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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00075
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: June 3, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00075
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text






For the Week Ending June 5. 1904.


TBRAaRY

JUN 1904

HI n flaurhnan+ at Awsmihers


WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.


Adptd Sept. 12t., 1902, by the Execative Committee of the Turpentine Operators' Association as its Exclasive Official Organ. and Adopted Sept. 1lth. 1902, It Anwma l -
rention, as an Official Organ Also of the Ceneral Association. Adopted Sept. t ta. 1903. as the only Oficial Organ ot the Turpentine Operators' Assaciatls.
Adopted April 27t., 1903, as te Official Organ of the Inter-State Came Growers' Associatit.n. Endorsed by the eorgia Sawmill
Assoclitlen. Official Organ of the Southeastern Stock Grower's Association.


VOL 8. NO. 23.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


ATLANTA. GA.


SAVANNAH, GA.


$3 A YEAR.


GUM DIGGING IN NEW ZEALAND,

The Kauri Pine Tree and Something of the Industry of Extracting
and Excavating For Its Product.
~#999~;99~90 0 lie El U flu urn -~r+~r


GOVERNMENT FORESTRY EXHIBIT.

What It Comprises and How It Is Arranged at the Big St. Louis
l Fair, A Study in Forest Preservation.
_ __*___ *S* se99^*9W 9Wec


The Kauri gum tree is found only in
the far north of the North Island of New
Zealand, says the Magazine of Commerce.
In 1902 the gum of this tree was sent
abroad, 5,32 tons coming to America, 2,413
going to England and 186 tons going to
Germany.
According to the testimony of the best
- authority no practical substitute for Kauri
gum has yet been discovered. But the
average New Zealander certainly does not
realize how valuable the industry has been
and is to the colony, probably because
the gum digging can only be carried on in
the limited district north of Auckland,
and but little notice is taken of it by the
government.
The price of this gum has ranged from
S40 to $310 per ton. The trade began
over fifty years ago, in the early days of
New Zealand and is one of its oldest in-
dustries. Six years ago the value of the
exported gum was greater than the col-
ony's entire output of coal, and greater
than the value of the butter and cheese
industry of that country. The area of
Kauri gum land in the whole world is less
than two million acres. A short distance
south of Auckland gum-bearing land ceas-
es, although there are signs that in former
age the Kauri pine flourished farther
South. It is one of the least known and
least developed parts of New Zealand.
The climate is sub-tropical, or almost so.
To this day the only way to reach these
lands is to take a small steamer from the
beautiful Bay of Islands, or one of the
numerous ports on the wooded shores
of the lake-like bays.
The bush in which the Kauri grows is
some of the finest on the island and the
pine itself the tal:est, the handsomest
and certainly the most unmistakable of
all the native trees. The bare, treeless
gum-fields of to-day, whether on the
swamps or on the slopes of the low hills
show no trace of the primeval forest
which must once have covered them.
There were giants in the earth in those
days among the trees as well as among
men, and it is not likely that the Kauri
of to-day'grows to the height of the an-
cient trees, the half-decayed trunks of
which are still found lying as they fell,
embedded in the gum fields Yet even
now the straight, smooth trunk, 8 to 12
feet through, rises to 100 feet and more,
its heavy, spreading branches being all
at the top. It is an evergreen tree.
The gum, or rosin, is found mainly at


the top. The action of the weather makes
the trees bleed, and the sap, sticky and
viscid, adheres to the bark, solidifying into
lumps, which, falling to the ground, in
time is buried beneath the leaves and soil.


The Bureau of Forestry of the U. S.
Department of Agriculture has prepared
for the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
the most extensive diiplpay it has ever
mad,. The purpose is both to illustrate


NEW ZEALANDYS KAURI PINE TREE--(Mde FrmPhoagraph.J

Where the branches form at the top a large, I the work which the iureaul is doing and
cavity is often formed which receives the to show actual forest conditions in all
(sozing sap and in older trees is generally i parts of the country. The visitor will see
full of gum. Lumps weighing 100 pounds; there the intst impri ssive evidence of
have been found.
The gunn is obtained from the trees in layers with strata of soil between.
a very crude way, and from the ground it; But the known gum fields have nearly
is simply dug up. Forests upon forests all been dug out and although gum is
have left these deposits of Kauri gum in often found, it is getting hard to find and
the earth, for it is frequently found in then only in small quantities.


what practical forestry is, and also its
great present and future importance as
a means of promoting the national wel-
fare. Lumbering ranked fourth among
the industries of the country, and it is a
matter of hopeful promise for the per-
nanence of the industry and for the
:-aus? of forestry that lumbermen are
adopting conservative forest manage-
ment in their lumber operations. That
agriculture, incomparably the most im-
portant of our national sources of wealth,
also depends in no small degree on for-
estry, is not, however, so well understood.
I'nder intensive methods of farming, and
with the enlargement of the cultivable
area made possible by irrigation, this de-
Iwndence will become increasingly close.
Mining and grazing, too, materially de-
:rnd on forestry, for mines demand cheap
and abundant timber, and the forage
which feeds most of the western stock is
ine of the important indirect products
which under proper restrictions, the forest
omay be made to yield. All of these re-
lationships are strikingly displayed in the
Forestry exhibit at St. Louis.
The space allotted to the Bureau of
Forestry is in two different though not
widely separated parts of the Fair
grounds. An indoor exhibit is located in
the Forestry, Fish and Game Building, in
which is centered also an exhibition of the
lumler industry of the United States. A
striking and complete collection of photo-
raraphic transparencies illustrate forest
conditions and problems as they are en-
countered by the Bureau. Typical single
trees and forests and their renewal by nat-
ural reproduction, forest planting in tree-
less regions or where forests have been
destroyed, and damage by fire, insects,
over-grazing, etc., are shown most clearly.
Nearly all of the transparencies are of
large size; some of them 4 by 5 feet.
The; are arranged to be seen from thq
inside of an arcade illuminated-by nat-
ural light, with eastern and western for-
est scenes, shown on opposite walls. T:.
' ries is supplemented by a collection of
large colored bromide photographs framed
in the panels of the hahllstrade which
surrounds the exhibit space. On the floor
between nthe balustrade and the arcade are
cases which display some specially im-
iortant phases of the Bureau's investiga-
tions. together with a collection of all the
instruments used in forest work, the pub-
lications of the Bureau, etc. Of particular

(Cotinaed on Page&)


------ ------------------ --------------


Iu i | v4







2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


>* * ^--1-77777777-* 77T11"7337 -7 7 7 7 7--- ---------


C. B. ROGERS. PRSIDEMT.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, Vicu-Pnasmresy.


C. H. HODGSON, 8C., and TwUs'a.


DILLECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


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GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.


Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches in Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.


The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Sorthern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries,


Grain, Pro-


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.



Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Cosist of oae Three-Story Building, 70x200; one two-story buldlig. 50x390; one one.story bulldig, 80x250,
making the largest space of amy Compaay of the Ukd Il the Soath.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.

Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensecola. Fla., and Savannah. Ga.


THE RECORD WILL BE WORTH DOLLARS TO YOU EVERM WEE.


CONSOLIDATED







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 3


***************************************** *********

J. S. Schofeld's Sons Company,
SHeadquarters for

-Distiller's Pumping
Sp Outfit.
No plant complete without one.
S* Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabnma, Mississippi and
South Carolina. Write us for particu-
slars and prices. We also manufacture
7* Engines, Boilers and lifh
a wl Grade Machinery,
Sas well as carry a full and complete *
-stockof-
Mill Supplies, Pipe,
; eI' Boiler Tubes, Etc.
Advise your wants.
SMacon, - Oeorgia.
S A LamI SeMtY f a
iom; of Trk W. for TrpU.tm Stwem r.
S-*****************-****d *************************O
III II ll3 illi t t III? tl t I 3lll lt it li itt l itt tlt iii i


* W. W. CANES. Pres.


Tai




Turpi

SLarg


TAMPA,


W. C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T DUDLEY. See. A Trea


nupa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
Hardware
>ntirne Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

e Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
Lnd Pullers on Hand.

S FLORIDA.


rivot, DYAL-UPCIRJRCII BLD,
GriVlO, Jacksonville, Fla.


All makes. $10 Up.


We can save you from $10 to $60
on any typewriter made.


Write us.


AGEIT "OLIVER" VISIBLE TYPEWRITER


ZINC NAILS

Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the lay -Ms which will pot injure
saws when left in the trees.
Salem Nail Co.
29 Pewit S lt Nw YoUr, M. Y.
Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc, Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.

BOWEN & CO.


Elgin & Hampden
Railroad Watches.

SEE

RILES

At His New Store,
15 W. BAY STREET.




NO FkRM "fl w ;'
A GROVE oF

0F1Lrao0


11 1 II IIi IIItIIIII M II lil IIIIIIIIIIIIIi i 1 IIII I


... NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA.. U. 5. A.


JOHN I. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
0. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD,


A. D. COVINGTON.
Vice-PresidenL
DNU9WT0St:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


H. L. KAYTON.
Seeretaryland Treasurer.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. B. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
warrE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.



W. R. THOMAS
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggies.


Jacksonville, Fla.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,


from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies

Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM d CO.
517 ad S19 West Bay Street.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


:Theey Are-M"

GRIFFIN'S CATALOG
TEWl AMOU 7T.
o Twenty Issuing vi m of Prnss
Also a esopIe Has at lt tG
* nanmutalessa *oos a".
* Catalog Sorre0M



BULDR AM DAdrmE
*n THErrr MIFU WO. *@..





BUIlDERS Awn DUA111 IN


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cott~ Sw. ierdlluer, On and Iee Ma
Ubhery. ud Supples af" b a
CAPACTTITY OR SI 6MDO
Marb Toomt. Wood-Workmt Mafbs
er., lhbettig. Pullers, HE agr IdthMbt
ard Rubblr BEltine and Hn., Mor4*
ad nil fSupplre and Tooa.
Pla- and emtinmt- fmrnidb for Pe...
Plants and Steel Brldrae
stm Pmps, Fe Water Useter s"
AUGUSTA. GA.


rTH RECORD 18 TH se OUTH GREAT TRADE JOURNAL.







4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SJ. A. Craig Q( Bro.
* 239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BOCK.


MORTGAGES.
WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,

Real Estate Broker.


Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
Up-to-Date Furnishings.


Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.


T. MURPHY
Jackseonville
Machine and Iron Works
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat and Sawmill Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron and
Brass Castings, Phosphor-Bronze Journal Bearings.
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


Standard Clothing Company I
*

One Price One Price f

S FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
S17 sad 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
S Steteso and Hawes Hats. Special Attention G;iven to Mail Orders.


.9V............ .q.y...w. -.- 5..... v. .y...... u .. .


For Sa.Ie:
22.000 Acres Sawmill Timber on St. Johns River, within tifeeen miles of
Jacksonville; will sell on very easy terms.
S11.000 Acres Round Timber and 9.000 acres now leing worked for turpen- f
tine; 11% crops virgin boxes, still, mules, wagons, and all
* necessary equipment for turpentining. *
4,500 Acres Round Timber and 4.000 acres now being worked for tuirpen-
* turpentine location.
5,280 Acres Round Timber. within 1% miles of railroad; price $3 per
acre; good lumber for turpentine and mill logs.
SSeveral large tracts round timber; also boxed timber ready for the saw.
* -

iBrobston, Fendig &Co.

*a *::ss:. .--Oue-:.sa;ee.C*..4:-***---
Cable Address. Florida

* Standard Naval Stores

SCompany.
DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN
S
| R.OSIN
AND TURPENTINE.
Jacksonville. Fla.
:0. --- -- 90**#9 4 ##9 #gr* l Iq99i


III W. FORsYTn STREET,


JACKS611vIE fla


Ier0ders in
ing and


The Largest and Oldest Copper
Work. in Georgia.


Baker Impreved
Seemless Tirpen-
Stine stills.
Write me for pries amd o
F. 0. B. ny pointt in Georia Ir-
Ida. Alabsma or MIs lssppl. Alh
stills sold murder a guarantee.
Job work through the
country a specialty.
Irunswicl(, Ga.


(W My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.

W. H. BECKWITH. W. B.'HENDERSON. G. C. WAl .
BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.

LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE AND MILL LAIDS,
Rooms 1.2-3, First National Bank Biildig.
TAMPA, : : : : : : FLORIDA.

Ai )t I lt i s tI 11 1 I l 14 t1 I: Il I I I I I I Ia iiIa


McMillan

Bros.


Florida Cop-
per Works. ,
Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
General Metal Workers.
Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
Patching through the country a specialty.
Orders by mail or wire will receive prompt
attention at either of the following works:
Fayetteville, N. C. Savannah. Ga.
Mobile, Ala. Jacksonville, Fli
't' ll Illlill III 1111111IIl l II 11111 Ill I li


DON'T FAIL TO MmETION TH RECORD TO ADVETISERS.


H, A. Renfroe Co,


TAILORS Stetson Hats

Suits to Order at Ready Made Prices Mail Orders Given Personal Attedioa
439 W. Bay Street. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

P rin tin g %Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.

M. A. BAKER,
Inveder an
Eamtuactirer of tIke


RENTS









) THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

*,OI I OIt eeSIS) Ill et ai ggggagaggg H I I II l ll II I ll I I )tll ll l4 I I lile III I II I I II it a sI I I I III I I IIIa IIIsia I-


T5/e


Seymour Cross-Tie Hewer and Veneer Mill.


This Machine is One of the Greatest Inventions of the Twentieth Century.


The patent for this wonderful machine
was granted to Mr. B. H. Seymour, of
Oeala, Fla, April 6, 1904, just as he had
installed in his mill the first working ma-
- chine; on the 1st of May, his mill and all
its contents were burned, but Mr. Seymour
is rebuilding the Tie Hewer as rapidly as
possible.
This machine more than doubles the
vale ot every cross-tie log by utilizing
the waste.
It cuts a perfect cross-tie on the same
principle as a hand-hewn tie, being
smooth, perfectly square, accurate in size
and can be used in bridge or trestle work;
at the same time it cuts as good veneer-
for boxes or crate material-from the
green log, as any veneer mill in the world
will cut by steaming the log. This is
done by the downward sliding or lateral
stroke of the big knife. In short, by using
this machine, the stuff now wasted in
hewing out a log is cut off in veneers
which brings down the cost of tie-produc-
tion over one hundred per cent. There is


FRONT VIEW OF SEYMOUR TIE HEWER.


enough raw material now wasted in the
State to make all the boxes and crates
necessary to ship all of Fklrida's many
crops. In addition there can be no ques-
tion as to advantage in durability gained
by cutting veneers off a log that has all
its rosin in it instead of from steamed
logs, which process must necessarily take
some of the logs' sap out of it. The Sey-
mour Cross-Tie Hewer only needs to be
seen to be appreciated. It will pay for
itself every three months; it should cer-
tainly be seen by every lumber and tie
man and crate manufacturer. It is in-
deed well worth careful examination; the
log, however large, is sliced by an enor-
mous knife giving the surface of the tie
the appearance of being hewn with a gi-
gantic broad-ax; this knife is ten feet
long, set so that one end is six inches low-
er than the other and working in vertical
guides, so that with its downward slid-
ing stroke, it cuts off the veneer in any
thickness required-the feed being auto-
matically adjusted. The machine is sig-
gularly simple and can be readily repaired


by any ordinary machinist; it requires
two hands and a 3-horse power engine to
operate it. When it is figured that with
this equipment three hundred and fifty
ties a day can be manufactured and in
addition veneers enough made to keep.
crate factb.ry busy, the business economy
in using this machine must be clear to all.
The Recorl certainly advises a close and
rigid examination of this wonderful inven-
tion and f els confident that it is destined
to add largely to the output of the tim-
ber districts. Any invention that makes
it possible to utilize raw material-previ-
ously wated--must be an advantage to
the world. We in the Southland are com-
mencing to realize that we have been too
prodigal with our resources, have produce.
ed too wastefully and hence it is particu-
larly encouraging to find that a citizen
and saw-mill man of Florida should have
invented such a material saving appliance.
Mr. B. H. Seymour has several offers from
individuals desirous of purchasing State
or other interests in this invention, but
so far has not closed with any.


09O99 66 l1 Igo I I lot ll 11 I IEtCORD II T1E lOP11RATO' l1 ELIA II ttt 111111CE."5111
TRB RECORD IS THE OOPERATORS' RELIANCE."


7 _7-r









a 7 1, TE WEMMY INDUSTRULA RECORD.


Limber Ospartuut. f


YELLOW PINE AND CYPRESS.

