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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00074
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 27, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00074
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text




B -RAR- Y

"THE PINE AND ITS PRODUCTS." MAY VD2 91


:)nartment of Agriculture.



WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

Adopted Sept. 12ra. 1902, by the Eiecuwtre committee of the T orpentine Operators' Associatios as Its Exclusive Offcal Organ, and Adopted Sept. lit* 1902. In AMusal Con
vreaton. as an Official Organ Also of the general Assoclarlon. Adopted Sept. I It. 1903, as the only Ottlfial Organ of te Turpentine Operators' Asseciation
Adopted April 27th. 1903, as tee Official Organ of the Inter-Stare Cane Growers' Associati..n. Endorsed by the Seorgia SaimlIl Assolcation.


VOL 8. NO. 22.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA


MAY 27. 1904.


SAVANNAH, GA.


$3 A YEAR.


: President Gaits



,.ri-r cuc;io


b**4******* conditions to prove what America an'i
S\Americans are capable of.
ill 's Review i History tells of the Florida of tlh past
You have but to look out over this bust-
of Industrial Developm ent, ling city to see and know the Florida,
of to-day. Its adversity has taught and
_tWW99_9_999999_ s1~ hown its ability. Now glance over the
SState and its varied industries, and they


At the recent convention in Jackson- tion of new varieties and better handling
ville of the Southeastern Stock Growers' of the orange and work along these
Association Mr S. H. Gaitskill, of Me- lines had advanced materially before the
i freeze of 1895. This freeze was a ter-
*UM~, r s.,~~UUt~jU~t.~ c~tda


IAnsu h, r a., su quen y ecl ye pres
ident of the assoication, read the follow-
ing excellent paper:


To give this subject justice would re-
quire considerable time, as the industrial
development of Florida is a long story,
too long to be told in one evening-and
do the subject justice. Florida is an
old State and its industries began taking
shape more than one hundred years ago.
Yet our industries are really in their in-
fancy. Great changes have been made
since its development began. The scene
of some of its earlier industries give now
but little indication of past activities.
Only a few weeks ago, I was in the Turn-
bull Hammock, near New Smyrna. There
is now what seems to be primeval for-
est, where indigo was once grown. Only
a few of the canals-drainage ditches
--remain to give evidence of past and
forgotten industries. Around MIentosh
-where I live-there are large live oaks
growing where sugarcane was grown be-
fore the Seminole War. These records
of the past are referred to to give som-.
idea of what was being done years ago,.
S Prior to the Civil War cotton and sug-
areane were the principal crops grown-
at least the principal money crops. Some
little attention was given to hogs and
cattle, and some corn was grown. Slave
labor was used in the production of these
crops. The Civil War made great
changes. The slave being freed, the cul-
tivation of these crops was to a great
degree abandoned, and, for a time, the
slave was the master, and Florida made
no progress for years-possibly ten years
-industrially, these ten years being con-
sumed in getting rid of carpetbag rule.
None but those living through this strug-
g'e can have a true conception of the
conditions that existed.
In the early years of the seventies.
a new life began to develop. IThe orange
legan to attract attention. Something
earlier than this a few siedllihg groves
were sending fruit out of the State. The
good quality of this fruit was recognized
and brought to the State such men as
F. G Sampson. of Boardman, A. S. Kills
and .1. B. Berland, of Citra. and others,
to other parts of the State. Really the
budding of sour trees and the introdue-


rible shock, and from it some have not
recovered, after the lapse of nearly ten,
years. A few more lost faith. As Mr
Dudley Adams ordered budwood from
California the day after the freeze, each
year has found a few of the old growers
taking heart again until to-day there art-
numerous groves in the old orange sec-
tions blooming and bearing. Possibly
thirty years ago a few vegetables were
grown to ship North. but shipments were
small for possibly ten years. Now this
has grown to be one of the important
industries of the State. Fruit, vegetable
and melon-growing has brought a great
many men to the State. With this new
blood come new ideas and from the old
days of cotton and sugarcane we have
advanced to fancy fruits and vegetables.
From the twister, the hoe and the buz-
7ard-win" sweep to the two-horse plows
and cultivators.
Th freeze of 1895 was a very severe
blow to the State. It destroyed proper-
ties that were great revenue producers.
but, taken as a whole. I am fully con-
vinced that the destruction of the orange
groves was the second great calamity
that ultimately proved a blessing. The
freeing of our slaves was considered at
the time an insurmountable disaster. 1
am convinced the South would have never
developed to its present condition undei
the old slave system and I feel quite safe
in saying Florida would not at present
have the great diversity of profitable in
dustries had there been no freeze. 1
am quit-, sure that I would not have
thought of growing beef had I not lost
my grove. I would not be growing corn,
rats nor hay. I would not have thought
of a mowing machine, a twine hinder
nor a corn-harvester, a feed-cutter, nor
a gasoline engine.
Now. I am feeling that that I will
zrow, beef fit to ship to the Livwrpool
market, meeting the Iwef from all part-
of the world in fair competien hoth as to,
quality and cost of production. The
stockbreeder and farmer now proposes to
work up their raw material into til
finished product and we ask that the
balance of the commercial world of Flor-
ida take care of her woods, minerals and
clays.
I sometimes think it takes adverse
N


are almost too numerous to name.
Start at the foundation-farming.
Without this business in no other line
could be maintained, for from the farm
the world must get its meat and bread.
While our land may not make as many
Inshels of corn per acre as the prairie
lands of the West. the crop from an acre
will bring to our farmer as much cash
as the Western acre. because of the high-
t-r price. and make as much meat. anti
we don't have to une our corn to coun-
teract cold. as the West must. Our corn
van he used in producing fat, while the
West must ie making heat to ke-p their
animals from freezing.
Now come our fruits of numerous
kinds, our vegetables-and one can hardly'
Ie namel that cannot be grown at a
profit. (hOr melons and berries bring good
returns to the State. Our forests and
mills, our phosphates and clays-I can-
not attempt to name all-but I will ven
ture, the assertion that no Stat- in the
Union has so many lines of industry
that will yield a profit over and above
a gpnl living to the industrious man.
and no State in the Union has had so,
crushing a blow as the freeze of 18ib
without asking her sister States for aid.



MERCHANT MARINE COMMISSION.

Begins the Hearing of Suggestions in New
York.

New York. May 23.-The merchant ma-
rine commission, authorized by the Fifty-
,-ighth Congress to consider and recom-
mend legislation for the development of
the American merchant marine, began its
first session here to-day. Among those
heard was C. B. Orcutt. president of the
Newport News Shipbuilding Company. who,
told the committee that ships can be built
in England for 75 per cent less than they
can be.built here. The cause of this dif-
ference, he asserted, was that 35 per cent
more was paid for labor in the yards of
this country than in Great Britain. and
at the sametime there is 40 per cent in the
cost of material in favor of the English
builders. He said the protective tariff was
responsible for the difference in cost of
material. In a later statement, however.
he corrected his estimate to from 40 to 5-,
per cent. Mr. Orcutt said that while a
few battleships had been built in Ameri-
can yards for foreign countries, he was


>f the opinion that they were not built
at a profit. He knew that American
builders made tenders to both Russia
and Japan. but although the bids were
almost down to cost they were rejected
absolutely as too high.
Rear-Admiral Bowles expressed similar
.pinion as to the cost of battleships and
the lack of profit in them. Lewis Nixon
favored differential duties. Thomas Clyde
spoke for subsidies.


The Need of Canneries.
Those of the Southern railroads who
are urging the establishment of canneries
along tt. ir lines, principally the Central of
Georg.a. Southern and Gulf & Ship Island,
are to be commended for this work. There
is money in canneries, and they are need-
ed at every point where a considerable
amount of fruit and vegetables are raised,
and their are now hundreds of these local-
ities along the lines of our roads.
Canneries can he established at small
.ost and with careful management they
ea nbe made to earn a handsome profit.
They are a blessing to any community, as
they furnish a home market for fruit and
vegetables, and at the same time give em-
ployment to a number of people.
There are thousands of dollars' worth
)f fruit raised that on account of delay
in -hipping, or from a wet season, is al-
owed to rot, that could be used to a good
advantage by a cannery if one were avail-
hile. (annrd goods are always in demand
and the demand is greatly increasing. The
2oods can Ih stored and shipped at such
seasons as they are in demand, while un-
manned fruit has to be shippel when it
ripens. no matter how glutted the market
nmay be. or else go to waste.
Canneries can be established from $250
up. and they may he owned individually
or by a group of farmers. The operation
is simple. and the work promises large
rewards.
An instance of the demand for Southern
canned fruits in the Eastern markets was
recently called to the attention of the
writer. A Georgia lady canned each sea-
son, several hundred cans of blackberries.
1Her method of canning them made then a
desirablee product. and a New York brok-
er finding then in demand, secured for
'ter last season from one customer, an
*rder for 4.000 cann. at a very fancy price.
We learn of quite a number of the can-
oing, establishments that were operatetl
;n Georgia last summer made go"od pro....
-ilthough they labor-d at a disadvantage
In getting fruit, owing to the short crop
an dthe excellent prices paid for it in the
markets.
We hope this season to see a great num-
ber in operation, and their is every reason
to believe that the operators will be well
paid for their work.-The Peach Grower.


_ __





2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
Me*a*e*e*6**ftM ieesn*6 ,WW--***


C. B. ROGERS. PRESIDENT.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, Vica-PRESIDENT8.


C. H. HODGSON, Sac, and TrzAs'l.


DIRELCIORS: C B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. It. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain,


Pro-


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one Three-Story Building, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; one oae.story building, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind in the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola. Fla., and Savannah. Ga.


THE RECORD WILL BE WORTH DOLLARS TO YOU EVERY WEEK.






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. A


I


1 1 1 1 III I I I I- I I I z r- II 1 I1 11-1-1I-1111111 1


W. W. CARNES. Pres. W. C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T DUDLEY. Sec. & Tress

Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
Hardware
Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
iand Pullers on Hand.

TAMPA, FLORIDA.


" i I: I i i i i I I I I- ll:- I ::-i-i i I I =I : Ir II-4I =1 :I I I--I -I- I I I :I: I i I -I I ; ;



...NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH. GA. U. 5. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG.
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD,


A. D. COVINGTON.
Vice-President.
DIRECTORS:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L. SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


H. L KAYTON.
Secretaryand Treasurer.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY.
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. H. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMONDCAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.


W.


R. THOMAS


GAINESVILLE. FLOR.IDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons. Harness and Buggies.


L.A *AA -& *so


BOWEN & CO.
Y^Y^Y^


Jacksonville, Fla.l


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,


from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies

ont rollers Blum's Monogram and Svi
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM d CO.
517 and 519 West Bay Street.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


NO FRIM tJ4M 1
A GROVE OF
* AI UbETUUE.


r


THE RECORD IS TBH SOUTH'S GREAT TRADE JOURNAL.


J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,

L Headquarters for
Distiller's Pumping
Outfit.
4 No plant complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
South Carolina. Write us for p rticu-
lars and prices. We also manufacture
9 Engines, Boilers and High
; d i Grade Machinery, 4
as well as carry a full and complete
-st,ockof-
SMill Supplies, Pipe,
SBoiler Tubes, Etc.
Advise your wants.
? Macon, - Georgia.
A ea ene Spedalty *f afl
Smis f Taot Wort for Torpent.e Storage prrpees
9 9Wvw w-*-99e-o-sQ4-4.-a


I


ril t, DYAL-UPCHURCH BLDG,
rivot, Jacksonville, Fla.

All makes. $10 Up.

We can save you from $10 to $60
on any typewriter made.

Write us.

AGENT "OLIVER" VISIBLE TYPEWRITER


ZINC NAILS

Turpentine Cups
Approved, by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the OMly a3as which ill not injure
saws when left in the trees.
Salem Nail Go,
279 Pearl St. New Yoar, N. Y.
Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.


Elgin & Hampden
Railroad Watches.

SEE

RILES

At His New Store,
15 W. BAY STREET.


-- ---


* UR A e 9 A
They Are. uA :

I GRIFFING'S CATALOG
TELLS ABOUT THE. *
: Twenty leading tari Pwie L
Alto a Pomplate line of Frift MA 4-
Snammtal toes sad .kbmbbey.
SCatalegueir ee.
SAddress
S TiE ,rIFrPIn *Ros. o0.
1 JAC9KSONVILJ-. PLA.




LiMaM Iron oi S Ipl Co.
HUILDKSR AND DIALUR8 IN





ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton. Saw. Ier'e seri il and lea MI
einery, and Supplies and RHpalra
CAPACITY FOR OM HANDS
Maebtie Tools Wood- Warking Mlacb
Pry. 1aftin. Pulleys. Hanrom. Last-.,
*nd Rubber t4rltint aend Him-. Rftllr.4*
end Mill Flulplo an Tolto
Plans end -tlmntpe furnlahed for Pno-
Plants "rd Stlat Rridges
fteam Pumps. Fed Water Meme ea
HoetnAg USTAb
AUGUSTA. CIA.






4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


-*e1)3e :* 6**-3 :e--**qsgU* MORTGAGES.

I J. A. Craig' tlS Bro. WII
239 W. B.y Street EVERETT BOCK. Real

SLeaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth- I w. FORSYTH STREET,
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats: largest stock in the City. H


T. M U R P H Y TAILO]
Jacksonville


Machine and Iron Works
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
locomotive, Steamboat and Sawmill Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron and
Brass Castings, Phosphor-Bronze Journal Beari ngs.
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


I Standard Clothing Company


SOne Price One Price

FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
S tetson and Hawes Hats. Special Attention Given to Mail Orders.


S. *9e910909e+~9erere@9.@.ip.O


RENTS'
LLIAM W. FRAZIER,

I Estate Broker.


JACKSONVILLE, ILORIS A


A. Renfroe Co,


RS


Suits to Order at ReadyMade Prices
439 W. Bay Street.


Stetson Hats


Mail Orders Given Personal Attenion
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


P rin tin g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.

M. A. BAKER,


00 ea.A a A A a a &a A. a d


Ie4 M e*f ee*ft***ft.****ft*.******. *

For S.die:
22.000 Acres Sawmill Timber on St. Johns River, within fifeeen miles of
Jacksonville; will sell on very easy terms.
11.000 Acres Round Timber and 9,000 acres now being worked for turpen-
*tine; 1112 crops virgin boxes, still, mules, wagons, and all
necessary equipment for turpentining.
S4.500 Acres Round Timber and 4,0() acres now being worked for turpen-
tine; 19 crops boxes; all necessary equipment for complete
turpentine location.
5.280 Acres Round Timber. within l/I miles of railroad; price $3 per
acre; good lumber for turpentine and mill logs.
Several large tracts round timber; also boxed timber ready for the saw.

SBrobston, Fendig &Co.


i Cable Address. Florida .
* 5
iStandard Naval Stores
| Company.
*DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN

SR.OSIN
SAND TURPENTIN E.
Jacksonville. Fla.


The Largest and Oldest Copper
Works in Georgia.


Inventor and
Manulactrer of the
Baker Improved
Seemless Turpen-
Stine stills.
Write me for prices and outAtt
F. 0. B any point in Georgia. Plor-
ida. Alabama or MlississiPpi. Ala
stills sold under a guarantee.
Jcb work through the
Country a specialty.
q3runswicl, Go.


MC My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.

W. H. BECKWITH. W. B. HENDERSON. G. C WARREN.
BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.

LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE AND MILL LANDS.
Rooms 1-2-3, First National Bank Building.
TAMPA, : : : : : FLORIDA.

I S t I I t I I I I rI I t i 1-i1 T I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 2 1


McMillan

Bros.
Florida Cop-
per Works. ..-
Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
General Metal Workers.
Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
Patching through the country a specialty.
Orders by mail or wire will receive prompt
attention at either of the following works:
Fayetteville. N. C. Sa.vannah. Ga :
Mobile. Ala. Jacksonville. FlaI


411 111 E ll iI I llIIrI II lIi F Ill 35I13888 113888 II II I881555I


DON'T FAIL TO MENTION THE RECORD TO ADVERTISERS.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5

li *l *t* I tl t |tl4ill tt llt~t~l1l


U6/e


Seymour Cross-Tie Hewer and Veneer Mill.


This Machine is One of the Greatest Inventions of the Twentieth Century.


The patent for this wonderful machine
was granted to Mr. B. H. Seymour, ot
Ocala, Fla., April 6, 1904, just as he had
installed in his mill the first working ma-
chine; on the lst of May, his mill and all
its contents were burned, but Mr. Seymour
is rebuilding the Tie Hewer as rapidly as
possible.
This machine more than doubles the
value of every cross-tie log by utilizing
the waste.
It cuts a perfect cross-tie on the same
principle as a hand-hewn tie. being
smooth, perfectly square, accurate in size
and can be used in bridge or trestle work;
at the same time it cuts as good veneer-
for boxes or crate material-from the
green log, as any veneer mill in the world
will cut by steaming the log. This is
done by the downward sliding or lateral
stroke of the big knife. In short, by using
this machine, the stuff now wasted in
hewing out a log is cut off in veneers
which brings down the cost of tie-produc-
tion over one hundred per cent. There is


FRONT VIEV OF SEYMOUR TIE HEWER.



enough raw material now wasted itl the
State to make all tlie boxes and rates
necessary to ship all of FkIrida's mian
crops. In addition there can be no qius-
tion as to advantage in durability gained
Iby cutting veneers off a log that has all
its rosin in it instead of from steamed
logs. which process must necessarily take
some of the logs' sap out of it. The Sey-
mnour Cross-Tie Hewer only needs to bn-
seen to be appreciated. It will pay for
itself every three months; it should ce -
tainly be seen by every lumber and tie
man and crate manufacturer. It is in-
deed well worth careful examination; the
log. however large, is sliced by an enor-
mous knife giving the surface of the tie
the appearance of being hewn with a gi-
gantic broad-ax; this knife is ten feet
long. set so that one end is six inches low-
er than the other and working in vertical
guides, so that with its downward slid-
ing stroke. it cuts off the veneer in tan
thickness reluired-the feed being auto-
matically adjusted. The machine is sig-
gularly simple and can be readily repaired


CED


by any ordinary machinist; it requires
I wo hands and a 3-horse power engine to
operate it. When it is figured that with
this e(ltilmient three hundred and fifty
t ;i a day can be manufactured and in
addition veneers enough made to keep a
c.ate faetry busy, the business economy
in using this machine must be clear to all.
The Record certainly advises a close ant
riiidl examination of this wonderful inven-
tion and feels confident that it is destined
to add largely to the output of the tim-
her districts. Any invention that makes
it possible to utilize raw material-previ-
ostly wasted--must be an advantage to
thi world. \\'W in the Southland are com-
imncKing to realize that we have been too
prodigal Nith our resources, have produu--
el too .wastefully and hence it is particu-
larly encouraging to find that a citizen
:lndI saw nill man of Florida should have
inv nted smuch a material saving appliance.
\Ir. 11. H. Seymour has several offers from
individuals desirous of purchasing State
or other interests in this invention, but
soi far has not closed with any.


4||8||| I I Il I0tfI 1#1 II 1 l i II tll I I 4 l40le t O tt i tI *Ettt l 4t>tt"tt I WI0 1 I Itlt I I I I1II I
THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."


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6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

AA A AA A mdA A A 6 .t A


da Phosphate Industry;

History of Development and Growth.


