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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00080
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: July 16, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00080
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text






For the Week Ending July 16. O190i r IAR
W UL 19 1904




WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL Rftt D.



Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

MWoet Sewt. 12t1. 1902, b the Exectlrve Committee of the Twrpestlte Operators' Asseclatio as Its Exclasive Oficial Orga, sad Adopted Seat. lta 1902, Ia A mmal Ceo-
nulaies. a a Offiial Orgas Also of the general Association. Adopted Sept. I It, 19.03, as the elyf Offcial Orgas ot tkh Turpelnne Operators' Ass ciatr e.
Adopted Aprl 27t. 1903. as the Oficial Orga of the Inter-State Case Grewers' Associatleo. ERsdrsed by the Georgia Sawmill
Association. Official Organ of the Southeasters Stock Grower's Associatoen.


V1L 9. NO. 2. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ATLANTA, GA. SAVANNAH, GA. $3 A YEAR.


The Geological Investigations

Arranged for Current Yearo

(Prepared for the Industrial Record by Harriet Conner Brown.)
------------------ wa***--


The field work of the division of geolo- r
gy and paleontology, United States Geo-
logial Survey, for the season of 1904 will
cover investigations in many States. Dr.
C. WilWard Hayes, geologist in charge of l
geology, has general supervision of this
work. Some of the most important of the
numerous parties in the field are here
mentioned.
Geneml Invetigationa
Besides investigations confined to the
imits of one or two States, several lines
of work will be taken up that will cover
wide general areas. The glacial geology
of the United States will be studied by
Prof. T. C. Chamberlin, who will have the
asmstanes of Messrs. R. D. Salisbury, W.
W. Atwood, F .H .H. Calhoun. Frank Lev-
watt, W. C. Alden and F. W. Taylor. The
gCl areas in the Rocky Mountain Re-
gion will be carefully investigated by
.Professor Salisbury, -assisted by Messrs.
Atwood and Calhoun. A monograph on
the Pleistocene formations of the lower
pmninmsla of Michigan and adjacent por-
tios of Indiana will be completed by Mr.
lIeerett. Mr. Alden will map portions of
mantheastern Wisconsin for folio publica-
tio
The pre-Cambrian and metamorphic ge-
olgy of the United States will be studied
under the direction of Prof. C. R. Van
HiMe, who will also complete his report on
the'geology of the Lake Superior region.
In this work he will be assisted by Messrs.
C. K .Leith and W .N. Smith. He is also
directed to continue investigation of the
metamorphic iron-ore deposits of the Uni-
ted States, particularly those of the Rocky
Mountain and Great Basin region.
Other general investigations covering
several States will be conducted by Mr.
K. Eckel. He will complete a study of
the cement industry of the United States
sad prepare a report in which special at-
tention will be paid to the geologic and
economic relations of the industry. Mr.
Eckel will also complete an investigation
of the slate industry of the United States
dirqting the work of Prof. A. H. Purdue
in Arkansas and Prof. T. N. Dale in Vir-
ginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Penn-
sylvania, Maine and Vermont.
The Missiappi Valley.
Several States will be included in an
investigation to be made by Mr. H. Foster
Bain, of the lead and zinc deposits of the
Mississippi Valley. He will make a spec-


CI


S.


rence and economic importance His spe-
itfic task is to examine the lead and zinc
lelmsits of the upper Mississippi district
n Illinois. [own and Wisconsin and to pre-
pare a preliminary report upon this dis-
trict. In addition lie will examine certain
.opper deposits in Shannon County, Mis-
souri. associated lead and zinc ores in St.
Genevieve countyy and in the Mine La-
inotte district, and the St. Clair and Gran-
by mines in southwestern Missouri. He is
also directed to reexamine the more im-
iwrtant lead and zinc mines of the western
Kentucky district and to make a recon-
naissance examination of the lead and
zine district of the Appalachian Valley in
Virginia and Tennessee. Mr. E. O. UI-
rich. who is directed to investigate the
Silurian and Ordovician paleontology and
stratigraphy of the northern Mississippi
valley, will co-operate with Mr. Bain in
the study of the lead and zinc deposits of


that district.
Alabama.
An areal and economic survey of the
Brookwoodl quadrangle, Alabama, will be
made by Mr. Charles Butts, who will be as
listed by Mr. Hoyt S. Gale. They will
probably also begin work upon the Jas-
per quadrangle. Alabama.
Arkansas.
Prof. A .11 .Purdue will make an areal
and economic survey of the Winslow quad-
rangle. Arkansas. If time permits, he will
also make an economic investigation of
tle developed slate deposits of Arkansas.
California.
The areal geology of the Redding quad-
rangle. California, will le revised by Mr.
J. S. Diller. He will also complete an
real and economic survey of the Indian
Valley Special quadrangle, California.
Mr. Arthur C. Spencer will co-operate
with Mr. Waldemar Lindgren in making
an investigation of the economic geology
of the Redding quadrangle. California.
An areal and economic survey of the
Tejon quadrangle. in southern California
will hle made by Mr. George H. Eldridge.
He will also make for correlation purposes,
the necessary reconnaissance examination.
of regions adjacent to this quadrangle.
The areal and economic survey of the
Santa Cruz quadrangle. California, will
be completed by Dr. .T. F. Newsom. who
will le assisted by Dr. Ralph Arnold.
Dr-. G. K. Gilbert will continue his inves-
tigations of the glaciology physiography


is study of their genesis, geologic occur- of the High Sierras.


Colorado.
I-nder the direction of Dr. Whitman
(ross, detailed areal mapping will be con-
tinued in the San Juan region of Colorado.
The Ouray quadrangle will be surveyed
and the work extended as far as possible
into the adjoining Lake City qaudrangle.
The survey of the Engineer Mountain
quadrangle will also be completed. Dr.
(ross will have the assistance of Messrs.
Ernest Howe, W. H. Emmons, and Al-
::ert Johannsen.
Mr. .E .Spurr will begin an investi-
zation of the areal and economic geology
,f certain mining districts in Colorado,
chiefly in Gilpin nd Clear Creek counties.
Mr. Spurr will be assisted by Messrs. Syd-
ney II. Ball, (eorge H. Garrey, and Oscar
H. Hershey.
Mr. S. F. Emmons will complete his
imonograph on the geology of the Lead-
ville mining district, and Dr. J. Irving
will make an investigation of the ore de-


the underground structure and its relation
to the accumulation of oil and gas.
Louisiana and Texas
Prof. N. M. Fenneman will make an
economicc investigation of the oil fields of
the Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas and Lou-
isiana.
Maine.
Dr. George Otis Smith will, with the as-
sistance of Messrs. E. S. Bastin and C. W.
Brown, continue the survey of the Penob-
scot Bay quadrangle in Maine, Dr. Smith
will also exercise general supervision over
geologic work in New England and the
crystalline belt of New York and New
Jersey.
Maryland.
Acting in co-operation with the Mary-
land State Geological Survey, Prof. Wil-
liam B. Clark will continue area and
economic surveys in Maryland for the
preparation of geologic folios.


ipsits of the Ouray district. i Massachutts.
Delaware. Prof. B. K. Emerson will continue his
Tie retaous and Tertiy formations investigation of the areal and structure!
Theology of central Massachusetts.
of Delaware will be investigated by Prof.
William B. Clark. MiniMappi
Florida. In co-operation with the division of hy-
r. G e H. E e wl c t drology, Mr. E. C. Eckel, assisted by Mr.
Mr. George H. Eldndge will complete i
field work in the pho phate district A. F. Crider, will prepare a report on the
Florida and prepare a final report on the ._logy and the water resources of Mi-
issippi.
region. Missouri
Georgia. The Silurian and Ordovician paleontol-
A thorough revision of the areal, struct- ogy of central Missouri will be investi-
ural and economic geology of the Carters- gted by Mr. E. O. Ulrich, who will work
ville Special and Cartersville regular quad- in co-operation with the State survey.
angles, Georgia, will be made by Mr. The lead and zinc deposits of the State
Laurence LaForge. Preliminary work will be examined by Dr. H. F. Bain
lie done in the Dahloneita district by Mir. will be examined by Dr. H. F. Bain.


he d iontan.
\rthur Keith. Montana.
Idaho. Mr. W. H. Weed will complete the prep-
aration of a report on the Butte mining
The areal and economic survey of the district.
(oeur d'Alene mining district, Idaho, will New Jersey.
be completed by Dr. F. L. Ransome.
Special attention will be given to the In co-operation with Mesurs. N. H. Dar-
ore deposits. Such reconnaissance exam- ton and W. B. Clark. Dr. Florence Bascom
nations of the adjoining regions as may will make an real survey of the pre-
Il deemed necessary will be made. Mr. Paleozoic formations of the Trenton quad-
F. C. Calkins will assist Dr. Ransome in wrangle. New jerseyy in preparation for
this work. the Trenton folio. Dr. Bascom will also
complete tihe mapping of the Paleoaoie,
Indian Territory. pre-Ialcozoic and Pleistocene formations
Area land economic surveys of the Sans- in the Burlington, Lambertsville, Borden-
Imois. McAlester, Tuskahoma and Winding- town and Princeton quadrangles.
stair quadrangles, Indian Territory. will Prof. W. S. Bayley will complete the
le made by Mr. J. A. Taff. Mr. E. 0. mapping of the crystalline rocks of the
Ulrich will co-operate with him in deter- Raritan quadrangle. New Jersey. He will
mining the stratigraphic succession in In- also make an area, economic, and struc-
dinn Territory. tural survey of the crystalline rocks of
Kansas. the Delaware Water Gap, Easton and Al-
Mr .F.'C. Schrader will make an areal lentown quadrangles. in New Jersey and
and economic survey of the Independence Pennsylvania.
quadrangle, Kansas. He will be assisted A thorough field revision of the real
by Prof. Erasmus Haworth, who will pay and economic geology of the Franklin Fur-
special attention to the investigation of (Continued on Page 4)




..- .. --'S"A m .i rB- l




'1
/


. . .--------------------------------- .


C. B. ROGERS. P`xWIDINT.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, VIcx-PaEsainis.


C. H. HODGSON, ~c, and TRuAs'u.


DIRIECTOR.S: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEaehern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GRocERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, la.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries,


Grain, Pro-


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one Three-Story Balldlg, 70x200; one two-story buildlag. 50x390; owe oe-.story bIildiSg, 80x20,
miakig the largest space of ay Compay of the kild in the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacoll. FIl., ind Savannah. Ga.

THE RiCORD WILL BK WOR PQ-LLARS T'O TO EV T WE-K.
TM RM"P WZL BE WOR= DOLLARS TO YOU VLZR W=X


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


2


4-


2







THE WEEKLY INuUbrTiIAL RECORD. 3


J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,

SW- Headquarters for
Distiller's Pumping
N Outfit
SNo plant. complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia, *
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
i. South Carolina. Write us for particu- *
lars and prices. We also manufacture *
Sf ~Engines, Boilers and figh i
J oGrade Machinery,
as well as carry a full and complete *
-stockof-
SMill Supplies, Pipe,
;Boiler Tubes, Etc.
S Advise your wants.
.Macon, -- Georgia. i
4 'A Leade SpedlittY *f ME
S* i; of Tra Work for Turpenste Ster. Pwp


S5I I tI lt3 I1 1 11 I 1i i 3lt I lr I I i1 I I 1 t1 111 1 1
W. CANES. Pres. W. C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T DUDLEY. See ; Tres -

Tampa Hardware Co.

E Wholesale
Hardware
: Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

SLarge Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
S aLnd Pullers on Hand.


This Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.


Wholesase


Liquor Merchants


Proprietors


Jacksonville BoftliAg Works


...Agents...


ACME BEER



BOWEN & CO.


Elgin & Hampden
Railroad Watches.

SEE

RILES

At His New Store,
15 W. BAY STREET.



iN Fo RM "tUW
A GROVE oF
FynD[=
Al'^U lorloo^bdownk 1u4100


a
* S.


- FLOJIDA.


III IIIII :II I III IIII 1 I I IIII i I1 II II 1 1 II-i i-I


...NATIONAL ...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA. U S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFOBD,


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.
DIRECTORS:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L. SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


H. L. KAYTON,
Secretaryjnd Treasurer.


J. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.




W. R. THOMAS

GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggies.


Jacksonville, Fla.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,


from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies


Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.


CHAS. BLUM td CO.
S17 ad 519 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


0
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0
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They ArelC POMVAal
GRIFFING'S CATALOG
TNJA Awn 7 4
Tweity lab vmdlm "
Also a eomplHtas Of Urns ana frut
mamidta was arna -bnw.
C1a~logne r~a.
rus hI#PPS ameS. eo.
.IAOcK8WLLA. PA6


**********************"***

Lim IN le IS"h Co.
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilizer, Oil and Ice Ma-
chinery, and Supplies and Repairs.
CAPACITY FOR 300, HANDS.
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting. Pulleys, Hangers, Leather ano
Rubber Belting and Hose, Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and
Hoisting Engines.
AUGUSTA, CA.
Send all orders for priatig for the
turpentine and commissary trade to tih
Record office to insure a prompt delivery.


TEE RECORD 16 T=U 9OUT GREAT T=ADZ JOMU[AL.


STAMPA,


kmmmwmwm


. . Y


----









4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Geslsal Iae.tnigts- AMranAg for
Current Yer.
Oomiamd from Page 1.
4aee quadrangle, New Jersey, will be
made by Dr. A. C .Spencer, who will also
prepare a report on the economic geology
of the district. Doctor Spencer will coop-
erate with Prof. J. E. Wolff in the prepa-
ration of the Franklin Furnace folio.
ew York.
Prof. R. 8. Tarr will complete his in-
vestigation of the Pleistocene geology of
the Watkins Glen quadrangle, New York,
and will prepare the Pleistocene section
for the Watkins Glen folio. He will also
investigate the Pleistocene geology of the
Harford-Owego quadrangle, New York,
and prepare the Harford-Owego folio in
co-operation with Prof. H. 8. Williams.
Professor Williams, assisted by Dr. E.
M .Kindle, will make an real and eco-
nomic survey of the quadrangle that em-
braces the Dryden, Harford, Owego and
Apalaehian quadrangles, New York.
Prof. J. F. Kemp will continue the
real and economic survey of the east-
ern part of the Adirondack region.

Mr. J. E. Spur will visit the Tonopah
district, Nevada, some time during the
summer, in order to make a final revis-
ion of his conclusions before publishing
the report on the Tonopah ore deposits
on which he has been at work for the last
yeae. Tm I
North Carolina, Soeuth Carolina, Tennessee
and Georgia.
Mr. Arthur Keith will complete real
and economic surveys of the Mount Mitch-
ell, Nanhahala, Cowee, Pisgah, Roan
Mountain and Morganton quadrangles in
North Carolina, South Carolina and Ten-
nessee, with a view to the preparation of
geologic folios. Assisted by Mr. Hoyt S.
Gale, he will make a reconnaissance of the
Hickory, Piekens, Walhalls and Dahlon-
ega quadrangles, North Carolina and Geor.
gia. Dr. W. Lindgren, assisted by Mr. L
C. Graton, will make a preliminary inves
tigation of the mineral resources, particu
larly gold and tin, in several counties ol
the northeastern part of South Carolina
M1O adt WMrt Virginia.
A revision of the Cadis-Steubenvil
quadrangles, in Ohio and West Virginia
will be made by Mr. M. R. Campbell, wh<
will- prepare the Cadis-Steubenville foli<
in co-operation with Mr. W. T. Griswold
Penasylvanli
Mr. M. IR Campbell will revise the map
ping of the Slatington quadrangle, Penn
sylvania, for the preparation of the Slat
ington folio. In co-operation with th
State of Pennsylvania, he will also sur
vey for folio publication the Amity, Rog
erville, Burgettatown, and Claysvill
quadrangles In this work he will hav
the assistance of Messrs. W. T. Griswoh
and F. Clapp.
The Trenton limestones of Easter
Pennsylvania and their continuation inti
New Jersey will be mapped by Mr. B
S. Basler for the purpose of furnishing
information to Mr. E. C. Eckel that ma.
be of assistance to him in the preparation
of his report on the cement resources o
the United States.
In co-operation with Messrs. N. H. D ir
ton a t W. B. Clark, Dr .Florence E1s
om will complete the field work and pre
pan for publication ie Philadelphia Spe.
ial folio.


Texas.
Mr. E. C. Eckel will visit northeastern
Texas, particularly Marion, Cass, Morris,
Camp, Harrison and Upshur Counties, for
the purpose of making a reconnaissance
examination of iron-ore deposits and deter-
mining the areas in which topographic and
geologic work can most advantageously I
be taken up next year.
Utah.
Mr. J. M. Boutwell will complete an in-
vestigation of the minig geology of the
Park City district, Utah. He will also
make a reconnaissance of area, strate-
graphic and structural geology of the
western portion of the Uinta Mountains.
Mr. Lester 11. Wool.sey will assist him.
Vermont.
Areal and economic surveys will be
made in Western Vermont by Prof. T.
Nelson Dale.
West Virginia
Dr. George H. Ashley, assisted by Mr.
W. C. Phalen, will make areal and eco-
nomic surveys of the Nicolas quadrangle,
West Virginia.
Mr. George W. Stose will complete the
areal and economic surveys on the Paw-
paw and Hancock quadrangles, in West
Virginia and Maryland. He will be as-
sisted by Mr. E. F. Burchard.
Wiscouin.
Prof. U. S .Grant will make an real
and economic survey of the Mineral Point
quadrangle, Wisconsin. The work will
probably be done in co-operation with the
State Survey of Wisconsin.

INDUSTRIAL NOTES.
It is reported that the Baldwin Loco-
.notive Works will discharge 4,000 men,
the working force being reduced to 6,0,o,
Sas against 16,000 when running full.

The American Federationist reports that
of the 601 unions making returns for May,
With an aggregate membership of 62,500,
there were 1.3 per cent. without employ-
Sment. In the preceding month 918 unions,
. with a total membership of 44,870, report-
f ed 4.2 per cent. without employment.

A decision that an agreement of a labor
union relating to the employment exclu-
sively of union help and to the regula-
Stion of the hours of labor is illegal wax
handed down by -.udge Haray, of the
SMassachusetts Superior Court, Tuesday.
The case was that of John Podolski and
others against Nathan Newman, trustee
- of the local union of the United Garment
- Workers of America. The judge holds
That the agreements referred to are con-
e trary to public policy.

