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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00076
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: June 17, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00076
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text







For the Week Ending June 17. 1904N A1904

artnt of AV cdture



WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

Afted Sept. 12t 1902. by The E Mecurh Cemitte f te U Tar9etle Operators' Association as its Exclsire Otlcial orgas, and Adopted Sept. 11t 1902. I Ammn Ca -
rejti, as an Omc al Or" Ala of the eseral AsAsciSti. Adfepte Sept. I Iat. 90J, as tae oly Oflrctal Orgalorm ta tarpretlaree Oper.ar Aasciatm.
Adapted Apr 27t 19a, as mte eomcIr OrpM eOfe Inter-Stare Case Growers' Associatio. ZEdersed by the seorga Sa will
Alssctioet. Official Orga of the Soetheastern Stock grower's Associatiom.


VOL NO. 24.


JACKSONVILLE, FLAM


ATLANTA, GA.


SAVANNAH, GA.


$3 A YEAR.


Treated Timber For Railroad Ties, f

Investigation Being Conducted by the National Bureau of Forestry. 9
Mc~a**-*&**-94r


The annual consumption of ties on 203,-
132 miles of railroad track In this coun-
try is 114,000,000, and it is yearly becom-
inging harder to meet this demand. Gran-
ite, metal and more recently concrete ties
have been experimented with, but nowhere
permanently adopted, and the indications
are that wooden ties are not soon to be
displaced. The bureau of forestry has for
some time been making studies and ex-
periments designed to improve the present
conditions and to prevent the exhaustion
of the timbers from which ties are made.
Bulletin No. 50, "Crosstie Forms and Rail
Pastenings, with Special Reference to
Treated Timbers," by Dr. Herman von
du'reak, which has just been published,
gives the latest results of these investiga-
tiens.
The manner in which ties have hith-
erto been made has been determined large-
ly by the ease and rapidity with which
they could be cut. They have been ob-
tained from trees of all diameters from
aine inches upward, the most serviceable
portions of live straight trees being se-
lected. The sapwood top sections and
trees killed by fire, insects, disease, etc, or
bolwn down, could not be utilized, owing
to the fact that ties from sapwood or dead
timber decay rapidly.
Although large ties make a better road-
bed than the same amount of timber in
a greater number of small ties, the first
consideration is to have as great a bearing
imrfaee as possible on the ballast. "A
trapeoidal or modified half-round tie,
with a base of 10 to 12 inches and a top-
bearing surface of six inches, distributes
the weight of moving trainloads upon the
roadbed as effectually as a rectangular tie
10 to 12 inches broad. The half-round tie
is good for the lumberman because in nu-
merous instances two ties of this form cat.
be made from a log which would furnish
but one rectangular tie; in other cases
material for several boards is saved where
a rectangular tie would have taken the
eatire log. This form is beneficial to the
forest, since it encourages the cutting of
large trees and the saving of small ones
until they reach more valuable size, and
permits the utilization of much timber
from the tops hitherto left in the woods.
The half-round tie is advantageous from
a mechanical standpoint also, because it
gives greater bearing surface per mile and
a orrespondingly more stable track than
restngular ties. This tie form is there-
fte advocated by the bureau of foretry


as economical of timber, conservative of
the lumber supply, and at the same time
equally efficient with the forms in com-
mon use.
Ties are commonly graded as first, see-
ond and third class, and culls, or ties,
which either in size or in quality fall be-
low the specifications, but which the rail-
roads generally accept up to a certain per-
centage of the total number of ties, though
at a greatly reduced price. There is, how-
ever, no accepted standard as to what con-
stitutes a first, second or third-class tie,
and the specifications of the various rail-
roads show wide differences in the dimen-
sions required. It is proposed by Dr. von
Schrenk that a standard classification be
adopted, consisting of six or more classes,
to be known as A B C, etc., each class to
be of a definite size, and no provision to
be made for culls. This will tend to econ-
omy, since the smaller-sized ties will fall
into th4 smaller classes and will be sold
at their market value to the roads which
want them, instead of, as largely now, to
roads which do not want them, but hav-
ing received a certain proportion of them
mingled with those of the specified size, do
not feel warranted in rejecting them alto-
gether. This proposal has been adopted
by the American Engineering and Main-
tenance of Way Association.
A far greater economy, however, than
can be hoped for from the adoption of a
new tie form or a new tie classification is
that promised by the studies which the
bureau of forestry has directed towards
opening new sources of supply of ties.
This it aims to do by making possible the
utilization of cheaper and more abundant
kinds of timbers in place of the high-grade
woods now employed. he commonest as
well as the best tie material of the past
and present in this country is white oak,
which reists both wear and decay excel-
lently, and is consequently cheaper in the
long run than less expensive woods like
beech, red oak or loblolly and lodgepole
pine. But white oak, besides being one
of our finest timber trees, is becoming
high-priced, and further, as railroad men
know well, is becoming scarce even faster
than the advancing price would indicate.
Not only is it very wasteful to make ties
of white oak, which can be manufacturer
into much more valuable products if a
lower grade wood will do, but soon, under
the present demand, white oak ties will
no longer be obtainable in the required
quantity at say pries,


The fiRst step in the search for substi-
tuteS was to discover how to prevent rapid
decay of softer woods when laid in the
track. Preservative treatment has long
been in general use abroad. With proper
methods it can be made entirely success-
ful. and impregnation with creosote, zinc
chloride or other antiseptic substances al-
lows the use of many woods hitherto pass-
ed over, as well as of sawed ties, sapwood
and dead timber. Preservative treatment
can make a beech or red oak or pine tiet
outlast a white oak tie. But the wearing
away of the softer fibres of these woods
under the rail and around the spike raises
a new set of problems. Even with cheap
treatment practicable, which insures
against the destruction of the tie in the
ground by decay, it is neither economical
nor safe to equip a road with such ties
unless mechanical devices can be found
which will prevent rapid wear. Ties chem-
ically treated resist decay, but the soften
woods cannot withstand wear of the rails
nor hold the spikes under the heavy traffic
of American roads.
This is true not only of ties upon which
the rails rest directly, but also where the
old forms of steel plates inserted between
rail and tie are used. Indeed, the thin
plates with prongs or spines and flanges
hitherto generally used in the United
States appear to hasten rather than re-
tard wear of the tie. With accompanying
screw-spikes, which hold the rail firmly
to the tie, severs Iforms of plates can be
introducedd successfully. Wooden tieplates
can be used, which, when worn out, are
easily replaced.
The functions of spikes are, first, to
hold the ties to the rails, and second, to
prevent the rails from spreading. Nail
spikes are still used for this purpose in
th;s country. In driving a spike into a
white oak tie, the strong and elastic fiber
of the wood is bent downward, maintain-
ing a close contact, so that powerful re-
sistance is offered to its withdrawal.
When driven into such woods as hemlock
and western yellow, lodgepole, loblolly or
shortleaf pine, the fibers of the wood are
crushed and broken. As a result the
spikes do not hold with sufficient firmness
to withstand the undulatory motion of
the rail nor the lateral pressure against
them; they become loosened, and the con-
stant friction enlarges the spike hole until
water collects in it and decay begins. The
spike must soon be driven in a new
place, and this constant re-piking rapidly
ruins the tie. Even if the tie has beew
treated with a solution like zinc chlorid,
he water will leach out the salt, so that
decay-producing factors begin their work.
The solution of this difficulty is achieved
by the use of a screw-spike. In the soft
woods screw-spikes will resist nearly three
times as great a strain as nail spikes. If
inserted in a screw dowel of hardwood the


- ____-.. -- -- ----- -- --- -----


:iower of the screw-spike is still greater.
A key, operated by two men, a hand-power
c-rew-spike driving machine, or a machine
with electric power may be employed to
insert screw-spikes.
Arrangements are being made for the
extensive introduction of these appliances,
the need of which has deveolped so con-
slecuously in the brief experience with
treated timbers. If in the maintenance of
a stable track, so indispensable for the
safety of trains moving at a high rate of
-peed. the proposed equipment fulfills the
promise of experimental tests, an impor-
tant step in the better utilization of our
forces resources will have been made.


The Seaboard is Ahead.
Mr. John Skelton Williams, chairman
of the board of directors of the Seaboard
Air L-ne, spent several hours in Baltimore
on his way South.
"The earnings of the Seaboard Air Line
system for the month of May," said Mr.
Williamt to a reporter for the News,
'were the largest in the history of the
company. It is the general opinion, both
North and South, that the Southern States
are lkely to feel less than any other por-
tio nof the country the recession in busi-
ness which is taking place in some see-
tions; and I see no reason to doubt that
business on this system will continue to
increase steadily throughout the year.
"Our Atlanta & Birmingham line is rap-
idly approaching completion, and we hope
to he running through trains from Bir-
mingham to Washington before the close
of the summer.
"The growing cotton crop will very
surely be the largest the South has ever
raised, and the universal shortage of the
staple and the growing demand for it
throughout the world are likely to insure
prices wh:ch will bring into the South
the ensuing season more money than has
ever been realized from any cotton crop.
"Notwithstanding the general falling off
in railroad earnings which is going on in
some parts of the country, the freight
and passenger earnings of the Seaboard
system for the twelve months ending June
30. lq04. will show an increase of approx-
imately $850.000 over last year."


The Southern Cypress Lumber Associa-
tion numbers 15 members and its total
output of lumber last year was three
hundred million feet of cypress.


The National Lumber Manufacturen'
Association, through its affiliated associa-
tions, numbers 800 members, and its to-
tal output of lumber last year was about
ten billion feet of all kinds.





t THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
m--------- a--------N


C. B. RBOER8. Pasmanr.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, VICB-PuaxaID2ws.


C. H. HODGSON, OSc, and TuAs's.


DIIR CTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEaehern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


- 4
4
4
4


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


WIll handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries,


Grain, Pro-


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of oae Three-Story Bldlag, 70x200; one two-story buildida. 50x390; ose osestory buildisg, 80x250,
maklag the largest space of amy Compauy of the kiad Is the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola. Fla., and Savannah. Ga.

-TH-E RECOD WILL' BX WORTH DOLLARS TO TO EERY WEK.
Tar ZrCORD WILL BZ WOrJ DOLLAR TO YOU ZY W] LL


CONSOLIDATED


I

i

I

I
I
4
4
4

4






THUE WNRLY INDUSThIAL R EOkD. 3


J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,

* 0y Hleadquaaters ftr
I ;i Distiller's Pumping
Outfit.
SNo plnt complete without one.
f Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
t [ Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
Smth Carolina. Write us for porticu-
l I I lars and prices. We also manufacMre
SEngines, Bellers aid "i th
o Grade Mschnery,
| as well as carry a full and complete o
--stockof----
I Mill Supplies, Pipe,
SBoiler Tubes, Etc. ;
Advise your wants.
SMacon, -- Georgia.
* 4 lsNeIof T& wt ftr TmI M StrIIIIIl PuII
0-* f-*t..et.t'*.$*e****o* .0. -**a* ***I* I* *IIT

I I I I I I I I I I I I tt t II III I L I a I I I t l l i:lll fl lr 111 11! :


W. W. CAR

Ta




STurpI

SLarg
a

fAMPA,


NES. Pre.


W. C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T DUDLEY. See. & Tress


nmpa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
Hardware
ntine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

e Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
nd Pullers on Hand.

FLORIDA.


* i ii l i s a 1 1 1 II ll i i llll I 11114111111s I rIi


... NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, OA.. U. S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
Q W. SAUSSY.
. A. ALFORD,


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.
DIRECTORS:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


H. L KAYTON,
Secmaoa Treasurer.


B F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY.
A. OOVINGTON.


J. R. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have heen revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.



W. R. THOMAS
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,
Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggies.


This Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.


Wholesale


Liquor Merchants


Proprietors


Jacksoville Botling Works


... Agents...


I ACME BEER I


BOWEN & CO.


Jacksonville, Fla.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,


from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866
Mount Vernon Pure
Whiskies


and
Rye


Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Mi'waukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHASE. BLUM & CO.
517 ai d 519 West Bay Street.
JACKSONVILLT, FLA.


Elgin & Hampden
Railroad Watches.

SEE

RILES

At His New Store,
15 W. BAY STREET.


..9.S0SOS**Sos*o$ e0*0..


GRIFFING'S CATALOG
I 130W TKU.
S ~ k
S
* TwentyrIl.6 vlea da
Also a emplete IH ad atmit u Qa
* nanetaI m mi dmbbay.
SCaJaboga Freae
Addzln
TM& AIPPIN SBROS. 06.
~JACKSON VULa.. FL.*
AMINO nOgIOSOS Ce




5UM16DU A19D Dlk&5 IN


ENGINES, BOILLRb.
tOtto o",aw. PrUnlaer. On ad got me.
chinery. sad Supplics and ReogIrs
CAPACITY rOR IS HANDS
Macbliu Too. Wo*0-Wrklag IE.4uft-
erY. MhafttTn. PulleY. Hanger.. L402
and Rublwr Wltln; mad Kuu*. Wtvw,4
and Mill qupVile and T-Ai
Plans 1Ad 4eths. dsha ter V-r
P1*3W a ad Steel bIgfae
61mm Pon*%Feed Fo l W IIm4. a"

AUOUSTA, CA.


THrE RCOnR IS T2B SOUTaH GREAT T RAD JOURNAL






4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


---------------- 6a Mt___*&&& _Z1 -1------

SJ.A. Craig t Bro.
S239 W. By Street EVERETT BOCK.

Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.
Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.


T. MURPHY
IJaskse wille
MahkIne and Iron Works
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat and Sawmill Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron and
Brass Castings, Phosphor-Bronze Journal Bearings.
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


.mtulillsslslslulssulusu 5


l5l5lt5t. at**5*5slt555os5


Standard Clothing Company ;


One Price One Price

FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 sad 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
etetaI0e ad Nawes Rats. Speial Atteniel Given to Iail Orders. 0


........................


m e**-----e---e--e-*-*: -
For SaJe:

22,000 Acre Sawmill Timber on St. John's River, within fifteen miles
of Jacksonville; will sell on very easy terms.
S5.120 Acres Round Timber, Liberty County. Price.............. $5.00
34,000 Acre Round Timber. Liberty County. Price per acre..... 4.50
3 6.000 Acres Round Timber, Washington County. Price.......... 6.50
24.000 Acres Round Timber, Lee County. Price.................. 1.35
-.------.- 0

jBrobston, Fendig & Co.
0 JACKSONVILLE, FLA. BRUNSWICK, GA.


Cable Address. Florida
---*

Standard Naval Stores|
aComrpany.
DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN!


R.OSIN


AND


TURPENTINE.
Jacksonville, Fla.


t- ~---- ---'-~-~- *-e#..;meaaaaas


RENTS


WILLIAM W, FRAZIER,

Real Estate Broker.


III W. roRSTnH STREET.


JACIISONVN=LE, flma1


H. A. Renfroe Co.


TAILORS Stetson Hats

Suits to Order at ReadyMde Prices Mail Orders Given Persoal Atteitio
439 W. Bay Street JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

P rintin g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.

N. A. BAKER,
B lve r amd
M*aulaclarer do le
Baker Improved
Seemless Torpew
tie stills.
Write me for prices m ae
!.C0. B. point in Geoa r71.
Id. AIabHas or MWisnif&i. Ab
tills solid under a gurste.
Job work through the
_.... country a specialty.
Works in Georgdi. I3runswlck, Go.
i My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.

W. H. BECKWITH. W. B.HENDERSON. G. C. WARAK.
BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.
LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTIIE AID MILL LAKlS.
Rooms 1-2-3, First Natlonal Bask Blldilg.
STAMPA, : : : : : : FLORIDA.

II I II Ill l l IIII 1 I !r I I 14 illlll11111111 IIll ll lll l ll

McMillan

Bros.
E Florida Cop-
per Works.
r Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
General Metal Workers.
Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
Patching through the country a specialty.
Orders by mail or wire will receive prompt
attention at either of the following wowks:
S rayetteville. N. C. Savacnn.h,. Ga.
: Mobile. Ala. Jacksonville. Fla
i 1ll .11111111lllll llll t11lllllllll illlll ll ll ,


Domi FAn TO xxNTioN TE 1z COND TO ADVNRTIKR&


~-~~-~~~r~~~~r+-~-+~+









t THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. S

198IOI 88I8OSI I I IilIO llllegettg AS** BiA)ll ll l l l alI l l IS III I*II Illii In l I IiI 9.OIgo* III


U5he


Seymour Cross-Tie Hewer and Veneer Mill.


This Machine is One of the Greatest Inventions of the Twentieth Century.


