roast Beef, Is ........ LU
SRoast Beef, s ........ -
Potted Ham and TounV -
-4s ....................... .
Sliced Beef, 1-2@ .. .. I.u
Vienna Sasaga, a ..
Tripe .................. Lo


ET A COPY OF TI RiAVAL STO1K8 BLUI WOOL-


. -* o "


,Vol1


r









__ "THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.





I Industrial Record's Department of Information |


This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers ad advertising patrons of this paper and no

charge i made for any informati supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, a

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention

For TrpmmenaSnImmnai r r Fastry SnUaples Miusiiry fo Any K FL r Timter Farmtn Ramage Laus.
DATV INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main Omce, Jacksonville, Fla. I am n the market for lands for the purpose of
Itheaetfor the follow Prefer in State of Please pt me i comacto
with responsible parties and give me other information.
Remarks
Pleae notify where sm ea be secured.ne
Sign-n

State specuIy the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or aseond-handed. DATE
Lenrs e far Tmrpmnat. 8aasi w Fastory. aw r A my inhdurtil btaorprWm. Fr Comdislr y. Oy te l r emmbeN Snumpe. sawmm o Ta rpefsntim M
DATE
INDUSTRIAL M CO D. J&casMile, Fla DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fta.
Please advise the pnereigned regarding a good location in (state or section of
state) for In the market for
together with fun information about labor conditions, taxes, transportation facilities,
tebol aothe*.t, ete.
eark Please give me Information as to best places to buy, etc.

Signe Signed


ge YO Wat t son SeoatIng? Are Yom TbMt*Ict of Iveting ?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksoaville, F1. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville. Fla.
Have for sale the followig Can you give any information as to the reliability of the following Arm or Oorpora
tlon
Remarks
Can you suggest a purehaser?
Signed Signed


M You Wagt to E-mpy a Moy? we TYe Wnt Empsleymn?
DATE DATE
IIqWSTRIAL gCcORD. Jacksaille, Mti. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Want a man to a the position of Want a position as

with the following requirements Refer to the folowing

Ca you suggest sch a man Can you assist me?
Signed Signed




CLIP THIS COUPON !
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD.
When you are anweruing an bhratiiamnt from the columns of this paper, whether you re making an inquiry or placing an order, please cut out the coupon
below ad attach it to the letter, h will pay you.

COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the lmjatril emecrd. issue dated

Signed


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonville, Fla., and Savannah, Ga., is the South's great
weekly trade journal.


The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.

U


Ia YOU DoFrT FnD IT i TH RKsCORD WRan U&








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. U
m -I


McMURRAY & BAKER,


riM III I ti1 HIMs. liniii TwMehrHwl
-We ase reesham aip ste--D o as pleas aoss vehei IS
SM rbes wuipb hrnee a n e h ic ram we have a t Me
a" ae toI sh with all. Tatrptn wagomn sad Learnes a speelalty. De*t
rget we can beat the wormd eb and-a0de hams.

Mi IBE, 41 L .E BL S.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHA cLtESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
Sh maglnct teliiis ef tbU he are appilted to snal a follwa calling
at Charlest, & C. both way.
Vrse. Now romr, wrs.. iasoe svu lo ar
~tr as rm nt ). owAna.. Charlefstl and New York.