T he proportion of unionists idle in New
SYork State during the first three months
e of 1904 was 14.6 per cent. as contrasted
d with 5.5 per cent. in the corresponding pe-
riod of 1903-the best year of the past
decade. Of the 55,710 workers who did not
n work at all in January, February or
o March. 34.365 belonged to the building
; trades and 10,631 to the transport trades
g -chiefly lake navigation. Nearly all of
y this idleness was due to weather condi-
n tions, as projected building operations
f compared favorably with those of previous
years. At the end of March no fewer than
- 25,723 union workers were idle on account
- of disputes, and the total number idle
- for all causes was 103.996, or 27.2 per cent.
- of the number reporting, as compared with
12.1 per cent a year ago.


MORTGAGS.

WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,


Real Estate Broker.


1,1W. nwfYT STmrT,


JACKcSeuvu r~um


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at Ready^Made Prices Mail Orders Given Pernoal Atention
439 W. Bay Street JACKSONVIILE, FLA.


P rin tin g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


The Largest and Oldest Copper
Works In Georgia.


a. A. BAKER,




Baker Imprsved

Seemiss Turpem-
liie stills.
Write me for prices and oua
F B. B. a point In Gefao i. Fir-
Ida. Alabama or Mimssisal. Ale
stills sold under a guarantee.
Job work through the
country a specialty.

3runswick, Ga.


WF My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.

_ a a/ =


I N ------ -0

4 4111 1111111 11111 IIl l 14 1111111 Ill I II1 I III I II i i


McMillan

SBros.

: Florida Cop-

E per Works. -
= Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
: General Metal Workers.
Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones
- Patching through the country a specialty.
Orders by mail or wire will receive prompt
attention at either of the following works:
SFeyetteville, N. C. Savannah. Ga
SMobile, Ala. Jacksonville, Ihla
.al lll aslllll lllll iee ttellillistillisliilittill."I


DON'T FAIL TO MNTIUX THS MCORD TO AD VW"Pw


H, A, Renfroe Co.


W. H. BACKWITH. W. B. HENIDERSON. G. C. WAURZM.

BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.

LARGE TRACTS OF TURPERTIIE AID MILL LAIDS.
Rooms 1.2.3, First Natlonal Ba k BlMdiuag.
TAMPA, : FLORIDA.


!









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


---u--u-----

SLm inMi I

How to Measre It.
The readers of the Chicago Lumberman
are wrestling with the problem how to
measure a stick of timber 50 feet long,
12x12 at one end and tapering down to
tx6 at the other. One man says that it
contains 00 feet. Another puts it at 375
feet, board measure. Another gets 350
feet out of it; another 337 1-2 feet; an-
other 1,200 feet or 400 board feet.
The 375 feet man says that when tim-
her and lumber are'traded in by the ree-
ognised standard foot called board meas-
ure, containing 144 square inches surface
and one inch thick, it is better not to
get away from this fact. Proceeding on
This basis, he contends that there is a.5
feet of lumber in the stick in question,
and gives the rule: Half the sum of the
areas of the bases multiplied by the
length reduced to board measure. This
would give a total of 54,000 cubic inches
or 375 feet, board measure.
The 337 1-2 feet man says it's dead
easy, via: 6 inches thick at one end 12
inches thick at the other, added, makes
18 inches, which divided by 2, would give
the mean thickness, 9 inches. A stick
of timber 9x9 inches, 50 feet long, re-
duced to board measure, gives 337 1-2 feet.
Is either correct?

Refre"ing His rEmrey.
That isn't a half bad story afAet at
Pittsburg concerning a well known lum-
ber salesman, whom we will call Brown,
as he would not care to see his name in
print in this connection.
It seems that a Pittsburg lumber con-
eera which Mr. Brown represents got a tip
that there was a large yellow pine bill
about to be let in New York City. Mr.
Brown was hastily summoned to the
offee and sent to New York to call upon a
large firm of contractors which had the
letting of the bill. He was dispatched in
such a hurry that the name of the con-
cern whom he was to visit entirely escap-
ed his memory, and much to the surprise
of the Pittsburg house the next morning
they had a request for the name and
address of the firm in question. The
salesman received the following message:
"You are to see Smith & Jones about the
yellow pine bill. Your name is Brown.
"Blank Lumber Company."

Yellow Pine Lumber.
Notwithstanding the small demand and
low price for lumber and timber in New
York the shipments from Florida con
tinue large, and the mills have not dimin
ished their output Florida yellow pin4
lumber has no equal for quality in manj
respects, and it now has become a neces
ity in many instances, and next to iroi
and steel, it is found to be the strongest
and most durable. It is much used ii
bridge construction, engineers asserting
that it is not anected by dampness lik
lessresinous wood, and as a crosstie ma
trial, it has proven to be the best of al
woods yet tried, and this is borne out b:
the fact t th there is always a large de
mad North for the Florida pine tie. Mil
Kons of ties have been exported from Jack
onville this year, and as many froi
other Florida ports. While the forests ar
being denuded to a greater extent tha
usual, it must be confessed that the lun
ber manufactured is affording considerable


employment to the industrious and keep-
ing the State well supplied with finances.
The demand for our lumber, crossties,
naval stores, phosphate, fruit and vegeta-
bles is most gratifying to our people and
demonstrates that Florida has resources
within her own borders sufficient to em-
ploy all in developing them and to secure
a comfortable living for many years yet
to come for those engaged therein.

Stopped a Leak with Sawdust.
To stop the leakage of a boat by the
use of sawdust appears at the first sug-
gestion ridiculous. It is a method, how-
ever, employed by backwoodsmen of the
Adirondack region.
One day a party having considerable
baggage discovered upon loading it into
a scow at the end of one of the regular
"carries" that the boat leaked badly. To
deplay for repairs would occasion con-
siderable annoyance, and without repairs
to proceed seemed impossible.
At this juncture one of the guides said:
"I think I can fix it. Just unload the
boat again." This was done, and then the
guide brought from a sawmill near the
spot a quantity of sawdust. This he
sprinkled upon the water on either side of
the boat.
"Now," continued he, "load up again."
This was done, and when the weight again
sank the boat the influx of water through
the sides and bottom sucked in the saw-
dust, which finally accumulated in the
crevices, swelled under the action of the
water and actually stopped the leakage.

ort Cyp ret
The Morthern Cypress Market.


Chicago. The call for finishing lumber
in the city is considerable and is being
met by various sellers from stocks deriva-
bel from different sources, no class of
dealers, representing particular localities,
seeming to have any monopoly of the
trade. Consumers do not seem to fully
understand that some varieties of cypress
are preferred to other varieties of cypress,
but buy the cheapest, from whatever
source derived Demand in other respects
than that for interior finish and door
stock is seasonably quiet, though there
is some movement all the time.
Kansas City, Mo. Cypress people say
that there is some danger of broken stocks
at the mills during the fall Thus far this
year the Louisiana manufacturers have
been able to make very prompt shipments
of yard stock and they still have a good
assortment. At the same time there is
no surplus of any item and the orders are
coming in about as fast as the stock is
gotten ready for shipment. The demand
is improving and there is a good inquiry,
and while the manufacturers expect to
take care of the fall business with fair
promptness there is likely to be more or
Iss delay in filling badly mixed orders
after the next thirty or sixty days. The
demand is reported satisfactory at this
time. There are no rush orders and the
mills could take care of more business
tha they are getting. At the same time
there is a good steady volume of busi-
ness coming from all parts of this ter-
ritory, and the northern and eastern deal-
ears are also ordering liberally. Prices
are stationary and very firm, as has been
the ease through the year.
I New York City. The present call is not
! very urgent and the situation remains
i as reported last week. Stocks in hand
Seem to be such as an easily supply the
e demand and no appreciable increase in


In e e-ee#* Y ----------m-------


SJ. A. Craig iS Bro.

239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BOCK.

I Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
0 ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

: Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.


ft************-----------;

For Sale:


Turpentine Location, of which 9,000 acres are now being worked
S with 11,000 Acres Round Timber. Price ........................65000.00
S13.000 Acres Liberty County Virgin Timber. Price per are... 5.50
S5.120 Acres Liberty County Virgin Pine. Price per acre....... &00
22.000 Acres Sawmill Timber on St. Johns River.
22.000 Acres Calhoun County, of which 7,750 acres are round.
Balance now ready for the saw. Located on two navigable streams.
Price per acre .... ......... .- .......... ........... .. 8.00


SBrobston, Fendig &Co.
S~RUNSWICK, OA. JACKSONVILLE, PLA.
0-


meenlmwmi i lmmmull muomulml


Standard Clothing Company


One Price


A01100D


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, JacksevMl, FlrMa.
Stetsan and Hawes Hats. Special Attenton Givem to Mall Orders.


ITIlTSVl t"LiTit TVIN INsMR a


Lwu0|||u|u|||u|8|||e MRsM


T. MURPHY

JACKSONVILLE MACHINE AD IRON WORKS
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat, Sawmill and Mine Machinery Made and Repaired. Iroe
and Brass Castings, and machine repairs of all kinds.
MARINE ENGINES AND BOILERS. PULLE AND SHIAFTING
Agent for Stationary Engines, Boilers. Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and Conden-
sers. Hydrants and Valves, Centrifugal Pumps, Hose, Belting and Rubber Goods
POWER TRAISNISSION All WATER MS EhIPMET A SRPEILTT
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


Cable Address. Florida


Standard Naval Stores

Cormpany.

DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN


t ROSIN

SAND TURPENTINE.

Jacasonville, Fla.


WHEN WRITTEN ADYEVTISKRS MENTION THE RECcOD.


I -i
i "


*+~9r~r~+9~~,~~,~~










6 THE WEEKLY INDUS'ht9AL RECORD.


bWsijess is noted. It is confidently as-
serted, however, that in a short time there
will be a material change for the better,
the amount of proposed building being
far in excessof last year. The character
of projected buildings is such as would in-
dicate an unusual consumption of cypress.
Buffalo, N. Y. The former element of
doubt as to the stability of the cypress
trade appears to have disappeared and
the jobbing trade is steady again. The
movement is not large, but prices are firm
and promise to continue so. Stocks are
not large, but deliveries from mills are
more prompt than they were.
Boston, Mass Cypress continues to
maintain its favorable position in the
market and inch ones and twos are sell-
ing in satisfactory volume at $45 for rail
shipments. Cargo stock is in fair de-
mand on the basis of $41 for inch ones and
twos.
Baltimore, Md. Stocks here are still
fairly heavy but some reduction is taking
place and the outlook is apparently better.
Confidence is expressed in the future and
there is less. disposition to make conces-
sions destructive of profits. With the
activity in the fire district and outside of
it the needs of builders increase, strength-
ening the market and contributing to the
general improvement. Singularly enough,
lumber of all building materials has sag-
ged o. the most Receipts of cypress are
now just about large enough to satisfy
the prevailing demand and the chances are
that still further improvement will take
place.


In the Ol North State.
Charlotte, N. C.-The plant of the Gay
Lumber Company, recently sold at pub-
lic auction at Kinston, N. C., will soon
be reorganized with ample capital. The
outfit was bought in by James H. Pou, of
Raleigh, for $60,000. It is estimated that
at least $100,000 will be laid out on the
plant. The parties interested are George
T .Montgomery, of Brooklyn, and Elling-
ton and G. Guy, of Richmond.
The Haviland-Warner Lumber Com-
pany, of Folkstone, Onslow County, N. C.,
has filed articles changing its name to
the Warner Lumber Company.
The Kinston Lumber Company, capital
$50,000, is the successor the Gay Lum-
ber Company, above mentioned.
The Lexington (N. C.) House Furnishing
Company has been organized with $25,-
000 authorized capital, to make furniture
and caskets and carry on a general mer-
cantile business.
The Buchanan Lumber Company, with
$50,000 capital, has been organized at
Judson, Buncombe County, N. C., by
James, Charles and C. E. Boyd. The
company proposes to develop timber lands,
manufacture lumber and deal in real es-
tate.
The Fulton Manufacturing Company,
of Mt. Airy, N. C., has been organized
to make boxes, furniture, etc., the capi-'
tal being $3,000. J. I. Fulton is one of
the incorporators.
The Corbett Buggy Works, of Hender-
son, N. C., have moved into larger quar-
ters on account of an increase of busi-
ness.
The Commercial Box Manufacturing
Company, of Beaufort, S. C., Is being or-
ganised with $10,000 capital. It is pro-
posed to manufacture crates, boxes, etc.,
for the trucking shipments.
In response to an urgent demand on the
part of the numerous furniture factories
of High Point, N. C., the Standard Mirror


Company has been organized to meet the
demand, and the contract for the build-
ings has been let.

Saw Mil Asociatioe Meetian
The Georgia Interstate Sawmill Men's
Association had its regular meeting at
Tifton, July 12, 1904. In the absence of
President H. H. Tift, who is away at St.
Louis, Mr. J. R. Trump, manager for the
Minnesota Lumber Company, was elected
chairman. Secretary E. C. Harrell was
present in his official capacity. There was,
considering the weather, a good attend-
ance. Many matters of small interest to
the outside world were discussed and it
was resolved-in view of the stagnation
of the lumber trade-to reduce the output
one-third. In other words, the mills will
run only four days a week. There is no
question but that the election due next
November is entirely responsible for the
present apathy of buyers; people will not
invest while there is any political excite-
ment. As soon as the elections are over,
the lumber trade will be brisker than. it
has been for years. It was reported to
the meeting that the railroads of Florida
were equipping their cars or paying the
shipper the legal penalty. The new in-
spection system is being rapidly got under
way and will prove a very satisfactory
move in the interests of harmony in the
shipping trade. The meeting adjourned
to meet at Jacksonville August 9, 1904.

LUMBER NOTE&
The Supreme Court of Maine has de-
cided that a permit authorizing anyone
holding it to enter on lands and cut and
remove logs and timber, paying stumpage
therefore, is an executory contract for the
sale of the logs and timber, after cutting,
as personal property, coupled with license
to enter and cut.

The Georgia sawmills are still suffering
for want of water. In Columbus the
water giving out, the citizens are taking
kindly to beer.

Among the visitors to the World's Fair
at St. Louis are many people who are
attracted by the novel styles and woods
of inside finish. Our own yellow pine,
and especially the curled pine variety and
cypress are receiving much attention, and,
in natural colors are not excelled in
beauty by any wood there. This is going
to create an increased demand for Flor-
ida pine and cypress for inside finish from
all parts of the country within our reach.

It did not occur to either of the great
parties to incorporate in its platform the
burning need of a uniform national set
of inspection rules.

Stumpage is an increasing factor in
the logging business.

The Southwestern Lumbermants Asso-
ciation contains 1,525 retail members and
350 wholesale members.

The new house of Hoo Hoo now being
rebuilt at St. Louis, is to be a splendid
building.

It is too hot to bother about feting big
orders now. Let us rest, cool off and
talk politics, and give the pine trees a
chance to grow.

In California there is a variety of the
staple called sugar pine. Does it exude
sweet turpentine?


White Springs Fla.
On the Suwanee River
The Great Health Resort of the South.
SWur SprWg 25,00 Gaeus per MiLte.
Healing Springs -- forest Walks Slheting &. Fishing
NO MOSQUITOES. NO MALARIA.
The Healthiest Summer Resort in America.


THE PRITCHARD HOUSE.


An Ideal Home for Invalids, FirstoClass Table
ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES.
Write r particulars ...
MRS. S. L PRITCHARD, Proprietres WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE OAKS.

A Typical Southern Home


NEWLY BUILT and FURNISHED.


- EVERY COMFORT


--Vrite or prticulars--
MRS. M. C SKIPWORTH, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


KENDRICK HOUSE.

Headquarters for Southern Families.
GOOD TABLE HOME COMFORTS
.. For particulars addnr ...
MRS. J. B. ROBERTS, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE HAMILTON.

A New, Modern, High-Class Hotel.


ELECTRIC LIGHTS and BELLS


HOT and COLD BATHS


-- For lull information writ
JNO. S. BOWEN, Owner and Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE NEW PAXTON.

Commodious, HomeLike Hotel.
ROOM FOR 100 GUESTS


Table Unexcelled.


Every Attention to Visitors


MRS. E H. PAXTON, Owner and Proprietre, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.



THE ARAGON
JACKSONVIILE. FLA.
NOW OPEN
under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, hi-
cluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.

A.S. PENlMETON. W. B.JOiMSO. JAS LASSETER. W. W. STamPLIm
PresMaent. Vies Pris. OGe Mmnaer. Asst. Tremsa

Uhe W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers


D. K 1LYnN.y
T.W. SUNDm


402-404-4406-408 East Bay Street. Jacksone. lM.
DIRECTORS:
B. F. CAMP. A. S. PENETON,
TIMS OWIN., W. JO
.. WADe, PERRY M. COLSOM.


W. W. SUIPIJN
JASn, AIWT


ARE YOU A 8uAkasER TO THE RECORD?








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


CATTLE In CUBA.

fteu Fast. About Thi Pftabue

Cuba is a ideal country for cattle ad
stiek of all kids. There are many eoli
ties necessary for a good stock country
and Cuba comes nearer combining all of
them thaa say country on earth.
First the climate is all that could be de-
ired, never too hot and never too cold for
the young things to be born and begin life
without suffering. There is more and bet-
ter grass than anywhere else and always
gren the year around, so that the stock
is always fat and the flow of milk equal
ad abundant at ll times The water i
abundant, fresh and sweet over most of
the island, while shade is plentiful. The
absentee of insect pests i remarkable,
there being less flies than I have seen in
* any country. Many of the heifers bring
calves at eighteen months old and the
native cows average a calf every ten
months, while twins are frequent. Goats
seldom have less than two kids, and
about half of them three to a litter, while
four at a birth is not uncommon. Sheep
generally bear two at a time, and fre-
quently three, and both sheep and goats
bear twice a year.
At the outbreak of the recent Spanish
War there were a million and a half of
registered cattle in the island, and it is
estimated that this was less than half of
the actual number, as only the recorded
ones were taxed During the war almost
the entire stock of the island was wiped
out, mueh of it being confiscated for the
e of the armies, and much being killed
by Weyler's order, so as to starve out the
insurgents. The estimated number of
cattle at the close of the war was less
than two hundred thousand; a very small
supply for a million and a half of people.
At the close of the war milk sold in
Havana at 25 cents a bottle (less than
a quart), aad beef at proportionate prices.
As soon as peace was declared shipments
of cattle came in from various countries
and sold for good prices, notwithstanding
the poverty of the people. The largest
shipments were steers landed at Havana
for beef, but more or less cows came in all
the time. The cattle came from Colombia,
Venezuela, Honduras, Mexico, Texas, Ala-
bama, Florida, Jamaica and Porto Rico,
and the shipments have kept pace with
the ability of the people to buy. Many ot
the large dealers, finding how profitable
the business was, have purchased large
pastures, and are now holding their ship-
ments until they put on fat before offer-
ing them for sale. In order to stimulate
the importation of cattle the Cuban Gov
ernment took the duty off from cows and
heifers. There is still a duty on steen
and bulls of $2 per head on animals weigh.
ing less than 500 pounds, while on fat am
mals from 500 up the duty is much higher
from $5 to $7, according to weight.
* I am frequently asked how much longer
this shipping business will last. This i
purely a matter of conjecture. There i
not more than 20 per cent of the stoel
there that the island ought to carry, am
beef has been so high that nearly all th
steers and bulls have been killed at on
and two earn old, so it is safe to predict
that good prices will prevail for som
years to come. It is quite probable tha
the duty will be put on cows again afte
this year .


