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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00073
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 20, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00073
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text







'"JgB4I E AND ITS PRODUCTS."
RECEIVED



WEEKL- INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

Ad9pt.d Sept. 12th. 1902. by te Executive Committee of the Turpentine Operators' Association as Its Exclusive Offtclal Organ, and Adopted Sept. Ilth. 1902. In Ausmal Col
reati as an Oftclil Organ Also of the general Association. Adopted Sept. I tb, 1903, as the only Official Organ of the Trpentine Operators' Association.
Adopted April 27th. 1903, as the Official Organ of the Inter-State Cane Growers' Association. Endorsed by the 6eorgia Sawmill Association.


VOL 8. NO. 21.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA


MAY 20, 1904.


SAVANNAH, GA. $3 A YEAR.


THE SEYMOUR CROSSTIE HEWER AND VENEER MILL,


This Machine is one of the Greatest Inventions of the Twentieth Century.


'I,


~L F---- __A
---low
.ew- M.- A


The patent for this wonderful machine
was granted to Mr. B. H. Seymour, of
Ocala, Fla., April 6, 1904, just as he had
installed in his mill the first working ma-
chine; on the 1t of May, his mill and all
its contents were burned, but Mr. Seymour
is rebuilding the Tie Hewer as rapidly as
possible.
This machine more than doubles the
value of every cros-tie log by utilizing
the wast
It cuts a perfect cross-tie on the same
principle as a hand-hewn tie. being
smooth, perfectly square, accurate in size
and can be used in bridge or trestle work;
at the same time it cuts as good veneer-
for boxes or crate material-from the
green log, as any veneer mill in the world
will cut by steaming the log. This is
done by the downward sliding or lateral
stroke of the big knife. In short, by using
this machine, the stuff now wasted in


FRONT VIEW OF SEYMOUR TIE HEWER.
hewing out a log is cut off in veneers long, set so that one end is six inches low- the world. We in the Southland are com-
which brings down the cost of tie-produc- er than the other and working in vertical, menacing to realize that we have been too
tion over one hundred per cent. There is guides, -so that with its downward slid-' prodigal with our resources, have produe-
enough raw material now wasted in the ing stroke, it cuts off the veneer in an ed too wastefully and hence it is particu-
State to make all the boxes and crates thickness required-the feed being auto- larly encouraging to find that a citizen
necessary to ship all of Florida's many matically adjusted. The machine is sig- and saw-mill man of Florida should have
crops. In addition there can be no ques- gularly simple and can he readily repaired invented such a material saving appliance.
tion as to advantage in durability gained by any ordinary machinist: it requires Mr. B. H. Seymour has several offers from
by cutting veneers off a log that has all two hands and a 3-horse power engine to individuals desirous of purchasing State
its rosin in it instead of from steamed operate it. When it is figured that with or other interests in this invention, but
logs, which process must necessarily take this equipment three hundred and fifty so far has not closed with any.
some of the logs' sap out of it. The Sey- ties a day can be manufactured and in
mour Cross-Tie Hewer only needs to b- addition veneers enough made to keep a
seen to be appreciated. It will pay for e-ate factory busy. the business rconom? D. Withers has bought an interest in
itself every three months; it should cer- in using this machine must he clear to all. the sawmill at Inverness, Fla.
tainly be seen by every lumber and tie The Record certainly advises a close and
man and crate manufacturer. It is in- rigid examination of this wonderful inven- T H. Mitchion and others, of El Pao,
deed well worth careful examination; the tion and feels confident that it is destined Texas. have bought nearly 500,000 acres of
log, however large, is sliced by an enor- to add largely to the output of the tim forest lands in the State of Sinaloa, Mex-
mous knife giving the surface of the tie her districts. Any invention that makes ico. paying therefore $300,000. These lands
the appearance of being hewn with a gi- it possible to utilize raw material-previ- are well timbered with mahogany, lignum
gantic broad-ax; this knife is ten feet ously wabted-must be an advantage to vitae, and other woods.






2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
r***6******4M******* * **:*d** *********** *jM*A****Jl>***j*'^A**aA****** ** h**********h**hh*h.*A***


DIRWE.C ORS : C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Ch
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C.



CONSOLIDATED
I


PLAIN, VICB-PRHEIDENTB.


C. H. HODGSON, Sac, and TEABs'a.


amplain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
M. Covington, Pensacola.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches in Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain,


Pro-


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.
*


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one Three-Story Building, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; one one-story building, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind in the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


6 Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
g Branches Tampa. Fla., Pentsacola. Fla., and Savannaeh. Ga.
I R
SWILL BE WO DOLLA TO W
THE RECORD WILL BE WO Roo DObARs TO yQW EwVY WgEK


GjROCERY


Co.


-'~~w ~~ ~w~~"







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 3


SJ. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
**
I T Headquarters for
Distiller's Pumping ,
Outfit. .
No plant complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
Sj South Carolina. Write us for p-rticu-
**lars an prices. We also manufacture
T Engines, Boilers and Hilgh
S0 Grade Machinery,
as well as carry a full and complete 0
S-stockof-
SMill Supplies, Pipe,
SBoiler Tubes, Etc.
Advise your wants.
Macon, --Georgia.
* A tedi e Spcalty f a0
Iods of Tamk Wort for Tirpenthe Storage rws es
................e......... $.$es.4.......4............


SW. W. CARNES, Pres.


W. C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T DUDLEY, Sec. a Tres


Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
Hardware
Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
and Pullers on Hand.


frivot DYAL-UPCHURCH BLDG.,
rinVOT, Jacksonville. Fla.


All makes. $10 Up.


We can save you from $10 to $60
on any typewriter made.


Write us.


AGENT "OLIVER" VISIBLE TYPEWRITER


ZINC NAILS
FOR
Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the Oiy aaiis which will not injure
saws when left in the trees.
Salem Nail Co.
279 Pelo 8t. New York, N. Y.
Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes. Round
Iron Rods, Etc, Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.


BOWEN & CO.





nil


FLOJRIDA.


III I I I-III I I I 1 11 11 III I I I I 1 II 1 II I I l 1 1 I I I I 1 l:


.. NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA. U. S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. D. COVINGTON.
Vice-President.
DIRECTORS:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L. SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


H. L KAYTON.
Secretary.and Treasurer.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY.
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. B. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.



W. R. THOMAS

GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons. Harness and Buggies.


Jacksonville, Fla.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,


from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies

Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM CO.
517 and 519 West Bay Street. *


JACKSONVILLE, FLA. I


10l0W Ihon orks I SoN8.
BUILDERI A"D DRA1.1M IN


ENGINES, BOILERS.
cotton. Saw. Fertilier, Oil and lee M
ehinery. and Supplies and Repire
CAPACITY FOR I HAND.
Maehlne Tools. Wood Working Mailm-
ry, Shafting. Pulleys. Rangers. Athr
mad Rubber Belting and Home, RaltlrU
and 1 Bupplles and Tou.l
P!anm and estimates frumised for Pwh r
Plants and Steel Bridge
4teem Pumpe. Peed Water eatea 0m
Ho dstli Enines
AUGUSTA. CA.

* a a aa na. ma.... a .m a a m


NO FARM '%1 00
A GROVE OF
~ hIDIE'TIU


s -
They Are, 5uRN :

GRIFFIN'S CATALOG:
TELLS ABOUT THEM
Twenty leading varwtl ef Piman.
Also a complete lie of Fruit a4A 0-
unmental trees and hrabbery.
Catalogue Fre.
Address
STsHE IFFINMe ROS. se.
JACKSONVILLS. PLA.


THE RECORD THE SVQUT'S GREAT TRADE JOURNAL.


STAMPA,


VVl


llllllOIlillilOIllOOIllll







4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


****...*'.. ....* *.*.*.*.....

J. A. Craig <
239 W. Bay Street EVERE

Leaders in Men's and Bop
ing and Up-to-Date Fu

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; large
--**8as aa4"a


......... MORTGAGES.

) Bro.
TT BOCK. R

rs' Fine Cloth- II w. rORSYTH s
rnishings.
rest stock in the City.
^aisw3a-39993a99


RENTS.
WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,

eal Estate Broker.


;TREET,


JACKSONVILLE, FLORISA.


L A, Renfroe Co.


T. MURPHY
Jacksonville
Machine and Iron Works
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat and Sawmill Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron and
Brass Castings, Phosphor-Bronze Journal Bearings.
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


Standard Clothing Company


One Price One Price

FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, - Jacksonville, Florida.
* Stetson and Hawes Hats. Special Attention (6iven to Mail Orders. "
*- *e****o******* .*******...***** * ** * **** 9 *****9


Do You Want to Sell
I Your Saw Mill or Tie Timber?


j Do You Want to Sell your Tur-
i pentine Location ?
If so, write us, we are in touch with many Northern, Western and
Southern Millmen who want to buy.

SBrobston, Fendig &Co.
Brunswick, Ga. and Jacksonville, Fla.


Cable Address. Florida

IStandard Naval Stores|

Company. |
DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN

R-OSIN
AND TURPENTINE,.
Jacksonville, Fla.
0*e **gg**W99W^ 9aeM-gs


TAILORS


Suits to Order at Ready/Made Prices
439 W. Bay Street.


Stetson Hats


Mail Orders Given Personal Attenion
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Pri nting Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.

M. A. BAKER,
T Inventor and
Manufacturer of the
Baker Improved
Seemless Turpen-
fire stills.
Write me for prices and outfit
F. O. B asp toint in Georgia. For-
du, A ap.n a or MiNsis ippi. Ala
tills sold uLder a guarantee.
Job work through the
-..... country a specialty.
The Largest and Oldest Copper
Works i Gergia.heay bottoms that do not leak.
i My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.


W. H. BECKWITH. W. B.'HENDESON. C. WARREN.
BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.
LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE AND MILL LANDS.
Rooms 1.2-3, First National Bank Building.
TAMPA, F .. .. FLORIDA.

t i affiI. ........ t t t t t ... ......


I


;.- .., ,,,,,, .i .- t 1 i i ii i |i i = [ 1:1 I I 1 I I 1|

McMillan

SBros.
SFlorida Cop-
| per Works. -- -
Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
General Metal Workers.
Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
Patching through the country a specialty.
Orders by mail or wire will receive prompt
attention at either of the following works:
SFayetteville. N. C. Svaennah. Ga.
SMobile, Ala. Jacksonville. Fla
l II llili ll 11111 1 llli I 111 1 l 111ill I 1 1 il 1 11111


DON-T*AIh TO NENTIOR THS RECORD TO ADVERTISER&


'"'"'"'"'"'"'"'"'"'"'"'"'^










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


S Lumber Department f


NEW YORK LUMBER MARKET.
NEW YORK, May 18.-A decidedly
quieter market prevailed in general during
the last week or ten days than during
the ten days preceding. Small arrivals
are noted at the yards, as dealers do not
want to be loaded up unless there is a pos-
itive outlet for the stock. Prices remain
practically at the same levels as last week,
although noticeably weak, and in general
cheaper lumber is expected. The question
of the new inspection rules was not dis-
cussed at yesterday's meeting of the lum
ber association, but it is expected to oper-
ate for lower prices on yellow pine and
miscellaneous hard woods.
Eastern spruce is just beginning to
come in, but the mills are starting up now
and better trade is expected. One mill at
St. Johns opened up yesterday. West
Virginia spruce is dull, price weak. White
pine is in steady demand; barn boards and
box woods are scarce in stock and price
firm. The large demand for window strips
indicates good building prospects for the
summer. Lath is down 15c from last week
on further arrivals. The stock on hand is
now plentiful. Yellow pine has been ex-
ceptionally quiet and yard supplies light,
prices are easy. The practical agreement
of the principal manufacturers throughout
the West to curtail the production is hold-
ing prices firm here.
Advices from the West indicate a fairly
prosperous condition. Minneapolis report
an exceedingly satisfactory business on
white pine. At Duluth mills are now
starting up. In the South business is
quieter. At Mobile a number of mills
have shut down and suspended logging.
Trade in Jacksonville is at a standstill.
Mills are running light and there is but
little new business. Only low offers are


made for stock lumber.

Yellow Pine.
Random cargoes, ordinary
lengths. ...............20 50
Special lengths.. .. ...21 50
Flooring, No. 1.... ...22 50
Step plank.. ....... 33 00
Siding, No. 1 saps.. ...21 50
Heartface, boards......27 00
Cypress, 4-4, Ists and 2ds..44 25


@i22 00
@23 50
@23 50
@36 00
@22 50
@29 00
@47 25


The Anderson Lumber Company, of
Tampa, with a large plant, will soon begil.
operations in that city.


CYPRESS AT THE NORTH.
Boston. Cypress is in'moderate demand
at steady prices. With more settled and
warmer weather the demand would be
Letter. Firsts and seconds, inch $44 to
$46. etc.
Philadelphia. Small lots are selling
freely and there is a good stock ready
for delivery.
New York. Demand good, and many
orders are being placed. The red is hold-
ing firm, and the market is generally in
good shape, and in favor of the seller.
Baltimore. Cypress more in demand
than week ago. Building operations in
the burned district give promise of an
early and active demand. The rush for
stocks, however, has not set in as expect-
ed.
Reports from the middle North and
Northwest indicate a sluggish market con-
-equent upon the continued cold weather.

WHITE PINE.
Reports received from the principal
\. white pine centers of the country, indicate
that stocks on hand are generally smaller
than at the same time last year, and that
prices, while holding firm, have not ad-
vanced, except the lower grades. At Al-
inny new shipments have been delayed
by ice, and at Buffalo there is quite a
large stock of high grade white pine. Al-
though an extreme scarcity is reported at
Milwaukee, prices have not responded, ozn
account of the unfavorable business condi-
tions. An increase is reported in No. 4
and No. 5 boards. Shipments from tht
Mississippi Valley for the first three
months this year were over 17,500,000 feet
les than for the same time last year. The
saw mills of Duluth and Superior will not
cut as much lumber by 30 per cent. as
was cut last year. There is little dry
stock on hand, but the demand is only
fair.

SAW MILL BURNED.
The entire plant of the Higgston Lum-
ber Company, at Pelham, Ga., with about
half million feet of lumber, was destroyed
hy fire about noon Saturday. Loss be-
tween $75,000 and $100,000; insurance
about $30,000. Several residences belong-
ing to the company were destroyed.


('apt. H. i. Tift, the large yellow pine
operator at Tifton, Ga., has begun the
erection of a turpentine plant at that
place.