The patent for this wonderful machine
was granted to Mr. B. H. Seymour, of
Oeala, Fla, April 6, 1904, just as he had
installed in his mill the first working ma-
chine; on the 1st of May, his mill and all
its contents were burned, but Mr. Seymour
is rebuilding the Tie Hewer as rapidly as
poible.
Ths machine more than doubles the
value o every crss-tie log by utiliiag
the waste
It cuts a perfect cross-tie on the same
principle as a hand-hewn tie, being
smooth, perfectly square, accurate in size
and can be used in bridge or trestle work;
at the same time it cuts as good veneer-
for boxes or crate material-from the
green log, as any veneer mill in the world
will cut by steaming the log. This is
done by the downward sliding or lateral
stroke of the big knife. In short, by using
this machine, the stuff now wasted in
hewing out a log is cut off in veneers
which brings down the cost of tie-produe-
tion over one hundred per cent. There is


FRONT VIEW OF SEYMOUR TIE IHEWER.


enough raw material now wasted in the
State to make all the boxes and crates
necessary to ship all of Fikrida's many
crops. In addition there can be no ques-
tion as to advantage in durability gained
by cutting veneers off a log that has all
its rosin in it instead of from steamed
logs, which process must necessarily take
some of the logs' sap out of it. The Sey-
mour Cross-Tie Hewer only needs to be
seen to be appreciated. It will pay for
itself every three months; it should cer-
tainly be seen by every lumber and tie
man and crate manufacturer. It is in-
deed well worth careful examination; the
log, however large, is sliced by an enor-
mous knife giving the surface of the tie
the appearance of being hewn with a gi-
gantic broad-ax; this knife is ten feet
long, set so that one end is six inches low-
er than the other and working in vertical
guides, so that with its downward slid-
ing stroke, it cuts off the veneer in any
Thickness required-the feed' being auto-
matically adjusted. The machine is sig-
gularly simple and can be readily repaired


,by any ordinary machinist; it requires
two hands and a 3-horse power engine to
operate it. When it is figured that with
this equipment three hundred and fifty
ties a day can be manufactured and in
addition veneers enough made to keep a
crate factory busy, the business economy
in using this machine must be clear to alL
The Record certainly advises a close and
rigid examination of this wonderful inven-
tion and feels confident that it is destined
to add largely to the output of the tim-
ber districts. Any invention that makes
it possible to utilize raw material-previ-
ously wasted--nust be an advantage to
the world. We in the Southland are com-
mencing to realize that we have been too
prodigal with our resources, have produe-
ed too wastefully and hence it is particu-
larly encouraging to find that a citizen
and saw-mill man of Florida should have
invented such a material saving appliance.
Mr. B. H. Seymour has several offers from
individuals desirous of purchasing State
or other interests in this invention, but
so far has not closed with any.


TUE RECORD I TUE "PIaATORSPW u iAuCu"










TRIM WIMtY IDUATRIAt RZCOO.


Dr. Herman Von Schrenk on the

Market Value of Some Inferior Woods.


At its last meeting in St. Louis the Nat-
ional Lumber Association was addressed
by Dr. Herman von Schrenk, of the For-
estry Bureau of Washington. The follow-
ing is a part of his address:
"Before going into a specific discussion
of the topic announced, I want to preface
it by a few words on the relations which
have arisen of late years between the con-
sumer and the producer of lumber. Dur-
ing the early history of the lumber trade
the consumer felt at liberty to order al-
most anything, with a reasonable assur-
ance of getting it. There was no question
on the part of the manufacturer but that
he could produce almost any kind of lum-
ber for which he might receive an order.
lake the example of white oak-and the
same will be true of pine before long, and
has become true of white pine-the con-
sumer can no longer go to the manufac-
turer with reasonable assurance of get-
ting what he wants. This is true to a
large extent because of the increase in the
demand, and an even proportionately
greater decrease in the supply of forest
products; and the situation is fast assum-
ing a phase of what the consumer can get
as distinguished from what he wants.
"To take a specific case, it was an easy
tiling for the purchasing agent of a rail-
toad company to go to a manufacturer
ten or fifteen years ago, or even later,
and make a contract for two years for
eight hundred thousand ties. To-day the
manufacturer is not in a position to ae-
ccpt orders for high-grade material of this
description, but, to a limited extent, he
can agree to furnish any such material
as the quality of his timber enables him
to supply.
"The question of the use of inferior
woods for some time has been prominent
in the work pursued by the Bureau of
Forestry. We have tried to keep in mind
the relations which existed between the
use of high-grade woods and the possible
substitution of lower-grade timbers for
dihierent purposes. The buyer has become
accustomed to certain qualities possessed
by high-grade woods-such as strength,
ease of finishing, long life, and other qual-
ities which go to make up a high-grade
material; but the time has arrived when
he is no longer in a position to get such
material easily. We are constantly re-
ceiving inquiries such as ehese: 'Please
tell us what we can do with beech.' Is
Western hemlock any good?' The consum-
er has been accustomed to using a great
deal of timber which he-did not have to
question; he is now up against the queb-
tion of using materials that he knows
practically nothing of. This is true also
also of the seller. He wants to get the
greatest return for the material he has
to sell. If he can put the product in the
most attractive form, he is going to have
a material that he can sell for the most
money. To take a concrete example, ques-
tions concerning gum and loblolly pine
are coming to the front more and more.
Manufacturers of cars and others are ask-
ing regarding the value of inferior timbers
for car sills and structural uses of all
kin.is. The owner of gum lands asks what
his gum is worth and how he may realize
on it to best advantage. We can see in
this an increasing interest in and demand
for these inferior timbers, and the ques-
tion is: What can we do to establish more
definitely the quality and value of each


for certain uses?
"The three problems we have started to
investigate are, briefly:
"1. To determine what the strength
values of the various inferior timbers are.
"2. What the lasting powers, both in
the natural state and when treated chem-
ically, are.
"3. How more economically to use the
waste products of both low-grade and
high-grade material, thus bringing about
the utilization of all the wood in the tree,
including tops, branches and slabs.
Preservation of Wood.
"The preservation of wood, while prac-
ticed a great many years, both in this
country and abroad, is still in such a
chaotic state that very few know prac-
tically what to do. If you were to con-
s:der the following problem. 'In connec-
tion with our sawmill we want to put
up as cheap and reliable a plant as possi-
ble whereby we can preserve a certain
wood---increase its hardness, increase its
resisting powers to decay, decrease its
tendency to warping and checking. How
can we do it? What process shall we
use?'--f you were to ask a question like
that, while there are a great many sys-
tems on the market, patented and other-
wise, there has been too little effort to
determine their exact value and whether
they can be absolutely depended upon.
What we are trying to do is to test the
various forms of preservative processes
used both in this country and in Europe,
to test the relations between strength
and chemical treatment of methods for
increasing the stiffness. We are starting
in these investigations in the South with
gum, beech, loblolly pine and red oak; and
.n the Pacific Coast, with Western hem-
lock and certain others of the market
timbers in use there.
"Regarding the strength of timbers,
there have been a great many tests made,
and the test values of timbers may be
found occupying a large amount of space
in the periodicals. Still, these tests are
of such a character that it is difficult to
depend upon them. They have not been
made with much system; the specimens
have been taken without regard to the
character of the test to be made. Many
woods have received a reputation for being
stronger than they are, which has hurt
them when they have failed to come up
to the expectations; other woods have
been c passed too low. I have at hand a
few of the results in a preliminary form
which we have obtained during the past
year, and will read them.
Loblolly Pine.
"Loblolly pine has not only a wide range
of growth, but a wide range of structural
merit. It is found locally on the mark-
ets of Washington and Norfolk under the
name 'Virginia pine,' in small sap sticks
eight by eight inches or ten by ten inches,
showing almost entirely sapwood of such
a rapid growth that sometimes four rings
occur in three inches. This is second-
growth timber and is usually very knotty.
"The same species occurs in the Charles-
ton market. and from there is shipped to
Phi!adelphia and the North under the
name 'North Carolina pine,' and shows a
large-sized lumber, fairly free from knots,
somewhat close ringed, and of a high or-
der of structural merit.


White Springs, Fla.

On the Suwanee River
The Great Health Resort of the South.
S r Spl 25 ,000 Odm pr Mhmrt.
lealin Springs Forest Walks Shooting & FlsMt
No MosQUITOES. NO MALARIA.
The Healthiest Summer Resort in America.


THE PRITCHARD HOUSE


An Ideal Home for Invalids, FirstClass Table

ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES.
Write ar pticular ...
MRS. S L. PRITCHARD, Propritrs r WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE OAKS,

A Typical Southern Home


NEWLY BUILT and FURNISHED.


- EVERY COMFORT


-Write fr particular -
MRS. M. C. SKIPWORTH, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


KENDRICK HOUSE.

Headquarters for Southern Families,
GOOD TABLE HOME COMFORTS
... For particum address...
MRS. I. B. ROBERTS, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


THE HAMILTON,

A New, Modern, HigheClass Hotel.


ELECTRIC LIGHTS and BELLS


HOT and COLD BATHS


For ull inlimation write

JNO. S BOWEN, Owner and Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE NEW PAXTON.

Commodious, Home-Like Hotel.
ROOM FOR 100 GUESTS.


Table Unexcelled.


Every Attention to Visitrs


MRS. E H. PAXTON, Owner and Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.




THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
NOW OPEN
under nkw management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator add oar
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.


a. S. I CLETOl, W. B. J JAg. LATER, W.W. STULIG,
Pres at. V ePres. COl Mmager. Asat Treasrr

TVhe W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers


402 t1o 406 008 Ema any Street. JacImseae tm.
DIRECTORS:
IL r. CAW. A. &. PENBLET4R
T19M MuqjS. W. I. J8USSU.
FLs Gw, e. rcmy r. COLEOU.


W. W. 15NIFLM
JA& LAGngm


ARE YOU A 8UUSCRM= TO 113 REORD?








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


rThe lobloly pine as a tree is proli
ad a vigorous grower, mad suecemfuay
holds its place in competition with their
speis in the forest. The operations of
ommervative forest -- ge-ewt, whereby
the Jumber companies look upon their
forest holdings as part of their plants and
reap perpetual harvests of timber there-
from, comaern themselves usually with
loblolly pine. It s, therefore a timber
which engineers and architects may ex-
pect to And on the market for a indefinite
period.
"The chief objection to lobioBy pine i
that, being usually sapwood it deay
rapidly when exposed under certain eodi-
tions. It is, however, a timber that mny
be treated with preservatives very sue-
cesefully. Some diUmelty is experienced
in preveting the wood from staining in
the South Atlantic States; but if the tim-
ber is kiln dried, it retains the pleasing
grain and the clear white finish to be
found in the sapwood of this species. It i
consumed very largely in the Philadelphia
market for joints and mill construction.
"Engineers have been for a long time
specifying long-leaf pine as the standard
material for construction, and it is the
opinion of most of them that a wood of
quick growth has little merit. It is u-
doubtedlyl true that there is no structu-
ral wood that approaches the long-leaf
pine for strength and durability; but for
indoor use or for service in which severe
shocks do not come on timber, this quick-
growth loblolly pine offers one of the
cheapest and most desirable building ma-
teriak
"Let us have some conception of the
relative strength of joists of long-leaf and
loblolly pine. Let us compare the loads
which would rupture two air-dry joists
eight by fourteen inches in roes section
and sixteen feet apan. One joist is o
long-leaf pine of good merchantable qual-
ity, showing two-thirds heart on faces,
free from shakes that show on the sur-
face or through shakes and unsound knots;
the other joist i North Carolina loblolly
pine of square edge grade, showing up
on all faces, free from through shakes
or unsound knots, but of rapid growth.
The long-leaf pine joist will weigh seven
hundred pounds in an air-dry condition
and contain one hundred and thirty-three
pounds of water; the North Carolina lob-
lolly joist will weigh five hundred pounds,
and when air-dry, will contain eighty-
seven pounds of water. The long-leaf pine
joist will stand forty-four thousand six
hundred and fifty pounds center load be-
lrei failing and will defeet two and one-
fourth inches at the time of failure; the
loblolly pine joist will carry thirty-two
thousand six hundred and fifty pounds at
the time of failure and will defleet three
inches. just before failing. To state the
matter in another way, if the loblolly pine
joist is eight by fourteen inches in cross-
section, the long-leaf pine joist would have
to be eight by twelve inches in cross sec-
t'on for the same strength."

During May 17,6690,00 feet of lumber
were exported from Gulfport, Miss. part
of the total of 104,953,000 feet exported
during the first five months of the year.

The Arkansas Association of Retail
Lumber Dealers has been organized, with
Messrs. Clarence M. Dickenson, of Para-
gones, president; F. P. Schillings, of St.
Lous, secretary, and J. 0. Burgess, of
Newport, treasurer.


Kohn = Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


NEW YORK LUMBER MARKET.
Pine, Yellow (Lon= Leaf).
By Sail.
Building orders, 12 in. and under $20.50
to $2.50; Building orders, 14 in. and up,
$26.00 to $29.00; yard orders, ordinary as-
sortment, $20.50 to $22.00; ship stock,
easy schedules, $2650 to $27.50; ship stock,
40 ft. average, $30.00 to $.00; heart face
siding, 1 in and 1 1- in., $20.50 to $21.50;
1 in. wide boards, heart face, $6.00 to
$2&00; 11-4 and 11-2 in. wide boards,
$2800 to $30.00; 2 in. wide plnk, heart
face, $30.00 to $31.50; kiln-dried sap siding,
4-4, $18.00 to $18.50; kiln-dried sap siding,
5-4, $19.00 to $20.00; yellow pine box
boards (knotty), $13.50 to $14.50; yellow
pine stepping, $3800 to $40.00.
By steam, add $1.00 to $150.
Leag Leaf Yellow Pine Fleer
Clear heart face rift DM&BBk, 13-16x
21-4 counted 1x3, $44.00 to $45.00; "A"
rift DM&HBk 13-16x21-4 counted 1x3,
$32.00 to $33.00; "B" rift DM&HBk 13-16
x2 1-4 counted 1x3, $26.00 to $27.00; "A"
Flat DM&HBk 13-16x21-4 counted 1x3,
$21.50 to $2.50; "B" Flat DM&HBk 13-
16x2 1-4 counted 1x3, $19.50 to $20.50; No.
1 Common DM&HBkl3-16x21-4 counted
1x3, $1&850.
For 11-g in. add $2.50. Steamer ship-
ment on flat grain flooring $1 less per
thousand than above prices.
Cypress.
Cypress Prices Current F 0. B. New York
Market. Lumber rough or dressed:
Tank stock, 11-2 to 3 inches, $4&75 to
$56.75; Firsts and Seconds, I to 3 inches,
$4425 to $52.75; Selects, 1 to 3 inches,
$38.25 to $45.25; Shop, 1 to 3 inches, $29.25
to $40.25.
For prices on 8 inch add $1 per 1,000 ft;
on 10 inch add $2 per 1,000 ft; on 12 inch,
add $3.50 per 1,000 ft.
Bevel siding, 1-2x6 inch clear, D to A,
$11.75 to $24.25; ceiling, 3-8x4 or 6 inch
clear, D to A, $13.25 to $24.25; 1-2x4 or 6
inch clear, D to A, $18.00 to $27.50; 5-8x4
or 6 inch clear, D to A, 22.25 to $32.25;
Flooring, drop siding and ceiling, 4 or 6
inch, D to A, $27.75 to $43.75.

Jacksonville Wholesale Lumber Market.

(For week ending June 17.)
Merchantab'e.
xard schedules-10.50 to $13.00.
Sound and square schedules, i50 to
$12.00.
Merchantable car material-
Average seheaule of sills, ;6 feet and


under, 10 inches and under, $13.00 to
$14.00.
Special schedules-according to sizes
and lengths-prices steady.
K. D. Sape--6" and up 90 per cent
clear, $0.50 to $10.00.
flooring:
$11.50; No. 4, $8.50.
Cypress.
First and seconds, 4 quarter base, car
lead prices, $34; selects, 4 quarter base,
No. $15.00; No. 2, $13.50; No. 3,
$28; shop, 4 quarter base, $20.
Cypress Shingles--6xl A's, per 1.000
pea., $5.25; primes, $4.25; 4x18, A's, $3.50;
primes, $2.75.
Cypress laths, $2 per 1,000.
Cypress market strong. Mills have
more orders than they can fill. Prospects
good for higher prices. Dry stock scarce.


O. R.- O RLI. .
MANUFACTURERB 01


BRICK.



Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per ionth.

I' M .


seumieaammueeuuaeumumsuuauommlluusaauuueuamuuuu


* R W n. Pros.


T. IL R49CARTN. V188Pres.


MMCLE STERM. Treas.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY,


savuMM X. WcU. Wonder.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


lg l III eI aIt # g *I foaug g oIII a Igggu g gug -gurugg gg



East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipmets a Specialty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


WHE WRiTIN= ADvA3ISAeS MNTIOM THE RECORD.


Standard Turpentine

Company /


Has revolutionized the wood distilling busil
m ess i the South.. After three mouths of careful
testing oar machinery at the Waycross, Georgia,
mmil, we are mow ready to sell direct amy size
pat amd auarantee results by oar mew KRUG 0
PATENT STEAM PRESSURE PROCESS. /

STANDARD TURPENTINE COMPANY./


/


/


. The ..








Wmny MUSTRAL kv.00RD. ________


PINK AND CYPRESS MARKT.