The finest openings for the business are
in Santa Clara and Puerto Principe prov-
ines, land being new, fresh and cheap,


Standard Turpentine

Company /


Has revolutionized the wood distilling busi.
eess in the South. After three mouths of careful
testing our machinery at the Waycross, Georgia,
mill, we are now ready to sell direct asy size/
plant and guarantee results by our new KRUG
PATENT STEAM PRESSURE PROCESS. o


/


1I


K


and the water and grass more abundant.
These provinces were little known before
the war by the outside world owing to
their lack of transportation, but the com-
pletion of the new Cuba Company Rail-
road has put them in easy touch with the
outside world, and Americans are now
coming in and buying land freely, both for
stock growing, general farming and for
planting tropical fruits. The best lands
are now selling at from $5 to $12 per acre,
according to quality and location in eastern
Santa Clara and western Puerto Principe.
If there is anything further about this
that the reader would like to know, I will
take pleasure in answering private com-
munications on the subject.-D. W. Child,
in Arcadia Champion.


Iutetrial Growth in the United States.
The following item from The American
Agriculturist gives some interesting in-
formation:
Marvelous as has been the growth of
the United States in population within
the past eight years, it has been com-
pletely eclipsed by the development along
commercial lines. An industrial journal
has compiled figures showing the relative
growth of population in that period to
have been 14A per cent. During the same
time railway freight traffic advanced 76
per cent:, iron production 108 per cent.,
immigration 140 per cent, bank clearings
91 per cent., deposits from 125 to 171 per
cent., and the wealth of the nation 3U
per cent. Agriculture has done her full
share in making this phenomenal record.
Particularly is this true with regard to
railroad traffic, postoffiee receipts, larger
bank deposits and clearings and immigra-
tion. Industrial development is phenom-
enal, yet agriculture is keeping pace with
advances in other lines of business; doubt-
less on the most solid basis of them all.


WORLD'S FAIR NOTES.
A pipe used by Miles Standish in 1620
is an interesting relic exhibited in the
Massachusetts building at the World's
Fair.


V.


B0. R. FI9 ER
MANUFACTURER 01


BRICK.


InTER HIr P ES.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.

U m.


A bookbinding plant is in operation in
the German section of the Palace of Lib-
eral Arts at the World's Fair.
The coat that Aguinaldo wore when he
was captured by General Frank Funston
"s hung in the New Mexican building at
the World's Fair.
Public demonstrations of the work of
the United States Signal Corps are given
daily on the steps of the Government
building at the World's Fair.
A Swedish manufacturer of matches
shows in the Liberal Arts Palace at the
World's Fair, 135,000 matches. A glass
case three feet high by two feet in diam-
eter is filled with a quarter of a minute's
output of matches.


*II$I~~hI~)I~CttI)ll~~lll~g*thhhISht,,tuIlUg.


PEAAL %iOUT. Pre


T. N. MCCAMKY, Vise-Prea.


MIA E STERN Treas.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.


IMVINVG WELC MA-aMr.


i Florida Timb


Agricultu

S401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


er, Grazing &


ral Lands.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


vs **i mri itwtu i i 'iu11 ITu gI giii i u ieu gtt ir utteugug


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


AD THE AD8 Im TME RECORD.


STANDARD TURPENTINE COMPANY.
A


ohn = Furchgott= Compan:
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


_. -


/


.. The..


r








aS THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Leal Jobbing House in Shes and
Dry Goods.
In years gone by there were few job-
bing houses in shoes and dry goods in
the Southern States, and those few carried
a very incomplete line of staple articles,
making it necessary for the retail mer-
chants doing anything like a large busi-
ness to go to northern markets where job-
bing houses carried large and complete
lines in order to supply their wants. In
those days New York was headquarters,
and no merchant of any importance would
have thought of doing business without
visiting that market, at least twice a year,
and there were many large jobbing.houses
there to offer special inducements in the
way of large and varied stocks. But in
recent years there has been a wonderful
change. The jobbing houses in the South
have grown in number as well as in size,
and are carrying complete stocks of the
very best assortments of goods adapted
to their section of the country, and are
in a position to supply, in a most satis-
factory manner, the requirements of the
largest retail houses in the country. On
the other hand, the large jobbing houses
in New York have gradually gone out of
business. Only a few weeks ago, Sweet-
ser, Pembrook & Co., one of the largest
houses in the United States, closed their
doors, and to-day, strange as it may seem,
there are only three large wholesale dry
goods houses left in the city of New York.
The necessity for such houses no longer
exists as the progressive up-to-date mer-
chant has changed his method of doing
business. Instead of buying twice a year
from New York jobbing houses in large
quantities, often buying too much, and of-
ten finding undesirable goods on hand on
account of conditions having changed be-
tween the time his order was placed and
the goods were shipped. He now buys
from the local jobbing house just such
goods as he wants, just when he wants
them, keeping his stock fresh with up-to-
date goods, saving freight and loss ot
time in getting his goods, and above all
secures his goods at the same price he
would have to pay the Northern jobbers.
Jacksonville as a jobbing center has
demonstrated in a practical manner the
correctness of the above statement. The
Covington Company, the largest shoe and
dry goods house in the State, are selling
goods to the majority of the best mer-
chants of this State, Southern Alabama
and Georgia. Only last week they sold
to Mr.-Frank Adams, Jasper, Fla., who is
one of the most progressive and up-to-
date retail merchants in the State, a bill
of 120 dozen shoes. Mr. Adams in addi-
tion to being State Senator and president
of the Senate, owns three or four large
stores, one at Lake City, one at Jasper,
Fla., one at Sparks, Ga., and has interests
at other places. He is one of the most
conservative buyers in the South, and the
fact that The Covington Company secured
his order for shoes, after having sold
him large bills of dry goods in the early
season, is conclusive evidence that this
progressive and enterprising firm is in a
position to meet competition from any
source. They carry the largest stock ever
carried by any house in this State, and
the rapid growth of their business is due
to the'r straight-forward methods. Their
motto is "Succes for our customers is
success for us." Their business has grown
continually from the day they located in
this city, and this year as compared with
last year, shows an increase in sales of
65 per cent.


There is no need for any merchant in
this State to go to New York or any other
market for dry goods and shoes as long
as The Covington Company is doing busi-
ness, and Mr. Covington states that he ex-
mpects to do business here the balance of
his natural life.

A scale agreement has been reached by
the American Sheet & Tin Plate Company
on a basis of 18 per cent reduction from
.ast year's, which leaves wages as they
.,ave been since the special April confer-
ence. The rebate question is still unde-
cided. however. Independent sheet manu-
iacturers want a 20 per cent reduction,
And are still in conference with the work-
ers The non-union mills of the leading
interest are the disturbing factor, and the
possibility y of the idleness of all union
;heet and tinplate mills for some weeks is
.,ot remote.

Facts About a Pecan Tree.
The statement that a twelve-year-old
pecan tree bore a crop of nuts which sold
ior $40 may sound like a story; it is,
however, the plain truth, ana raraer more.
though this be an exception rather tnan
a general rule, it does show what care and
attention will do. I will try in the follow-
ing to give the facts in detail: In the
early spring of 1892, seventy-five grafts
.vere made by the party owning this tree,
and only two grew; in 1893 these two
trees were planted where they now stand.
tlie party informed me that for three
,ears thy hardly made any growth, but
when once started they made up for lost
-.me. I said in my letter to Farm and
.,anch it was a twelve-year-old tree. 1
judged the tree to be that age by the size
,i it. The facts, however, reveal that it
.s but ten years old. My friend tells me
.hat the tree has borne for five years.
.ast year's crop was between thirty and
>orty pounds of nuts. This tree stands
moout twenty-five or thirty feet from its
iwner's residence. It has had the best of
.-are since planted there. The other one
.%-as plant back in the field, and has haa
.Jo extra care, and, although it bore several
pounds s of nuts, it does not compare with
lie one near the house. It is just tue
sanme with trees as in other branches of
agriculture; take care and give all the
.iceded attention to a little pig and it will
.nake a fine big hog, an let another one
.,ot for itself and it will remain a runt.
In regard to saying that such a tree
ind its crop beats trucking; I do not want
to say that one shall give up this line ot
businesss and plant pecan trees only-not
.t all; but plant pecan trees and raise
rops between them, and by fertilizing and
..aking the crops the trees will get the
.eneit, an das they grow and shade the
i.,il further every year, let them have
Ahe ground to themselves. Do not dis-
turb tlie roots by deep plowing close to the
.ee or else you will injure them and
hliek thle growth of the tree. Suppose
..,u plant an acre; plant the trees 50 feet
*part; that would take only 17 trees; it
jiney bring you 40 pounds of nuts when ten
-. ars old, which they surely will do, it
..ou give them care, and sell those nuts
it 25 cents a pound, that would be $10 a
ee. or $170 for the 17 trees. The cost ot
he trees is insignificant compared with
.he returns in compared period. This is a
,ow estimate, and the trees will grow up
to that, and with good care will do con-
sidtrably better, and all that while you
.:e the ground between them for some-
thing else.-Farm and Ranch.


: MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.

Jecksonville. Fla.
*IImI6 ll IIIi 8 &, u a is ,ti ti ltiit ii ,( II gllIuuiImit


Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply 0o.

Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement., Brick, Paints.

Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.



Cummer Liumber Co.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER"

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.


"In the Good Old Summer Time"

SYour customers will remain well, if you do
like Dr. Mathews of Thomson, Ga. He wrote
us 15th of Janurry, 1094:
"I have been carrying Cuban Relief in stock for
several years, and have frequently used and prescribed
-_ it. I consider it superior to any preparation on the
market for Cholera Morbus, Sick Headache, Colic,
and all infallible remedy for horse colic."
You write us for a supply.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga. Tenn.

R. TOLAR. J. H. HART. T. H. BLACHLY. J. R. TOLAR, JM
(Establlahed 1872.)

TOLAR. HART & CO.,
160 FRONT STREET, NEW YORK.


Commission Merchants
end Jobbers of Neav.l Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


*OSEPH D WEED. H. I). WEED. W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.



Read the Record Adv't's.


THE RECORD KEEPS PACE WITH SOUTHERN PROGRESS









THE WEEKLY INUUTKItAL RECORD. 9

IHuMa--I chinery and NMill Supplies.f

| Machinery and Mill Supplies.


Bar Irew, Irn Pipe and Fittings, Bolts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tols, Lumberman's Tools,
Packdig of all Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corrugated





JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


a~ --


AT TH MATIONAL CONVENTION. in the councils of the delegation. All in
The naval stores fraternity played an all, Florida was well represented, and
important part in the National Democrat- acted her part well.
ie Oonvetion. Capt. W. J. Hilman,
chairman of the Florida delegation, second- American farmers do not comprehend
ed the nomination of Judge Parker, and all the great profit in the cultivation of
his delegate led the demonstration in nut fruits. Originally the forests of Amer-
favor of the nominee when he had been ica were full of nut-bearing trees-the
played in nomination by Mr. Iittleton. walnut, the butternut, the hickory, the
Mr. W. F. Coachman was at the Coven- pecan, the chestnut. In many of the
tioa as national committeeman, represent- States these trees have almost entirely
ing Judge Baney, who could not be pree- disappeared. Nuts of nearly all kinds are
eat Mr. Coachman was an enthusiastic always salable at a good price, and the
Parker man and to him, as manager of the chestnut and pecan crop never equals the
campaign in Florida for the uninstructed demand. Every walnut tree on the farm
deeates, is due in a large measure the is good for $2 to $3 ever year without any
feet that Florida sent six delegates to cost in cultivation of time or labor. The
the Convention who voted for the nomi- only labor required is gather the nuts
eue. Mr. P. L Sutherland was present after nature has knocked them from, the
as a alternate, and his influence was felt trees and prepare them for market.


STATE AGENT FOIR
ATLAS ENGINES and BOILERS, SOULE STEAM FEED
WORTHINGTON STEAM PUMPS, JENKINS VALVES
DISSTOIrS SAWS, FUNTKOTE ROOFING,
CURT1S MANUFACTURING CO.'S Ml MacMlmey.
DeLOACI SAW MILLS, GBERT WOOD PULLEYS
HOYT'S LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SPRING aMd RUBER CO.
BeIt ad Rabber Mese.
SOLVENTINE BOILER COMPOUND,
DODGE MFG. CO.'S Cast bIr Srlt Pubys,
McCAFFREY FILES, MONARCH EMERY WHEELS,
DANIELS' PPP Steam Packladg
A. LESCHEN & SON, Wire RMe.


The Great World's Fair.
The greatest fair ever held is now in
progress in St. Louis, Mo. About $50,-
000,000 has been spent in getting this stu-
pendous show in readiness. This is nearly
twice as much as was spent on any
World's Fair. This fair cover more ground
and has a wider range and a greater va-
riety of exhibits than any previous show.
Again, it is nearer to the Southern people.
This fact alone should encourage us to
patronize it. It is gotten up on a more
advanced plan and with a constant eye to
minuteness of detail. So you can see
more that is really worth seeing. A trip
to St. Louis nill give you more instruc-
tion and pleasure than trip to Europe or
any other foreign country, and one-tenth
the cost. Arrange your business anc se-
to the's, the most wonderful show ever
brought to gether on this earth. The
Southern farmer in particular should go


and see what other farmers are doing.
Be sure and go by the best route, that is
the Southern Rlailway. Write J. C. Lusl,
Division Passenger Agent, Jacksonville.


The big stockmen and timber men of
the West, who have only forty or ffty
thousand acres of land and who are am-
bitious to increase it to 100,00 aeres,
will have to move lively and rustle some
dummies and substitutes to make 161
or 380 acre entries under the timber and
stone act or the desert land act or the
commuter's clause of the homestead act,
or they will not fulfill their desires. The
country and Congress are beginning to
wake up to the importance of saving this
Western public domain, our greatest re-
sources to-day, with national irrigation
an established government policy, and
converting it into homes for settlers and
homeseekers. It looks as though the days
of the speculator and the landgrabber
were numbered.


D. M. FLYNN, President


W. B. JOHNSON, Vice-President


A. S. PENDLETON, Sec'y & Treas


J. W. Oglesbee


DIRECTORS
L. Horn


N. G. Wade


J. L. Medlin


W. B. Johnson


Independent Naval Stores & Export Co.,


Jacksonville, Florida.



Naval Stores Factors and Operators.


Capital Stock, $500,000.


The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal advances made on consignments.
Our interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operative company.




Some Money and Some Timber For Somebody.


All Producers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.


TUE X3COUD 1S TE '"OPZRATOU' UinE tA1_"


D. M. Flynn


Walter Ray


411




WR

:V117


-- ----------~ ~300F03)Fi0~rr'^"~"^~^ ^~r~+OC0+0


-------------- ---^L __ _I _~~ -------


)~I~~ir:U I;USjr srcrr~trrrrrrrrr S~jS`1i~lC~kSi aaECSXS3CC33 S a---- ------S~af~E3SCE~m


L~,rrr~r:~E~,~i~rr~Jf~ ?~IFfl~SFSfSF)FJSSS~FI~F SCSaaaC~clC~FmF~F~E SaESE~crrr~;li~,~i;i;~i;r~,`li~i;~;i~~


6 A









10 THE WEEKLY INL1uUI-l-AL RECORD.


~l~w~ra- A :M--u&AM~~~hhHa4~ameo


J. Pa s. HUARD,. AmuBB F. PaBaT
President. Vice-President. Onsher.

The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
Capital $200.000. Surplus, $100,000 *
STATE DEPOSITARY.
General Banking. Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes. .OO per Year.


*Mweenetwetwwwwwweeent*Pweetwaseweenw*

eview of Naval Stores for a Week


Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Price Repts Sales Exp 1903
Mon., July 11153 452 3171227 48
Tues., July 1253 1329 11603 193 48
Wed., July 1315311085 1 519 1 110 48
Thur., July 14153y|1441 1 465 1 232 48

Rosin for the Week at Savannah.
Monday, July 11. Last Year.
WW .... .. .. .. 4.65 3.30
W ............ 4.35 3.10
N ........... 3.85 3.00
M............ 375 2.90
K .. .. .. .. .. ... 3.50 2.80
I .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3.40 2.65
H .. .. .. ...... 2.85 2.25
G.............. 2.65 1.80
F ...... ..... ... 2.60 1.75
E .............. 2.55 1.70
D .. .. .. .... .. 2.50 1.65
ABC .. ..........2.45 1.60
Receipts, 1,929, sales, 3,073, exports,
753.
Tuesday, July 12.-No changes. Re-
ceipts 3,659, sales 1,603, exports 193.
Wednesday, July 13.-1 and below ad-
vanced 2 1-2 cents a barrel. Receipts,
3,715, sales 3,128, exports 3,310.
Thursday, July 14-WW to I advanced
5 cents a barrel and I and below 2 1-2 cts.
a barrel, making a general advance since
Monday's quotations of 5 cents a barrel
through all the grades. Receipts, 3,312,
sales 2,440, exports 5,229.