IN NORTH CAROLINA.
On Wednesday- of last week, a charter
was issued to the Rowland Lumber Com-
pany, of Goldsboro, to do business it.
Wayne, Duplin, Sampson and Johnston
Johnston counties, with capital stock ot
$100.000, al subscribed by S. C. Rowland,
S. G. Ryland, Jr., of Baltimore, Md., anu
George W. Jones, of Norfolk, Va.; W. R.
Allen and W. T. Drtch. of Goldsboro. A
charter was issued to the People's Ic-
Company, of Rocky Mount, with total
authorized capital stock of $5,00, of which
.5(M) is subscribed by C. L Gay, W. D.
Rice, F. R. Waskey, John Forbes, W. E.
Smith, B. J. Featherford, I. J. Nebb, W.
1. Walsh, E. W. Shearin and others, ot
IRocky Mount.


The large mills at Williston and Mor-
ristown in Levy County are extending
their tram-roads further west and are
tapping an excellent body of timber ii,
that part of the county. Both mills clain,
to have timber enough to last them sev
eral years.

The leading railroads in this section ar.-
equipping additional flat cars for shipment
of lumber according to the recent Browni
law, but the supply is not near equal to
the demand.

The Wylly-Gabbett Company, of Savan
nah has taken charge of the Stokes mill at
l;osewood, Fla., and it will be operated
under the superintendency of Henry
Stokes.

W. A. Haves. of the hnion-Pinopolis
,aw mills at Moultrie, Ga., has resigned
!he management of those mills and will
nigage in the sawmill business at Carra-
'elle, where he has an extensive sawmill
property.


TAPPED YELLOW PINE.

Is It As Strong As Pine That Has Not
Been Tapped.
In the development of the use of yellow
pine for construction purposes there has,
perhaps, been more of a diversity of opin-
ion upon the relative strength of tapped
ailnd untapped timber than upon any oth-
r r comparisons of that lumber with other
varieties as to strength, durability, etc.
Indeed, there are today many users of
heavy yellow pine who still cling unalter-
ably to the belief that the acme of
strength is comprised in untapped timber.
\e know, however, that a vast majority
Sf users have gone over to the opposite
belief, and while numerous tests have been
made in recent years on this point, there
has been perhaps, no test which has been
ais exhaustive and final in its conclusions
:is that recently made by the Forestry
,rnimission at Washington on this point.
'I he conclusion reached has just been pub-
lished, and we quote as follows from the
report:
"Tlhe yellow pine is superior wherever
-trength and durability are required. In
ensile strength it approaches, and may
-urpass, cast iron. In cross-breaking
strength it rivals the oak, requiring 10,000
Sounds per square inch on the average to
break it, while in stiffness it is superior
to the oak by from 50 to 100 per cent. It
is best adapted for principal members of
heavy constructions, for naval architect-
tre, for bridges, trestles, viaducts, and
house-building. Contrary to common be-
lief, the tapping for turpentine was found
iby a large number of tests, lately made
inder direction of this division, not to


weaken, but to strengthen the timber in
,ross-hlriaking and compression and to in-
c iease its stiffness."


C. M. Brown's Flattering Vote.
.I. T. Hammond, of Orlando, Fla., has )ne of the candidates for Governor, Hon.
Iought 60.000 acres of pine and cypress C. M. Brown, Senator from Marion Coun-
lands from the Ilaskell Taylor estate. ty. received a very flattering vote in the
These lands are located in Brevard, Or- primary held on the 10th inst. The Sen-
ange and Volusia Counties, and are worth ator is an old hero of the Lost Cause, and
about $200,000. a prominent me-chant of Ocala. While in
the Legislature he secured the passage of
The sawmill of Robinson & Mankin, at tl;e law that requires railroads to prop-
Bayard, Florida, was recently destroyed erly equip their flat cars in handling lum-
Iby fire. Ih r. In the past shippers had to do this
at great expense. Now the railroads have
John S. Ends & Co. offer for sale 1,400,- to do it. Georgia lumbermen are so well
000 acres of fine mahogany, black walnut. pleased with this law that they propose
ebony and other valuable timber in Mex- si cu:ing its enactment in that State.
ico at $1 per acre. Information furnishedl senator Brown is a sterling citizen and
in application, an all round good business man.


Machinery and Mill

Bar Iron, Iron Pipe and Fittings, Bolts,

Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-

smith's Tools, Lumberman's Tools,
Packing of all Kinds, Railroad Material,

Painted and Galvanized Corrugated

Roofing.




JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Supplies.

STATE AGENT FOR
ATLAS ENGINES and BOILERS, SOUL STEAM FEED,
WORTHINGTON STEAM PUMPS, JENKINS' VALVES,
DISSTON'S SAWS, FUNTKOTE ROOFING,
CURTIS MANUFACTURING CO.'S Mil Machinery,
DeLOACH SAW MILLS, GILBERT WOOD PULLEYS,
OYT'S LEATHER BELT,
S NEW JERSEY CAR SPRING anti RUBBER CO.
IBelt and Rubber Hose.
SOLVENTINE BOILER COMPOUND,
DODGE MFG. CO.'S Cast Iren Sprit Puleys,
McCAFFREY FILES, MONARCH EMERY WHEELS,
DANIELS' PPP Steam Packinjt
A. LESCHEN & SON, Wire Rope.


THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."


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FIFTY -11111111111 T__ I T i33 'ITT01;0-7 1;03.977 lr;9;p"T 0~~i~OFI~3PF~










r-'ir, WE1LY INDUSTRIAL RECOkD.


Problems in Lumber Transportations

Existing Evils Must Be Remedied,


The National Lumber Manufacturers'
Association holds its annual meeting at
St. Louis next week. At that time the
transportation questions will ie among
the most important matters discussed andl
acted uilpon. Mr. W. B. Stillwell. of Sa
vannah, who is chairman of that commit-
tee, has addressed a letter to the Presi-
dents and generall Managers of the vari-
ous railroads of the United States. Mr.
Stillwell has sent a copy of this letter to
the Industrial Record. It follows:
Savannah, (;a., April 19)th, 1904.
To the Presidents and generall Managers
of the Railroads of the United States:
Gentlemen:-Not second to. but corre-
lative with, the internal problems of the
lumber manufacturing business, are those
problems of transportation which, through
years. have defied local treatment and call
for remedies National in scope. Impelled
byv the first law of nature., self-pre'serva
tion. conference of the lumber manufac-
turers were held in Charleston, S. C., April
18th. 19'0-2, in Atlanta. 6(a., October 7th and
8th. 1902. and in St. Louis, December 9th
and 10th, 1902. culminating in the tem-
porary organization of the National Lum-
her Manufacturers' Asociation at St.
Louis on last mentioned date, and its full
and successful organization in Washing
ton, D. C., April 20th and 21st, 1903.
The purpose of the National Lumber
Manufacturers' Association is to remedy
existing evils and promote the welfare ot
of the great lunmhr industry by intellh-
gent and conservative methods. The first
step in this direction brings it face to
face with car e.luipment, car shortage, re-
ciprocal d&murrage, prompt transporta-
tion, claims and other problems, all ot
which we believe can, by mutual and de
termined effort, be greatly ameliorated, ii
not quite removed.
The National Lumber Manufacturers
Association will hold its annual meeting
at St. Louis, Missouri, on the 24th. 25th
and 26th days of May. At this meeting.
these problems wil come up for discussion
and 'some action is sure to be taken. It
is the desire and purpose of the officers ol
the Association that such action shall be
on lines which will afford the greatest re
lief with the least friction and inconven
ience to those concerned. To this end.
they now invite you, and through you tht
transportation company with which yot.
are connected, to give your views on thi
various questions above enumerated a.
scon as possible. mailed so as to reactl
William B. Stillwell, Chairman of tht
Transportation Committee, at Savannah.
(;a., prior to May 21st, 1904, or Geo. K.
Smith. Secretary of the Association.
Equitable Building, St. Louis, Mo., prior
to May 23d, 1904.
Please do not lay this aside or destroy)
it. but call the attention of the heads ol
the departments involved of your road to
the same. and give us the benefit of your
I.e.t information and suggestions.
We desire to review the situation front
the lumnilrmen's standpoint, and hope you
will consider our presentation of the mat-
ter carefully.
Take. for instance, the want of propel
eluipnu nt of flat cars for the transport
tion of lumber. The status of this matter
can be well styled the wonder of this pro-
gressive age.


First came the whip saw, propelled by
manual labor. and transportation by wa
gin: next the upright or sash saw. pro-
;iclled by water power, producing 500 to
1.0(0 feet per day, and the early railroads
witl primitive equipment.
When the first flat cars were placed for
oadiing, the manufacturer, after putting
his lumber thereon, out of mere comrade-
ship and in protection of life, at r--"" -
of engineer or conductor, cut down sap-
ling, and. hewing the ends, placed them
in sides of the car to prevent accident by
lumber falling off. Thus was the practice
if the manufacturers equipping flat cars
begun, so it has continued through all
gradations for a time so gradual as not
to emplhasize this unjust burden, for in
ile 70'- the flat cars had not gone beyond
a capacity of 15,000 to 20,000 lbs., 4,000
to 5,I000 feet of lumber, and still the sap-
lings were doing duty in a large measure.
Large capacity cars gradually evolved and
.notre si cure equipment became necessary,
;ind protection uwas given from the abun-
.lance of low grade material, then accept-
able to the railroads and not so ready of
-ale as now. The manufacturer was still
apparently oblivious to the injustice, but
progress became rife and passed all
bounds.
Ihe l1.)00 feet a day mill grew to the
reco.d of 223,000 feet in one day for one
-:vw. and 7.0.000 in one day for one mill,
aggregating an annual output of 35,080,
.ti(.004) feet, and the lumber industry ac-
-ordingly became the second in importance
.11 all the land. As a logical result, stump-
age has rapidly advanced in value, cost
of manufacture increased, with consequent
appireiation of value of lumber. Reduce
ll(c out-put as above on an average basis
if four pounds to the foot, which is low,
;i woods included, into tons of traffic.
ind its potent position as a factor in the
roslierity of railroads will be readily ree-
.gulnze.l. In a recent case, involving a
large area and many railroads, it develop-
d that lumber constituted 60 per cent of
the tonnage of some of the roads and that
h.l prosperity of railroads was gauged, ihi
t measure, by the ratio of lumber ton
iage. Furtlwr, that the one of many rail-
iads involved that was not prosperous
il making no money, was the one that
.lad no initial lumber tonnage and but lit-
ile intermediate.
During this period the railroads have
improved their road-beds, doubled, yea.
liadrupled and more, the capacity ot
.hlir locomotives and cars of all kinds.
-*romn the hard-seated, uncomfortable, un
.enti!ated passenger coach has evolved the
.-etibuled parlor and sleeping car of to-
,ay. veritable palaces on wheels, witn
speed increased from fifteen to sixty miles
per hour. Special freight cars, many ot
hli' of expensive construction, built to
..ei th e requirements of all traffic of
tny inlportance,--ore, coal. oil, petroleum,
meats, fruits, vegetables, g.ain, live stock.
furniture poultry, etc, etc.,-many of the
items of traffic being of periodic or sea-
soitnale movement only. besides requiring
l.t'cial schedules to accommodate.
liut for lumler, the one steady all-year-
round traffic. what has been done? The
same old flat cars of forty years ago, with
.A equipment. are still with us, made
,vorse by a five-fold increase in capacity,


.I# V "15 4111: I 7I r wa inii *I IV .-11 I 1` I 1 't IaI I*B I i5 4

" MERRILL-STEVENS CO. :


SBoilermaking and Repairing

S Still Boilers and Pumps.
SSHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.

* Jacksonville, Fla.
S>It 114111t 1 I II14 114i411* 14 tit t 1 1,fl ) 14 I tt i It l i ItIt#


Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Co.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.



Cummer Lumher Co.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER


Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.

0*0
BLAKESLEE PUMPING OUTFIT.
This outfit can be directly connected to a pump and will
supply sufficient water for general farm and household e.
Why not have a water works plant of your own at a small
cost, and this Is the most desirable power for use In cae
of fire or other necessity; it can be started at a moment'a
notice. You don't have to walt for the wind; it's always
ready for work.
The engine can Instantyl be made ready for other pow-
er purposes, such as grinding feed. churning. etc., by di-
connecting the pump. This outfit is simple, durable, economical, easily operated, .
and ready for work any minute. No country home is complete without this Ideal 8
labor saver. We build a complete line of pumping plants for mines. Irrigation, 0
fire protection, railway supply, and Install water works plants for city service. 4
SWill be pleased to furnish any additional information on request.
S WHITE-BLAKESLEF MFG CO. Birmingham.Ala.
Builders of the Blakeslee Gas and Gasoline and Connected Outfits. 4
. .O 8


R. TOLAR.


J. H. HART. T. H. SLACHLY.
(Established 1872.)


J. R. TOLAR, JR


TOLAR, HART & CO.,
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange Orders executed for Cotton Futures.

JOSEPH D. WEED. W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Batings, Etc



Read the Record AdvTs.


ARK YOU A SUBSCRIBKK TO THE RECORD?