^^-~ ~ ~ a --r -QcMP uPPSWa M-


- - --~P~~P~~


~i~~Y~iillili C ~ w w~~ WV WUVVV WV'V' WWW~~r


In the year 1889 when Banker John F.
Dunn, of Ocala, Florida. staked everything
he had on a few samples of rocks he felt
pretty sure he had something good, but
he little dreamed that he was to be tihe
means of developing such an important
industry for the State of Florida and the
world at large as the phosphate mining
business has turned out to be. He little
dreamed that the hamlet of Dunnellon of
his days would assume the importance of
today where a Bank is talked of, where
brick buildings are common and whe:e a
steady stream of cars loaded with phos-
phate for the ports give proof of tile large
volume of business done. lie little dream
rd that the development of tile product
would lead to the opening up of new har-
bors and the building of new Railroads
and also the opening up of the riv als of
the State. tef little dreamed that the
phosphates of Florida would take their
place at the head i.f the market and make
the priee for all thi other phosphates ot
the world. It is admitted oni all side.,
that the Florida High grade phosphate
lock of 75, 80 per cent. has no c.inpeltitor-
either in quality, quantity or cheapness ol
production.
At the time (if the discov ryi of Fliorida.
hard rock, Canada and South Carolina
were producing large quanttie., but tlne>
have ueen forced to give it up for expo.t
business. hey were prosperous then,
more prosperous that the Fh.ll.a nliner ol
today. They aere making aion.y ruapidl
and had Leen d(.ing so for ilnamy years.
Stock in certain phosphate companies iit
South Carolina had risen in price from
five to twenty times the cost of original
capitalization. This condition of atiai:s
mas due to the fact that the miners ol
phosphate rt.ck in the State hia.l agreed to
work in liaiir iIy. How' diti ,rent it t to-
.lay in Florida. In the year lS-0 ibhe 1lini
-rs of South Carolina rock produced and
sold 541,645 tons of rock at. ajiout $. l0
per ton when the av.'riage -t It l produ-
ing it was not more than s.3.50 per ton.
making the total value of production !it.
South Carolina in 1889-4.4,060,337 with
a profit of $2.166.580. These prices wire
being maintained when the discovery of
Florida hard lock was male. The dis
covery cf the Florida product. whlichl often
runs above 80 per cent. phosphate of lime.
changed the whole condition ot thb phlos
phate trade. In the winter of 1889-90 the
first cargo of high grade phosphate was
shipped from Dunnellon. Fla.. to Liver-
po l, England, ant although mined and
cleaned by crude methods, analysed 75
per cent. and brought $27.00 per ton in
Liverpool. Other shipments followed with
equal good results in price and quality.
This naturally brought about a great fever
tof land speculation and cause. tlie o-
ganization of a great many phosplate
companies in rlorida. so mulchl so. that
when the United States Government sent
its officials to the State in 189.1 to inves-
tigate the industry, they found and re-
ortedi between 125 ani 1.50A companies or
ganized, and either mining or getting ready
to mine phlosldate r;ck, with an inflated
stock capitalization. Under these circunm-
stances the mining of rock became ver3
active. The miners being new in the busi
ness and having little experience in mar
k'ting the product and being utterly
without organization, compete I with each
other, and gave the consumers and dieal-
ers the greatest possible opportunity to
break down prices.
Thie following statement of slhlpment-


of high grade rock from all ports in Flor-
ida since th? discovery shows the increase
in volume of business done:
Year. Tons.
1890 .... .. 18.363
181 .. ..... . 87,242
1892.. ......184.244
183 ...... .. 220.216
18904 ...... 304.296
1895 ..... .. 303.154
1896...... .. 322.869
1897........ 350.277
1898......... 357,574
1899....... 445.639
1900.. .. .. 345.833
1901.. .. .. .. 419,392
1902 .... .. 489,361
1903 .. ........ 462,8224,311,282 tons.

This makes a total up to the end of
last year of 4,311,282 tons. The above
table shows that the demand for the prod-
uct has risen from 18,363 tons in 1890 to
462,822 tons in 1903. The price obtained
by the miner is not at all commensurate
with the value of the material, and while
it is true that the situation is better to-
iny than it liha been at any time previous,
there is much to be accomplished in the
line of co-opiration and nothing but co-
iperat:on will accomplish the desired re-
sult.
There is no reason in the world why
Florida hard rock should not bring $8.00
ir $!.(0 at the seaboard. The prices
.hlichl are I:eing paid in Europe cost
freight and insurance are ridiculously
low for a product so valuable. Why is it
to? Th:re is only one answer as already
stated and that is the lack of co-operation.
IIl the schemes which have been devised
n the past have come to naught, because
:he individual is unwilling to give up any-
thing for the goiss of the whole although
lie cannot help but see it will benefit hint
n the end. Several genuine attempts
'ave been ima!e on this side, and in Eu-
opew. on schemes for the consolidation of
he business on the basis of vested inter-
:-sts in realty, but owing to the complete
uncertaintyy regarding the actual value o0
lie real properties and the impossibility
-f determining d'lfinitely the quantity of
phosphate unmined therein, also in conse-
uience of the inflated ideas which the
owners of realty (even though in dis-
tressed financial circumstances) have as
Lo the value of their lands, nothing has
been accomplished.
There are but a handful of operators
in the business now, but each one thinks
he is the most iitiortant and will not
iel. As long as this condition exists,
ve need not look for improved prices.
S.-omeonn-'s neck nmuist be broken.
The ol enini g of Prt Inglis, on the Gulf
if Mexico. has been tile means of stimu-
lating tigers to nieet the advantage
vlielh this new out',et gives to those who
are fortunate enough to be able to ship
through it. and now we find that Messrs.
I. Buttgenbiachl & Co.. are building a rail
-road from R'okwell, Dunnellon, to their
'ariouts mines. which will give them ati
iitlet at Port Inglis. We also find that
the Camp Phoslphate Company are build-
ing barges and tug boats at Dunnellon on
the Witlilaceoct e river so as to convey
;heir ipispiliate to the Gulf, and their ap-
.lication is oni lilt, for a charter to build
i railroad froin D)unnellon to Crystal
liver.
Florida Land Pebble.
Thlie sliipments iof this class of phos-
Ihate during the year 1903 amounted to
"'9.449 tons. of which 154.289 tons went
ilroad and 165.159 tons went to domestic
-orts. or about 23,000 tons less than in
1902. This falling off is not on account
,f hlck of demand, but because the miners
in the busine s could not produce more.
although the pa!uts as a rule are operated
lay and night. With the exception of
a very severe storm in August, produc-


0w94vww

IThe Flori


R. TOLAR.


J. H. HART.


T. H. BLACHLY.


J. R. TOLAR, JM


(Established 1872.)

TOLAR, HART & CO.,
160 FRONT STREET, NEW YORK.


Commission


Merchants


and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Prtoduce Exchange Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


IOSEPH D WEED.


W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.



Read the Record Adv't's.


ARE YOU A SUBSCRIBER TO THE RECORD?


iii 9e* i t ^tatt leI-staiftt1 t**FESSirtiiiiiiia j




Boilermaking and Repairing i

S Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
* Jacksonville, Fla.
4 I14 11 I 144I4 t141 I 141 4I4 I It 11t*441 I 1t I II I 14ta I It


Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply 0o.

Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.



Cummer Lumber Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER


Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.



SBLAKESLEE PUMPING OUTFIT.
This outfit can be directly connected to a pump and will
supply sufficient aiter for general farm and household ue.
Why not have a water works plant of your own at a small
cost, and this is the most desirable power for use in case
of fire or other necessity; It can be started at a moment's
notice. You don't have to wait for the wind; It's always
ready for work.
The engine can tnstantyl be made ready for other pow-
er purposes, such as grinding feed, churning, etc., by dis-
connecting the pump. This outfit Is simple. durable, economical, easily operated.
and ready for work any minute. No country home is complete without this Ideal
labor saver. We build a complete line of pumping plants for mines. Irrigation,
fire protection, railway supply, and Install water works plants for city service.
Will be pleased to furnish any additional information on request.
WHITE-BLAKESLEK MFG CO. Birmingham, Ala.
Builders of the Blakeslee Gas and Gaisoline and Connected Outfits.
*<44<4s">*. ^S^2<~ S* >< >"








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


tion was kept up for the entire twelve
months. The demand is very great. The
heaviest producer is Joseph Hull, of Sa-
vannah, who, besides operating the Com-
pany, he organized known as the Prairie
Pebble Phosphate Co., has absorbed the
lAnd Pebble Phosphate Co., and the two
plants of Louis McLain, one kno*n as
the Phosphoria Phosphate Co., and the
other operated under the name of the
Florida Engineering Company at Kings-
ford, Fla. There are one or two compa-
nies which still work independently.
Florida River Pebble Phosphate.
The shipment of this class of phosphate
amounted to 62,910 tons for the year 1903,
the plant of the Peace River Phosphate
Mining Company having been in operation
nearly the whole year. Until this past
year, it has been unproductive since Jan-
uary, 1902, when the entire plant was de-
stroyed by fire. The domestic market
absorbs all that this company can pro-
duce and could take double the quantity
if it could be mined. This is the only
company operating in the river pebble
section of Florida. A large investment is
necessary to produce the rock at all, the
Peace River Company having to maintain
about 50 miles of railroad track. The
dredging is done at one part of the prop-
erty, the crude product is carried to the
driers at another point several miles
away, placed in sheds there and then
barged to deep water. Many companies
have been organized to mine river pebble.
but have either been absorbed or gone to
the wall.

Business Conditions in Presidential Years.
According to an article in the World's
Work, there was an excess of gold exports
over gold imports in 1860, 1864, 1868, 1872,
1876, 1884, 1892, 1896 and 1900; in other
words, in every year of a presidential elec-
tion, but two, since the beginning of the
civil war. Since 1896 there has been only
one year in which more gold left the
country than came itno it, and that was
the year of the last presidential election.
In three election years since 1860 there
was a falling off in the circulation or
money. Three other elections were fol-
lowed by a decrease in circulation the next
year. The other elections do not appear
to have had any special effect in this par-
ticular. In 1876, 1884 and 1896 there was
a noticeable decline in loans and discount-
of the national banks. Bank clearings in
New York, which are a good barometer ot
the activity of speculation as well as ot
trade, declined in 1868, 1876, 1884, 1888
and 1900. They increased in 1872 anti
1880, and there was a very slight gain
in 1892. Bank clearings in the United
States declined in 1888 and 1900, and the
gains in 1802 and 1896 were so small as
not to indicate a normal growth. Cus-
toms receipts decreased in four presiden-
tial elections since 1868 Merchandise ex-
ports per capital declined in four such
years. There was a notable increase in
1892, a year which President Harrison
described as having reached the high-water
mark of American prosperity, though its
records have since been exceeded. In 1896b
the per capital exports were $12.29, against
$11.51 in 1895, but expanded to $14.42 the
year after the election. Pig iron produc-
tion declined in 1876, 1884 and 1896, and
practically stood still in 1888 and 1900.
All this indicates a decided disturbance
of business in presidential years.

Earnings of Southern Railroads.
The Southern railroads in their latest
reports of gross earnings show that there
is a continuance of the prosperity that
has marked their affairs from the begin-
ning of the season, as may be seen from


.. The..


*0 Standard Turpentine

7 e Company

Has revolutionized the wood distilling busi.
y ness in the South. After three months of careful
testing our machinery at the Waycross, Georgia,
mill, we are now ready to sell direct any size
plant and guarantee results by our new KRVUG
PATENT STEAM PRESSURE PROCESS. to

STANDA RD TURPENTINE COMPANY.






Kohn = Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACSONVILLE" FLA.


the following figures of the roads of chief
interest to this section of the country:
Atlantic Coast Line-Gross earnings for
March, $1,980,746; previous year, $1,949,-
521. From July 1st to latest date, $15,-
198,978; previous year, $14,469,658.
Central of Georgia---Gross earnings for
second week of May, $150,340; previous
year, $143,570. From July 1st to latest
date. $8,370O566; previous year, $8,151,738.
Louisville & Nashville- Gross earnings
for second week of May, $655,520; previous
year, $680.370. From July 1st to latest
date, $32,466,885; previous year, $30,710,-
120.
Seaboard Air Line-Gross earnings for
fourth week of April, $314,370; previous
year. $'297,696. From July 1st to latest
date, $11,130,319; previous year, $10,579,
i89.


Southern Railway-Gross earnings for
-econd week of May, $807,209; previous
year, $789,473. From July 1st to latest
date, $39,679,375; previous year, $37,165,-
736.

Every turpentine man is urged to go
to St. Louis on the Special Naval Stores
train leaving Jacksonville June 30th. At
that time the great World's Fair will be
at its best and the operators will also
have the pleasure of looking in upon the
Democratic National Convention, an op-
portunity that comes to the average man
only once in a life time. Besides, this
train and trip generally will furinsh un-
usually fine accommodations without any
extra expense.


The lumbermen are not worrying.
Nearly every sawmill in this territory
made money last season, and there is
nothing in sight to prevent them doing
as well if not better this season. In
fact, the sawmill man and the logger
can easily tallow and white lead the
machinery. turn the stock out in the
woods and rest as easy as not. But they
don't have to. Orders are coming in and
business prospects are looking up.


*,aIua......ul u .Ituamuai 1190e4II*SI3I11II**444141I*


PEARL WIGHT. Pres.


T. H. McCARTHY. Vice-Pres.


MAURICE STERN. Treas.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.


IRVING H. WELCH. Manager.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


; 401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


*31331113133C:I~ iuui1156i56ui6 ittul i-m..ul)tmu ,u,,vttu


i


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
Jacksonville, Fla.
CAPITAL $300,000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS $300,000
Strength and ample facilities. Bu'ines- solicited. Prompt attention to collec-
tions and busil:ess of customers not living in Jacksonville. Best Safety Deposit
Boxes for rent.


Inseee010;vyvvgpp;voijuvvvpvY;I;ev9rvm


"The" PAINT STORE,
I. E. BAIRD (E CO., Jacksonville, Fla,
1 all paper, pictures, frames, painting and all interior and exterior decorating.
Hardware, glass, etc. If you are building a fine home, get Baird & Co. to do
tne decorating that it may be in keeping with the building. Oldest and most ex-
perienced house in F.orida.


Planters "Old Time" Remedies A


NUBI.N TEA-For the Liver.
BENEDICTA-Female Tonic.
CUBAN RELIEF, for Cramp Colic, Horse Colic.
WARRANTED TO GIVE RELIEF IN TEN MINUTES.
CUBAN OIL, a Liniment Unexcelled.
Also Golden Crown Specifc, Pink Pills & Horse & Cattle Powders
SPENCER MEDICINE CO..
Chattanooga. Tenn.


WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS MENTION THE RECORD.









Q THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SNaval Store Department.

FOREIGN EXPORTS.

Shipments of Naval Stores Abroad Since
Our Last Report.
From Philadelphia, ship Belgenland for
Antwerp, 200 barrels of rosin.
From New York, ship Nord America
for Glasgow, 250 barrels rosin; ship Min-
nmtonka, for London, 100 barrels rosin.
From Fernandina, British steamship
Belfast, for Rotterdam, 3,302 casks spirits
turpentine, 5,234 barrels rosin; Norweg-
ian bark Kragen for Bristol, 1,719 casks
spirits turpentine. 1,100 barrels rosin,
British steamship Alala, for Buenos Ay-
res, 3,030 barrels rosin; for Pernambuco,
263 barrels rosin.
From New Orleans, Norwegian bark
Phonigia, for Anjer f. o., 4,0() barrels
rc in; S. S. Inishowen Head, for Dublin.
')00 barrels rosin.
From Savannah Norwegian bark Endy-
imion for Bristol, 1,650 casks spirits tur.
lmntin., 2.900 barrels rosin.

AN ENGLISH VIEW.

What the London Oil and Colorman's
Journal Says of Wood Turpentine.
hne of the Record's most valued ex-
changes is the Oil and Colorman's Jour-
nal. of 19 Ludgate Hill, London. In its
issue of the 7th inst. appear two articles
on turpentine, on- speaking of the Amer-
ican wood product and the other sug-
gesting that rosin itself might be made
into turpentine. The following are the
articles:

The Chemical Reduction of Rosin to Spir-
its of Turpentine.
The literature of the turpenes is very
voluminous, but as far as any practical
suggestion is concerned, it is as barrel.
as it is bulky. The Americans are busy
imitating the Russians in extracting
spirits of turpentine from pine root tar.
It does not geem to have occurred to
them that it might be possible by chem
ical means to reduce rosin to spirits ot
turpentine by appropriate chemical treat-
ment. Rosin is a very valuable product,
which is grossly wasted in being dis-
tilled into rosin oil. Illuminating gas can
be made from rosin by modifying the
distilling process. Adopting a medium
course Lt tween gas and oil, who knows
what we might get. Or rosin oil might
I.e used as the starting point. In any
case, rosin oil might find better uses
than as a cheap lubricant. Some of our
"res arch chemists might very well de
vote themselves to this matter.

Jlames A. Hollomon, editor of the In-
dustrial Record, left for St. Louis Wed-
nesday, accompanied by District Passen-
ger Agent Lusk, of the Southern Railroad,
to make complete and final arrangements
for the entertainment and accommodation
of the turpentine operators who will go
to St.- Louis on the Naval Stores Special
T:ain leaving .lacksonville June 30th.

The R cord nominates Captain V. J.
Hillman chairman of the Florida delega-
tion to the National Democratic Conven-
tion. No better selection could be made.
Captain Hillman is a prominent operator
an dwill go to St. Louis with his party
on the special naval stores train.


The warm weather is making the gum
drop.

Prices will probably go higher before
.hey go lower.

Turpentine is said to be an antidote
,or carlilic acid poisoning.

Last season was the most remarkable
in tlhe history of the business.

A feast of rosin and a flow of gum is
low the war e.'y of the turpentine man.

Turlwntine is higher by 5 cents than
for fiv years past at this season of the
year.

Spirits turpentine is holding its own
n fin shape, with indications of an ad-
vance.

Rosin firm and advanced. All grades
in demand at list prices, with an upward
tendency.

The British ship Castleventry, that
don, with 3,300 casks spirits turpentine and
cleared from Savannah April 27th for Lon-
200 barrels rosin, arrived at destination
on the 18th inst.

Thlre are now at sea twenty ships
.vith partial cargoes of naval stores. elear-
ed from American ports en route to for-
eign ports, the first sailing April 18th
.i.om Pensacola, bound for Genoa, Italy.
\\. r.-fer to the Italian steamship Vin-
e.nzo lIonanno.

A study of the tables showing receipts
it all ports of naval stores week by
veek since 1900 reveals several curious
acts. For instance, for the week ending
.iay :13. 1!04, the turpentine receipts were
16.518 casks, rosin 42,183 barrels. For
the same Meek in 1900 they were: tur-
<'niine. 16.9!74 casks and rosin, 33,421!
arrels. That is to say, during the week
Jf 19014 ;alsv, quoted, the turpentine re-
cipts were 456 casks less, while the rosin
.eceipts were 8.754 barrels more than for
tlih same week in 1900. Are we getting
tiore rosin pro rata from the same quan-
tity of gum. or are we getting less tur-
,:entine ?