Bailey & Montgomery's Review.
New York, July 13, 1904.
Spirits Turpentine-Stoek 914 barrels.
The market during the week has been
more active and quite a little business
has been done, quotations being held very
steady from last Thursday, July 7th, in-
cluding today, the 13th, at 561-4 cents
tor machine barrels.
Rosin--4tosck, 14,440 barrels. This
market has not been quite so steady, and
owing to the declines at the- South busi-
ness has not been so active. We quote
the market dull.
AC, $2.90 to $2.95; D, $3.00; E, $3.0%;
F, $3.10; G, $3.15; H, $3.25 to $3.30; I,
$3.50 to $3.60; K, $3.90 to $3.95; M, $4.10
to $4.15; N, $4.25 to $4.30; WG, $4.70;
WW, $5.00.


Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.
Stock April 1 .......... 6,495 44,550
Receipts July 14 ........ 1,441 3,312
Receipts previously ..... 71387 178,720
Total ............... 79,323 226582
Exports July 14 ........ 232 5,229
Exports previously ...... 6066 165,898
Total ............... 60,598 171,127
Stock July 14 ........... 18,725 55,455
Stock last year......... 9,853 62,518

Range of Turpentine ad Rosin at Savan-
nah July 14 and Same Day
Last Year.
SJuly 14 | July 13 1July 14
Spirits. 1904 I 1904 | 1903
SpiritsI 531/l 531/- 48
Spirits. Firm. I Firm. IFirm.
Sales .. 465 519 1 729
Spirits. Firm. I Firm. Firm.
WW .... 4.70 4.65 3.40
W .... 4.40 4.35 3.15
S..... 3.90 3.85 3.00
S...... 3.85 3.75 2.00
K 3.55 3.50 2.80
1 ... 3.45 3.42y, 2.65
H ...... 2.87% 2.87%/ 2.25
G ......I 2.70 2-67% 1.75
F ..... 2.65@2.671 2.62.6 @2.65 1.70
E ...... 2.60@2.62 2.57%@2.60 1.65
D ...... 2.55 1 2.52/ 1.65
C, B, A, 2.50 2.47% 1.55
Sales ... 1 2,440 3,128 | 360

Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Review.
Spirits Turpentine-The market has
been a quiet one, but some little business
doing right along. Stock 1,180 barrels.
We quote Machines 561-4 cts.
Rosin-Stock, 14,440 barrels. This
to prevent any accumulation of stocks,
there does not appear to be any snap to
market. We quote:
PB', $3.00; D, $3.06; E $3.10; F, $3.15
to $3.20; H, $3.35; I, $3.60; K, $3.95 to
$4.00; M, $4.20; N, $4.40; WG, $4.70 to
$4.75; WW, $5.05 to $5.10.
Respectfully yours,
TOLAR, HART & CO.


Imports of Turpentine to U. K
The following table is compiled by James Watt & Son, of London, from the
official returns. For convenience of comparison we have turned cwta into barrels
-320 cwt. equal 100 barrels.


1897
From U. 8., bbls..... 152,652
From France, bbls.... 161
From other countries.. 1,494
154,307

From Russia .......... 2,815
Total Barrels .. 157,122


1898
173,786
244
878
174,907
4,183
179,090


1899
149,375
517
50
149,942
4,998
154,940


1900
174,446
2,283
840
177,509
8,521
186,090


1901
193,429
859
53
194,341
6,861
201=202


1902 1903
155,122 143,851
1,656 4,630
904 616
157,682 148,997
8,711 17,595
1e6,393 166592


Thus the import of Russian Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 1903 was double
that of 1902, and over six times as much as in 1897. It is interesting to see how
this import fluctuates with the price of American Turpentine.
Percentage of Import of Russian ..1.79 2.33 3.22 4.57 3.41 5.24 10.56
Av. Price Amer. Turp. in London ..21-6 24-6 34-1 35-4 27-1 33-1 42-2

FOR SALE.


50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill. $ 35 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in the State.

C. BUCKMAN, a. orantr..t
Jemokno onviege, P'l*


A


Send us your Mail Orders

W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.,
VALDOSTA, GA,


THE RPLIuArIJTY 0 OUR ADVERTISERS VOUCHBD FOR


r


Crops of Spirit and Roins for Three Year.
p IM-0. Crop 1B.-3 u 10" 1- M
Spirits. Rosin. Spirits. Rosin. Spirit. 1ra
Wilmington.. .. .. ....16,511 ,7 18,83 113,M 16,1 IMM
Cart.. ....... 32,W 3,15 3,00 11,835 3,6I 1
Savannah.. .. .. .. ..176A,18 60, 270,670 940,56 313,0 IJ
Brunswik.. .. .. .... 55,008 184,27 681947 244,10S 79,j M
Mo .. .. .. .. ....... 131 2 580 18,9I 79,272 21,M ap
New Orle a.. .. .. .. .. 36,17 13,1 33,103 108,033 21,68 9k,3
urrabl.. .. .. ......dosed closed 33 348 8J77 AW
Georgetown .. .. .. 7,515 44,14 10,07 468 8468 8I
Pneola .. .. ..... 4..2s;4 20so,92s 3,s7s 192,e6 ,788 1u4,A
Ja. & Ferndina.. .... 187,210 663,210 91,76 375,11 70,66 M5MU
Tamps .... .. ........ elod eloed 13,56 4006 4 16,4 f5iJ
Totals.. .... ......36,5 3 0 571,096 2,184,818 6B34 8,AU

R. S. HALL. Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. Kxorr, Sec. and Trees.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,


HARDWARE, MILL AND 4

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.

Herbert A. Ford, (eo. H. Ford, F. L. W1se8,
President. Vice-Pres. Cashier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITA L, 650,000.00.
DIRETonRs: R. L. Anderson, R.S Hall, Edward Hiller, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford. Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Soicited.

C. H. BARNES, Pres. J. D. SHAW, Vice-Pre. RALP JESSUP, sea.-Tfr

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Gcages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonville. Pensacola, Fernandima and Savannah
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FA.

W.RAZIER JOES C. H. AE R. JESSVP. W.. A .
WPfl5.* T!reasu. ALst Trese. W erela.

UNITED GROCERY. CO..

Importers & Wholesale Grocers
HAY, GRAIN and FEED.
Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
B. LASS ERaGT Agr. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


M. A. BRIGGS, President. HOMER BROWN, 2d Vice-President.
H C. BRIGGS, 1st Vice President. J. C. McDONALD, Secretary and Treasurer



W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.

HARDWARE, MILL and TUKlN I SUPPI M

Council Tool Co., & Holmes' Tool Co.. Tools,
Brigg's Sterling and Perfection Hacks and Pullers,
Cutters, Files, Whetters, Glue, Batting, Strainer Wire,
Turpentine Wagon Harness and Collars,
Hoop Iron, Coopers' Tools and Rivets.

Everything in Turpentine Supplies,









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11

^^%^%% ^%%%%%%%%%%%'AllAt^W W ket became. As far as th week itself is Country Life in America points out that
SQUALITY PIRST-PRICES RIGHT. concerned, those who were playing the bricks are now being made of clean mand

long side got the money. There is still and ground quicklime that are said to be
S an extensive short interest that may or as substantial as granite. They eodt
I ma ynot be induced or frightened into $2.50 per thousand. The mixed ingredi-
S- covering. This depends very much on the ents are forced into a strong steel cylinder
S nature of the weather next week. Should mold by means of a screw. After hte air
R anything unfavorable turn up at the pres- has been tucked from the cylinder, hot
ent time, it will be quite impossible to water is admitted, the rock being formed
prevent a further rise. All this is entirely by the resulting pressure and heat.
independent of the size of the crop and
.-* the course of the market later on. Look-
,L-ZS ing at the market at the moment, there Sam 'I P. Holm es& Co.
are evidences of so extensive a short in-
&8 P. ROLIMS & CO.'S WEEKLY COT- Belt, and the rise is generally attributed terest and resulting nervousness on every Stocks, Bends, Cetten.
TON LETTER. to the technical position of the cotton little advance that it would seem to be Grain and ProvisiMs.
situation rather than to any change in the best policy to keep off the short side MEMES
New York, July 15th.-The weekly cot- crop news. The simple fact of the mat- for the time being. If we have a sharp
te market has proven a surprise to a ter is, there has been too much company advance, things would be different. It NEW YORK GOTTON EXCHANGE
great many profestionale. There has been on the bear side. Every one has been will be some weeks before new cotton is CHICAGO BOARD Of TRADE
a settled conviction on the part of a ma- short of cotton and no one dares to buy. available, and until this time rarives, it Direct private wires to all exchanges.
jority of those operating in the market, As a result, there has been no speculative looks as though buyers on any eclnne Local stocks and bonds al special .
long interest and one of the most ex- would be able to find a market to sell on
that as long as crop news continued good, tensive short interests that the market at a profit. Bell Pe 853 Baldwla BMck
nothing but sagging prices was in sight. has seen in years. Now when a few of
But for four days this week, the market these shorts attempted to convert apaer The EXports of Turpentine and Rosln.
has gradually hardened, gaining a few into real profits, the process proved di- RITS OF TURPENTIN
points each day, until this morning Octo- turbing. Sell as they would, the bears PI OF TN OSNS.
To United Kingdom, In gallons: To United Kingdom barrels 2o Ibs:
br sold 9:72, or four points higher than could not supply cotton enough to pre- Month 1K10-0o 1902 19-2 Month i1o l e- 24 1014
the best price of last week. This ad- vent a reaction. Day after day, traders April.. .. .... 116.1 11.128 316.344 April .... .... 7192432 u s.
vance bhas taken place in the face of would as each other what it all meant. M ay .. .... ,15 .m 2 1a.3 May .. .. .. .. .o,31j OP
Juno 79114.17 L 1.O401 L ne June ........ 41D.748 671M IrL
strenuous opposition on the part of the A careful review of all the factors, as July n.... ......1 W M 4 1 m5I6.0 July .. .. .. 8s. 8 51 1. 4
bear element and with very little assist- far as news was concerned, failed to Augult.... .. ..S.O 1.7J7.y4 Augtut .. .... 74.64S Cs
ance on the part of the general public, furnish the real excuse of the rise. And September-.... 64. 7,611 7 0. September... .471 4a .8 s
October ........7. 434 41 111 1.46.o8 October ...... 641 41, 911si
There has been no change for the worse he more opposition there appeared to be, November .. 661,638 1,2969 922.1 November .. 71,107 95,735 8843
in the nature of advices in the Cotton the stronger the undertone of the mar- December .. 1,659,666 1,531,779 576.784 December .. 61,455 64.455 72.50
January. .. 228,850 373,240 164,330 January ... 53,06 42,70 01418
Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets. February... 116,452 38,200 247,490 February ... 28,51 37,326 91,1
1903- 1904. March .... 35,250 ...... 25,000 March .... 39,015 35,946 46,755
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE To um and Netherl, b--
Apr 1 Apr. 2 Apr. 1 Apr. 17 Apr. t M ay 1 May 8 Maay 15 May Maay 2M To Belgium and Netherlands. In gallons: Toun m and Netherlands, barred 3
6D "D 0 4 el 4 1-24 4-2 410-1 4F Month 13I4 1s23-i 1Isl-a Month 13- 143 1
June June 12 June 1i June 6 July J July 1 July 17 July 2 July i Aug A l .. .. .. .. 1 ,447 Included April 61.70 1 Inclu
S 4 4" 47 4 8 4 Apr il. .... ...2.. 6 60.527 Included April........ 167 aSs Included
A 14 Aug. 6 Aug. Sept. 4 Sept. n Sept 3 p 26 O Sep t. 2 Oct. 2 Oct.Y nllothr y ...............41 11 11 lotr Maye......... .un 0n &o0r
SIWO % 66% 6 2-4 57 ND W 5i 1-4 S I-2 3-4 June ........... .$7.1 21.210 urope June ... ..... I.6 1.,3 I4%o=
Oct. I Oct % Nov. Nov. Nov. i,. Dec. & Dec. 10. Dec. 17, Dec. 31. Jan. u ........ 847 Ju..y ....A61 .t7 Jy......... L4 11167 43
S61- a 56 56 59 14 56 1-4 62 1-244 euguet........N.667 711.2400 Auguste... ..... 4-2 $IN
Jam. Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18, Feby. 25 Mch. 3 Mch. 10 Meb 24 Optmbe .. .. 2 5.01 1 ~ ~ September. .. S.mat 1 2.
Oetobe r...... ...0. 210.651 m2L410 October .........1.131 6I.463 23
65 bt 64 2 0 59 0 68 November .. 133,695 349,726 381,226 November .. 3,991 60,020 31504
Me. 30 December ..100,372 58,659 672,164 December .. 37,077 13.325 2,940
67 January .... 168,879 241,150 174,367 January .... 0,739 24,19 15,61
R.OSINS February .. 5,130 372,444 366,501 February ... 9.849 25,268 18,366
WW WG N M K I H G F E D C-A March .... ...... 8,713 18,474 March .... 10,192 32,121 11,814
April 1 .......LM ... 3 M. $S1.2 2.5 2.40 23 2.10 2. -----.6 2. L
April 3 . .....5 3L & 3.4 3.1 28 2.40 2.3 210 3.5 L 3 2.5 To Germany, in gallons: To Germany, barrels 280 Ib.
Apr 1 .. .. L. L4 *L LS i 3.85 2.40 .10 L.O 2.0 S01 2.0 Month 1 -44 19-1 111- Month 111-44 I0e-S 111-
April f1 . &.5 3 L L2 L1 LO 21. t402 2. 2. 1.U 1.5 L April .. .. .. ......... 114.04 112.53 April .. .. .. .. 5 37.8M4 .
April M. .. 1 .15 l 10 1.11 2.5 2. 2.05 2. La 1.5 LM May .......... .. 3.23 6,4 2. May .. ... ...2 S&L s kag 7
May 1..... 3. 5 25 .15 110 2.5 .S 1. L85 1.80 175 L75 1.76 June...... .. 104. 06 1,2CS 4M0.04 June .. .. .. .. 41564 4B
May L. .. L. t. .56 1 10 Li. 2.5 2. 1.80 1.71 14 L70 1.70 Tuly .. .. .. .. ,11 1,412 72.711 July ........ 1W.sM 34.874 SU
ay .. .1 4% i3.% &.17% &.1% 1.w% 2.87% 2.27% L Lt L17 1.70 1.70 August .... .. 51.rS G7.437 August ...... 7t8.84 34.1c
May 5 ... . 36 S6 L -10 300 2.25 17 L L.70 L 1.60 September..... K. 56I60 6 T71.30 September.... 1157 1 1.411
May .... . . & 15 3.5 2.0 2.04 1.8 LN 1. 1 L70 1.70 October ...... .57.216 I1.44 14.57 October .... .. ..L. 138.S4 3W1
June ..... L. L1 L. 1.1 t5 3.6 2." 1.10 L. 1.11 1.80 1.75 November .. 179,010 110,153 81,780 November .. 56,763 42,841 ~2,373
Jme 12..... 3. .1 5 I 2 5 X1 1 1.2 126 L 35 L 1.75 1.7 December .. December .. 15,407 39,171 648
June 1. . . l30 o 2.5 .70 2e 1.75 170 1.5 1. 1.6 January .... 132,600 54, 153,898 January .... 34,762 54,062 99,273
June ......2 10 .5 2t 2. L 70 1.3 1.5 1.1 February ...220,182 15,838 67,174 February... 172,135 40,915 56,39
July I ............. L3 .10# L2.90 LIS 3LS LIS l.0 L7 .1_71. 1.6 10
JuI .... . L1* t6 .* 2M.S 2.- 2.5 Lb) 1.75 L7 13 L6 March .... 65,256 ...... 94,609 March .. 49,962 60,920 41,0
Jaly 1 .....L. L4 .. &U 10 L U* 2.75 2.30 180 170 1.5 1. L.M --- --- --
Juy M ...... 6 31 3A. L- 2.9 2.75 2.30 1.85 1.75 L7 l.3 1.65 To all other Europe In Gallons: To all other Europe. barrels 20 Iba:
July ....... 1..0 &23 L3S L La 2.70 75 1. 1 7 1.5 L 1 Month 1M1-04 10-1 101-43 Month 103-04 11M-8 1U148
August T L 4 12 .15 .35 2 70 2 1758 1.6 1.5 1.5 1.s April .. .. .. .. .. 510 1.475 2O.r5S April .. .. .. .. 3E84 10.1423 .
AuSat 14. .. L" S. 1I. LS 2. 2. 2.20 L W 75 W 170 l70 1.7 May.... .. .... .8 1.07 574.311 May .. .. .. .. 07.1 4.711 u1,
Augt . . .30 3.2a .1 .0S 2.3 I 2. a 2 1.3 1. 1.7 L.70 1.70 June..... .14.21 1.60 98.40 June.......... 14,044 *9.C2 .j
AuguSt ..... .7 3 3.5 & 3.10 L.- 2.4 0 .OO 1.90 1.5 1. 1.9 July ......... 6.60 124.24 48.43 July ...... .. 4.51 61.812 14,116
September 4. .. L6 3.40 3 0 L 3.00 2.50 2.1 2.5 10 L9 1.5 Augus* ...... .. 2.000 3.IO August .. .. .. 8.35 .119
Septmbe 11. 10 5 2 50 3.46 .40 3.10 2.50 2.06 1.5 1. 1.5 1.78 September.. .. 3. 3.04 21.0010 September.... .494 17.4 1.3 .1
eptember 1 & 3.Is 3.7 L) t 42 3.20 2.60 2.15 2.05 1.9 1. 'Tctober ..... .. 10.000 42.83 17.50 October ...... 4.40 15.442 11.
eptember .. 4.A 4.10 3.5 -15 .70L 3.35 2. 5 L 2 .20 2.10 I.0 1. November .. 32,500 17,00 94.837 November .. 13.328 6,415 25,01
October 2. . 4.46 4.40 4.35 4.30 4.15 23. 2.70 .46 .30 2.20 L L. December .. 470 89591 23,000 December .. 25,299 48701 39,816
S October .. .. .. 4.7 4.4 4.5 4 4.10 3.50 270 2.5 2.40 L.30 2.3 L January ... 11,000 -- January ... 17,124 7.148 24,902
October .... .. 4. 4 0 0 4.t 3 2.5 .0 2.455 2.50 5 2. LU February .. 15.471 ...... 44502 February ... 38.184 42,654 5,931
October .... ... M L 1 t 2.S 2. 2.45 4 2.5 6 t5 2.IS March 14,189 12,275 36,000 March .. 33,687 51,949 71,99
Oetober2 ........ 4.3W L LOD 30 3. 2.70 2.60 65 50 2.5 2. 52.15
November 6......3S 1.23 1.10 S 2.L 2.70 2.00 2.5 2.O5 2. 2.30 ----
November 1 ...... 3.5 2.10 2.0 2.90 2.70 2.35 2.0 2.5 2.10 2.1 2.5 Total Foreign Exports. In gallons, includ- Total Exports of Roain. barrels 28 pounds.
November a .. .... 3.5 2. 2.0 2.70 2.45 2.46 2.35 2. 2.15 2.16 Ing everything outside of the United Including Asia, Africa and America out-
November .... S 1.5 10 M9 M 2.0 2.40 2.0 2.0 2.10 2.10 211 States: side of the United States:
Decemhbr t .. .. .S25 2S 2.W 2.80 2 2.36 230 2.20 L. 2.1 2.11 Month 1 0244 1902-M 1Snl- Month 193I-4 1902-B 1m1-.
Deceber 1 .. .. 2. 2 .3 2.5 2.2 2.5 10 2.23 2.1 2.21 Aprl ........ 14,084 66W.815 96.67 April ...... .. 19.. 1 18.128 W5.1M
December 10 .... 20 S 3.5 2.1 2.0 2.56 2.6 2.10 2.20 2.20 2.2 2.23 May .. .. .. .. 198.782 211.144 2.2S .M May .. .... .. 1.8& 260.144 4.Me
December 31 ..B 3. 3. 10 2.16 .85 2.6 2.4 2.10 2.5 2.5 2. 2.15 June...... .... 1.s8.g0. 2.22S.5 2.947.821 June ........ 178.24 210.0 1 211.S
January 14 .. ..4.00. 3.60 3.3 3.15 3. 3.00 2.96 2.0 2.70 2.5 2.50 2.50 July ........ 2.181.81d 1.51.015 2,43.84 July .. .. .. .. 36.580 187.193 116,4
Jaam ry U ......4.1 4.10 L. 3.10 3115 2.10 2 1 2.70 2.5 2.0 21. 2.4 Anugut ...... 1.734.13M 2.906.458 August .. .... 2 2.15 22R. A
January .... .. 4.10 1 3.2 3..05 .15 2.10 2.5 2.86 2.75 2.7 Septensber.. .. .1.471 2.154.5 2.224.190 September... .3 0 23.032 1U.4
February 11 ..3.75 3.45 3.36 3.30 325 3.20 2.85 2.85 2.80 2.75 2.70 2.70 October...... 1.4s0.m 1.012.11 1.627.32 October .... .. 200.B3 27S.7I 1I t
February 18 ...3.65 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25 3.05 2.70 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.55 November ..1,851.068 1,932,183 1,652.574 November .. 184,860 231.543 222,479
February 25 ...3.70 3.50 3.35 3.20 3.25 2.95 3.60 2.55 2.50 2.45 2.40 2.40 December ..1.993.529 1,794.23 1.859.175 December .. 210,457 202.066 191.440
March 10 ......3.80 3.60 3.40 3.5 3.30 3.05 2.75 270 2.65 2.60 255 2.55 January ... 700292 820.253 629,990 January ... 192,471 170,96 247,684
Marh 24 ......4.00 3.70 3.50 3.35 3.30 2.95 270 2.65 2.60 255 2.50 2.50 February .. 487577 531.346 855,476 February ... 306.090 189,632 257,224
March 31 ......4.10 3.80 3.0 3.35 330 2.95 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.50 250 March .. .298,488 118,174 285,958 March .... 171,548 204,433 214,913
THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.