Last Week's Business of These Southern
Staples in the Northern Markets.
Baltimore.-Yellow pine trade not yet
in a satisfactory condition. Although
building operations are becoming more
active. ~aith consequent increase in the
inquiry, the volume of movement is con-
siderably smaller than had been expected.
As a result values are off and more or
Ih-s unsettled. The wharves are loaded
and storage room is overtaxed. It is not
that the demand is less, but the existing
situation attracted a greater supply than
is needed for present demands.
New York.-Yellow pine lumber, timer
and flooring are in fair call throughout
the metropolitan district. Large schedules
are quite numerous and a good volume ot
business is being closed. Manhattan is a
good market, but Brooklyn is a better,
for there has been an increase of thirty
per cent in building in that borough ove;
last year. We quote, building and yard
orders. $20.50 to $*2; stepping, $38 to $40;
ship stock, easy schedules, $26.50 to $27.50;
flooring clear, hard face rift, $44 to $45;
'AA" lift $32 to $33 and "A" flat, $21.50
to $22 50.
St. Itouis.-The shipments of yellow
pine were better for May, 1904, than for
May, 1903. complaints by mill men to the
contrary notwithstanding. Prices, how-
ever, are low and unsettled. Stocks are
above normal, and prospects are fair for
better prices.
Buffalo.--Trade reports indicate some
depression in yellow pine, though the de
mand for timbers is good. Trade in all
lines is dull, and lumber is dull in sympa-
thy with it.
Boston.-Improved weather is having
its effect on the yellow pine demand, es-
pecially for hard pine in small lots from
the yards.
Cypress.
Baltimore.-Cypress is easier in prices.
o% ing to the deferment of many improve-
ments that, it was supposed, would go up
imme-liately. Soon after the fire lumber-
men placed large orders for the lower
grades of cypress to be used in building,
and these arrivals have not yet been
worked off. Cypress is not coming in ex-
cept on orders, and this will strengthen
the market.
New York.-The demand for cypress has
eased off just a little during the past 30
days, but even on that the market is in
a very satisfactory condition, and prices
are holding very firm on all sales. As
soon as the building operations now under
way begin to call for trim, cypress will
experience an immediate advancement
Ixbth in demand and price.
St. Louis.-Trade continues to improve
and orders for cypress are increasing in
volume, and there are many inquiries.
Yard stock has a fair call with an increas-
ing tendency. Interior cypress is selling
freely because of building operations.
Buffalo.-The cypress trade is called
quiet with the rest, though it is selling
fairly well and prices appear to be main-
tained. There is no complaint of the wood
anywhere and it can be depended on to
hold its own generally.
Boston.-As yet the trade in eypres


has failed to expand, as, according to all
precedent. it should do at this season.

Jacksonville Lumber Shipments
Shipments of lumber from the port of
Jacksonville did not hold up as well for
the month of May as expected. The rec-
ords of the customhouse show a falling
off in lumler shipments of 2,868,702 feet,
as compared with the month of April, and
a falling l off 1,68i,488 feet as compared
with the month of May, 1903.
the shipments during the past month
averaged 574,827 feet per day, and the
total shipments were as follows: Pine
lumber to coastwise ports, 15,533,07 feet;
cypress lumlwr to coastwise ports, 447,09a
feet; pine lumber to foreign ports, 1,264,-
111 feet. Total lumber shipments for the
monti, 17,244,810 feet.
For the first five months of 1904 the to-
tal lumber shipments amounted to 82,321,-
003 feet, an avt rage of 16,464,200 feet per
month, the shipments being as follows:
1904. Feet
January .............. 15,587,246

February ............. 15,960,186
March ................ 13,415,249
April.............. 20,113,512
May .... .. .. .... .. .. 17,244,810

Total .............. 82,321,003
During the same period last year the to-
tal lumber shipments amounted to 77,853,-
081 feet. Notwithstanding the falling off
in ship ,nts during the month of May, it
still hloks as though the record for lumber
shipments will be broken this year.
The customhouse records show the fol-
lowing shipments of Florida products to
oastwise ports during the month of May:
Pine lumber, 15,533,607 feet; cypress
umbnir, 447.0Y2 feet; crossties, 103,700;
ihingles, 2279.800 inbulk, and 31,600 bun-
lles; naval stores, 14,815 barrels; kaolin,
5,310 sacks; frfuit and vegetables, 101,455
packagess ; Florida tobacco, 100 bales; mis-
cellaneous merchandise, 38,050.
The hlipi.ents from the port of Jackson-
tille to foreign ports consisted of 1,264,111
ftet of pine lumber, 480 bundles of shin-
gles, 28 barrels of grits, 24 barrels of flour,
2 sacks of coffee, 17 boxes of soap, 1 sack
if beans, 2 Is,xes of starch and 4 tins of
ard. The value of the foreign exports
vas $22,728.86.

Hope without hustle, like faith without
o,,rks. is dead.

The Campn sawmill at White Springs,
i-cently dressed 68,800 feet of inch boards
in a day's run.

The Pennsylvania Railroad Company is
buyingg large tracts of land in that State
and planting them in young locust trees.
I'wenty-five years hence these trees may
.ui;plly that road with cross-ties.

Such is the demand for cedar wood for
lhe manufacture of pencils that several
farmers near Columbia, Tenn., have torn
lown their barns, built of cedar wood and
si:d them at a good price.

Considering the fact that the South-
east is contributing a large share of lum-
ier to the trade, is it not singular that
we have no furniture factory in all this
territory worthy of the name?

Mr. II. Il. Tift and wife are visitors at
the St. Louis Fair. Mr. Tift went as a


NEWLY BUILT and FURNISHED


- EVERY COMFORT


-Write or prticulrs--
MRS. M. C SKIPWORTH, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS FLA.


KENDRICK HOUSE,

Headquw-ters for Southern Families.
GOOD TABLE HOME COMFORTS
.. For particulars address ...
MRS. j. B ROBERTS, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS FLA.


THE HAMILTON.

A New, Modern, High-Class Hotel.


ELECTRIC LIGHTS and BELLS


HOT and COLD BATHS


Fr lull information write

JNO, S. BOWEN, Owner and Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE NEW PAXTON.

Commodious, Home-Like Hotel.
ROOM FOR 100 GUESTS.
Table Unexcelled. Every Attention to Visitors

MRS E. H. PAXTON, Owner and Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.



THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
NOW OPEN
under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.


A.s. PVNLETON, w. a. JoemsNo. J. LATER. W. W. STRIPLIM
Presist. Vie Pre. Gen hmmigr. Asst. Tremmarr

6he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholeseae Grocers


D. M. FLYNN
WALTER FAV.


402-404-406-408 East Way Street, Jackeesm0Ue. ft..
DIRECTORS:
3.r. aA S. PENSDLETOI1.
res. m uo, w. a. $104W
N. 0. WADE, PERRY. eoN


W. W. STPWLM
isA. LAS3UTE


ARS YOU A SUUSCDRMR TO TEX RECORD?


White Springs, Fla.

On the Suwanee River
The Great Health Resort of the South.
Sgrb Sr nta 2s500 G mi per Mukte.
Healing Springs Forest Walks Shooting & fishit
NO MOSQUITOES. NO MALARIA.
The Healthiest Summer Resort in America.


THE PRITCHARD HOUSE.


An Ideal Home for Invalids, First Class Table

ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES.
Write or particulars ...
MRS. S L PRITCHARD, Proprietress. WHITE SPRINGS FLA


THE OAKS.

A Typical Southern Home








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


representative of the Georgia
Sawmill Association to the Nati
vention of Lumbermen, which
in St. Louis May 24, 25 and 2

In many places along the A
Birmingham Railroad in Georgi
noticed burning woods caused
from locomotive engines. As t
is very dry these fires spread r
are doing great damage to pro]

The depot of the Atlantic &
ham Railroad at Tifton, Ga., w
destroyed by fire last Friday n
about 4,500. It is supposed th
caused by a spark from a passi
No one was in the depot at the
the flames had made such rapK
before they were discovered tba
could be saved.


Again we make the inquiry, why is it
that the ash of the Florida swamps is not
quoted along with the ashes of other
States. Baltimore, New York, Buffalo
and Boston have a good ash trade, but so
far as we can learn, none of the stuff
comes from Florida.

Poplar, white and red oak, chestnut,
baIewood, red gum, birch, cottonwood, ma-
hogany, cherry, maple, elm, hickory, syca-
more, cedar, walnut, beech and buckeye
are the other marketable woods.

The Waccamaw Land & Lumber Com-
pany, of Southport, N. C., with a capital
stock of $1,000,00, has been Incorporated
to engage in a general lumber business.

A bill has been introduced in the Louis-
iana Legislature providing for a system-
atic protection of the forests of that State,
and for replanting denuded timber lands.

One of the newsiest weeklies that comes
to the Industrial Record is the Tifton, Ga.,
Gazette. Each issue is brim full of live
items about the doings of turpentine men,
lumbermen and other busy men.

The long-leaf pine tree will outlive the
short leaf tree, that is, if both die of old
age. The long-leaf pine is getting to be
such a favorite, however, in industrial de-
velopment that it is wanted before old
age comes.

The schooner Julia A. Truby arrived in
port last Friday morning and will load
with lumber at once for Cooney, Eckstein
Co., New York.

Jackmvle Whlesale Lumber Market.

(For week ending June 3.)
Merchantable.
xard schedules-$0.50 to $13.00.
Hound and square schedules, bD.50 to
$12.00.
Merchantable car material-
Average schedule of sills, :6 feet and
under, 10 inches and under, $13.00 to
$14.00.
Special schedules-according to siles
and lengths-prices steady.
K D. Sape-"6" and up 80 per cent
lear, $9.50 to $10.00.
Flooring:
$1150; No. $80.
CyreM
First and seconds, 4 quarter base, ear-
load prices, $34; selects, 4 quarter base,
No. 1, $15.00; No. 2, $13.50; No. 3,
$28; shop, 4 quarter be, $20.
Cypress Shinglea--xl8 A's, per 1000
pea, $6.%; prime, $4.6; 4x18, A's, $3.50;
prices, $2.7.


Interstate
onal Con-
was held
L .. T*he..

MA be ;* Standard Turpentine

by sparks Co
he season C mp n
.. -. Company
Lpidly and
perty. Has revolutionized the wood distilling basi-
Birming- ess In the South. After three months of carefl
a totally testing our machinery at the Waycross, Georgia, 4 & ,
e wat mill, we are now ready to sell direct any size / p
ng engine. plant and guarantee results by our new KRUG 0
time d PATENT STEAM PRESSURE PROCESS. i
I progress
t nothing STANDARD TURPENTINE COMPANY.


K






Cypi


ohn = Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


res laths, $2 per


1,000.


Cypress market strong. Mills have
more orders than they can filL Propects
good for higher prices. Dry stock scarce.


TO BUY AND SELL ONLY.


A New Real Estate Firm Jut Openig
in Jacksonville.
The firm of Beacham & Shackelton will
open a real estate office this week on
the fifth floor of the West Building, cor-
ner Bay and Laura Streets. This firm
will not do a commission business, but
will buy outright for itself any lands it
handles. As Mr. Beacham remarked to
a Record representative yesterday:
"We are not real estate agents. What
we buy will be with our own money and
what we sell will be our own lands.
"That is," said he, "unless the trade
involves too much money. We might be
up against a land transaction requiring
more than we have on hand. In that
event we will buy an option on it where
we are wiping to back our judgment."
Mr. B. Beacham, the senior member of
the firm, has been operating in Florida
lands very extensively from his former
home, Orlando, Forida, for the past twen-
ty years and is to-day probably the larg-
est individual holder in the State.
Mr. H. H. Shackelton, his partner, is
from Michigan, and has also much exper-
ience in handling Florida lands. In open-
ing the office here they will also make
Jacksonville their home, and the Indus-
trial Record welcomes them with the glad
hand. They will operate in all parts of
Florida.

bigger and Better.
In a letter from Mr. Z. C. Chambliss,
of Oeala, reference is made to his ad-
vertisement in the Record of five bulls
for sale, in which he says one of them
hal already been shipped and the others
are growing bigger and better every day.
WHEN WRITIG ADVERTISIRS


aawwuu. *8 mawsaus wum a.: E BUN E mu asasw.. a. ur


SPEL WIGHT. Pre.


T. K. MCCARTHY. Vice-rea.


MAURICE STERL Trems.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.


IRVING u. WIELc. Nanaer.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


**i~~irri ~ Q* **fwr ********e****e **r


STHE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE.
Jacksonville, pFa.
CAPITAL $300,000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS 530000
Strength and ample facilities. Business. solicited. Prompt ottentloa to colec-
tions and business of customers not lvin. in Jacksonville. Best Safety Deposit
i Boxes for rent.

--

"The" PAINT STORE.
I. E. BAIRD Stl CO., Jacksonville, Fla,
'vall paper, pictures, frames, painting and all interior and exterior doratng.
Hardware, glass, etc. If you are building a fine home, get Baird & Co. to do
toe decorating that it may be in keeping with the building. Oldest and most ex-
perienced house in Faorida.



East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carluad Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.

WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.

NMrTION THE RECORD.


z


"









A T1B WEPXiLY INDUSTRIAL RWECOID.


GOVERNMENT FORESTRY EXHIBIT.

What It Comprises and How It is Ar-
ranged at the St. Louis Fair.
Continued from Page I.
interest is a large case containing long-
leaf pine trunks which show the advan-
tages of the new system of turpentining
promoted by the Bureau and the disad-
vantages and injurious effects of the old
system of boxing. Two other cases ex-
hibit insects and examples of their des-
tructive work. The method determining
the strength of commercial timbers is
shown by a testing machine, while the
results of tests are shown by charts and
tested timbers. There is also a large col-
lection of timbers, both from the United
States and Europe, treated by different
preservative processes to show the man-
npr of increasing the life of various con-
struction timbers. Several specimens are
shown of building and other timbers which
have been in use for thirty years or
more.
One of the special features of the ex-
hibit is a relief map of the United States
cast upon a section of a sphere 16 feet in
diameter. By using this type of map
the geographical distortion inevitable in
flat maps is avoided, and the real rela-
tionship of the various parts of the coun-
try and their actual position on the globe
are correctly Ishown. The distribution
and character of the forests of the coun-
try are shown in different colors, as art.
the location and extent o national and
State forest reserves. The forests man-
aged according to working plans prepared
by the Bureau and lands upon which
plantations have been instituted under
Bureau planting plans are also indicated
by special symbols. The situation of for-
est schools and other institutions which
afford training in forestry is shown on the
map. On another relief map are shown
the location of the proposed Appalachian
Forest Reserve, the extent and character
of forest and other lands included and
the relation of the reserve to the sur-
rounding country.
The outdoor exhibit of the Bureau is
on a tract of 21-2 acres, situated about
300 yards southwest of the Forestry, Fish
and Game Building. Here are displayed.
on and about a model farm, forest plant
tions suited to every part of the United
States, practical forest nurseries, and tnhe
best forms of windbreaks which are so
important for protection of the western
farmer's crops and buildings. The coop-
erative work of the Bureau in this 4di
reaction has been very successful, and this
exhibi is certain to attract much interest
among visitors from the regions in whiel,
forest planting has proved its usefulness
both for protection an das a means ot
providing local supplies of fuel and tim-
ber. During the past five years plans for
such planting have been put in operatic-ii
under the direction of the Bureau of For-
estry on 10 western farms. The model
farm represented comprises a quarter of
a section of prairie land laid out on a
scale one-tenth the actual linear measure-
ments, to show a model plan for planting
trees in a treeless country. Forty-seven
forest blocks surrounding this area ilius-
trate pure forest plantations and various
methods of mixing tree species. In each
of these blocks the trees are given the ac-
tual intervals recommended for planting in
* the different regions to which the illustra-
tions apply. Methods of growing nur-
sery stock from cuttings, transplants, and


niom seeds are fully illustrated, as are t
various styles of screens used for shadi
coniferous tree seedlings. The cultiv
tion of four varieties of basket willow
also an interesting feature of the outd
exhibit. fields, larnusteads, etc.j are I
off wth growing trees planted along i
fence lines and about the home lot.
In addition to the displays describe
the Bureau of Forestry will coopers
with the Department of Mines and Met
lurgy in a series of comparative tests
*atlng to the best methods of preserve
timbers. Fc:r this purpose a complete
perinental treating plant, consisting ol
small cylinder, vacuum and press
pumps ,and tanks for holding the preseri
tive solutions will be in operation on o0
door tract ot thie Department of Mines a
Metallurgy. Other plants will snow
application of the Giussani and Rupi
processes. It is expected that one
more runs will daily be made, when t
and timbers from all parts of the Unil
States will be treated. Close to these 4


he lIII S I EI t l 4I I I I i *1it I mll i*Ii t 5 ) 14 1 i I I il 8 lii
ng
" : MERRILL-STEVENS CO.
is *


S| Boilermaking and Repairing

ed, Still Boilers and Pumps.
ate SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
al- 4
re- Jacksonville. Fla.
ing 4 > lt 4 1 +l< II *441 i ll ll l
*#1Ii11 4111 &lIII404 111l#t1 t?1*4* 11F4#44 1 &1 SllS l 1*111i It 0


ex-
Sa
ure
va-
ut-
na
the
ing
or
ies
ted
ex-


perimental plants will be found a cylin-
der whose operation illustrates the best
methods of increasing the longevity of
fence posts. In a separate building near
the treating plants several testing ma-
chines Awill be operated by the Bureau of
Forestry for the purpose of determining
the strength of different timbers treated
by various preservative processes.
The greatest etlort has been made in
the preparation of the Government forest
exhibit to give as complete an exposition
as possible of the purposes and work of
the Burnau. The result, it is hoped, will
be peculiarly interesting and instructive
.o that vast body of citizens whose ma-
terial welfare is so intimately connected
with the adoption of practical forestry.