Largest Cargo of Naval Stores.
New York. May 22.-The steamer Lew-
:s Lukenihach, which arrived this after-
!o: n from P'ensacola, brought a full cargo
if naval stores, consisting of 18,956 bar-
,eis of rosin and 2.500 barrels of turpen-
tine. This is said to be the largest cargo
i)f navil stores shipped from any South-
n port to New York.

Wood Turpentine and Russian Turpentine
IThe wood turpentine now being put oni
lhe Anmierican market seems to be :t
)rIodlinct analogous to Russian spirits tur-
ientine. But even although it is a home
product. opinions as to its merits and
:lenmrits are far from unanimous, its
smell. like that of Russian turpentine.
.'ing its greatest disadvantage. Pine
wousl yields about 14 per cent. of tai
from the dried stem and 18 per cent.
from roots. enginene Russian tar (?Arch-
angel) from the roots of conifers, says
Mills, has a density of 1.06. On distilla
titn it yields between 70 to 250 deg. C.
a light oil of specific gravity 0.841 toi
0.877. The 150 to 200 deg. C. fraction is
known as wood creosote, used in preserv-
ing timber, etc.


White Springs, Fla.

On the Suwanee River
The Greet Health Resort of the South.
SupNur Spring 25,000 Gale per Mnute.
Healing Springs -- forest Walks -- Shooting & Fishing
NO MOSQUITOES. NO MALARIA.
The Healthiest Summer Resort in America.


THE PRITCHARD HOUSE,


An Ideal Home for Invalids. FirstClass Table

ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES.
Write for particulars. ...
MRS. S. L PRITCHARD, Proprietress. WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE OAKS.

A Typical Southern Home


NEWLY BUILT and FURNISHED.

-Write for particulars-


EVERY COMFORT


MRS. M. C. SKIPWORTH, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


KENDRICK HOUSE,

Headquarters for Southern Families.
GOOD TABLE HOME COMFORTS
... For particulars address ..

MRS. J. B. ROBERTS, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


THE HAMILTON.

A New, Modern, HighClass Hotel.

ELECTRIC LIGHTS and BELLS HOT and COLD BATHS
- -For full information write

JNO. S. BOWEN, Owner and Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE NEW PAXTON,

Commodious, HomeLike Hotel.
ROOM FOR 100 GUESTS.


Table Unexcelled.


Every Attention to Visitors


MRS. E H. PAXTON, Owner and Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE TELFORD HOUSE

A Large, New, Three-story Brick and Stone Hotel, Newly Fure
nished Throughout, All Modem Conveniences.
Rates $5.00 to $8.00 Per Week. $1.00 and $2.00 Per Day
CAN ACCOMMODATE 85 GUESTS.

W. B. TELFORD, Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.

A. S. PENDLETON. W. a. JOHNSO. JAS. LASITER. W. W. STRPLIN
President Vice Pres. Gen. Manager. AssL Treasurr

5he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers


D. M. FLYNN
WALTER RA'.


402-404-406-408 East Bay Street. Jacks*ville. Fla.
DIRECTORS:
B. F. CAMP. A. S. PENDLETON.
THOSE DOWLING. W. B. JOHNSON
N. G. WADE, PERRY F. COLESON.


W. W. STRIPUN
JAS. LASSITER.


THE RECORD KEEPS PACE WITH SOUTHERN PROGRESS











THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


MEET IN JOINT CONVENTION,



The Southern Hardware Jobbers' Association and The American

Hardware Manufacturer's Association Meet,


The fourteenth annual convention of come. We have no keys to the city, so I
the Southern Hardware Jobbers' Associa- can't turn them over, but if you want
tion was called to order Tuesday, May 24, anything go to Mr. Crumley, and if you
at 9:45 a. m. by President Crumley, the get into trouble about it, come to me and
American Hardware Manufacturers being I will get you out.
present as guests. "I ant gratified to see so many in at-
At the opening of the convention an tendance at this convention, and I hope
overture was played by the Reading, Pa., many of you will come to stay. The peo-
band, followed by a prayer by Rev. H. S. ple of the South are hospitable people,
Bradley. of Trinity M. E. Church, South, and w.e have also every branch of trade
of Atlanta, after which America was sung and more organizations than any other
by all present. city. We will do everything we can to
The president then delivered a short ad- make it pleasant for you and your organ-
dress of welcome and introduced the Hon. ization and wish to extend to you our best
Evan P. Howell. imay.or of Atlanta. who wishes and hope you will have a prosper-
spoke as follows: ous meeting."
"Mr. President. Ladies and (;entlmen: This was responded to in an eloquent
"There is nothing left for nme to say speech by Mr. .1. C. Birge, of St. Louis,
other than to assure you that there Iaa- Mo.. president of the Manufacturers' As-
been a great change in the South during sociation. Then the Manufacturers were
forty years. The last hardware 'conven- aptly welcomed by W. W. \Webber, of the
thin I remember of was generall Sherman WA'lber-Ayers Hardware Co., Fort Smith.
with 125,000 men. who met the southern Ark.. a speech that was replied to by S. G.
hardware jobbers at this place and dis- Giltillan. of Belfast Iron Works Co., Iron-
cussed various subjects for albut four ton. O. This wound up the welcoming
months. It was the biggest hardware speeches and the convention listened to
convention I ever saw in my life. and various reports and resolved itself into an
when they left, what they didn't take informal gathering. Among the speeches
away was burned. When General Sherman delivered then perhaps the happiest one
went on his march to the sea. he I-ft very was that of Mr. 1. G. Christopher, who
little here for us. When we got back here attended the convention as the delegate
from the war. everything was desolate- of the South:'rn Supply and Machinery
nothing but ruins and ashes, and we had Dealers' Association. Mr. Christopher
to be thankful that it was in the spring spoke as follows:
of the year and not in the fall, for by "It is a great pleasure to me to rep-
winter we got enough together to live. resent Mr. Blow, the president of the
We have worked along for years. but now. Southern Supply and Machinery Dealers'
thank God, we have nothing but peace in Association. of which I am a member. I
Atlanta. I now thank God for the con- did not expect to have the pleasure of
vention we lost, for now all the hardware coming here, but when Mr. Blow found
men in the United States are one. We it was impossible for him to represent our
have a glorious government. I thought association. le requested me to do so in
the war was going to end differently in- his place. I feel that we are very near
deed, but in consequence we are under Ie t- kin to the Southern hardware dealers. So
ter government as a whole than would handle so man lines that
niany mif oils handle so many lines that
have been tlhe case had we been-divided. ar alike. e th all at the same
amni it does nmy heart gool to sce the ^ ^ I ^^
and it doe.s my heart goodl to see the places or on the same people. We offer
children of the union and tile children of the same material and the same articles.
the confederates playing together. And naturally come in o -
Thcrefore. wc naturally come in coilnjti-
Shave lived long enough to see that tion with one another. Competition is
though a dreadful war. it was a blessing what has enused the organizations to form
to this country. If we had won, we such as this and our own and when you,
would have had about eleven States, each ~nrl th n what do vfl


with an independent
are better all together
ter citizens. We are pr
try than if we had a
government, as in Sou
they have a revolution
There is not a house it
that you can see that v
eral Sherman made hii
the sta. Vhen lie left
for us to see. We hav
of which we are so pr
other Iond which holds
ware mlen. There has
ware sold and the har
nmoiny. no matter how
they always do. Once
gets itno the business a
to keep it up and dro|
pens in every branch ol
"Now, gentlemen, wh
extend the hand of wel
Atlanta. We have alt
which make about o
each one of which wai


us for tile first time in New Orleans. VWe
were more than pleased when we sent in
the policy of our association, and the
manner in which the manufacturers ac-
cepted it. It was to us the most gratify-
ing of all results. It showed the manu-
fa.cturers to be large, warm-hearted men.
lie only wanted the jolber to put out his
hand to him. He was willing to do his
part. He only asked the jobber to do his.
In what way? In a legitimate way, and
I tell you, g:'ntlemen, that that was what
these associations are built upon for a
foundation. In this way has our asso
ication grown and it is a great pleasure
to me to meet with you in the city of
Atlanta, the pride city of the South, for
we love to point out the city of Atlanta
as the city of the South. (Great ap-
plause.) In what portion of the country
to-day is the public mind and the public
attention drawn? In the direction of
the Southern States. And we are just as
proud to think that after the years of
adversity, the struggles and trials, that
to-day it is acknowledged by the entire
United States that the Southern States
are the most prosperous States in the
United States. (Great applause.)
"In 1880. only 42.000.000 tons of coai
were mined in the United States, and here
in the last year or two, over 72,000,000
tons have been mined in the States of the
South. What does that mean but great
progress? Iook at the manufacturers
to-day. They are leaving the Northern
States and ticoling to the Southern. So
let them come. We want them, andt ex-
tend to them a welcome. I thank you for
this opportunity for allowing me to come
I before you. We trust we may see you
in our homes in Florida. We have eoer\ -
thing good there, in the winter and in the
summer. We can offer -you to-di h the
tuuinimer resort of the Soith. Atlantic
Beach. (Comne and join inm. in a math in
the gray old briny ocean."
The afternoon session was ian executi-ve
one and in the evening tile delegates and
their ladies attended the thcat!-, in a
body.
O()n ednesdayn morning each association


S analyze tile assocIatons, wnac o, yu Ihelt executive meetings and in tie after-
government. -e find? lVhat is the object and cause of i non a joint session was held under tlhe
and will make bet- I the formation of these associations? You presidency of Mr. .1. C. Birge. Addresses
rouder of our coun- ill find when -you lxil it down that it is were made by Mr. S. Norvell on (Catalogue
small independent hut one thing. Legitimate competition. House Competitors; by Mr. IT. P. Bigard-
th America. where That is what we are all striving for. That ers president of the National Retail Hard-
,every few months. .
* very few months. is what we are all asking for and nothing ware Dealers' Association on The Necess-
Sthe South today ore. The man who seeks illegitimate ity of a Closer Affiliation of Jobbers and
ras here when (,en
Sere when Gn competition has but one ending. He is IRetailers: by Mr.. John Donnan. of Rich-
Sterrib oarch t und to step down and out, because the nmond. Va., on Rebates and Restrictive
the;e was nothing dealer who welcomes legitimate compe- IPrices from Manufacturers of Association
e uiilt uI our city tuition is the man who survives and is on.( eods versus Open Market: and by Mr.
s as know of nhar top. When your association was formed .I. (. Sproule. of Anniston. Ala.. on Should
o t hrd three years ago. meeting for the first time Not Manufacturers Protect Jobbers against
always een hard in Charleston. there was a very small Radical Declines Brought about by Dis-
-dwalre inailn makes
are man mae thering. but the enthusiasm that was agreements in their own Assoeiation? Tlhe
sht ake it, bu w n at that meeting led us to look evening was pleasantly sp"nt at the
in a while a fellow forward to a very bright future, and in "smoker" tendered the delegates by the
not don't know how
n don't ko ho less than three years, we did have a very reception committee, music being furnished
ps out. That hap- strong organization for our line of busi- by the Reading Hardware Co.'s band and
Stride. ness. We never looked forward, nor canI singers. Thursday morning was taken up
ile I am here I will we expect to have the large membership executive sessions and in the afternoon a
come of the city ot that the Southern manufacturers have to- joint session was Ihld. President (rumley
out 250,000 hands, day, for the reason that we haven't so in the chair. Mr. Frank Guildener, of
ne-quarter million many dealers in our lines as you have, but Sargent & Co.. New York City, presented
nts you to be wel- we asked the manufacturers to meet with "Suggestions to the Buyer from the


Travelling Man." in a manner that cre-
ated nulch amusement. The meeting then
discussed the rebate proposition at some
length and adojurned.
At night a banquet was tendered the
.loblsrs by the Manufacturers at which
460 sat down. The menu was all that
could be desired and the speeches witty
and to the point.
Friday will witness the end of the meet-
ing. In the morning officers and next
place of meeting will be arranged and in
the afternoon the visitors will enjoy a
barbecue and trolley ride tendered them
hy the Atlanta joblbrs.


Convention Notes.
Only one Floridian was in evidence, but
thin lie was a wheel-honse. Whenever
Mr. .1. (. Christopher represents his State
ie can well do it alone.


Including ladies. 700 visitors were pres-
ent.

The Reading Hardware Company, of
Reading, Pa., has its own notion about
how to attend a convention. The com-
pany sent most of its principal executive
ollicers ani with them the Philharmonic
Band of 25 pieces, a quartette choir and
a mandolin club. all from their own,em-
ployees.

Talk about souvenirs. it fairly rained
them. frcm hatchets down to the most
diminutive augur hit.


The Tradesman of Chattanooga, Hard-
ware. of New York and the Industrial
Record, of .Jacksonville, were the only
three trade papers personally represented.


Atlanta certainly understands how to
entertain conventions.


Florida Fruit and Truck Grower.
This monthly perodliceal is one of the
Iest of its kind publlished in the South.
It is twenty-four pages. three columns to
the page. mini every column filled with
good reading matter or advertising some
sterling business house. Formerly it was
a tiwenty-page publication. but its pub-
lisher. Mr. L. .-. ruiiihby. has found it
necessary to increase it by adding four
additional pages. The Fruit and Truck
(;rower st.rves two purpose in the econ-
omy- of Florida journalism. It keeps the
orange. lemon. pineapple. banana, peach
ind( other fruit growers, also those engaged
in raising garden truck for the markets.
such as potatoes. tomatoes. strawberries,
cantaloup-s, celery. etc.. etc., thoroughly
Iposted as to the relative merits of the
different varieties of fruits and vegetables
raised for market: and also gives hint
every month valuable hints as to how
Iest to forward and market his crops.
In addition to these merits it is a read-
able magazine. furnishing much valuable
information, not only to the head but also
to all the members of the fruit and truck
grower's family. Each issue has usually
one or more fine half tone illustrations
of some feature of Florida industry.
The Record is gratiti,,d to learn that the
subscription list of the Fruit and Truck
Grower. already very large. is growing
every month.


NOTHINGG SUCCEDS LUZ 8UCCESS.








10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SJ. R. PAROTrT, ARCHRa S. HUBBARD. ARTHUR F. PERRY
President. Vice-President. Cashier
The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA,
SCapita. $200.000. Surplus, $100,000
STATE DEPOSITARY.
General Banking. Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes. $5.00 Ier Year.
Q~~s~~~~; Y O F339~~~


R. S. HAILL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KNIGHT, Sec. and Tress.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,


HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES.


Review-of Naval Stores for a Week OCALA, eLoDA.
Spirits for the Week at Savannh. Prices remain about steady. Stock in- HerbertA. Ford, Geo Watsh o,
Prce Repts Sales Exp. 1903 creased considlirahlv by arrival steamer [ President. Vice-Pres. Cashier.
Mon., May 2325414 947 181 151 51 from Pensacola. Stock. 2.302 Iarrel. WeThe Central National Bank of O ala
Tues., liMay "teMaheines tThe Central National Bank of Ocala
Wed., May 25 541/ 944 187 110 49 Kosin-lMarket has been firm and a- OCALA, FLORIDA.
Thurs., May 26541/4 912 620 317 47 vancing with all grades scarce. Late ar-
Srivals will prolhnly gi\ve spply of every A C 1 A I rA 1, $.50,000.00.
Srade. W.e quote: I)I E.c : E 1. L .0. Anderson, R. S. llall, Clarence Camp, J. K. Christian, Geo.
Rosin for the Week at Savannah. BC. $3.05; D. $3.10: F. $3.15; F. $3.20'; McKay. Geo. 11. Ford. Ilerbert A. Ford.
Monday, May 23. Last Year. (,. $3.25: 11. $3.:30: 1. $33:5; K. $3:70; Ni,
WW ........... 3.85 3.65 3.:S.5: N. $4.0o; W;. -4.20 to $4.25; w\\. Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicited.
WG ............. 3.55 3.35 :.$4.30 to $4.35. TOLAR. HART & CO.
X .. ....... .. 3.30 3.25
M ........... 3.20 3.20 Bailey & Montgomery's Review. C. H. BARNES, Pres. J. D. SHAW, Vice-Pres. RALPH JESSUP, Sec.-Treas.
K ............3.15 3.10
..............3.00 305 New York, May 25. 194. BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY
H ..............2.85 2.40 Spirits Turpentine-Stock, 1,775 barrels. 9
............ 2.80 1.80 market during the week has een ll NAVAL STOR FACTORS.
F ..2.80 1.75 hut steady. Our stock has been greatly
E ......2.75 1.70 increased by an arrival of a cargo from Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
D .. .2.70 1.70 'enaol. The market has n steaTurpentines and Rosins
ABC ............2.60 1.65 from Thursday of last week till, and in-
Reipts 907, exports 4,9 eluing. to-dlay at 58c. for Machine bar- Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
eipt 907, exports 4,6. rels. Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
lrosin -Stock. 28,750 barrels. This mar-
Tuesday, May 24.-F. and below quoted ket has also been ery te hiady aill week Deliveries at Jacksonville. Pensacola, Fernandina and Savannah
five cents less than Monday's figures above and stock shows a large increase owing to Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
posted. Receipts 2,904, exports 200. a cargo from Pensacola, Fla.


Wednesday, May 25-All grade
vanced 5 cents a barrel over Tue
quotations except I, H and E, which
lined 5 cents. Receipts 1,662, export
Thursday. May 26---WW to K, incl
and D. A, B. C. advanced 5 cents a
over Wednesday's quotations. G, F
declined 5 cents. Receipts 1,833. e:
2.5,60.
Savannah Naval Stores Stateme
Spirits. R
Stock April 1 .......... 6,495
Receipts May 25 ........ 912
Receipts previously ...... 29,213
Total .............. 36.620 1


Exports May 25 ........ 307
Exports previously ...... 27.282


SAI). 3.00 to $3.03; E, $3.10; F, $3.15; -
s ad- f $3.20: II. $3.25: I. $3.30: K, $3.70; M.
Sad- $3.0-: N 4.00 V, $4.20; LVWW, $4.30 to W. FRAZIER JONES. C. H. BARNES. R. JESSVP. W. H. BAKER.
day's i President. Treasurer. Ass't Treas. Secretary.
S$4.3. UNITED GROCERY CO.,
elusive. Turpentine at London.
arrl1904. 190. 1902. 190. Importers & Wholesale Grocers
and E Stock lMay 7 14.3:4a 25.561 17,139 5,18 )
sports l)el'd this wk I.8471 1.674 2,201 2,010 HAY, GR.AIN and FEED.
Sine Jan. 1 :l1,065 26.114 32.791 32.010 Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
n Price 9t .May .. 42- 42-9 34- 26-1 B. G. LASSETER.
int. Julv -D.. .... 41 6 35 -6 33-6 25-ii B. G. LASSETER. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
[osins. (a) inclnd-s 301 French; (b) includes Vice Pros. and Gen. Mar.
44.550 110 French.
1.833 Ieported by James Watt & Son. M. A. BRIGGS, President. HOMER BROWN, 2d Vice-President.
75,278 H C. BRIGGS, 1st Vice President. .. C. McI)ONALD, Secretary and Treasurer
21,6611 Range of Turpentine and Rosin at Sa-
vannah for Three Years.
irit 451 1 421 6511 311 W: H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.