in









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

JAMES A. KOLLOMON.
Eder a" Manager.
Paltdahd Every Frrmy.
SugmJrnw t g(Domesti). ..g. Pr Annm
(Forelan).... 83s0 .
"The Pine and Its Preduots.
At communlestlkm should be addressed
The Induatril. Record Company.
JLcksonvilol. Fla.
Iramh EdMtal a Bnd Bm ines OmIo at
Atlanta*. Ga.. f Savanna1, Ga.

Entered at the Postoffiee at Jacksonville,
Fla., as second-lass matter.

Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association,
September 12, 1902, as its exclusive official
organ. Adopted in annual convention
September 11, as the organ also of the
general Association.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the official
organ of the Interstate Cane Growers' An-
sociation. Adopted Sept. 11, 1903, as the
only official organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.


COPY FOR ADVERTISING.
Advertising copy (changes or new ad-
vertiements) should reach us Tuesday
morning to insure insertion in the isse of
the sme week.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES
The publishing plant and the main of-
ices of the Industrial Record Publishing
Co. are located at Ho. xi South Hogan
Street, Jacksonville, Fla., in the very heart
of the great turpentine and yelow pine
idustries.
The Atlanta, G., office is located in the
Equitable Building No. 723. Atlanta is
the center of the great manufacturing
trade of the entire South.
The Savannah, Ga., office is in the Board
of Trade building Savannah is the lead-
ing open naval stores market in the world.

WHY SHOULD BUSINESS SUFFER?
The Industrial Record is the business
man's trade journal It will not be drawn
into the conflict now opening between the
two great political parties in this country,
nor will it champion the cause of either.
Being guided by -this, we fail to see why,
as is claimed by a number of trade jour-
nals at the North, the election of Mr.
Roosevelt is necessary to protect the busi-
ness interests of the country. We recog-
nize that during the campaigns of four
and eight years ago, when the free coin-
age of silver at the ratio of 16 to 1 was
the issue, men who looked upon the gold
standard as an absolute necessity, had
a right to view it as a business proposi-
tion affecting the business interests of the
country, and to vote accordingly. To
them the maintenance of a double stand-
ard was as impossible as the riding of
two horses at the same time, when the
horses were going in opposite directions.
That they were right in their contention
is proven by the fact that the moment
the question was eliminated from the
policy of this government, and the gold
standard adopted, prosperity began. Mon-
ey tied up until that question was set-
tied. found investment, and everything
has been smooth sailing in business ever
since.
The Democratic Convention just ad-
journed recognized this truth and wisely
forebore to make it an issue in its plat-
form. There remains, therefore, but one
issue on which there need be any trouble,


to-wit: the reduction of the tariff. Of
course the big syndicates and trusts are
opposed to the importation of any com-
modity into this country from the out-
side world that may compete with what
they sell, and they are willing to make the
tariff so igh that it would be practically
prohibitive. But on articles in which
they are not dealing they wish a reduc-
tion of the tariff. Our country can well
profit by the example of England, that has
ruled the markets of the world for cen-
turies. She claims to have done it by
free trade.
We do not advocate free trade, but we
do say that there is a general demand all
over the country for a reasonable reduc-
tion of the tariff, especially upon those
articles that make possible the corners in
the necessities of life. The beef trust is
an instance. It is a fact that the cost of
living is steadily advancing in this coun-
try, while the wages of operators remain
stationary or are diminishing. Here is
where a reduction of tariff is necessary.
And we fail to see where a moderate
reduction of the tariff in such instances
as we have pointed out can affect the busi-
ness interest of the country It might
make the beef trust's profits smaller, but
it would enable the masses to live better
and cheaper.
The business of this country has out-
grown its territorial limits. We need the
trade of the outside world, and how can
we get it while a tariff so high that it
prohibits the outside world from exchang-
ing commodities with us?
Another thing. Should the Democratic
ticket be elected the Senate will be over-
whelmingly Republican, so that there will
be no possibility of anything being done
to affect vested interests of a high tariff
for the next four years.
The clientage of the Industrial Record
consists of leading business men of the
Southeast. Politically, nine-tenths of
them are desirous of the election of Judge
Parker to the Presidency, on racial and
other grounds. We, therefore, fail to see
that the election of the Democratic ticket
would affect the business interests of the
country, but if it should, it would af-
feet it for the better.

PASSING OF THE PAINT BRUSH.
The method of applying paint to build-
ings, furniture, etc.. in use up to the first
day of January of the new century, has
been by means of a brush in the hand of
a professional artist. It had its advan-
tages and its drawbacks, but it required
a master hand to lay it on at the proper
thickness and consistency. We all re-
member him. He wore overalls made out
of the whole cloth in one piece, usually of
white material and usually badly daubed
with old paint. How. in our extreme
youth, we used to admire him! How he
sputtered about while mixing his paints:
how, when they were mixed, he fearlessly
climbed a high ladder which leaned against
the house, and with a graceful movement
of his right hand applied the paint, and
how sometimes he would have painter'
colic.
The opening of the twentieth century
threatens 'to do away with him and his
method of business. The coming painter
is to apply the stuff with a hose and noz-
Szle. na if putting out a fire. By the new
process it is said that the paint can be
driven into the interstices, cracks. et al..
of the building and will stay on better.
Moreover, it is said that a man can paint
three houses hose and ozzle fashion.
where he could paint only one by the old


almost sacred, have in almost every in-
stance reaped, and are to-day reaping, a
prosperous reward. Many, no doubt, who
did not aid in the organization movement
and who have never aided it, have reaped
good results from the labors and sacrifies
of their neighbors. Heaven give unto
them yet a spirit of gratitude that sur-
passes understanding! Those who an-
tagonized the organization movement, as a
rule. have not succeeded. Find the pro-
ducer who has fought the Turpentine Ope-
rators' Association, who has protested
against the spirit of co-operation that
has practically revolutiomzed the busi-
ness, and you will find a producer who is
as poor to-day as the average operator
was years ago, when every man distrusted
his neighbor and regarded his factor as
an enemy.
On the whole the industry has passed
through three years of unbounded pros-
perity. Spirits to-day is worth over $2
a barrel more than it was a year ago.
Roains are correspondingly higher. To the
operator who lives only in the past and
the present the situation looks excellent.
But. in reason, what is in the future?
There is no necessity for temporizing
with facts. Unless there are some
radical changes the future is full of gloom.

process. and do it better, too.
Painters. you old-fashioned daubers.
who have been doing nothing else for
forty years, if you wish to continue in
the business, the Industrial Record sug-
-ests that you acquire the art of hand-
ling a hose and nozzle as soon as you en.


act as a reliable substitute in many of
the merchantable uses for turpentie, ad
they are doing it all the time. Jst so
sure, then, as night follows day, if the
production of spirits turpentine is greater
another year than the present year's out-
put, or equally as heavy, just so sure wfl
the price of spirits be precipitated to a
price where it cannot be produced except
at a loss.
It is absolutely necessary, in the opin-
ion of the Record, that every operator
study these conditions and come to the
September convention prepared to dis-
cuss them and then act in harmony with
all the other operators along the les
best adapted to prevent disaster.
The question of holding the bo cut
down is an old one. but if the box eat
another year is not held down, the pro-
ducers collectively will lose more in a
season than they have made in three.
The Record is the operators' chawpin.
It realizes that spirits cannot be made and
sold at a figure less than fifty cents, at
the present prices of timber, and it is for
this reason that this note of warning is
sounded.
Let every operator, regardless of his lo-
cation or the conditions of his individ-
ual trade, prepare to be at the Septem-
ber convention.
Facing the situation honestly and brave-
ly. It is ji:st as important that they at-
tend this coming convention and meet and
prepare to offset these disasterom possi-
bilities. as it was important that they
first organize for their own alvatioL


Er YOU ArM MIPNV XIN, ADVERTISE IN TZE XWOrU


Preparing for the Next T. O. A. Convntieon

There's Danger Ahead if Opertors Negc

The executive committee of the Tur- It may not be orthodox oD my a0, hat
pentine Operators' Association will meet it is just as well that we face the e-
in the very near future and make the fnal tions as we find them. The -iu- .
arrangements for the Fourth Annual Con- are there will be a large increase in th
vention of the Turpentine Operators' As- year's spirits receipts, perhapM 3 lM bir-
sociation in Jacksonville during the week rels. The market this summer hea bem
of the 10th of September. maintained above the fifty cent dead-lie,
The Convention will meet this year in as every operator who had faith in the
the beautiful new auditorium of the Turpentine Operators' Association kw-
Board of Trade, which is in the very heart would be the case. It was promised. The
of the city, and is comfortable and com- receipts have been controlled thi summer,
modious. and the interests who were behind the
The convention itself, which will prob- maintenance of high prices have been se-
ably last two days, will be the most im- cessful in their undertakings; but these
portant ever held by the Association. In conditions cannot be promised amnther
many respects it will be an occasion more year. With a heavy increase in leeaipt
pregnated with great and even far-reach- this year the buyers know what to rse-
ing problems than that of the memorable onably expect next year. And yet with
convention of 1901, when thft movement spirits above the fifty cent mark during
for mutual benefit and protection was in- the May-August deliveries the average
augurated. operator is to-day absorbed with the Mide
At that time the producers of naval of increasing his production another year.
stores were in a critical shape. Many of And right there is the danger hae.
them were broke with little prospects for For the past few months trading ha
rehabilitation Others were desperately been wild. Turpentine men hav in some
near the brink. That movement and that cases been scrambling almost like eray
movement alone, backed as it was by the men to assume new obligations ad to
leading operators and factors, who real- take on new responsibilities. Many of
ized the perilous condition the industry them have reached the point where debt
was in, saved the situation, has lost its horror. In the mad and reek-
It was not alone the Turpentine Ope- less scramble for more place and men
raters' Association as a working organisa- crops and more product so e have lat
tion, perhaps, that did it, but the spirit of every thought of their obligation and
co-operation, the spirit of mutual trust, have not attempted to penetrate eve a
the spirit of business affinity that devel- season into the future. And again, the
oped then was accordingly responsible and world is getting full of substitutes. Wood
this spirit was the direct result of or- turpentine is coming more heavily into
ganization. No person will dispute it, the markets of this country. In Europe,
who is familiar with the conditions be, Russian turpentine, which is practically
fore and after the blessed 10th of Septem- the same, is flooding the markets. There
ber, three years ago. is no substitute, it is true, for pure spirit
The three years that have followed are of turpentine, made from the distillation
full of history for the naval stores ope- of the gum, but there are thbinau of
rator. Those who lived faithful to the people studying day and night to pt
obligations of that occasion, which were upon the market some article that will









THE WEEKL INUTILRCR.1


-f"----- -1 ----


I
I


JAPANES COURAGE.
It must be conceded, we think, that
the Japanese are displaying in the war
they are now carrying on in the far East
a courage and determination which do not
Sad their parallels in the records of any
recent war. Courage is not a national
quality. Men are fearless or the reverse
as individuals, but each nation is disposed
to believe thta it possesses in its soldiers
the bravest men in the world, the people
of each and every country assuming that
when it comes to a question of a bayonet
charge, they have an incontestable super-
iority. We think, however, it may be
fairly said that there has been a greater
average of individual courage shown by
the Japanese than by any other modern
nation. We doubt whether there is an
army in the world the soldiers of which
could be counted upon to make the frontal
attacks against strongly fortified positions
that have been made on two or three oc-
easions by battalions of Japanese armies.
We do not believe there is a navy in the
world that would promptly undertake the
work that the Japanese officers and sail-
ors undertook in endeavoring to sink more
than a dozen ships in the channel of
Port Arthur, in carrying a steamer load-
ed with high explosives under the guns of
the land fortifications at Port Arthur for
the purpose of planting mines in the ship
channel, or that would engage in the last
exploit of endeavoring to send torpedo
boats and torpedo destroyers directly into
one of the strongest fortified harbors in
the world for the purpose-of torpedoing
the warships lying there. The fact that,
in the ventures thus entered on, three out
of four of the men engaged in them lost
their lives indicates the desperate char-
acter of these exploits.


SHIPPING DEPRESSION.
The English Maritime reports are to the
effect that at no past time has the ship-
ping business of the United Kingdom been
in a more unsatisfactory shape than it
has been for the last six or eight months.
It has been impossible during this time
to obtain freight money suticient to pay
running expenses and depreciation, to say
nothing of profits. Four or five years ago
conditions were quite the reverse. and it
was said that some of the ship owners
were earning a sufficiently large return
on their tonnage to pay the cost of con-
* struetion if the profits were continued
through a term of three years. The ship-
ping business tends toward extremes, and


J~=l;,o,~or+r~ 9++v U; v,~~sppv0~


all that can be said at the present time
is that the low-water mark has been
reached.

CIRCULATION AGAIN INCREASING.
It may be remembered that in May, for
the first time in eleven months, a falling
off instead of an increase in circulation
occurred, so that on June 1 the total vol-
ume of money in circulation was less by
over $2.,300,000 than it had been on the
first of the preceding month. The fig-
ures for June disclose an opposite ten-
dency, for on July 1 we find an increase of
over $1,000,000 less; silver certificates
total on June 1. The figures have not,
it is tnre,'reached the mark attained on
May 1. but they are $4,500,000 in advance
of those given for April 1. As compared
with June 1, the most noteworthy item
of increase is a gain of nearly $14,200.000
in gold certificates. Gold coin showed an
increase of over $1,600,000, national bank
notes a gain of over $14,800,000 and sub-
sidiary silver a nominal increase-a little
over $23,000. The other items showed
decreases. Standard silver dollars were
over $1,000,000 lass; silver certificates
showed a decline of over $1.500.000; Treas-
ury notes of 1890 exhibited a falling off
of over $400.000, and United States notes
were less by over $2,800,000 what they
were on June 1.
As compared with the corresponding
(late of last year, we find that gold coin
shows an increase of over $25,000.000.
while gold certificates exhibit a gain of
over $87,700,000. Silver certificates show
an increase of nearly $7,500,000 and sub-
sidiary silver one of over $2,400.000, while
national bank notes exhibit a gain of over
$33,100.000. The decreases comprise one


of nearly $800.000 in standard silver dol-
lars, one of over $6,100.000 in Treasury
notes of 1890, and one of nearly $2,100.000
in United States notes.


The St. Louis SpeciaL
The Naval StoresSpecial train, which
left Jacksonville for St. Louis on the last
night in June carrying statesmen, editors.
lumbermen and naval stores folks, return-
ed last Monday. The passenger list had
shrunk wonderfully. Many of those who
went, either remained in St. Louis or
after seeing the sights and listening to
the patriotism that abounded in that pre
cinet for a season, went elsewhere, to
enjoy a season of rest-from St. Louis.
and will turn up later.


Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.


CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS,


AND V


Any size, Any sh
SDAValogue for t
(*. Pd. D)AVlS k SON',


NO. 6888.

lTH ILEUITIC HAIOIAL BANK OF mJAKSO111E.
CAPITAL PAID IN. $350,000.00.
OPEN FOR BUSINESS AUGUST i, 1903o
OFFICERS:
Ewarn W. Lme, Preldert. Fred W. noyt, Vke-Prsdert.
TboImas P. Dealam, Cashier.


Flavius T. Christie,
President.


Frank Groover,
Vi ePres


Maraell W. tewart,
See. and Tre.


THE IHRISTE-UR OOR ORUfiG O.


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Jocsonmtile,


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we silc Trdme fi ULmer N ml I Cis Drm.

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WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain. Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514- 516- 518- 520- 522- 524- 526 EAST BAY SIKLL
Jacksonville. Fla.


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


J. W. WADE.
Vice-President.


E. HUGHES,
Sec'y and Treas


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS. LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.

DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.


ATS. Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
ipe. Our Cat- eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
ie asking, solicited.
PArLATKA. FLIA. Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.

"TAI, IAmsaanDa A"D PROGnRSSIVa"


The WestaRaley-Rannie Company.

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
A. N. Wear, Pres. R. e. West. Vice-Pres. W. 9- Ramie. Vice-Prs. M. RaJfe. Sec. a reas.


.We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
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Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-:
thispaper.
KINGAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


THE WEEKLY MNUSTRAL RECORD..


. 13






14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY


Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF
Freight and Caboose Cars,
Brass and Gray Iron Castings.


CAPACITY:


Analysis of Wood Spirit. *
Wood spirits, otherwise called wood al- Z IN N A IL S
cool, consist principally of methyl alco- Fo
hol, mixed with smaller amounts of ace- Turpentine Cups
tone, methyl acetate, dimethyl acetal,
alsekyde, allyl alcohol, methylamine, oil Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
and water. Some of these constituents, the OmIy aaMa which will not injure
such as allyl alcohol and the oily matter saws when left in the trees.
give to wood spirits a pungent odor, and Sa le N ail 0o.
it is on this account the government se- 2"7 plWkl A. Nr oTr*, M. YV.
elected it as the denaturing principle oi Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
methylated spirits, which consists of nine Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
parts of spirits of wine and one of wood Iron Rods, Etc, Slating and Roofing
spirits. Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
S .I'Tacks.

* THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE.
Jacksonville, Fla.
* CAPITAL 300,000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS 5300,000
We issue Time Certificates of Deposit, whichdraw interest at the rate of three per
Scet per ammau, if held ninety days or longer.
Particular attention paid o Out-o-Town accounts. sending deposits by man". o..
ak*_e-asa*aeaaaeaeattassaeasaaa*- staeaeas*eaeam


TEN CARS PER DAY.


Located in the heat of the Lumber District gives u adva-
tage of choieest material at lowest cost.


"The" PAINT STORE,
I. E. BAIRD 41 CO.. JacRsonville, Fla,
W all paper, pictures, frames, painting and all interior and exterior damet.
Hardware, glass, etc. If you are build ing a fine home, get Baird & Co. to do
tne decorating that it may be in keeping with the building. Oldest and met a-
perienced house in F;orida.

T5he Chattanooga Pottely Co.,
DAISY. TENN.
has the exclusive right to manufacture and sell the

HERTY TURPENTINE APPARATUS,
Patented Feb. 3, 1903.
Infringements of the Patent will be vigorously prosecuted


CHAS. H. HERTY,


Green Cove Springs, Fla.


JOHN HENDERSON, President.


J. A. CRANFORD, Secretary.


CHATTANOOGA POTTERY CO.,


Factory located Daisy, Tenn.

Sole Manufacturers of


Jacksonville. Fla.


The Herty Turpentine Cups


If you


expect


to use cups next


season place


your orders now for future delivery, Prices and


all
4 .. ... ,
,,:. ": ~. %,

."
.-:. : : .-:- : ."


information cheerfully furnished on

Cups, Gutters and all Tools
Used in the HERTY system.


Address all commurrications


?5he


Chattanooga Pottery Company,
Jacksonville, Fla.


PATRONIZE VrZa1D.AnV55Zrjg roa SyTonO DNULoNG


p





I.


-- ---- ---------- ------- e~a3CK 3


;sffsaf3c~Esrscs~E3Esc~3isi3i~i~r~


~c~3F)Elr~FfJ~rr~+~ss~;~-~~';i~SCSESa









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


AT TuI HUB OF Tar soUT.
Atlanta Bureau, July 14, 1904.
Nothing particularly startling has hap-
pened here during the week, unless it is
the crowd of excursionists that visit our
city and keep our merchants from re-
membering that this is supposed to be th.
dull time of the year. Contrary to all
precedents, the hotels are comfortably
full, the visitors pleased at the quality
of climate we furnish them, and all go
away convinced that to its other titles,
Atlanta should be called a summer resort.


The news of the complete renovation
of the Kimball House will be welcome
to the people of Georgia and Florida gen-
erally; it has been the headquarters of
two generations, and old and young alike
would hate to see it go uuer. There is
plenty of room in Atlanta for first-class
clae hotels. No sooner was the Pied-
mont furnished than it was found neces-
sary to build an annez. There are lots of
factories here and they are all busy. On-
of the busiest manufacturers in the South
is Mr. J. K. Orr, of "Red Star" shoe fame.
His company has so pushed that brand,
and so well backed it up by the high qual-
ity of the goods sold under it that the
firm finds a difficulty in filling the orders
received. Great preparations are being
made for the Horse Show, which is con-
idently claimed will be greater than ever.
The Fourth National Bank Building,
which is seventeen stories high and is
now being looked and sub-divided, shows
just how much business is done in this
city. Not yet finished, every office in it
is already rented. The U. S. Government
has lead the top floor for quarters for
the Department of the Gulf. The officers
expect to move from their present head-
quarters next to the Capitol City Club
by the first of October next.
The Chandler Building, owned by the
president of the Coc-Cola Company, is
rapidly getting under way and already
with only the foundations being built,
people are inquiring the price of rents.
The legislature is still in session and
has passed the Australian ballot law-the
only really important measure before
them. In fact, the members are com-
mencing to ask for leaves of absence, a
sur sign that interest is waning.


Marble ad Stone


we am...



Beacham & Shackehon OND TIMBER
ROUND TIMBER-


ukh hbiung imt 9K on L".


Desirable Tracts For Sale.


515 WIt hiding Jaengie, RL


COURSE OF PALE AND MEDIUM ROSINS AT SAVANNAH FOR TWO YEARS.

W.W. W.G. N K I
DATE 1904-06 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04 1904-05 1903-04


April I.........
April 8.......
April 15........
April 22........
April 29........
May 6........
May 13........
May 20........
May 27........
June 3........
June 10........
June 16........
June 23........
July 1 ........
July 7 ........
July 14 ........


$4.10
3.95
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.95
4.35
4.50
4.60
4.65
4.75
4.75
4.70


$3.90
3.60
3.50
3.40
3.35
3.35
2.42%
3.65
3.65
3.60
3.40
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30
3.30


$3.80
3.75
3.60
3.60
3.60
3.50
3.50
3.55
3.65
4.05
4.10
4.15
4.25
4.40
4.40
4.40


$3.60
3.45
3.35
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.27y,
3.35
3.35
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10


$3.60
3.60
3.45
3.45
3.45
3.35
3.30
3.30
3.40
3.85
3.85
3.85
3.90
4.00
3.95
3.90


$3.50
3.35
3.25
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.17%
3.25
3.25
3.20
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00


$335
3.35
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.65
3.65
3.65
3.65
3.80
3.80
3.85


$ 3.40
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12%
3.20
3.20
3.15
2.95
2.95
295
2.90
2.90
2.90


$3.30
3.30
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.15
3.25
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.55
3.55
3.55


$3.20
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.02
3.10
3.10
3.05
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.80
2.80
2.80


w w -w -w w w w w w w w w -w w w -


THE COVINGTON COMPANY,


2.95
2.9%
180
2.80
2.80
2.80
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.10
3.25
3.30
3.30
3.45
3.45
3.45


$9.85
2.86
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.87%
3.00
3.05
3.00
2.80
2.70
2.70
2.65
2.65
2.65


-. -- -w


4
4
4
<


Whes5eSHOQES AND DRY GOODS. 635 to 641 West Forsytk Strut
* ** SHOES AND DRY GOODS. "S,'""','"*'

NEW YORK: 256 Church St. ack nvile

We Sell Merchants Only.


Clark Buys out Overstraet.
.. A. Clark, of Steinhatchie, Fla., and
J. E. Overstreet, of Baxley, Ga., were in
the city one day this week. While here,
Mr. Overstreet sold his interest in the
firm of (lark & Overstreet, Steinhatchie,
Fla.. to Mr. Clark, who will carry on the
business in his name.

Stiller Wasted.
Prefer a young man who has a very
good education and a fair knowledge of
turpentine business. L T. Hardee, Mulat,
Fla. 2t.


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE & RETAIL


HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints, Oils and Glass,
Stoves, Tinware, Country-Holloware.


10 WEST BAY STREET


Jacksonville, Fla.


Are absolute necessities in building the
houe beautiful. Realizing the enormous
strides Jacksonville has made in improve-
ments, Mr. Reed E. LaMance, the manager
of the Brunswik Marble and Granite
Comnay, has moved his head office to this
city. Mr. IMance has also purchased
the Dixie Stone Company, of this city,
and in future the concern will be known
as the Southern Marble and Stone Com-
pany, headquarters, 4 Hogan St, Jack-
sonville, where at present there are no
* less than forty-five marble and stone me-
chanics employed. Mr. LaMance is well
known throughout this section of country.
In this city he has but recently com-
pleted the Board of Trade Building. He is
doing the marble and stone work for the
Government building. Special attention
is paid by this company to monumental
work. In Waycross there is a beautiful
monument built by them in memory of
the son of Mr. W. W. Beach, the well
known operator. Mr. LaMance gives per-
ionsa attention to all the work and prom-
ises his patrons the best service of the fin-
est marble and stone working establish-
met in the South.


Tailor-Made Shirts
THE KIND THAT fIT





tb fe Siftr.
NEII m









FITTM TIE
AAI-TO-FIT
.i Ew.


Se for .'





F. S. BLANCK
OLUMBIA, S. C.
TM uLMNe uSm fSMT hi nmTK L
WHLI WRITING ADVERTISERS


IoA RCBKB Prmr C V. BARTLESOKN Vic&Pm& BAM It BAXIX E hBCM
C&)bHds e (C V. a 'b CM) leffla CAUFAI Sv- & Trai

FLORIDA FREIGHTr CLAlm AGENCY
(INICORPORATED.)
W~e can collect yourr Freightt Claimas against
Rallroads and Steamship Companies.
Charges Reassonable. Your Membebrship Solicited.
Wer save yon :11 worry nd tromble. Emlersed by all Piblic Dilie
I the Citraz rrawsportatio Companies.
216 Dyal-Upchurch ffift JACKSONVILLE. FLA.



BE'rTrE L11r41 5 SIPECIAIL.IrY


I will send by express, prepaid, the following:
Four full quarts Lincoln County, Sunnybrook Rye or Big Horn Rye .. S. L
single Bottles ...................................................................
I will send four full quarts of Somers' Corn, Melwood Rye, Golden Wed-
ding Rye, Holland Gin, Ton. Gin, Peach Brandy, Peach and Honey
Whiskey, Gin and Manhattan Cocktails-any of the above for........ L.m
One bottle of any of the above .............................. ............ ........ 1.00
*our bottles of the following California Wines: Sherry, Port, Muscat.
Catawba ........................................................ .... ....
Single bottles .................... ................... ............ ........ .
Single bottles ......... ......................................... IU
Four bottles Wilson Whiskey, eased............................. ....... t
Single bottles ..................................... ....... .................... .
Five bottles Duty's Malt ......................................................
Bulk goods of all kinds. Special Prices on application. All kinds of
liquors in jugs from $1.50 to 6.~O, f. o. b. Jacksonville.
F. BETTELINI W Bay St., epp. Union uepot, Jacksonville, Fla
MENTION THE RECORD.


--,-- - - - - - - - - - -


v v








1n THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


h M Stos Dpartmeu t


WOOD TURPENTINE.

It Is Now Being Manufactured in the
Northwet.
Whether the new process turpentine
which is secured from pine stumps by var-
ious methods of distillation is destined to
become a complete substitute for the old-
"turps" is largely a matter of opinion.
Some say that it is already a formidable
competitor of rosin turpentine; others
say that while it is not entirely satisfac-
factory now, it will be when perfected,
and still others, but they are a small mi-
nority, insist that it can never be a
successful substitute for turpentine. The
truth lies somewhere within those limits.
The fact is that plants are being multi-
plied in the endeavor to make more wood
turpentine, and we hear of no complaints
from the manufacturers of it on the score
of the market. There is, evidently, a de-
mand for all they can turn out.
A comparatively new feature of the bus-
iness is that it is not confined to the
South, but is bein gtaken up seriously in
the North and far West. Promoters are
at work along that line in northern Min-
nesota, and they claim that good turpen-
tine can be made from the old pine stumps
of that section. A similar move is contem-
plated in the fir-bearing states of the
Far West-Oregon and Washington. It
is said that in northern Minnesota the
manufacturers of wood spirits will clear
away all pine stumps from a farm in
return for the stumps themselves, and
that the farmers find profit in the enter-
prise indirectly in having the lands cleared
.without cost.
If it is true, as claimed, that the white
pine and the fir, as well as the yellow
pine, is rich in turpentine, then the pos-
sible perfection of this process becomes
of double importance Hundreds of
thousands of acres in the northern States,
which have been cut ever for lumber, are
now covered with the stumps of pine
trees, which, if the new process becomes
fully successful, can be made the basis
of big returns as a source of wood spirits,
creosote, tar, etc., in great quantities. No
doubt there are many obstacles to I~
overcome, but science is nothing if not
progressive, and in time it may be possi-
ble to produce by distillation a product
that is equal if not superior to commercial
turpentine. When this day comes there
will be a large production of the wood
spirits, owing to the fact that hundreds
of capitalists will enter the business, and
thousands of users of turpentine will wel-
come anything that will cheapen this ex-
pensive product.-Chicago Paint, Oil andl
Drug Review.

fOREIGN EXPORTS.

Ships that Have Left Laden with Naval
Store Since our last Report.
From Philadelphia: Ship East Point,
London, 3,641 barrels rosin.
From Baltimore Ship Ulatermore, L'v-
erpool, 400 barrels rosin; ship Necker.
Bremen. 1,000 barrels rosin; ship Ockmore.
Antwerp, 200 barrels rosin; ship Bethama.
Hamburg, 500 barrels rosin.
From New York Ship Sardegna, Genoa,
300 barrels rosin; ship Hong Wan, Glas-
gow, 300: barrels rosin; ship Prinz Adal-
bert, Naples, 150 barrels rosin; ship Brit-


ish King, Antwerp, 400 barrels rosin.
From Savannah: Austrian steamship
Clara, Genoa, 1,700 barrels rosin, 300 casks
spirits turpentine; Venice, 500 barrels
rosin; Barcelona, 500 casks spirits tur-
pentine; British steamship Daltonhall,
Hamburg, 600 casks spirits turpentine;
London, 3,450 casks spirits turpentine.

AMONG THE OPERATORS.
Mr D. E. MeKethan, of Baldwin, was
in the city Friday.

Mr. J. S. Simmons, of Marietta, Fla.,
was in the city Friday.

Mr. Lee A. Briles, of St. Catherines,
Fla., was here one day this week.

Mr. C. Downing, of Brunswick, Ga., one
of the South's leading naval stores factors.
was in the city to-day.

Mr. Robert Powell, assistant. serelary
and treasurer of the Consolidated Naval
Stores Co., was in the city this week.

Mr. H. L. Covington, vice-president of
the Consolidated Naval Stores Co., of
Pensacola, Florida, has been in the city
this week.

Mr. D. H. McMillan, who was with tlie
naval stores party at St. Louis, bought a
new Queen automobile upon his return
and is now said to bt: converting the
country roads around Jacksonvilla into
veritable race-tracks.

Prepare for the Convention.
The Record hopes to see every turpen-
tine man in the pine belt present at the
convention of the Turpentine Operators'
Association in Jacksonville in Septem-
ber. Begin making preparations now to
be in Jacksonville on that occasion. The
importance of the convention cannot be
estimated until we all get together and
talk over the situation.

Some of the Party.
Of those who did not return on the
Special, P. L Sutherland went to Wies-
baden, Indiana, J. A. Cranford and wife
went to California; W. R. Carter and wife
went to Canada; Captain Garner and
wife and Senator Telfair Stockton also
went to Wiesbaden. W. F. Coachman,
who went from Westbaden to St. Louis.
returned after the convention to Jack-
sonville.

Mr. Covington's Quincy Mansion.
Mr. A. D. Covington, of Bristol, Fla..
president of the Turpentine Operators'
Association, has bought a magnificent co-
lonial home and estate at Quincy and will
soon move there. Mr. Covington is spend-
ing a great deal of money in remodeling
and furnishing the place and the Record
is informed that when he moves in he will
have one of the most magnificent homes
in Western Florida.

The turpentine is just "pouring in." It
is probable that at least fifteen hundred
casks of spirits are our daily receipts in
Jacksonville just now, and the rosin is
coming in about three times as fast.

Operators say that the warm weather
is forcing the gum to drop very fast now.
The rains are facilitating the flow, as at
increases the sap.


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903404 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


Receipts 1908-04
Spirits, casks .................. ........ .193,647
Roins. bbls. ............................ 650,988
Total .................. .............. 844.585
Exports
Spirits casks...... ................... 188,398
Rosins, bbls........................ .... 752,270
Foreign
Spirits, casks.... .. ................. ... 98,884
Rosins, bbs .............................. 888,171
New York
Spirits, casks.................. ........... 5,658
Roins, bbls............... .. ........ 87,853
Sundries
Spirits, casks.. ........ ....... .. ... 59,351
Rosins, bbls ............... ........... 826.746
The receipts of spirits are l than 190203 by 9849 casks, and of


1902-03 j 1901-02
292 496 814,846
940,507 1,071,440
1,238,038 1,386,786

296,430 814,876
975.428 62,687

206,109 217,446
504,178 585,042

42,765 53,797
138,121 129,059

87,55 48,633
387,784 898,586
mint 289,59 hbn


Automobiles.
State Agents for the Famous


FORD


Launches


Automobile and Launch
Supplies.