Reports of These Southera Wee Staples
at the Leading Norther Market.L
Philadelphia. The event of the past
Sfew days has been the arrival of unusual-
ly aarge supplies of lumber, not only from
the South, but from the Northwest. That
trom the South came largely by water,
though the shipments by rail were not
insignficant. Wholesale dealers have been
fortunate in contracting hoeral supplies
of lumber. The granting of permits for
sky-scrapers and other large buildings
has given the market an upward impetus.
Baltimore. There is no material change
in the yellow pine trade. Stocks remain
large, and the demand does not attain
sulcient volume to make a distinct im-
pression upon them in the way of a re-
duction. A the available space is taken
up with lumber and prices are rather eas-
ier than had been expected. At the same
time the situation has some encouraging
features. The inquiry appears to be on
the increase and building operations, es-
pecially in the burned district, are grad-
ually attaining larger proportions. Per-
haps no great boom will develop, but busi-
neos will remain fair for a long time to
come. The demand for more dwellings is
being met and a large number are going
up
St. Louis. There is little difference in
the existing conditions of yellow pine, com-
pared with those of a year ago. A com-
paratively good business, fully equal to
the business done last year is being done
by those who are willing to meet buyers
half-way on prices. Those who bold out
for high figures find that business is rather
quiet. The condition of prices is bad, and
is principally due to the fact that mills
are cutting more commercial lumber than
they did a year ago, and also to the in-
creased capacity of new mills. Then, too,
the spring was backward in the North and
favorable in the South, so there were
heavy stocks at the mills and little buy-
ing by Northern yards.
New York. There ia quite a brisk call
for yellow pine and general construction
orders and inquiries are quite numerous.
Easy schedules are easy to place at the
mills, but anything out of the ordinary
is only booked at increased prices. The
local wholesale trade report business as
quite satisfactory, although there is no
immediate rush on. Conditions at the
mills South are reported satisfactory so
far as a maintenance of the market is con-
cerned, and the outlook is favorable for a
steady market throughout the summer and
fall.
Boston. It seems impossible to lift the
market for hard pine from the rut into
which it settled some time ago. Buyers
as a rule, decline positively to be inter-
ested in any but quite small lots needed
for immediate use; and a change in their
attitude is not generally expected for at
least two weeks yet. Occasionally in-
quiries for large quantities are received,
but they are seldom followed by orders,
the intended buyers losing courage before
negotiations have fairly begun.
Cypres
New York. Cypress continues to more
than hold its own. While supplies in
the hands of wholesalers are ample for
current wants, the demand is increasing in


such volume as to indicate an advance in
values before many weeks.
St. Louis. There is only a moderate
movement in cypress. There was a lighter
demand during May than during April,
and much lighter than last year. Fac-
tory stock is particularly quiet. The
same condition exists in yard stock.
prices are fairly well maintained.
Boston. Cypress is quieter than it
should be at this season and concessions
are not absolutely unheard of, although
the tone of the market may be described
as fairly steady.
Baltimore. The demand for cypress is
still smaller than had been estimated.
A considerable part of the stock laid in
by the lard men shortly after the fire
has not yet been distributed, and the in-
quiry for additional lumber is therefore
somewhat restricted, but the prospects
are encouraging. Many buildings in which
cypress will be used are either in process
of erection or have been planned, and
much activity of this kind will prevail
from now on.
Philadelphia. The cypress trade among
retailers is quiet, but all those who han-
dle cypress to any extent say that their
business this year will go ahead of last.
All the cypress now coming in is on
special orders. One or two wholesalers
have arranged for abundant supplies, but
the lumber will not arrive until the latter
part of June.

TO HAVE THEIR OWN INSPECTORa.

New Inspection Rules to Go into Effect
July xst ext.
The session of the Georgia Interstate
Sawmill Association which was held at
Atlantic Beach last Monday proved a very
interesting meeting to the members. Ev-
ery portion of Georgia and Florida was
well represented.
The depression in the lumber trade has
betn evident for some time and all lum-
bermen have been more or less discouraged
over the prospect. The cause for the de-
pression is traced generally to the political
aspect, such bing generally the case just
prior to a Presidential nomination and
election. The-reports of members showed
the condition of business unsatisfactory,
and a resolution was adopted shutting
down all mills one and a half days of each
week during August, provided the Gulf
Coast Association and the Southern Lum-
ber Manufacturers' Association did the
same.
The new inspection rules recently adopt-
ed by the Association will become effect-
ive July 1, and under the new rules mer-
chantable will be sold one dollar cheaper
than under the rules of 1883, which the
association has been using for the past
twenty years.
The committee in charge of the bureau
of inspection was instructed to appoint a
chief inspector at Savannah, one at Jack-
sonville, one at Brunswick and one at
Fernandina. The establishment of bureaus
of inspection is the result of a measure
introduced before the association by Sam-
uel A. Sizer, of Jacksonville at the April
meeting. A committee was appointed to
investigate and report and Mr. Sizer's
plan of inspecting lumber at each of the
ports was adopted, the idea being to have
a uniformity of inspection which will be
final. Under the present methods of in-
spection the middle man is said to be the
man who bears the brunt of unsatisfac-
tory inspection, and under the proposed
method there is' reason to hope that all


SMERRILL-STEVENS CO.


I Boilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
S SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
a lJcksonville Fla. ;



Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.

Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.



Cummer Lumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.


"In the Good Old Summer Time"

SYour customers will remain well, if you do
like Dr. Mathews of Thomson, Ga. He wrote
us 15th of January, 1094:
"I have been carrying Cuban Relief in stock for
several years, and have frequently used and prescribed
- it. I consider it superior to any preparation on the
market for Cholera Morbus, Sick Headache, Colic,
and an infallible remedy for horse colic."
You write as for a supply.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga. Tenn.


R. TOLAR.


J. H. HART.


T. H. BLACkLY.


J. R. TOLAR, JMa


(Establlshed 1782.)

TOLAR. HART & CO.,
160 FRONT STREET, NEW YORK.


Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange, Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


J. D. WEED L CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.


Read the Record Adv't's


JOSEPH D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON


THE RECORD KEEP PAC wrrIT SOVTH=M PROGRESS








THE WEEKLY iNmuuwsalAL RECORD. 9

oe- wt Machin^ery an***d Mill Supplies. _.4.*

Machinery and Mill Supplies. |


Bar Iron, Iron Pipe and Fittings, Belts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tools, Lumberman's Tools,
Packing of all Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corrugated
Rooflng.



JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


"alp


STATE AGENT FOR.
ATLAS ENGINES a BOILERS, SOULE STEAM FEED,
WORTHINGTON STEAM PUMPS, JENKINS' VALVES,
DISSTON'S SAWS, FLINTKOTE ROOFING,
CURTIS MANUFACTURING CO.'S Mi Macinery,
DeLOACH SAW MILLS, GILBERT WOOD PULLEYS,
nOYT'S LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SPRING anM RUBBER CO.
sBet aM RIbber mles.
SOLVENTINE BOILER COMPOUND,
DODGE MFG. CO.'S Cast Irh Srit Pileys,
S McCAFFREY FILES, MONARCH EMERY WHEELS,
DANIELS' PPP Steam Packiln
A. LESCHEN &. SON, Wire Roe.


M- iI9: 7?1_Ti:Fy9i~iT_131TT I aw1 1!.fl


parties concerned-the mill man, the mid-
dle man, and the final consignee-will
proft and prosper equally in so far as
the matter of inspection is concerned.
In the evening there was a concate-
mation of the Hoo-Hoos, an order to which
all good lumbermen belong, and a general
good time was enjoyed.
The next meeting of the association will
b held at Tifton, Ga., on the 12th of
July.
The Continental Hotel is an ideal spot
for an event of this kind. The delibera-
tios of the lumbermen were held in the
damee hall, a few steps from the surf and
the murmuring waves were mingled wita
the business discussions without disturb-
ing them As for the Hoo Hoo proceedings
the opportunities for making the kittens
walk the strand were unlimited.


LUMBER NOTES.
The export trade is dull, but the de-
mand now going out from the thriving
i~ti f thic uty fu UU ,U~Is


put of lumber last year was four hundred weather from now on there will be an av-


and seventy-six million, two hundred and
ninety-four thousand feet of yellow pine.


erage
of lalb


>c es o coun ry r more iimber to ,
build with is going to tone up the domes- The receipts at Brunswick, Ga., for May there v
tic trade. were: casks turpentine, 6,577; barrels tion la
rosin, 15,946. Exports were: May 28th,
The Georgia Interstate Sawmill Associ- per steamship Rio Grande to New York,
action numbers 127 members, and its total 800 barrels rosin; steamship Comal to Quit
output of lumber last year was seven New York, 400 casks turpentine, 1,609 bar-
hundred million feet of yellow pine. rels rosin; steamship Inca loading with
h h naval stores for foreign shipment.
The Southern Lumber Manufacturers'
Association numbers 198 members, and its Valdosta, Ga.-In regard to turpentine
total output of lumber last year was two industry in this section will state that
billion, seven hundred and sixty million the weather is getting warm and chipping
feet of yellow pine. is making a fairly good yield, at present. Boar
So far has been very dry and windy,
The North Carolina Pine Association knocking the yield of turpentine off ten
numbers 32 members and its total out- per cent. up to June 1st, though with good [ip


crop of turpentine made, if plenty
or can be had. Labor is a little
in this section of Georgia, although
rere very few boxes cut in this ee-
st season.


man Cooperage Co.,
QUITMAN. GA.
Manufacturers of

CRADLE SPIRIT BIRRELS
According to specifications of
d of Trade, Savannah.
Also make
and Syrup Barrels.


D. M. FLYNN, President


W. B. JOHNSON, Vice-President
DIRECTORS


A. S. PENDLETON, Sec'y & Treas


J. W. Oglesbee


L. Horn


N. G. Wade


J. L. Medlin


W. B. Johnson


SIndependent Naval Stores & Export Co.,


Jacksonville, Florida.



Naval Stores Factors and Operators.


Capital Stock, $500,ooo.

The patronage of turpentine operators generally is invited. Liberal advances made on consignments.
Our interests and those of the producers are identical, as ours is purely a co-operative company.




Some Money and Some Timber For Somebody.


All Producers are Requested to Call On or Correspond With Us.



WHE WRITING ADYVUTISKR8 WTIOW TH= RECORD.


D. M. Flynn


Walter Ray


- -- -- -


sr~`ir~i~;~il~i~i~`i~rrrrrrrr~cr~ SmESSaaESC3mCSCSSOC3~SaESE~WaC~W( SCSCSCXJCS(SCSESCSE3CSCSCSESaCSC~CWCSC1~ r~(CSL~X~C3CSEJmCSE~cSCSaE3aaaaCSSXXSCSC









10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


--------------------- *-----f1 see
J. R. PAumO-T, AnCa S. an HUma. AwrnmT F. PamBT
President. Vice-President. tashler.

The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
Capital. $200.000. Surplus. $100.000
STATE DEPOSITARY.
General Banking. Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes. 5.00 per Year.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week

irit for the Week at SramMh. Range of Turpentine and Rsin at Sa-
Pre Repts Sales Exp. 190 vanna for Three Years.


Mon., June 131531 566 401 361 47
Tuma, June 14 1530 595 905 47
Wed_ June 15 53 11040 125 0 47
Thur., June 15152% 951 490 345 47

Rosin for the Week at Savannah.
Monday, June 13. Last Year.
WW ... ........ 45 3.0
WG .............. 4.10 3.20
N.............. 3.85 3.10
34 .............. 3.65 3.06
K .............. 3.40 2.95
I .............. 3.30 2.90
H .............. 3.06 2.40
G ..............2.95 1.90
F............. 2.90 1.85
E ............ 2.85 1.80
D .............2.80 1.70
ABC ........... 2.75 1.70
Receipts 2,383, sales 1,020, exports 5,659.
Tuesday, June 14.-A general advance
of 2 1-2 cents a barrel on everything. Mak-
ing WW $4.57 1-2, and so on down the
line. Receipts 3,341, sales 1,674, exports,
613.
Wednesday, June 15.-More advances,
making complete quotations as follows:
A, B and C, $2.77 1-2 to $2.80; D, $2.85;
E, $2.90; F, $2.92 to $2.95; G, $3; H,
$3.10; I, $3.32 1-2; K, $3.42 1-2; M, $3.70;
N, $3.90; window glass, $4.20; water
white, $4.60 to $4.65.
Receipts 1,761, sales 2,193.
Thursday, June 16-A general decline
of 5 cents from Wednesday's prices on
each grade. Receipts 2,937, sales 1,576,
exports 345.
Savannah Naval Stores Statsmet.
Spirits. Rosins.
Stock April 1 .......... 6,495 44,50
Receipts June 16 ........ 951 2,9
Receipts previously .... 46,811 115,223
Total ................. 54,257 162,732
Exports yesterday ...... 345 2,133
Exports June 16 ...... 38,848 126,879
Total ................. 39,193 129,012
Stock June 16 .......... 39,193 129,012
Stock last year ......... 15,064 33,720


I 1903-4 1902-3 | 1901-2
Spirits 41 | 5 42 6511 31 53
hosin


\vW
WG..
K........
F ".. ..
D .. .. ..


.. 3.4.1 0
..3.104.40
.. .804.15
..1.652.90
.. 1.55 2.80


3. 3.85 2.003.70
2.403.20 1.65 2.4
1.22.101 1.101.50
1.102.061 1.001.40


Tolar' Hart & C.'s Review.
New York, June 14, 1904.
Spirits Turpentine-The market contin-
ues in the same old rut. Demand rather
light, but about sufficient to absorb all
arrivals. Stock 797 barrels. We quote
Machines 56 1-2 to 563-4 cents.
Rosin-Market continues strong with
good demand good demand for all grades.
We quote BC, $3.10 to $3.15; D, $3.15; E,
$320; F, $3.25; G, $3.30; H, $3.40; I,
$3.45 to $3.50; K, $3.80 to $3.85; M, $4.15;
N. $4.35;; WG, $4.50; WW, $4.85 to $4.90.
TOLAR, HART & CO.

(Cypress mills in the lower Mississippi
valley have been temporarily closed, which
action wasi due to the difficulty experi-
,need in logging them. Operations will
be resumed as soon as conditions will per-
mit. Stocks are generally light and list
values are being received for practically
all grades. It is claimed in some of the
eastern markets that choice lots of stock
are being placed at prices in excess of the
listed values, but the general market is
not quite up to that notch.

Georgia Industrial Notes.
Valdosta-Street Paving.-The city will
expend about $50,000 for the construction
of vitrified brick pavements. Address The
Mayor.
Wlinchest Wataterworks. William
Wheeler, Concord, Mass., and C. F. Atter-
sail and Edw. S. Jouett, of Winehester,
have incorporated the Winchester Water-
works Co., with a capital stock of $50,000,
a',luiring an established plant.


Imports of Turpentine to U. K.
The following table is compiled by James Watt & Son, of London, from the
official returns. For convenience of comparison we have turned cwts into barrels
-320 ewt. equal 100 barrels.


1897
From U. S., bbls. .... 152,662
From France, bbls.... 161
From other countries.. 1,494

154,307
From Russia .......... 2,815
Total Barrels .. 157,122


1898
173,785
244
878
174,907
4,183
179,09


1899
149,375
517
50
149,942
4,998
154,940


1900
174,446
2,283
840
177,569
8,521
186,090


1901
193,429
859
53
194,341
6,861
201,202


1902
155,122
1,656
904
157,682
8,711
106,393


1903
143,851
4,630
516
148,997
17,595
166,592


Thus the import of Russian Turpentine (or Wood Spirit) in 1903 was double
that at 1W0, and over sxi times as much as in !15Y. It is interesting to see 'how
this import fluctuates with the price of American Turpentine.
Percentage of Import of Russian ..1.79 2.33 3.22 4.57 3.41 5.24 10.56
Av. Price Amer. Turp. in London ..21-6 24-6 34-1 35-4 27-1 33-1 42-2


FOR SALE.
50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
Lofty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill P35 per aere. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in t e State.

C. BUCKMAN, A m'arn'tee'tt
,Joknoonvie, Cle


Crops of Spirits
Orop
Spirits.
Wilmington...... .....16,511
Charleston...... .... 2,400
Savanah.. ....... ..176,418
Brunswick...... ...... 55,002
Mobile.. .. ......... 12,15
New Orleans........... 36,017
Carrabelle...... ...... closed
Georgetown....... 7,515
Pensaola.. ...... .. 42554
Jax. & Ferndina.. .... 187,210
Tampa ...... ........losed

Totals...... ......535,915


and Rosin for Three Years.


190-04.
Rosin.
89,6W7
3,150
650,938
184,527
5080
133,126
closed
44,214
205,982
653,210
closed

2,020,925


Crop 1902-03
Spirits. RoBsin.
18,83 113,68
3,007 11,835
270,670 940,507
68,947 244,106
18,969 79,272
33,103 108,033
3,394 32,148
10,307 4,8a0
38,275 192,206
91,976 375,211
13,565 42,14,
571,096 2,184,818


Crop 19014-
8piriu. Book
186,21 10L.48
3,004 I3,L
313,086 1,Pl4
79,M sa2,w
21,038 34,38
8,177 47*7
8,458 50,515U
37,781 164,32
70,000 3460
15m,4 5,13

593,4#2 21841U


R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KnIoHT, Sec. and Treas.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,


HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.