CHANGE OF DATE.

xeforgia Interstate to Meet at Atlantic
Beach June 13.
The Secretary of the Georgia Interstate
Sawmill Association has issued the follow-
ing:
Tifton, Ga., May 30, 1904.
'o all concerned:
Please take notice that the meeting o0
this Association called for June 6th, has
..een p-ostloned to Monday, June 13th, 10
o lock a. in., at the Continental Hotel,
At.antic Beach, Fla.
The postponement is made for the rea-
son that tinre will be an important pri-
mary'election to be ..' 1 throughout the
state of Florida on June 7th and the pos-
sibihty of same affecting the attendance
at the meeting if held as first intended.
\\W want to impress on you the impor-
tance of this meeting, the Price List to be
made for the G. 1. S. M. Association Rules
of 1!9 4, the consideration of important
1ii stions, such as the Bureau of Inspee-
tion. tade conditions, supply of labor and
'a.s. Car Equipient laws, etc., and we
hIop' you will favor the meeting with your
presence.
Atlantic Beach, and the Continental Ho-
tel are elegant places for the holding of
this meeting, and special rates will be
made to those att ending, and a pleasant
and iproit'lle time is promised.
Yurs truly,
E. C. HARRELL, See'y.

The Buffalo Yellow Pine Company, of
iHaylov, (;a., lost their sawmill a few
days sinc. Iby fire.


Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Co.

Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.

Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.



Cummer Lulmher Co.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.



"In the Good Old Summer Time"

Your customers will remain well, if you do
like Dr. Mathews of Thomson, Ga. He wrote
us 15th of January, 1094:
"I have been carrying Cuban Relief in stock for
several years, and have frequently used and prescribed
it. I consider it superior to any preparation on the
market for Cholera Morbus, Sick Headache, Colic,
and an infallible remedy for horse colic."
You write us for a supply.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga. Tenn.


R. TOLAR.


J. HART. T. H. BLACHLY.
(Established 1872.)


J. R. TOLAR, J


TOLAR, HART & CO.,
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange Orders executed for Cotton Futures.

JOSEPH D. WEED. W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc,



Read the Record Adv't's.


THE RECORD KEPS PACE WITH SOUTHERN PROGRESS&


L











THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


The National Good Roads Convention.

A. S Mana, of Florida, Selected as First Vice-President and National Organizer.


The National Good Roads Convention
held a six days' session at the St. Louis
'Fair during the week ending May 21 last.
It was composed of representative men
from every State in the Union and the
whole subject of good roads was discussed.
The convention pledged itself not to sup-
port any man for any office who was inim-
ical to the good roads movement. The
federal government was asked to aid to
the extent of one-half the cost in good
roads. The federal constitution declares
that "Congress shall have power to estab-
lish post roads." This is the text and
upon it very strong sermons were preach-
ed by the delegates.
Mr. Mann delivered an address on "The
Outlook for Better Roads in the Southern
States," from which we make the follow-
ing extracts:
"I am supposed to address you on The
Outlook for Better Roads in the Southern
States. If I tell you what they will do
for us you will better understand me. We
have gone into the work to stay until we
have not only good roads, but we feel that
the best are none too good for us. In my
own State and others 1 have visited, I find
the people fully alive to the importance
and advantages of good roads. They see
immense sums of their money spent in
preparation to carry them and their prod-
ucts to any part of the world, when they
shall have reached a shipping point, but
at certain seasons of the year this is near-
ly impossible, and at all seasons a hard-
ship and cost that means at best but
scant profits. The larger part of the
country is so remote from shipping sta-
tions as to make home a dreary place, and
raising anything for the market is not
to be thought of. Existence alone is all
that such homes promise.
"While it is the plain duty of the gene-
ral government to aid us, we are not idle,
and the work of road improvement is going
forward in most of the counties of the
Southern States. Since the agitation be-
gan in Florida. our most progressive coun-
ties have built from fifty to one hundred
mi'es of good roads. These roads are
pushing out into the country to connect
the larger settlements and best lands
with the shipping points. This work pro-
gresses slowly as it is done by county
tax. Where such roads have been con-
strid lands have advanced in value
many times the entire cost of the work.
and products grown for the markets of
the world, pay handsome profits, which in
other sections go to pay the heavy ex-
pense of transportation. In many cases
the bruising of vegetables causes not only
a total loss, but the grower must pay the
freight. The railway lines often refuse
to receive such shipments unless charges
are prepaid. Hence, you will see our only
course is to continue our. efforts until
every section of our fair State has an
open, easy, rapid outlet to the markets
of the world.
"The last legislature gave to the coun-
ties the right to increase taxation for road
purposes. They also gave an immense
amount of what is known as I. I lands to
this work and to-day Florida has in sight
a large sum of money for good roads,
which is to be divided among the counties
according to valuation. Florida is not
waiting for government aid. It has been
esid that 'God helps those who help them-
hlves' If national aid is secured we will


come into our rights as the common peo-
ple sooner; but if we have it to do our-
selve, we are always working until it is
done. We will fight this to a finish,
calling on all interested to do their duty.
And we will not fold our arms until our
products-no matter who grows them or
where they are grown-can go from the
home to those who want them in any
part of the world, and any day of the
year. This will require good, hard, sur-
face-d roads, which will be built as rapidly
as possible.
'"Good roads add value to every acre.
They practically bring the country and
city together, so that the present crowd-
ed, unwholesome conditions may be avoid-
ed. and change dreary country life by
eawy- visits to the city. The hand that
guides the plow supports the nation. Any


ill that befalls the farmer increases the
cost of living to everyone. Therefore,
anything that benefits him helps those in
all the walks of life. The nation rests
lpon the shoulders of its workers, and
their protection should be well considered
in all we do. We should encourage home
builde:s for front the home come patriots.
In times of trouble we look to them for
defenders. Men will do and die in defense
of family and fireside, while they would
n-t defend a boarding or a tenement house.
In the home where love dwells will be
found the faithful husband and patriot."
Offered by A. S. Mann:
"Resolved that it is the sense of this


Convention that a committee of ive mem-
bers of this Good Roads movement shall
be appointed by the President to attend
the conventions of the different political
parties, State, Congressional and National,
and secure where possible a plank endors-
ing in the fullest possible manner State
and National aid for Good Roads; the
President to be ex-officio member of this
committee."
Unanimously adopted May 19, 1904, St.
Lois Convention.
The Convention unanimously passed a
resolution presented by the committee
pledging their support to such candidates
as were pledged to Good Roads.
Resolution offered by A. S. Mann:
"Resolved That it is the sense of this
convention that the minutes of this con-
vention should be compiled; so that the
speeches as -well as all facts placed be-
fore us. may be preserved and given to us
to aid in our work at home."


Unanimously adopted May 21, 1904, St.
I.ouis convention.
A. S. Mann was elected National Vice-
President and National Good Roads Or-
ganizer.


America's Commercial Prestige.
William J. Clark. manager of the for-
eign trade of the General Electric Com-
pany, has an article in the Engineering
Magazine, "A Comparison of American
and European Commercial Conditions."
Mr. Clark shows the manufacturing pro-
ductive power of various countries in this
table, including the value of products per


wage earner, per capital and population:
Per
Value espita.
United States .......... $2,450 $170
United Kingdom ....... 515 122
Germany .............. 400 80
France ................ 600 90
Belgium ................ 480 110
Switzerland .............. 500 106
Austria-Hungary ....... 425 44
Russia ................. 440 15
Italy .................. 472 53
Norway ................ 450 41
Sweden ............... 572 56
Holland ................ 540 49
Spain ..................... 361 38
Australia .............. 900 90
Japan (factories only) .. 566 5
Canada ................ 1,455 146
He shows the total manufactures con-
sumed and approximate consumption per
capital population in this table:
Consumption
per
Consumed, capital.
United States ... $12,885,60,303 $160
United Kingdom 4,273307,438 104
Germany ......... 4,152,450,000 74
France .......... 3,168,00,000 82
Belgium ......... 660,000,000 98
Switzerland ...... 243,500,000 74
Austria-Hungary 1,9000,000,000 42
Russia ........... 2,00,000,000 16
Italy ............ 1,714,000,000 53
Norway .......... 115,000,000 52
Sweden .......... 260,000,000 52
Holland .......... 269,000,000 53
Spain ............ 730,000,000 43
Australia ........ 605,000,000 162
Japan ........... 230,000,000 5
Canada .......... 880,000,000 183
He says: "The tables show that Amer-
ica itself is by far the best market of
the world for manufactured products;
consequently it is not strange that up to
the present American manufacturers
should have devoted their principal at-
tention to home trade. Their success in
foreign markets so far is attributable
principally to their natural advantages
already stated, and to the energy and
ability of their representatives abroad.
"When American manufacturers devote
especial attention to meeting the require-
ments of each foreign nation; when the
American ocean carrying trade is re-es-
tablished; when America's growing wealth
is- more largely invested abroad; and
when the country participates more thor-
oughly in international banking-then
the amount of America's foreign trade
will be more extensive than that of all
Europe combined.
"Considering the average annual com-
pnsation of the wage earner in European
factories. $170. which is one-half that
paid in the United States, the figures there
being $340; and considering the average
cost of generating power about $40 per
annum ( n each continent, it is seen that
'n European factories the average pe.-
centage for labor and power on total coet
of production is 21.4 per cent. In the
United States it is 17.4 per cent. In view
of this and of the well-known advan-
tages possessed by the United States on
nearly all classes of raw materials, no
further arguments are considered nec-
essary to demonstrate its strong position
as a manufacturing nation, and its ability
to compete for the world's trade on man-
ufactured products."

The crop of tomatoes at Mandarin is
late, as it generally is, and tomatoes
will be shipped from that fertile vicinity
for a month to come, if not longer. The
erop is brought down on lighters, and put
on board the Clyde steamers at Jackson-
ville for shipment.

Send all orde for printing for the
turpentine and commisary trde to the
Record office to sure a prompt delivery.










10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J. I. PAIoTrr, Aucaun S. HUBBAan. ARTBUR F. P---RY


---------r- ~--------- ------- --t~C
SPrident. Vice-President. C lr.
The Mercantile Exchange Bank, f
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA. i
CAhpital. $200.000. Surplus. $100.000
STATE DEPOSITARY.
GWmeral asking. Intrest Paid on Saving Deposits. Sfe Deposit Boxes. 8.00 per Year.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week


R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KlxoHT, Sec. and Tress.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,


HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.


Spirit for the Week at Savanah.
Pree Repts Sale Exp. 1903
Mon, May 30152%-531 990 759 287 4454
Tneu., May 31153 1316 994 625 145
Wed., June IstW53% 971 324 110 %
Thurs., June 2154 63 393 512 45%
Friday, June 3-Holiday (Jefferson Davis'
birthday).

Romia for the Week at Savannau


Monday, May 30.
WW ............ 4.10
WG ........... 3.80
N .... .. ...... 3.55
M .............. 3.45
K .. .. .. .. .. .... 3.40
I .. .. .. .. .... 3.10
H ...... .. .. .. 2.85
G ...... ....... 2.75
F .. .......... 2.70
E ........... .. 265
D.............. 2.00
ABC .......... 2.60


Last Year.
3.65
3.35
3.25
3.20
3.10
3.05
2.40
1.85
1.80
1.75
1.75
1.70


Receipts 2,487, sales 1,327, exports 2,463.

Tuesday, May 31-The four top notchers
advanced 10 cents on the barrel. Re-
ceipts 3,246, sales 1,635, exports 558.
Wednesday, June I-WW and WG ad-
vanced 5 cents a barrel over Tuesday; N
and M advanced 10 cents a barrel over
Tuesday. Receipts 2,468, sales 1,750, ex-
ports 2,350.
Thursday, June 2-The four top notch-
ers, WW, WG, N and M, advanced 10 cents
a barrel over Wednesday Receipts 1,35h,
sales 2.074. exports 1,496.

Bailey & Montgomery's Report.
New York, June 1st, 1904.
Spirits turpentine-Stock, 1,103 barrels.
The market during the week has been
rather quiet; business fair.
Thursday, May 26---57 1-2 c.
Friday, May 27-571-2 c.
Saturday, May 28-57 c.
Monday, May 30-Holiday.
Tuesday, May 31-57 c.
Wednesday, June 1-57 1-2 c.
Rosin-Stock, 32,760 barrels.
This market keeps very steady for all
grades; demand good.
AD. $305; E, $3.10; F, $3.15; G, $3.20;
H, $3.30; I, $3.40; K, $3.80 to $3.85: M.
$4.00 to $4.10: N. $4.10 to $4.20; WG, $4.30
to 4.40; WW, $4.60.


Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosins.
Stock April 1 .......... 6,495 44,50
Receipts June 2 ........ 663 1,358
Receipts previously .... 35,249 89,716
Total .............. 42,407 135,624
Exports June 2 ........ 512 1,496
Exports previously .... 30,191 108,912
Total ................ 30,703 110,408
Stock June 2 ............ 11,704 25,216
Stock last year ......... 5,842 94,957

Range of Turpentine and Rosin at Sa-
vannah for Three Yar.
| 1903-4 | 1902-3 1| 1901-2


Spirits


Rosin


WW .
WG..
K. .. .
S.. ...
D ..


) 5 4 65 | 42 65 j| 31 53


3.504.25
3.253.85
2.403.20
1.202.10
1.102.05


2.25 3.9
2.003.7
1.65 2.4
1.101.
1.001.4


..3.304.75
..3.104.40
..2.804.15
.. 1.652.90
.. 1552.80


70
ro
15
50


10


For Industrial Development in the South.
The South will be the destination of
thousands of new industries within the
next five years, according to Horace F.
Smith, of Nashville, traffic manager of
the Nashville, Chattanooga and St. Louis
Rialroad. Mr. Smith was in Louisville
yesterday on the way to New York, where
he was called by business of his com-
pany. He was one of the principal factors
in the organization of an industrial and
immigration bureau which has for its pur-
poses the attraction of capital and enter-
prises to that section of the country. It
is composed of the traffic officials of the
principal railroads, and in speaking of
the results that have been accomplished,
Mr. Smith said:
"The work of the association has been
more successful even than we had expect-
ed. It is still young, but the accomplish-
ment of its officers are manifest in the
nature and the number of new factories
which have been brought to the South in
the past year. The section is thoroughly
advertised through the association, and
while it is a new conception for the de-
velopment of a country's resources, it is
an unusual success.


Crops of Spirits and R ins for Three Years.
Crop 190304. Crop 1902-03 Crop 1901-02
Spiris. Posin Spirits. Rosin. Spirits. Rosin
Wimington...... .... 16,511 80,667 18883 113,968 16,921 109.484
Charleston.......... 2,409 3,150 3,007 11,835 3,004 13,270
Savannah...... .. ..176,418 650,938 270,670 940,507 313,085 1,071,440
Brmunwick.. ......... 55,002 184,527 68,947 244,106 79,69 286,125
...... .. ..... .......12,21 50,80 18,969 79,272 21,080 88,572
New Orleam.... .. .. 36,017 133,126 33,103 108,033 21,038 94,36
Crrabelle ...... ...... closed closed 3,394 32,148 8,177 47,497
Georgetown...... .. 7,515 44,214 10,307 46,899 8,458 50,515
Peamola.. ....... .. 42,554 205,982 38,275 192,205 37,786 14,350
Ja. & Ferndina.. .... 187210 663,210 91,976 375211 70,000 245,000
Tamp ...... ........ closed eloed 13,565 40,664 15,424 51,779
Totals.... .. ......535,915 2,020,925 571,096 2,184,818 593,492 2,212,413


FOR SALE.
50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill 9 35 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in the State.

C. BUCKMAN, fJormoorvlll. f|


Herbert A. Ford,
President.


(eo. H. Ford,
Vice-Pres.


F. L. Watas,
Cashier.


The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPI TAL, $50,000.00.
DIRECTORs: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Clarence Camp, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford. Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicited.

C. BARES, Prs J. ARE SHAW, Vce-Pres. RALPH JESSUP, See.-Treas.

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. GOmaes,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonville Pensacola, [ernandiua and SavainMa
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLAL


W. FRAZIER JONS0 C. H. BARNES. R. JESSVP, W. H. BAKER.
P Treasurer. Aset Trea. se.msemy.
UNITED GROCERY CO.

Importers & Wholesale Grocers
HAY, GRAIN and FEED.
Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
3. G. LASSETER.
S cePrs.LA Eanden.Mr. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

M. A. BRIGGS, President. HOMER BROWN, 2d Vice-President.
H C. BRIGGS, 1st Vice President. J. C. McDONALD, Secretary and Treasurer



W, H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.
HARDWARE MLL and TURPENTI SUPES

Council Tool Co., & Holmes' Tool Co.. Tools,
Brigg's Sterling and Perfection Hacks and Pullers,
Cutters, Files, Whetters, Glue, Batting, Strainer Wire,
Turpentine Wagon Harness and Collars,
Hoop Iron, Coopers' Tools and Rivets.

Everything in Turpentine Supplies,

Send us your Mail Orders.

W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.,
VALDOSTA, GA.