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


the records of a larger lumber-carrying
railroad showing that in the past ten
years only they had increased the capacity
of their cars, vis: flats, 123 per cent; box,
47 per cent.; coal, 33 per cent., and by
rigid rules as to equipment promulgated
by the railroads, taking only the best
quality of lumber, and subject to most
technical inspection by the railroads. And
who furnishes this equipment; does cabi-
net work to fit to the cars, subject to these
railroad rules and technical inspection?
The manufacturer? Yes, and then pays
freight on it besides!
Marvelous that this industry, second in
all the land, should have so long submitted
to such discrimination. Marvelous indeed
that the railroads, every ready, and 1
may add, with commendable promptness,
to meet the requirements of progress in
al other directions, on all other commodi-
ties, should have continued to impose this
unjust burden on the lumber manufactur-
ers. and particularly when in a State leg-
islative hearing a Master Mechanic of
forty years experience admitted that prop
er equipment could be provided by the
railroads for a cost of $25 per car-a mert
bagatelle, when compared to the showing
at the same hearing that this equipment
was costing the lumber manufacturers
from $100 to $150 per car per year, or
several timts the value of the whole car
during its average life. Marvelous that
as an element of safety the railroads have
not long ere this devised and applied per-
manent adjustable equipment to flat cars
just as they did in the matter of air-
brakes and automatic couplers. Look at
the risk of having 30,000 or more mills,
great and small, furnishing and fitting
equipment of all kinds of material, with
all kinds of workmanship, the same to be
inspected by tens of thousands of inex-
perienced and often irresponsible agents
and inspectors, resulting in accidents un
recorded, and culminating in the Connells
ville accident, in which sixty-five lives
were sacrificed. The inducement to all par-
ties to solve this problem is too apparrent
for comment or argument. That the solu-
tion and adjustment of the other mention
ed problems are necessary for the mutual
good and prosperity of the railroads ano
the lumber manufacturers is also appar-
ent.
Now, as to the manner of procedure.
The manufacturers urge comprehensive,
prompt action; the railroads are disposed
to delay action or temporize. Great rail
road men and high officials have made
serious mistakes in their day. One, in.
speaking of the movement of lumber fron.
a certain territory, remarked that if the)
did not transport it today, they could to-
morrow, next year or some time. Wheh
a branch was extended from another sys-
tem and tne traffic slipped entirely away
from his lines, he realized his mistake.
Later, equally high officials likened tht
individual "kicker" to weaklings shooting
spit-balls at the Leviathan, and remarked
that as a rule they could not make a pay-
ing tariff for a ten-mile railroad to save
their souls, nor were they big enough to
run a hand-car, and proceeded to expati-
ate on the beneficent influence of railroad
managers as follows:
"Put th'.se men down in any old sleep)
hollow with their seething brains, heads full
of steam hammer, pulley, crank and get
there, and right away everything begins
to shine with new values." But the weak-
ling can "evolute" as well as anybody
Find a lumber manufacturer of any im.


portance today, and you find a railroad
man. who, in this great country of ours
has built more branch railroads and laid
the foundations for more trunk lines than
the lumber manufacturers. They have
pushed their way hundreds of miles into
hle wilderness, built up cities, and made
:he surrounding country alive with activ-
ity and development.
We know not how the Leviathan is cre-
ited. grows or is built, but we know the
evolution of the lumber manufacturers,
and believe that in the National Lumber
manufacturerss' Association you will find

intellect to cope with intellect, and should
t come to war, foemen worthy of your
-teel. But it is not war we wish. By con-
prence, study and intelligent action busi-
n ss problems should be adjusted, ant we
now ask your suggestions looking to the
promptt eradication of existing evils. We
wish these to come from equals, your
practical men in authority, and not sub-
tdinate officials who, after writing to
and hearing from us can do nothing final
Ibut will have to refer everything to some
ne higher in authority, as happened in a
e-cent notable case. This ended in the
railroad making a mistake which amount-
e I to a crime, for in that instance they de-
moralized and irreparably injured the lum-
-er manufacturing business over an area
wherein originates one-fifth of the enor-
!ious traffic represented by this industry,
vith no corresponding benefits. We ask
ioun to avoid a similar mistake in this in-
stance and let your reply come promptly
and through the right channel, addressed
is above suggested, in order that the an-
nual meeting may view the matter front
all standpoints and take action according-
!y. Yours respectfully,
Wm. B. Stillwell,
Chairman Transportation Committee.


In Louisiana's World's Fair exhibit
there will be shown ninety-two varieties
-f mosquitoes. They are in cases, and
-i:e guaranteed not to bite or sing.-Bal-
timore American.
WHEN WRITING ADVERTISE!


I 194I #11 *13*11 3 Is 3 I t212 1411111 1 AA1 1 11&&A*&* I IIA I 0181a I Illa


PEARL WIGHT. Pres.


T. H. McCARTRY, Vice-Pres.


MAURICE STERN. Treat.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.


IRVING H. WELCH, Masnger.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


S401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


0l 134i S114 1, 99 I011` tl W t1ill I V11 t# I 1 It #11115tl5 tl i


5 THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE.
j Jacksonrille, F.
CAPITAL $300,030 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFfTS $300,000
Strength and ample facilities. Business solicited. Prompt attention to collec-
tions and business of customers not living in Jacksonville. Best Safety Deposit
S hBoxes for rent.



Cochrane's Booh Store.
Wholesale Stationery, Fishing Tackle, Pipes,
Notions, Stencil Ink Brushes, Lumber Crayons.
PALATKA. FLORIDA.
Write for Prices. Have kandreds of articles suitable for the Commissary Trade.


Planters "Old Time" Remedies A


NUBIAN TEA-For the Liver.
BENEDICTA-female Tonic.
CUBAN RELIEF, for Cramp Colic. Horse Colic.
WARRANTED TO GIVE RELIEF IN TEN MINUTES.
CUBAN OIL, a Liniment Unexcelled.
Also Golden Crown Specifc. Pink Pills & Horse & Cattle Powders
SPENCER. MEDICINE CO.,
Chattanooga, Tenn.
IS MENTION THE RECORD.


Ine


.. The..


.P Standard Turpent

`4
& WHas revolutionized the wood distilling busi.
9 / ness in the South. After three months of careful
testing our machinery at the Waycross, Georgia,
mill, we are now ready to sell direct any size
plant and guarantee results by our new KRUG ,
PATENT STEAM PRESSURE PROCESS.

STANDARD TURPENTINE COMPANY.


Kohn = Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACSONVILLE' FLA.


_ I


---









TIHE tEKLY INDt11I~At UISCOUD.


SNaval Stres Department.


Advanced Clyatt Case.
In the United States Supreme Court
Tuesday the Solicitor General entered a
motion to advance the hearing of the case
of Samuel M. Clyatt vs. the United States.
Clyatt is under indictment in Florida und
er the anti-peonage laws, and the ese
comes to the Supreme Court on qluestif.n*
certified by the Circuit Court of Appeals
for the Fifth District.

Turpentine Still Burned.
On the 9th inst. the still, cooper shopl-
and some other property of the Clark
Ray-Johnson Co., naval stores operators,
at Martel, Fla., were burned to the ground.
Loss $2,000, with no insurance. The lire
caught while the stiller was making a
draw, and it burned so rapidly that noth-
ing could be saved. The still will be re
built at once.

It is Delegate Hillman.
Capt. W. J. Hillman was a winner itn
the primary held on the 10th inst, as one
of the delegates to the National Demo-
cratic Convention, which meets in St.
Louis on the 6th of July next. In choos-
ing this gentleman, the Democrats of Floi-
ida have honored themselves in honoring
Capt. Hillman.

NAVAL STORES NOTES.
The steamship Celba cleared from Fer-
nandina on the 7th inst. for Hamburg
with 3,000 casks spjirits of turpentine and
12,200 barrels of rosin.

The British bark Golden Gate from Sa-
vannah, arrived at Hull May 4th with
5,400 barrels rosin.

The steamship Costa Rica, from Nes
Orleans, arrived at Liverpool May 6th with
220 casks spirits turpentine.

The increased demand for naval stores
is more than keeping pace with the con
editions. The prices prove this. The av
erage price for turpentine this year is
ten cents a gallon higher than it was at
its lowest point last year. This standard
has been maintained by the operators.
who set a limit below which the minimum
could not go, and one way to keep the
price up was by sustaining the market.
This has been done all along the line, and
the result is highly satisfactory.

The American Turpentine Company, ol
Washington, D.C., will install a plant fox
the manufacture of wood turpentine at
Valdosta, Ga., to cost $40,000.

The Lewis Naval Stores Company, ol
No: th Carolina, has purchased 19,000 acre-
of land in Washington County, Ala., 43
miles north of Mobile. It is said the com
pany will erect a large turpentine plant
in the near future.

This is one result of Mayor Timmon'-
visit to Washington recently. In our last
issue announcement was made that ad-
ditional counsel had been obtained foi
Mr. Clyatt, but we have not been informed
as to who it is.


:are a little letter than they were a week D. M. FYNNY
ago. WALTER RAY


NAVAL STORES SPECIAL

To the World's Fair and National Demo-
cratic Convention.
Th: special train for naval stores people
that leaves Jacksonville at 8:30 p. m. June
:0th prox., for the St. Louis Exposition
:ind National Democratic Convention will
;:. one of the finest that ever pulled out
f Jacksonville. The rolling stock of th,
uoitlhern Railway has been carefully gone
>v.er and the very finest cars, with all
.node. n comforts and luxuries, have been
-et aside for this trip.
Mr. J.. A. IIollomon, secretary, an-
nolunces that of the one hundred persons
o which it's passenger list is limited,
ighty-tive or ninety have engaged pas
-ag.e and those naval stores men who con
template going had better hurry up if they
.vant to lie included. Mr. Hollomnon will
leave here on the 25th of May for St.
,.onis as the avant courier of the party,
:rid will make all arrangements for theii
onifort during their stay in the Mound
City.
This is in no sense an excursion. It is
a special train, controlled and occupied
exclusively by turpentine men, and it will
.ake no stops along the route. It will be
ihout thirty-four hours in transit, arriv-
nog at Atlanta at 5:30 a. m. July 1; at
.hattan,:oga at 10:15 a. m.; at Lexington,
Kiy., 5:30 p. In.. at Louisville 8:30 p. nm.
and at St. Louis at 6:00 a. m. on Satur-
lay, July 2.
The World's Fair will then be in full
blast. On the Gth of July the National
Democratic Convention will assemble in St.
Louis. and from present indications this
ives promise of being a most interesting
.,vent. It will doubtless last several days.
and its deliberations will relate to matters
in which every one in the South is deeply
interested.
Returning, the special train will leave
St. Louis at 9:0)0 p. in. Saturday, July 9,
arriving in Jacksonville at 7 a. m., Mon-
day, July llth.
The train, to be operated by special ser-
vice, will consist of library, club and bag-
rage car, four Pullman sleeping cars, each
containingg two drawing-rooms and ten sec-
tions. and one dining car. The expense
;,f the trip will be. round-trip railroad
fare. $27.50. one berth, round trip, $13.00.
and six meals round trip, $6; total enroute
$40.50.

Bank of Green Cove Springs.
The Bank of Green Cove Springs, Fla.,
has opened for business and a well known
Jacksonville banker, who is in a position
to know, says it is one of the best of the
smaller banks in Florida. Mr. P. L.
Sutherland. the well-known young naval
stores operator. is president of this bank.
and this is a guarantee of its safe, conser
vative and yet professional business meth-
ods. The bank owns its own building, is
equipped with the most modern vault.
saf s. etc.. and the banking system is tht
most systematic now in vogue.

Yellow Pine.
There is very much of a sameness about
the market quotations in this staple this
week. Large buyers report that they are
;ending forward good orders close on to
:ist prices, and that probably conditions


NEWLY BUILT


and FURNISHED, -

-Write for particulars-


EVERY COMFORT


MRS. M. C. SKIPWORTH, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


KENDRICK HOUSE,

Headquarters for Southern Families,
GOOD TABLE HOME COMFORTS
... For particulars address...

MRS, I. B. ROBERTS, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


THE HAMILTON.


A New, Modern, High-Class Hotel.


ELECTRIC LIGHTS and BELLS


HOT and COLD BATSH


For lull information write

JNO. S. BOWEN, Owner and Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE NEW PAXTON.

Commodious, Home-Like Hotel
ROOM FOR 100 GUESTS.

Table Unexcelled. Every Attention to Invalids

MRS. E. H. PAXTON, Owner and Proprietres, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


THE TELFORD HOUSE

A Large, New, Three-story Brick and Stone Hotel, Newly Fur-
nished Throughout, All Modern Conveniences.
Rates $5.00 to $8.00 Per Week. $1.00 and $2.00 Per Day
CAN ACCOMMODATE 85 GUESTS.
W. B. TELFORD, Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.

A. S. PNDLETON, W.B. JOHNSON. JAS. LASSITER, W.W. STAPLING.
PresMent Vice Pres. Ge. Manager. Asst. Treasarer

5he W. B. JOHNSON CO..


Wholesale Grocers
402-404-406-408 East Bay Street, Jaclksvlle. Fla.
DIRECTORS:


B. F. CAMP,
THOSE. DOWLINW
N. G. WADE,


A. S. PENDLETON,
W. B. JOHNSON.
PERRY F. COLESON.


W. W. STnRwIP
JAS. LASER,


THE RECORD KEEPS PACE WITH SOUTHERN PROGRESS.


White Springs. Fla.

On the Suwanee R-iver
The Greet Health Resort of the South.
SMphur spring 25,000 ans per Minte.
Healing Springs -- forest Walks -- Shooting & Fishing
NO MOSQUITOES. NO MALARIA.
The Healthiest Summer Resort in America.


THE PRITCHARD HOUSE,


An Ideal Home for Invalids. FirstClass Table

ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES.
Write for particulars. ...
MRS, S. L PRITCHARD, Proprietress. WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE OAKS,

A Typical Southern Home









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


NAVAL STORES


Special Train
TO THE

WORLD'S FAIR
AND

National Democratic

Convention.
Train to be operated by special ser-
vice, will consist of:
One combination Library, Club and Bag-
gage Car, four Pullman sleeping cars;
each car containing two drawing-rooms
and ten sections. One dining car. Total,
six cars.
Our schedule will be:
Leave Jacksonville, 8:30 p. m.. Thurs-
day, June 30; Leave Atlanta, 5:30 a. m.
Friday, July 1; leave Chattanooga 10:15
a. m. Friday, July 1; leave Lexington, 5:50
p. m. Friday, July 1: leave Louisville 8:30
p. m. Friday, July 1; arrive St. Louis 6:00
a. m. Saturday, July 2.
The party will therefore spend July 2,
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 in St. Louis, and re-
turning-
Leave St. Louis, 9:00 a. m., Saturday,
July 9; leave Louisville, 6:00 a. m. Sun-
day, July 10; leave Lexington, 9:30 a. m.,
Sunday, July 10; leave Chattanooga, 5:31$
p. m., Sunday. July 10: leave Atlanta
10:25 p. m., Sunday, July 10; arrive
Jacksonville, 7:00 a. m. Monday, July 11.
This train will be a -olid vestibuhled one,
composed of the very latest andi newest
equipment, and will run: through to St
Louis and return frr the exclusive us,'
of the Naval tSorem people.
Our route will be over the SOI TIIERN
RAILWAY, going and returning.
The expense of the trip wi!l he:
Railroad fare, Jacksonville to St. Louis
adn return, $27.50 each; one lower berth,
Jacksonville to St. ]. round trip. $13.00: one upper Iwrth .ack-
sonville to St. Louis, one way, $6.50.
round trip. $13.00; one section. lower andi
upper berth, Jacksonville to St. Louis,
one way, $13.00. round trip. $2600: iraw-
ing room, Jacksonville to St. Louis, one
way, $24.00, round trip, $48.00.
The berths are of regular size and will
of course accommodate two people, but
for a couple it will be better to have a
section, which will be the lower andl upper
berths.
Dining car will he operated on table
d'hote plan at $1.00 each meal for eacd:
person. Three meals will be served on
the going trip, being breakfast, lunch
and dinner, and these three meals will be
$3.00 for each person.
Three meals will be served on the re-
tur trip, being breakfast, lunch and din-
ner, and same charge will be $3 for each
person.
Under this arrangement, therefore, it
will cost one person on this special train
from Jacksonville to St. Louis and re-
turn:
Round trip, railroad fare ....... .$27.50
One berth, round trip .... .... 13.00
Six meals, round trip ............ 6.00

$46.50
Two people will be twice $46.50 and
so on.
The number of passengers on this train
will be positively one hundred.
It is necessary, therefore, in order to
Conclude all detailed arrangements for ap-
plications for space on this "Special" to be
filed with the Secretary of the Turpen-
tine Operators' Association, Jacksonville,
as early as possible. Each application will
then be assigned certain space on the
train, and such applicant will be fully in-
formed in a personal letter.
Address
JAS. A. HOLLOMON,
Secretay,.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Jacksonville Wholesale Lumber M
(For week ending May 20.)
Merchantable.
lard schedules-$10.50 to $13.00.
Sound and square schedules, *.
$12.00.
Merchantable car material-
Average schedule of sills, ,6 fee
under, 10 inches and under, $13.
$14.00.
Special schedules-according to
and lengths-prices steady.
K. D. Saps-"6" and up 80 per
clear. $9.50 to $10.00.
IFlooring:
$11.50; No. 4, $8.50.
Cypress.
First and seconds, 4 quarter base
load prices. $34: selects. 4 quarter
No. 1. $15.00; No. 2, $13.50; 1
$28; shop, 4 quarter base, $20.
Cypress Shingles--6xl8 A's, per
pcs.. $5.25; primes, $4.25; 4x18, A's,
primes, $2.75.
Cypress !athls. $2 per 1,000.
Cypress market strong. Mills
more orders than they can fill. Pro
good for higher prices. Dry stock


Business Director

CHAS. A. CLARK, INC.
FUNERAL DIRECTOR AND EMBAI
I0 and C W. Forsyth St., Jacksonville
Telegraph orders receive prompt
tion. Open always.