Repairing a. Specialty.

Florida Automobile Co.
132-134 E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

H. ROBIN SON Pres. H. GAILLARD. Cashier
W. n. OWEN. Vice-Pres.
Commercial Bank, Trde Checks


State Depository.
BnaNCHes: Ocala Fla.. Lake City. Fl
Jacksonville, - - Florida


KIRK & JONES
DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


THE CANNON COMPANY
CAPITAL PAID
IN $19,500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barrels hold and will pass the se,
verest American and European inspection

Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, OUITMAN, GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address orders to home office,
QUITMAN, GA.


FOR THE


COMMISSARY mIINS.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Industrial Record Co.,

THE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
Extracts the spirts without dest.hir th
wood fibre. Runs out a charge winless
twenty-four hours. Makes from twetly I
forty-five gallons from cord et
Makes pure water white spirits, frees
the odor of tar or creosote. No amee ai
used in refining the spirits. Needs at ha
distilled only once after coming fr rsw
tort.
No trouble with bi-products, the aIktt
pronounced to be far the finest ever -
duced and from wood. Only e
of spirits produced and that the he =
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGER wROM PIER
Built of finest material by high-grade
workmen. The cheapest machine offered to
the public.
We challenge comparison of output sad
quality of product. We guarantee output
and quality.
For full particulars, prices, sasple
etc., address-
The ri.e et CMsttiM CrinP
P. 0. Box Nm RALIOH. N. Q


"NOTHING BVCCEDM L= guCCZaw'





THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 1
^^^^WtW^^^^%^^ ^^^^ ^^^^VWW ^M


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade
Western White Oak Spirit Barrels

Capital $100,000.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.

OFFICERS:.
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


DIRECTORS:
JOHN E. HARRIS, C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST,
W. C. POWELL, W. F. COACHMAN.


W. J. KELLY


Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are

McMILLAN BROTHERS'
Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS,


SAVANNAH, GA.
MOBILE, ALA.


J ACKSONVILLE. FLA.
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.


OnI OF THr WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PAPIM.









18 THE WEEKLY INvuUmIIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory


Thee advertisers are in this issue If
you want anything, look through th"
lassifed list and write to the firm ap-
pering therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.


AUTOMOBILES.
Florida Automobile Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Central National Bank, Ocala, Fla.
Mercantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Foster, Geo. RB, Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co, The, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
CARS.
South Atlantic Car & Manufacturing Co.,
Waycross, Ga.
CATTLE.
Palmetto Park Farm, Ocala, Fla.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
Pinkussohn Cigar Co., J. S., Jacksonville,
Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro, J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., IL A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Larendon, M. W, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
COOPERAGE.
Cannon Co., The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Cooperage Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Quitman Cooperage Co, Quitman, Ga
DRUGS.
Kirk & Joris, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Christie-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. S., Maeon, Ga.
gusta, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY.
Florida Freight Claim Agency, Jackson-
Sville, Fla.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
ruR ITURE..
Grand Rapids Furniture Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co., Savannah, Ga.
Hargraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Johnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
White, Walton & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott A Co, Jacksonille, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co, Jacksonville, Fa.


HARDWARE.
Baird & Co., L E., Jackskoknville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H.,Valdosta, Ga.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah Ga.
HARNESS.
McMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
HOTELS.
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hamilton, The, White Springs, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
Kendrick House, The, White Springs, Fla
New Victoria Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
New Paxton, The, White Springs, Fla.
Oaks, The, White Springs, Fla.
Pritchard House, The, White Springs, Fla.
Zahm's European Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Gifford Iron Works, Geo. T, Tifton, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Maeoh, Ga.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fa.
Riles, R. J., Jacksonville, Fla.
LAUNCHES.
Florida Automobile Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, Fla.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Bowen & Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
Gornto & Co., J. E., Valdosta, Ga.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
MACHINE WORKS.
Gifford Iron Works, Geo. T., Tifton, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply C0., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS 'FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MEATS.
Kingan & Co., Ltd., Jacksonville, Fla.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocla, Fa.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co, Tampa, Fla.
MULES AND HORSES.
Dillon & Penuel, Marianna, Fla.
Thomas, W. R-, Gainesville, Fla.
NAILS
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barnes-Jessup Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co., The, Savannah, Ga.
*Independent Naval Stores and Export Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
PAINTS
Baird & Co., I. E., Jacksonville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PECANS.
Grifliing Bros. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Campbell, J. R., Ocala, Fla.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.


1 .


No. I Outfit has a capacity of 45.00 gallons in 24 hours.
No. 2 Outfit has a capacity of ll,,000 gallons in 24 hours.
Write today tor prices to-
WHITE-BLAKESLEE MANUFACTURING CO.
Birmingham, Ala.


THE RECORD'S SPACE HAS A- BIG MONEY VALUE.


PUMPS. TANK&
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla. Cypress Tank Co, Mobile, Ala.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla. Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fa.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, FI. Schofield's Sons Co, J. 8, Mase, Oa.
Schofeld's Sons Co, J. S., Macon, Ga. TOOLS.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham, Christopher, John G, Jacksonvillp, i.
Ala. Council Tool Co, The, Wannish, N. C.
TANK STORAGE. TURPRIILs APPARATUS
National Tank & Export Co, Savannah, Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksoille,
Ga.
National Transportation & Terminal Co, IURPEaTlas PROCESS
Jacksonville, Fla. Pine Product Construction Co, The, Fy-
I etteville, N. C.
AIL Pine Belt Construction Co., The, Ralsrig
Joseph Iron Co., Isaac, Cincinnati, 0. N. C.
EAL ESATEStandard Turpentine Co, The, New Yerk
REAL ESTATE. City.
Beekwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa, Ct PE STILL
Fla. I UxPEB ajLI STILLS.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fla. McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
Frazier, W. W., Jacksonville, Fla. TUmPEBTIms STILL TUBS.
Gifford Company, Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Oal, Fla. Davis & Son., G. M., Palatka, FI.
Southern States Land and Timber Co., TURPEBTIlt VATS.
Jacksonville, Fl. Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
West-Raley-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville,
Fla. I YEwiUjLKS.
Gr;vot Typewriter Exchange, Jacksorvill
SHIP YRDS Pla.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla. UNDERTAKERS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Clark, Chas. A., Inc., Jacksonville, F
SHOES-WHOLESALE. VEHICLES
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla. McMurray & Baker, Jacksonville Fla.
STATIONERY. Thomas, W. R., Gaiesville, Fa.
Cochrane's Book Store, Palatka, Fla. WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co, Jacksovrille, f.
STEAMSHIPS. Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City. Riles, R. J, Jacksonville, Fla.
STOCK BROKERS. YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville la. Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, FI
Jacksonville Brokerage Co., Jacksonville, East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fh
Fla.
S TAILR CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Best in the Warl.
Ciancaglini & Bro., John B., Jacksonville, B i e W uiL
Fa. For delered pice wmt,
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla. Cypr es Tak CO. MWUa.M

i1 1111il I 11 I lII II l 1111 tI i lilllIIIIIIIbi lli I
SJ. P. WILLIAMs President. J. A. G. C&RasO. Ist VIce-Presidet.
T. A. JaNIxaos, 2nd Vice-President. J. F. Dusaxrnar.34 Vice-Prrident.
SH. L. KATTON. Secretary. D. G. White. Treasurer.


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

N11- i iSwT I Eoir IN} T FI NFKEI 61Tfa I. e
SMain Office SAVAMNNXH, COOROIS.
ranch offices: PENSACOLA, FLX. ranch Orocery H10,
I JACKSONVILLR,. Fa. COLIUMBU, G.OJ.

- Naval Stores Producers are invited to Correspoed With Us
l i111 I I1111111 11 11l I I I Illl=|l I I I n-I I II ll I I I iI|

This Cat Represents the rFams

"Blakeslee" Gasoline Pump Rig
For
Irrigation, Tank Supply and Draimage' Service.








___THE WEEKLY imuUIfrA1tAL RECORD. 19


Jackrrvie Whouamle Luaer Market.

(For Week Ending July 15.)
Merchantable.
Yard schedules-$10.50 to $13.00.
Boand and square schedules, s.50 to
Merchantable ar material-
Average schedule of sills, 46 feet and
uder, 10 inches and under, $13.00 to
$14&0
special schedaules-acording to siaes
and lengthsprices steady.
LK D. sap-"' and up 80 per cent
dear, $.0 to $10.00.
flooring:
$11.0; No. 4. $80.
Cyress.
t ad seconds, 4 quarter base, car-
load prices $34; selects, 4 quarter base,
N 1, $15.00; No. 2, $13.50; No. 3,
; shop, 4 quarter base, $
S Cypress ShBingei -xl8 A's, per 1,00
pe $.2; primes, $4 ; 4x18, A's, $3.50;
rmuss, $2.76.
Cypress lath, $ per 1,000.
Cypress market strong. Mills have
mre orders than they can IUL Prospects
good for higher prices. Dry stock scare

NEW YORK LUMBIE MARKET.
Pinss Yelo w (Le Leaf).
By Sail
Building orders, 12 in. ad under $20.0
to $Pi.0; Building ordrs, 14 in. and tp,
$29.00 to $2e.o; yard orders, ordinary as-
sortment, $2060 to $22.00; ship stock,
easy sceduls, $6.50 to $27.50; ship stock,
40 ft. average, $30.00 to $35.00; heart face
siding, 1 in and 11-2 in., $20.50 to $21.50;
1 in wide boards, heart face, $6.00 to
$8.00; 11-4 and 11-2 in. wide boards,
$2OO8.00 to $3000; 2 in. wide plank, heart
face, $3000 to $31.50; kiln-dried sap siding,
4-u, $100 to $1&0; kil-dried sa siding,
5-4, $19.00 to $0.00; yellow p box
boards (knotty), $13.50 to $40; yellow
pine stepping, $3800 to $4f.0
By steam, add $1.00 to $165
Leng Leaf Tellow Pho Fleing.
Clear heart face rift DM&HBk, 13-1x
214 couted 1x3, $4400 to $45.00; "A"
rift DM&HBk 13-lx2 1-4 counted 1x3,
$32.00 to $33.00; "B" rift DM&HBk 13-16
x2 1-4 ounuted 1x3, $2600 to $27.00; "A"
Flat DM&HBk 13-1x21-4 counted 1x3,
$21.50 to $22.0; "B" Flat DM&HBk 13-
11x21-4 counted 1x3, $19.50 to $0.50; No.
1 Common DM&HBkl3-1621-4 counted
13, $1850.
For 11-8 in. add $20. 8teamer ship-
ment on flat grain fooring $1 less per
thousand than above prices.
Cyprs.
- Cypress Prices Current F. O. B. New York
Market. Lumber rough or dressed:
Tauk stock, 11-2 to 3 inches, $48.75 to
56.75; Firsts and Seconds, 1 to 3 inches
$44.5 to $52.75; Selects, 1 to 3 inches,
$38.25 to $45.5; Shop, 1 to 3 inches, $.25
to $40.2.
For prices on 8 inch add $1 per 1,00 ft;
em 10 inch add $8 per 1,000 ft; on 12 inch,
add $3.50 per 1,00 ft.
Bevel siding, 1-2x6 inch elar, D to A,
$11.75 to $24.5; ceiling, 3-8x4 or 6 ihch
ela, D to A. $13.25 to $2425; 1-2x4 or 6
inch dear, D to A, $18.00 to $7.50; 6-8x4
or 6 inM clear, D to A, $8225 to $3225;
Flooring, drop siding and ceiling, 4 or 6
inch, D to A, $27.75 to $43.75.


Grivot, AV., .CIM.v 1..1 .
f Jacksooville. Fla.

All makes. $10 Up.
We can save you from $10 to $60
on any typewriter made.

Write us.
AMIT "MUVE" YIILE TYrPEWTE

rAwe 7y1 s east e"r mar
lita s:bsar L smeq@tas
0" g MGWM16


Business Directory.

FIRE INSURANCE-Lowet rate. Ia-
ren H. Green & Co, 9 and 10 Park Bldg,
Jacksonville, Fla. Omo.

JOMN ZAHM'B EUROPMAN HOTI.r
1i 1 Bay Street.
aloen and Restaurant. Nicely Warnisbie
Reom. Open day and night. Bettlla's
old Stand.

JACKSONVILLE
Manufacturing Location
or Shipping Point.

Deep Water---Railay Termini
ADDRESS
GIFFORD COMPANY
1110 k*l E*S IrI
Laura Street, Jacksonville. Fla.

M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores
Commission Merchants.
RosM, TU ENTIE, TAR, PITCH,
GUM THUS, RIC, nTC
138 Frot Street, NEW YOR.


HAIUY i MONIIOMERY,
Commission Merchants,
Naval Stores & Cotton
Liberal adaces mae against hip-
ament. C0-s-mn-to soliidte.
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
NEW YORK CITY.


New Victoria.
Corner Main and Adams,
Opposite Board of Trade Building.
Jackovme's New Hotel.
Rates 2oo to $a.5
R. BIXLER, Proprietor.

Quitman Cooperage Co.,
QUITMAN. GA.
Manufacturers of

HIGH C DE SPIRIT BAlRRELS
According to specifications of
Board of Trade, Savannah.
Also make
Dip and Syrup Barrels.


Pumping Outfits t 1

Turpentine Stills
WITH FIRE PROTECTION CONNECTIONS.

Best PUMP in the World
From 40 to 700 Gallons of Water per Minute.
Write or call o
FRED E. GILBERT,
Automobile Headquarters
29 West Forsyth St. Jacksonville, Fla.





Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

ddvertisements Will be Inserted im tas Deparftnent at the fINPfrwI states:
For one week. 3 cents a line.
For two weeks, 35 cents line.
For three weeks, 50 cents a line.
For four weeks, cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Headin counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Tha day
morning to secure insertion in Friday's paper.


For Sale.
An improved wood track tram engine;
easy kept up; for low price. Call on or
address E. L Vickers, Tifton, Ga., for par-
ticulars.

For Sale.
Turpentine and sawmill location for
sale, eight thousand acres, in Georgia, oe
to three and one-half miles from railroad.
Low rates to market. For information
address Lock Box 43, Adel, Ga.

For Sale.
200 tons 48-lb. relaying steel rails West
Virginia and Kentucky delivery. 100 toes
60-lb. relaying steel rails, Southern de-
livery. 1,500 tons 56-lb. relaying steel
rails, West Virginia delivery. 150 tons a0
lb. relaying steel rails, West Virginia de-
livery. Isaac Joseph Iron Company, 562-
535 Hunt St., Cincinnati, Ohio.


W.


Stiller Wauted.
An experienced turpentine stiller want-
ed Man with family preferred. Address
Fletcher & Murrell, Altman, Fla.
Twrpcetlc Men.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. 1 outit pumps ,00
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 ents and
requires no attention whilq running.
Started in one minute. J. R. (hapbell,
Ocala, Fla.

Five Registered Shortlor Bulls
One i half brother to "Beauty Boy,"
who was ehumpioa at three T-a show.
Another is half-brothr to our 18 pond
cow, "Mary Spears." All good and ready
for immediate service. Prism $1. to
$175.00, subject to preiou sale.
Palmetto Park Stock Farm, Z. C. Cham-
bliss & Co., proprietors, Ocala, Fla.


r. RILEY, J. A. 6. CARSON, SEO. J. SCOVEL,
President. Vice-Presldeut. Sec. and rn


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.

MANUFACTURERS OF


eas.


J. E. GORNTO & CO. BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS


Shipping Trade
a. Specialty. .
h $3 Orders Ia mr, Exprn Prep

WHISKIES

FROM $1.50 TO $6 A GALLON
Sole Agent
Old Saratoa Rye, $8 Gal.
Old Baker Rye, $6 Gal.
Old Westmorelad Rye, $4 Gal.
Big Hor Rye, $3 Gal
J. E. GORNTO & CO.,
Yaldosta, Georgia


Machine and Hand Factories,

8th Street R. R. Crossing.


JACKSONVILLE,


FLORIDA


I* IYou Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Swmill Location?
You Want any Kind of Florida Land?
I You Mean Business?
Sca on or Wro to .
J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS,
Ocala, Florida
*********************** *000 0 ; Sao $41


THE ]RCORD IS TH"OPERATORSW ImAT.lwA w


--~- ----- -----


I




0O THE WEEKLY INDUSTIlAL R1BEORD.
s 1010101010101 6116ia 6 tiiatie I1 tolt e 6triate eroe0l 0l l*ote 010le e**********e**************e


Preidmit, W. C. POWBIL; Vice-Predents. who with the Preldent conoitut the Directory and Boaud of Mnager. W. 7. COACHMAN. B. V. BUL-
LARD, H. L. COVINGTON. H. A. McEACHERN, JOHN I. YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN. C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS. C. B. ROGERS; Auditor. JOHN HENDERSON.


S


Jfacol viilie, F1i.


Slvonnnlh.


P 0 iiscoll, [0.


t NATAL STORES FACTORS~


PM i illil *10o, 2 ,500.00.


OwM Id Ciolnled b Ralicol oitols


Small Imotl So11c Y1e i Re l re 10 t ell 0o Oplaocs no on Iralie o Bu.


The Consolilled is Purel a CO eralte Compoly.


O te Producers.


Its llrlle s re ientical Wih lMs


The Plroinage o Tu penfi $peR101a e0ryuhere 1n111


Plen o0 M ei ond PIn ol T0 ller for ERIelml


1YAS AT JAK 8ON1ILLE, SA11AN, fERNANDINA on PIENI O1.


All Pr0ices ore InMvied to all or Colresiol


*,1,1111 -rIS Is I$o',,, I*+ "m it I I #.IVTHE PINV A I oD ITS PRODUCTS.IIS so 1 1$,
-TH] PM= AJD ITS PRODUCTS&"


GiONSOlDATED NAVAL STORS COMPANY,








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commaisary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
S. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 27
.C. Creamery, 80 .. 28
10 .. 29
A C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 18

Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... Market
50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-b tin. .... ......

Vinegar


Red Apple Cider bbl........

Sugar


granulatedd


Sugar, bbls.....
5 bbls..
10 bbls..
S sacks..