Jacksonville Brokerage Co.
112 WEST FORSYTH STREET.
Correspondent to The Odell Co.. Capital Stock $200,000.00

COTTON, STOCKS, BONDS, GRAIN, PROVISIONS
Handled on margin or for delivery.
Private Leased Wires direct to New York. Chicago & New Orlean
Bell Phone 1560.


TH= Wu- TAUF TY 01 OMR ADvsgZiSS VOUCHID FOM







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11


OTICE OF APPLICATION FOR LET-
TERS PATENT.
Notice is hereby given, that we, the un-
dersigned subscribers intend to apply to
his excellency William 8. Jennings, as
governor of the State of Florida, at Tal-
lahasee, Florida, on the 7th day of July,
191N, for letters patent incorporating the
undersigned and their associates into a
corporation to be known as The Meldrum
Brothers Company, in accordance with the
following articles of incorporation.
ARCHIBALD MELDRUM,
M. L. MELDRUM.
T. S. GRAY.

ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION OP
THE MILDRUM BROTHERS
COMPANY.
We, the undersigned incorporators, here-
by associate ourselves together for the pur-
pose of forming a corporation 'under the
laws of the State of Florida, and adopt the
following articles of incorporation:
Article L
The name of this corporation shall be
The Meldrum Brothers Company, and its
principl place of business shall be in the
city of Jacksonville, Florida.
Article II
The general nature of the business to be
transacted by this corporation shall be to
own, control, buy, sell, mortgage or lease
real or personal property of every kind
and description, patents, secret formulas
or processes of manufacturing any drug,
chemical, compound, mixture, or other ar-
tiles of merchandise; to own, control,
rent, build or erect, or acquire or dispose
oi in any manner, any real property, fac-
tory, offices or other buildings, tramways,
sidetracks, or other means of transporta-
tion for the purposes or convenience of the
business of the corporation, but not for
the purposes of a common carrier, and to
buy, sell, manufacture and deal in. Tho-
rium Nitrate, Aluminum Nitrate, Ammon-
ium Nitrate, Barium Nitrate, Beryllium
Nitrate, Calcium Nitrate, Cerium Nitrate,
Didymium Nitrate, Erbium Nitrate, Lan-
thanium Nitrate, Lithium Nitrate, Mag-
nesium Nitrate, Uranium Nitrate, Yttrium
Nitrate, Zirconium Nitrate, Soluble Gun
Cotton, Phosphoric Acid, and Starch; and
to mine, buy, sell and deal in Phosphate
Rock, Monasite and Tale, and manufac-
ture the same into fertilizers, by-products
or any commercial products thereof, and
buy, and sell such products at wholesale
ad retail, and to manufacture, buy, sell
and deal in all kinds of chemicals ano
commercial fertilizers; and to own ana
operate turpentine lands, stills, and manu-
facture turpentine and any other products
thereof, together with all chemicals, drug.
or articles of merchandise as may front.
time to time be deemed advisable; and to
act as consulting and analytical chemists;
and to subscribe for, purchase, receive,
own, hold for investment or otherwise,
sell, dispose of and make advances upon,
the stock, shares, bonds, securities or other
obligations of other corporations whatso-
ever, engaged in or pursuing any one of
the kinds of business purposes or objects
indicated herein, and while the holder or
owner of any such stock, bonds or obliga-
tions, to exercise all the rights, powers
and privileges of ownership thereof, and
to exercise all and any voting power
thereof; to borrow money and to secure
the same, by deeds, mortgages, notes,
bonds or others obligations; to receive
payment for capital stock subscribed, in
money, or in property, labor or services
at a just valuation thereof, in the judg-
ment or discretion of its Board of Di-
rectors; to have a lien upon all shares of
stock of any stockholder who may be-
come indebted to this corporation, either
individually or as copirtners, with the
right to sell and dispose of such stock, or
such portion thereof as may be necessary
to pay such indebtedness; and to make
such by-laws in furtherance hereof as may
be deeme advantageous, and by such by-
laws, to provide that the Directors may
employ such officers of the corporation,
at such salaries as they may deem ad-
vantageous; and generally to exercise all
sch powers as may be necessary or con-
venient to the purposes or businesses of
this corporation, and to have, exercise and
enjoy all the rights, powers and privileges
incident to corporations for profit, organ-


ized and existing under and by virtue of
the laws of the State of Florida
Article Il.
The amount of authorized capital stock
of this corporation shall be Twenty Thous-
and Dollars ($20,000), divided into two
hundred shares of common stock of the
par value of One Hundred Dollars ($100)
each, ten per cent of which shall be sub-
scribed and paid in in cash before this cor-
poration shall be authorized to transact
any business. Said stock may be paid for
in legal money of the United States, or
in property, real or personal, labor, ser-
vices, or other thing of value, provide
that a just and reasonable sum shall be
allowed for any of the foregoing, said price
to be fixed by the incorporators or di-
rectors hereof, at a meeting called for that
purpose.
Article IV.
This corporation shall continue, and
have full power to exercise its corporate
franchise for a period of ninety-nine years
after the commencement of its existence.
Article V.
The business of this corporation shall
be conducted by the following officers: a
president, two vice-presidents, a secretary
and treasurer and a board of directors ot
not less than three nor more than nine in
number, and who shall be stockholders of
said corporation. The Board of Directors
shall be selected by the stockholders at
the annual 'stockholders' meeting to be
held in the city of Jacksonville, Florida,
at the place of business of the corporation
on the 15th day of July, 1904, and an-
nually thereafter on the first Tuesday in
January in each year. The president, vice-
presidents, secretary and treasurer shall
be elected by the board of directors, an
shall be directors. The offices of secretary
and treasurer may be filled by the same
person. Until the first annual meeting ot
stockholders, and until the officers as
above mentioned are elected and qualified
at the tirst election, the officers who shall
conduct the business of this corporation
shall be: Archibald Meldrum, president;
Robert Meldrum, first vice-president; M.
L. Meldrum, second vice-president; N. P.
Tutwiler, secretary and treasurer. The
stockholders shall meet in the city of
Jacksonville, Florida, on the 15th day of
July, 1904, at 10 o'clock a. m., for the pur-
pose of adopting by-laws, and completing
the organization of this corporation.
The by-laws shall provide for the calling
of special meetings of the stockholders and
directors and may give the directors pow-
er to employ other officers in their discre-
tion, and shall fix the duties and powers
of the officers of this corporation. Those
first adopted shall be adopted by the ma-
jority vote of all the capital stock then
subscribed, at the first annuals meeting,
and may be amended by the majority vote
of the stockholders at any regular or spec-
ial meeting. Each stockholder of this cor-
poration shall be entitled to one vote for
each share of stock, owned or held by him.
Article VL
The highest amount of indebtedness or
liability to which this corporation may at
any time subject itself, shall be Five Hun-
dred Thousand Dollars.
Article VIL
The names and residences of the incor-
porators, and the amount of capital stock
subscribed for by each, are as follows:
Archibald Meldrum, Jacksonville Flor-
ida, 50 shares; M. L. Meldrum, Jackson-
ville, Florida, 50 shares; T. S. Gray, Jack-
sonville, Florida, 1 share.

State of Florida, Duval County, ss.
I hereby certify that on this 24th day of
May, 1904, before me a notary public, in
and for the State of Florida at large, per-
sonally came Archibald Meldrum, M. L.
Meldrum and T. S. Gray, to me well
known as the persons described in and
who executed the foregoing instrument,
and acknowledged before me that they
executed the same as incorporators of
said The Meldrum Brothers Company, for
the purposes therein expressed.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set
my hand and affixed my official seal at
Jacksonville, said county and State, this
24th day of May, 1904.
RUSSELL E. COLCORD,
Notary Public State of Florida at Large.
My commission expires Feb. 19, 1905.
(Seal)
May 27-4t


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903,04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


Receipts
Spirits, casks ...........................
Rosins. bbls- ......... .. ..............
ToMtal .. .......... ..................
Exports
Spirits casks.......................... .
Rosins, bbls....... ...................
Foreign
Spirits, casks .-.-.--- -. . .
Rosis, bbs ...... .. .. .. ........ .. .. ..
New York
Spirits, casks....... .. .. .. .. ...........
Roias, bbls. .... ....... ................
Sundries
Spirits, casks...... .. ................
Rosi s, bbls. . . . . . . . . . . . . .


1908-04 '1902-03 1 1901-02


198,647
650,988
844,585

188,398
752,270

93,884
888,171


35,658
87,353

59,351
826.746


292 496
940,507
1,238,038

296,430
975,428

206,109
504,178

42,765
138,121

87,556
387,784


814,840
1,071,440
1,385,786

814,876
62,687

217,446
585,042

53,797
129,050

48,633
898,586


The receipts of spirits are less than 1902-03 by 98,849 casks, and of rosins, 289,569 ba se



Automobiles.
State Agents for the Famous


FORD

SLau ches Automobile and Launch
Launches Supplies.
Rep&iring a. Specialty.

Florida Automobile Co.
132-134 E. BAY ST.. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

H. ROBINSON Pre a. H.GAILLAD. Cashers
W B. OWEN. Vice-Pres.
Commercial Bankir Checks


State Depository.
BasNCHMs: Oeals. Fla.. Lake City. Fa
Jacksonville, - Florida


KIRK & JONES

DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


I~












THE CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barels hold and will pass the se-
verest American and European inspection.

Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, OUITMAN, GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address orders to home office,
QUITMAN, GA.


FOR THE


COMMIWREAY BIIE1S.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

ladistrial Record Go.,

THE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
Extracts the spirts without destroying the
wood fibre. Runs out a charge In l than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-five gallons from cord of wood
Makes pure water white spirits, free from
the odor of tar or creosote. No chemsicas
used in refining the spirits. Needs to be
distilled only once after coming from re-
tort.
No trouble with bi-products, the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
duced and from wood. Only one grade
of spirits produced and that the bIgtL
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGER FROM PIRI
Built of finest material by high-grade
workmen. The cheapest machine owfr to
the public.
We challenge comparison of output ad
quality of product. We guarantee output
and quality.
For full particulars, prices, samples
etc., adress
The Fn et C imctIa Clpamy
P. O. Box 4S, RALIGH . .


THE RECORD'S SPACE HAS A BIG MONEY VALUE.








THE WEEKLY INUIIUrlIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL IECOR.D.

JAMES A. HOLLOMON.
EdUMor sod MamaOe.
P~ibohed Evnr Frdary.
I m zrrown Do )..0 Perr Aannam
Ik*mmUlllOM f(orein) .... 13.0 "

-The Pme and Its PredMs.
A oemmureatlems oost be adnrem
Tle Induatrial Leord Company.
Jacksoevillo. I'l.
atmah EdearIal mad l uaine OfoieM at
Atlata.n Ga. Srannb. Ga.

Entered at the Postoffeie at Jacksonville,
Fla., as second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association,
September 12, 1919, as its exclusive official
organ. Adopted in annual convention
September 11, as the organ also of the
general Association.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the official
organ of the Interstate Cane Growers' As-
sociation. Adopted Sept. 11, 1903, as the
ohly official organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.

COPY FOR ADVERTISING.
Advertiing copy (changes or ew ad-
vertiemets) should rlech Tuesday
menaig to imure inertio i the iume of
thle mine Vee.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the main O-
sce of the Iadutrial Record Publis
Co. are located at No. i Seoth Hgan
Street, Jackamvile, Fla., in the very heart
of the great turpentine and yellow pine
industries
The Atlata, Ga, ofce is located in the
qsitable Building, o. 73. Atlanta is
the: center of the great mansfacturi
trade of the entire South.
The Savannah, Ga., ofce is in the Board
o Trade building Savanna i the lead-
ing open naval stores market in the world.

REGISTER YOUR STILL.
It is not generally known, but it is nev-
ertheless true, that every turpentine ope-
rator who does not register his still with
the U. S. Collector of Internal Revenue
of his district, is violating the United
States laws. This is an old regulation
and has not heretofore been rigidly en-
that hereafter it will be.
forced, but the signs of the times indicate
The collector of Internal Revenue for
this district is Joseph E. Lee, of Jackson-
ville, Fla. The collector for Georgia is
Rueker, of Atlanta, and for Alabama, is
Thompson, of Montgomery. We do not
know what their initials are, but a com-
munication addressed to the office of the
collector of Internal Revenue at either
place will reach the proper office.
An operator failing to register his still
is liable to a heavy fine and even imprison-
ment and we warn all operators to at-
tend to this matter without further delay
and if the Industrial Record can give any
further information it will cheerfully do
so upon application.
It might be added that a registration
costs nothing and is done only once so
long as the title to the still remains in
the same parties. If a change of owner-
ship or a change in location occur, new
registration papers must be taken out.


A WORD OF WARNING.
Mr. Editor: I have been watching the
trend of affairs, as relates to turpentine
for some time, and if there is anything
in the signs that are to be seen, it is
clear, at least to my mind, that there is
danger in the not very far distant future.
unless proper precautions are taken.
In the first place, operators are paying
too much for timber lands. Many thous-
ands of acres of lands have this yeal
changed lands, based on the high prices
being obtained for both timber and tur-
pentine. Aqd already the prices of lum-
ber have gone so low that many mills have
shut down. It is therefore seen that lots
of this same timber has depreciated, so
far as lumber is concerned.
While turpentine and rosins are bring-
ing good prices and I believe will hold
up for the present season, it is the rule
that it must go down with lumber and
other industrial products, unless proper ef-
fort is made to prevent such a course.
The high prices of turpentine prevail-
ing for a year or two has greatly stimu-
lated other countries to increase their out-
put, which goes into consumption and
fills a place that otherwise would be filled
by American turpentine. As an instance,
I note that France has greatly increased
her output. In 1901 she exported 19,864
casks, in 1902 she exported 22,053 casks.
and in 1903 she sent out to other countries,
43,195 casks-about doubling from 1902 to
1903. Russia and other countries have
made proportionate increases. Even the
"Old North State" has gone out into the
heads and hedges and increased her crop
of turpentine.
The question of substitutes is one to
be seriously considered. In no period of
world has there been such activity in the
search for substitutes for turpentine as
now.
For many purposes substitutes of re-
cent invention or discovery are now being
used with success. Every barre lof sub-
stitutes that is used lessens the demand
just that much for pure spirits. The time
is close at hand when the spirits from
light-wood knots will find a place as a
good substitute for spirits from the prod-
uct of the green tree. Science knows no
such word as fail It goes from theory to
experiments and from experiments to
practical success.
With the facts above mentioned staring
us in the face, shall we go madly on
without stopping to consider? Many have
bought lands-sorry lands, too-at such
high prices, and in many cases borrowed
large sums of money to pay for same with,
that the very thought of 30 to 40 cents
turpentine in the future brings the thought
of ruin to them. Labor conditions are
also such that no operator can succeed
unless he can obtain good prices for tur-
pentine. It is therefore clear that we
must not have low prices for the next
number of years. Where is the remedy?
What can be done before it is too late?
There is but one remedy: To cut down
and keep down the output. Let us stop
buying lands at high figures. Let us stop
making preparations to do more business.
Let us begin, right now, to shape our
affairs to make less turpentine in 190.5
than we will in 1904. Let us bend every
energy to use economy now, so that we
will not be compelled to do too much busi-
ness in order to meet our debts. Let nus
realize we can't get it all. Don't buy an-
other acre of timber. Lay your plans
so that you will not have to cut a box


next year. I ask that every operator
put-on his thinking cap right now. Don't
wait till it is too late. The same thing
applies to factors that applies to ope-
rators. They are not better than opera-
tors about this matter. Let operators
factors and distributors work in har-
mony for the common good. We must
have high prices and the only way to get
them is to keep production down.
H. A. M'EACHERN.


EDITOR EDMONDS' REPORT.
In next week's Record will be found
the editorial letter of Richard H. Edmonds,
of tlh, Manufacturers' Record, of Balti-
more. Mention was made at the time of
his visit and the purpose for which he
came, to-wit: to assist in formally inaug-
urating .Jacksonville's new Board of Trade
building.
Mr. Edmonds' letter marks a red letter
day in the annals of Jacksonville. The
ica'sioin for it occurs but seldom, but the
occasion was ripe for it and he has done
it ample justice.


UTILIZING MILL WASTE.
It will probably he a surprise to some
of our readers tolearn that chief among
the undeveloped resources of this section
should be numbnlred what is commonly
known as "mill waste"-the nameless odds
and ends left in the woods and around our
sawmills after the timber has been con-
verted into lumblnr, and the lumber ship-
ped from the State.
Aside from the new method of utiliz-
ing such waste products as "fat" pine
stumps, chips and butss" by distillation.
Northern ingenuity has devised ways and
means for working up much of this waste
into articles that have a distinct com-
mercial value, and to such an extent has
this process been carried that the New
York Commerical recently declared that-
"Machines for turning out checkers,
skewers, toothpicks and dice boxes are
ct:nmon in the same factory, and there is
economy in thus combining different ar-
ticles. The trimmings and waste from one
machine will often serve to supply ample
material for another."
There is scarcely a town in the entire
yellow pine belt of the South Atlantic
coast in which a profitable industry might
not be built up along this line. Cheap
furniture is also always in good demand,
and thousands of dollars are every year
sent out of the South for household fur-
nisliings that might readily be supplied at
holme.
As one of our up-to-date Georgia con-
temporaries puts it in discussing this sub-
ject:
"Hand-made toys used to'be imported
Irom Europe and millions of dollars of
,nol American money were annually sent
abroad for these wares. But now the
smart New England people produce from
waste lumber, in their woods, by machin-
ery. all the toys needed at home. Of
course. our lunlller men know their own
business. but these are timely hints how
mnn make money out of what they prob-
hably throw away and let rot on the
-round."
In much of this work special machin-
ery would be required for the profitable
-production of these goods, but to suppose
for a moment that the South will ever
be found lacking in this direction is to
Sunderrate the native intelligence of our
people.