JOHN ZAHM'S EUROPE
128 E. Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant. N1
Rooms. Open day and nil
old Stand.

Conover's Irug Store. B
Jacksonville. Fla. Mail u
for commissary drugs. Giv
J. 8. PINKUSSOHN CIGA
61 W. Bay Street, Jacks
THE BEST OF EVERYTH
TO SMOKE
The Largest Tobacconists

JACKSONV

Manufacturing

or Shipping P

Deep Water---Railwa
ADDRESS
GIFFORD CO1
merl Ral Estate I
Laura Street, Jackso


market.



50 to

t and
00 to
sizes
Scent



e, car-
base,
No. 3,


3.5 anted and For Sale

have DEPARTMENT.
aspects I
scarce.
Advertisements Will be Inserted n Thrs Department at the Following Rates:
For one week. 20 cents a line.
For two weeks. 35 cents line.
SFor three weeks 50 cents a line.
For four weeks, - 65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Headinr counts as two lines.
iM]tR No display except the headings can be admitted.
, Fla Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
atten- containing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Thursday
morningg to, secure insertion in Friday's paper.


AN HOTEL.
Five Registered Shorthorn Bulls Employment Wanted.
hely Bernitt h One is half brother to "Beauty Boy" Owing to a change in our business, we
who was champion at three Texas shows. have a faithful woodsman we do not need,
Another is half-brother to our 1800 pound whom we can recommend. Salary reas-
ay and Julia, .ow, "Mary Spears." All good anl ready onile. Address J. N. Brown & Co.,
s your orders for immediate service. Prices $100.00 to Br"kfihl. Ca.
e us a trial. $175.00, subject to previous sale. Turpentine Men.
Paalmetto Park Stock Farm. Z. C. Cham-
R COMPAN,. bliss & Co., proprietors. Ocala. Fla. Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
onville, Fla. fit for your still. No. 1 outfit pumps 2,000
INGl, gallons per hour at a cost of 3 cents and
AND CHEW For Sale. requires no attention while running.
I Started in one minute. J. R. Campbell,
in the South 200 tons 48-lb. relaying steel rails West Oala, Fla.one nute J
Virginia and Kentucky delivery. 100 tons
ILLE (0-lb. relaying steel rails, Southern de- For Sale
liver. 1.500 tons 56-lb. relaying steel o .
liver. 1500 toVirinia deliver. relaying steel The right party can buy half interest in
Iocaion rails, West Virginia delivery. 150 tons 30-
L atin relaying steel rails, West Virginia de- good turpentine business, with 15 crops
livery. Isaac Joseph Iron Company, 525- virgin boxes, plenty hands, good healthy
point I:5 Hunt St.. ('incinnati. Ohio. place, good outlet, cheap freights. Will
take $12,00 to $15,000 cash to buy half
Interest. Will sell all if can't get suitable
y Terminal Wanted. partner, partner preferred that can take
A position as manager of turpentine charge. Information, address P. O. Box
plaxe by a mIan with several years of ex- 288 Tifton, Ga. Also good saw mill loca-
MPANY l"''iener as manger. Can furnish best of tion for sale. Address box 288, Tifton, Ga.
refi-rences. Address Mlanager, Thelma, Ga. 4t.


nville. Fla.


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


J. W. WADE.
Vice-President.


E. G. HUGHES,
Sec'y and Tress


M. W. LARENO Union Naval Stores Co.
Naval Stores

Commission Merchants. MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.
ROSIN, TURPENTINE, TAR, PITCH,
GUM THUS, RICE, ETC.
38 Front Street, NEW YOR NAVAL STORES FACTORS.


BILY & MONIGOMRY, DEALERS IN
Commission Merchants.
Neove Stores & cotton Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Liberal advances made against ship-
ments. Consignments solicited. Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING, l ai- ;n Wst -ltri;da l Alnhamni anrd ; ;i;ir;si T ;,


NEW YORK CITY.


New Victoria.


eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Prinrtinal nOffirc MOBRIIE AL.ARAMA


Corner Main and Adams,
Opposite Board of Trade Building.
Jacksonville's New Hotel.
Rates t$.oo to $2o. e
BIXLER, Proprito. Send your order for general printing to the Record


"NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIUE SUCCESS."


Pumping Outfits FOR

Turpentine Stills
WITH FIRE PROTECTION CONNECTIONS.

Best PUMP in the World
From 40 to 700 Gallons of Water per Minute.
Write or call on
FRED E. GILBERT,
Automobile Headquarters
29 West Forsyth St. Jacksonville, Fla.
--- -- -- --- -- -- ----- -- --Wv


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


__ __~~_









10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J R. PARBTT, ARCHER S. HUBBARD. ARTHUB F. PeRRY
Q President. Vice-President. Cashier.
= The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA,
SCapital. $200.000. Surplus. $100.000
STATE DEPOSITAILY.
General Bankingr. Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Sate Deposit Boxes. $5.00 per Year.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week
Savannah, Ga., May 20.-The first rosin Exports previously ...... 22.646 73,399
sales of the week were made yesterday
and yet the market has remained firm Total ................ 24.703 77,780
throughout without the slightest evidence
of a pending break. The general condi- Stock May 19 .......... 6.957 32,100
tion of all grades may be regarded as firm Stock last year .......... 5.199 103,443
with factors all satisfied that the strong
undertone will keep prices up for some Range of Turpentine and Rosin at Sa-
tim evet. vannah for Three Years.
Spirits has held its own during the week 1903-4 |\ 1 02-3 II 1901-2
with a firmness backed by a good h althyv 1
demand. There were no changes in the S irits I 45 65 1 42 1I t 1 311
spirits market during the week. The re- Rosin I | II
ceipts held up well. WW .... ..3.30 4.75 3.504.252.253.95
WG ... 3.10 4.40 3.253.852.003.70
K ........... 2.80 4.15 2.403.20 1.652.45
Spirits for the Week at Savannah. F ........1.65 2.90 1.202.10 1.101.50
Prce Repts Sales Exp. 1903 D ... .. .. .1.55 2.801.102.05 1.001.40
Men., May 16 54/4 589 652 | 225 47%-(
Tue.., May 17 54/ 1232 42 42 1 Outlook for Turpentine in London.
Wed.. May 18 541,4 793 431 50 47%/, 1904. 1903. 1902. 1901
Thurs.. May 19:54'/4, 970 494 2057 47:4 Stock 30 April 16.100 27,000 19,300 7,000
Afloat 3.400 nil 500 3,000
Rosin for the Weck at Savannah. 19500 27.000 19.00 10000
Monday, 3lay 1V. Last Year.
MV monday. May Last Year. )Deliveries Mav-J.une 19,700 14,900 15,100
WC .............. 3..50 3.35 .Shipments to London
N ..... ........ 3.30 3.25 duri Ma fro
............. 3 0 .2 ............... 1.000 8.900 11.800
K ............ 15 3 .0 t year was abnormal both in respect
S.............. .00 2.95 of deliveries in Iondon (which were .swol-
H .. .. .. .... .0 2.35 len by return to (;la-gow. Hull and Bristol
. .......... 5 0 f Turlpentine **lent" to London in April)
F ............ ... 2.70 1.75 and shinimlnts from America which were
F ............... 2.65 1.70 artificiallv restrained.
D ......... .2.60 1.70 'The avenrag of 1901 and 1902 is. perhaps.
ABC ............ 60 1.70 a safer guide for deliveries and shipments.
Receilts 2.621. exports 3.(i78. Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Review.
New York. May 17. 1904.
Tuesday. May 17.-II and below quoted The Industrial Record. Jacksonville. Fla.
five cents higher than Monday's figures Sp!irits turpentine-The market has
above posted. Receipts 2.70i. exports 35(1. riulel steady during the past week with
lhut liihlt changes in quotations. Demand
Wednesday. May 18.-No chang- in quo- fair. Stock. i670 barrels. We quote ma-
tations from Tuesday. Receipts 1.933. ex- chines. 58 cents.
ports 512. Rosin--Low grades firm and active;
Smediumsl and pales quiet and steady.
Thur-daiy. May 19.---No change in quo- (' t D. '300: E. -305: F. $3.0; C.
tations R,.eipts 1..41. sales 1.R16f. ex- .3.15: II. .3.20; 1. .$3.25: K. $,.fi5; ?,.
station. ts 141. sales. to $3.45: N. $3.90 to $4.00M WG, $4.15
ports 4381. to $4 20: WWN. .X4.25 to $4.30.
Turpentine at London.
Savannah Naval Stores Statement. 1904 1903 1902 1901
Spirits. Rosins. Stock Apr. 30. 1.11.la 26.980 19.340 6.949
Stock April 1 .......... 6.495 44.550 Del'd this wk 1.3701) 1.437 1.853 1.504
Receipts Mar 19 ...... 970 1.841 Sine, .TJan. 1.. 29.218 24.440 30.590 30.00M
Receipts previously ...... 24.195 C63.4S9 Price 2nd May 41-101/2 42-9 32-3 27-
Jul -1)e ..... 40-101/, 35-3 32-3 25-6
Total ................ 31.60 109.880 (a ) Incllde 311 French and 5.000 land-
ing ex. "Iris.'" (h) includes 40.
Exports May 19 ........ 2.057 4.381 Reported by James Watt & Son..
Crops of Spirits and Rosins for Three Years.


Crop 1903-04.
Spirits. I'1 -;
Wilmington.........16.511 89,667
Charleston.... ...... 2.409 3.159
Savannah........ ..176.418 650,938
Brunswick.... .. .... 55.002 184.527
Mobile. ........... 12.315 50;,,80
New Orleans ........... 36,017 133,126
Carrabelle...... ......closed closed
Georgetown..... .... 7,515 44.214
Pensacola.. ...... 42.554 205.982
Jax. & Ferndina...... 187.210 653,210
Tampa ...... ........closed closed
Totals...... ......535,915 2,020,925


Crop 1902-03
Spirits. Rosin.
18,883 113,968
3.007 11.835
270,670 940.507
68.947 244.100
18,969 79,272
33,103 108.033
3,394 32,148
10,307 46,899
38,275 192.205
91,976 375,211
13,565 40,664
571,096 2,184,818


Crop 1901-02
Spirits. Rosi
16.921 109.41
3,004 13,27
313.085 1,071,44
79.669 280,15
21,080 88,5
21,038 94,3:
8,177 47,4
8,458 50,51
37,786 154,31
70,000 245,01
15,424 51,7


in

0
ro
10
25
72
36
97
15
50
00
79


593,492 2,212,413


FOR SALE.
S50.000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill $3.35 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in tre State.

C. BUCKMAN, 1.0r41 Mr


Jacksonville Brokerage Co.
112 WEST FORSYTH STREET.
Correspondent to The Odell Co.. Capital Stock $200,000.00

COTTON, STOCKS, BONDS, GRAIN, PROVISIONS
Handled on margin or for delivery.
Private Leased Wires direct to New York, Chicago & New Orleans
Bell Phone 1.560.


R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KNIOHT, Sec. and Treas.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,


HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.

Herbert A. Ford, Geo. H. Ford, F. L. Watson,
President. Vice-Pres. Cashier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CA 1 TAL, $.,30,OO.OC.
DIRECTORS: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Clarence Camp, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford. Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicited.

C. H. BARNES, Pres. J. D. SHAW, Vice-Pres. RALPH JESSUP, Sec.-Treas.

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonville, Pensacola, Fernandina and Savannah
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

W. FRAZIER JONES. C. H. BARNES. R. JESSUP. W. H. BAKER.
President. Treasurer. Ass't Treas. Secretary.
UNITED GROCERY CO..

Importers & Wholesale Grocers
HAY, GRAIN and FEED.
Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
B. G. r LS anTEdR.. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

M. A. BRIGGS, President. HOMER BROWN, 2d Vice-President.
H C. BRIGGS, 1st Vice President. J. C. MCDONALD, Secretary and Treasurer



W. H, BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.

HARDWARE, MILL and TURPENTINE SUPPLIES.

Council Tool Co., & Holmes' Tool Co.. Tools,
Brigg's Sterling and Perfection Hacks and Pullers,
Cutters, Files, Whetters, Glue, Batting, Strainer Wire,
Turpentine Wagon Harness and Collars,
Hoop Iron, Coopers' Tools and Rivets.