TmSday, June 14, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ....Sunday, June 19 at 9:00 am
Wednesday, June 15, at 3:00 pm-x*ONEIDA ......Monday, June 20, at 9:00 am
Wednesday, June 15, at 3:00 pm..ALGO NQUIN ..Tuesday, June 21, at 11:00 am
friay, June 17, at 3:00 pm .APAC E .... Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'n
xSEMI NOLE ..Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'n
Mmiay, June 20, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Saturday, June 25, at 1:30 pm
Wednesday, June 22, at 3:00 pm..COMANCHE ..Monday, June 27, at 4:00 am
xHURON ........ Tuesday, June 28, at 5:00 am
Friday, June 24, at 3:00 pm... .IROQUOIS ..Thursday, June 30, at 6:00 am
Tuesday, Jne 28, at 3:00 pm .... APACH E ..........Sunday, July 3, at 8:00 am
x'ONEIDA ..Monday, July 4, at 8:00 am
Thursday, Jne 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Tuesday, July 5, at 9:30 am
saturday, July 2 at 3:00 pm ..OOMANCHE ....Thursday, July 7, at 11:30 am
HxSEMINOLE ....Thursday, July 7, at 11:30 am
Tuesday, July 5, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ......Sunday, July 10, at 1:00 pm
Friday, July 8, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ......Wednesday, July 13, at 4:30 am
**ZxURON ......Wednesday, July 13, at 4:30 am
Saturday, July 9, at 3:00 pm ..ALONQUIN ......Friday, July 15, at 6:00 am
Tuesday, July 12, at 3:00 pm .COMANCHE ......Sunday, July 17, at 7:30 am
*xONEIDA .........Monday, July 18, at 8:00 am
friday, July 15, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS ......Thursday, July 21, at 11:00 am
*xSEMINOLE .... Thursday, July 21, at 11:00 am
Tuesday, July 19, at 3:00 pm .APACHE ......Sunday, July 24, at 12:30 pm
Wednesday, July 20, at 3:00 pm .ALGONGUIN ... .Tuesday, July 26, at 4:00 am
Friday, July 22, at 3:00 pm ... .COMANCHE ..Wednesday, July 27, at 4:30 am
*xHURON .... Wednesday, July 27, at 4:30 am
Tuesday, July 26, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, July 31, at 7:00 am
*xONEIDA ......Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 8:00 am
Wednesday, July 27, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ......Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 8:00 am
Friday, July 29, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ......Wednesday, Aug. 3, at 9:00 am
Suday, July 31, at 3:00 pm .... "ALGONQUIN ... Friday, Aug. 5, at 10:30 am
!xSEMITOLE .... Saturday, Aug. 6, at 11:30 am
-lteighdt eny. *-Boston via Charleston and New York.
m--Botom via Brunswick Charles ton. Boson, via Charleston.
THE CLYDE. NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
SMie"t serve letwemn Jasr- ul, eato am Fo Prvimet e A d an u s
n Pl.n Omllns at CLharlesto nRt ways.
tI .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... .. .... ..From Lewis Wharft Bas
r'athlS d.. .............. .. .. .. *... from foot of Catherine Street. Jacuovlll
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
ietiween Ja-Eksvn asl fste&r.
SIeppis at PaIatsa, Astor, St. Francis. Berestord (De Land) and lntermediate
Iamlsns n a t. Jobhn rver.
STEAMER "CITY OP JACKSONVILLE"
il aweaited to all as follows: Leave JaLksonvlle. Sunday, Tuesdays and Thurs-
day, 8: p. m. Returning, leave Sanford, Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays : ai. m.
mu a 2M mJtJu.[ NORTHBOUND,
ald down, I Read up.
LeTse : p. mi .....................Jacksonville............... ..... Arrive S4- a. m.
-saos 1: p. .......... .. ......Pa'-lth ...... Leave 4** p. m.
Lave 8 a. ml........... ............Asr................ ............ Leave 2 p. m.
Lsave 4: a. m. ...... .... .. ........St. Franels.............. ......... Leave 1: p. m.
...... ...........I .. ........Bereord (Demand)...................... Leave 1n- noon
Arrve s: a. m..........................nford............ ..... ...... ILeave :3 a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m................................. prise...... ...... 10:00 a. m.
&aWRIAL PAWqSe U t AND TICKl T OflICL. -84 W. any St.. Jaek*ifle.
P. 'L TRONMONOMP. JR.. Asst. Gent. Pass Agent. 2t W. Bay t.. Jacksonville. Vla
W. 0. COOPR,. JR. Local rt. Ast Jak'vllle. C. P. LOVELL Ast. Spt.,Jaek'vll.
root Hogan Street. Jacksonvile.
A. C. HAGUO RT. G. I. P. A., New York. CLYTD MILNT. . A., New Yoert
911O. 1 0Mln I P. CLoYDm A cO.
Oensral Maager. General Agents,
lCheeebresg Buldlag. t state Street. xew r ort.


Warn TEE RECORD FOR ANY IMOKAUTION DESIRZD


ue. of this .
The e will be
he sptee0 of th port are n


,ak~~-r(te the~ rome oof 0o t s'
Amerlea's Lemlta Trae Je-rwta.
fits wit p mleers. jo
The Wely Industrial Record of Jack- .
sonvelle and Savannah has taken its place
amoig the leading trade Journals in the
United 8ta. and as an authority on lum-
ber od naU stores It to being quoted not
eonly by the bet and most carefully edited
0l Papers in this country, but by thooe
o l rope also A London trade paper
ahing this ofice yesterday *gie liberal t
apsao to the Record*a views on market con- Lv
'ttoo. lot|
Thut week's toee of the Induetrlal Rec- a"*
rd i even better than usual, and it lto h
a strog and entrtaAnlan general Indus. trik
trial newpapr, in addition to Its value He
as the champion of the two speelSo Iadus- vs .
tries tt represents. It is briaal of new Joh
toeres of development ina hm o9theast. plah
emn tethem belg the steor of & bhalf-ill- fend
a4dolla eorgcoration aoranlsen in Jack- 06
aoevlle yester. and th oreanIsation of Hi.
eral otr corporations during the and
It has set the sace or eo terprip and It Wan
el serve the great ure of saees wick
St 1s roevtlng. both hin it subertption and
adverthiin departmnents.arrylng as It does.
peihapa ooe oa the largest advertising pVt-: ,
ra rse st re to any of thme Snuthe tra ,

.u

SD-las. whob This
d seamm
-- - - - ----- -- dS



SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.LITY.
o l
30 YEARS RELIABILITY. a
Hess & Slager,
SDiamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry
CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND I A 13 MAIN.
o mu-6 r.o- -b6-yr"-b-IS-nob-s .r."-- r-r- rm- rrnrs


Naval Stores MarKet

and Stock Report
Published Daily in The



Jacksonville Metropolis,
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe fr it now.