The Florida Deleati.
The Florida delegation to the nation
Democratic convention at St. Louis July
6;. have selected the Southern Railway, via
Atlanta, Chattanooga and Louisville, as
the official route to St. Louis, aceorugda-
tions having been engaged through Chal.
W. .1. Hillman, vice-president of the Tur-
p ntine operators Association. A special
Pullman sleeping car has been provided to
Le handled on the naval story special
train of Pullman sleeping and club ears,
which will leave Jacksonville over the
Southern Railway June 30, at 8:30 p. i.
Captain Hillman, who is a member of this
d legation, and whom it is understood will
le made chairman, is one of the most
prominent turpentine operators in Florid.
The delegation will be located at the
St. Nichclas Hotel at St. Louis, where
ilorida headquarters will be established
July 2.
National Committeeman Jefferson B.
Browne, and other prominent Democrats
of Florida have also made reservations on
the naval stores special, by arrangements
with the Turpentine Operators' Associa-
tion.
The turpentine operators generally are
delighted at the magnificent train service
arranged by the association. President A.
I). (ovington, of Bristol, Fla., is now in
Jacksonville, conferring with Secretary J.
A. lHollomon relative to this movement of
naval stores people, and no pains will be
spared to make this trip a most delightful
one.

The Cotton Output.
We have received the final report of
the census bureau upon the production of
cotton for the past year, which bears the
following information:
Number of commercial bales, including
linters, 10399.558, against 11,275,106 for
1902.
The following table distributes the crop
exclusive of linters in the United States:
In the United States, 1,205,073 commer-
cial bales; 9,359,472 square bales; 770.708
round bales; 75,393 Sea Island bales.
The total crop reduced to a common
I:sis as to size of bales is an equivalent
of 9,851, 129 500-pound bales, as against
10.630,.45 500-pounud bales in 1902.
The number of bales, counting round as
half bales, including linters, was 10,014,-
454 against 10,784,473.
The square bales, upland crop, reported
from ginners, which aggregated 9,380,372,
shows a decrease of 633,193 from 190.
The round bales, upland crop, reported
from ginneries, were 770,208, a decrease of
211,056; the bales of Sea Island cotton re-
ported from ginneries were 75,393, a de-
crease of 29,560; and the bales of linters
reported from cottonseed oils are 194,48,
a decrease of 1,738
These statistics were collected through
a canvass of the individual ginneries of
cotton States by 631 local special agent
who found that 30,218 ginneries had been
operated for the crop of 1903, compared
with 30.948 for 1902.
The effect of this official announcement
was to cause a sudden rise of from 30 to
40 points at one juAp. This has aceom-
pl:shed a rreat deal towards counteract-
ing the effect of the Sully failure, for be-
fore the corner was broken it was a hard
matter for the producer to determine just
what cotton was worth, and just how
much was due to the operations of the
Bulls; but with the break in the cornr,
the consequent drop and the subsequent
rise after the publishing of the Govrn-
nient report, he can he assured that cotton
is bringing a price that is justified by con-
ditions, and in planting may conduct him-
self accordingly.


IF YOU AlR PROGRESSIVE, ADVERTISE IN THE RECORD.






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 12


NO. *. e s

ITHE ITLIITIC HIIUL BlK OF JA1MILLE I
CAPITAL PAID IN. $350,000.00.
OPEN FOR BUSINESS AUOUST 1903.
OFFICERS:
endwr W. Lae, Presidet. Fred W. Hoyt, Vice-Pr.ski t. 0
Thomas P. Denrm, Cashier.


In the Busy City of Atlanta
Atlanta Office, Record, Yet with all these industries there is
Atlanta, Ga., June 2, 1904. an opening here now for an industry that
The more one sees of this city, the would pay from the start off. Atlanta
larger it seems to be. And there is al- is a great shipper of bottled beers, ales,
ways "something doing." Last Friday the etc., packed in barrels, and there is not a
Hardware Manufacturers and Jobbers ad- Uarrel factory here. A cooper understand-
journed after having re-elected their old ing how to make this kind of a barrel
officers and having had a splendid time. could start with standing orders of 300
This week the State Convention and the daily. Perhaps this may prove an open-
Musical Festival took the center of the ing for a Record reader.
stage, both interesting but in widely dif- Activity in building here is strong. The
ferent ways. The first showed how much Fourth National Bank building, seventeen
excitement can be worked up on a pretty stories high, will not be finished for some
sure thing and the second that Atlanta time, but all the space is already rented.
has a sufficient number of musical peo- Of course this city has a few minor
ple to give festivals that would not be faults. Since it was nick-named the New
unworthy of Cincinnati or Boston. York of the South, it has tried to live up
Next week the wholesale grocers are to the title by keeping the streets as
going to capture the town, and so it goes. much torn up as possible; on the same
To realize the importance of Atlanta as principle, it is to be presumed, as the
a trade center one has to remember that Boston Anglo-maniac who turns up his
she boasts of over 400 manufacturing pants when the cable reports that it is
plants, employing 16,000 work people, and raining in London. There is one little
all apparently as busy as may be; add to matter that those in authority aeem to
that her jobbing interests and one has have entirely overlooked-and that is
a trade that is not equalled in proportion making street crossings. But then some
to population by any city in America. fellows would kick if they were in heav-
No wonder she is growing and it costs en, and if they did not have corns, who
$3 a week to sleep in a bathroom. would care about a level street crossing?
- --CCO4^ 4tgSt(* The tarheels all originally came from
I s r- Do m" .iI North Carolina. All the North Carolina
troops were known in the Civil War as
P-0-0 00 w i @@ @ M 99@*VV1 91 "tar heels" and it was said that they wore
The Moultrie Cooperage Company, of tar on their heels during battles. Be that
Moultrie, Ga., burned out some time since, as it may, they always "stuck," and were


has rebuilt and resumed work.

A dispatch from Washington advises
that the Clyatt peonage case in the Su-
preme Court has been advanced and set
down for argument on the first Monday in
December next.
All aboard for the special naval stores
train that is to take the operators and
families to St. Louis, leaving here June
30th, inst. Mr. Hollomon has been to St.
Louis and made arrangements to have the
party stop at the Hamilton Hotel, a few
blocks away from where the Democratic
Convention will be held.


never whipped. Even now Wilmington
sells more tar than any other port in the
world.
For the eight months ending last Fri-
lay, there were exported from this coun-
try to the Phillippine Islands, 96 barrels
of rosin, worth $322; 35 barrels tar, worth
$94; 186 barrels pitch worth $364; and
23,050 gallons spirits turpentine, worth
$14,360.
During the same time there were ship-
p d to Porto Rico 150 arrel rosin worth
$439, 124 arrels tar worth $167, 108 barrels
pitch worth $222, and 7,397 gallons spirits
turpentine worth $4,104.


Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.


CYPRSS TANKS, TUBS,

AND VATS


Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
*. M1. DA.VIS r& SION, PALATKA, rLA.

Send your order for general printing to the Record


The West-Raley-RannIe Company,
114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksoaville, PIa.
4. N. WEST, Pres. e. e. West. Vice-Pres. wW. R. Ile Vlce-Pres.C . i. R5. e. S a Trers.

We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotatione-
thispaper.
KINOAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Flavin T. Christie, Frank C Groover, Marsnl W. Sewart,
President. Vie-Pres. S. aad Tra.


THE GHRIS IR-OOR DUG 0.


/T1t0'0- OlN10 U ls


Jacksonwille,


0 0 H i


It iMCH IN In [a 1i Too C8inli OWN.

lrIMWoff SOeil. iRm 9ed. Ilea ITIlrI


C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpentine und Sawmill Men's Requirementa
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516- 518-520-522-524- 526 EAST BAY Si KLLI
Jaecksonville, Fla.


BUY BED ROOM FURNITURE NOW
Sand take advantage of our
SPECIAL PRICE SALE
It is for you. You will never regret it.
k May you live long to remember It.


Largest swleti. L st prices.
Best Goods. Freigt paid.
Send for Blue Prints to-day and mention the
Industrial Record.

rand Rapids Fritmre Co iy,
16 W. BAY ST. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


*AR, iU=DZpn~mDz AND PROGWRSSVJVL








14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


S. P. HOLMES & CO.'S WLEKLY COT- last year added a depressing factor, butl
TON LKTT LR. prices appear to have reached a level,
where resistance is being offered to selling
New York, June .--This time a week pressure. This is the European buying of
ago a considerable portion of the cotton listant months, particularly October cot-
belt was suffering from drouth oi several ton on a basis of 10 1-2 cents and below
weeks duration and the outlook was far and is now a decided factor in the mating
from encouraging. .;horts covered freely, of prices. The feature of the week had
knowing that without rains this week been the extensive decline in July Lotton,
there would be an exciting market. When but this has not attracted general at-
operators came down after the three tention fro commission houses in that
days' holiday on Tuesday, they learned customers have been asked to avoid that
that showers had fallen where needed and option as much as possible in their ope-
similar conditions have existed nearly rations.
every day this week. The actual record Selling has been on an extensive scale
of rainfall will not be available until early and liquidation bear pressure and we.-c.ll
next week, but every indication furnished hammering have proved more reckless
by the weather map would lead to the 'han anything seen in the market since
belief that many counties without r*ois- the January inflation in the other direc-
ture have been relieved and that 'he out- tion. During the January craze it seemed
look generally has been improved. As he .is though cotton never would stop ..iing
market is now controlled by weather con- up, but there came a day of reckoning
editions, for the rains proved to be all that none the less. In the same way, cotton
was necessary to bring about an extensive ,ow nsems to have no value and 50 or 75
decline in prices. New crop options work- pointss are taken from quotations without
ed as low as 10:25 cents, losing about much dilliculty. But cotton at the pres-
half cent in the four days' trading. To- rnt time is worth all that it is selling for
day the report of the financial Chronicle and it is more than likely that an awaken-
that cotton acreage had been increase.- :ng to this fact will bring about a sharp
this year over 11 1-2 per cent and t-iat rally in prices. Everything now depends
the general start of the crop is better than ,n the new crop. It is odd that the June


report due tomorrow will show a liberal I fire-proof, steel building with every hotel
increase in acreage and a condition above! convenience, including excellent eafe adl
78 and below 83. The average option on buffet service. It is convenient to &e
the Floor is that while the figures might Fair grounds and on direct ear connection
possibly be in the seventies, the condition with all parts of the city.
is not far from 80. The decline in prices Rooms have been provided for the entire
han been so extensive that it would be ex- party, with only two to room with bath
tremel yunwie to remain short of new attached, and the arrangements. assure a
crop options at this level. eamfortabhl and pleasant stav. The naval


ST. LOUIS ACCOMMODATIONS.

Naval Stores Party Will Have Every Com-
fort Ther.
The Turpentine Operators' Association
has arranged with the Hamilton Hotel
management in St. Louis for accommoda-
tions there during the week of July 2-9,
when the operators will be taking in the
World's Fair and the National Democratic
Convention. The Hamilton is a modern.








I


stores people will be met at the central
depot with electric talleyhoes. The hotel
management will also give the party an
afternoon at the Delmar Park races, with
the compliments of the house. Accom-
panying this is a cut of the Hamilton
Hotel, where the party will be located.



Sam'I P. Holmes &Co.



Stocks, Bends Cotten.
Grain and Previseon


NEW YORK GOTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD Of TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Bell Phone 853 Baldwla Blck


SPim rs Of TURPENTIU4.


To United Kingdom, in gallons:
Mouth ism-04 1941-
April.. .... ... UIM 1U.12c
May .... .. .... 112 3222
Juo ...... .. IW7 1.4,.1 1
July ... .. .. 1. 2t.M64
August.. .. .....6SM1 1,7W74
September.. .. 7T,211 6
October .. ....... 711.404 41,1
November .. 061,8 1,295,76
December .. r,65,656 1,631,779
January. .. 228,80 373,240


1M1-4U






922,991
576,784
164,330


To Belglum and Netherlands. in gallons:
Month 1 U-0 1M-4 1U01-f4
April .... .. .. 3 12 90.447 Included
May .. .. .. ..M,76 61iin all other
June.. .... ..... n7. 26s210 Europe
July ...... .. .5616 819.217 81.3I5
August.. ....... 466MT .4M6
September...... 2.46 IS01 438.61
October.... .. M.4 210.011 121.48
November .. 133, 349,726 381,226
December .. 100,372 680 672,164
January .... 168,879 241,150 174,367

To Germany, in gallons:
Month 191-04 191-4 I14-04
April ... ......... U114,I4 112
May .. .. ... 0 6U .416 213, 6
June..... .. .. I..16 U3.6 40.042
>uly .. .... .. .. .11 11M412 78,77
Augst .. .. .. ..1.U 6,4
Septieber.. .. 113. 51101 71.67
October .... .. 10fJi 1.844 14L-7
November .. 9,010 110,153 81,780
December ..
January .... 1200 6407 163,89S

To all other Europe In gallons:
Month 1-344 1 t u-0 1 I1-2
April........ .. 5S1 .47116 0.06
May.. .. .. .... .M 66 1.017 574. 11
Juneo....... 1423 1.0 16.1466
July .... ..L..... 124.4 4.46-.
Au~gu .. ...... 2.106 W
September.. 4. 4.MI 38.01. 21.00
elctobr ..... 1. 4.3 17.>1
November 32,500 17,800 94,837
Deember .. 47,306 89,591 23,000
January ... 11,000 -

Total orleln Exports. in gallons, includ-
Ing everything outside of the United


states:
Month 190-44t 1Me-03
April .. .. .. .. 514.06 X55.815
S.. .. .. .. 18.782 2.144
S.. .. ... 1. .O 22
; .... ... 2.181. 1.61.015
Augst ...... 1.7T.L 23M.458
September... .1.474.146 .164.6
October .. .. .. 141.2 I 1.4 T1
November .. 1,851.068 1,32183 1
December .. IJ3.S9 1,794i30 1
January ... 700,292 82053


101 _1".

.47.351

2.21LW~

,652,574
.R59.175
629,99


RIOSINS.
To United Kingdom. barrels 210 l-:
Month 1B03-0 19-46 1 41-6
April .... .... 79,= 6SS 46
May .... .... 0.51 4,2 61,M
June ........ 60,748 67,42 61,W2
luly .... .... .2948 0.25 5I510
August ...... 74,.6 4 .1u
September.. ... ,471 4,2M1 743
October ...... 46,641 446M 6.7
November .. 71,107 95,735 88643
December .. 61,455 64,4556 72,0
January ... 53,506 42,700 0,518

Tn BRelrlum and Nedtherlnd harrmls S1


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE
Apr 1 Apr. 3 Apr.19 Apr.17 Apr. M May 1 May 8 May 15 May 2 May
ND ND 1 0 46 1-3 414-3 4-2 a
Jun 5 June June Jne Je X July 2 July 10 July 17 July 2 July 1 Aug. 6
48-4 46 47 47 6T 473-4 48 g s 40
Aug. 14 Aug. 2 Aug. X Sept. 4 Sept. 1 Sept U Sept. 5 Oct 2 Oct 8 Oct. 1
aa =% 6 % 643 -4 57 ND 6 57 1-35 1-0 1-4
Oct. 2. Oct. 26 Nov. 6, Nov. 1% Nov. .Dec. 3, Dec. 10, Dec. 17. Dec. 3I, Jan. 1
U 1-2 6 1 66 56C 56 6 1-4 M 1-4 4 1-2-64
Jan. 22, Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18,Feby. 25 Mch. 3 Meh. 10 Mek 24
66 5 i. 64 E0 60 59 60 58
Mch. 30
67
RIOSINS


pounds: WW WO N M K
Month 190304 19-B IM1-1 .April 1 .........10 .L S.50 0 .40 2S.2
April .... .. .. 16,7 653, Included April 3 ........ L.1 &3. t.429 U
May ...... .... 23.1 1SlU1in all otn April 1 . . 3M L46 .5 3 L.O
June .... .. .. Ms66 53,3 Europe April 17 . . AM 3.5 L. .16 t .
July ...... .. ,SSi I.C647 4 i. April 4. .. .46 2.5 2 16 .W1
August .. 48,5 47,2B May 1. . ... .5 .5 &165 Li. L1.
September... 45. 63 1081U 34.T3 May 8. . ... .L3 L6 .1S &
October .... .. 37.131 44, 2 01S May 5 . . .&% ZPl L171% .124% 1.%
November .. 3,991 60,020 31,604 May .. .... 1N 2L .5 20 .1LU
December 37,077 13,32 20,940 May 2. . . .6 L. L 5 3.0 3.W
January.... 60,739 24,192 15,1 June 5 ..... L. 1 2a0* 2L 1.6
Jun .... 12 . . . 2.1 .6 2.5
To Germany, barrels 2S lbs. Jun .. .. L L.19 1 6 .M 5
Month 1A 12M3- 1M14- June 2 . ... 2 8.19 &13 .6 2. 3.
2DecembeM 1. 1840 1901-0k July S . . S. *U0 0 M Los LIS