Everything in Turpentine Supplies,

Send us your Mail Orders,

W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.,
VALDOSTA, GA,


TH RELIABILITY OF OUR ADVERTISERS VOUCHED FOR.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11


Warning, Advice and Law.
Under recent date the Great Northern
railroad has given a wide circulation to
the following advice and suggestions which
should be carefully read by every one:
"Every summer and autumn large areas
of public and private forests are devastat-
ed by fire. This destruction is a univer-
sal injury. It not only destroys a valua
ble asset in the list of the country's re
sources, but is productive of floods. Tihe
forest is the most effective means of pre-
venting floods and producing a more reg
ular flow of water for irrigation and other
useful purposes.
"To prevent the mischievous forest fires
Congress has enacted a law, which forbids
setting fire to the woods, and forbids leave.
ing fires (camp fires and others), without
first extinguishing the same.
"The law provides a maximum fine ot
$5,000, or imprisonment for two years, oi
both, if the fire is set maliciously, and
a fine of $1,000, or imprisonment for one
year, if the fire is due to carelessness.
It also provides that the money from these
fines goes to the school funds of th,
county in which the offense is conumittea.
"Commissioner W. A. Richards. of tht
general land office has issued circulars,
warning the public against carelessness.
inasmuch as many fires stai t from neglect
ed campfires, and makes the following re-
quests:
"Do not build a larger fire than you
need.
"Do not build your fires in dense
masses of pine leaves, duff and other corn
bustible material, where tile fire is sun
to spread.
"Do not build your fire against large
logs, especially rotten logs, where it re
quires much more work and time to put
the fire out than you are willing to ex
pend, and where you are rarely quite eel
tain that the fire is really and complletel.
extinguislhd.
"In windy weather and in dangerous
places dig a hole and clear off a place to
secure your fire. You will save wood ant
trouble.
"Every camp fire should be completely
put out before leaving thle camp.
"Do not build fires to clear off lana
and for other similar purposes, without
informing the nearest ranger or super
visor so that he may assist you.
"As hunters, fishers and campers will
soon haunt the iwoodsl and streams, ii
is hoped that newspapers everywhere will
circulate this warning and information.'
The above is take from the Puget Sound
Lumberman. It seems that in tile Far
West they are taking steps to strlo tlt
wholesale and needless destruction of their
forests by fires. The Great Northern and
other commercial arteries of the North
west are taking a hand to supplement til
laws of Congress. Tlhe railroads of the
Southeast could do much also by co-ope-
rating with the State and County author-
ities to circumvent as far as possible this
wasteful practice.


Wilson's Cypress Camp.
The lumber has been hauled and the
work of building a camp has begun foi
the men employed in taking out cypress
for the Wilson Cypress Company on DeelI
Creek. The camp will have steady work
all summer as the cypress is abundant


To Be a Fine Plant.
The Jetton-Dekyl sawmill wi'l soofi be
in operation on Lake Newnan.
The immense sawmill which has been
in course of construction on Newnan's
Lake, by the Jetton-Dekyl Lumber Com-
painy of Tampa. is about completed. The
machinery is being installed, and if re-
ports are true. the steam will be turned on
to another important Alachua industry
within the next three weeks.
The Industrial Record has already had
something to say about this mill.
The Jetton-Dekyl Company, whicl is
one of the largest lumber concerns in tilt-
State, a few months ago secured several
thousand at.res of tine cypress timber bor-
dering on Newnan's lake. and immediately
proceeded to erect an immense mill, which
will have a cutting capacity of about 60,-
000 feet per day. The machinery ordered
was all modern and of the latest and most
improved pattern, with the result that the
plant will be labor-saving and up-to-date
from every standpoint.
This mill i- located on the shores ot
Newnan's lake, a distance of nearly two
miles from Fairbanks. The mill will be
connected by a tramway to Fairbanks,
where an outlet for its products via the
Sealoard Aair Line Railroad will be at-
forded. The tram i ill also be used to
convey timber to the mill. A tow-boat.
will also be placed in commission on the
lake to transport the timber in rafts to
the plant.
A large number of hands will be em
played at this mill, and altogether tht
indu-try will prove of great commercial
interest to that section.


Bailey & Montgomery's Review.
New York. May 18, 1904.
Spirits Turpentine. Stock-574 barrels.
The market during the week on the
whole has been dull. and spot goods have
moted slowly. There has been a fair bus-
,ne-s ldor in arrival lots, however.
Thur.da*v. May 12-581-2c. asked.
Friday. Mlay 13'-5Sl-2c. asked.
Saturday. May 14-58 l-2c. asked.
NMonday. .May (i6-5H. asked.
Il'esLdai. May 17--5c. asked.
Wed nsday. .Mlav 1 -58c. asked.
losing -Stock. i4.000 barrels.
lusines- in this market has been good;
ill grades met with quick sale, with pos-
-ill li1e ex\rcption of H and I.
A(. $2.95 to $.00; I). $:3.05; E. 3.10:
I:'. $3.15. (.. l .20; II. $3.20: 1. $3.25: K.
,3.T70: M. $3.10: N.$4.00: WG(. $4.20; W\\.
44t :35.
Send us your orders for Commissary
checks. The Record prints more commis-
sary checks than all the printing houses
in the South combined.


J. E. GORNTO & CO.
Shipping Trade
a Specialty. .
On $3 Orders and over, Express Prepaid

WHISKIES

FROM $1.50 TO $6 A GALLON
Sole Agent

Old Saratoga Rye, $6 Gal.
Old Baker Rye, $6 Gal.

Old Westmoreland Rye, $4 Gal.

Big Horn Rye, $3 Gal.

J. E. GORNTO & CO.,


and must be gotten out within a specifne
time. Valdosta,


Georgia


Automobiles.
State Agents for the Famous


FORD


Launches


Automobile and Lauxnch
Supplies.


Repairing a Specialty.

Florida. Automobile Co.
132-134 E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903,04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


Receipts
Spirits, casks ............................
Rosins. bbls. ............................


Spirits casks.... ...................
Rosins, bbls..... ................... ..
Foreign
Spirits, casks ... .. .. .... .. ....
Rosins, bbs .......... ..................
New York
Spirits, casks............ ... ..............
Rosins, bbls................. ..........
Sundries
Spirits, casks........ ..................
Rosins, bbls. ................ ............


[i)013-0 1 t02-3 11901-02


I193, 64 7
650,93S
8441.585


188,398
752,270

93,384
338,171

35,658
87,353

59,351
326.746


.292,49) 314,846
940,507 1,071,440
1,233,038 1,385,786


296,430
975.428

206,109
504,173

42,765
133,121

87,556
387.734


314,876
( 1 7

217,446
535,042

53,797
129,059

43,633
898.536


The receipts of spirits are less than 1902-03 by 98849 casks, and of rosins, 289,569 barrels

H. ROBINSON Pres. H. GAILLARD. Cashier
W. B. OWEN. Vice-Pres.
Commercial Bank, Trade Checks


State Depository. FOR THE
BRANHnas: Ocala. Fla.. Lake City. Fla
Jacksonville, f- lorida

IEs & THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
KI RK & JON S manufactures more of them
DRUGGISTS. than all the printing and office
107 E. BY sT. supply houses in the South
107 E. BAY ST.
Combined.
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED. Send all orders for Com-
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. missary Checks, any color, any
Denomination, padded or loose
Sto the
Industrial record Go.,


THE CANNON COMPANY
CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barrels hold and will pass the se,
verest American and European inspection.

Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, OUITMAN, GA.,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address orders to home office,
QUITMAN, GA.


THE

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
Extracts the spirts without destroying the
wood fibre. Runs out a charge in less than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-five gallons from curd of wood.
Makes pure water white spirits, free from
the odor of tar or creosote. No chemicals
used in refining the spirits. Needs to be
distilled only once after coming from re-
tort.
No trouble with bi-products, the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
duced and from wood. Only one grade
of spirits produced and that the highest
ABSOLUTTFIY NO DANGER FROM FIRE
Built of finest material by high-grade
workmen. The cheapest machine offered to
the public.
We challenge comparison of output and
qriility of product. We guarantee output
mnd quality.
For full particulars, prices, samples.
etc., address-
The fine Belt Constuction Company
P. O. Box 543 RALEIGH, N. C.


THE RECORD'S SPACE HAS A BIG MONEY VALUE.









12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
im


INDUSTRIAL R.ECOR.D.

JAMES A. HOLLOMON,
Editor and Manager.
Published Every Friday.
emro (Domestic) ...3.00 Per Annum
BmBoOPTIOH ((Foreign).... $3 50
"The Pine and Its Products."
AC: communications should be addressed
The Industrial RIocord Company,
JackIonville. Fla.

Branch Editorial and Business Office at
Savannah, Ga.

Entered at the Postoffice at Jacksonville.
Fla.. as second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association, Sep-
temper 12, 102. as its exclusive official or-
ga. Adopted in annual convention, Sep-
tember 11, as the organ also of the general
association.
Adopted April 27th, 1(0, as the official
rgan of the Inter-State Cane Growers'
association. Adopted Sept. U, 19, as the
only omicial organ of the T. 0. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
remlutlon adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.

COP rI) ADVERTISING.
Advertising copy (ehanmes or mew
advertisements) should reach us
T eMday mormtim to insure Insertloe
Im the Issue of the rme week.

FROM THE WOODS TO THE STILL.
Pure spirits of turpentine and water-
white rosin are the products of virgin gum,
freshly dipped from a pine tree box or cup.
The trees are boxed in the fall and win-
ter, and when the warm weather of spring
comes and the sap begins to flow, the
gum drops into the boxes. If the weath-
er be warm, the flow of gum will be free,
checked only by hardening of the gum in
the pores. In cool weather but little gum
will drop. With a good flow the boxes
will fill in about a month. Once a week,
after the flow begins the cutters go over
the crop and hack the tree just above
the box. This is to open the flow that
has been stopped by the hardening of the
gum at the point of exudation. This hack-
ing is done by a peculiarly shaped blade,
cutting what is called a 'streak." The
flow continues for several months, and the
boxes are dipped once a month.
The dipping is done with a sheet iron
scoop, that fits into thle box, and as the
contents are dipped they are emptied into
a two-gallon bucket. This. when full. is
emptied into a nearby barrel, and when
that is filled it is cove red with a hermetic
top and hauled to the still. Here it is
r.lle.l up to the platform, and its con-
tents emptied into the still. In two or
three hours we have turpentine as the dis-
tillation and rosin as the residuum. After
the turpentine has bien taken off, a floodl-
gate in tile still is lifted and the rosin
flows through a strainer into a vat. That
wlich comes out first is not as good as
that which comes later. The vats are then
dipped into barrels and the first dipping is
usually the best WW rosin. After the
turpentine has been purified it its barreled.
And this is how pure spirits of turpen-
tine and water-white rosin are made from
virgin gum.


OUR LABOR PROBLEM.
We are proud of the position attained
by the South in the development of its
varied resources, and realize that the la-
horer who toils in the forest, at the forge,
in the factory and in the field has done
much, and full credit should be accorded
him.
But there are laborers and laborers.


Like men in other walks of life, the la-
boring men are not all trusty. There are
some who can be relied upon that when
a contract is made with them and money
is advanced to them on it, relying upon
their fidelity to carry it out, to live up
to their contract.
And then there are others who regard
a contract as a chance to rob their em-
ployers, and they do not hesitate to make
contracts to engage in work for a season
or for a year and as soon as they can get
an advance upon it, skip the neighborhood,
leaving employers in the lurch. It is for
just such laborers as these that stringent
laws should be provided. It is time that
the turpentine men and the lumbermen
get together and sketch out the draft of
a bill that, while constitutional and en-
forcible, will afford employers full protec-
tion. Now is the time to discuss such a
proposed law.


T. 0. A. SUBS.
Time and again the Record has advocat-
ed the importance of sub-associations of
the T. O. A. More of them should be or-
ganized in the Southeast and more mem-
Ihers should enjoy their advantages. The
Record will gladly aid the craft in any
locality to effect the organization of a
sub. and publish its proceedings or any
other thing it may wish that would be of
general interest to the turpentine men.
[here are eight States represented in the
Turpentine Operators' Association. There
should be at least an average of six sub-
associations in each State. Correspondence
is solicited by the Record on this line.
There is a strong sub. at Ocala, Fla.,
which has accomplished wonders for the
good of the association. At its meeting
held on the 12th instant the question ot
continuing it was discussed among its
members, and it was decided that it was
too useful as an adjunct to the turpentine
isiness to let it go down, and a conm-
mittee was appointed to send a circular
letter to its members, making an appeal
for renewed interest. A copy was receih-
Sd by tie lRecord and we cheerfully give it
publication. It is as follows:
"Oeala, Fla., May 12, 1904.
"'Dear Sir: Tie Turpentine Operators'
S1nb-Association held a meeting to-day.
and ;was largely attended, and it was de-
-ided tlo write each and every operator in
this t-,r.itory a letter, and for that )pr-
,.cse. a committee consisting of R. S. Hall.
I'. '. Thaggard and T'. C. Hall, were ap-
,ointed to write you tie views of the As-
,soiation.
"The question of continuing this Associa-
tion was discussed among its members, and
It wa's decided to continue it, as it has
proved such a wonderful success to all
the turpentine operators throughout the
-everal States. This committee wishes to
call your attention specially along these
lines, as the prices of naval stores are
high. naturally the operators will make
mnoncy and feel independent, and will neg
Ihct their duty to the Association.
It is our intention to beg you and be-
-sechl you to stick to the Association, as
it is one of the best and strongest bod-
ies ever organized. and has done more
or tlhe turpentine people than any one
thing that has ever been organized, and our
Sub. at Ocala is in a flourishing condition.
and has the reputation of being the larg-
est and hest attended in the Southern
States.
"We invite you to meet with us on the
second Thu'rs:day in each month and ex-
change views with us and help the Associ-


TWENTY YEARS FROM NOW FOR THE MEN OF THE SOUTH.


From time to time editorials in the Rec-
ord have shown what the progress of the
Southeast has been during the past twenty
years. It may not be out of place to at-
tempt a forecast, and the Record herewith
hazards one, believing that in each case, it
has under rather than over estimated the
probabilities.
Twenty years from now, the pine lands
of the Southeast, some of which are now
so ioor that they require fertilizers to
raise a crop, will be the recognized vege-
table gardens of the United States foi
early marketing. So perfectly' adapted
to truck farming is this section that even,
now the large produce dealers of the
Northern cities are acquiring thousands
of acres here with a view to meet their
demands.
Twenty years from now Jacksonville, it
sihe keeps up her present pace, will have
over a half million population.
Twenty years from now a majority
of the planters and farmers of the South-
cast will be graduates of some of our agri-
cultural colleges and will employ only
the newest and hast methods of farming.
Twenty years front now there will be
a marked change in the methods of em-
ploying farm labor. The young man on,
the farm, be lie white or black, who begins
his work at sunrise, works continually
until noon, and from 1 o'clock until the
going down of the sun, will command $30
or more per month, instead of $12 to $15
ais now; while lie who strains his ears
to catch the first rumblings of the ap
proaching train, stops his work and sor


nation. If you are not a member already,
we would Ie glad to have you enroll your
name as such.
"With kind regards, and wishnig you
a prosperous year, and hoping to see you
in tih second Thursday in .lunn-, we arc,
Respectfully yours,
II. S. HALL, Chlairman,
E. P. THAGGARD,
T. C. HALL.
Committee.