Total ................ 2 94.385 o in
WW ...... 3.3014.75 13.50 4.25 .25 3.95 HARDWARE, MILL and TURPENTINE SUPPLIES.
Stock May 25 .......... 9,031 27.276 WG ..... 3.104.40 13.253.85 2.003.70
Stock last year ........ 7,490 96.596 K.......... .2.8014.15 12.40 3.20 1.65 2.45
F .. .. ... ..11.65 2.911.202.10 1.10 1.50 Council Tool Co., & Holmes' Tool Co.. Tools,
Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Review. D .. ....11.52.80 1.10o2.05 1.001.40 Brigg's Sterling and Perfection Hacks and Pullers,
New York. May 24. 1904. Cutters, Files, Whetters, Glue Batting, Strainer Wire
The Industrial Record. Jacksonville. Fla.: Send all orders for printing for the
Spirits Turpentine-The market contin- turpentine and commissary trades to the Turpentine Wagon Harness and Collars,
ties to drag along in an uninteresting way. Record office to insure a prompt delivery. Hoop Iron, Coopers' Tools and Rivets.

Crops of Spirits and Rosins for Three Years. Everything in Turpentine Supplies,
OrN 190-04 C-o 190M-03 ro 190l1-02


Spirits. lhin Spirits. Rosin. S
Wilmington.. .. ..... 16,511 89,667 18,883 113,968 1i
Charleston.. .... ..... 2,409 3,159 3.007 11.835
Savannah....... .. .176,418 650,938 270,670 940,507 31;
Brunswick ...... .... 55,002 184,527 68.947 244.106 79
Mobile ............... 12315 50;,80 18.969 79,272 21
New Orleans.......... 36,017 133,126 33.103 108,03.3 21
Carrabelle...... ...... closed closed 3,394 32,148 f
Georgetown......... 7,515 44,214 10,307 46,899
Pensaola.. ...... .. 42,554 205,982 38,275 192,205 3
Jax. & Ferndina....... 187,210 653,210 91,976 375,211 7(
Tampa ...... ........closed closed 13,565 40,664 1
Totals...... ......535,915 2,020,925 571.096 2,184,818 59:


r- -
pirits. Rosin
6.921 109.484
1,004 13,270
3,085 1,071,440
>,669 286,125
.,080 88,572
,038 94,336
,177 47,497
8,458 50,515
7,786 154,350
4,000 245,000
3,424 51,779
3,492 2,212,413


FOR SALE.
50.000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill $2 35 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased f:'r term, of years, or canr
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in tte State.
C. BUCKMAN, *a .o-ioril. r,. t
0 v^ IYIM 1^, j k~ic3nv iii, F|


Send us your Mail Orders.

W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.,
VALDOSTA, GA.



Jacksonville Brokerage Co.
112 WEST FORSYTH STREET.
Correspolndent to The < klell Co.. Capital Stock $-20,00).00

COTTON, STOCKS, BONDS, GRAIN, PROVISIONS
Ilandled on margin or for delivery.
Private Leased Wires direct to New York. Chicago & New Orleans
Bell Phone 1560.


THE RELIABILITY OF OUR ADVERTISERS VOUCHED FOR.


I


TURPENTINE SUPPLIES






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR LET-
TERS PATENT.
Notice is hereby given, that we, the un-
dersigned subscribers intend to apply to
his excellence William S. Jennings, aa
governor of the State of Florida, at Tal-
lahassee, Florida, on the Ist day of July,
1904, for letters patent incorporating the
undersigned and their associates into a
corporation to be known as The Meldrum
Brothers Company, in accordance with the
following articles of incorporation.
ARCHIBALD MELDRUM,
M. L. MELDRUM.
T. S. GRAY.

ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION OF
THE MELDRUM BROTHERS
COMPANY.
We, the undersigned incorporators, here-
by associate ourselves together for the pur-
pose of forming a corporation under the
laws of the State of Florida, and adopt the
following articles of incorporation:
Article L
The name of this corporation shall be
The Meldrum Brothers Company, and its
principal place of business shall be in the
city of Jacksonville, Florida.
Article IL
The general nature of the business to be
transacted by this corporation shall be to
own, control, buy, sell, mortgage or lease
real or personal property of every kind
and description, patents, secret formulas
or processes of manufacturing any drug,
chemical, compound, mixture, or other ar-
ticles of merchandise; to own, control,
rent, build or erect, or acquire or dispose
oi in any manner, any real property, fac-
tory, offices or other buildings, tramways,
sidetracks, or other means of transporta-
tion for the purposes or convenience of the
business of the corporation, but not for
the purposes of a common carrier, and to
buy, sell, manufacture and deal in, Tho-
rium Nitrate, Aluminum Nitrate, Ammon-
ium Nitrate, Barium Nitrate, Beryllium
Nitrate, Calcium Nitrate, Cerium Nitrate,
Didymium Nitrate, Erbium Nitrate, Lan-
thanium Nitrate, Lithium Nitrate, Mag-
nesium Nitrate, Uranium Nitrate, Yttrium
Nitrate, Zirconium Nitrate, Soluble Gun
Cotton, Phosphoric Acid, and Starch; and
to mine, buy, sell and deal in Phosphate
Rock, Monazite and Talc, and manufac-
ture the same into fertilizers, by-products
or any commercial products thereof, and
buy, and sell such products at wholesale
and retail, and to manufacture, buy, sell
and deal in all kinds of chemicals ann
commercial fertilizers; and to own ano
operate turpentine lands, stills, and manu-
lacture turpentine and any other products
thereof, together with all chemicals, drugs
or articles of merchandise as may frou
time to time be deemed advisable; and to
act as consulting and analytical chemists;
and to subscribe for, purchase, receive
own, hold for investment or otherwise
sell, dispose of and make advances upon
the stock, shares, bonds, securities or other
obligations of other corporations whatso
ever, engaged in or pursuing any one ol
the kinds of business purposes or objects
indicated herein, and while the holder oi
owner of any such stock, bonds or obliga
tions, to exercise all the rights, powers
and privileges of ownership thereof, an,
to exercise all and any voting power:
thereof; to borrow money and to secure<
the same, by deeds, mortgages, notes
bonds or others obligations; to receive
payment for capital stock subscribed, ii
money, or in property, labor or service:
at a just valuation thereof, in the judg
ment or discretion of its Board of Di
sectors; to have a lien upon all shares o
stock of any stockholder who may be
come indebted to this corporation, either
individually or as copartners, with the
right to sell and dispose of such stock, o
such portion thereof as.may be necessary
to pay such indebtedness; and to makt
such by-laws in furtherance hereof as lman
be deeine dadvantagous, and by such by
laws, to provide that the Directors ma;
employ such officers of the corporation
at such salaries as they may deem ad
vantageous;. and generally to exercise al
such powers as may be necessary or con
venient to the purposes or businesses o
this corporation, and to have, exercise an
enjoy all the rights, powers and privilege
incident to corporations, for profit, organ


ized and existing under and by virtue of A u to
the laws of the State of Florida.
Article Li. utoo i s.
The amount of authorized capital stock
of thivs corporation shall be Twenty Thous-
and Dollars (.20,000), divided into twou- State Agents for the Famous
hundred shares of common stock of tile
par value of One Hundred Dollars ($100)
each, ten per cent of which shall be sub- F O R D
scribed and paid in in cash before this cor- I
portion shall ibe authorized to transact L au ns Automobile and LLunch
any business. Said stock may be paid for
in legal money of the United States, or L ach es i Supplies.
in property. real or personal, labor, sel-i
vices, or other thing of value, provide Repfiring a Specialty.
that a just and reasonable sum shall be
allowed for any of the foregoing, said price Fri A uob ile C o .
to be fixed by thie incorporators or di- l ri L A t o
rectors hereof, at a meeting called for that I
purpose. t 132-134 E. BAY ST.. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Article IV. |
This erploration shall continue, and
have full power to exercise its corporate SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903-04 AND TWO
franchise for a period of ninety-nine years I
aft-r the commencement of its existence. PREVIOUS YEARS.
Article V.
Thie business of this corporation shall Receipts 19034-4 1902-03 | 1901-02
lie condut-ted ib the following officers: a Spirits, casks....................... 198,647 292 496 814,346
president, two v'ice-presidents, a secretary Rosins. bbls- ......50,98 940,507 1,071,440
and treasurer and a board of directors ol ........................... 0
not I ss than three nor more than nine in Total ................ ................. 844,585 1,233,038 1,385,786
number, and who shall be stockholders of Exports
said corporation. The Board of Directors Spirits casks ............................ 188,398 296,430 814,876
shall be .tlc-ted by the stockholders at Rosins, bbls..... ................ ..... 752,270 975.428 62,687
the annual stockholders' meeting to I,e For
held in tlh city of Jacksonville. Florida, Foreign
at the place of business of the corporation Spirits, casks ... .. ............... . 93,884 206,109 217,446
on the 1.th day of July, 1904, and .in Rosins, bbls.......... ................ 338,171 504,173 585,042
nually thereafter on the tirst Tuesday in New York
Januaryy in each year. The president, vice- S it, ca8 765 5379
president., secretary and treasurer shall Sprts, casks............................. 35,658 42,765 53,797
lie elected by the board of directors, ano Rosins, bbls..... .............. .... 87,353 138,121 129,059
shall lie directors. The offices of secretary Sundries
and treasurer may be filled by the same Spirits, casks .. .. .. ................. 59,351 37,556 48,633.
la-rson. I until the first annual meeting ot Rosins, bbls.......... 326.746 387,784 98.56
stockholders, and until the officers as
above ,meintioued are elected and qualified The receipts of spirits are less than 1902-03 by 98,849 casks, and of roins, 289,569 barred
at tie lir-t election, the olicers who shall ---
conduct the business of this corporation H. ROBIN SON Pres. H. GAILLARD. Cashier
,hall be: Archibald Meldrum, president;
Robert Meldrumn, first vice-president; M. W. B. OWEN. Vice-Pres.
L. Meldruni, second vice-president; N.P. Commercial Bank, Trade C hec
Tutwiler, secretary and treasurer. The
stockholders shall meet in the city of State Depository. FOR THE
Jacksonville, Florida, on the 15th day of
July, 1904, at 10 o'clock a. in., for the pur- BRAN H'ns; Ocala. Fla.. Lake City. FlaM aUl
pose of adopting by-laws, and completing Jacksonville, - florida
the organization of this corporation. C U
The by-laws shall provide for the calling
of special I meetings of the stockholders and K IR K THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
directors and imay give the directors pow- J manufactures more of them
er to employ other otlicers in their discre-
tion. and shall fix the duties and powers DRUGGISTS than all the printing and office
of the officers of this corporation. Those supply houses in the South
lirst adopted shall Ib adopted by the ma- 107 E. BAY ST. combined.
jority vote of all the capital stock then m ine
subscribed, at the first annual meeting. MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED. Send all orders for Com-
and may e ended by te majority vot JACKSONVILLE. FLA. missary Checks, any color, any
of tile stockholders at any regular or spec- emissary Checks, any color, any
ial ine.ting. Each stockholder of this cor- denomination, padded or loose
li>ration shall ls' entitled to one vote for to the
Seac'h -lie of stock,i owned or held by hinm.
Article VL Idu i
The highest amount of indebtedness ol Industrial Record Go.,*
liability to which this corporation mav at
iian tilnl. subject its'-lf. shall b veFivm-e flu T
,1reid Thiousand Dollars.


I



e
1


f

Ie





I.
ii


it


Article VII.
The naii-s andil redenvce- of the ineor-
Porators. ;and the almounit of capital stock
ilbscribed for by each, are as follows:
Archibald M'il.iii. .Jacksonville Flor
idla. 50 sli.ares: M. L. Mehldrumi. Jackson-
%ville. F'lorida. 50 -hares T. S. (;ray. Jack-
sonvill-. Florida. 1 share.

State of Florida. Dtuial County, ss.
Sherelby certify that on this 24th day of
May, 1!(4. before me a notary public, in
and for tlih Slate of Florida at large, per-
sonally cainle Arcihbald Mleldrum, M. L.
Mleldruni and T. S. Gray. to me well
known as the persons described in and
who executedd the foregoing instrument.
and acknowledged before me that they
executed the aine as incorporators of
said The Mleldrum Brlothers Company, for
the purposes therein expressed.
In witness hereof I have hereunto set
inU hand andl allied my ollicial seal at
hacksonville. a-id county and State, this
24th ilay of May. 1904.
1 SELL E. C(OLCORD.
Notary Pl'ulic State of Florida at Large.
iMy commission expire s Feb. 19, 1905.
(Seal)
May 27-4t


THE CANNON COMPANY

CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00


BARRELS

ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barrels hold and will pass the se-
verest American and European inspection.

Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, QUITMAN, GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address orders to home office,

QUITMAN, GA.


Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
Extracts the spirts without destroying the
wood fibre. Runs out a charge in less than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-five gallons from cord of wood
Makes pure water white spirits, free from
the odor of tar or creosote. No chemicals
used in refining the spirits. Needs to be
distilled only once after coming from re-
tort.
No trouble with bi-products, the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
duced and from wood. Only one grade
of spirits produced and that the highest.
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGER FROM FIRE
Built of finest material by high-grade
workmen. The cheapest machine offered to
the public.
We challenge comparison of output and
quality of product. We guarantee output
and quality.
For full particulars, prices, samples.
etc.. address-
The Pine Belt Ccstcti Cmpamy
P. O. Box U4, RALEIGH. N. C.


THE RECORD'S SPACE HAS A BIG MONEY VALUE.







12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL R.ECORID.

JAMES A. HOLLOMON.
Editor and Manager.
Puzblihed Every Friday.
SuNaIro f (Domestic).. .3 .00 Per Annum
f(Foreign).... 3.50
Th Pine and Its Products."
AC communications should be addressed
The Induntrial Lecord Company.
JackLonvilli. Fla.

Branch Editorial and Business Office at
Savannah, Ga.

Entered at the Poetofflce at Jacksonville.
Fla.. as second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association, Sep-
temper 12. 102. as its exclusive ofcial or-
gan. Adopted in annual convention, Bep-
tbilr 11, as the organ also of the genera,
r4soclatlon.
Adopted April 27th. 1902, as the official
rgan of the Inter-State Cane Growers'
association. Adopted Sept. 11, 103, as the
only official organ of the T. 0. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.

COPl FOR ADVERTIMING.
Advertliang *opy (ehamses or new
advertisemenmas should reach us
Tnseday meormin to insure Insertioe
mt the Ioen of the mmne week.

FOREST FIRES AGAIN.
The Record makes this appeal to those
gentlemen who are again offering them-
selves as candidates for the legislature
before the second primary to take place
dh the 7th of June. prox.:
Will you, if selected as the nominee and
elected as representative to the next ses-
sion of the legislature, see to it that Flor-
ida has a forestry, fish and game commis-
sion for the protection of its forests, fish
and game?
There is plenty of law on the statute
books now, but what is wanted is ma-
chinery for enforcing the law,
We hear a great deal about the great
advantages of a railroad commission. The
courts held the railroads in restraint be-
fore the creation of the commission, and
there was not only a remedy, but the laws
were invoked to secure it. These men
were the sufferers and men can look out
for themselves.
Admitting its benefits, however, the
proposed forestry, fish and game commis-
sion is of infinitely greater importance to
this State than the railroad commission
can be for it will look out for the forests.
the fish and the game, tlhre great factors
in Florida's prosperity that cannot speak
lor themselves. Even as we write the
air is filled with the smoke of burning
forests all over the State, and this is
n arly June 1st. Millions of dollars worth
this year of our Lord 10)4, in order that
a few scrub cattle may have crisper graz-
ing. Hundreds of thousands of game birds
and animals have been burned up in the
woods. Millions of fish are being taken
to be converted into fertilizers in some
instances by men who are not citizens
of Florida.
To our brethren of tile State press, we
say please aid in this great work and
place the candidates on record in favor
of a forestry, fish and game commission,
as one of tle glorious results of the next
session of the Florida legislature.

THE WAR IN THE ORIENT.
Advice from the Far East this wt'ek
are not so one-sided as they have usually
been of late. The earlier reports were,
indeed, unfavorable to the Russians whose


forces were represented as In rapid re-
treat on tile line to Mukden, with the
probability of falling back even to Har-
bin. The evacuation of Newchwang was


OUR ATLANTA OFFICE.
The Daily Times-Union of May 25th
has tlhe following to say of the Record
and its work, for which we tip our hat


finished; the Japanese effected another in appreciation:


landing west of the Yalu; the investment
of Port Arthur both by sea and land was
declared complete; Dalny was captured,
and it was reported that lJapanese troops
had got in the rear of General Kuropat-
kiin' army. Later in the week, however,
news came that the Japanese had lost a
battleship. the Hatsuse, by the explosion
of a mine at Port Arthur, and a cruiser,
the I ohlino. which was rammed by a sis-
ter cruiser in a dense fog. Tile number
of inen lost is not definitely known, but
nily three hundred and ninety were saved
from both vessels. The latest reports tell
of a check to the Japanese advance, one
of the divisions of the Yalu army having
oeen driven back on Feng-Wang-Cleng
Iy) a superior IRussian force. One of the
noteworthy incidents of the week has been
thle alnulmnent by the Corean government
of all treaties with Russia.

JONES.VS. JONES.
IlJudge Thomas (G. Jones, of the United
States district court, in Birmingham, Ala.,
ilas rend.-,red a far-reaching decision in
the Walker conspiracy case. Last sum-
imer Joseph llattier, organizer of District
No. 20. of the United Mine Workers, and
13. L. Green, colored, vice-president of the
organization, were assaulted and whipped
while they were in Walker county on a
Inission of organizing local unions.
'IThe opinion concedes the right to form
labor unions, but says it is not one of the
rights conferred by the constitution of the
United States. The judge says in conclu-
sion:
"It wolud be a lesser evil to society
to leave the wrong unredressed than to
usurp jurisdiction to punish the offense
here. This court has no jurisdiction, and
tihe defendants are discharged, without de-
lay."
The readers of the Record are faminiiar
witl the (lyatt peonage case. We learn
that Jludge Jones. who by tile way, is a
gallant old confederate veteran, and was
governor r of Alalama in the '90's. has
ipheldl tlih constitutionality of tle fede-
al ipe.nage law of 1H847. and that he lhas
forcedd it in his court against citizens of
.\labama.. In tlhe case above cited he dis-
inisses it for lack of jurisdiction and gives
ias tlle dictum of Ilis opinion almost the
exact language we ulsed in commenting on
I" uncon-tiittutionality of that law as ap-
.lied to the t'lyatt caise.
If the constitution does not confer ju-
risdiction upon the federal courts to pun-
ssh those who interfere with organized
lalor in organizing unions, it does not
confer it uplon them to punish a man
who is simply requiring his employees to
aw!rk out their contracts-.

IT COMES HIGH.
'ITh Record notes that tile Savannah
Naval Stores Review has increased its
subscription price to $5 a year. Two
y ars ago this paper was published for $1
a year. At that time it had some circu-
lation among the producers. So memonths
ago, as it gradually became the organ of
the consumers, its subscription price was
advanced to $2.50 a year. Now, tllat it
is wholly the consumers' organ, it is mak-
ing til:.ml pay .$5. Rather steep, don't
vou think? And yet the consumers are
able, no doubt, to pay it; and, after all,
it is none of our business.