Way &I'mp July itb. . . I.S L10 LN L" LM
April .. ...... .65i,8 34 July .......3 .1 t 0 2 2.1
May .. ...... 28 July 1. ........L 310 L. 1 L.
June ........ 41,664 4, 61 4 O1 t Juy a .......6 2.1 2. L 0
July ...... .. 10.216 34.574 .1 July ... .. .. .4 3 .19 e i .
August .. .. .. 73, 4 s4.e July 31 .. .. ... .0 31. 2 .5
September.. .. 10.,157 1.48 18 August T . .4 2.c 0 .6 2. 1. 8
October .. .. .. 82.3,56 5.4 6, August 14 .. . u.1 L6 .16
November 56,763 42,841 23,73 ANlaust n . 3.50 L .0 L2 L6 2.2
December.. 15,407 39,171 ,482 August .....2 .50 2. 2.u
January .... 34,62 54,052 99,279 Septe~ 2er 1 .1 S .W S. 1 .46
september 1 .LS OS6 1&. 1. 1.4
o E roe deptember 13.. 2.6 3. 215 L 1O 346
To all other Europe. barrels I l;: Septembr a.. .. 4. 4.10 LS L6 6 S3.
Month 1U-64M 1U-4 1U01-C October I. .. .7 4.4 4.* 4.5 4J. 4.16
April ...... .. 1 .841 M.14 S71 October .. ....4.7 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.10
May .. .... .. .2 40.72 M0.116 tober .5 ..... 4.46 .0 4.20 4.0 L
June.. ...... 14.044 *.Qt .3-. October 0 ......34.C2 L M LI 1.1S
July .... .... 45,511 51.612 14.10, October .. .. .... 4.3 S & L0 t&.0
August .... 8 .. I,11.8 November 6 ...... 3.0 2.30 .10 .LO 2.
September.. 27,4 17.23 156.M November 1 1 ...... 3.50 &5 &3.1 3.30 .80
October .... .. 34.4.0 91,4 11U November .. .... .L IS.3 L2 O L.M
November .. 13,328 6,415 25,014 November .... 3S .Z 2S.10 2S 2.S
December 25,299 48,701 39,816 Iecember .... .2 .X 2.6 2.1 2.
January... 17,124 7,148 2429 December 17.... 2. 2 10 2 280
December 10 ... 2. 5 6 23 2. 19
December 3 ....L5 3.2 i 1 2.t I IS
Total Exports of Rosin, barrels 30 pounds January 14 ..4.00 3.60 &3.5 .15 &96
Including Asia. Africa and America out- January .....4.M 4.1 1M &.156
side of the United States: January I .....410 4.10 L 3..6 3.25i
Month iU2- 132-46 1301-t February 11 ..3.75 3.45 3V6 330 325
April ..... ...... 1 1 .12i Mil February 18 ...3.65 3.46 35 330 325
May ....O.... .822 2.144 W February 25 ...3.70 3.50 3.35 320 3.25
June .. .. .. .. 173.2D 210.0W 211,m
July ........ 30.580 18.114 1LUlt March 10 ......3.80 3.G0 3.40 3.35 3.30
August .. ..... 23.15 22,sZ March 24 ......4.00 3.70 3.50 3.35 330
September.... X33S,80 .021 SS.4 March 31 ......4.10 380 3.00 335 3.30
October ...... X0.3 z15.T ini
November 1.. 84,860 231,543 222,479
December 210,457 202.056 191,440
January ... 192,471 170,96 247,084 FIr PrU pl eliverj S d Us 1

THE RECORD CIRCULATS ALL OVEt T5H WORLD.


I H G F
21 2.40 226 3.10
26 240 2.20 2.1
2.6 2.4 2.10 216
2.5 2.40 .6 2.1
2.8L 2.6 2.0 2.1
2.5 2. L86 LW
2L 25 .80 1.75
287% 2.27% L0 L75
20 2 6 1.7 L.7
L26 2.40 L8 1.80
3.0 2.0 L. L86
218 2.0 1L.0 1.58
270 L2. L76 L70
2.6 2L 1.7 L6

2.6 2.526 .1 15
2.6 2.5 L1. L76

2.5 2.0 L& L.20
275 2.3 1.5 1.D
2.7S L36 2.L5 1
2.7 2.0 L.7 1.65

2.0 230 2.56 12.
2.80 230 156 .L7
2.90 2.0 2.10 13

3.0 2.50 2.1 2.06
3.35 2.6 2.30 230

3.50 2.70 2.66 2.0
3.25 270 2.56 2.50
205 2.1 246 2.4
2.70 2.0 2.5 256
2.70 2 2.56 2.50
2.70 2.56 2.30 2.
.70 2.45 2. 2.3
266 2.40 2.30 2.20
2.56 2.5 2.30 2.20
2.56 2.36 2.26 2.20
2.56 2.36 2.30 2.20
2.66 2.40 2.30 2.5
3.00 2.96 2.70 2.70
2.10 26 2.706 2.16
3.26 .15 2.10 2.5
3.20 2.85 2.85 2.80
3.05 2.70 2.70 2.65
2.95 3.60 2.55 2.50
3.05 2.75 2.70 2.65
2.95 270 2.65 2.60
2.95 2.70 2.65 2.60


C-A
L2.6i
&*
2.L
L1
1.t
1.5

1.70
L70
1.t
LW
L
L70
LI

LW
La

1.S
1.6
1.5

LU
L7
1.6

L76
LW
1.1
LW
LU


2.1
LU
2L5
2.5
.1
2.6
2.1
2.10
2.5
zLi


2.5
2.50
2.46
2.5
2.70
2.S
2.40
2.55
2.50
2.50


four Commissary Check Ornrs.


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.


_ ____ ~_ _____








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will send by express, prepaid, the following:
Pour fun quarts Lincoln County. Sunnybrook Rye or Big Horn Rye .. $S.C
Single Bottles ............* ............................. U
I will send four full quarts of homers' Corn, Melwood Rye olden Wed-
ding Rye, Holland Gin, Tom Gin, Peach Brandy, Peach and Honey
Whiskey, Gin and Manhattan Cocktalls-any of the above for........ .Pt
One bottle of any of the above .......... ........... ....................... $1 00
Four bottles of the following California Wine: Sherry. Port. Musat,
Catawba ...... ....................................................
ingle bottles .............. ........................................
Single bottles ................................... ................................
Pour-bottles Wilson Whiskey. cased. .......... U
Single bottles ............................. .....................
Five bottles Duffy's Malt .................................................... U
Bulk goods of all kinds. peclal Prices on application. All kinds of
liquors In us from "LBB to .5 f. o. b. Jacksonvflle.


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE a RETAIL

HARDWARE
Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints, Oils and Glass.
Stoves, Tinware, Country- Holloware.


10 WEST BAY STREET


Jacksonville, Fla.


F. BETTELINI W Bay St., opp.


A "Low Down" Newpaper.
The Coachella valley lies in a depression
ty, Cal., is famous not alone for the finest
early canteloupes, grapes, sweet potatoes,
watermelons string beans, peas, aspara-
gus, etc., but to having a very unique
newspaper. This publication is called
the Submarine, because it is printed 76
feet below the level of the sea. It is
printed on paper of an ocean blue color
specially made under the heading, "Along
the Coral Strand." The editorials find
their place under the general title "The
Uhdertow." A department for women
comes under the heading "With the Mer-
maids," and there is a column of quaintly
humorous matter supposititiously edited
by that "McGinty," fabled in song and
story, who fell "to the bottom of the sea,
dressed in his best suit of clothes."
The Coachella valley lies ina depression
below the sea level. From this fact the
Submarine has achieved world-wide im-
portance as the "most low-down newspa-
per on earth." Its editor says: "Countries
below sea level are not as numerous as
grapes upon the vines. They are interest-
ing wherever you find them. Ours is the
most interesting of all."
The Submarine is issued weekly at Coa-
ehella, Cal, by Ralph Freeman, manager
of the Submarine Land Bureau, and owner
of the Submarine Ranch of 320 acres, who
has the material on the ground for a large
adobe building, the increase in business
necessitating larger and better quarters.

Help To Keep Well
Lettuce and celery help nervous people.
Vist your dentist every six months.
Eat tomatoes, which are good for the
liver.
All varieties of the onion tribe help di-
gestion.
Don't worry unless you enjoy worrying.
Rest for half an hour, anyway, in the
middle of the day.
Spend at least an hour outdoors ever)
day-more if possible.
Never drink water which has stood in
a sleeping room all night.
Eat always less than satisfies you to
repltion. Drink two quarts of water a
day- eight glasses.
Don't have a light in your room at
night of any kind. It takes up the oxy-
gen of the air and is irritating to the
eyes.
The paper handkerchief is suggested by
a hospital magazine as more sanitary iu
some kinds of contagious diseases than
the linen one. It can be destroyed at once.
Air out your house thoroughly twice a
day-early in the morning and before you
go to bed. Then sleep with a current of
air through the room. Pile on the bedding
if you need it.
These few rules, observed faithfully, will
make you healthy, wealthy and wise-for
is not a healthy man rich?-and his health
is a sign of his wisdom. Try these for
the first half of 1904, and you will need
no other New Year's resolutions.-Can-
adian Thresherman.
CYPRESS WATER TANKS
S Best in the Worid.
For delivered prices write,
Cneyp Task C, MN te...UA


Union Depot Jacksonville, Fla


This Space Reserved for


Gus Muller & Co.

Whelese!e


Liquor Merchants

Proprietors


Jacks0o1ille Bottlil Works

...Agents...


ACME BEER

I



J. E. GORNTO & CO.
Shipping Trade
a Specialty...
O $3 Grim MI mr, Eprm OaMh

WHISKIES

FROM $1.50 TO $6 A GALLON
Sole Agent
Old Saratoa Rye, $6 Gal.
Old ker Rye, $6 Gal
Old Westorelatd Rye, $4 Gal
Big Hom Rye, $3 Gal.
J. E. GORNTO & CO..


Valdosta,


Georgia


N D BAK. Pr C WV BART ISON. Viem-Pr. BA & BAKER P. EB
(aker & Hohs Co) (C. W. Brdson Co.) Gneral Cound. Sec. & Tr

FLORIDA FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY
(INOPORATED.)
We can collect yoer Freight Claims against
Rallroads and Steamship Companies.
Charges Reasonable. Yoar Membership Solicited.
We save you all worry and trouble. Endorsed by an PMraltc Bdiles
In tbe City ald Transportatto Compasies.
216 Dyal-Upchurch Bldg JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


W. T. RILEY,
President.


J. A. 6. CARSON,
VIce-President.


GEo. J. 5COVEL.
Sec. lran Teres.


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.

MANUFACTURERS OF


BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS

Machine and Hand Fectories,

8th Street R. R. Crossing.

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

*~+* .-:--:-:---B.: .., :.c -'. "***--"-'* 0@** *-0* ** *** **t* *0*
You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
: You Want any Kind of Florida Land?
You Mean Business?
SCall on or Write to
: J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS.
Ocala. Florida
***o@@* tt0t4649~b99*~M9tfO 44ee&O* -'*99teett


Geo. T.Gifford Iron Works Co.
Founders and Machinists.
Special attention to Saw Mill and Turpentine Work.
Tifton, Georgia.


THE COVINGTON COMPANY,

1w-s SHOES* AND DRY GOODS. ""35 to 61 Wt F,-
Jackrsonville, Fla.
NEW YORK: 256 Church St.

We Sell Merchants Only.
~ ~ b M_ .hL AhL Ah- AIL -lk 'Il _ _____


IFEAD To


---


A U.
A A A A A


V V


v r -,vv v v v











16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SDi t Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Buyers Directory Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
HARNESS.


Them advertisers are in this issue. If
you want anything, look through this
clamsifed let and write to the irm ap-
pearing therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.

AUTOMOBILES.
Florida Automobile Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gilbert, Fred E., Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Central National Bank, Ocala, Fla.
Mercantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICL
Foster, Geo. R., Jr., Jacksonville, Fla
Southern Fuel & Supply Co, The, Jackson.
vil Fla.
CARS
South Atlantic Car & Manufacturing Co.,
Waycross Ga.
CATTLE.
Palmetto Park Farm, Ocala, Fa.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
Pinkussohn Cigar Co., J. S., Jacksonville,
Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furehgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Larendon, M. W, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
COOPERAGE.
Cannon Co., The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
Conover Drug Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS--WHOLESALE.
Christie-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. S., Macon, Ga.
gusta, Ga.
FOUNDRIES
Gifford Iron Works, Geo. T., Tifton, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
FWL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fa.
FURNITURE.
Grand Rapids Furniture Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
GENTS' FURNISHgRS
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co., Savannah, Ga.
Hargraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Johnson Co., W. B., Jacksonville, Fla.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
White, Walton & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furehgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
HARDWARE.
Bond & BooUr Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
riggs Hardware Co., W. H.,Valdosta, Ga.
topher, John G., Jacksonville, Fa.
ri Hardware OC, Ocala, Fpg.


McMurray & Bakr, Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fla.
HATS
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co.. H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS.
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hamilton, The, White Springs, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
Kendrick House, The, White Springs, Fla.
New Victoria Hotel. Jacksonville, Fla.
New Paxton. The, White Springs, Fla.
Oaks. The. White Springs, Fla.
Pritchard House, The, White Springs, Fla.
Zahm's European Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Gifford Iron Works, Geo. T., Tifton, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons (o., J. S., Macon, Ga.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
Riles, R. J., Jacksonville, Fla.
LAUNCHES.
Florida Automobile Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bettelini, F., Jacksonville, Fla.
Blum & Co.. Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Bowen & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gornto & Co., J. E., Valdosta, Ga.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
MACHINE WORKS.
(iffo--d Iron Works. Geo. T., Tifton, Ga.
Loml.ard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Murphy, T., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker. M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
MULES AND HORSES.
Dillon & Penuel, Marianna. Fla.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Ila.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barnes-Jessup Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson
ville, Fla.
Ellis-Young Co., The, Savannah, Ga.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
PECANS.
(Iriffiing Bros. Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Briggs Hardware Co., W. H., Valdosta, Ga.
,'ampbell, .1. R., Ocala, Fla.
'hristpher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
rampa Hardware Co.. Tampa. Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
Christopher. John G.. Jacksonville, Fla.
gilbert, Fred E.. Jacksonville, Fla.
IMrrill-Stevens ('o., Jack-onville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons (o., .1. .. Macon, Ga.
White-Biakeslee Mfg. Co., Birminghanm,
Ala.
PAINTS.
Raird & Co., 1. E., Jacksonville, Fla.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
RAILS.
Joseph Iron Co., Isaac, Cincinnati, 0.


REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tampa,
Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Buckman, C., Jacksonville, Fla.
Frazier, W. W.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Ocala, Fla.
Southern States Land and Timber Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
West-Raley-Rannie Co., The, Jacksonville,
Fla.
ROOFING TIN.
American Tin Plate Co., New York City.
SHIP YARDS.
Cunmmer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co.. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
STATIONERY.
Cochrane's Book Store, Palatka, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville ,la.
Jacksonville Brokerage Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
TAILORS.
Ciancaglini & Bro., John B., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A.. Jacksonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cypress Tank Co., Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
National Transportation & Termihal Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
TOOLS.
Christopher, John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Council Tool Co., The. Wananish, N. C.
TURPENTINE PROCESS.
Pine Product Construction Co., The, Fay-
etteville, N. C.


Pine Belt Construction Co., The, Raleig,
N. C.
Standard Turpentine Co., The, New York
City.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
Baker. M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros, Savannah, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
Davis & Son., G. M., Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
TYPEWRITERS.
CGr;'ot Typewriter Exchange, Jacksonville,
Pla.
UNDERTAKERS
Clark. Chas. A., Inc., Jacksonville, Fla.
VEHICLES.
MeMurray & Baker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas, W. R., Gainesville, Fla.
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
Riles, R. J., Jacksonville, Fla.
YELLOW PINE LUNMBE.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fla.





o. R. FOS R. .
MANUFACTURER OF



BRICK.


RITE FIR PIE.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Mouth.

'PIS UW.


1I -1-- 1 -1 1 f4-t 1 1 -1 1 1 11 f- t I r I- 1 -1 1 +? I -- 1 -1- f 1 I 1 1 f I- I 1 -1 t I I I I I I I I I


. J. P. WILLIAm. President.
ST. A. Jnsos, and Vice-President.
SH. L. KAYLOn, Secretary.


J. A. G. CARsoN, Ist Vice-President
J. F. DusnBTN Y,3d Vice-President.
D. G. White, Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

I111 I I TTII I FWCIONS I WH IOLESILE 1OE S.
SMain Office SAVAnNXH, GEORGIA.
branh Offices. I, ACOLA. PLX. e Branch Grocery Houne,
S Brane ore:. JACKONVIL C. .FLA. COL..MBU.U,GA.