Herbert A. Ford,
President.


Oeo. H. Ford,
Vice-Pres.


F. L. Wats*e,
Cashier.


The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAP1TA L, $50,000.00.
DIRECTORS: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Clarence Camp, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicited.


C.n BARNES, Pres.


J. D. SHAW, Vice-Pres.


RALPH JESSUP, S4..-Trem


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonville Pensacola, Fernandina and Savauma
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

W. FRAZIER JONES. C. H. BARNES. R. JESSUP. W. H. BAKER.
Presdent. Treasurer. Ass't Tres. SeesUary.

UNITED GROCERY CO.,

Importers & Wholesale Grocers
HAY, GRAIN and FEED.
Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
B. G. LASSETER. JACKSONVILLE, LA.
Vice Pres. and Ge n r. i. JACKSONVILLE FLA.

M. A. BRIGGS, President. HOMER BROWN, 2d Vice-President.
H C. BRIGGS, 1st Vice President. J. C. McDONALD, Secretary and Treasurer



W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.

HARDWARE, MILL and TURPbN I SUPPLIES&

Council Tool Co., & Holmes' Tool Co., Tools,
Brigg's Sterling and Perfection Hacks and Pullers,
Cutters, F4es, Whetters, Glue, Batting, tra'inTer Wire,
Turpentine Wagon Harness and Collars,
Hoop Iron, Coopers' Tools and Rivets.

Everything in Turpentine Supplies,

Send us your Mail Orders.

W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.,
VALDOSTA, GA.


TUE RZJAMXlrY OFr OUR ADVEETIRERS VOUCHED FOR.






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY


Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose


Cars,


Brass and Gray Iron Castings.


CAPACITY:


TEN CARS PER DAY.


Located in the hea t of the Lumber District gives us adva-
tage or choicest material at lowest cost.


The week has been a dreary


one to the


southern manufacturer, owing to the con-
tinuation of rain and soft ground, which
has practeally put a stop to logging op-
erations in portions of the Mississippi
Valley, and consequently many of the
mills have closed down for want of sawing
material. This cessation of production
bids fair to have a stimulating bids fair
to have a stimulating effect on values.
Stocks in the east are generally low and
prices firm, especially on low grade stock.
The eastern dealer is depending almost
entirely on shipments from the southeast
coast, as rail consignments have about
ces ed to make their appearance.


ZINC NAILS

Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the omly aait which s ill not injure
saws when left in the trees.
Salem Mail Co.
279 PeaI 8& Now YoFr*, A Y.
Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc, Slating and Roofing
Nails, SIaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
Jacksonville, Fla.
CAPITAL $300,0 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS 5300000
Stre ath and ample facilities. Business solicited. Prompt attention to collec-
tons and bnIiness of customers not living in Jacksonville. Best Safety Deposit
Boxes for rent.
-insm-m--****---- :::e..-,-.#.".-" u;


"The" PAINT STORE,
I. E. BAIRD d. CO., Jacksonville, Fla,
\all paper, pictures, frames, painting and all interior and exterior decorating
Hardware, glass, etc. If yon are building a fine home, get Baird & Co. to do
tue decorating that it may be in keeping with the building. Oldest and moat Rx-
perienced house in F:arida.

5he Chattanooga Pottery Co.,
DAISY. TENN.,
has the exclusive right to manufacture and sell the

HERTY TURPENTINE APPARATUS,
Patented Feb. 3, 1903
Infringements of the Patent will be vigorously prosecuted


Green Cove Springs, Fla.


JOHN HENDERSON, President.


J. A. CRANFORD, Secretary.


CHATTANOOGA POTTERY CO.,


Factory located Daisy. Tenn.


Jacksonville. Fla.


The Herty Turpentine Cups


If you


expect


to use cups next


season place


your orders now for future delivery, Prices and

all information cheerfully furnished on


Cups, Gutters and all Tools
Used in the HERTY system.


Address all communications


Chattanooga Pottery Company,


Jacksonville, Fla.

'*IOTHIG SUCCXD8S LIKE 80CCB~."


CHAS. H. HERTY,


She


--


-. -. . - - - - -








12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

JAMES A. NOLLMO1N,
rEdtr and Manaer.
Publihod Every Friday.
snoro (Domestic)... ~ 3.00 Per Annum
O(Forelan).... 3.mO .
~The Pine and Its Prsedc."
AC eommunleatein should adiddssam
Tho Industrial LRecord Company.
Jacksonvillo. Fla.
Swanch Ed l ad buna Offic at
AtUntf. Ga.. 1 Satvannah. (G.

Entered at the Postoffice at Jacksonville,
Fla., as second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association,
September 12, 1902, as its exclusive official
organ. Adopted in annual convention
September 11, as the organ also of the
general Association.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the official
organ of the Interstate Cane Growers' As-
sociation. Adopted Sept. II, 1903, as the
only official organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.

COPY FOR ADVERTISING.
Advertising copy (changes or new ad-
vertisemets) should reach a Tuesday
morning to insure insertion in the issue of
the sme week

THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the main of-
iea of the Industrial Record Publishing
Ce. are located at No. Ix South Hogan
Street, Jacksonville, Fl., in the very heart
of the great turpentine and yellow pine
indutries.
The Atlanta, Ga, office is located in the
Equitable Building. No. 723. Atlanta is
the center of the great manufacturing
trade of the entire South.
The Savannah, Ga., office is in the Board
of Trade boiling Savannah is the lead-
ing open naval stores market in the world.

ENFORCING THE NEW INSPECTION
RULES.
The lumbermen of this territory are
just about to face a new state of things.
On the first of next month the new rules,
what is known as the 1904 inspection
rules, go into effect, and it is going to be
a little difficult, perhaps, to enforce them
unless the lumbermen stick to their col-
ors. All sorts of devises and tricks will
be resorted to to embarrass them. Buyers
are going to shove inquiries under their
noes of schedules made up of the old
1883 rules, and ask for bids. Business
is dull and the lumberman will be sorely
tempted to bid on the schedule as offered.
If the buyers can break down the new
rules they are going to do so.
The duty of the lumbermen is clear.
Either refuse to bid and ask for a new
sehdule made up of the 1904 rules, or add
such a premium to the list prices of the
old schedule that he will find it to his
interest to submit a new schedule under
the 1904 rules. The buyer may hesitate
before doing so. He may even submit
his old schedule to every lumbermen in
the trade in his effort to break down
the new rules. If he insists on it, let no
lumberman make a bid of less than five
dollars premium alove the list of 1883.
If the lumbermen begin bidding against
each other and reduce the premium, it
will not be long before some lumberman
will be offering figures very near the old


schedule and the bars once down, the new
inspection rules will be gone.
Stand firm, brethren, and you will in
side of ninety days, see the old rules cut
out of all inquiries and the new ones
firmly installed in their place.


HOW TO REGISTER A STILL.
In a recent issue we took occasion to
urge upon turpentine men the necessity
of registering their stills in the U. S. cus-
tom house. To do this each operator
should apply to the nearest customhouse
for a blank, No. 26, U. S. Internal Reve-
nue. This blank provides fo a list of
stills and distilling apparatus in any given
location, designated by town, county and
State and also in the proper collection
district of the State and by whom owned.
It gives a registered .distilling number,
a number to each still, its kind and ca-
pacity, whether or not for use, and if
used, for what purpose. This blank when
filled out is, to use the words of the blank,
"to be returned in duplicate to the deputy
collector by every person having in his
possession or custody, or under his con-
trol, any still, or stilling appratus set up.
Persons failing to register become liable
to a penalty of $500 and a fine of not less
than $100, nor more than $1,000, and im-
prisonment for not less than one month,
nor more than two years, in addition to
forfeiture of the still and all personal
property found in the building, etc., where
the same shall be set up. (Revised Stat-
utes, Section 3258.) A copy of each notice
on this Form is to be immediately for-
warded to the Commissioner of Internal
Revenue." The last sentence evidently
refers to the duty of the collector of in-
ternal revenue.
As we stated in the former article there
is no fee or charge made by the officer
in registering a still, and it need be done
but once so long as the ownership or lo-
cation be unchanged.


OPPORTUNITIES IN THE PHILLIPINES
As a result of the intelligent and well
directed efforts of the Insular Government
conditions in the Phillippines are now rap-
idly approaching a degree of stability that
should encourage the influx of American
capital to these islands in liberal amounts.
The great harbor improvement works in-
augurated three years ago at the port of
Manila are now nearing completion. As
a result of these important works Manila
will shortly have the best harbor in the
Orient, and this fact, taken in conjunction
with its fortunate location at the inter-
section of several great commercial high-
ways, will tend to give the city a mari-
time importance of the first rank. The
total cost of the harbor works has been
over two and a quarter million dollars,
making it the largest contract ever placed
in the history of the islands. It is in-
teresting to note in connection with this
undertaking that the contractors have
succeeded in training native labor so as to
prove entirely satisfactory both in point
of efficiency and economy. While this
circumstance is not sufficient in itself to
demonstrate that the labor problem in the
islands may eventually besolved without
importation of Chinese, it at the same
time gives ground for encouragement in
the event of Congress persisting in apply-
:ng the Chinese Exclusion Act to the Arch.
ipelago. If capitalists can be convinced
that native labor can be trained, and can
also be relied upon to work with reason-
able regularity, there is no douit that


I TOU AREe 1006111V3, ADVERTISE I THE RwwCOD.


one of the leading drawbacks to the im-
mediate development of the islands will
be removed.

THE OLLEMARGARINE LAW.
The Oleomargarine law was declared
constitutional by the Supreme Court at
Washington in the case of McRay vs. The
Ignited States. In this case the plaintiff
in error brought suit against the United
States in the District Court for the South-
ern District of Ohio to recover $50 paid by
him as a penalty for the sale of a fifty-
package of colored oleomargarine bearing
a tax stamp of three-quarters of a cent a
pound instead of 10 cents a pound. It
was argued by the counsel for McRay
that although the oleomargarine was col-
ored to look like butter, the color was
obtained by the use of butter which was
itself artificially colored, but the use of
which as an ingredient in the manufae-
ture of oleomargarine was authorized by
law. It was also contended that the tax
of 10 cents a pound was prohibitive and
confiscatory and an attempted federal
usurpation of the police powers of the
States. The court held that the tax con-
templated the finished product and not
tne details of manufacture; that if the
oleomargarine was colored it should pay
the higher tax and if uncolored the lower
tax, regardless of how obtained. As re-
garded the amount of the tax, the court
said that it could not consider the amount
of any tax fixed by Congress, that being
a purely political function. It therefore
sustained the validity of the law and of
the tax.

TIMBERING FLOOD LANDS.
George L Clothier, of the bureau of for-
estry, of the National Agricultural De-
partment, after a study of flood-damaged
lands in the Kansas River valley, makes
suggestions for reclamation which may
be applied elsewhere with a secondary
purpose of meeting the demand for eross-
ties, fenceposts, etc. The sanded lands
he says, should be planted to cottonwood
seedlings. The plantation should be
thinned out at the end of about six or
eight years by removing half the stand
of trees, and should be thinned in like
manner at the end of 12 or 15 years. At
the end of 20 years the majority of the
remaining trees may be cut for saw logs.
For eroded lands he suggests catalpa trees,
which make their most rapid growth in
the first ten years of their life, or walnut
trees, which continue to grow for a cen-
tury or more. For caving river banks
with alluvial soil, the willow is admira-
bly adapted. Mr. Clothier says that the
hardy catalpa will probably give poor re-
turns on lands covered with more than
two feet of sand, but that on rich soil it
will produce more fenceposts per acre in
a shorter time than any other species.
Some catalpa plantations in Kansas have
paid six per cent compound interest on
the land and labor invested and $10 an
acre per annum net profit for a period of
twenty years.

FOREIGN EXPORTS.

Shipments of Naval Stores Abroad Since
our Last Report.
The following vessels have cleared from
the following ports laden with naval
stores:
From New York: Ship Furnessis to
Glasgow, with 350 barrels rosin. Ship
Marianna. to Trieste, with 10 barrels rosin.


From Philadelphia: Ship Mamah.te
Exchange, to Manchester, with 1, 0 bar-
rels rosin.
From Baltimore: Ship Rowmamore, to
Liverpool, with 1,200 barrel roam.
From Pensacola: Norwegian bark olfl,
to Riga, with 6,53 barrels rosl.
From Savannah: British steamsip
Tantallon, to Hamburg, with 2,000 eas
turpentine; Italian steamship Cttt di
Messina, to Genoa, with 640 casks arits
turpentine and 500 barrels ria; bak
Glad Tidings, Rio de Janeiro, with 3,
barrels rosin; Italian bark Letia, to Rio
de Janeiro, with 1,000 barrels rosn.
From Fernandina: Belgian steamship
Iris, to London, with 8.34 easks spirit
turpentine; to Antwerp,-4,660 casks spirits
turpentine; Belgian steamship Clemata,
to Antwerp, 7,366 casks turpentine aml
3,573 barrels rosin; to Hull, 5,000 asks
turpentine.


NEW NAVAL STORES CO.

Independent Naval Stores and Rapit
Company is Oat for Buhis.
A short time ago mention was made in
the Industrial Record that a new naval
stores company had been organized in thi
city and at the time we gave a detailed
account of what it proposed to do.
The names of those in charge of this
company is of itself a sufficient guarantee
that it will do a most satisfactory bsi-
ness. All, or nearly all of them are old
hands at the naval stores business, and
many of them were trained up from the
turpentine still to factors. It is strictly
a co-operative company, where the inter-
ests of turpentine operators will be fully
protected, for the most part the members
of the company being turpentine operators
themselves.
The officers of the Independent Naval
Stores & Export Co. are D. M. Flynn,
president; W. B. Johnson, vice-president;
A. S. Pendleton, secretary and treasurer.
The Board of Directors consists of the fol-
lowing gentlemen: D. M. Flynn, Walter
Ray, J. W. Oglesbee, L. Horn, N. G. Wade,
S1. L. Medlin and W. B. Johnson.
The company starts with a capital stock
of $500,000, and, being naval stores fac-
tors and operators, are prepared to do a
large business. The patronage of turpen-
tine operators generally is invited, and
PIheral advances will be made on consiga-
ments. According to their advertisement,
which appears on another page, they have
"some money and some timber for some-
body." They invite all producers to call
on or correspond with them.


Yellow Pine at the Wrlds Fai.
There is on exhibition at the St. Louis
Fair a building constructed of yellow pine
including weather-boarding, shinglesand
other siaed lumber, stained with a oil
stain. The weather-boarding is stained
a brick red, while the gable-ends are of.
a deep brown, giving the effect of long
exposure to the weather. The roof is of
a soft moss green color, obtained by
staining with oil. Within and without it
are exhibits of yellow pine, in various
styles of finish. These exhibits are en-
tered for award by the Southern Lumber
Manufacturers' Association.


Two hundred white oak trees, standing
:n the woods near Glasgow, Ky., were sold
last week to a Eastern lumber company
for $4,000.






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 1
,,~ai***** pg*1 ~~ su


--------- ---'m m " " "
NO. 6s0e .

TIl ATlAl IC NTIOINL A OF JACSOIILLE.
CAPITAL PAID IN. $350,000.00.
OPEN FOR BUSINeSS AUOUST i, 1903.
OFFICERS:
Edward W. Lae, Presdert. Fred W. Hoyt, Vie-Prsideat.
Thonasa P. Delhm, CaHer.


Affairs in Atlanta


Industrial Record Bureau,
Atlanta, Ga., June 16, 1904.
Everything has been quiet here for a
few days; no particular function to chron-
icle; and yet a busy week withal. There
will be no fair at Atlanta this year; in its
place the Horse Show promises to be un-
usually brilliant. Already the secretary,
Mr. Frank Weldon, is being inundated
with letters of inquiry from all parts of
the United States and Canada. There
seems to be quite a consensus of of opinion
here, among those interested in Horse
Shows that the show should make a cir-
cuit 6f some of the neighboring cities,
thus affording the, horse lovers of Mobile,
Birmingham, ,acksonville and Savannah
an opportunity of enjoying the exhibition
without the inconvenience of coming here.
What say the admirers of the equine race
in Savannah and Jacksonville? Believe
that if the secretary of the Jacksonville
' Carnival Association were to take' the
matter up, that city could easily arrange
to have a Horse Show week. It is cer-
tainly here, as in our sister city-New
York-the fashionable happening of the
year.
The Georgia Legislature meets next week
and among other matters that will come
before it for consideration, interesting to
Record readers, is a bill similar to the
Florida law to compel railroads to suitably
equip lumber ears. The measure stands,
it is understood, a fair chance of passing,
but if not enforced more stringently than
is the Flcrida law. will not help the saw
mill men much. The writer, as indeed all
who know him do. deeply regrets the un-
fortunate accident that befel ICol. W. S
West and trusts that he will soon be
able to get about again. It is particu-
larly ill-timed as Col. West is a power
in the State Legislature and wbuld have
used his great influence and splendid elo-
quence in advocating the passage of such
a bIll. At all events let us hope that the
Valdosta accident was not as serious as
reported and that soon we shall have the
pleasure of seeing the genial colonel again
himself.
The friends of U. S. Senator Taliaferro
-and they are legion-are pleased to know
for certain what they always believed-
that the Senator is to succeed himself
and are satisfied that the smaller major-
ity in the second primary was due wholly
to the fact that his supporters felt vie-


tory was assured and so did not make
an effort to bring out a heavy vote.
Atlanta is to have another slice of fed-
eral pudding. Headquarters for the South
for the Civil Service Commission will be
established here. Nothing succeeds like
suces.
ff anybody works harder than Secre-
tary W. W. Cooper of the Chamber of
Commerce, he must be a whale. Mr.
Cooper can always be found in his office,
but always, too, up to the neck in busi-
ness.
No sooner does Atlanta buy Piedmont
Park for the public use than a private eit-
izen, a former New Yorker and ex-Federal
soldier, General Eldelatone, presents the
home of his adoption with the land for
another park. This is the Atlanta spirit
breaking out again. No wonder the city
grows.