"'Tie Industrial Record, in order to meet
the growing demands of its patrons, has
established an office in Atlanta, Ga., and
.Mr. Ralph Edwardes, who has for a long
while been a member of the Record staff,
has been placed in charge of that office.
lie left yesterday for Atlanta.
"The Record is one of the largest week-
ly trade journals in the United States.
\With the exception of the Baltimore Man-
ufacturers' Record, it is the largest and
imolt extensively circulated industrial
journal in the Southern States. Its suc-
cess has been phenomenal since it was
established in Jacksonville three or four
cyais ago, and one of the great factors in
its success has been its enterprise and the
progressive methods placed behind it. Mr.
J. A. Hiollomon, the editor and general
manager, is a newspaper man of wide ex-
perience, having been prominently con-
nected with 'some of the leading dailies
in the United States, as well as serving a
long time in the Congressional press gal-
lery as staff correspondent, and lie knows
journalism in its evrry phase. His meth-
od of making a paper with a first consid-
eration for the benefit of its patrons, and
the owners afterward, hias been a win-
ning card, certainly so far as the Record
is concerned. That paper is spending as
much or more money, perhaps, in aiding
the general industrial development of the
Southeastern States as in the more selfish
Method of aiding only itself. As Mr. Hol-
lnion explained in an article in a Noltii
ern journal recently: 'If this section ot
the South grows, the Industrial Record
will grow. My paper will keep pace with
that progress. If there is no industrial
progress, my paper cannot hope to pros
per. It is. therefore, just as essential that
the Record should aid in building up anu
developing the South as in building up
and developing itself. The latter will net-
essarily follow the former.' This view ,,t
the matter, carried out by energetic prac
ti '. has placed the Record in the closest
possible touch with every movement being,
iiade to-day for the industrial develop-
iment of the Southern States. It is the
ollk'ial apler of the turpentine and tim
I, r inte ests. the stock-growing, and the
sirup and sugar manufacturing interests.
M.r. Hollomon Ibeing personally an olli-
cial in each one of tlu'se associations. Tie
liccord is particularly tIhe champion of in-
dustrial organization. It is the strong ad-
voccte of organized and co-operative en-
ergy.
"The Atlanta office of the Industrial
lecrord C'omplany will handle the central
Southern business of the company and it
is safe to say this last move will be one
If great importance to the paper. It also
maintains an ollice in Savannah, Ga., and
has an agency in New York.
"The Industrial Record is a great credit
to Jacksonville. and Jacksonville's busi-
ness interests appreciate it."


Big Price For Pigs.
One of the growing stock farmers of
this region is Mr. H. H. Whitworth, and
whose name is destined to be mixed up
very intimately with the progress and de-
velopment of the county.
He has purchased the well-known
Moore place and is growing on it breeds
of fine stock that will make it famous in
coming years.
We might cite as an example the two


12 THE WEEKhY INDUSTRIAh RECORD.


IF YOU ARE PROGESSIVE, ADVERTISE IN THE RECORD.


months' and 22 day's old pigs that he sold
at the Chambliss sale at auction and
which brought the magnificent price ot
$25 per pair.
This is a bigger price than is paid for
those at the Vanderbilt farms at Biftmore
after attaining the age of 5 months.
Marion is rapidly coming to the front.
--Ocala Banner.

To Turpentine Operators.
Editor Industrial Record:
I have noticed for some time the con-
dition of a large quantity of the turpen-
tine received at Jacksonville and Fernan-
dina and it you will allow me space in
your valuable apaler, I would like to
Make a few 'suggestions, which, if care-
fully followed, will greatly reduce the loss
alused froin leaking and turning.
I hav, Iheen for a number of years en-
gaged in the handling of turpentine and
1,utting it in merchantable order, and
have had the care of as much as 10,000
barrels at a time, and have given the
inatter lluuch study.
Preparation of Glue.
U se about three parts glue and four
parts water. Boil from one and a half to
two hours. Stir often and be careful to
see that it doe's not scorch. The necessity
for cooking thoroughly is to get the water
entirely out, if this is not done, the glue
will not stick to the wood-in fact it will
hardly color the wood inside, and your
time and glue are both wasted and in ad-
dition to this possibly a lot of turpentine
from leaking.
Use Good Glue.
By all means use a high grade of hide
glu,. Cheap glue is dear at any price
and it is as money thrown away to buy
it. A good glue can be had at from 12
to 14 cents per pound. To illustrate-
You use an 8 or 9 cent glue in a ship-
mnent of. say, 48 barrels; it will .lo. hold
and tile inspector will more than likely
have to turn 25 or 30 barrels, and there
has probably beL n 8 or 10 gallons lost by
leakage. while in transit, and you are out
alout twelve dollars. Use good glue and
prepare it properly. There is no economy
in losing a gallon of turpentine at 54c.
trying to save 5 cents on a pound of glue.
Almost 'every day my attention is called
to a number of barrels that have been
turned on account of leaking and the heads
have been taken out and there is absolute-
ly no sign of glue in them, a good many
..eing the .saml, color inside as outside.
Glueing Barrels.
F'or the first coat use a thin, hot glue.
Let tile barrel stand drive two or three
lays. drive the hoops well and Olue the
-econld tine, using a coat of thick glue,
allow ing half a Ipund or more to the bar-
.rl. If these rules are followed carefully
the turning will be reduced to a minimum
-po-sildl not more than five per cent.
Barrels.
.\ barrel to hold turpentine must be of
lirstelass material, well seasoned and well
made. The following are the specifications
laid down by the Savannah Board of
Trade:
"Packages must be well made new or
second-hand hIrrels, holding from 48 to 54
gallons gross; staves of white oak, heads
of white oak. or white ash, all well sea-
soned anid not less than three-quarters of
an inch thick for the staves and three-
,luarters to one inch for the heading, when
dressed."
I would especially urge all operators to
insist on having a tirst-class barrel.
Yours very truly,
J. R. PARKER,
State Sulervising Inspector.







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


s No. 8a8s.

I THE ATLANIC NATIONAi BANK OF JACKSONVI11E.
CAPITAL PAID IN, $350,000.00.
OPEN FOR BUSINESS AUGUST I, 1903.
E OFFICERS:
3 Edward W. Lane, President. Fred W. Hoyt, Vice-President.
* Thomas P. Denham, Cashier.
nn a.** .......i..a..a... a- an->**ai


* i

j Meeting of the Industrial Agents

( of the Southeastern Railroads,
j**0 o ..-***-ii86 i-mw-9-4l-- .f


A meeting was held at the Southern Ho-
tel in St. Louis last week of the South-
eastern Railway Land and Industrial
Agents' Association, which includes in its
membership the Southern Railway, At-
lantic Coast Line, Seaboard Air Line, Nor-
folk and Western, Central of Georgia, Illi-
nois Central, Louisville and Nashville,
Nashvile, Chattanooga & St. Louis, Geor-
gia Southern & Florida, Georgia Railroad.
Macon, Dublin & Savannah Railroad,
Florida East Coast Railway, Frisco Sys-
tem, Georgia, Florida & Alabama, Atlanta
& West Point, Wrightsville & Tennile,
Mobile & Ohio, Alabama Great Southern,
Tallulah Falls Railway, W. & A. R. R.
The purpose of the Association is to pro
mote harmonious work for the develop-
ment of the States lying east of the
Mississippi and south of the Ohio and Po-
tomac Rivers, and tak>e up matters con-
cerning immigration into the southeast
from northern states and from Europe.
Nearly all of the railroads represented
in this new association have been engaged
in immigration and industrial work, and
most of them have regularly constituted
departments for handling it. The result of
this work in the past has been very satis-
factory and had much to do with the re-
cent growth of the Southern States. Man)
matters have arisen in connection with the
handling of the work which have shown
that- co-operative efforts on the part of
the different railroads would greatly as-
sist the settlement of farm lands in the
South by homeseekers, and that by keep-
ing in close touch with each other, the
railroads would be able to greatly benefit
the whole Southern country.
It was shown that there are to-day in
the Southeastern States many millions of
acres of land suited for farming and for
horticulture, which are not now under cul-
tivation. As these lands present the best
opportunities for the general farmer, the
cotton producer, the grain raiser, the stock
man, and the fruit grower, it is deemed
important that even more active work
than ever be done in bringing before


iionumtskers the advantages of the South,
especially in the way of available lands.
I ie Railroad Land and Industrial Agents'
Association also has in mind the most ac-
Live co-operation with the people of dif-
ferent sections of the South in the devel-
opment of their respective districts, and
iill lose no opportunity to induce local
people to co-operate with them.
Reports were made to the Association
from different fields of work along the
lines represented, and these reports were
all of the most favorable character re-
garding tie dl'velopmlenti of the South-
eastern States, and the outlook in tile
way of crops and in general prosperity for
die future is very bright. From many
hdstricts were reported increasing demands
lor farm lands, the putting of new fields
into cultivation, and of the gradual in-
crease in the value of farm property. Out-
side of the reported increase in the cot-
ion acreage in the South for this year
it was also made evident that the South
is to have a heavy increase in the fruit
yield. Outside of a few districts the fruit
crop was reported to be very large. The
shipments of strawberries from tire more
southern districts this 'season have been
niiuch larger than ever before, and this
will also Iw true of the more northern
districts which are now in the midst of
their shipping season. The number of
peach and apple trees set out during
the past year was very heavy, and a very
large nuinlber of both will bear fruit this
sunnilir and fall for th" first time.
The representatives of all railroads
reaching the fruit districts agreed that the
increase in business from those districts
in 11M4 would amount to at least 30 per
cent. over any pleviou's year. There con-
tinue to be in all sections of the South
a steady ilnuiry on the part of capital-
is.t from other sections of tie country
:or investment in tiimlsr lands and fac-
( ry properties. and local capital is also
going into industrial interests more wx-
ttl niively than heretofore. Money for
investment in industrial plants seems to
. e plenty in all districts of the South.
I'roll the mineral sections increased de-
velopmnents were also reported.


Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.


CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS,

AND VATS


W Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
4F. 1M. DLAVIS & sON, PALLATKA, FLA.


The West.Raley-Rannie Company,

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
S. f.. WEST. Pres. E. E. West, Vice-Pres. W. R. Ranine. Vice-Pms. N. V. Raley, Sec. & rreas.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.



"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINGAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Flavius T. Christie,
President.


Frank C. Groover,
Vice- Pres.


Marshall W. Stewart,
See. and Treas.


THE GHRISIE-GROO!ER IRU1 6O.


Wholesale OrugDis


Jack0nille


- N


We Solicit Trade Irom Lumber ond TurpnEe Commissor Depamrten

lIOr ers Ofr Specilly. Conesponaence Soliciled. We Wonot Yor TmUr


C. H. HARGRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed

Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524- 526 EAST BAY STREET
Jacksonville, Fla.


BUY BED ROOM FURNITURE NOW
and take advantage of our
SPECIAL PRICE SALE
It is for you. You will never regret it.
May you live long to remember it.

Largest selection. Lowest prices.

Best Goods. Freight paid,

Send for Blue Prints to-day and mention the
Industrial Record.

Grand Rapids Furniture Company,
16 W. BAY ST.. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


"FAIR, IDEPENDENT AND PROGRESSIVE."










14 TE WEEXCLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


S. P. Holmes & Co.'s Weekly Cotton 1 been. It is now known that the precipita-


Letter.
New York, May 27-The position of the
cotton market begins to look decidedly in-
teresting. For some time the average
trader has been laboring under the beliet
that there was nothing in store for the
market but lower prices as the natural
result of over speculation with its favor-
able start. Selling has been general and
for weeks it has been difficult to find any
one in the market willing to buy a hun-
dred bales of cotton for higher prices.
There seems to be no question that the
market is short. The only traders have
been the bears who were bears at 9 1-2'
cents last Fall and have been bears ever
since. The South has sold a good deal ot
cotton for Fall delivery and the temper
of the trade has been bearish to a ma.l.
The course of prices has encouraged this
position and for a month there has been
money on that side of the market. But if
present accounts from the South can ibe
relied upon, there is a rude awakening
in store and it begins to look as though
it might not be very far off. Last week
the market broke about half c'nt on rains
in the Atlantic Coast region. Lntil the
records were available, it was impossible
to tell just how extensive the rainfall had


ton will gain mole in 24 hours than it has


tion was scattered and not at all heavy lost in a mointli. We are not acting as
en' ugh to do the work necessary. Vast weather prophets, but are simply stating
regions east of the Mississippi River have what is inevitable next week should rains
had no rain in six or eight weeks. State I.e \\ithhcld. October cotton under the
rilprts show that cotton in many fields Ires nt conditions in the cotton belt is I
has died. Let there lie no confusion re- very cheap mouth and a most attractive :
guarding tlie condition. It is not simply speculation proposition.
that rain is needed. There is a drought
in ci.unty after county, some of the best To the Mountains.
cotton growing sections of the Eastern There is n11 reason for the jaded Florid-
lelt. and there is no question about the ian to Ily to New lanimpshire lwlin ith
s'riousness of the situation. But, with teels lie iiu.t hunt a rest place; let himl
the change of tlhe rmoln on tile 15th. the write to 511 \est Building, Jacksonville,.
p< ssibilitv of rain storms has leen diiin i-la., and get full particulars about Ta-
islhel. Slowers come and go, but are of lhilih Falls. This is the Niagara of the
little lellp. (oo 1 soaking rains are abso- South, perched in the Blue Ridge Moun-
'titely lnee salr to prevent total destruc- trains of Northeast (Georgia, i- all ideal
tionl of cotton fields and it is getting very I hnie for thie untiiiltier visitor. Scenery.
late to repllant. 'Thli market will be closed ilihing. hunting, giood living and fil*, bath-
lintl: Tuesday mornlling and should tlihe ing are all tAo e cnjled there. ielllem-
weather ilmap show at that time conditions I, er Talllilah is 2i.l114t feet above the sea
similar 1o tllo-c pIrevailing the last fe\w anid the change of climate is as thorough
di \,. a decided advance in the price of lne\ :-- if n.-gleeting this Aierican Switzer-
cni'p month Iio. fore- next Saturday can Ix 'iand- one went to Eiirope to find perhaipsl
looked for. Fri:ln tlie nature of State re- i t a- perfect a rest holile.
ort.s throughout the month of May. it
would ie foolish to expect a good bureau Send us your orders for Commissary
oni Saturday of next week. Without the checks. The Record prints more commis-
nel sar.. r ains shorts are going to get sary checks than all the printing houses
v ry ner\iois next week. and October cot- in the South combined.


A big timber land deal was closed at
I'ensacoala st Monday when F. and B.
F. Axels'.n purcllsed from the Michigan
S'yniicate 18.000 acres of land lying along
East river, near the end of Choctaw-
iha.tch le hbay. The property sold for about
1I p:r acre for the timber alone, and
subject to a turpentine lease of two
\ears. This land is all but a few thous-
iand acrns left of the three million acres
bought four years ago, by what is known
as the Michigan Syndicate, and shows
how western Florida is being settled up.


Sam'l P. nolmes& Co.

Stocks, Bonds, Cotton,
Grain and Provisions.
MEMBERS

NEW YORK GOTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
LIcal stocks and bonds a specialty.


Bell Phone 853


Baldwin Block


CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Best in the World.
For delivered prices write,

Cypress Tank Ce, MobleAl


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.


SPIRIT TS OF TURPENTINE.


To United Kingdom, in gallons:
Month 1903-04 1902-03
April.. ....... 196.81 186.128
May ........ 0.315 63.222
June........ 795.037 1,480,186
July ........ 973.759 289.934
August.. ..... 968.890 1,77.874
September.... 773.211 646.257
October .. ....... 71.44 498,.40
November .. 661,638 1,295,769
December ..1,659,656 1,531,779
January. .. 228,850 373,240


1901-02
366.346
1,183.364
1.56.550
1.530.070

909,700
1.059.895
922,991
576,784
164,330


To Belgium and Netherlands, in gallons:
Month 1903-04 1902-0 1901-02
April......... 286,812 90.447 Included
May .... .... 23.706 51,513in all other
June........... Fi07.1 267,210 Europe
July ...... .. 576.188 819.217 869.388
August........ 489,387 38,490
September..... 265.455 758.201 438.621
October .... .. 30.914 210.001 121.480
November .. 133,695 349,726 381,226
December .. 100,372 58,659 672,164
January .... 168,879 241,150 174,367

To Germany. in gallons:
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
April .... .. ......... 114.034 112.53:
May .... .. 33,283 68.436 230.066
June.... ... 104.000 331,672 90.,04:
Tuly .... .... 368,110 180,412 78,781
August ...... 51.856 578,437
September..... 226.950 666.981 713.967
October .. ... 57.M 91.644 148.597
November .. 179,010 110,153 81,780
December ..- -
January .... 132,600 54,607 153,898

To all other Europe in Gallons:
Month 1903-04 1902-0 1901-02
April ........ .. 610 18.475 260.065
May.. .... .... 58.068 31,047 574.311
June... 145.233 1,000 C96.468
July ......... 5.000 124.284 48.46-
August ........ 2.000 2.500
September..... 43.368 3S.040 21.000
October ...... 10.000 42.832 17,05-
November .. 32,500 17,800 94,837
December .. 47,306 89,591 23,000
January ... 11,000


Total Foreign Exports. In gallons.
ing everything outside or the
States:
Month 1903-04 1902-03
April .... .... 514.088 556.815
May ...... .. 198.782 280.144
June ..........1.838.000 2.223.253
July ...... ..2.181.818 1.651.015
August ...... 1.724.15 2.906.458
Septenber.....1.474.145 2.154.565
October ...... 1.4..261 1.002.897
November ..1,851.068 1,932.183 1
December .. 1.993.529 1,794.336 1
January ... 700,292 820,253


include -
United

1901-f.'
946.676
2.268.065
2.947.821
2.493.849

2,224.9S
1.527.,36?
,652.574
.859.175
629,990


ROSINS.
To United Kingdom, barrels 280 Ibs:
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
April ........ 79,243 55,387 63.49
May ........ 60.315 63.22 58.994
June ........ 60,74s 67.542 51,632
July ......... 82.948 59.235 65.51v
August ....... 74.649 62,613
September. . 98,471 42,869 73,309
October ...... 46,641 41,034 90,57
November .. 71,107 95,735 88,643
December .. 61,455 64,455 72,502
January ... 53,506 42,769 60,518


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE
Apr I Apr. 3 Apr. 10 Apr. 17 Apr. 24 May 1 May 8 May 15 May 22 May 2
NL ND 50 49 47 45 1-2 461-2 41-2 47
SJune 5 June 12 June 1i June 26 July 3 July 10 July 17 July 24 July 31 Aug. 6
45 3-4 46 47 47 4T7 47 3-4 48 50 50 40
Aug. 14 Aug. 21 Aug. 27 Sept. 4 Sept. 11 Sept 18 Sept. 25 Oct. 2Oct. Oct 15
52%-53 53 v 53% 569 54 3-4 57 ND 56 57 1- 55 I-0 3-4
Oct 22, Oct 29. Nov. 6, Nov. 19, Nov. 2,Dec. 3, Dec. 10, Dec. 17, Dec. 31, Jan. 14
56 551-2 56 56 56 56 56 56 1-4 56 1-4 63 1-2-01
Jan. 22, .Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18,Feby. 25 Mch. 3 Mch. 10 Mch 24
6t5 t. 64 62 60 59 60 58
Mch. 30
r7


To Belgium and Netherlands, barrels .80
pounds: WW
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02 April 1. . ...3.90
April ........ 16,709 53,015 Includeo April 3 . ... 3.75
May ...... .... 23,706 51,513in all oth April 10 . . 3.60
June ...... .. 35.b66 63,67. Europt April 17 . .. .50
July ........ 26.646 19,647 40,2-7. April 24. . 3.40
August ...... 43,035 47,263 May 1 ..... .3.35
September.... 45..3 10,819 34,737 May 8 . . 3.35
October ...... 37,131 64,408 23,019 May 15 . . .3.47% 3
November .. 3,991 60,020 31,504 May 22 . 3.65
December .. 37,077 13,325 20,940 May 29 .... .3.65
January .... 60,739 24,192 15,951 June 5 . . 3.60
June 12. . ... 3.46
To Germany, barrels 280 lbs. June 19. . . 3.30
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-0 June 26 . .. 3.30
April ........ 40,558 37.844 636, July 3. . . 3.30
May........ 33,283 68,436 57.74 July 10. . 3.30
June ...... .. 41,564 49.632 48,80 July 17 ... 3.40
July ...... .. 100,236 34,874 S,3ai July 24 ...... .3.45
August ...... 78,834 34.921 July 31 . . .3.40
September.. ... 160,157 96,468 62,22 August 7 . .. 3.40
October .. .... 82.756 38.654 35,73 August 14.. .3.50
November .. 56,763 42,841 23,373 August 21 . .. 3.50
December .. 15,407 39,171 6,482 August 28. . .3.70
September 4. . 3.70
January .... 34,762 54,052 99,273 September 11 3.
September 18 3.90
To all other Europe. barrels 280 lbs: September 25. . 4.25


PROSINS


WG N M K
$3.60 $3.50 $3.40 $3.2
3.60 3.50 3.40 3.2
3.45 3.35 3.20 3.0
3.35 3.25 3.15 3.0
3.25 3.15 3.10 3.0
3.25 3.15 3.10 3.0
3.25 3.15 3.10 3.0
.27% 3.17% 5.12% 3.02
3.35 3.25 3.20 3.1
3.35 3.25 3.20 3.1
3.30 3.20 3.15 3.0
3.10 3.00 2.95 2.8
3.10 300 2.95 2.1
3.10 3.00 2 !5 2.t
3.10 3.00 2.90 2.1
3.10 300 2.90 2.1
3.20 3.10 3.00 2.9
3.25 3.10 3.00 2.9
3.2 .050 .5 2.95 2.
3.20 3.05 2.98 2.8
3.30 3.15 3.06 2.S
3.30 3.15 3.05 2.9
3.50 3.25 3.15 3.1
3.50 3.4&V 3.30 3.2
3.65 3.50 3.45 3.4
3.75 3.60 3.60 3.4
4.10 3.95 3.95 3.;


0
0
0
0
0
0
0


0
b
s
15




45






.0
10








:0


2.8
28
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.8
2.871
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.8
2.7
2.6
2.6
2.6

2.;
2.7
2.7
2.7
2.9
3.8
3.1
3.:
2!