SNaval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Us.
t 1111 II I Itltl i 111it 11 l- 11 111 :11 111 1 1i1i lil f i t i

This CR Represects the Fames

"Blakeslee" Gasoline Pump Rig
For
Irrigation, Task Supply and Drainage Service.
ecB


No. 1 Outfit has a capacity of 45,0n" gallons in 24 hours.
No. 2 Outfit has a capacity of II ,00t gallons in 24 hours.
Write teoay tor prices to-
WHITE-BLAKESLEE MANUFACTURING CO.
BIrmIE. ss Af.





THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17
--------- -------------------------------------- -----------


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade
Western White Oak Spirit Barrels

Capital $100,000.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.

OFFICERS:
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


DIRECTORS:
JOHN E. HARRIS, C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST,
W. C. POWELL, W. F. COACHMAN.


a - - - - ------ ----- - -%%W - -- - -- - - % --A AA



Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are

McMILLAN BROTHERS'
Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS,


SAVANNAH, GA.
MOBILE, ALA.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.


ONa OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PAPKZR


W. I. KELLY








18


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY

Waycross, Ga.
-MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located in the heas t of the Lumber District gives us advan-
tage of choicest material at lowest cost.


QUALITY PIRST-





Ac 9
r5 -



CARRABELLE BOOMING.

Friend of the Record Writes from that
Prosperous City.
Editor Industrial Record:
From what I can gather, your excellent
journal is "boosting" tle Land of F!(voers
in an able manner, but as yet I read
nothing of the greater and future Carra-
belle. Lately a new life has been "blown
into" the old sleepy town. J. P. Wil-
liams, the owner of the Georgia Pine
has bought the C. T. & G. R. R. and has
recently told this people that he was here
strictly for business and that we must
have deep water (which some people don't
seem to want), all of which when spread
out and carried into effect means a great
big volume.
Then Capt. Hayes, big lumber company,
with headquarters in Atlanta, has bought
the Roaring Branch saw mill, with a ca-
pacity of 65,000 per day and are now
busily engaged in building tramways, fell-
ing timber and in many other ways mak.
ing ready to do a land-office business.
We have five fish buyers and Ed Moore


-- ----' -- -------- 11 MAGAZINE "DIXIE" IS SOLD. Formerly it was claimed that the bleed-
-PRlICESERICHT. ing of pine trees for turpentine impaired
SJacksonville Men Purchase Well Known loth the durability and strength of the
Stimllsir, and in the specifications of many
Industrial Journal. architects and large consumers, such as
Mr. Benjamin F. Ulmer, who has for railway companies, bled timber was ex-
S some time been in charge of the lumber eluded. The utilization of the resin of
S office of McDonough & Co., in Jacksonville, the pine trees is an important industry
left last Tuesday for Atlanta to become in the Southern States, and the process
Managing editor of Dixie, the well-known of bleeding for turpentine affects several
S industrial magazine, million dollars every year. For this rea-
"Dixie" was recently purchased by Mr. son a secial series of tests were made by
VV VA A Frank E. Waymer, of the Otter Creek the Division of Forestry of the United
.--- Lumber Company, who has his office in States Department of Agriculture under
has just added to his fle t another schoon- Jacksonville; Mr. Benjamin F. Ulmer, be- Prof. .1. B. lohnson at St. Louis, and also
er. costing over a $1,000, when the nap- fore mentioned; and Mr. W. P. Baldwin. by .Mr. Filibert Roth in the laboratory
tha engine is added. These gentlemen are all practical business in Washington, to determine what effect
men and it is safe to predict that "Dixie" the bleltding process has upon pine timber.
Land buyers are numerous and two
gentlemen fro Cuthbert, Ga., are arrange will not only continue in its good work, The results of tests, which have been pub-
ing to oen a first-class hotel. are but will find additional prestige in its lislhed in official bulletins, says the South-
ing to opetn a first-class hotel.
new management. ern LunImlwrman, prove conclusively that
The handsome summer and winter re- Mr. Ulmer for some time has conducted bled tinlIdr is as strong as unbled of the
sort at Lanark-by-the-sea, is in full blast the lumber department of the magazine, same weight; that the weight and shrink-
with Mrs. Morgan, the widely-known land- and in addition to this, has been connect- .age of the wood- is not affected by bleed-
lady in full charge. ed with various publications as staff cor- imng. and that the bled trees contain practi-
A. J. Alford has just received the ma- respondent. He is well capacitated for the call neitli r more nor less resin than
chinery for hischinery for his new barrel position which he goes to assume, and will imbled t:ees, the loss of resin referring
factory, which will be added to his plan no doubt give a good report of himself.on to the sapwood, and therefore the
ing mill and ere long a net and twine fae- McDonough & Co. has discontinued to t apoo an therefore t
tory will be placed under the same roof. their office in Jacksonville, temporarily at 'I"rability is not affected by the bleeding
Soon a Board of Trade will be formed, least, with the leaving of Mr. Ulmer. process.
statistics printed and a bid made for our But the decision of the Mississippi Su-
our part of a just proportion of the Pan- BOXING PINE TREES. preme Court appears to apply to the effect
amra Canal trade. Really this is the only The Supreme Court of Mississippi has of bleeding upon the value of the standing
genuine harbor between Pensacola and given final judgment for that State that trees. It has been claimed that the boxing
Key West. We have $20,000 yet to spend tapping, or boxing, of pine trees for tur- of young trees checks their grow and
to make our waters deeper still. I could pentine does not injure the trees. We are slortemsr the life of mature trees.
name many other matters that are coming not familiar with the particulars of the
case in which the decision was' rendered,
to help the boom along, but these will but the leading newspapers of that State Four million feet of lumber are to be
suffice for the present refer to the decision as one of great im- shlilp:d through Savannah to Montreal
W. H. LAWRENCE. portance to the timber interests, for use' on the Canadian Pacific Railroad.


Machinery and

Bar Iron, Iron Pipe and fittings, Bolts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tools, Lumberman's Tools,
Packing of all Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corrugated
Roofing.



JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Mill Supplies.

STATE AGENT FOR
ATLAS ENGINES amll BOILERS, SOULE STEAM FEED,
WORTHINGTON STEAM PUMPS, JENKINS' VALVES,
DISSTONS SAWS, FUNTKOTE ROOTING,
CUiRTIS MANUFACTURING CO.'S ME MasdrUy,
DeLOACH SAW MILLS, GILBERT WOOD PULLEYS,
HOYT'S LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SPRING ian RUBBER CO.
Belt ami Rubber INse.
SOLVENTINE BOILER COMPOUND,
7 DODGE MFG. CO.'S Cast Ir Srlt Prles
.+." McCATTREY TILES, MONARCH EMERY WHEELS,
DANIELS' PPP Steam Packlh.
A. LESCHEN & SON, Wire Rep.


WHEL WRITIM ADVZTI SERS IMETION TMH RECORD.


___


_ _








THE WEEKLY uINDUTKIAL RECORD. 19


NAVAL STORES


Special Train
TO THE

WORLD'S FAIR
AND

National Democratic

Convention.
Train to be operated by special ser-
vice, will consist of:
One combination Library, Club and Bag-
gage Car, four Pullman sleeping cars;
each ear containing two drawing-rooms
and ten sections. One dining car. Total,
six cars.
Our schedule will be:
Leave Jacksonville, 8:30 p. m., Thurs-
day, June 30; Leave Atlanta, 5:30 a. m.
Friday, July 1; leave Chattanooga 10:15
a. m. Friday, July 1; leave Lexington, 5:50
p. m. Friday, July 1; leave Louisville 8:30
p. m. Friday, July 1; arrive St Louis 6:00
a m. Saturday, July 2.
The party will therefore spend July 2,
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 in St. Louis, and re-
turning-
Leave St. Louis, 10:30 p. m., Saturday,
July 9; leave Louisville 8:00 a. m. Sun-
day, July 10; leave Lexington, 11:55 a. m.
Sunday, July 10; leave Chattanooga, 6:50
p. m, Sunday. July 10; leave Atlanta
12:10 a. m., Sunday, July 10; arrive Jack-
sonville 10:06 a. m. Monday, July 11.
This train will be a solid vestibuled one,
composed of the very latest and newest
equipment, and will run through to St.
Louis and return for the exclusive use
of the Naval tSores people.
Our route will be over the SOUTHERN
RAILWAY, going and returning.
The eIpense of the trip will be:
Railroad fare, Jaeksonville to St. Louis
adn return, $27.50 each; one lower berth,
Jacksonville to St. oIuls, one way, $6.50;
round trip, $13.00: one upper berth, Jack-
sonville to St. Louis, one way, $6.50,
round trip, $13.00; one section, lower and
upper berth, Jacksonville to St. Louis,
one way, $13.00, round trip, $26.00; draw-
ing-room, Jacksonville to St. Louis, one
way, $24.00, round trip, $48.00.
The berths are of regular size and will
of course accommodate two people, but
for a couple, it will be better to have a
section, which will be the lower and upper
berths.
Dining ear will be operated on table
d'hote plan at $1.00 each meal for each
person. Three meals will be served on
the going trip, being breakfast, lunch
and dinner, and these three meals will be
$3.00 for each person.
Four meals will be served on the re-
tur trip, being breakfast, lunch and din-
ner and breakfast, and same charge will
be for each person.
Under this arrangement, therefore, it
will cost one person on this special train
from Jacksonville to St. Louis and re-
turn:
Round trip, railroad fare ....... .$27.50
One berth, round trip ...... .. 13.00
Six meals, round trip ............ 6.00

$46.50
Two people will be twice $4650 and
so on.
The number of passengers on this train
will be positively one hundred.
It is necessary, therefore, in order to
conclude all detailed arrangements for ap-
plications for space on this "Special" to be
Sled with the District Passenger Agent
Southern Railway, Jacksonville, Fla.,
a early as possible. Each application will
then be assigned certain space on the
train, and such applicant will be fully in-
formed in a personal letter.


JAS. A. NOLLOMON,
Secretary,
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


RAILROAD INCORPORATED.

It Proposes to Run from Savannah to
West Florida.
A special from Savannah, Ga., says:
The South Atlantic & Mexican Gulf
Railway Company, organized here with a
capital of $3,000,000, with the privilege of
increasing it to $5,000,000, seeks a charter.
It is proposed to construct a railroad 325
miks in length, beginning at Savannah and
running in southwesterly direction through
the counties of Chatham, Bryan, Liberty,
Tatnall, Appling, Coffee, Berrien, Brooks,
Thomas, and Decatur in Georgia, and the
counties of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Lib-
erty, Franklin, Calhoun and Washington
in Florida, and thence toa deep water port
on the Gulf of Mexico. The principal of-
fices of the company are to be located at
Savannah, and the following are given as
the petitioners for incorporation:
D. G. Purse and D. G. Purse, Jr., John
McDonough and E. M. Frank, of Savan-
nah; P. M. Comas and C. W. Dean, of Ap-
pling County; F. L. Sweat and John Mc-
Lean, of Coffee County, and W. J. Rogers
and J. W. Purden, of Berrien County. It
is understood Captain Purse has inter-
ested Chicago capitalists in the plan to a
considerable extent.


Business Directory.

JOHN ZAHM'8 EUROPEAN HOTEL.
128 E Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant Nicely Furnshed
Rooms. Open day and night. Bettllin
old Stand.
Conover's Drug Store, Bay and Julia,
Jacksonville, Fla. Mail us your orders
for commissary drugs. Give us a trial.

JACKSONVILLE

Manufacturing Location

or Shipping Point.

Deep Water---Railay Terinial
ADDRESS
GIFFORD COMPANY
Insml Il Eit b Inrs.
Laura Street, Jacksonville, Fla.


M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores
Commission Merchants.
ROSIN, luxPEanjlm, TAR, PITCH,
GUM THUS, RICE, ETC.
138 Front Street, NEW YORK.


MILY MO TOMERY,
Commission Merchants.
NveLvl Stores & Cotton
Liberal advances made against hip-
meats. Coniagnmentsts licited.
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
NEW YORK CITY.


New Victoria.
Corner Main and Adams,
Opposite Board of Trade Building.
Jacksonvine's ew Hotel.
Rates $2oo to $2.5&
BIXLNM, Prpriste.


----L'C~-C~"--------- ~ ~LL------------------

Pumping Outfits 5_,

Turpentine Stills
WITH FIRE PROTECTION CONNECTIONS.

Best PUMP in the World
From 40 to 700 Gallons of Water per Minute.
Write or call on
SFRED E. GILBERT,
Automobile Headquarters
29 West Forsyth St., Jacksonville, Fla.





Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advertisements Will be Inserted i This Departmst at at e Pflewhw *rtes:
For one week. cents a line.
For two weeks, 35 cents line.
For three weeks - 5 cents a line.
For four weeks, 65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Thrlday
morning to secure insertion in Friday's paper.


Five Registered Shorthora Balls
One is half brother to "Beauty Boy,"
who was champion at three Texas shows.
Another is half-brother to our 1800 pound
cow, "Mary Spears." All good and ready
for immediate service. Prices $10000 to
$175.00, subject to previous sale.
Palmetto Park Stock Farm, Z. C. Cham-
bliss & Co., proprietors, Ocala, Fla.

For Sale.
200 tons 48-lb. relaying steel rails West
Virginia and Kentucky delivery. 100 tons
60-lb. relaying steel rails, Southern de-
livery. 1,500 tons 56-lb. relaying steel
rails, West Virginia delivery. 150 tons 3
lb. relaying steel rails, West Virginia de-
livery. Isaac Joseph Iron Company, 525-
535 Hunt St., Cincinnati, Ohio.
For Sale.
An improved wood track tram engine;
easy kept up: for low price. Call on or
address E L. Vickers, Tifton, Ga., for par-
ticulars.
For Sale.
One good double-deck sawmill, mules
and carts complete; one and one-half mil-
lion feet of timber; easy terms. Address
Dixie, care Industrial Record, Jacksonville,
Fla. 2t


W. J. L'ENGLE.
President.


Stiller Wasted.
An experienced turpentine stiller want-
ed Man with family preferred. Address
Fletcher & Murrell, Altman, Fla.

Tarpeatlie Mea.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. 1 outit pumps 2,40
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 cent and
requires no attention while
Started in one minute. J. pb
Ocala, Fla.
For Sale.
Six thousand acres land, 4,500,000 fees
cypress, 2,000,000 feet pine timber; bear-
ing orange grove; eight houses; hotel,
store, newspaper and plant, or capital to
develop same; good colony location; artes-
ian wells; fine vegetable lands. John ].
Harris, St. Francis, Fla.
Wanted.
A position as manager of turpentine
place by a man with several years of ex-
perience as manager. Can furnish best of
references. Address Manager, Thelma, Ga.
it y ue ae thlmaing of boxing a
vesting An ray tMblty *y I wan
Jasee, -m111 the em he ev. er
to buf matte err of nay '
the lnduMt el Rwedr a *a u
telling of your wi nt.


J. W. WADE,
Vice-President.


E. G. HUGHES,
See'y and Treas


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.


DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.

Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.

Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


TE PIN AND ITS PIODUCTS."





20 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Sel11eS TeI 1rrr1 *ieieri41r^>I1 I$$!*r frISr1 I$1$elelelele! $!*5i1 e$II$1$********************o****
Peldient, W. C. POWELL; Vice-Pr .tent ,a who with the President comotltUt th Diretory and Board of Manager, WI. COACHMAN, B BUL-
IARD H.L L. COVINGTON, H. A. McEACHERN, JOHN R. YOUNG, J. A. CRANpORD, D. H. MeMIILAN. C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERB; Auditor, JOHN HENDER8ON.


4
4
4
4
4
*
4
I
4
4
4
4
9
4
4
4
*
4
4
4
4
4
4
4


Joklsloville, Fig.


Slvinnh, Ga.


Pernscola. FiI.


~~ ~ NAVAL STORES FACTORS.~


pi in 810C1 S K, 2,500.00.


Ow1ed OH Conrolled I Puraicol optors


SSmll Amo1i of1 loc Yl in Rsere Io tell o1 Oeror1s Who in Arrlge to 1i.


The Consolidled is Purel a DrCo ier Compan.


o Ime ProdCeMs.


tls Inr ore Identl l Wilh li


he Parolnag i lTuieolne errors e ierCere Inliel.


PleW o1 Moe101i Plel ol Tli l or 1Eve0lblo


YARS AT JCKSONI1LLE, 1SAVANAH, E R ANDIA ndl PENSLAOIA.
n n


Ill Prolcers oe i led 1o Call 01 Colresol


THI RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIAICE."


CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES COMPANY,
o .ll J lli 1 11 Ai 19









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 21


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Comnminpy Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 27
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 28
10 -. 29
A. C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 18

Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... Market
'" 50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-1b tin. ............

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl ........ 16


granulated
as


Sugar
Sugar, bhls.....
5 bbls..
10 bbls..
sacks..


500
495
495
500


Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb .................. 80
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 10
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 8
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages ....... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ages .............. market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 14
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
S Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 50
English B'fast, 10 lb.. 45
S Formosa, 10 lb....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 5 and lOc size
10 lbs to case, per pound'.. 40

Salt


200-lb sack ................
100-lb sack ................
Ice Cream, 200-lb sacks.....
100-1b sacks.....
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-lb....
" "i 2.lb ....