$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.


BIG PRIZES:

A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposition, to
Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.


Carter & Russell Publishing Co.

Jacksonville. Florida.









J I CROSBY, resMint


.THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


- -


C n FULLr^ Vio.presaieet


JASF LAMM010I


Greenleaf f

Crosby Conpny


Diamoed mand *I.berr
Stores


Fine Gold Jewedr


3ouder% alU

4boibr~mtnizt


41 West Bay Stret

JadMonvitle

Tan beg" end fst siss is -d et an
5 .aftiss. N e soniu e Insah mollres


American and Foreige Waech
and Clocks


Sterlin Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


Fine China Dimer Sets a
Fancy Pieces


Write for Cataloge


European Novelties


- Lz ~iI-4-
S.- ,-.


---- -- -- u- ****-:e* -T 6--a

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO."
of Wanaalsh. N. C.,
rbuly o Co a's statioa, C. a.. st set Dliamed Ed
Hacks at WIA Black Joe at Standard at If4, Old Style and Patent
PWllrs at LS a deme. They hold average a little better than ever.
We hae broht out a new brand, the Blue IJne Hack at SL and Pul-
er at W. which are warranted. Al wholesale dealers n naval stores
.pp.s carry our N.a and should pply Ogpertors.
-------------*-- <-- mrm
Ia G. McKETHAN, PIdMa. ALFRED A. McKETHAN, Lt U. S N.
Ja..,m e. 1t. Bsetd See'y and Tre..a CoaBtrcUng
Eginer. Pagetterlle N. G.

Pine Product Construction Co,
Fr~yttevile. N. C.
sprltos of Turpetine, 011 of Tar. Cre ste, Tar Disinfectants: Wood Preservative.
Paata, Wood states. Itc.. ad Charel. from Lihtwood Stumps, Box-facings.
Prdts Incareaed. Thas of dstllation rduced. Condenaatio controlled at will
N dame from fire. Plant eected complete. and men taught the process. Fur-
tMr Ibtrnmaton. wrtte Alred MacKethan. general manager, rayettevile. N. C.
am EM NEMIRIALS II MARBLE, STONE AI BRONZE
Irlo the sille Tablet to the mot elaborate Mausoleum.
Write, or come to see as-our desans will please you.
SOUTHERN MARBLE AND STONE CO.
IrEn rmen nB LUMMA. Nman.er
Cut so ...* r buldie W 4 Se -l e Street
Jaesm a ~e. a r.
Anyshvaii Stan, Marble, Mesaic a" Tile.


-p---------- -j


-4~Y~~~1 C ID-SI,'~


HOTEL BARTHOLDI, b*R w.AY AD ST.,
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout.
Near all Big Stores and Places of Amusement. Cars Pass
the Door for all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings.
argue a ample Boom& for Commercial Travelers: Here you
nd no raod and magnificent decorations: no luxurious
grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fre, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
Speak to Yee. No Employees Ia Aev Way laatrtetative.
Bat just a cosy. home-like lttle hotel that wll appeal to the
heart of those who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plain American cooking. and affable and courteous treatment.
7TM RMr PgrdNe ,.
-- --- -- 006 000 0000000000";i -~---r--


SWNWW Wy WW Ily III IT WIT IwI III Tww w W1WWWW
John R. Young. Pre ldent. C. I s. Vi... .fal.
J. W. Motte. Jr. Secretary anOd Trssrm .t

The ELLIS-YOUNG COO


Commission Merchants

NAVAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.


J.W. HUT. President. J. a HAnBIS. 1 V. Press. H.I. BRamanro ge., Ie.na '
P. L. PSaocK, 1st V. P W. J. KmI.Y, 3d V. P. D.R. WLajm Aeio, A o

Peacock-Hunt & West' Cmp ;
Gen, ral Offies .w 2 Bay Seetn. ,sel Ga.
}west au i NiL, ,1 Ia.L
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is musial.m
never take to account, nor are we interested in any eompeny tha h pe
Turpentine and rosin.)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tels and Naval Stres Hardware Our Spee
-SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebated UAin Iurpent in Axes and Wlbi"
Philadelphia Wates.' r

Naval Stores Received at Savaanah. Ga., amd JI
and FemandlNua, Fla. *
S '. '.


C


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