I 1H
5 2.40 2.20
5 2.40 2.20
5 2.40 2.10
5 2.40 2.05
5 2.25 2.06
5 2.25 L85
5 2.25 1.80
/ 2.27% 1.80
0 2.35 1.75
6 2.40 1.85
0 2.40 1.90
0 2.30 1.90
0 2.25 1.75
5 2.25 1.70
5 2.25 1.80
5 2.25 1.b)
75 2.30 180
75 2.30 1.85
0 2.20 1.75
70 2.20 1.75
0 2.30 185
80 2.30 1.85
90 2.40 2.00
W0 2.50 2.15
0 2.50 2.05
20 2.60 2.15
Li CK. e *


Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-.0 October 2. 4.45 4.40 4.35 4.30 415 3.50 2.70 2.45 230 920 2.05 1.0
April .. .. .. .. .848 30,142 8573 October 8 .. .... 4.70 4.40 4.35 4.25 4.1. 3.50 2.70 2.55 2.40 2.30 2.05 1.0
May .... .. .. 27,102 40,729 99.11I October 15, ......4.45 4.40 4.20 4.00 3.b5 3.25 2.70 2.55 2.50 2.35 2.5 215
June.. ...... .. 14,044 9.682 63.3;. October 22 ......4.20 3.90 3.80 3.80 3.15 3 .5 2.60 2.45 240 2.35 2.25 2.1
July .. .... 45.513 51,612 14,1a. October 29 .........4.20 3.90 3.60 3.30 3.wi 2.70 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.35 2.25 2.1
August ...... .85 30,119 November 6 .... ..3.90 3.30 3.10 2.90 2.&1 2.70 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.35 2.30 20
September.... 27494 17,386 15.3 November 13 .. ....3.50 3.25 3.10 2.90 2.S) 2.70 2.3 2.30 2.25 2.10 2.05 2.5
October ...... 34.480 15,442 11,86i November 19 ......3.60 3.35 3.20 3.00 2.90 2.70 2.45 2.45 2.35 2.5 215 2.15
November .. 13,328 6,415 25,014 November 25 ....3.50 3.25 3.10 2.90 2.&1 2.60 2.40 2.30 2.20 2.10 2.10 2.10
December .. 25,299 48,701 39,816 December 3 .... 3.50 3.25 3.05 2.90 2.8i 2.55 2.35 2.30 2.20 2.15 2.15 2.1
January ... 17,124 7,148 24,629 December 17 ... 3.50 3.25 3.00 2.90 2.81: 2.55 2.35 2.25 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.2
__ December 10 .... 3.50 3.25 3.05 2.90 2.80 2.55 2.35 2.30 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.9
December 31 ..3.55 3.30 3.10 2.95 2.85 2.60 240 230 2.25 2.25 2. 2.5
Total Exports of Rosin, barrels 280 pounds January 14 ....4.00 3. 0 3.:* 3.15 3.f, 3.00 2.95 2.9 0 2.70 2.65 2.50 2.50
Including Asia, Africa and America out- : January 22 ......4.50 410 3.95 3.90 3.15 3.10 290 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.46 245
side of the United States: January 28 ......4.50 4.10 3.96 3.90 3.25 3.30 3.15 2.90 2.5 2.86 2.75 2.L
Month 1903-04 1902-0 1901-0- February II ..3.75 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25 :.20 2.85 2. 5 2.80 2.75 2.70 .2.70
April .. 1.. .1 181 F ebri ary IS ...3.05 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25 :105 2.70 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.55
June ...... .. 178.26 210,038 211.559 Februarv 25 ...3.70 3.50 3.35 3.20 3.25 2.95 3.(0 2.55 2.50 2.45 2.40 2.40
July ... ....... 30.580 187.193 198.84 Mrch 10 ......3.0 3.60 3.40 3.35 3.30 3.05 2.75 2.70 2.65 2.60 255 2.55
August ...... 239.155 228.f2 I March 24 ....4.00 3.70 3.50 3.35 3.3( 2.95 270 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.0,
September..... 333.50 223.032 231.< I March 31 ......4.10 3.80 3.60 3.35 3.30 2.95 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.50
October ...... 29.823 275.766 192,160
November .. 184.860 231,543 222,479
December .. 210,457 202.056 191,440ery Send Us Your C mi Check Ord
January ... 192,471 170,966 247,684 P Deiey S d Us Your CommissaryCheck Orders.

THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.


- ---


-------







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will send by express, prepaid, the following:
Four full quarts Lincoln County, Sunnybrook Rye or Big Horn Rye .. $4.00
Single Bottles .................................................................. $1.25
T will send four full quarts of Somers' Corn. Melwood Rye. Golden Wed-
ding Rye, Holland Gin. Tom Gin. Peach Brandy. Peach and Honey
Whiskey, Gin and Manhattan Cocktails-any of the above for........ 3.00
One bottle of any of the above ............... ....... ....... ...... 1 00
Four bottles of the following California Wines: Sherry. Port. Muscat,
Catawba ........................................................................... $2.00
Single bottles .................................................................. .
Single bottles ........................................................ .... .. $.00
Four bottles Wilson Whiskey, cased ......................................... $1.25
Single bottles ................................. .......... ................. 00
Five bottles Duffy's Malt .................................................... $1.50
Bulk goods of all kinds. Special Prices on application. All kinds of
liquors in jugs from $1.50 to 6$.00, f. o. b. Jacksonville.
F. BETTFLINI. W Bay St.. opp. Union Depot, Jacksonville, Fla


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE & RETAIL

HARDWARE
Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints, Oils and Glass,
Stoves, Tinware, Couintry-Holloware.
10 WEST BAY STREET Jacksonville, Fla.


THEV ARA CCNT


Phosphate.
Along the eastern border of Hillshor-
ough and the western border of Polk coun- Thi Space Heserved for
ty lies a strip of land richer in pebble ... i
phosphate than any section of like area
yet discovered in the known world. The _
section is from two to seven miles in US M lle
width, east and west, and twenty-five *us M uller Co
miles long from north to south. Within M r"
this area are located the phosphate plants
known locally by the names, beginning at Wholesale
the most northerly and going southward:
Bone Valley. Land Pebble. Kingsford. Pal- W. T. RILEY, J. A. 6. CA
metto, Electric. Bone Hill. Phosphoria. *r M President. VIce-
Green Pond and Tiger Bav. The phos-
phate is found at varying depths underly-
ing this whole section of country, and it Jacvi
is only a question if the thickness of the
Strata of phosphate will pay for the re- Proprietors Jacksonville
moval of the overburden.
Here at the head of the Alafia River
and of Long Branch and the various bays Jacks lle B in Wo
and round ponds that feed them are locat- JackSOnville Bottlin Works MANUFAC
ed these numerous plants because the
overburden is light, the strata of phos-
phate from five to twenty-five fe"t thick
and plenty of water to separate te phos- ... Agents... B W I A
phate rock from the sand of clay matrix BEST W HITE OA
in which the phosphate is imbedded. The
method in which this phosphate rock is: A C B E E R
mined and prepared for shipment is an in- AJ Machine and
teresting question to those who have never
visited the mines. One of the most up-
to-date mines is the Prairie Pebble near
Mulberry. owned by Col. Joseph Hull. of 8th Street I
Savannah. Here a large plant is built on
the side of the pit with immense Ioilers!
and engines and a complete electric plant C JACKSONVILL
with a number of large dynamos that fur-J. E. 0RNT0 & CO. AON IL
nish the motors with electricity used in _
the various motors for all the machinery
used both in the drying department andl Shipping Trade + + :.:- :. ----:
running the pumps both at the plant and a Specialty. . t
on the oats. Six-inch artesian wells have X You Want a Tur
been driven to supply them with the ncese- 0O $3 Orders and over, Express Prepaid
sary water. This water is forced through You Want a Saw
a large centrifugal pump into the pit and W HIS KI S
through a reduced brass nozzle is turned You Want any Ki
against the walls of the pit which washeS a
down the whole ma into a center pit FROM $150 $6 GALLONou Mean using
deeper than the surrounding and is takenFROM $1.50 TO $6 A GALLON You M BS
up by a powerful centripetal pump and S)le Aenlt cr.e to
forced into a revolving screen washed 1 J. H. L
where the sand and clay is thoroughly Oil Saratoga Rye $6 Gal.
washed from the small phosphate rocks 0O S 6 a
which remain in the screen until forced O11 Raker Rye, $6 l "" -
out by a revolving screw into the wet- Old B r R 6 l
mit, whence it is cvonveyed Iby open cups Od at rln $ a
arranged on an endless )elt into the dry Old Westmoreland Rye, $4 Gal, T. ( ff
bin, through the dryers large revolving g H n GRy. T Gor
cylinders under a strong heat. The dry Big rn Ry $3 al.
bin holds thousands of tons and the hot- Founders
tom of it is up level with the box car J. E. GORNTO under an
that stand on the side tracks on each side O
of the bin and when the rock is sufficient- Valdosta Georgia Special attention to Saw
ly cooled is drawn off through shoots into Vado Tinr a
the cars and is ready to 1b shipped to
distant fertilizer factories, where it i
submitted to acids and made the )ase of ,ftI A
all commercial fertilizers. RWw W V'
A line of the Atlantic oCast Line lFail-
way runs to all these plants and is t COVINGTON CO
most paying branch of the whole line. a-
for months to gether they handlee a hlin-
dred cars a dlnay on this line. which, at S HO AN DRY GT ON C
sixteen tons to lthe car at 5. pIer ton would i
mean that tihe road liandles over two and I
a half million dollars worth of hplhosphate Wh
per annuni. Some (of these plants have Whlesale
teen running for nine or ten ve.ar and SHOES A D D Y
the amount still available. s..em. to I, NE W YORK 256 Church St
inexhaustible. Large quantities are ship-
ped to Germany. It is a great pity that l
Florida has not large fertilizer factories W e Sell M merchants
to utilize the output of these mines and
send out the finished product instead ot
the raw material. L '
READ THE ADS IN THE RECORD.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
NOW OPEN
under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator aLd our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.


RSON,
President.


GEO. J. SCOVEL,
Sec. aud Treas.


Cooperage Co.


'TURERS OF


K SPIRIT BARRELS


Hand Factories,


<. R. Crossing.


"< FLORIDA

:- ************. AA~x.<^aa*** *< v


penti
mill
nd o
ess?


ine Location?
Location?
f Florida Land?


IVINGSTON & SONS,
Ocala. Florida *



Iron Works Co.
d Machinists.
Mill and Turpentine Work.
Georgia.





MANY,

i to 641 West Forsyth Street
lacksonville, Fla.

Only.


W,~~ ~ ~ ~ 1W 1W1 WW-- -


ff


I









16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

These advertisers are in this issue. If
you want anything, look through this
classified list and write to the firm ap-
pearing therein.' The Record guarantees
a prompt response.

AUTOMOBILES.
Florida Automobile Co.. Jacksonville. Fla.
(Gillert. Fred E.. Jacksonville. Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
commerciall Bank. Jacksonville. Fla.
Central National Bank. Opala, Fla.
Ierc:antile Bank, .lacksonville. Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
('uinntr Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Ila.
BRICK.
F,itter. 4; e. 1.. IJr.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jackson-
ville. Fia.
CARS.
,South Atlantic Car & Manufacturing Co..
acrosss, Ga.
CATTLE.
I';iltmetto 'Park Farm, Ocala. Fla.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
I'inkrss.on Cigar (o., J. S.. Jacksonville,
Fla.
CLOTHING.
'raig & IBro.. .. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
lienfroe Co.. H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard (lothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn. FutrchgItt & Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
II il.ey & Montgomery, New York City.
lairenito. M. W., New York City.
Tolar. liart & Co., New York City.
COOPERAGE.
1anno1n C'o.. The. Quitman, Ga.
C(',ooarage Co., The, .lacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
'onor I)rug ('Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Kirk & .Iotns, J.ackionville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
('hristiei-Grnoveer Drug Co., Jacksonville.
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
(,x iintttin C'o.. The. Jacksonville. Fla.
KIm. Flurclhgiott & CVo., Jacksonville. Fla.
ENGINES.
( hristopher. John G., Jacksonville, Fla.
Lo.mblard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
NMerrill-Stevens Co.. Jacksonville, -Ia.
Scho.ield's Sonls Co., .1. S., Macon, Ga.
gusla. Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
(itiford Iron Works. Geo. T.. Tifton, Ga.
i.\urpl.v, T.. l.acksonville. Fla.
s.-ihliclhl's Son.. Co.. .1. S.. Macon. Ga.
FUEL.
Sitlher in FIuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
-Ainville, Fla.
FURNITURE.
;iIranId Rapids Furniture Co., Jacksonville.
Fla.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro.. J. A.. Jacksonville, Fla.
1:,nfroi Co.. H. A.. lacksonville, Fla.
S la;tird Clothing C'o.. .Iacksonville, Fhi.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
SI 'ii, dialed (ro ery ('o.. Jacksonville. Fl;a.
I.!;i itungi Co(.. Savannah. Ga.
liirma ( o. II.. Jacksonville. i'la.
.h hI -'i ( o.. \\ I1.. J.acksonvil Fla.
I'<;,-wk. Ilinit & \\'.-t Co.. Savannah, (;a.
I 11itel Inrov.ery Co.. Jlacksonville. Fla.
\\ hitl. \\;alton & Co.. Jacksonville. Fla.
V, illiams Co...I .1. '..Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn. F'Irchgott & C'o.. Jacksonville, Fla.
HARDWARE.
Blond & Bours Co., .Jacksonville. Fla.
Irigg.s- IrarI lii -C'o.. WV. 11..Na iista. Ga.
(I l i-toplher. John G., Jacksonville. Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Oecala, Fla.


Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa. Fla.
Weed & Co.. J. D.. Savannah, Ga.
HARNESS.
.M.leurray & Baker. .acksonville. Fla.
Thomas. VW. I., Gainesville. Fla.
HATS.
('Crai & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville. Fla.
lenfron Co.. II. A., Jacksonville. Fla.
Standard clothingg Co.. Jacksonville. Fla.
HOTELS.
Araigon. The. Jacksonville. Fla.
ilamilton. The. White Springs, Fla.
Hot-l Barthloldi. New York ('ity.
Kendrick House. The, White Springs. Fla.
New Victoria Hotel. Jacksonville, Fla.
New Paxton. The. White Springs. Fla.
(hks. The. White Springs. Fla.
Pritchard IHoe. T. The. vhit' Springs, Fla.
Zahm's European Hotel. .acksnmville. Fla.
IRON WORKS.
I;ilTord Iron Works. Geo. T.. Tifton. Ga.
ILombard Iron W\orks & Supply (o., Au-
gusta. a.
Murphy. T.. .lacksonville. Fla.
Schoticld's Sons (o... S.. Macon. Ga.
JEWELERS.
;reenleaf & ('rosly Co.. .acksonville, Fla.
less & Slager. Jacksonville, Fla.
Itiles. R. I J.,. Jacksonville. Fla.
LAUNCHES.
Florida Automobile Co.. .lacksonville. Fla.
LIQUORS.
kettelini. F.. Jacksonville. lia.
Itlum & (o.. ('hals.. Jacksonville. Fla.
Ilowen & (o... Jacksonville. Fla.
Gornto & Co., . E., Valdosta, Ga.
Ilanne Bros., Jacksonvill". Fla.
MEDICINES.
Speni.er Medicine Co., (hattanooga. Tenn.
MACHINE WORKS.
(;ilo! d Iroin Works. Geo. T.. Tifton. Ga.
I.oUiiard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta. (:a.
Murphy. T'.. Jacksonville. Fla.
Schlotieil's Sons Co.. .1. S.. Macon. Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Scholield's Sons Co., J. S., Mnacon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker. M. A.. Brunswick. Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Iri'gs IHardware Co., W. H.. Valdosta. Ga.
(Christopher. John G.. Ja.ckonville. Fla.
Marion tlardwiare (Co.. Sc hoti.lld's Sos Co.. S., Macon. (;a.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa. Fla.
MULES AND HORSES.
Dillon & Penuel. Marianna. Fla.
Thomas. W. R.. Gainesvill '. Fa.
NAILS.
Salehi Nail Co.. New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
Barnes-Jessup Co., The, .lacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co. Jackson
ville. Fla.
Ellis-Young ('o., The, Savannah. Ga.
Peacock. Hunt & W\est Co.. Savannah. Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Co.. .Ilaksonville.
Fla.
IUnion Naval Stores Co.. Mobile. Ala.
PECANS.
Grilling Bros. Co., The. Jacksonville, Fhla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
I riggs itldw ar" Co.. .W. Ii.. Valdosta. Ga
('ain)i,ll. .1. I.. i N'ala. Fla.
( hrist(lpqhr. .Iohin G., Jacksonville. Fla.
ITaimpa Illnr'ware ('o.. Tampa. Fla.
Marion Hlardlaie ('o.. Ocala. Fila.
PUMPS.
('iristpiher. John G., Jacksonville. Fla.
Iillertl. Fred F.. Jacksonville. Fla.
Mlerrill-Stevens ( o.. Jack-4snville. Ila.
Schiolilild's Sons (Co.. .1. .. Maicon. (Ga.
\Vhite Iiakesc.-, Mfg. (Co.. lbirm itngia ,.
Ala.
PAINTS.
Itnird & ('. E I. .. Jacksonville. Fla.
Itond & Bouirs Co.. .Iacksnuville. Fla.
RAILS.
Joseph Iron Co., Isaac, Cincinnati, O.


REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith. Hrnderson & Warren. Tampa.
Fla.
Brolkston, Fendig & ('o., Jacksonville, Fla.
Buckmain. ('.. Jacksonville. Fla.
Frazier. \V. ..lJacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & 8 ns. .I. 11, Ocala. Fla.
Southern States Land and Timber Co.,
.Jacksonville. Fla.
West-Ralvy-Rannie Co.. The. Jacksonville.
Fla.
ROOFING TIN.
American Tin Plate Co.. New York City.
SHIP YARDS.
('nCille: Lunmber ('o.. Jacksonville. Fla.
Tierrill-Stevens Co.. Jacksonvillh, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
(Covinglon Co.. The, Jacksonville. Fla.
STATIONERY.
(' i.hrane's Book Store. Palatka. Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
('lydl: Steamiship) (Co., The, New York (ity.
STOCK BROKERS.
[lolnes & Co.. Samuel P.. Jacksonville ,Fla.
.Iack onville Brokerage ('o.. Jacksonville,
Fla.
TAILORS.
('iin-naglini & Bro.. John B., Jacksonville.
Fla.
Ienfroe C(o., HI. A.. Jacksonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cvprv,'s Tank Co.. Mobile. Ala.
D)avis & Son. G. M.. Palatka. Fla.
Sch.liteld's Sons (o.. J. S., Macon, Ga.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
National Transportation & Terminal Co.,
.lacksonville. Fla.
TOOLS.
(hristopher. .John G., Jacksonville. Fla.
council l 'Iol ('o.. The. Wananish. N. C.
TURPENTINE PROCESS.
Pine Product constructionn Co., The. Fay-
etleville, N. C.


J. P. WILLI.AMS. President
T. A. JENNIN:S, 2nd Vice-President.
H. L. KAYTON. Secretary.


Pine Belt Construction Co., The. Raleigh,
x. C.
Standard Turpentine Co., The, New York
City.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
Baker. M. A.. Brunswick. Ga.
MicMillan Bros. Savannah, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
lDavis & Son., G. M.. Palatka. Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS.
Davis & Son. G. A.. Palatka. Fla.
TYPEWRITERS.
G(rivot Typewriter Exchange. Jacksonville,
Fla.
UNDERTAKERS.
('lark. (las. A.. Inc., Jacksonville, Fla.
VEHICLES.
McMurray & Baker. Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas. W. R., Gainesville, Fla.
WATCHES.
(Greenleaf & Crosby Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Less & Slager, .Jacksonville, Fla.
ltiles. R .. Jacksonville, Fla.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
('unimer Lumler (o., Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fla.





lI R. F I, a
MANUFACTURER OE



BRICK.


WRITE fOR PRIEm.
Capacity of Yard 800.000 Per Month.

'P* 30.


J. A. G. CARSON. Ist Vice-President.
J F. DUSENBTRY. 3d Vice-President.
D. G. White. Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

SYNIV STORES IID COTTON ACTORS 10 W ISILE GROCERS.
Main Office SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.
Branch Oice: PENSACOLA. FLA. I Branch Grocery Houre,
Brh O JACKSONVIL E. FLA. i COLUMBUS. GA.

Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Us.
- I = I I I ==I=II = 11 HIIHI I I II I=III =I l!!: 1 = l 1 111111= I 141 I I I I "


I


S HN D. BAKER. Prs. C WV. BARTLESON. Vice-Pr. BAKER & BAKER. P. E PECK
(Baker & 1Hlmes Co.) (C. W. B.tleso Co.) Genel Cound. Sec. & Tre~a

FLORIDA FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY
(INCORPORATED.)
We can collect your Freight Claims against
Railroads and Steamship Companies.
Charges Reasonable. Your Membership Solicited.
We save you all worry and trouble. Endorsed by all Publlc Bodles
In the City and Transportation Companies.
216 Dyal-Upchurch Bldg.. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
A "k AA AA A hA A- AA A 1


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF FELLOW PINE.


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.

WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


PATRONIZE RECORD ADVERTISERS FOR SATISFACTORY DEALINGS


111-1 -1 T 1 -1 1-1-11-1 -1 I:-Vr I '. I-T-rr-1-1 Ir--1--1 I T I1II I


1





THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17




The Cooperage Company

Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels I

Capital $100,000.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.

OFFICERS:
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.
DIRECTORS:
J. C. LITTLE, JOHN E. HARRIS, C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST, W. J. KELLY
W. C. POWELL, W. F. COACHMAN.




Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are

McMILLAN BROTHERS'
Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS,
SAVANNAH, GA. J ACKSONVILLE, FLA.
MOBILE, ALA. FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.


ONE OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PAPERS.








18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY


Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.


Located in the heart of the Lumber District gives us advan-
tage of choicest material at lowest cost.


SWhen The Day's Work Is Over,


Truth Stranger than Fiction.
Newark. N. .J., May 22.-John S. Ward,
general manager of the carriage firm ot
Ward & .Ihnson. spent a considerable
part of to-day in vain striving to reach
that spot lietween his shoulder blades,
where there still clung remains of a po-
rous plaster. stuck there by a thief who
got awa3 witl Mr. Ward's two-hundrel-
and-fifty-dollar diamond stud. his waten
and chain and $50.
The carriage man was in his otlice, at
259 Market Street. one day last week
when a stranger with a brisk. engaging
manner ent-erid and introduced himself
as Dr. (. S. Colder.
"I'm about to engage in practice in
Newark," explained Dr. Colder. "and 1
want a nice carriage."
Then began a business discussion. andt
)r. ('older selected a phaeton. l ic made
an engagement to call on Saturday and


take it away. and was about to depart
when lie regarded Mr. Ward with a pro-
fessional eye.
"My! Imy!" he exclaimed, "you look all
run down. You don't feel well. do you?"
Mr. Ward protested that he was en-
joyingl excellent health.
"Ilniist-ilble!" exclaimed tihe doctor.
reallyy a man in your condition ought
to Iw in lied. You can't fool me about
yourvslf. You've been working too hard."
Mr. Ward suddenly recalled that he
had been kept at the grind pretty con-
tinuallll for the last few weeks, and re-
l cteil that lie had not had much appetite
for breakfast. There might be something
in what the doctor said, and when lie
saw his new customer shake his head
gloomily as lie shiok hands good-bye the
carriage man began to feel really de-
pressed.
However, left to himself he soon forgot


lhow hard he had been working, and made "Thenl I'll go and ask her to let me have
up for his light breakfast by a dinner s.oc.'" -aid the doctor, and after some
that would form no part of a sick man tiptoe ing around the room he went out
bill of fare. (li the stairs he met Mrs. Ward. "I'm
Mr. Ward continued in his usual spirits going t to the drug store for some medi-
until .y sterday morning, when the doc- vinle." explained tile doctor, and went out.
tor reappeared. The stranger viewed the Ten minutes passed. Then twenty. The
carriage man andu a look of solicitude aiticnt grew weary of his position and
spread over his feature's. litt<.l his face from the pillows. Somehow
"No carriage talk to-day," lie announ- i l thl doctor's absence, lie began to feel
ced in emphatic tones. "You to bed as I.elttr. lie east his mind over the various
quick as you can. You'll be my first v) llltolls he had confessed to having and
Newark patient, and I'll start off by say- decided that if he were ill it was a mighty
ing that under the doctor's orders you "ild attack. Then he sat up, put on
go to bed." sonie clothes. aid wished that the sticky
That was enough. All the unpleasant Iplshter as o '.
sensations of a few days before came I.:vryi mImient le felt improvement and
Iack to Mr. Ward augmented, and wit, llnali.v called his wif'.
ltheir- in their train. The ldoct).r bean "'I!,-n't the doctor come back yet?"
to rattle off a list of symptoms, and tihe I- i'uired.
patient deit(ld that lie had 'em all. Illis \I W\ard i aid that lie had not. "Did
f. eble resistance was swept away by tihel hie dIo y.i good:'" she inquired.
torrent of dire prophesy let loose b\ Iler husband was about to answer, when
the doctor, ani. almost I.tfore he knew his eve f(ll upon his shirt. The stud was
it. he had been rushed to his home at ,-i Ill It ped to his waistcoat. Watch,
1:10 (arside Street.
hire Str ichlain and ca-hl also missing. Then he
There tilted doctor assisted him to un- I
dress. The shirt, with its diamond or- I111"'" l t llis wife and said earnestly,
nineint, was placed on one chair; thlte "''\s. lie did me gosod."
waiscat, with watch. chain and money \ When the carriage man complained to
nit another, and their patient, wearing a lic e fnd that the same swind-
the heilice ie found that the same swind-
irsign d expression. was placed face
downward on a bed. iHe buried his face le' had lbeen pursuing the same general
in tilth pillows and tlthe doctor went to i'lan in Manhattan and Brooklyn. One of
work. He produced a sticking plaster, hli, recIet victims was Frederick Seitz, a
clut it in strips, and ornamented Mr. ral et.at' owner, of 1200 Pacfic Street,
Ward's back with crosses nd itnerlacings itrkly w tae te
until it looked like a magnified fly-screen.
muntl, I in the guise of a prospective pur-
"llas vouir wifie anyv strips of old linen'"
finally inquired the doctor, and the niuf- 'hai'r of a house. On learning this, Mr.
lied voice of the victims announced that Ward went honme to devote himself to
she had. picking off the plaster.


Machinery and Mill


Bar Iron, Iron Pipe and fittings, Bolts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tools, Lumberman's Tools,
Packing of all Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corrugated
Roofing.




JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER


d


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Supplies.

STATE AGENT FOR.
ATLAS ENGINES and BOILERS,SOULE STEAM FEED,
WORTHINGTON STEAM PUMPS, JENKINS' VALVES,
DISSTON'S SAWS, FLINTKOTE ROOFING,
CURTIS MANUFACTURING CO.'S Mill Machinery,
DeLOACH SAW MILLS. GILBERT WOOD PULLEYS,
HOYT'S LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SPRING and RUBBER CO.
Belt and Rubber eose.
SOLVENTINE BOILER COMPOUND,
DODGE MFG. CO.'S Cast Iron Sprit Puleys
McCAFFREY FILES, MONARCH EMERY WHEELS,
DANIELS' PPP Steam PackIng,
A. LESCHEN & SON, Wire Repe.


WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS MENTION THE RECORD.


-------------------- W ----- -----M ~
QUALITY PI RST-PRICES.RIGHTR






IC 00


- - - - - -


-- --


rl-, I !I I _TT-T T I _TT IX I. T.T.-IT-1


UTTITT---T-.-T--TI _TX --T-T- Z-TT-T T TI TT--T-TT-T








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 19


NAVAL STORES


Special Train


TO THE

WORLD'S FAIR
AND

National Democrati

Convention.
Train to be operated by special s,
vice, will consist of:
One combination Library, Club and Ba
gage Car, four Pullman sleeping cai
each car containing two drawing-roo:
and ten sections. One dining car. Tot
six cars.
Our schedule will be:
Leave Jacksonville, 8:30 p. m., Thu
day, June 30; Leave Atlanta, 5:30 a.
Friday, July 1; leave Chattanooga 10:
a. m. Friday, July 1; leave Lexington, 5:
p. m. Friday, July 1; leave Louisville 8:
p. m. Friday, July 1; arrive St. Louis 6:
a. m. Saturday, July 2.
The party will therefore spend July
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 in St. Louis, and
turning-
Leave St. Louis, 10:30 p. m., Saturd;
July 9; leave Louisville 8:00 a. m. Si
day, July 10; leave Lexington, 11:55 a.
Sunday, July 10; leave Chattanooga, 6
p. m., Sunday. July 10; leave Atlai
12:10 a. m., Sunday, July 10; arrive Jai
sonville 10:05 a. ni. Monday, July 11.
This train will be A solid vestibuled o
composed of the very latest and new
equipment, and will run through to
Louis and return for the exclusive 1
of Lhe Naval tSores people.
Our route will be over the SOUTHIE]
RAILWAY, going and returning.
The expense of the trip will be:
Railroad fare, Jacksonville to St. Lo
adn return, $27.50 each; one lower her
Jacksonville to St. I.culs, one way, $6.
round trip, $13.00: ore upper berth, Ja
sonville to St. Louis, one way, $6.
round trip. $13.00; one section, lower a
upper berth. Jacksonville to St. Loi
one way, $13.00, round trip, $26.00; dra
ing-room, Jacksonville to St. Louis, 4
way, $24.00, round trip, $48.00.
The berths are of regular size and i
of course accommodate two people, 1
for a couple it will be better to havi
section, which will be the lower anrl up
berths.
Dining car will be operated on ta
d'hote plan at $1.00 each meal for ei
person. Three meals will be served
the going trip, being breakfast, lui
and dinner, and these three meals will
$3.00 for each person.
Four meals will be served on the
tur trip, being breakfast, lunch and d
ner and breakfast, and same charge i
be for each person.
Under this arrangement, therefore,
will cost one person on this special tr
from Jacksonville to St. Louis and
turn:
Round trip, railroad fare ........ $2"
One berth, round trip ........ 1.
Six meals, round trip ............ ;
$46
Two people will be twice $46.50
so on.
The number of passengers on this tr
will be positively one hundred.
It is necessary, therefore, in order
conclude all detailed arrangements for
plications for space on this "Special" to
filed with the District Passenger Ag
Southern Railway, Jacksonville, F
as early as possible. Each application
then be assigned certain space on
train, and such applicant will be fully
formed in a personal letter.
Address
JAS. A. HOLLOMON,
Secretary,
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Jacksonville Wholesale Lumber Market.
(For week ending May 20.)
Merchantable.
lard schedules-410.50 to $13.00.
Sound and square schedules, $9.50 to
$12.00.
Merchantable car material-
Average schedule of sills, :6 feet and
under, 10 inches and under, $13.00 to
$14.00.
Special schedules-according to sizes
and lengths-prices steady.
K. D. Saps-"6" and up 80 per cent
clear, $9.50 to $10.00.
Flooring:
$11.50; No. 4, $8.50.
Cypress.
First and seconds, 4 quarter base, car-
load prices, $34; selects, 4 quarter base,
No. 1, $15.00; No. 2, $13.50; No. 3,
$28; shop, 4 quarter base, $20.
Cypress Shingles-6x18 A's, per 1.000
pcs., $5.25; primes, $4.25; 4x18, A's, $3.50;
primes, $2.75.
Cypress laths, $2 per 1,000.
Cypress market strong. Mills have
more orders than they can fill. Prospects
good for higher prices. Dry stock scarce.


Business Directory.

CHAS. A. CLARK, INC.
FUNERAL DIRECTOR AND EMBALBER
4 and 42 W. Forsyth St., Jacksonville, 1I.
Telegraph orders receive prompt atten-
tion. Open always.

JOHN ZAHM' EUROPEAN HOTZIL
128 E. Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant. Nicely FPrnished
Rooms. Open day and night. Bettllni's
old Stand.
Conover's Drug Store, Bay and Julia,
Jacksonville, Fla. Mail us your orders
for commissary drugs. Give us a trial.
J. 8. PINKUSSOHN CIGAR COMPANY.
5 W. Bay Street, Jacksonville. Fla.
THE BEST OF EVERYTHING
TO SMOKE AND CHEW
The Largest Tobacconlsts in the South

JACKSONVILLE

Manufacturing Location

or Shipping Point.

Deep Water---Railway Terminal
ADDRESS
GIFFORD COMPANY
e ral eal Esale l ers.
Laura Street. Jacksonville. Fla.


iM W. LARENDON,
will Naval Stores
it
ain Commission Merchants.
ROSIN, TURPENTINE, TAR, PITCH,
I *50 GUM THUS, RICE, ETC.
1.00 38 Front Street, EW YORK.

B50 IY & MONTGOMERY,
and

ain Commission Merchants,
to Naval Stores & Cotton
ap- Liberal advances made against hip-
Sbe ments. Consignments solicited.
ent
na., COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
will NEW YORK CITY.
the
in-


Pumping Outfits OR

Turpentine Stills
WITH FIRE PROTECTION CONNECTIONS.

Best PUMP in the World
From 40 to 700 Gallons of Water per Minute.
Write or call on
FRED E. GILBERT.
Automobile Headquarters
29 West Forsyth St.. Jacksonville. Fla.





Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advertisements Will be Inserted In This Department at the Following Rates:
For one week. 20 cents a line.
For two weeks., 35 cents line.
For three weeks, cents a line.
For four weeks, - cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Thursday
morning to secure insertion in Friday's paper.


Five Registered Shorthorn Balls
One is half brother to "Beauty Boy,"
who was champion at three Texas shows.
Another is half-brother to our 1800 pound
cow. "Mary Spears." All good and ready
for immediate service. Prices $100.00 to
$175.00, subject to previous sale.
Palmetto Park Stock Farm, Z. C. Chanm-
bliss & Co., proprietors. Ocala. Fla.


For Sale.


Stiller Wanted.
An experienced turpentine stiller want-
ed Mlan with family preferred. Address
Fletcher & IMurrell. Altman. Fla.

Turpentine Men.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. 1 outfit pumps 2,000
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 cents and
requires no attention while running.
Started in one minute. J. R. Campbell,
Ocala, Fla.


200 tons 48-lb. relaying steel rails West
Virginia and Kentucky delivery. 100 tons For Sale.
60-lb. relaying steel rails, Southern de- Six thousand anres land, 4.500.000 feet
livery. 1500 tons 56-lb. relaying steel cypress. 2.100 .01( feet pine timber; bear-
rails, West Virginia delivery. 150 tons 30- inig range grovv; eight houses; hotel,
lb. relaying steel rails, West Virginia de- i tore,. newspaper and plant, or capital to
livery. Isaac Joseph Iron CopVpany, 525- Ide 535 Hunt St., Cincinnati. Ohio. inn wells; fine vegetable lands. John E.
Harris, St. Francis, Fla.
Wanted. .. are thinking of bu.yin a
A position as manager of turpentine laee, selling the omne you have. or
1;edin=g; if you are thinking of ia-
place by a man with several years of ex- v n i am any industry; If you wnt
I'lience as manager. C'an furnish best of to buy machinery of any a d ro
rfrthe ndatnes. ai Reord, postal elr
references. Address Manager, Thelma, Ga. telling Of Recr wlat.


W. J. L'ENGLE.
President.


J. W. WADE.
Vice-President.


F, G. HUGHES,
Sec'y and Treas


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.


DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.

Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.