100
60
100
50
265
275


Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-1b tin........ ...... 21
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 do to box
sifter top, per doz...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and 80

Corn
100 Sk Less 100
Car Lot Lot Sk
W. Corn,110lb, 143 1 45 1 48
S 100lb. 1 29 1 81 1 84
Mxd corn,ll01h.1 14 1 40 1 4
S 1001b,1 25 1 27 130


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon..... O0
Oats
100 Sk Less 10o
Car Lot Lot Sk Lots
W.clip'd,1251b,2 20 222 225
S 1001b,1 75 1 77 1 80
White 1251b, 2 10 2 22 2 15
White 100)l. 1 67 1 69 172
Mixed 1251b 2 5 2 7 210
1001b, 164 165 168
Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat


Wheat, 100 lbs., choice.....
fancy.....
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..


165
1 70


Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 5 75
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 lb sack.........5 75
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 5 75
Pillsbury's Best ..... 6 00
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 6 25
bbl .... ....
Meal
Meal, per barrel........... 3 50
92-lb sacks........... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel............ 8 60
". 92-lb sacks....... 1 60

Rice
Good.................. ... 5
Choice...... ............ 54
Fancy Head............... 6
Broken................... 81
Canned Vegetables
Dow.


Tomatoes, 3s, Chief........
Tomatoes, 2s ........
Clayton,3s................
Clayton, 2s ...............
Sifted Peas, 2s ............ 1
Rose L. J. Peas ..........
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........ 1
Lima Beans,2s ...........1
String Beans, 3s..........
String Beans, 2s ..........
Baked Beans, 8s...........
Baked Beans, Is...........
Corn, fancy, 2s............ 1
Born Tomatoes, 2s..........
Beauty Beets, 3s. .........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ...........
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s ..............
Hay.
car lots 100 bale Ie


lots
Choice.... 19 50 2000
No.l Tim 18 00 18 50
No. 2 17 00 17 80
No.1 Cl'ler 17 00 1750


as


qumatity
2050
1900
1800
1800


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz ........ 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz............. 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz ... ....... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case.
per doz...... .......
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 8 85
Candy
Mixed 30-lb pails, per lb... 7
10-lb '" 8
Gum drops, 0-lb rails, rer
lb .................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
per lb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb ........ 8

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 84
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 13
Ex. Choice " "L
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lh. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. case 3 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
bx.x, 40-50............. 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 50-60 ............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown..... 1 85
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 90
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 12
Citron, 10-lb box ........ 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 64
Extra H P, .... 5
Seed Peanuts, "
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ ..... 18
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Peacans .... .............. 12
Filberts................... 12
al0 nuts.................. 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 Less I
lots Sk. Lot Sk. L
Cottonseed Meal 27 00 27 50 28 00
S Hulls 1150 12 50 1800


Matches
Atlantic, per gross.......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
hoop.........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per dos.......1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
Snested ......2 00
Bucket ,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 60
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. ..1 20

Washboards D
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay...............3 00
175 Diamond Glass .........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per doz 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
doz ................. 96
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 75
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 65
Salmon Is, Tale 4 doz to case
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon, ls, 4 doz to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz .
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, B1b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
Ibs to box............. 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge ... 141-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avge .. 14
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avrge .. 131-
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge.. 91-4
"Reliable" California Hams, 6-8 9
Breakfast Bacon, light av. .... 131-2
D. S. Bellies, 16-18 av. ........ 83-4
D. S. Bellies, 2022 av. ......... 81-2
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av. ......... 81-
D. S. Plates .................. 71-2
Bacon P'ates .................. 81-3
D. S. Butts .................. 63-8
Bologna Sausage ............... 7
SSausage in oil ................$3.75
Butter and Cheese.
"Strawberry" Creamery, 60-lb tube 25
30-lb tubs 251-2
60s, Is... 261-2
"IAdybird" full cream cheese .. 121-2
Kingan's ard.
"Indiana" Pure Leaf ........... market.
S.Mea-Foam" Compound .........market.
Kingan's Canned Meat.
"Reliable" Corned Beef, Is ...... $1.2
Corned Beef, 2s ...... .s
Roast Beef, Is ........ 126
Roast Beef, 2s ........ s2
Potted Ham and Tongue
1-4s .............. ......... ...
Sliced Beef, 1-2s .... 1.15
Vienna Sausage, 12 .. .86
STripe .................. I


GET A COPY O THI NAVAL 8TOR0S BLUX BOOK









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Industrial Record's Department of Information


This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertising patrons of this paper and no

charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attentions

Fr T urpente. Sawmaw Factory SmInties wr Mof inery of Amy la. For Tiber. Farn or Rane Lab.
DAtE INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main Offlce, Jacksonville, Fla. I am in the market for lands for the purpose of
In the market for the following Prefer in State of Please put me in communication
with responsible parties and give me other information.
Remarks
Please notify where same can be secured.
Signed

State specifically the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or second-handed. DATE
Leatm- for T'rpentin. SatwR or Factory. r for Any Industrlal Enterprise. Fe Commissry. Office or Hosel Spihes, i Sawmll or Terpoait Mbe
DATE s Wages. Etc.
DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jaicksonville, Fla. DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla.
Please advise the undersigned regarding a good location in (state or section of
state) for In the market for
together with full information about labor conditions, taxes, transportation facilities,
local encouragement, etc.
Remarks Please give me information as to best places to buy, etc.

Signed Signed


sD YeV Wart to Se Se ethn? Are Ym Thuikin of ivestinf?
DATE r TE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Have for sale the following Can you give any information as to the reliability of the following firm or corpora
tion
-Remarks
Can you suggest a purchaser?
Signed Signed


De Yea West to EmLlow a Mam? Do Yea Want E mayment ?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville. Fla.
Want a man to fill the position of Want a position as

with the following requirements Refer to the following

Can you suggest such a man ? Can you assist me ?
Signed Signed




CLIP THIS COUPON
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD.
hen you are answering an advertisement from the columns of this paper, whether you are making an inquiry or placing an order, please cut out the coup
below and attach it to the letter. h will pay you.


The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiserand in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.



IF YOU DON'T FIRD IT I THE RECOD WRITE US.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. U


McMURRAY & BAKER, ;-


Slw ill lnd lnuetin Hunaw. :u 'd nu* th c

We am resaeg day -to-dat plesme ad hanes vehi I otO The ntt il
laprbs, wp, harness and hors aurniinla we have n O y b Ha th t of th sport are
am dda In3 taochu with ll. Turpentine wagons and hare a peI D't t nt wth pleasure
feget we an beat the world hand-made harms.

n I 0 3 E B a eilr the Nome Of One of it
h4 4 Amere a'. Leading Trade Joermale pI.
The Weekly Industrial Record of Jack- F0r
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. onvinle and Savannah has taken its place
Samon the leading trade Journas In tbe
Unioteld St and as an authority on lum-
berand nY, I stores it it being quoted o
The Clyde Steamship Company an d a th.ort y aon
elams paper. in this country. but by tho h
tn Europe also. A London trade paper r
reaching this olffce yesterday gives liberal a f
space to the Record's views on market con- five
titona. lot I
STh is week's toIe of the Indu"rial Ro- nd
"o rd Is even better tan usual. and it ia 'h
t strong and entortainiag general indus. trial
Trial newspaper. In addition to Its value Hr
Os* -sa the champion of the two specific Indus- v.
t it represents. It is bretmll of new Jobh
store of development In tie Southeast plait
amor them being the story of a half-mill- fend
Son-dollar corporation organlsed in Jack- G*
011e0vll ~asterday. and the organization o Ho
veral otlhr tg corporations during the and'
Swee In Go S and lorida.
It has et the Pace for eaterprse. and It WaND
""dy Jun1,.a-3:0--pmwelCm -on m tAe -At mesmure of suoes wiek
It is recalving. both In Its mbseription and
NEW YORK, CHA RLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES derdamin departm~ts.carrylng as It doe
perhaps one of the largest advertising pat.
The uman cent steamships of this line are appointed to sail a follow, alliag romas tive to ay of the u
at Charleston, S. C. both ways. I
Prom New Terk, Prom Jaeksonetlle fo.,
(Per s Werth Uiver). STURA ANe Chabrleton and New York. UnAV Wtl A. n
em at erty
Friday, May 13, at 3:00 pm..ALCONQUIN ...... Thursday, May 19, at 7:00 am --e at aed t rM
8udy, May 15, at 3:00 pm .!IROQUOI ........ Saturday, May 21, at 9:00 am -*-, who This
Taeday, May 17, at 3:00 pm .APACHE........ Sunday, May 2, at 10:00 am 4w oeas
Thursday, May 19, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ......Tuesday, May 24, at 12:00 an)
saturday, May 21, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ......Thursday, May 26, at 1:00 pm -- -- -
..**SEMINOLE .... Friday, May 27, at 4:00 ns
TaMeday, May 24, at 3:00 pm ..ALGONQUIN .... Sunday, May 29, at 4:30 am
Wednesday, May 25, at 3:00 pm ...... "*xHURON Tuesday, May 31, at 5:30 am jg.9.9.A._._9 .9999.99.0.__L2_ 99 J.qPjP9. Q_9L9-J..A o.
Friday, May 27, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ...... Thursday, June 2, at 7:00 am n
Monday, May 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Saturday, June 4, at 8:30 am SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS
Wednesday, June 1, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ..Monday, June 6, at 10:30 am O I
Friday, June 3, at 3:00 pm ....ALGONQUIN ..Thursday, June 9, at 12:00 n'n 30 YEARS RELIABILITY.
*xSEMINOLE ... .Thursday, June 9, at 12:00 'n H ess S lager,
Tuesday, June 7, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE .... Sunday, June 12, at 4:00 am o
**xHURON........ Monday, June 13, at 4:00 am J jewelry
Thursday, June 9, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ... .Tuesday, June 14, at 4:30 am Diamonds, S verware, Watches and
Saturday, June 11, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ..Thursday, June 16, at 6:06 am CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND II & 13 MAIN.
SNAVAHOE .... Sunday, June 19, at 9:00 am -6" Ib5-fb rF--6b r-rr r-n 1 a
Tuesday, Jne 14 at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS .... Sunday, June 19 at 9:00 an I
Wednesday, June 15, at 3:00 pm..ALGONQUIN ..Tuesday, June 21, at 11:00 am
Friday, June 17, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE .... Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'n aav S to res M a r
xSEMINOLE ..Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'n
Monday, June 20, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Saturday, June 25, at 1:30 pm
Wednesday, June 22, at 3:00 pm..COMANCHE ..Monday, June 27, at 4:00 am a S to c
***xHURON ........ Tuesday, June 28, at 5:00 am
Friday, June 24, at 3:00 pm.... .IROQUOIS .Thursday, June 30, at 6:00 am a n d S to c R e p o rt
"'NAVAHOE ...... Saturday, July 2, at 7:00 am
Tuesday, June 28, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE .......... Sunday, July 3, at 8:00 am Published Daily in The
Thursday, June 30, at 3:00 pm .. ARAPAHOE .... Tuesday, July 5, at 9:30 am
-ea ton via Brunswick 'd Charles ton. --Boston. via Charleston.
TIe E CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
aireot Serwsee Between Jalkseronville, Beten and Previdemee and aln Ysme-
erm Peints, callina at Charleston Both Way.M metropolis,
SEBI-WU3KLY SAILINGs.
srtabonda...... .. ... .. ...... ... .. ...rom I..Le Whar Batso Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
Wrabbsund.. ......... ...... .. From toot of Cathmerie Stree Jacksonvie daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jacke. rvill and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatks, Astor, St. Franuls, Berestord (De Land) and Intermediate
landings on St. Jobs river$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.
lmadeins on St. Johns river. *
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
Is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jasksonville. Sunday, Tuesdays and Thurs-
days, S p. m. Returning. leave Sanford. Monday, Wednesdays & Fridays 9: a. m.
sou raBOUND, NORTHBOUND, IG P IZ
Read down. I Read up.
Leave -:0 p. m. .... ...............Jacksonvi......Jackso........nvi..lle..... ....... .......Arrive 21 a. m.
Leave 3:4p. m. .... .......Palatka ................ ..... Leave p. MA trip to Europe. to St. Louis Exposicn, to
Leave :91 a. m.j........................Astor.............. ............. Leave 2 p. m. Europe,
La~4:0a. m.| .... .. ..... st. L.........a......... e uM npo.. Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
......... .. .. ...... .. ....Beresord (DeLand).............. ........ Leave noon
Arr" s --. m ...... .... ....... anford........ ...............Leave 3 a m. Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
Ar. 10:00 a. m..1.............. Enterprise .................... ILv. 10:00 a. m. scription contest. Write for particulars.
GLWIIRAL PAqIZNGUR AND TICKET OPPICE, 204 W. May St.. Jaekotle.
P. X. M~ONMONGER, JR.. Asst. Gent. Pass Agent, m04 W. Bay St.. Jacksonville. la
W. G. COOPER, JR., Local Prt. Agt., Jack'ville. C. P. LOVELL, Asat. Supt.Jack'vle
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
A. C. HAGG3RTY, 0. Z. P. A. New York, GLYDE iIILNE. 1. P. A., New Ters.
Ta. 0. mean, W.Carter & Russell Publishing Co
general Manager. General Agtine,
Cbaeebroung Building. 1. State Street. New York. Jacksonville, Florida.

WRITE THE RECORD FOR ANY INFORMATION DESIERD.







24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J N CmLOsay. Profhdent


C M FULLER. Vieo-President


JAS r LANE. Se-oy Trees


Dw I-iu*flt4L


Greenleaf &

Crosby Company


ebtekr0 anb

BbW.reazutIJ0


41 West Bay Street

Jacsonuvie

Ti mbsf a"a Roadt "ims d &dm part of fte
SWOONS 5Sff Propt% 0 os in to si o"1001


Diamonds and Other Precious
Stones


Fine Gold Jewelry


American and Foreign Watches
and Clocks


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware
Choice Cut Glass


i i
~s q


Write for Catalogue


I THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.J
of WananIsh. N. C.,
Formerly of Council' Station. N. C.. are still selling Diamond Edge
Haek at (1.k Black Joe and Standard at NB.. Old Style and Patent *
S Pullers at U.W a domen. They should average a little better than ever.
We have broncht out a new brand, the Blue Line Hacks at $L&O and Pull-
S er at 66.00 which are warranted. All wholesale dealers in naval stores
supplies carry our lines and should supply operators.
*I*O** ************ >**: ***--*----**-


D. Cy UCKETHAN, Prrddet.
Jacksonville. Ms.


ALFRED A. M ETHAN, L't U. S. N.
Ret'd Sec'y and Treas Constructing
Engineer, Fayetteville, N. G.


Pine Product Construction Co.
INOORPORATCED
Fsyetteville. N. C.
Spirit. of Turpentine. Oi of Tar, Cremote, Tar, Disinfectants: Wood Preservative,
Paate, Wood Stains, Etc., and Charcoal, from LUghtwood Stumps, Box-facings.
Profts increased. Time of distillation reduced. Condensation controlled at will.
No danr fom fire. Plant erected complete, and men taught the process. ur-
thbr Information write Alfred MacKethan. general manager. PFaytteIvle, N. C.

THE PHILADELPHIA TAILORS


JOHN B. CAINGAGLINI & BI


MERCHANT TAILORS AND
48 W. Bay Street.
*-- :ss u -- a----a----i-- --


J
I.


RO.,

IMPORTERS
ACKSONVILLE, FLA.
--


HOTEL BARTHOLDI, BROADWAY ad ST.
NEW- 1u, K CITY.
Facing Wadison Square Park. Newly Furnished.Throughout.
Near all Big Stores and Places of Amusemenit. Cars Pass
the Door for all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landinps
Large Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
find no grand and magnificent decorations: no luxurious k
grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
Speak to Yro. No Employees la Any Way Inattentative.
But just a cozy, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the
hearts of those who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plain American cooking, and affable and courteous treatment.
. Mt RW- 8EE; 0Pe% w-f..


S




4i


Fine China Dinner Sets d
Fancy Pieces


European Novelties


John R. Young. President. C. S. Ellis. Vice-Prsiddent.
J. W. Motte. Jr.. Secretary and Treasurer.


I m ELLIS-YOUNG CO.

Commission Merchants
NAVAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

| Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.

L niummAIIAIIUIaAiIIJmmumiIlAhmmuammlmi


J. W. HUNT. President.
P. L. PBACOCK, 1st V. P-


J. E. HARRIS. 3d V. Pres. C. R. HOUSE. See. a TmA.
W. J. KRLLY. 3d V. P. H. L RiCanown, Ams Seel'-T7esa


Peacock-Hunt & West Coupany,
20 Bay Street, E,, Sava"nals, Ga. a"i
General Offices: 20By StrVt. Suahl ad
SWest 8ukilnt, Jacksonville, Fa.
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutuaL We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that boys srl s
Turpentine and rosin.)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our Specialty
--SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wilson & GhM1s'
Philadelphia Wagons.
Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga., and Jacksmnvl
and fernandina, fla.


Ma-S
do


l1awroos


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