GOLD COINAGE IN 9go4.
Statistics of the coinage operations o0
thei- United States mints in the months of
.-bruary and Marcl rendered it certain
that the coinage of gold for the current
year would be exceedingly large, and the
pildlication n f the figures for April not
,,nly Isl- rs out the earlier anticipations,
iut indicates that the figures reached this
year will be the largest in the history of
tie government. Thi coinage for Jan-
aary was not large-only $2,765,000-but
that for February amounted to $35.(60,500.
that for March to $63.605,790 and that for
April to $26,177,0()0. The total for the
four months amounted to $128,151,890,.
which represents an increase of over $84,-
4(00.0W as compared with the gold coinage
for the whole of last year and of over
$169.00,000 as compared with the previous
record year 1899.
These figures are phenomenal. Moreover
they are gratifying and teach a wholesome
lesson. The drains upon financial centers
has been very great this year for the de-
velopiment of numerous industries and en-
terprises. However great the demand lhas
been the supply has proved adequate.
Now that we have a gold standard the yel-
low metal comes forth for coinage uoon
demand so easily and so abundantly that
it dispels the dread of free coinage of sil-
ver so blatantly demanded eight years ago.


rowfully watches the train disappear in
the dim distance, will be out of a job.
The tenant who cannot work 80 acres then
instead of 10 acres now, will have to emi-
grate to the Phillippines.
Twenty years from now the survivors
of those who are now advocating asso-
ciation methods and co-operative ideas
\ ill be living on the fat of the land, earned
for them by the progressive, far-sighted
men of the present time.
Twenty years from now the country
homes of the Southeast will resemble the
old-time comfortable and luxurious planta-
tion houses so prominent before the War,
while the barns, sheds and fences will
,'onlpare favorably with those of the finest
farms of the great Northwest.
Twenty years from now the Southeast
will breed and fatten the finest live stock
to ie found anywhere in the world.
Twenty years from now, the half mil-
lion people of Jacksonville, instead of
using milk produced in pent-up, unsightly
uand uncleanly quarters, within a few
miles of the courthouse, will get their
upplly of pure milk and pure cream
from tidy farms located along the lines
of the railroads running into this South-
en metropolis, where the conditions of
natural grass, pure water and cleanly
environments are favorable to milk pro-
duction, and brought to this city in spec-
ial milk trains equipped with storage cars.
The thrifty, energetic, economical, up-
to-date, pushing young man, who is just
starting out for himself without capital
will he wealthy and happy twenty years
from now.


JUST RECOGNITION.
The Record rejoices at the recognition
show n President H. H. Tift, of the Geor-
gia Interstate Sawmill Association, at the
annual meeting this week, by the presenta-
tion to him of a silver service by the en-
.ire association. a token of appreciation of
int itinl sc vices. The service consisted
;.f seventeen pieces of hammered silver, en-
ziaved as follows:
"To our President,
H. H. Tift,
As\ a token of our appr'-ciation of his five
years of devoted and loyal service
to e the (ergia Interstate
Sawmill Association, Presented at
the Fifth Annual Meeting,
Quitnman, Ga., May 17, 1904."
lihe picsentation was a complete sur-
Irise to .Mr. Tift, and for a moment ne
\iwa; at a loss. Then in his quiet, peculiar
-tyh, le" expressed, in feeling terms, his
-;ratitude at the kind remembrance, and
Iis deep appreciation of the token of es-
t.in tron Ihis fellow members.
President Tift has been a great power
in the development of the South and no
I ss has his influence been felt as presid-
ing ollicer of this well-known progressive
association.


Strange as it may appear, those saw-
mills which are thoroughly advertised in
a good trade journal, and thereby get
into direct comnnmunication with the pur-
chaser East are running full or overtime
-n orders, while those which are not ad-
vertised, and hence remain in obscurity,
until they are found by the commission
broker, are for the most part running on
half time or not running at all. The Ree-
ord is on file in the office of every lead-
ing lunmIer dealer in the North.


IF YOU ARE PROGRESSIVE, ADVERTISE IN THE RECORD.


-- ----- --







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


NO. 6888.

i THE ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE.
0 CAPIIAL PAID IN. $350,000.00.
OPEN FOR BUSINESS AUGUST I, 19o3.
OFFICERS:
: Edward W. Lane, President. Fred W. Hoyt, Vice-President.
* Thomas P. Denham, Cashier.

FINANCIAL SWINDLES IN GOTHAM. thing was as much a sham as were the
imitation telephone connections and the
What looks like an epidemic of crime imitation "tickers."
in financial circles has attacked the me- In Woodend's case thousands of pat-
tropolis. On every lip is the question, runs all over the East have discovered that
Where will be the next outbreak? Within the well-known society man, yachtsman,
a fortnight have been disclosed three of horse-show patron and entertainer of large
the most outrageous cases of swindling on parties at the opera and the seaside, and
a large scale that New York has known the man now reported to be in Los An-
in recent years. These are the collapse of eles, whose handsome home on the west
Dr. Woodend, the high-flying broker of mne -ide was presided over by one of the most
Consolidated Exchange, the unique "invest- ambitious women in New York, is only a
ment" operations of members of the law bucket shop" keeper of the most depraved
irm of Sheldon & Gwynn and the start- type.
ling rascalities of David Rothschild, whose As for Sheldon & Gwynn, they appear
so-ealled Globe Securities company and to have had a specialty of making love to
Federal Bank have turned out to be just impressionable women with money, and to
so many worthless balloons. I e about equally skilled in wrecking for-
When the police examined the splendid tunes and wrecking hearts. No lawyers
looking "safe" of the securities company. in the State had more gorgeous offices;
they found the front door of steel and none made more plausible pretence of hon-
the rear partition a bit of tin and scant- ,sty and good form, none ever was guilty
ling through which one of the detectives ,:f such disgusting faithlessness and breach
easily thrust his foot into the "safe." Not of trust. The secret history of their be-
one dollar of the large deposits of the havior must remain hidden in the breasts
trusting public was there. The whole of their numerous feminine dupes.


The WestcRaley-Rannle Company,
114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
A. f. WEST. Pres. E. E. West. VIce-Pres. W. Ramale, Vice-Pres. M. V. Raley, Sec. & Treas.

We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.


"Kingan's Reliable."
Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and Westeri Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINGAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Flavius T. Christie,
President.


Frank C. Groover,
Vice-Pres.


Marshall W. Stewart,
See. and Treas.


THE GHRITIE-IROOEG R I DRUiG O.

SWholesole OruogisIs


Jacksonill e,


S- HO


The Ford. ;'s some salesmen claim, why do all the
There are automobiles and automobiles, i "ost expensive cars have two or mor,-
c'-linders !
but few have as many friends as the
"Ford." It is a noteworthy fact that in The truth is that manufacturers of sin
such high esteem are they held here that ',le cylinder machines only continue to
the Florida Automobile Company, of .lack a'ke them because it would cost too much
sonville, who are State Agents for it, tinl to change their out-of-date models.
it is impossible to have any on hand. As The Florida Automobile Co. claim the
soon as a shipment arrives it is sold. The Ford to he the only high-class machin-
Ford is a double opposed motor machine. that. Ibein outside the trust, can be bought
If a single cylinder engine were as good. at a reasonable price.
Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.


CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS,
AND VATS.
Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.


*. M. DAVIS & SON,


PALA-TKA, FLA.


We Solicilt Te iro lilmber ow liupeil0e Commissa Dep:rl1e0l
ioll 0de Our Specilly. Corfespolence Solicled. We Wonl YoIr TwiN


Naval Stores Market
and Stock Report
Published Daily in The


Jacksonville Metropolis,
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.

$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.


BIG PRIZES:


A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposi'icn, to
Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.


Carter & Russell Publishing Co.
Jacksonville. Florida.


"FAIR, INDEP~END AND PROGRESSIVE"











14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


S. P. Holmes & Company's Weekly Cotton
Letter.

NEW YORK. May 20th-The ship cot-
ton has ben dragging at its anchorage
again this week. The dragging process ha-
continued for so long that one is temlptea
to wonder just how long the stagnation
and sagging tendency are to continue.
There is just about enough business to sai
there is a market which opens at 10 o'clock
and closes at 3 p.. B. ut as far as outside
interest is concerned there is none and it
will require definite and known damage to
the new crop or evidence manipulation in
the old to bring about speculative activity.
For two weeks now the Imaket has been
held by the absence of necessary rain in
the Atlantic Coast region. On Monda
rains began and continued for several days.
New Orleans became somewhat anxiotu
about the position and hedged a lot oi
their cotton in New York and Liverpool.
As all incentive to buy has been with
drawn through the rainfall there was ver
little support for the market and Jul i
worked down to 13 cents. It will be re
i:embered that after the .January inflation.
July broke below 13 cents and recoveretl
to 16l1/ cents. With the Sully failure, the
option again broke below 13 cents and af-


SPIRIT r OF TURPENTINE.
To United Kingdom, in gallons:
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
April...... 1986,81 186.128 366.346
May ........ 60.315 63.222 1,183.364
June......... 795.037 1,480.186 1,562,50
July ........ 973.759 289.934 1,530.070
August... ..9.. 890 1,767.874
September.. .. .773.211 646.257 909.700
October .......... 711.434 498.240 1,6.8M,
November .. 661,638 1,295,769 922,991
December .. 1,659.656 1,531,779 576,784
January. .. 228,850 373,240 164,330

To Belgium and Netherlands. In gallons:
Month 190-04 1902-03 1901-02
April ...... .. 286,812 90,447 Included
May .... .... 2,706 51,513in all other
June........... 507.693 267.210 Europe
July .... .. .. 576.188 819.217 8.i9,348
August.. .... 489.387 358490
September ... 26.455 758.201 438.621
October ...... 30.914 210.001 121,480
November .. 133,695 349,726 381,226
December .. 100,372 58,659 672,164
January .... 168,879 241,150 174,367

To Germany, in gallons:
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-n2
April .... .. ......... 114,034 112.53.;
May .... .. .. 33283 68.436 230,056
June....... 104,000 331.672 190.04,
luly .. .. .... 68,111 180.412 78.7s.
August ....... 51.856 678,437
September..... 226.950 566.981 713.97
October .... ..57.316 91.644 148.597
November .. 179,010 110,153 81,780
December ..- -
January .... 132,600 54,607 153,898

To all other Europe in Gallons:
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
April .......... 510 18,475 260.061
May.. ........ 58.058 31.047 574.311
June........ .146.233 1.000 66.468
July ...... ... 6.000 124.284 48.4C2
Augus* .... .. .. 2000 2.500
September..... 43.368 38.040 21.000
October ...... 10.000 42.832 17.05.O
November .. 32,500 17,800 94,837
December .. 47,06 89,591 23,000
January ... 11,000 -

Total Foreign Exports. In gallons, includ-
Ing everything outside of the United


States:
Month 1903-04 1902-03
April ...... .. 514.088 56.815
May ..... ... 198.782 260.144
June...... ....1.838.000 2.223.253
July .... .. ..2.11.80S 1.651.015
Aunust ...... 1.734.1aM 2.906.458
September.... .1.474.145 2.154.565
October .. 1438.121 1.002.897
November ..1,851.068 1.932.183 1
December .1.993.529 1,794.336 1
January ... 700,292 820,253


1901 .n0
94.676
2.26S.06->
2.947.821
2.493.849

2.224.990
1.827..38
,652.574
.55n.17.5
629,990


ter the census report advanced to 1,1/%2
tcent.. Since then, there has been a steady
-agging market and in all probability
gnod weatlhir anl favorable new crop
news will carry the price some lower. But
il th1i other hand, the situation is such
that IoIIe one Ilma step in at any moment
anld caiiue a Ilurry in the old e:op positions
-o that is extremely unwise to attempt
'short Iling fior such moderate profits as
.are likely to accrue. As far as the new
-rop niontlis are concerned the trade gen-
irali. is divided over the outlook. One of
tle most acute ol;servers (,o tile floor of
N ew oork Exchange gives as his opiniolh
,bat the public wil only begin to realize


LROSINS.
To United Kingdom, barrels 280
M month 1903-04 1902-03


lbs:
1901-02


ill Selte filwr. cotton was being picked an
sold in Texas at 10 and 10/4 cents. The
course of lie market during the balance
of the season is well known. With the
attention of the spinning world centered
upon the absence of supplies in all direc-
tion-. it is not unlikely that prices will
be a cent or half a cent a pound higher
than during tlie same marketing season
la.t year. This means that it will require
a full crop which means perfect weather
,endition.- in the interim to depress Oc-
tober cotton to 10:50 cents or below.
There is likely to lie a sagging market for
a time as the acreage is big and weather
is generally good in May and early June.