*rii/n DYAL4PCM CCI BLDG,
nVO, Jacksonville. la.
All makes. $10 Up.
We can save you from $10 to $60
on any typewriter made.
Write us.
AEI T "OLIVER" VISIBLE TYPEWRITER


J. E. GORNTO & CO.
Shipping Trade
a Specalty...
I $3 Sik al or, Ea ms frM

WHISKIES

FROM $1.50 TO $6 A GALLON


Sole Agent
OH Saratega Ry, $6 Gal.
O Baer Rye, $6 al.
Og Westmela Rye, $4 a.
Big Hera Rye, $3 Gal.
J. L GORNTO & CO.,
VaMldta, Geomr


Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.


CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS,

AND VATS.
Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
. M. lDAVIS & EON, PALATRA, FLA.



i The


WestaRaley-Rannie Compan
114 W. Fersytk Street, Jacksemville, Fla.


A. a. WST, res. e. C. C. West. vic.-Pres-. w a. ce-Pres. V. r.y. Sec. a rfas.

We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.


"Kingan's Reliable."
Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINOAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Flavhii T. Ckdsti
President


rank C. Groover,
WaPres.


Marsha W. BowS%
fse. and Tres&


IHE HRISIE-ROW R DRUG gO.


Whol0le Domisis.


JlcsonlleC


. Ho


I mil hIN 1nM oil M11TmNiCi Ias 0W

il Om oUanOIS WO e ieiMM. Ie ~ TTink


C. H. HARGRAVES CO..

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpentine .nd Sawmill Men's Requirementm
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY SIKLLI
Jacksonville, Fla.


BUY BED ROOM FURNITURE NOW
and take advantage of our
SPECIAL PRICE SALE
It is for you. You will never regret it.
May you live lomn to remember it.

Largest selectis Lm st prices.
Best Gods. Freipt paH.
Send for Blue Prints to-day and mention the
Industrial Reqord,

ruad Raids Feri mi Cpw y,
S1 W. BAY ST.. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


TAR,4 lmflSAuDk& AMD PRZoGnSSIVL"









14 THE WEEKLY INAUSrRIAL RICOED.


QUALITY PnIRT-P OICS 1 IOH1T.



d 18

00


*c c




& P. HOLIES & CO.'S WEEKLY COT- it does not mean a big crop was demon-
TON LETTER. st-ated in 1899. when the June conditions
New York, June 17th.-Taking all brought about a July average of .88, only
things into consideration, it is doubtful to end with an October figure of .62. But
whether the cotton belt has experienced when compared with the last four years,
such favorable June weather since 1897 there is nothing to complain of. It is
and 1898. The trade has become so ac- difficult to see how the weather could be
customed to unfavorable developments improved, and barring the absence of nec-
during June, owing to climate conditions essary moisture in some sections of the
of the last four years that there is now Eastern belt and boll weevil in Texas,
a general disposition to look for a very the crop is doing well There has been
high average condition in the July repor.. abundant moisture in the lower Mississip-
This is the situation in a nutshell. It pi Valley and even too much in the South-
accounts for the sagging tendency of the west. The average rainfall in the Eastern
future market and the bearish attitude of Belt is still, however, much below nornal,
the average trader. Reports from nearly and while sufficient rains have fallen
all sections of the cotton belt are of most lately, the condition of the soil there is
favorable tenor. There seems to be little such that the crop in Alabama, Georgia
doubt that the cotton plant ia getting a and the Carolinas must be watched rather
good start. While far from nalf the bat- carefully. For instance, one of our cor-
tle, a favorable start is a great deal. That respondents from South Carolina wires

Course of the Savasnah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SPrKI t & OF TURPENTINE
Apr 1 Apr. 8 Apr. M1 Apr. 17 Apr. M May 1 May 6 May IS May a May p
N-D NMD 10 1 45 14 141 4-4 41
Jun- June 2 June U June 86 July Julyly July 17 July M2 July 31 Aug. 6
41-4 41 4y 47 % 47 -4 41 M M 0
Au. 14 Aug. Aug. X Spt. 4 Sept 11 Sept U Sept. 5 Oct. 2 Oct. 8 Oct. 1
a5 13% B% 1 5% 64-4 R7 ND 6 67 1-2 i 1- .-
Oct. Out 36 Nov. 6 Nov. 1 No. 5.Dee. Dec. 10, Dec. 17, Dec. 1, Jan. 14
a U14 I a a e 6 1-4 5 1-4 1-2-44
Jan. 22, Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18,Feby. 25 Meh. 3 Mel. 10 Meh 24
65 4 W 60 59 60 58a
Mek. 3
47


ROSINS
WW WG N M I H
AUL .......M (U0 et Wn O U Ls Lo
April 1. .....LI L.O 4 1 L O 11 2.N 2. L
April .... ... LO. o L4 .41S. 2.5 L20
April17 . .. A.M LX s .M 2X 2.4O
April ... O41 U UL 2.S L L26
May 1 . 3. Us US UsL Le. 2.5 2.a
May L. .... aS US 6 U s 2.5s .2r5
May 3 . . L % 6% n1t% lVAh 3e'W% 2.67% 2tl%
May as . . .Ln Lie &W & 1LU a 2.36
May a.... .. La L35 L 6s La a. 2.fL
JMy . . ..L U. L.U 6 US 3. L2.
Juail.........34 3. 1L US 6 3 20
June 3.. ..... L 3 sI Le .S Ls. 2.17 2.t
June . . . Ln Ia ILN 3.5 .s 2.7 2.is
Jluy 8.... .. 3 .16 .S L 35 2. LS 2.6
July 1. . .. .to UL 3.1 2Si S 2.5 L
July ... .. .. L4 3. .1 2.3 2. 2. 7a .s
July L ..... L41 U* U3 1S 3 I L 2.6
July M. . . E. L6. La 7 2LA L27 L0
August . .. . L4 8 3.* 5 L.5 2.S 27 2.
AugeMt 4 . . 3 La1 S 2A. 2L. 2.L
August . ... .L L. o. Le 3 L. 2.M3 2.s
September 4. L. 3.7 me 3.41 8* 8 2 1.10 2.5

September It . 5 L5 a LO L 2L 5 0
Oeptembr S. . .4. 4.10 .15 3.5 1SL 35 2.
October s.... 4.6 4.4 4.s 4. 4.15 U 2.70
October 8 ...... 4.71 4 4.5 4 410 13.0 2.70
October .... ..4e 4. 4,1 4.4o 3.2 2. 7
Oeteber a .. .. .. &W S. 8 11.1S &05 2.0
October 3 .......4. 0 )s L 3. 3.0 2.710 2.
November 6 .... ...M 1 13.10 2.1 2.L 2.70 2.O
November 1 ........&. &1 1. 2.e 2L 2.7 2.53
INovember ...... .l &.S 3. L. LI 2.7 2..4
November ... ) La 2. 2.I r 2.40
December 3 .. .. L 3.5 .l 2.M 2. 2.6 2.53
December 17 .. .;: 2. S .M .19 2. 2s 2.3
eeaember .. 3U LIS 2. 2.80 2.56 2.35
Decembera = .. i5 s 16 LIS. 3S 2. 4 140
January 14 ....4. L3. 2.3 S.15 3. L 2.5M
- Jamary .. .. ..4 3.L5 3.S15 3.10 210
Jamary .. .. ..4J 4.1 3. 2.S 5 2. 3.15
february 11 ..375 3.45 3.3 3.30 3.25 ?-0 2.85
February 18 ...3.66 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25 3.06 2.70
February 25 ...3.70 3.50 3.35 3.20 325 2.95 3.60
March 10 ...... 3.80 3.0 3.40 3.35 3.30 3.06 2.75
MNo4; ?4 ......4.00 3.70 3.0 .35 .3 2.95 270
March 31 ......4.10 3. 0 3.0 3.3 332 2.95 2.70


D C-A
2.5s .l
LIB 2.41


L5 1.5
1O76 1.7
1.514 L1
176 L.0
Le) Lt
1.41 L2.
1.71 L7
1.5 1.7


LW LM
LU L.
1. 1.16

Le7 L7
LK L1
oGn L

1.S 1.7
LaU L



2.00 1.K
L56 L1


2.5 13.
LM LO
2.26 1.
2.5 2.15
2.L L2
2.1 2.1
2.1 2La
2.15 2.
2.1 2.X
2.1O 2.70
2.5 2.5
L32.6 2.
2.L5 2.Lo

2.70 2.70
2.55 2.55
2.40 2.40
255 2.55
250 2.0
2.50 2.50
2.60 ZW6


that in his section the plant is going back-
ward rather than forward at the present
time. We point out this condition In
order to indicate that a great deal can
happen in the next two or three months
and the crop is never made by the first of
July. In another week the July condition
will be reported by correspondents of the
Agricultural Department. As the records
of the Department for 15 years show no
improvement of a full three points, it is
unreasonable to anticipate as high a con-
Jition as some of the more enthusiastic
bears predict. That the figures will be
h-gh enough to warrant anticipations of
a good crop if maintained must be cheer-
fully admitted. Under the circumstances
it seems likely that prices will have a
sagging tendency and that the new crop
positions will work some lower before the


and that progress towards a lower level
is likely to be very slow. Europe is buy-
ing new crop in enormous quantities ad
this selling is being done by spenlators
and people in the South and of course is
done on margin. Any unfavorable devel-
opments of the least breath of bad weath-
er in the South would have an instant
effect on the market so heavily short as
it "s at present.


Sam'l P. Holmes&Co.


Stocks, BSM11, Cotton.
Grain anm Prevtiss s.


NEW YORK GOTTEN EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE


next report. But we would advise those Direct prva to all excn .
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
who desire to play the short side that Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
the market can safely be sold on bulges Bel Plsme 853 BaMiwl Blck


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.


SPIRITS OF TURPENTIUNI.


ro United Kingdom. In gsawas:
Month sm 04 1~4
April.. ....... I16 16.11
May .. .. .. ...Oki= 6,1
June .. .. .. .. 1uR 10.41
July ...... .. ..3. tJ,
ugust.. .... ..Ua 1.14
September.. .. 7Xfl11
October .. ....... 74111, 4aJl
November .. 61,638 1,295,70
December .. 1,65,666 1,31,779
january. .. 228,80 373,20
February. .. 116,452 38,00
March . 35,20 ......


=944

LUM



922,91
678,784
164,330
247,490
25,000


To Belgium and Netherlands, n galloom:


Month 1U1- 13 I U1-
April........... U11,1 39,47 Included
May ..... .. ..3 .6 a L,2U 1 all other
June..... ..... 1,Y1 3n; 1 Europe
July .... .. .. E.76.1.U 1,2 U1
Augut...... .. am 41, r7 1 1
September..... M.M 51.U 4WA1l
October .. .. .. M4 AM 61 121.4
November .. 133,065 349,726 381,228
December .. 100372 6863 672,164
January .... 168,89 241,4J 174,367
February ... 5,130 372*444 366,501
March .. ........ 8,713 18,474

To Germany. in gallons:
Month a1-4e 11-4 11U-01
April .. .. ........... 114.4 11.Z
May.. .. .. ......52 6. 5i- 36 ,
June.. ..... ... 14,31 4M.a
uly .. .... .. M 6,3 12.1t 711
August .... .. .SMA8 as
September.. .. 2U 361U 13167
October .. .. .. .1W X.6M 1M17
November .. 179,010 110,163 81,780
December -
January .... 1M2e00 5607 153
February ... 220,182 15,838 67,
March .. 6,26 ...... 94

To all other Europe in Gallo s:
Month U1M4 1U- U1M4-
April ...... ..... 1 1.4 6.M.S
May .... .. ... 6M 2 4.u1
June.. .... .. 14L I. W418
July ......... .6.M 6.1 4.41
Auust .. .. ... a. 2. AU
September.... .414. 3." a.m
october ...... 16. 4Ut 17A.
November .. 32,e00 17,800 94,837
December .. 47,306 89,41 23,00
January ... 11,000
February .. 15,471 ...... 4402
March ... 14,18 12275 36,000

Total oreign Exports. In gallons. includ-
ing everything outside of the United
states:
Month 13644 1i9- 13M1-M
April...... R. B 1441 9- 4"
May ..... ... .13 3.144 2.*.68
June.. .... .... 1.-. aJ. 2 u t9l.kl
July .. .. .. ..131.3m 1.61.6 2.410.4s
Augn .. .. .. ..1.7 34.1 2.M4o
September.. .. 1474.146 2AU3 L39.L6
October...... .1.36 1.M.JO LULnI
November .. 1,851,068 1,932,183 1,656274
December ..IJ)03.52 1.794,38 1,65.17%
January ... 700,292 820,253 829,0
February .. 487,577 531,346 855,476
March .. 298,488 118,174 285,58


ILOSINS.
To United Kingdom, barrels =a ib:
Month 186-M 1is- 1U1-1
April .... .. .. 7.23 11 1,M8
May .... .. .. O, lsm 6U.
June ......... 01.748 7. L
July .......... .M 116
August .. ... 746C$ m.
September..... 471 L. 1U
October .. .. .. 4.sa1 .4LM a
November .. 71,107 95,735 8864
December .. 61,455 64,466 7
January ... 53,506 42,78 681
February ... 28,351 37,336 1,18
March .. 39,016 35,946 48,76

To Belgium and Netherlands, barrels -
pounds:
Month 13646 U-49 1S-4
April ........ 1,M s1u75 l10h0is
May .. .. .. ...... 610 3r an etr
June .... .... I 5AN a,.
July ....... 2,M A113. 4 mUn
Auguc t .. .. .. L 47.1
September..... 4,22 1.1 MoI
October .... .1=21 64 234M
November .. 3,391 80,860 3U
December .. 37,077 13,26 O,*
January ..... 0,739 24,19 15,61
February ... 9,849 26,268 18,66
March .... 10,192 32,121 11,814

To Germany, barrels 3 Ibs
Month U1- U1QI- IM1-a
April .... .. .. 4M 3.IM4 6.-
May .... .... aa 1,ao6 n.W
June .... .. .. 41, 4L@ 411UI
July .... .. .. 1U. UM.4 ,11m
August .. .. .. 7. 8.111
September.. .. 1. 4M1 944 4
October .. .. .. B.1n 1.SM 1430
November .. 56,763 42,841 2
December .. 15,407 3J,171 8
January .... 34,768 654, 9,173
February ... 172,135 40,915 66,37
March .. 49,962 60920 410

To all other Europe, barrels 3 lbe:
Month '13-e 1C-6 Ia-18
April ...... .. 44 .14 .1
May .. .. .. .. iJa 4.7 S11
June.. ........ 14,441 *.MS 6m
July ...... .. 513 531. 14.
August .. .. .. 8.5 .1
September.... 7.4 171. 1SAM
October .... ... M.4 1 tIe
November .. 13,328 6,415 25,01e
December .. 25,299 48,701 39,816
January ... 17,124 7448 A24
February ... 38,184 42,654 56,931
March ... 33,687 51,949 71,99

Total Exports of Rosin, barrels 20 poada.
Including Asia. Africa and America out-
side of the United States:
Month 1144 11643
April ...... .. 1u.61 US.1 -
May ...... .. i1.a2 5,144 n
June .... .. 178.31 316.6 MU
July .... .. .. .11M 1.1 1Um6
August .. .. .. .. .1B 2218.6
September.. .. 3* 5 U.LI LIMas
October ....... SILM 5 7.116 31.o
November .. 184,800 231,543 222,79
December .. 210,457 20e066 191A40
January ... 192.471 170,910 247,8
February .. 30,090 180,632 257,224
March .. .. 171,548 204,433 214,913


T11Z 3pZlO E"TE L AUL OVER THE WO&LD.









THE WEUELY INDUSTRIAL RECORDl.


FLORIDA BANIKES IMET.