16


600
495
495
500


Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb......... ....... 80
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 10
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 8
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages...... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
age .............. market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 14
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 60
English B'fast, 10 b.. 45
Formosa, 10 lb....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 5 and lOc size
10 lbs to case, per pound-.. 40

Salt
200-lb sack............. 100
100-lb sack ............... 50
Ie Cream, 200-1b sacks..... 1 00
6" 100-lb sacks..... 50
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-lb.... 2 65
'' '" "' 2-lb.... 275

Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin.............. 21
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box
sifter top, per doz...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and 80

Corn


Car Lot
W. Corn,1101b, 143
1001b, 1 29
Mxd corn,1101b,1 14
S 1001b,1 25


e10 Sk
Lot
145
1 81
140
127


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


Car Lot
W.clip'd,1251b,2 20
S 1001b,l 75
White 1251b, 2 10
White 100lb. 1 67
Mixed 1251b 2 5
S 1001b, 1 64


100 sk
Lot
222
1 77
222
1 69
2 7
165


Lear 100
Sk Lots
2 25
180
215
1 72
2 10
168


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice..... 1 65
i fancy..... 1 70
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl............... 5 75
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 lb sack.........5 75
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 5 75
Pillsbury's Bet ..... 6 00
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 625
bbl.... ....
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 350
92-lb sacks........... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 8 60
92-lb sacks....... 1 60
Rice
Good..................... 5
Choice...... ............ 54
Fancy Head............... 6
Broken ................... 83
Canned Vegetables
Doz.


Tomatoes, 8s, Chief.......
Tomatoes, 2s ........
Clpyton, 3s................
Clayton, 2s.............
Sifted Peas, 2s ............1
Rose L. J. Peas ...........
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........1
Lima Beans,2s ........... 1
String Beans, 3s............
String Beans, 2s ..........
Baked Beans, 8s...........
Baked Beans. s ...........
Corn, fancy, 2s............ 1
Born Tomatoes, 2s........
Beauty Beets, 3s..........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ...........
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s..............
Hay
car lots 100 bale e
lots qm
Choice.... 19 5 2000 2
No.1 Tim 18 00 18 50 1
No. 2 17 00 17 80 1
No.1 Cl'ler 17 00 1750 1


90
80
45
70
40
80
20
00
90
70
90
45
40


5S
entity
050
900
800
800


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
'Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per doz............. 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz.... .........
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 3 85
Candy
Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 7
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb ]ails, Fer
Ib.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb ................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box.
assorted, per lb ........ 8

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 8
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 13
Ex. Choice " "
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-1b. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lh. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 36-lb. case 3 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
bo.x, 40-50 ....... ...... 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 50-60...... .... 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 3 crown..... 1 85
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 90
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 12
Citron, 10-lb box ......... 1 50

Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 6
Extra H P, ....
Seed Peanuts, ...
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ ..... 18
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Peacans.... ............. 12
Filberts................... 12
al0 nuts.................. 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 10T Le1sO00
lots Sk. Lt Sk. Lt
Cottonsed Meal 27 00 27 50 28 00
S Hulls 1150 12 50 1 00


Matches
Atlantic, per gross.........


47


Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop.......2 20
3 hoop ..
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz....... 1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
Snested ......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 00
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. ..1 20

Washboards Do.
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay...............3 00
175 Diamond Glass ..........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per doz 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75

Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
doz 95
doz. ................... 96
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 75
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 65
Salmon Is, Tale 4 doz to case
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon, Is, 4 dos to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box............. 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 arge ... 141-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avge .. 14
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avge .. 1314
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge.. 91-4
"Reliable" California Hams, 6-8 9
-reakfast Bacon, light av. .... 131-2
D. S. Bellies, 16-18 av. ........ 83-4
D. S. Bellies, 20-22 av .......... 81-2
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av. ......... 8-8
D. S. Plates .................. 71-2
Bacon P:ates .................. 81-1
D. S. Butts .................. e3-8
Bologna Sausage ............... 7
Sausage in oil ................$3.75
Butter and Cheee.
"Strawberry" Creamery, 60-lb tubs 25
30-lb tube 251-2
S 60s, is... 251-2
"Ladybird" full cream cheese .. 121-2
Kingam's ard.
"Indiana" Pure Leaf ........... market.
sea-Foam" Compound .........market.
Kingan's Canned Meats
"Reliable" Corned Beef, Is ...... $1.25
Corned Beef, 2s ...... 2a.
Roast Beef, Is ........ 126
Roast Beef, 2s ........ 226
Potted Ham and Tongue
1-4s .......................... .36
Sliced Beef, l-2s .. .. 16
Vienna Sausage, 12a ..
STripe .................. IA


GET A C00P Of TIB MAVAL STOES BLUE BOOL







=* THE WEEKLY INuuiS'rIlAL RECORD.






Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertising patrons of this paper and no

charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention


eor Tmrt~mlte.awm or Faster rSuMples Macflaery of amy Kid. For Tinmer Fa, frma e r Rnarla Lands.
DATE INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main Office, Jacksonville, Fla. I am in the market for lands for the purpose of
In the market for the following Prefer in State of Please put me in communication
with responsible parties and give me other information.
Remarks
Please notify where same can be secured. Signed
Signed

State specifically the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or second-handed. DATE

Lee~ for Typenl. SawmIM er Factory. er fr Amy lduestrtal Enterprise. For Ce missary. Oflee or nmels ub Su es. Sawml or TarpmeamI Males
HITses. Wagams, Etr.
DATE
DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Pla.
Please advise the undersigned regarding a good location in (state or section of
tate) for In the market for
together with full information about labor conditions, taxes, transportation facilities,
local encouragement, etc.
Remarks Please give me information as to best places to buy, etc.

Signe' Signed


be You Want to Sel SometMig? Are You TMda eof iostnt?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Have for sale the following Can you give any information as to the reliability of the following firm or corpora
tion
Remarks
Can you suggest a purchaser?
Signed Signed


me Ye Wart to Empl- a MMa? De You Wret Emp m t?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Want a man to fill the position of Want a position as
Refer to the fodlowin
with the following requirements Refer to the foowi

Can you suggest such a mn ? Can you assist me?
Signed Signed




CLIP THIS COUPON
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD
When you ae answering an advertisement rom the c ns tis paper, whether you are making an inquiry or placing an order, please cut out the coupo
below and attach it to the letter, h will pay you.

COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the Inadatrial Retd, issue dated

Signed


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonville, Fla., and Savannah, Ga., is the South's great
weekly trade journal.



The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser,and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.


IF TOU DOIT NfID IT I TH RECORD WRITE UIS








THE WEEKLY JNDUlbrrKAL RECORD. 28


I

I
I




'1

'1


McMURRAY & BAKER,


S Ml hI la nfl HIioIs. n i u
We am reelviug "ly up-te-date pleemue ae Wmtness vedas1n, 1 &
Ifeb, whips, h.arans ea" herse turalsdage, we have a aMbf fYr. FM es
ana meso IA tonch with am. Turpentine wagoew and harness a speft. Dut
fdeaet we ema eat Me worMl em heatdmed h ar ome

IENRY I BII, 4 413 1. BY 9.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The Clyde Steamship Company












NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magvet steamships o this lie are appointed to sail as follows, cal
at Crlestem, 8. C. both ways.
Peem Now TYrk, Prem Jaeksaivtlle le
(Pler Nortmh mver). TRAM ER. Charlestom mad New York.


eaMday, June 14, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ....Sunday, June 19 at 9:00 am I I IM A. J. IIn_. n
Wednesday, June 15, at 3:00 pm-x*ONEIDA .....Monday, June 20, at 9:00 am wsom at Iss. "h
redmesday, June 15, at 3:00 pm..AITGONQUIN ..Tuesday, June 21, at 11:00 am h-'is rm --- tre
Wdiy, June 17, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE .... Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'n '.*ha. whw This
*xSEMINOLE ..Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 'n ul ac-
louday, June 20, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Saturday, June 25, at 1:30 pm
Ved eeday, June 22, at 3:00 pm..COMANCHE ..Monday, June 27, at 4:00 am -AA-W^-- W
***xHURON ........ Tuesday, June 28, at 5:00 am
Friday, June 24, at 3:00 pm....IROQ UOIS ..Thursday, June 30, at 6:00 am
'sesday, June 28, at 3:00 pm ....APACH E ..........Sunday, July 3, at 8:00 am o9Jj L_UJg _Oe91.9SJJJJ93jL9.9t. JJ.LJ.A ..9J.al9 9JL9.. SJjJIJ..9J
x*ONEIDA ..Monday, July 4, at 8:00 am o
1mrrday, June 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Tuesday, July 5, at 9:30 am SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS. 3
saturday, July 2 at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ....Thursday, July 7, at 11:30am 30 YEAR8 RELIABILITY
**xSEMI NOLE .... Thursday, July 7, at 11:30 am 30 EA EABIIT
tuesday, July 5, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ......Sunday, July 10, at 1:00 pm H ess Slager,
Friday, July 8, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ......Wednesday, July 13, at 4:30 am
S**xHURON ......Wednesday, July 13, at 4:30 am : Diamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry
Sturdy, July 9, at 3:00 pm ..AIGONQUIN ......Friday, July 15, at 6:00 am erware atces and J lry
Tuesday, July 12, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ......Sunday, July 17, at 7:30 am CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND It A 13 MAIN.
rxONEDA ........ Monday, July 18, at 8:00 am 1 CrEl 6-6-T--
Friday, July 15, at 3:00 pm ... IROQUOIS ......Thursday. July 21, at 11:00 am rwv 6
**"SEMINOLE ....Thursday, July 21, at 11:00 am
Tuesday, July 19, at 3:00 pm .APACHE ......Sunday, July 24, at 12:30 pm
Wednesday, July 20, at 3:00 pm ..AULGONGUIN ....Tuesday, July 26, at 4:00 am
Friday, July 22, at 3:00 pm ....COMANCHE ..Wednesday, July 27, at 4:30 am N aval S t M ark e
*xHURON ....Wednesday, July 27, at 4:30 am
Tuesday, July 26, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ......Sunday, July 31, at 7:00 am
I *xONE IDA ......Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 8:00 am an d Sk
Wednesday, July 27, at 3:00 pm .IROQUOIS ......Tuesday, Aug. 2, at 8:00 am
Friday, July 29, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ......Wednesday, Aug. 3, at 9:00 am Published Daily in The
Sunday, July 31, at 3:00 pm .... .*ALGONQUIN ... .Friday, Aug. 5, at 10:30 am
X-Freight only. *-Boston via Charleston and New Tork.
**-Bostoa via Brunswick --d Charles ton. "--Boston, via Charleston.
THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES. ckeonvi I I
M"w"e Se ee Bekrtween Jaucikeavtlle, ftete and Pr*vdenee 1a" anl Mu-st-
essm Peolmfi s. r n~la at Cbarlestem WBotb Waym.
s1 msr. -wmaKrY st scsew. Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
s.orlbsa ...n .. ... ...of.... ... .. o ..t ot Catherise wha Jl daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.
Nrt d.. .. .. .. .. .... ........-..Prom foot of Catherine Stret, Jacksonvillel
CLYDE ST. JS R A YEAR; $2 50 SIX MONTHS
Between Jaeftoovil and gauterl
tepptag at Palatka. Astor. St. brands. Bersford (De Land) and latermedte $
litelgeo on 9t. Jeohs river.
STEAMER "CITY OP JACKSONVILLE"
t appointed to sal as follows: Leave Jacksonville. Sunday Tuesdays and Thu BIr- P R I Z
day, 3A p. m. Returning, leave Sanford, Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays 93 a. m.
nuu x IBOUND.1 NORTHBOUND,
Read down, I Read up.
Leave 8: p m.......................Jacksonville........ ....... .......Arrive 2- a. m. A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Expositicn, to
LM.re S:atpk. : a... ..... Patk .................. .....Leave a" ..
....... .......t... ........................... L -ea" p. I. Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Leave 4 a. m. ..... .................St. Prands.................... Leave l~ p. m.
S............................. ...resford eLand)....................... Leave n oon Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
Arrive. 1 a. m......... ...............ntpri.............. ........ eave :0 m.sn c t. W e fr p.
Ar. 10:00 a. m.I ................... Enterprise............ ....... Lv. L10:00 a. m. scription contest. Write for particulars.


ANWURAL IPAW OWbE AND 'TCKUTr OFIIC I W. Bsy St.. Jaekhvlul.
P. M. IR OMONOGIER JR.. Asst. Genl. Pass Agent. 20 W. Bay St.. Jacksonville. DI a
W. G. C000PE, JR., oal rt. AstL. Jak'ville. C. P. LOVELL Adst. Supt.Jack'vlin
Foot Hogan street, Jacksonville.
A. C. HAOGRTY. O. . P. A., New York. CLYDE MTLNE G. P. JA.. New York Cr Russe Publishing
TnmO. 4. NORe1t, Wl. P. CLYDeV a CO.
General Manager. General Agents.
CrM .le t .s b aMn. estate Btr-et. NecW Taork. Jacltsoaville, Florida.
WRITE TH E RCORD FOR ANY IFORMATION DESIM D.


t he ytee of th nmort aref n
0 r
W LI.45assaroM wo a^ss. Ija
S Amerlero s Leastr Trade adrmetl.
euonvlle and Savannah has taken its place Al
among the leading trade journals In the o
npace to th.e Recrds vian hon arket o on l-




This weeks Issue of the Industrial -Beor and J
er and n v stores It Is being quoted not a
only by the bent and most careneull edited tia
cla papers In this country. but by thsae Is
In Europe also. A London trade paperI 'S
eaehlng this oice e yesterday biven liberal a Jo

sris week's Isse of the Industrioteat.c-, and
od 4o even better than usual and i t I- Th
Sstronat and entrda and th general Indus- trial
s the chal ioni of the two speefle Indus- the a
trte tt re events. Ith briit m l of new Joha
stortlae o development In the goutheast.t do p
emon them bn e n the story o a half-mill- p end
Io-fdollar corporation organised In Jack- Gil


alle esatver toda. an o the outanteron ot H.
several. otr rp on dur the and
week In Georga and Florida. w.
It has met the pace for enterprise, and It Wali,
won daserves the rant measure of success wick
ft In reeiin both In Us subasrlptlon and
advertlsing depanments.carrylin as It does.
I perhaps, one ot the largest advertising pat-
I roo ga i ves to any ot the Boutbra .7
* 8utrnals ^6Ie


I






K THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J1 U CRtOUSY President


C M FULLER. Vice-Presiadet


JAB F LANCE. Siesy @ *rfre


-

/ Greenleaf a

- Crosby Company


Diamonds and Other Precios
Stones


Fine Gold Jewelry


30b"ekr0 afib

*i~leer.011100


American and Foreign Watches
and Clocks


41 West Bay Street

jacksonvifle

"Ms 0 and fnt VuiaI am@ pu of as
Soma lian Pr1096 % talead to man od


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


Fine China Dinner Sets and
Fancy Pieces


Write for r-tsa'ogue


European Novelties


- -- -~
..E~


*-"""""""""""a~he.T _T 3-


THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
of Wananish, N. C.,
Pormerl of Councll's Station, N. C., are still selling Diamond Edge *
Hacks at 3n.0 Black Joe and Standard at $5.00. Old Style and Patent *
Pullers at $.0 a domn. They should average a little better than ever. *
We have brought out a new brand, the Blue ULne Hacks at 8.00 and Pull- *
era at 68.00 which are warranted. All wholesale dealers In naval stores
supplies carry our lines and should supply operators.


V V V V I W`V `WPP88V7w of***"


traTr THnr Tfnr mImm T
John R. Young. Preside
J. W. Motte. J


CommELL

I Commisi


a. G. McKETHAN, Pr t. ALFRED A. McKETHAN, Lt U. S. N.
Jaeksbaille, ia. Ret'd Sec'y and Treas, Constructing A VAL STORE.i
Engineer, Fayetteville, N. G.

Pine Product Construction Co. Sh
.o. 'Savannah a
Fayetteville, N. C.
spirits of Turpentine, Oi of Tar, Creosote, Tar. Disinfectants; Wood Preservative, I i ii i I
Palnts Wood Stains Etc., and Charcoal, from LUghtwood Stumps, Box-facings
Profits increased. Time of distillation reduced. Condensation controlled at will.
No danger from fire. Plant erected complete, and men taught the process. Fur-- -
thr Information, write Alfred MacKethan, general manager, Payetteville, N. C. J.W. HUNT. President. J. R.
P.L. P aCOCK, 1st V. P W.
I" NE hI. U MEMORIALS II MARBLE, STONE AND BRONZE Peacock-Hunt
IF M MaIeT to E"e mt ealcoorte Musol


from the simple Tablet to the most elaborate Mausoleum.
Write, or come to see us or designs will please you.
SOUTHERN MARBLE AND STONE CO.
Iron Fenacitng ED LAMANCE MM aer.
Cru Sto for Buildings noe 4 Sert**l Sa Stret,
Anythan n Sene, Marble, Ms and Tila.
jyibig hinSios, MaNr4W Momsac and TIle.


13111142TTTTT=TTT-TTT*3T


BROADWAY AND 23d ST.,
HOTEL BARTHOLDI, ADWAYOD sT.
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout.
Near all Big Stores and Places of Amusement. (ars Pass
the Door for all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings
Large Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
fid no grand and magnificent decorations: no luxurious
grandeur; no awe-insiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
Speak to You. No Employees Is Any Way Inatteatative.
But just a cosy, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the
hearts of those who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plain Ameican cooking, and affable and courteous treatment.
m nFw ANNwM-1 N


---------------- --- ---


lrnrmmrm nr nrr mlw u m mur w w w
T TIIT HTYUH1HHI ffTHyTTHf WIW
nt. C. S. Ell.s Vice-Presdet.
. Secretary and Tre-urer.


5-YOUNG CO.

sion Merchants

FACTORS
WHOLESALE GROCERS

nd Brunswick, Ga.
I1 lit 11I1 11 1 1 1l 11U 11 11 1 il-


HARRIS. I V. Pres. H. I RIcaron e ea & ,
J. KuLL, 3d V. P. D. R. WILrruA, Asgt See'y-Tses.

& West Conmpa.


General Offies: 20 Bay Street. ,, Savmimak, Ga. am
Genal Offiest BEMding, Jackseavll, Fla.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutual. We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that buys pitri
Turpentine and rosin.)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,


Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our Speealit
-SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wilsn. & GIs'
Philadlphia Wagons.

Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga., and .Mlvs
and femandiua, Fla.


_________I________


w


v_


i


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