,!he pIice as high when new crops get lint it is an open question as to the prob-
.iroungi 101:, .c nts. Another olerat(lr able course of the market later on and


1


,\lose opinion if fully as valuable as the ianwl damage will favor the buyers. pretation which was given to the weather
.nie list quoted, states that new crops at
1 cI lts ca;lllnot Ib. called high in view ololmes Co Stock L P Holm es
lie uncertainty surrounding the crops an S. P. Holmes & Company's Stock Letter. P. lm
hle practical certainty that we will have NEW Y(ORK. May 20.-Aside from the
liit as s rious reports of boll weevil dain- temporaryy spurt of activity in Union Pa- Stocks, Bonds, CPttn,
ige this season as last. Taking the pa-t el ic which advanced from 82 to 83%;. the Grain and Previ ns.
season as a whole and it would seem as market was featureless. The buying of MEMB
iniouili tlie last view was more likely to I'nion Pacific was started by Housman & NEW YORK GOTTON EXCHANGE
.. aa correct diagnosis of thie position Co., and while is was said to be for short CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
illyy a ,small part of last year's crop was account. it looked as if it might be bought Direct private wires to all exchanges.
marketed below 10/, cvints. When flit- for a turn on the long side. The general Iocal stocks and bonds a specialty.
.res in New Yiork were selling at .,1/, cent- dullness was intensified today, the tl., Bell Phone 853 Baldwis Block


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE
Apr 1 Apr. 3 Apr. 10 Apr. 17 Apr. 24 May 1 May 8 May 15 May 22 May *
NID ND 50 49 47 45 1-2 461-2 4K1-2


April ...... .. 79.243 65,387 63.49. June 5 June 12 June 19 June 26 July 3 July 10 July 17 July 24 July 31 Aug. 6
May ...... .. 60,315 63,222 58.994 45 3-4 4 47 47 47% 47 3-4 48 50 0 4
June .. .. .. .. 60.748 67,542 51,632 Aug. 14 Aug. 21 Aug. 27 Sept. 4 Sept. 11 Sept 18 Sept. 2 Oct. 2 Oct. I Oct. 1
July......... 82.948 59.235 65,510 52%-5 53% 53% 6% 54 3-4 57 ND r5 57 1-2 ( 1-3V -4
August ...... 74.649 62,613 Oct. 22, Oct 29 Nov. 6, Nov. 1, Nov. 5,Dec. 3, Dec. 10, Dec. 17, Dec. 3, Jan. 14
Septembn r.. ... 98,471 42.88 73.309 66 561-2 66 66 56 56 56 561-4 6 1-4 3 1--44
October ...... 46.641 41.034 90,057 Jan. 22, Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18,Feby. 25 Mch. 3 Mch. 10 Med 24
November .. 71,107 95,735 88,643 (i5 bc 64 62 60 59 60 68
December .. 61,455 64,455 72,502 Mch. 30
January ... 53,506 42,769 60,518 57
RLOSINS
To Belgium and Netherlands, barrels 280 WW WG N R I H G D C-A
pounds: WW W N 3 K I H o F 3 D C-A
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901--0 April 1... ..... 390 3.40 3.5 0 8140 $3.20 2.85 2.40 2.0 2.10 t 2.5 2.
April .. .... .. 16,709 53015 Included April 3 . .. 375 3.0 3.50 3.40 3.20 28 2.40 .20 1 20.05 .e 2 L
May .. .. ...... 23706 1,513in all other April 10 .. 3.60 345 335 .20 3.00 2.85 2.40 10 21 0 2 .0 2.L0 2.r
June...... 35.866 63,673 Europe April 17 . A.50 3.35 3.25 3.15 3.0040 85 2.40 2.05 00 L6 1.16 L1
July .. .. .. .. 26.646 19,647 40,271 April 24. 4. 40 .25 L3. 310 3.0 2.25 2 5 2.00 1.15 L 1.;
August ...... 43.035 47.263 May 1. ...... 3.3 3.25 3.15 3.10 .00 2.85 2.5 L85 1.80 L75 161 L5
September.... 45.3'3 10,819 34.737 May 8 . .. 3.35 3.25 3.15 310 .00 2.85 2.25 1.80 1.75 L70 L79 1.7
October .. .. 37,131 64.408 23.019 May 15 . . 347% 327% 3.17% 5.12% 3.02% 2.87% 2.27% 1.80 L7T L7T 1.7 LT
November .. 3,991 60,020 31,504 May 22 . . 65 335 5 3.20 3.19 3.00 2.35 1.75 1.70 1. L5 L0D
December .. 37,077 13,325 20,940 May 9 .. ... 3.65 3.35 3.25 320 310 305 2.40 1.85 1.80 175 L70 LU'
June 5 . . 360 3.30 320 3&15 305 300 2.0 1.90 1.56 18 1.80 L7
January .... 60,739 24,192 15,951 June 12. ...... .40 3.10 00 2.95 2.85 2.80 2.30 1.90 1.5 1.80 1.1 L7~
June 19... .. ..30 3.10 00 2.16 2.85 2.70 2.25 1.75 L70 LO LN La
To Germany, barrels 280 lbs. !June 26 .3)0 110 2.00 295 2.81 2.65 2.25 1.70 1.5 LW 1.6 LB
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02 July 3... 3.30 10 3.00 2.90 2.80 2.65 25 1.80 1i7 L70 LO LN
April ........ 40.558 37.844 6.658 July 10. 3.0 310 .00 2.90 2.80 2.65 2. 1.6. 1.76 L70 LO LO
May ........ 33,283 6,436 5. July 17 . .. 40 3.20 3.10 30 2.10 2.75 2.30 1 1.0 1. 1 L.B L.
.une .... .. .. 41,55 49.632 48803 July 24. . .. &45 &.2 310 3.00 2.30 2.75 230 1.85 1.75 L79 LU L
July ...... .. 100236 34.874 55.391 July 31 . .. 3.40 3.20 3.05 2.9S 2.a 2.70 2.20 L75 1..6 1.5 1.5
ugus .. .. .. 8.834 3 .91 August 7 . 3.40 20 3.0 2.9 2.85 2L70 2.20 1.75 5 1. 1.56 1.
September..... 160.157 96.4S .2 August 14. 3.50 3.30 3.15 3.05 2.5 2.80 2.30 1.85 1.75 1.70 1.70 1.70
October .. .. .. 82.-,'; 38.654 36'9 August 21 . .. 3.50 3.30 3.15 3.06 2.95 2.80 2.30 1.85 1.75 1.70 1.70 1.7
November .. 56, 42,841 23,3 August 28..... 3.70 3.50 3.25 3.15 3.11 2.90 2.40 2.00 1.90 1.86 1.30 L
December .. 15,407 39,171 6,482 September 4. . 370 3.50 3.4i 3.30 3.30 3.00 2.50 2.15 2.05 z.00 1.0 1.5
January .... 34,762 54,052 99,273 September 11 . 3.80 3.65 3.50 3.45 3.40 3.10 2.50 2.0 1.95 1.90 1.86 1.
-- September 18 . 3.90 3.75 3.60 3.60 .45 3.20 2.60 2.15 2.05 2.00 1.6 1.8
To all other Europe. barrels 280 lbs: September 25. . 4.25 4.10 3.95 3.95 I.70 3.5 2.65 2.30 2.20 10 2.00 1.
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-0. October 2. 4.45 4.40 4.5 4.30 4.15 3.50 2.70 2.45 2.30 2.0 2. L1
April .... .. .. 33.848 30.142 85.731 October 8 ...... 4.70 4.40 4.35 4.2 4.19 3.50 2.70 2.55 2.40 2.30 L2. 1.
May .... ... 27.192 40.729 99.116 October 15 ... ..4.45 4.40 4.2 4.00 3.85 3.25 2.70 2.55 2.50 2.3 2. 2.1
June.......... 14.044 9.682 63.3g: October 22 ......4.20 3.90 3.80 380 315 3.05 2.60 2.45 2.40 2.35 2. 2.1
July .... .. .. 45.513 51.612 14.1 L October 29 .. ......4.20 3.90 3.60 3.30 3.00 2.70 2.60 2.55 2.50 2 2.5 2.1
August .... .. 2.85 30.119 November 6 .... ..3.90 3.30 310 2.90 2.89 2.70 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.35 2.3 2.3
September..... 27.494 17.386 15.398 November 13 .. ....3.50 3.25 3.10 2.90 2.80 2.70 2.35 2.30 2.25 2.10 2.6 2.5
October .. .. .. 34.418 15.442 11.g i November 19 ......3.60 3.35 3.20 3.00 2.0 2.70 2.45 2.45 2.6 2. 5 2.15 2.65
November 13,328 6,415 25,014 November 25 .. ..3.50 3.25 3.10 2.90 2.80 2.60 2.40 2.30 2.20 2.10 2.10 2.1
December 25..199 48,701 39,816 Iecember 3 ... 3.50 3.25 3.0 2.90 2.80 2.55 2.35 2.30 2.20 2.15 2.15 2.16
December 17 .... 3.50 3.25 3.00 2.90 2.80 2.55 2.35 2.25 2.20 2.2 2.2 2.29
January ... 17,124 7,148 24,629 December 10 .. 3.50 3.25 05 2.90 2.S0 2.5 2.35 2.0 2.0 2.20 2.20 2.2
December 31 ....3.55 3.30 3.10 2.95 285 2.60 2.40 2.30 2. 2. 2.5 2.I=
Total Exports of Rosin, barrels 280 pounds January 14 ....4.00 3.A0 3.35 3.15 3.%5 3.00 2.96 2.80 2.70 2.65 2.50 2.6
Including Asia Africa and America out- January 22 .. ....4.50 4.10 2. 3.90 315 3.10 290 270 2.5 2t 2.46 2.4
side of the United States: January 2 .... ..50 4.10 3.& 3.19 3.26 3.30 3.15 2.90 2.5 2.5 .75 2.3
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-O, February 11 ..3.75 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25 :320 2.85 2.85 2.80 2.75 2.70 2.70
April ...... .. 196.681 186.128 26.061 February 18 ...3.6.5 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25 305 2.70 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.55
Tunay ........ 178.269 210.031 21 5 i February 25 ...3.70 3.50 3.35 3.20 3.25 2.95 3.60 2.55 2.50 2.45 2.40 240
July .... .... 306.580 187.193 11.69 March 10 ......3.80 3.60 .40 3.35 3.30 30 W5 2.75 2.70 2.65 2.60 255 2.55
August .... .. 239.155 2"8atg2 March 24 ......4.00 3.70 3.50 3.35 3.30 2.95 270 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.50
September..... 333.850 233.032 231.%4 March 31 ......4.10 3.80 3.60 3.35 3.30 2.95 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.50
October ...... 2.. .21.2 2751.716 192.1
November .. 184.860 231.543 222.479
Jeeanuale 4. 177 6 21941440 For Prompt Delivery Sed Us Your Comm'ssary Check Order.

THE RORDanuary CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.247,
THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.


j


traders even abandoning their efforts to
*"Scalp" eighths. An undercurrent of
strength was noticeable throughout the
list and stocks offered at any successions
found a ready market, but it is doubtful
if any considerable amount of stocks could
be marketed. The Steel issues were ne-
glected but was steady and in good de-
mand. We look for a very narrow market
tomorrow.


Jacksonville Brokerage Company's Cotton
Letter.
NEW YORK, May 18th.-Cotton open-
ed steady, four lower to four higher. The
new crop displayed relative strength in
consequence of the less favorable inter-







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will send by express, prepaid, the following:
Four full quarts Lincoln County, Sunnybrook Rye or Big Horn Rye .. $4.00
Single Bottles .................. ................................ ...-- $1.26
I will send four full quarts of Somers' Corn. Melwood Rye, Golden Wed-
ding Rye, Holland Gin. Tom Gin, Peach Brandy, Peach and Honey
Whiskey, Gin and Manhattan Cocktails-any of the above for........ $.0O
One bottle of any of the above ....................... ........ ...... $1 00
Four bottles of the following California Wines: Sherry, Port, Muscat,
Catawba ................................ ............................... 2.00
Single bottles .................................................................. 0c.
Single bottles ........................ .......................................... .00
Four bottles Wilson Whiskey, cased................................. 1.2
Single bottles .......................... ....................................... 00
Five bottles Duffy's Malt .......... .................................... $1.
Bulk goods of all kinds. Special Prices on application. All kinds of
l f..- I. 4.. *.. *1 EA An to A f n b JTa sonnvrll


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE RETAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints. Oils and Glass.
Stoves, Tinware, Couintry-Holloware.
10 WEST BAY STREET Jacksonville, Fla.


s murouq a . n......
F. BETTELINI. W Bay St.. opp. U on sepot. Jacksonville, Fla T A R A G O N

conditions. Private advices from the belt EDITOR EDMONDS' VISIT.A
in this connection were quite interesting JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
in that it was figured that the tempera- The Baltimore Manufacturers' Record rep- NOW OPEN
tures were too low, while the excessiv- resented at Board of Trade. under new management. Thoroughly
moisture in some sections was as damag- The editor of the Record had pleasant M" renovated and repaired throughout, in-
ing as the drought conditions in others chat with Mr. Richard H. Edmonds. of at ..nii"u ~ eluding new electric elevator and our
The cables were about as expected, and the Baltimore Manufacturers' Record, dur- ai own electric light plant.
they had little effect on the market. O( ing his visit here this week to help open ----'i H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.


the lower prices there was some little
support, but there was continued selling
by spot interests, while the professional
bears continued persistent in their ef-
forts to bring about lower prices. There
was some buying on the dips by houses
having English and German connections.
some of the wire houses had scattered
buying orders. The demand from these
-various sources, however, were soon filled
and the market developed a rather weak
tendecy, the price levels being reduced with
comparative ease. Trade as a whole was
moderatively active and local interests
figured for bulk of the operations. The
market during the latter part of tlw da)
was narrow. New crop months were well
supported on lower levels. On the close
there was a mixed feeling with profes-
sionals in control.


our New Woard"of Trade Building. He
expressed himself as much impressed with
lacksonville's rapid rebuilding after the W. T. RILEY,
fire. Presid
"You know we had a fire, too. We do
pot expect to rebuild as rapidly as you
have in Jacksonville. nor do we wish to.
I can readily understand that there was a JacH
necessity for it here, a's nearly your whole
business portion was destroyed. It speaks
volumes in favor of the energy. pluck and
confidence in the future of Jacksonville
Miat this has been done so well. But in
naltimore we think that "festina lentle" iouild he the rule. Make hasite slowly.
Although our loss -was absolutely two on
thlee times as great as yours, measured
in dollars. yet as compared with what wa,
-aved. your loss was proportionately great-
er than our-. There were buildings left!
in Baltimore after the fire sufficient for the'
Iulk of its business to Ie carried on tenm-


J. A. G. CARSON,
Vice-President.


GEO. J. SCOVEL,
Sec. and Treas.


ksonville Cooperage Co.


MANUFAC URERS OF


WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS


Machine and Hand Factories,


8th Street R. R. Crossing,


acksonville Brokerage Company's Grain orarily. and tle.s were at once ouplied .
Letter. They were a little crowded, but there vwas JAC SONVILLE,
CHICAGO. May 18.-Bullinh domestic no great break in the business. If N'e
;atistics caused longs in the wheat pit build ul in five years the entire section 4 4
Sc It destroyed byv the lire, we will lIe satilied.
Should fast today. Incidentally the fig- for the charter of our ne, i ildings we You Want
cs s t a for the character of our new buildings we, I You W anti
res caused shorts to become nervous and propose to e such that they will with-
llropose to lie such that tley will with-
ere was active buying for this account. and the raages of time. Y Want a
eceipts were not only small, but prom- Speaking of the industrial outlook in i You W t
ed to continue so. Estimates for to the Soutl r. Ednonds said: "Our pe, Yu Want a
Torrow were three cars. Northwestern y te m e f t
locks showed a big decrease and cash e, are startled 1y the magnitude of the WOU IY CuMe E
ocks showed a big decrease and cash undertakings now in progress throughout i
Interests showed some uneasiness about e g CGwll on or Write to
the South. It took us some time to grasp~ J.
apples the possibilities of the future. But we are
There was a small offering from the getting there. There seems to le no limit
mntry and shipping interest tried to (, -,, A*'*W++*MC***1* '
ntry and shipping interest tried to the size of any industrial venture, anm "l
et larger supplies. Export demand whilt t t.
the larger it is the better it will pay. \\'e ...
:ill small was expected to increase, the are just beginning to appreciate that the
re i just b~llegin g to appreciate that tilh ^ Tp ^ W
point being made by the bulls that before js 1i I e
t bei m e b the bulls tt bfore th is to he the great industrial center G eo. TI iffo
tng Argentine, Australia and India will of this country."
e out of the market as shiplpers and Mlr. Edmonils said ninny other things to Founders
merica will, alone, be in the field, the Record. >but the foregoing is the sub- rs


Advices from Texas regarding harvest-
ing is bullish and the southwestern houses
were buyers of wheat, there were fail
clearances and the primary movement was
small. Contract stocks decreased and
caused nervousness over the passing out
of the May delivery. On the higher lev-
e.'s th. re was some increase in offerings,
but up to the la.t, wheat that came out
was well taken.
Corn was sluggish most of the da3.
some active buying took place at times.
Sho: ts were the best buyers. Condition ot
influence mixed country reports indicate
bigacreage. Exports small and clearances
lightt.
itos sympathetic with other cereals.
Cai demand fair.
Provisions dull and featureless.