Maaimef t After-Dinner Speeches ade
a the Occasi.
The Georgia Interstate Sawmill Asso-
ciation held the boards at the Continent-
al Hotel at Atlantic Beach last Monday
They were followed by the Bankers of
l-lorida who held their annual meeting in
the same hall the following day. Man-
ager Kenny, of the Continental, made
tnem at home and the day was devoted
to a discussion of the many phases of the
banker's life.
President Garner, of the Jacksonville
Board of Trade, delivered the address of
welcome, dubbing them "Triangulars," be-
cause, in a large measure, they are pillars
in business, in the State and in society.
The deliberations were, for the most part,
routine. Affairs were pretty much what
they had been, although improved with
an added year's work. But the feature
of the occasion was the evening's ban-
quet.
John T. ismukes, the retiring president,
was tosatmaster, and if there ever was
a toastmaster who was born and not
made, Colonel Dismukes is that man. His
happy incidentals interjected while an-
nouncing subjects and speakers showed
that there is something more to the man
than mere debits and credits.
S. G. MeLendon, of Thomasville, Ga.,
responded to the toast, "The Potentiality
of the Banker." He ran the entire gamut
of the banker's business life in his ad-
dress and it was one of the best delivered.
Col. Robert Lowry, president of the
Lowry National Bank, of Atlanta, a dis-
tinguished guest of the occasion, delivered
a fine address on the condition of banks
and banking at present compared with
what they were many years ago. In con-
eluding his speech, he said:
"My friends, we bankers have the re-
sponsibility of this great era of industrial
development largely upon our shoulders;
we are expected to carry the burdens of
our several communities, and to support
in a large measure these industrial enter-
prises; we are held responsible in a great
measure for the credit and financial stand-
ing of our section; therefore let the high
calling of our profession appeal to us, as
we exclaim with the poet:
'Honor and fame from no condition rise;
Act well your part; there all the honor
lies.'"
Mr. P. L. Sutherland, president of the
Bank of Green Cove Springs, and the sil-
ver-tongued orator of the Turpentine Ope-


W. J. LIENMGL
Predient.


rators' Association, had the most import-
ant mission of any to perform at this ban-
quet. It was left to this thinker and
eloquent speaker to tell the bankers of
Florida and the people of the State gen-
erally how to borrow money without se-
rurity.
It was a great and interesting subject,
and was handled in a masterly manner.
Had the people of Jacksonville heard the
speech there would have been such a run
upon the banks of Jacksonville as would
have forced even the "United States" Bank
,ere to close its doors. The committee on
program had heard Mr. Sutherland speak
frequently in the past; had heard him pick
o pieces any subject that they attempted
to discuss, and upon this occasion they
evidently attempted to stagger him, but to
no avail Mr. Sutherland was equal to the
emergency. He added a wrinkle or two
to practical banking in this State, and
staggered some of the old bankers with
the feasibility of this new scheme for
,lacing the circulating medium before the
people of the South without security.
Mr. John G. Christopher, a director of
the National Bank of Jacksonville, re-
sponded to the toast, "Board of Direc-
tors," and right ably was that subject
handled by him. There was a great deal
of wit and humor in connection with what
Mr. Christopher had to say, and it was
received with a great deal of pleasure by
those who were seated about the banquet
tables.
The association kept rather late hours
about the banquet table. No one attempt-
ed to look at the watch or at the large
clock in the dining hall when the toast-
master bowed to a finish, but those who
were there noted at least two changes
of the tide on the beach before the bank-
ers and their friends withdrew. The
banquet was in every way a great success,
and those who were present voted it so
to a remarkable degree.


J. W. WADE
Viee-fPtedent.


E . HUGHES,
See'y ad Tress


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.

DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE Q RETAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints. Oils and Glass.
Stoves, Tinware, Country-Holloware.


10 WEST BAY STREET


Jaclksonville. Fla.


J OHN D. BAKER Pr. C V. RAKRleSON1 Vi e res BAKB & SBA. P.E KEd.
saberr a Hdes C.) (C. hr kM C&) Gemrd Cam. Se. & Tus

FLORIDA FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY
(I We can collect your Freight Claims against
Railroads and Steamship Companies.
Charges Reasonable. Your Membership Slicited.
We save yo all rorry and troMe. Endorsed bfy al Pnlic S 8els
in tee Chty mea B rumas JtAo CKmmNVLes.
216 Dyal-Upchudrch Bldt_ JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


W. T. RILEY,
President.


J. A. G. CARSON,
Vice-Presldet.


GErO. J. SCOVEL.
Sec. and Tress.


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.

MANUFACTURERS OF


BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS

Machine and Hand Factories,

8th Street R. R. Crossing.


3 A ff~Ug~d~~tU7UW V ~


V ALJLFr.,


FLORIDA


,****** **** ****@ 1ou*nISOoun******* SeS* S **O****
I F You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
You Want any Kind of Florida Land?
You Mean Business?
SCewl on or Write to
J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS,
Ocala. Florida




Geo. T.Gifford Iron Works Co.

Founders and Machinists.

Special attention to Saw Mill and Turpentine Work.
Tifton, Georta.


MUD T= AD Un T= REcoRD


THE COVINCTON COMPANY,


SWhole SHOES AND DRY GOODS. 635 641 st th Stre.

NEW YORK: 256 Church St. Jacisonville, Fa.

We Sell Merchants Only.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


. . . v v v v v v


-










16 ~ PTHE WEEKLY INOtMT`IAL RECORD.


Dp HARDWARE&.
Buyers D directory Briggs Hardware Co.,W.H.,Valdosta,Ga.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co, Ocala, Fla.
These advertisers are in this issue. If Tampa Hardware Co, Tampa, Fla.
you want anything, look through this Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah. Ga.
classified list and write to the firm ap- HARNESS.
hearing therein. The Record guarantees McMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
a prompt response. Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fla.
HATS.
AUTOMOBILES. Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Florida Automobile Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gilbert, Fred E, Jacksonville, Fla. Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS. HOTELS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla. Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla. Hamilton, The, White Springs, Fla.
Central National Bank, Ocala, Fla. Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
Mercantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fla. Kendrick House, The, White Springs, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville. New Victoria Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
BOXES AND CRATES New Paxton, The, White Springs, Fla.
Oaks, The, White Springs, Fla.
Cummer Lumber Co.. Jacksonville, Fla. Pritchard House, The, White Springs, Fla.
BRICK. Zahm's European Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Foster, Geo. IR, Jr., Jacksonville, Fla. IRON WORKS.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co, The, Jackson- Gifford Iron Works, Geo. T., Tifton, Ga.
ville, Fla Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
CARS. gusta, Ga.
South Atlantic Car & Manufacturing Co., Merrill-Stevens Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Waycroes, Ga. Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
CATTLE. Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Palmetto Park Farm, Ocala, Fla. JEWELERS.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO. Greenleaf & Crosby Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
less & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
Pinkussohn Cigar Co., J. S., Jacksonville, Hiles, R. J., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING. LAUNCHES.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla. Florida Automobile Co., J.eksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla. LIQUORS.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Jacksonville, a.
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, Ila.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE. Blum & Co.. Chas.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Bowen & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
C(ornto & Co., J. E., Valdosta, Ca.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS. Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City. MEDICINES
Larendon, Af. W., New York City. EDICN .
Tola.-, Hart & Co., New York City. Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
COOPERAGE. MACHINE WORKS.
Cannon Co., The, Quitman, Ga. affordrd Iron Works, Geo. T., Tifton, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla. Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
Jacksonville Cooperage Co., Jacksonville, gusta, Ga.
Fla. Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Quitman Cooperage Co., Quitman, Ga. Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
DRUGS. IATERIALS- FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fla. CESS.
DRUGS-4WHoLESALE. Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Christie-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville, METAL WORKERS.
Fla. Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE. McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla. MILL SUPPLIES.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
ENGINES. Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla. Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au- Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fla. "ampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. S., Macon, Ga. MULES AND HORSES.
gusta, Ga. Dillon & Penuel, Alarianna, Fla.
FOUNDRIES. Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fla.
Gifford Iron Works, Geo. T, Tifton, Ga. NAILS.
murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fa. Salem Nail Co., New York City.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY. NAVAL STORES.
Florida Freight Claim Agency, Jackson- Barnes-Jessup Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
ville, Fla. Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
FUEL. Ellis-Young Co., The, Savannah, Ga.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack- Independent Naval Stores and Export Co.,
sonville, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla.
PFURNITUREeacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
RUlTU Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Grand Rapids Furniture Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Fla. Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
GENTS' FURNISHERS. PECANS.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla. rifflingng Bros. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fl.
Reafroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, a., a.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, Fla. PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE. Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Consolidated Grocery Co, Jacksonville, Fla. Campbell, J. R., Ocala, Fla.
Ellis- young Co., Savannah, Ga. Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hargra-es Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fla. Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
J. hnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fla. Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Ptacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga. PUMPS.
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
White, Walton & Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga. gilbert Fred E.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS-WHOLESALE. 'ehofield's Sons Co.. J. S., Mapon, Ga.
Krhn, Furrhgott & Co., Jackson.ille, Fla. White-Blakeslce Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Bond & Bours Co, Jacksonville, Fla. Ala.


PATRONIZE p ACOwnL ADVERTISRS FOR SATISFACTORY DSALIMSG


PAINTS. TOOLS.
Baird & Co., I. E., Jacksonville, Fla. Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Council Tool Co., The, Wananish, N. C.
RAILS TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Joseph Iron Co, Isaac, Cincinnati, O. Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jacksonville, kla.
REAL ESTATE. TURPENTINE PROCESS
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa, Pine Product Construction Co., The, Fay-
Fla. etteville, N. C.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Pine Belt Construction Co., The, Raleigh,
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fla. N. C.
Frazier, W. W., Jacksonville, Fla. Standard Turpentine Co., The, New York
Gifford Company, Jacksonville, Fla. City.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Ocala, Fla. TURPENTINE STILLS.
Southern States Land and Timber Co., r, M. A. rn
Jacksonville, Fla. Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
West-Raley-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville, McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
Fla. TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
ROOFING TIM. Davis & Son., G. M., Palatka, Fla.
American Tin Plate Co., New York City. TURPENTINE VATS.
SHIP YARDS. Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla. TYPEWRITERS.
SHOES-WHOLESALE. (rvot Typewriter Exchange, Jacksonville,
SO --WHOLSLIL Pla.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla. UNDERTAERS.
STATIONERY. Clark, Chas. A., Inc., Jacksonville, Fla.
Cochrane's Book Store, Palatka, Fla. VEHICLES
STEAMSHIPS MeMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City. Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fla.
STOCK BROKERS. WATCHES.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville ,Fla. (reenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Brokerage Co., Jacksonville, HIss & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
Fla. Itiles, R. J., Jacksonville, Fl.
TAILORS. YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Ciancaglini & Bro., John B., Jacksonville, Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Fla. East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fh.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
TANKS. Are yoe remadl r y ow n wae
or one bsomwed em a im negh rtI
Cypress Tank Co., Mobile, Ala. j te Ianer be the ease, wte t-4a
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla. nom noberi e.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
TAK STO GE.CYPRESS WATER TANKS
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah, Best in the Wold
Ga. For delivered prices writ,
National Transportation & Terminal Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla. Cy r Takl C, MebCeA

Ili l Ill ll I I 1 1 I I I I t 1| 11111 l I I I 1 I t ll I II l
SJ. P. WULLAS. President. J. A. G. CARsON, 1st Vice-Presldent.
ST. A. JarIIao, 2nd Vioe-President. J. F. DusNBsar, 3dVice-President.
- H. L. KATn, Secretary. D. G. White, Treasurer.


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

I liat mom llN F:MS IN) -I3f aon.
SMaln Ofliee SAVANNXIH, GEORCIA. .
raneb or-ee:- PUI ACOLA, FLX. t Banch Grocesy Ho-,
Sract OffiOces: JACKiONVILLE, FLU. COLUMBUO, GA.

SNaval Stores Producers are lavited to Correspond With U s.
Sllll1fill fllllII Illlll l ll l i 1111111 l lt III1111111i --

Thls Cat Represents the Phmoms

"Blakeslee" Gasoline Pump Rig
rIr
irrigation, Tank Supply and Drainage Service.
=11


No. I Outfit has a capacity of 45,0OW gallons in 24 hours.
No. 2 Outfit ha a capacity of 1 .,000 gallons in 24 hours
Write teay owr prices to-
WHITE-BLAKESLEE MANUFACTURING CO.
B ritgham, Ala.






S THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17




The Cooperage Company

Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels

Capital $100,000.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.

O FFICERS:-
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.
DIRECTORS:
J. C. LITTLE, JOHN E. HARRIS, C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST, W. J. KELLY
W. C. POWELL, W. F. COACHMAN.




Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are

McMILLAN BROTHERS'
Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS,
SAVANNAH, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
MOBILE, ALA. FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.


ON OW THZ WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PAPER.









18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR LET-
TES PATENT.
Notice is hereby given, that we, the un-
dersigned subscribers intend to apply to
his excellency William 8. Jennings, as
governor of the State of Florida, a Tal-
lahassee, Florida, on the 7th day of July,
1904, for letters patent incorporating the
undersigned and their associates into a
corporation to be known as The Meldrum
Brothers Company, in accordance with the
following articles of incorporation.
ARCHIBALD MELDRUM,
M. L. MELDRUM.
T. 8. GRAY.

ARTICLES OF IRCORPORATION OF
THM MKLDRUM BROTHERS
COMPANY.
We, the undersigned ineorporators, here-
by associate ourselve together for the pur-
poe of forming a corporation under the
laws of the State of Florida, and adopt the
following articles of incorporation:
Article L
The name of this corporation shall be
The Meldrum Brothers Company, and its
principal place of business shall be in the
city of Jacksonville, Florida.
Article IL
The general nature of the business to be
transacted by this corporation shall be to
own, control, buy, sell, mortgage or lease
real or personal property of every kind
and description, patents, secret formulas
or proeeses of manufacturing any drug,
chemical, compound, mixture, or other ar-
ticles of merchandise; to own, control,
rent, build or erect, or acquire or dispose
o0 in any manner, any real property, fac-
tory, offices or other buildings, tramways,
sidetracks, or other means of transporta-
tion for the purposes or convenience of the
business of the corporation, but not for
the purposes of a common carrier, and to
buy, sell, manufacture and deal in, Tho-
rium Nitrate, Aluminum Nitrate, Ammon-
ir Nitrate, Barium Nitrate, Beryllium
Nitrate, Calcium Nitrate, Cerium Nitrate,
Didymium Nitrate, Erbium Nitrate, lan-
thanium Nitrate, Lithium Nitrate, Mag-
nesium Nitrate, Uranium Nitrate, Yttrium
Nitrate, Zirconium Nitrate, Soluble Gun
Cotton, Phosphoric Acid, and Starch; and
to mine, buy, sell and deal in Phosphate
Rock, Monazite and Tale, and manufae-
ture the same into fertilizers, by-products
or any commercial products thereof, and
buy, and sell such products at wholesale
and retail, and to manufacture, buy, sell
and deal in all kinds of chemicals and
commercial fertilizers; and to own ana
operate turpentine lands, stills, and manu-
facture turpentine and any other products
thereof, together with all chemicals, drug
or articles of merchandise as may from
time to time be deemed advisable; and to
act as consulting and analytical chemists;
and to subscribe for, purchase, receive,
own, hold for investment or otherwise,
sell, dispose of and make advances upon,
the stock, shares, bonds, securities or other
obligations of other corporations whatso-
ever, engaged in or pursuing any one of
the kinds of business purposes or objects
indicated herein, and while the holder or
owner of any such stock, bonds or obliga-
tions, to exercise all the rights, powers
anl privileges of ownership thereof, and
to exercise all and any voting powers
thereof; to borrow money and to secure
the same, by deeds, mortgages, notes,
bonds or others obligations; to receive
payment for capital stock subscribed, in
money, or in property, labor or services
at a just valuation thereof, in the judg-
ment or discretion of its Board of Di-
rectors; to have a lien upon all shares of
stock of any stockholder who may be-
come indebted to this corporation, either
individually or as copartners, with the
right to sel and dispose of such stock, or
such portion thereof as may be necessary
to pay such indebtedness; and to make
such by-laws in furtherance hereof as may
be deeme dadvantageous, and by such by-
laws, to provide that the Directors may
employ such officers of the corporation,
at such salaries as they may deem ad-
vantageous; and generally to exercise all
such powers as may be necessary or con-
venient to the purposes or businesses of
this corporation, and to have, exercise and
enjoy all the rights, powers and privileges
incident to corporations for profit, organ-


ized and existing under and by virtue ot
the laws of the State of Florida.
Article ll
The amount of authorized capital stock
of this corporation shall be Twenty T'hous-
and Dollars ($20,000), divided into two
hundred shares of common stock of the
par value of One Hundred Dollars ($100)
each, ten per cent of which shall be sub-
scribed and paid in in cash before this cor-
poration shall be authorized to transact
any business. Said stock may be paid for
in legal money of the United States, or
in property, real or personal, labor, ser-
vices, or other thing of value, provide
that a just and reasonable sum shall be
allowed for any of the foregoing, said price
to be fixed by the incorporators or di-
rectors hereof, at a meeting called for that
purpose.
Article IV.
This corporation shall continue, and
have full power to exercise its corporate
franchise for a period of ninety-nine years
after the commencement of its existence.
Article V.
The business of this corporation shall
be conducted by the following officers: a
president, two vice-presidents, a secretary
and treasurer and a board of directors or
not less than three nor more than nine in
number, and who shall be stockholders of
said corporation. The Board of Directors
shall be selected by the stockholders at
the annual stockholders' meeting to be
held in the city of Jacksonville, Florida,
at the place of business of the corporation
on the 15th day of July, 1904, and an-
nually thereafter on the first Tuesday in
January in each year. The president, vice-
presidents, secretary and treasurer shall
be elected by the board of directors, ana
shall be directors. The offices of secretary
and treasurer may be filled by the same
person. Until the first annual meeting ot
stockholders, and until the officers as
above mentioned are elected and qualified
at the first election, the officers who shall
conduct the business of this corporation
shall be: Archibald Meldrum, president;
Robert Meldrum, first vice-president; M.
L. Meldrum, second vice-president; N. P.
Tutwiler, secretary and treasurer. The
stockholders shall meet in the city of
Jacksonville, Florida, on the 15th day of
July, 1904, at 10 o'clock a. m., for the pur-
pose of adopting by-laws, and completing
the organization of this corporation.
The by-laws shall provide for the calling
of special meetings of the stockholders and
directors and may give the directors pow-
er to employ other officers in their discre-
tion, and shall fix the duties and powers
of the officers of this corporation. Those
first adopted shall be adopted by the ma-
jority vote of all the capital stock then
subscribed, at the first annual meeting,
and may be amended by the majority vote
of the stockholders at any regular or spec-
ial meeting. Each stockholder of this cor-
poration shall be entitled to one vote for
each share of stock, owned or held by him.
Article VL
The highest amount of indebtedness ou
liability to which this corporation may at
any time subject itself, shall be Five Hun-
dred Thousand Dollars.
Article VI.
The names and residences of the incor-
porators, and the amount of capital stock
subscribed for by each, are as follows:
Archibald Meldrum, Jacksonville Flor-
ida, 50 shares; M. L Meldrum, Jackson-
ville, Florida, 50 shares; T. S. Gray, Jack-
sonville, Florida, 1 share.