NeW ViCtoria. Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.
Corner Main and Adams,
Opposite Board of Trade Building.
Jacksonville's New Hotel
Rates $2.oo00 to $2.50.
R. BILER, Proprietor. Send your order for general printing to the Record

"THE PINE AND ITS PRODUCTS."


,








20 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commissary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 27
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 28
10 .. 29
A. C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 18

Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... Market
"' 50-1b tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-lb tin. ............

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 16


Sugar


Granulated
"6


Sugar, bhls.....
5 bbls..
10 bbls..
S sacks..


500
495
495
500


Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb ................. 80
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ........ 10
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 8
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages...... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ages ............ market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 14
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
S Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 50
English B'fast, 10 lb.. 45
Formosa, 10 lb....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10c size
10 lbe to case, per pound-.. 40

Salt
200-lb sack................ 100
100-lb sack................ 50
Ice Cream, 200-lb sacks..... 1 00
100-lb sacks..... 50
Pocket Saltin bbls., 8-lb.... 265
'' "' 2-lb.... 275

Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin.............. 21
Ground 1-8 tin, 3 doz to box
sifter top, per doz...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and 80

Corn
100 Sk Les 100
Car Lot Lot Sk
W.Corn,1101b, 143 1 45 1 48
1001b, 1 29 1 81 1 84
Mxdcorn;1101b,1 14 140 143
S 1001b,l 25 1 27 130


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....

Oats


car Lot
W.clip'd,1251b,2 20
1001b,1 75
White 1251b, 2 10
White 1001b. 1 67
Mixed 1251b 2 5
S 1001b, 1 64


100 Sk
Lot
222
1 77
222
1 69
2 7
165


Less 10:1
Sk Lots
225
180
2 15
1 72
2 10
168


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 Ibs:, choice .... 1 65
S. . fancy..... 1 70
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 5 75
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 lb sack........ .5 75
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 5 75
Pillsbury's Best ..... 6 00
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 6 25
bbl ......
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 3 50
92-lb sacks......... .1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel............ 8 60
S 92-lb sacks...... 1 60

Rice
Good...................... 5
Choice ................ 54
Fancy Head............... 6
Broken ..... .............. 3

Canned Vegetables
Doz.
Tomatoes, 3e, Chief ....... 90
Tomatoes, 2s ........ 80
Clayton,3s................ 45
Clayton, 2s ............... 70
Sifted Peas, 2s ............1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s........1 20
Lima Beans,2s ............1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 3s........... 90
Baked Beans, Is........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............ 1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets. 3s...........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ........... 85
Saner Kraut, keg.........
Pumpkin, 3s ............ 90
Hay


car lotS 100 bale
lots
Choice....19 50 2000
No.1 Tim. 18 00 18 50
No. 2 1700 1780
No.1 Cl'ler 17 00 1750


les.q
quantity
2050
1900
1800
1800


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 401
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz............ ... 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case.
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 3 85

Candy


Mixed 80-lb pails, per lb... 7
10-lb .' 8
Gum drots:, 0-lb pails, Fer
lb .................. 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 84
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 13
Ex. Choice " '
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lh. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 36-lb. case 3 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
xb.x, 40-50............. 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 0-60.............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 3 crown..... 1 85
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 90
Seedless, 1-11 packages .... 12
Citron, 10-lb box......... 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 64
Extra H P, .... 5
Seed Peanuts, "
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11;
Almond ............ .... 18,
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Peacans.... ............. 12
Filberts...... ............. 12
alO nuts.................. 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 Less I
lots Sk. Lot Sk. L
Cottonseed Meal 27 00 27 50 28 0
S Hulls 1150 12 50 180|


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
8 hoop .......
Nest Measures, 5 pieces...... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz....... 1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
nested......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 60
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. 1 20
Washboards .,
Dozen
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay......... ......3 00
175 Diamond Glass ...... ..8. 25
O. W D., 17 inch, per doz 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75

Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
doz ........ ......... 9
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 75
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 65
Salnlo" is, Tale 4 doz to case
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon, Is, 4 doz to case,
per doz Col. River .... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins....... 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 1b ...... 95

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-1b pails............. 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box............. 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per Ib. 8

Kingan's Meats.


"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge ... 141-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avge 14
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avge .. 131-2
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge.. 1-4
"Reliable" California Hams, 6-8 9
breakfastt Bacon, light av. .... 131-2
D. S. Bellies, 16-18 av. ........ 83-4
D. S. Bellies, 20-22 av. ......... 81-2
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av. ......... 81-8
D. S. Plates .................. 71-2
Bacon P'ates .................. 81-2
D. S. Butts .................. 63-8
Bologna Sausage ............... 7
Sausage in oil ................ 75
Butter and Cheese.
'Strawberry" Creamery, 60-lb tubs 25
30-lb tube 251-2
S so, Is... 261-2
"Ladybird" full cream cheese .. 121-2
Kingan's ard.
"Indiana" Pure Leaf ........... market
iea-Foam" Compound ........market.
Kingan's Canned Meats.
"Reliable" Corned Beef, ls ...... $1.25
Corned Beef, 2s ...... 2.25
Roast Beef, is ........ 1.2
SRoast Beef, 2s ........ 2.6
Potted Ham and Tongue
1-4s ......................... 3
Sliced Beef, 1-28 .... 1.15
Vienna Sausage, 12 .. .85
Tripe .................. I


GET A COPY OF THE nAVAL STORES BLUE BOOL




THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 21
SPresident, W. C. POWELL; Vice-President a. who with the Preeldent constitute the Directory ana Board of Managers, W. F COACHMAN. B. F. BUL-
LARD, H. L. COVINGTON, H. A. McEACHERN. JOHN R. YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMIILLAN. C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS. C. B. ROGERS; Auditor. JOHN HENDERSON.
*
. *


COiilOD NAVAL ORI8 COMPANY,


Jc1so1 ville, F11.


Sov na, to .


Pe sa cOl, Ft1.


MNAVAl STORES FACTORS.

pOid ini Goilol StOK, ,500.000. 0Ownd d Cfolled by Paciol oertglor
Small Amoull 01 SIoc Yel in Resele I o lell o 010lo1r Who Cii AInge lo BUy.


The Consolioled is Purely o Cooperolii ve COii its l l l re
01 lhe Prodlcers. Te Poliironei 01 Oliaenlin O aors eien
PMlen ol Money ind Plen ol limber lor101 11Er


Ildeical With Those


where Miled


YARDS AT JACKSONYILL, SAVANNAH, FERANDINA n1 P11SACOIA.


All Producers ore invited lo Cll or CoireSionl


.IIuIlldll mINM BllllllllFI


THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIACL."









22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.






Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertising patrons of this paper and no

charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention


For Turpentine, Sawmill or Factory Suplies or Machinery of Any Kind. For Timber. Farming or Range Lands.
DATE INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville. Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main Office. Jacksonville. Fla. I am in the market for lands for the purpose of
In the market for the following Prefer in State of Please put me in communication
with responsible parties and give me other information.
Remarks
Please notify where same can be secured Signed
Signed

State specifically the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or second-handed. DATE

Location for Turpentine. Sawmill or Factory, or for Any Industrial Enterprise. For Cmmissary. Office or Isehld Sppilles, Sawmill or Turpentine Mules
trses, Wagons, Etc.
DATE
DATE____
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jatksonville, Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla.
Please advise the undersigned regarding a good location in (state or section of
state) for In the market for
state) for
together with full information about labor conditions. taxes, transportation facilities,
local encouragement, etc.
Remarks Please give me information as to best places to bay, etc.

Signed Signed


Do You Want to Sell Something? Are YoR Thlaking of Investing?
DATE P4TE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville. Fla.
Have for sale the following Can you give any information as to the reliability of the following firm or corpora
tion
Remarks
Can you suggest a purchaser'
Signed Signed


Do You Want to Employ a Man? Do Yo Wnt E ly t?
DATE
DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville. Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville. Fla.
Want a man to fill the position of Want a position as__ -
Refer to the following
with the following requirements

Can you suggest such a man ? Can you assist me?
Signed Signed




CLIP THIS COUPON!
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORDs
When you are answering an advertisement from the columns of this paper, whether you are making an inquiry or placing an order, please cut out the coupon
below and attach it to the letter. It will pay you.

COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the Industrial Reaord, issue dated

Signed


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonville. Fla., and Savannah, Ga.. is the South's great
weekly trade journal.



The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.



IP YOU DON'T FIND IT IN THE RECORD WRITE US








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


McMURIRAY & BAKER,

MW Mill ndp lrpnohine Hrnes COnzer BaYlnd
SOW Mill onld Tulgpnelll! Haniress.l Liberty Streets.






JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnificent steamships of this line are appointed to sail as follows, calling
at Charleston, S. C. both ways.


From New York,
(Pier 36 North River).


Prom Jackmonville for
UTEAiICB. Charleston and New York.


Friday, May 13, at 3:00 pm. .ALGONQUIN ...... Thursday, May 19, at 7:00 am
Sunday, May 15, at 3:00 pm ..!IROQUOIS ........ Saturday, May 21, at 9:00 am
Tuesday, May 17, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ........ Sunday, May 22, at 10:00 am
Thursday, May 19, at 3:00 pm .ARAPAHOE ......Tuesday, May 24, at 12:00 n'n
Saturday, May 21, at 3:00 pm .COMANCHE ......Thursday, May 26, at 1:00 pm
.."SEMINOLE ....Friday. May 27. at 4:00 am
Tuesday, May 24, at 3:00 pm ..ALGONQUIN .... Sunday, May 29, at 4:30 am
Wednesday, May 25, at 3:00 pm ...... '"xHlHRON Tuesday. May 31, at 5:30 am
Friday, May 27. at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ...... Thursday. June 2, at 7:00 anm
Monday. May 30. at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Saturday. June 4, at 8:30 am
Wednesday, June 1, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE .Monday, June 6, at 10:30 am
Friday. June 3, at 3:00 pm ....ALGONQUIN ..Thursday, TJune 9. at 12:00 n'n
*xSEMINl Tuesday, June 7, at 3:00 pm ....APA'CHE .... Sunday, June 12, at 4:00 am
**xHURON........ Monday. June 13, at 4:00 am
Thursday, June 9. at 3:00 pm .ARA ..ARAP... Tuesday, June 14, at 4:30 am
Saturday, June 11, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ..Thursday, June 16. at 6:00 am
*NAVAHOE .... Sunday, June 19, at 9:00 am
Tuesday, June 14, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS .... Sunday. June 19 at 9:00 am
Wednesday, June 15, at 3:00 pm..ALGONQUIN ..Tuesday, June 21, at 11:00 am
Friday, June 17, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE .... Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'n
"xSEMINOLE . Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'n
Monday, June 20. at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAIOE ....Saturday, June 25, at 1:30 pm
Wednesday, June 22, at 3:00 pm..COMANCHE ..Monday, June 27, at 4:00 am
***xHURON....... Tuesday, June 28, at 5:00 am
Friday, June 24, at 3:00 pm....IROQCOIS .Thursday, June 30, at 6:00 am
"NAVAHOE ......Saturday, July 2, at 7:00 am
Tuesday, June 28, at 3:00 pm ... .APACHE ..........Sunday, July 3, at 8:00 am
Thursday, June 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Tuesday, July 5, at 9:30 am
x-Freight only. *-Boston via Charleston and New York.
--Boston via Brunswick -'d Charles ton. "--Boston, via Charleston.
THE CLYDE NEW ENOLAID AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Direet *rvlee Between Jaeksonville. Boston and Providenee and all ramt-
era Ponlt., CIllmg at Charleston BetL Waye.
SEMI-WEEKLY SAILINGS.
Southbound.. ........ .........................rom Lewis Wharf. Boston
Northbound.. ........ ........ ..From foot of Catherine Street, Jacksonville
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jaeksomnvll and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis, Beresford (De Land) and Intermediate
landings on St. Johns river.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville, Sundays, Tuesdays and Thurs-
days, 310 p. m. Returning. leave Sanford. Monday. Wednesday & Fridays 9:30 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND. INORTHIBOUND,.
Read down, I I Read up.
Leave 2:20 p. m. ...... ........ ... Jacksonville... ........ ....... Arrive 2:00 a. m.
Leave 8:45 p. m. ..... .. . ......Palatka.................... ....... 4eave *40) p. m.
Leave 1:30 a. m. ............ ......... Astor................ .............ILeave 2:30 p. m.
Leave 4 a .. .........St. Francis.............. ......... Leave 1:00 p. m.
.............. .... ... ... .... eresford (DeLand).............. ......... Leave 12.0 noon
Arrive 8-30 a. m....... .... ...... .......Sanford......... .......... ...... Leave 9:0 a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m................... Enterprise..................... Lv. 10:00 a. m.
fiRRIRAI PiAtSENGER AND TI(KlKT OFPFIcE. 204 W. Bay St.. Jaekvtllle.
P. M. IRONMONGER. JR.. Asst. Geni Pase Agent. 204 W. Ray St.. Jacksonvll'e. FIr
W. 0. COOPER, JR., Local Frt Agt., Jack'ville. C. P. LOVELL. Asst. Supt..Jack'vilv
Foot Hogan Street. Jacksonville.
A. C. HAGGERTY. G. E. P. A., New York, CLYDE MfLNE, 0. P. A.. New York
THWO. 0. EGER, WM. P. CLYDR CO.
General Manager. General Agents,
Chlebrougm h Building. 19 State Street, New York.


f w k oU ..J..t E... tt*.j

th. IcL 3
sices of this ,
The mes will -be larg
the tees of th sport are on -a
th nts with pleasure.
lWer
WELL.EKESERVED S1CCOSS. *Iwi
Jaekannvtlle sthe te-I of One of ie
Amueer g's Leading Trade Joarrale.
The Weekly Industrial Record of Jack- Poree
eonville and Savannah has taken its place Al
among the leading trade journals In the .
United Statqp. and as an authority on lum- Ri
ber and navrl stores It la being quoted not R4
only by the best and most carefully edited dsS
c laser papers in this country, but by those s 8i
In Europe also A London trade paper for
reaching this office yesterday gives liberal a fe
space to the Record's views on market con- n
ditions. tot 2
Thls week's issue of the Industrial Rec- anid
ord ts even better than usual. and it is Th
o strong and entertaining general indus- trial
trial newspaper. in addition to Its value Ha
ea the champion of the two specific Indus- e- a.
tries It represents. It Is brimful of new Johr
stories of development In the Southeast. plail
among them being the story of a half-mill- fend
Son-dollar corporation organized In Jack- Ge
monville yesterday. and the organization of H 1
several other bjg corporations during the and.
week In Georgia and Florida. w"
< It has set the pace for enterprise and It Wail
well deserves the great measure of success rick
It is receiving. both in Its subscription and
advertising departments.carrying as It does.
perhaps, one of the largest advertising pat-
troages grven to any of the Southern tra r. F
Journals. .m
9tr.
DUATE OP A. j. RILA.&1N In
erty.
emne at pheasto,-PeUe IIs .
ST-- Ti orml stre
**".s, who' This
i111 nodef
-- -----U1 --- --



]JJJ 0.!s 0 Q0 000000000001 )L(Q QQ. Q itSQeg Q 0_.._S..0.j.9 0 00 0 000. A 0
SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
30 YEARS RELIABILITY. a
Hess & Slager,
D Diamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry
6 CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND 11 & 13 MAIN.
Fobo aa0 a a a0 0a a c 0 o 0 0 a a o ol-a o'o" 0 0 0o 0 a aa a a a 0 a 56 ao'o T 6


Naval Stores MarKet

and StocK Report
Published Daily in The




Jacksonville Metropolis,
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.

$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.


BIG PRIZES:


A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposi'icn, to
Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.



Carter & Russell Publishing Co.

Jacksonville. Florida.


WRITE THE RECORD FOR ANY INFORMATION DESIRED.


yrF I ''


__~~__~_ ~ __ __


I







24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J H CROSBY. President


CM UVLLER. Vice-Presldent


JAS F LANE. Secy 0 Trei


bhhahsd
9061sse


Incrpoated
M69


Greenleaf &


Crosby


DepawLauenb


Diamonds and Other Precious
Stones


Company


3r)"Celne anb

bilbtbemitbs;


41 West Bay Street

Jacksonville

The lowest and fineSt sto s in thi part of the
Soahea States. Prompt attention to mal orders


Write for Catalogue


Fine Gold Jewelry


American and Foreign Watches
and Clocks


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


iT L1

I.


Fine China Dinner Sets and
Fancy Pieces


European Novelties


%THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.o
of Wananish, N. C.,
Formerly of Council's Station, N. C., are still selling Diamond Edge
Hacks at $8.00, Black Joe and Standard at S5.00, Old Style and Patent a
Pullers at $6.00 a dozen. They should average a little better than ever.
We have brought out a new brand, the Blue Line Hacks at $8.00 and Pull-
ers at 8.o which are warranted. All wholesale dealers In naval stores
supplies carry our lines and should supply operators.
lii* 4**.wwwwwnesust**w*wW


D. G. McKETHAN, Prcsident.
Jacksonville, Fla.


ALFRED A. McKETHAN, L't U. S N.
Ret'd Sec'y and Tress. Constructing
Engineer. Fayetteville, N. G.


Pine Product Construction Co.
INCORPORATED
Fe.yetteville. N. C.
Spirits of Turpentine, Oil of Tar, Creosote, Tar, Disinfectants: Wood Preservative,
Paints. Wood Stains, Etc., and Charcoal, from LJghtwood Stumps, Box-facings.
Profits increased. Time of distillation reduced. Condensation controlled at will.
No danger from fire. Plant erected complete, and men taught the process. Fur-
ther information, write Alfred MacKethan, general manager. Fayetteville. N. C.

THE PHILADELPHIA TAILORS
JOHN B. CAINGAGLINI & BRO.,

MERCHANT TAILORS AND IMPORTERS


48 W. Bay Street.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


HOTEL BAR5THO hDI BROADWAY AND 23d ST.,
U LL /IIULUI NEW YORK CITY.
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout.
Near all Big Stores and Places of Amuseme',t. Uars Pass
the Door for all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings
Large Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
S find no grand and magnificent decorations, no luxurious
0 grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
Speak to You. No Employees In Any Way Inartentative.
But just a cozy. hme-like 1Ittle hotel that will appeal to the
hearts of those who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plain American cooking, and affable and courteous treatment. 6
w ITwU*T ROB",0 POpietoaor.s
a*r*~* 0"; *a is is a**a a*--__-a"!


SJohn R. Young. President. C. S. Ellis, Vice-President.
SJ. W. Mottoe. Jr. Secretary and Treasurer.


_h ELLIS-YOUNG CO.

SCommission Merchants
NAVAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

| Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.

SamiUAiYWaaYIaIYAUAaaUIUalauuru-uiA ui


J. W. HUNT. President.
P. L. PsACocK, ist V. P-


J. 9. HARRIS. S V. Pres. C. R. SHOUSE. See. a Trs.
W. J. KELLY. 3d V. P. H. L RICHMOND. Asst See'y-Treas


Peacock-Hunt & West Company,
General Offices: 20 Bay Street, f, Savannah, G. ad
SWest Building. Jacksenville, Fla.
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutual We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that buys spirits
Turpentine and rosin.)

WHOLES LE GROCERS,
Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our Specialty
-SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Union turpentine Axes and Wilson & GhiMs'
Philadelphia Wagons.

Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga., and Jacksonville
and Fernandina, Fla.