State of Florida, Duval County, as.
I hereby certify that on this 24th day of
May, 1904, before me a notary public, in
and for the State of Florida at large, per-
sonally came Archibald Meldrum, M. L.
Meldrum and T. S. Gray, to me well
known as the persons described in and
who executed the foregoing instrument,
and acknowledged before me that they
executed the same as incorporators of
said The Meldrum Brothers Company, for
the purposes therein expressed.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set
my hand and affixed my official seal at
Jacksonville, said county and State, this
24th day of May, 1904.
RUSSELL E. OOLCORD,
Notary Public State of Florida at Large.
My commission expires Feb. 19, 1905.
(Seal)
May 27-4t


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903-04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS
Receipts 1908-04 1902-03 1901-02
Spirits, casks........................ 19,647 292 496 814,846
Rosins, bbls .. ....................... 650,938 940,507 1,071,440
Total ... .......... .. ..... ..... 844,585 1,238,0331,385,786
Exports
Spirits casks ......... ...... ........ 188,398 296,430 814,876
Rosins, bbs.............................. 752,270 975.428 62,687
Foreign
Spirits, casks-... .................- .... 93,884 206,109 217,446
Rosins, is ............................. 338,171 504,178' 5N5,042
New York
Spirits, casks............ .............. 35,658 42,765 53,797
Rosinsbbls.......................... 87,853 138,121 129,059
Sundries
Spirits, casks............................. 59,351 87,556 48,633
Rosins, bbls. .............. ........... 826.746 387,784 898.586
The receipts of spirits a less than 1902-03 by 98849 casks, and of rols, 289,549 ba



Automobiles.
State Agents for the Famous


FORD

SLaunchs Automobile and Launch
Supplies.
Repairing a Specialty.

Florid.. Automobile Co.
132-134 E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

H. ROBIN SON Pre a. GAILLARD. Cashier
W. B. OWEN. Vice-Pres.
Commercial Bank, trade Checs


State Depository.
BRANCum; Ocala. Fla.. Lake City. Fla
Jacksonville, --- lorida


KIRK & JONES

DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


THE CANNON COMPANY
CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00


BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barrels hold and will pass the se'
verest American and European inspection.

Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, QUITMAN, GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address orders to home office,
QUITMAN, GA.


FOR THE


COMMISSARY BSI1g0.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Industrial Record Go.,

THE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
Extracts the spirts without fetroyjhg the
wood fibre. Runs out a charge In Iss than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twent to
forty-five gallons from curd of wood.
Makes pure water white spirits, free from
the odor of tar or creosote. No cbml.sa
used in refining the spirits. Needs to be
distilled only once after coming from re-
tort.
No trouble with bl-products. the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ver po-
duced and from wood. Only one grade
or spirits produced and that the hght.
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGER FROM Im R
Built of finest material by high-grae
workmen. The cheapest machine offered to
the public.
We challenge comparison of output sad
quality of product. We guarantee output
and quality.
For full particulars, prices, samples
etc., address-
The rihe Belt Cestacti Cmp
P. 0. Box 4 RALMEI C.


THE RECORD'S SPACE HAS A BIG MONEY VALUE









THE WEEKLY IN1DUbrItiAL RECORD. 19


NAVAL STORES


Special Train
TO THE

WORLD'S FAIR
AND

National Democratic

Convention.
Train to be operated by special ser-
vice, will consist of:
0ne combination Library, Club and Bag-
gage Car, four Pullman sleeping ears;
each ear containing two drawing-rooms
and ten sections. One dining car. Total,
six cars.
Our schedule will be:
Leave Jacksonville, 8:30 p. m., Thurs-
day, June 30; Leave Atlanta, 5:30 a. m.
Friday, July 1; leave Chattanooga 10:15
a. m. Friday, July 1; leave Lexington, 5:50
p. m. Friday, July 1; leave Louisville 8:30
p. m. Friday, July 1; arrive St. Louis 6:00
a. m. Saturday, July 2.
The party will therefore spend July 2,
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 in St. Louis, and re-
turning-
Leave St. Louis, 10:30 p. m., Saturday,
July 9; leave Louisville 8:00 a. m. Sun-
day, July 10; leave Lexington, 11:55 a. m.
Sunday, July 10; leave Chattanooga, 6:50
p. m, Sunday. July 10; leave Atlanta
12:10 a. m., Sunday, July 10; arrive Jack-
sonville 10:05 a. m. Monday, July 11.
This train will be a solid vestibuled one,
composed of the very latest and newest
equipment, and will .run through to St.
Louis and return for the exclusive use
of the Naval tSores people.
Our route will be over the SOUTHERN
RAILWAY, going and returning.
The expense of the trip will be:
Railroad fare, Jacksonville to St. Louis
adn return, $27.50 each; one lower berth,
Jacksonville to St. Iouds, one way, $850;
round trip, $13.00: one upper berth, Jack-
sonville to St. Louis, one way, $.50,
round trip, $13.00; one section, lower and
upper berth, Jacksonville to St. Louis,
one way, $13.00, round trip, $26.00; draw-
ing-room, Jacksonville to St. Louis, one
way, $24.00, round trip, $48.00.
The berths are of regular size and will
of course accommodate two people, but
for a couple it will be better to have a
section, which will be the lower and upper
berths.
Dining car will be operated on table
d'hote plan at $1.00 each meal for each
person. Three meals will be served on
the going trip, being breakfast, lunch
and dinner, and these three meals will be
$3.00 for each person.
Four meals will be served on the re-
tur trip, being breakfast, lunch and din-
Snr and breakfast, and same charge will
be for each person.
Under this arrangement, therefore, it
will cost one person on this special train
from Jacksonville to St. Louis and re-
turn:
Round trip, railroad fare ........$27.50
One berth, round trip ........ 13.00
Six meals, round trip ........... 6.00

$46.50
Two people will be twice $46.50 and
s on.
The number of passengers on this train
will be positively one hundred.
It is necessary, therefore, in order to
conclude all detailed arrangements for ap-
plications for space on this "Special" to be
fled with the District Passenger Agent
Southern Railway, Jacksonville, Fla.,
s early as possible. Each application will
then be assigned certain space on the
train, and such applicant will be fully in-
formed in a personal letter.
Address
JAS. A. HOLLOMON,

JACKSq0VILLE. FULA


For Dryig Barrd Stock.
The kilns recently installed by th
eral Refining Company, of Yonkm
Y., for the drying of barrel stock p
several special and interesting fe
The apparatus for heating the aa
driving it through the kilns is pi
a small room on the roof of the bL
The heated air is discharged into ti
air supply duct built into the w
each compartment Each of these
is provided with a suitable damp
means of which the supply of air
is regulated. From the vertical Af
hated air enters a large undergroun
beneath the floor and goes up in
kilns through the slatted floors,
through the material to be dried
becoming moisture laden, drops
through the slatted floor into the
apartment of the underground duet,
up through vertical flues to the
duct on the roof, thence to a dis
with angle iron flanges built into t
of the beater room. When in ope
it is claimed that the air is change
times per minute throughout the
compartments of the kiln, at a main
temperature of 170 degrees Fabr.


e Fed-
rs, N.
resent
stores.
ir and
ed in
ilding.
e hot-
alls of
ducts
er by
to it
s the
Sduet
to the


Business Directory

FIRE INSURANCE-Lowest rates. Io-
ren H. Green & Co, 9 and 10 Park Bldg.,
Jacksonville, Fla. amo.


JOHN ZAHM's ZUROPMAN HOTrL.
1a Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant. N 0or Prnisshed
Reom- Open day sad lnht Bettilla


JACKSONVILLE

Manufacturing Location

or ShippingPoint.

hDp Water---Ra lay T iniul
ADDRESS
GIFFORD COMPANY

Laura Street. JckLonville. Fla.


M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

Commission Merchants.
ROSIN, iLuxpMPgail TAR, PITCH,
GUM THUS, RICE, TC.
138 Front Street, NEW YORK.



IlLY A MOITIOM[RY,
Corn mission Merchants,
Naval Stores & Cotton
Liberal advance made against p-
menta. Cmsignmants aeidtL
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
NEW YORK CITY.


New Victoria.
Corner Main and Adams,
Opposite Board of Trade Building.
Jacksonville's New Hotel
Rates $oo to sa.0s
R. BIXLER, Proprietor.
Send all orders for printing for the tur-
pentine and commisry trades to the
Record office to insure prompt delivery.


Pumping Outfits __

Turpentine Stills
WITH FIRE PROTECTION CONNECTIONS.

Best PUMP in the World
From 40 to 700 Gallons of Water per Minute.
Write or call on
FRED E. GILBERT,
Automobile Heedquarter.
29 West Forsyth St. Jacksonville, Fla.
ASShS44%HSSrc~wa set~


n, Wanted and For Sale
down

Pas- DEPARTMENT.
return
e faa, Idertlsemets Will be Inserted In TMhs bDeOrtmen at the Perfewia1 Rates:
he wal For one week. 2D cents a line.
ration For two weeks. - 35 cents ine.
For three weeks, 50 cents a line.
Three For four weeks, - 65en line.
e four Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Headin counts .s two lines.
trained No disy except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Thnrday
Anornink to secure Insertion in Friday's paper.


For Sale.
An improved wood track tram engine;
easy kept up; for low price. Call on or
address E L. Vickers, Tifton, Ga., for par-
ticulars.
For Sale.
One good double-deck sawmill, mules
and carts complete; one and one-half mil-
lion feet of timber; easy terms. Address
Dixie, care Industrial Record, Jacksonville,
Fla. 2t

For Sale.
Turpentine and sawmill location for
sale, eight thousand acres, in Georgia, one
to three and one-half miles. from railroad.
Low rates to market. For information
address Lock Box 43, Adel, Ga.
Eor Sale.
Twenty-barrel still and fixtures; 10 crop
boxes, plenty hands; 15 crops next season;
4 mules, 2 wagons,.l horse and buggy; on
railroad; want to change business; address


Wated.
An experienced distiller; sober, single
man preferred; address J. 8. Shingler &
Co., Freeman, Fla.
Wanted.
A position as manager of turpentine
place by a man with several years of ex-
perience as manager. Can furnish best of
references. Address Manager, Thelma, Ga.

Stiller Wasted.
An experienced turpentine stiller want-
ed Man with family preferred. Address
Fletcher & Murrell, Altman, Fla.

TarpeMtlie MeA.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. 1 outfit pomps JM,
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 cents sad
requires no attention while ruling
Started in one minute. J. R. Cmpbll,
Ocala, Fla.


Melvin & Co., Esto, Holmes Co., Fla. FIve ReCtlstered Shortkor BAlls
For Sale. One i half brother to Beaty Boy,"
Six s who was champion at three Tmxa sbows
Six thousand acres land, 4M500,000 feet Another is half-brother to our 180 pond
cypress, 2,000,000 feet pine timber; bear- cow, "Mary Spears." All good and ready
ing orange grove; eight houses; hotel, for immediate er mvse. PriAe 1000r to
store, newspaper and plant, or capital to $17.00 i d to p o sie.
develop same; good colony location; artes- $17P00, Pbaet to previous u Che.
ian wells; fine vegetable lands. John E.; Palmetto Park Stock Farm, Z. C. Cham-
Harris, St. Francis, Fla. bliss & Co., proprietors, Oal, Fla.


For Sale.
200 tons 48-lb. relaying steel rails West
Virginia and Kentucky delivery. 100 tows
60-lb. relaying steel rails, Southern de-
livery. "1,500 tons 56-Ib. relaying steel
rails, West Virginia delivery. 150 ton 30-
lb. relaying steel rails West Virginia de-
livery. Isaac Joseph Iron Company, 625-
535 Hunt St., Cincinnati, Ohio.


U y sere t**anki iof umiw a
aneo. selling the eme yew have. er
tradmrar if Tve are talking o to-
vOtiUMIn ire y i-n-tlwy;t fu IN want
to buy maehnaery .I any ki l, de
the Indumtrial Reor, a ostal em uw
telling of "ear wants.


BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will send by express, prepaid, the following:
Four full quarts Lincoln County, Sunnybrook Rye or Big Horn Rye .. $4
Single Bottles .................. .............................................. $1.
I will send four full quarts of homers' Corn, Melwood Rye, Golden Wed-
ding Rye, Holland Gin, Ton. Gin. Peach Brandy. Peach and Honey
Whiskey. Gin and Manhattan Cocktalls-any of the above for........ $L.
One bottle of any of the sborve.............................................. ... .00
Four bottles of the following California Wines: Sherry. Port. Muscat.
Catawba .......................................... $L.
Single bottles .................................................................. a.
Single bottles .......................................... ...................... S
Four bottles Wlson Whiskey, cased,..........................................
Single bottles ......................................................................
Five bottles Dutfy's Malt ......................................................
Bulk goods of all kinds. Special Pries on application. All nds at
liquors in jugs from $1P to 5.lM f. o. b. Jacksonvlle.
F. BETTELINI W Bay St, pWp. Unin Iept, Jacksmvile, Fla


T=H PINE AmLD T rzDOu.CX&




so THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
* g.ugusg ug u.,.r*,r #ltelt* 3*I li@9I*I*IR"I' mI 4*********************
" *
SPresidt.t W. C. POWELL: Vice-Predldet *. who with the President octloitute the Directory and Board ot Maagery. W. r. COACHMAN. B. BUIX
SLABD. L. U COVINQTON, H A. McKACERN. JOHN R. YOUNG. A. CRANFORD. D. H. McMILLAN. C. DOWN-
ING, J. 8AUNDERS. C. B. ROGORS; Auditor. JOHN HENDERSON.


I
i
4
4
4

a

4
4
4
4

4
4


OON* IlDAT[D NAVAL STORES MPANY,


Jlllaks iile, Hi.


vonnoi, No.


POSlcolo, ol.


SMV A1 STOE IS FACTORS. .

P i l lMllo, 1,5010.00. Owd M Co lloll i Prolhial opwnlor

na illl ick 01 iU Rseil I l e t oill eI OiElor s Wh o Ila A Ie0 l.
> ___-


The lnsol d is tlil o1d i ell Colle Ul. In Iol10 0Ore
I te Pro101le he Polnig I ullwllenilE 00rrs t ieri
Piln 01 Mr olan Plen0 ol 10ber tor ieMoi


ideIniol ih mos


whre InNi


YARS A IKsoNL[, SAANNH, 9ERANDINA ao PENSACOlA.


All Oue a1e ilVilG 10 Clil Or Co 01 1 0eson


THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. l



The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commisary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 27
A. C. Creamery, 80 .. 28
S10" .. 29
A C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 18

Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... Market
S 50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-lb tin. ............

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 16


t.*ranulated
4'ol~a


Sugar
Sugar, bbls.....
5 bbl..
10 bbls..
sacks..


500
495
495
500


Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb.................. 80
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 10
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 8
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages....... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ages.............. market price
Roasted, 100lb. drum....... 14
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 50
English B'fast, 10 lb.. 45
Formosa, 10 lb....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10c size
10 lbs to case, per pound-.. 40

Salt


200-lb sack ................
100-lb sack ...............
lee Cream, 200-1b sacks.....
100-lb sacks.....
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-lb....
".' 2-lb....


100
50
100
50
265
275


Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin...... ....... 21
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box
sifter top, per doz...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and 80

Corn


Car Lot
W.Corn,1101b, 143
100lb, 1 29
Mxd corn,ll01b.l 14
1001b,1 25


100 Sk
Lot
1 45
1 81
140
1 27


Lesm M
Sk
148
1 84
1 43
130


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


Car Lot
W clip'd,1251b,2 20
S 1001b,1 75
White 1251b, 2 10
White 1001b. 1 67
Mixed 1251b 2 5
l" 1001b, 1 64


100 Sk
1At
222
1 77
222
1 69
2 7
165


Le. 100
Sk Lots
2 25
180
2 15
1 72
2 10
168


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice..... 1 65
fancy..... 1 70
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 5 75
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 b sack.........5 75
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 5 75
Pillsbury's Best ..... 6 00
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 6 25
bbl .... ....
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 3 50
92-lb sacks........... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel............ 8 60
S 92-lb sacks....... 1 60

Rice
Good.................. ... 5
Choice...... ............ 54
Fancy Head.............. 6
Broken.................. 31
Canned Vegetables
Doz.
Tomatoes, 8s, Chief..... .. 90
Tomatoes, 2s ..... 80
Clayton, 3s............... 45
Clayton, 2s ............... 70
Sifted Peas, 2s ............1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s........1' 20
Litpa Beans ,2s ............1 00
String Beans, 3s ........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8s........... 90
Baked Beans. s ........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............ 1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s........
Beauty Beets, 3s..........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ........... 85
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s .............. 90
Hay


car lots 100 bale
lots
Choice....19 50 2000
No.1 Tim 18 00 18 50
No. 2 1700 1780
No.1 Cl'ler 17 00 1750


less
quantity
2050
1900
1800
1800


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 0
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case. per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy
Mixed 30-lb pails, per lb... 7
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, rer
lb.................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
per lb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box.
assorted, per lb........ 8

Dried Fruits


Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb.......
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb.......
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes.
Ex. Choice " ..


9

18
....


Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lh. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 36-lb. case 8 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
bt.x, 40-50............. 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, i0-60............ 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 85
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 90
Seedless, 1-lb packages ... 12
Citron, 10-lb box ........ 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 6(
Extra H P, .... 5
Seed Peanuts, "
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds................ 18
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Peacans............... 12
Filberts................... 12
al0 nuts.................. 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car o10 Le a
lot Sk. Lot Sk. LO
Cottonseed Meal 27 00 27 50 280
Hulls 1150 12 50 180


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
8 hoop.......
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz....... 1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
6" nested .....2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 60
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. ..1 20

Washboards D1.
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay......... ......3 00
175 Diamond Glass .........8 2
O. W. D., 17 inch, per doz 1 06
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
doz ................. 96
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ....... 8 75
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 66
Salmon 1s, Tale 4 doz to case
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon, ls, 4 doz to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box ........... 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge ... 141-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 age .. 14
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avg .. 131-2
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge.. 1-4
"Reliable" California Hams, 6-8 9
L breakfast Bacon, light av. .... 131-2
D. S. Bellies, 16-18 av. ........ 83-4
D. S. Bellies, 20-22 a .......... 1-2
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av........... 81-8
D. S. Plates .................. 71-2
Bacon Plates .................. 81-
D. S. Butts .................. 63-8
Bologn Sausage .............. 7
Sausage in oil ................ 3.75


Butter and Chees
"Strawberry" Creamery, 0-lb tubs
30-lb tube
dybird fu am s..
"ladybird" full aream cheese .


a I-
251
261.3
121-4


Kingn's aid.
"Indiana" Pure Leaf ........... market.
t6ea-Foam" Compound .......... maret
Kimgan's Camnne Meats
"Reliable" Corned Beef, Is ...... $1.2
Corned Beef, 2s ...... 2a
Roast Beef, Is ........ 1.2
Roast Beef, 2s .........
Potted Ham and Tonge
-4s .......................... .3
Sliced Beef, 1-2a .. .. 1.15
Vienna Sausage, 12s .. .s
Tripe .................. LI


GET A COPY OF THIE AVAL STORES BLUE BOOK.








22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL REORD.






Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertising patrons of this paper and no

charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention

rr Tirrostino. Sawmm r Factr So ks *or Macm i m orf Ay Kim. Fr Tiambr. FrlmS or IaTmte Lamu.
DATU INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Ia.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main Omee, Jacksonville, Fla. I am n the market for lands for the purpose of
In the market for the fodowl Prefer In State of Please put me in communication
with responsible parties and give me other information.
Remarks
Please notify where same can be secured.
SiSigne
Signed

State specifically the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or second4handed. DATE
Laomti for Turpts. S wsl e r Fatory.oer fo r AnP dutral Enttrprw For Commlar** Ofoee w liue Supe. Sawml er TarpeatI Maes
wses. Wajsos, Ete.
DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jaeksonville, Fla DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla.
Please advise thp undersigned regarding a good location in (sate or section of
state) for In the market for
together with full information about labor conditions, taxes, transportation facilities,
local encouragement, etc.
Remrks Please give me information as to best places to bay, etc.

Signed Signed


o YM Wautto s1 SemetIS? Are Y Thn of lctata?
DATE r tTE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, i INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville. Fla.
Have for sale the following Can you give any information as to the reliability of the following firm or corpora
tion
Remarks
Can you suggest a purchaser?
Signed Signed


bo Yes Wat to Eieply a Mr? bo You Want ECmplosmet?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Want a man to fill the position of Want a position as

with the following requirements Refer to the followi '

Can you suggest such a man? Can you assist me ?
Signed Signed




CLIP THIS COUPON
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD
hen youe answering an c tibef ..nt from the columns of this paper, whether you are making an inquiry o placing an order, please cut out the coupon
below and attach it to the letter, will pay you.

COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the Inajtrial Reocrd, issue dated

Signed


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonville, Fla., and Savannah, Ga., is the South's great
weekly trade journal.


The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.


Ir YOU DOFT FnD f IT rM paCORD W aI US.







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. S


McMURRAY & BAKER,


&o Mill nnd luwenionine Hanw eq

We awe sreelvI dally p-to-date pleare sad buvnea vehsea. sty
Lapubeis, w harness a ba hore urnlshta~ we have a nobby Ia. Prtef
amd goods n touch with all. Turpentine waons and harness a speealty. Don't
fget we ean beat the world on hand-made harness.

INRRIT BIiER, 401 413 E. BIT IT.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHA RLISTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The nmaAicmt steamships of this line are appointed to sail as folows calling
at Charleston, S C. both ways.
Ferma ew TYork, Pro Jaekrsonvlll tor
(Pler W- Wert RSver). STEAMER. Charlestem and New York.
PMday, May 13, at 3:00 pm..A4IGONQUIN ...... Thursday, May 19, at 7:00 am
adasy, May 15, at 3:00 pm .. IIROQUOI8 ........ Saturday, May 21, at 9:00 am
Tumlay, May 17, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE........ Sunday, May 22, at 10:00 am
Theraday, May 19, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ......Tuesday, May 24, at 12:00 n'n
Saturday, May 21, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ......Thursday, May 26, at 1:00 pm
.."eSEMINOLE ....Friday, May 27, at 4:00 am
T' day, May 24, at 3:00 pm ..ALGONQUIN .... Sunday, May 29, at 4:30 am
Wednesday, May 25, at 3:00 pm ......***xHURON Tuesday, May 31, at 5:30 am
Friday, May 27, at 3:00 pm .IROQUOIS ...... Thursday, June 2, at 7:00 am
Monday, May 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Saturday, June 4, at 8:30 am
Wednesday, June 1, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ..Monday, June 6, at 10:30 am
Friday, June 3, at 3:00 pm ... .AGONQUIN ..Thursday, June 9, at 12:00 n'n
*xSEMINOLE ... .Thursday, June 9, at 12:00 n'n
Tuesday, June 7, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ....Sunday, June 12, at 4:00 am
*xHURON........ Monday, June 13, at 4:00 am
Thursday, June 9, at 3:00 pm .ARAPAHOF ....Tuesday, June 14, at 4:30 am
Saturday, June 11, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ..Thursday, June 16, at 6:00 am
*NAVAHOE .... Sunday, June 19, at 9:00 am
Tuesday, June 14, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ....Sunday, June 19 at 9:00 am
Wednesday, June 15, at 3:00 pm..ALGONQUIN ..Tuesday, June 21, at 11:00 am
Friday, June 17, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ....Wednesday, June 22. at 12:00 n'n
"xSEMINOLE ..Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'n
Monday, June 20, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Saturday, June 25, at 1:30 pm
Wednesday, June 22, at 3:00 pm..COMANCHE ..Monday, June 27, at 4:00 am
***xHURON........ Tuesday, June 28, at 5:00 am
Friday, June 24, at 3:00 pm.... IROQUOIS ..Thursday, June 30, at 6:00 am
**NAVAHOE ......Saturday, July 2, at 7:00 am
Tuesday, June 28, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE ..........Sunday, July 3, at 8:00 am
Thursday, June 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Tuesday, July 5, at 9:30 am
x-lreght only. *-Boston via Charleston and New York.
**-Boston via Brunswick -d Charles ton. **-Boston, via Charleston.
THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Direst Serviee retwee Jeksonlvlle, Boston and Pr'ovdenee and all Mae-
era Ploits, Callngr at Charleston BIth Ways.
SBKI-WREKLY CEILINGS.
Southbound........ .. ... .. .. ........ .....From Lewis Wharf, Boston
Nerthbond.................... .. ....rom foot o Catherine Street. Jacksonville
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between JaekWnvll and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis. Beresford (De Land) and Intermediate
ladings on St. Johns river.-
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Ja&ksonville, Sundays. Tuesday and Thurs-
days, &: p. m. Returning, leave Sanford, Mondays. Wednesday & Fridays 9:0 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND |NORTHBOUND,
Read down, I I Read up.
Leave 1-J p. m................ ....Jacksonville....... ....... ....... Arrive S20 a. m.
Leave 8: p. mj........... .. .....Palatka................... ..... :.Leave ) p. m.
Leave a m ..... ... ..........Astor............ ... .... .......Leave 230 p. m.
Leave 43 a. m............. .........St. ranels.......... ...........Leave 1-00 p. m.
.......... ..... .... ...... ....Beresford (DeLand).............. .........ILeave 12 noon
Arri v m ....... .......... .. anord......... ... ....... ...... Leave 9:s a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m ...................Enterprise.................... Lv. 10:00 a. m.
OBMW LAL PAqSIWGER AND TICKeT OFFICE. 204 W. Bay St.. Jaek'vlle.
P. I. IRONMONGEP.. JR.. Asst. Genl. Pass Agent. 04 W. Bar St.. Jacksonvll:e. FIa
W . OOPER, JR., Local rt. Agt., Jack'ville. C. P. LOVELL, Asst. Supt.,Jack'vlle
Foot Hogan Street. Jacksonville.
A. C. HAGGO RTY. 0. P. P. A., New York, CLYDE MILNE, I. I A.. New Yer1L
TV1 0. 0. 63m., WM. P. CLTYDT CO.
General Manager. General Agents.
Chebrough Building. 19 State Street. New York.


umerafl t ie m of Oe o .
The inil be d sr.l.
the tees of th sport ara n
tI nts with pleasure.

wAau.. mra Kesoc aOC 8. Twrade
The Weokly Industrial Record of Jack- lorl
oonvlle and Savannah has taken its place
among the leading trade journals in tbe
United Stap., and as an authority on lum.
ber and navl stores It Is being quoted not
only by the best and most carefully edited not wb
oam papers In this country, but by those It
tn Europe also. A London trade paper or,
reaching this office yesterday gives liberal a fe
8Dao to the Record's views on market coa- "fi
et1onm. lot I
This week's Issue of the Indstrial Rec- aned
Ord Is even better than usual and It is 'Th
a strong and ent taintag general Indus. trial
trial newspaper. In addition to Its value Hf
as the champion of the two specific Indus- vs.
tries It represents. It is brimful of new Joha
tortes of development in teo Southeast. iplal
among them baing the story of a half-mill- fend
on-dollar corporation orgased In Jack- G~
asvllne yesterday and the organiatlon of H. 1
several other NM corporations during the and '
week In oGorf& and Plorda. w'
It has set the Pe ftor enterprise and It Wan
well daSeros the at measure of success wick
it is receiving, both In it sIacrtptlon and
dvertlsin deprtments.arrylng as It does.
perhaps, on of the largest advertllsing Pat-..
rPOnags gBIv to any of the SoutlhranV

Itre

i *no*es. who This

Da od S vr Wat cIa cw :Iyr
-UL owdl



3 33A.9. -JL..9 a9_9_!..,.9.3..AS.B.L3JPA .L.a .RJ.IJUU _LA AA9.AA.9 ..JU.UL0JUI l
SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
30 YEARS RELIABILITY.

:Hess a Slager,
o Diamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry a
CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND it & 13 MAIN.
rm rniws6sms(sITsv s a I 3


Naval Stores MarKet

and Stock Rleport
Published Daily in The



Jacksonville Metropolis,
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.

$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.


BIG PRIZES:

A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposi'icn, to
Saratoga. to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.


Carter & Russell Publishing Co

Jacksonville. Florida.


WROTE THE RECORD FOR ATY INFORMATION DESIRED.







S- THE WEEKLY INIDUIBTIAL RECORD.


J K CK.0T Psienat


C N FULLEEI. VIca.Presidemt
,, I


JABS LAME. eery Tsee


JOG*6


Department


Greenleaf s

Crosby Compy


Miimoseil
Stones


and Other Precios


Fine Gold Jewelry


3tirnkers anb

Oilbetoutritbo


American and Foreign Watches
and Clocks


41 West Bay Street

Jacksonville

"M ond a" sait AD. is p"At of as
&eo Uhoes. Pompt ah heati mft Oaker


S-erlqg Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


Fine China Dinner Sets and
Fancy Pieces


Write for Catalogue


European Novelties


THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
of Wananilsh. N. C.,
ermery ot Councils Stton. C., are still selling Diamond Edge
Haeks at WS Black Joe aad Standard at IL. Old Style and Patent 0
Puhms at nl a doemn. They should average a little better than ever.
We have brought out a new brand, the Blue Line Hacks at $8. and Pull-
es at WoS which are warranted AD wholesale dealers in naval stores
e carry our mais and should wppy operators
------------------- OMI----- -- --


D. G. WrITHAN, PimideI'.
Jacksonville. Fla.


ALFRED A. MKETHAN, Li U. S N.
Retd Sec'y ad Tress. Constructing
Engineer, Fayetterille, N. G.


Pine Product Construction Co.
NOORPORATKD
FaLyetteville. N. C.
Spirits ao Turpentine, Oi of Tar. Creosote. Tar, Diineetants.; Wood Preservative
Panta. Wood Statis. te., and Chareoal, from Lihtwood Stumps. Box-facina
Prota inceased. Time of distillation reduced. Condensation controlled at will
No dMagr ftrm fr Plant erected complete, and men taught the process. P r-
ter ifornti, write Alre MacKethan. gmeeral manager. Payetteille. N. C.

THE PHILADELPHIA TAILORS
JOHN B. CAINGAGUNI & BRO.,

MERCHANT TAILORS AND IMPORTERS


48 W. Bay Street


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


*:us-e------ -----
ROADWAY AND 23d Sr.,
HOTEL BARTHOLDI, "N"W AYNDC d ST.
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout.
Near all Big Stores and Places of Amusemet. C'ars Pass
the Door for all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings
Large Sample Booms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
find no grand and magnificent decorations no luxurious
graMdeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
Speak to Yew. No Employees Is Asy Way Isatteatative.
Bnt just a coSy. home-like little hotel that will appeal to the
hearts of those who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plain American cooking, and affable and courteous treatment.
-- .----------- II----I-- > -------Ml II IwI H.
mzra mmun pv v~eS
... .. ::: ::: :: ::: ::: ::: .. .. ... ... ... :; S


mm---


III I II III III IIIf 111 ll1 'I I I1 I "l I V 'I V l 'vI '1i V l 11 --1 V
SJohn R. Young. President. C. S. Ellis, Vice-Preedtet.
J. W. Motte. Jr.. Secrtary and Treasurer.


The ELLIS-YOUNG CO..

Commission Merchants
NAVAL STORES FACTORS
F AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

| Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.

LML Wwaui.nruiAu II M 1AAiiUrri


J. W. HUNT. President.
P. L. PsacoCK, Ist V. P"


J. & HARRIS, a V. Pres. C. I. SHOUSI. See. a Tres.
W. J. KamLY, 3d V. P. H. L. RIacumoI. Ast See'yr-Tra


Peacock-Hunt & West Company,
General Offices: 20 Bay Street, E,, Savannah, Ga. aud
SWest Building Jacksomvif, Fia

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutual We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that bays spiire
Turpentine and rosin.)

WHOLESALE GROCERS,
Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our Specialty
-SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wilson & Gims'
Philadelphia Wagons.

Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga., and Jacksodvle
and Fernandna, Fla.


I


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