M FLORIDA

,:*.-:-*- 9.--.'--.:+-4,- *************4
a Turpentine Location?

Sawmill Location?
ny Kind of florida Land?
business?

H. LIVINGSTON & SONS,
Ocala. Florida o




rd Iron Works Co.

and Machinists.


stance of them. He addressed the Board .
of Trade at its banquet o Wednesday Special attention to Saw Mill and Turpentine Work.
evening and left for Baltimore yesterday. Tifton, Georgia.

- - -


THE COVINGTON COMPANY,


SoS al SHOES AND DRY GOODS 635 o41 West Forsyth Str
SJacsonville, Fla&.
NEW YORK: 256 Church St.

SWe Sell Merchants Only.


READ THE ADS IN THE RECORD.


tI
u


is

it




A
in




st
P
to

A


rl------------- ---------.-----I ~-


r ~ ~ --r -r ~ ~ -r -o -,--- --- -- -- ~ -- -r -


J.











16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

These advertisers are in this issue. If
you want anything, look through this
classified list and write to the firm ap-
pearing therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.

AUTOMOBILES.
Fred E. Gilbert, Jacksonville, Fla.
Florida Automobile Co., Jacksonville.
Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonvill, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Central National Bang, Ocala, Fla.
Mercantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOOKS.
Cochrane's Book Store, Palatka, Fla.
BRICK.
Geo. R. Foster, Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
The Southern Fuel & Supply Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
CARS.
South Atlantic Oar & Manufacturing Co.
Waycross, Ga.
CATTLE.
Palmetto Park Farm, Ocala, Fla.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
J. S. Pinkussohn Cigar Co., Jacksonville.
CLOTHING.
H. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
J. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville.
standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville.
CLOTHING--WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
M. W. Larendon, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
COOPERAGE.
She Cannon Co., Quitman, Ga.
The Cooperage Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
.Jacksonville Cooperage Co.. Jacksonville.
Fla.
DRUGS.
Conover Drug Co., Jacksonville.
Kirk & Jones. Jacksonville.
DRUGS-WHOLEbALE.
Christie-Groover Drug Co. Jacksonville,
Fla.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
J. S. Pinkussohn Cigar Co., Jacksonville.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
The Covington Co., Jacksonville.
ENGINES.
Merrill-Stevens Co.. Jacksonville. ila.
j. S. Schofields"' Sons, Macon. Ga.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
Geo. T. GIfford Iron Works, Tifton, Ga.
T .Murphy, Jacksonville, Fla.
J. S. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
The Southern Fuel & Supply Co., Jack-
sonville.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
J. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville.
H. A. Renfroe Co.. Jacksonville.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE
W. B. Johnson Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
C. H. Hargraves Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonille.
Ellis-Young Co., Savannah, Ga.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co.. Savannah. Ga
White. Walton & Co., Jacksonville.
J P. Williams Co.. Savannah, Ga
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn. Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
HARDWARE.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Itond & BJ-rrs Co., Jacksonville.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Valdjata. Go
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
J. D. Weed & Co., Savannah. Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
HARNESS.
McMurray & Baker. Jacksonville.
W. R. Thomas, Gainesville, Fa.
HATS.
H. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
Standard Clothln Co., Jacksonville.
J. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville.


HOTELS.
The Aragon, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
Zahms' European Hotel. Jacksonville.
New Victoria Hotel. Jacksonville.
The Oaks, White Springs, Fla.
The Hamilton., White Springs, Fla.
The New Paxton, White Springs, Ila.
The Kendrick House, White Springs,
Fla
Pritchard House, White Springs, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works, Tifton, Ga
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta. Ga.
T. Murphy, Jacksonville.
J. S. Schofield's Sons Company, Macon,
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co.. Jacksonville.
Hes & Slager. Jacksonville.
R. J. Riles. Jacksonville.
LIQUORS.
F. Bettelini. Jacksonville.
Chas. Blum & Co.. Jacksonville.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville.
Bowen & Co., Jacksonville.
J. E. Gornto & Co., Valdosta, Ga.
LAIUCHES.
Florida Automobile Co., Jacksonville.
Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
MACHINE WORKS.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works. Tifton, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
T. Murphy, Jacksonville.
J. S. Schofield's Sons "'impany, Macon,
Ca.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
J. S. Schofield's Sons & Co., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
M. A. Baker. Brunswick. Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
John G. Christopher. Jacksonville, Fla.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Valdoeta,
Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
'Iampia Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
J. S. Schofields' Sons, Macon, Ga.
MULES AND HORSES.
)illon & Penuel. Marianna.
W. R. Thomas. Gainesville, Fla.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
The Barnes-Jessup Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville.
The Ellis-Young Co.. Savannah, Ga.
Peacock-Hunt & West Co.. Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Ca., Jacksonville.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
PECANS.
The Grifling Bros. Co., Jacksonville.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Valdsta,
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
.J. R. Campbell, Ocala, Fla.
Ga.
Taxnpa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
J. S. Schoflelds' Sons, Macon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
Fred E. (ilbert, Jacksonville.
PAINTS.
I. E. Baird & Co., Jacksonville.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville.
RAILS.
Isaac Joseph Iron Co., Cincinnati, O.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith. Henderson & Warren, Tampa.


STOCK BROKERS.
Samuel P. Holmes & Co., Jacksonville.
.Jacksonville Brokerage Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumbler Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
TAILORS.
John B. Ciancaglini & Bro., Jacksonville.
II. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
TANKS.
G. M. Davis & Son.. Palatka, Fla.
Cypress Tank Co., Mobile, Ala.
J. S. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon Ga.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah.
Ga.
National Transportation & Terminal Co.,
Jacksonville,


GEO. R. F08 9R, JR
MANUFACTURER OP



Bs RICK.


WRITE FOR PRICES.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.

'PHONE 9m.


TOOLS.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
The Council Tool Co., Wananish, N. C.
TURPENTINE PROCESS. This Space Reserved for
The Pine Product Construction Co., Pay-
etteville, N. C.
The Pine Belt Construotion Co., Raleigh,
The Standard Turpentine Co.. New York j US M ller CO.
NCit. Go o.. Gus Muller & Co.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
M. A. Baker. Brunswick, Ga. holesal
McMillan Bros., Savannah. Ga. Whol
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
G. M. Davis & Son, Palatka. Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS. Liquor Merchants
G. M. Davis & Son, Palatka, Fla. Li, uor M merchants
TYPE WRITERS.
Grivot Typewriter Exchange, Jacks3aville
UNDERTAKERS. Proprietors
Chas. A. Clark, Inc., Jacksonville.
VEHICLES.
McMurray & Bro., Jacksgoville.
W. R hoas. Gainesville, la Jacksonville Boffttling Works
WATCHES.
R. J. Riles. Jacksonville.
Greenleaf & (roslby Co.. Jacksonvil'e.
Hess & Sager, Jacksonville. ...Agents...
YELI)OW PINE LI MBEER.
('nnuer Liinml.r Co.. .Jacksonville, Fla.
East Loast Lumber Co.. Watertown, Flla. IUU 'U'
SHIP YARDS. ACME BEER
Merrll-Stevens Co., .Jacksonville, Fla.

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Best in the World.
For delivered prices write, Send all orders for printing for the tur-
I pentine and commissary trades to the
Cypress Tank CO, MoebieAlai Record office to insure prompt delivery.


BAK. P. C. V BARTLEsON. Vik.Pre BAKER & BAKER. P. E PEK
(Be. & Ham"sC. Co, P(C) G l o e Sm. i Tmi

SFLORIDA FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY
(INCORPORATED.)
We can collect your Freight Claims against
Railroads and Steamship Companies.
Charges Reasonable. Your Membership Solicited.
We save you all worry and trouble. Endorsed by all Public Bodies
In the City and Transportation Companies.
216 Dyal-Upchurch Bldg.. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
LA .AA A d A.lAA t A & A AAohM M hI A i


WWWWwww 0~ .- 9W


"The" PAINT STORE,
I. E. BAIRD ft CO., Jacksonville, Fl.,
Itall paper, pictures, frames, painting ant all interior and exterior decorating.
Hardware, glass, etc. If you are build ing a fine home, get Baird & Co. to do
tne decorating that it may be in keeping with the building. Oldest and most ex-
perienced house in F:arida.


Fla. -I I I I ! I 1 1 1 I Ti i -4 -i--A -iI II -!ri 1--1-1 -- > 1 I i
Brobston. Fendig & Co., Jacksonville. j. p. WILLI.AMS. President J. A. G. CARSON. 1st Vice-President. .
C. Buckman, Jacksonville. T. A. JE.NlNiG. 'nd Vice-President. J F. DUSENBITR, 3dVice-President.
W. W. Frazier. Jacksonville. 6, H. 1. KAYTON, Secretary. D. G. White. Treasurer.
The West-Raley-I'annie Co., Jacksonville"
Soitliern States Land and Timber Co., IL L IA M SM A
,J. P.WILLIAMS COMPANY,
.I. H. Livingston & Sons.. Ocala. Fla.:
.1. H. Livingston & Sons., Ocala. Fla. W| TOREn RiD 0TTON VICTORS 1 WHOESILE GROCERS
ROOFING TIN.L O .
American Tin Plate Co., New York City. Main Office SaVAANNXH, GEORGIA.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
SHOES-WHOLESALE. P rSCOLA. FLA. Branch Grocery House,
The Covington Co., Jacksonville. Branch Offices; JACKSONVIL LE. FLA. t COLL Gr MBUoSo. .o
STATIONERY.
Cochranes' Book Store. Palatka, F a. Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Us.
STTEAMSHIPS. (t
The Clyde Steamarip Co., New York (t -:Il l I lh Ih Ihl=l :ll lII hI | l1 1I I III iItIIZ- I I tIIII


PATRONIZE RECORD A W -TSER& FOR SATISFACTORY DEA TTW'`


i -


v . . . .






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17
------------------------------------------^^----------------------------



The Cooperage Company

Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels

Capital $100,000.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.

OFFICERS:
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.
DIRECTORS: %
J. C. LITTLE, JOHN E. HARRIS, C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST, W. J. KELLY
W. C. POWELL, W. F. COACHMAN.




Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are

McMILLAN BROTHERS'
Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS,
SAVANNAH, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
MOBILE, ALA. FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.


ONE OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PAPERS.










18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY


Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF


Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.


CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.


Located in the heart of the Lumber District gives ub advan-
tage of choicest material at lowest cost.


When The Day's Work Is Over
1a**ae>66s*aa~aaa~aaaa


TAKE YOUR MEDICINE.

Now and then you hear a fellow
Make a kick about his luck,
But you very seldom hear him
Talk about his lack of pluck.

Now and then a failure tells us
That the world is down on him,
But he never tells us how he
Milk-and-mushed his grit and vim.

Every day you hear some loser
Say that he was frozen out,
But that he was never in it
He expresses not a doubt.

When the world stamps on the kicker,
You can hear him yell a mile;
But who always scowled at others
Now is begging for a smile.

1When a man is down and out, lie
Always has some tale to tell.
He was always pushed or shoved, but
Ni ver tells you that he fell.

And, in sort, it seems the rule to-
When a chap is on the shelf-
Tell a tale that sounds so good he
Nearly thinks it's true himself.

Moral.
Never squeal if you've been bunkoed,
For nobody's in the dark,
Either you passed by the shuffle
Or you were an easy mark.
If they caught you in the pantry
With your fingers in the jam,
And you got a proper licking,
Emulate the wise old clam.
-Baltimore News.

The sawmill of Gibson Brothers, at Gib-
son, Fla., was recently destroyed by fire.


VEGETABLE ANIMALS.

A Waxen Woman, An Iron Man, a Cotton
Darkey, Etc. Etc
ST. I,(LUIS, May 18.-Quaint and curi-
ous are the, many objects on exhibition at
the World's Fair. Several of the States
vie witl each other in presenting the odd-
< t freaks of human conception to exploit
their respective products. Some of these
creations provoke broad smiles, not to sa3
hearty laughter, but all are useful in
showing forth some leading product ol
tlie State to which they belong.
California sends several such exhibits.
()ne is a horse made entirely of hops. InI
-ize and appearance this figure looks just
lke a real horse, and some of the athletic
girls who have sel n the animal in the Pal-
ace of Agriculture have remarked flacet-
ioulsly that they would like to harness
"lloppy"' for a drive around the grounds.
-Hloppy" is from Sacramento county,
where hops grow abundantly.
California's exhibit also shows a start-
ling lifelike black bear, reared upon his
haunches as if ready to hug the visitor.
lie is made of prounes, of the black va
riety so popular with boarding house land-
ladies in certain cities. His huge mouth
is wide open, and one finds upon close ex-
amination that even his teeth and tongue
are made of prunes of the lighter shades.
In t'tah's exhibit there is a statue of a
l.eautiful woman in bieswax. This dainty
ienale is plump and solid, no framework
being usled; shie is wax through and
through, and is a work of art.
I.ouisiana furnishes a cotton negro.
'his i- the only white negro on record.
lie. hias a black face, however, the cotton


and causes many a smile from the spec-
tators.
In the Palace of Mines and Metallurgy
is an iron man, a statue of Vulcan, 50 feet
tall, cast in Birmingham, Ala. He is
mounted upon a pedestal of coal and coke,
and is the (Goliath of the Exposition.
A statue of the famous Indian girl,
Pocalontas, made of leaf tobacco, repre
sents Virginia in both history and agri
culture. Kansas has contributed a huge
steer made entirely of corn. Red and whitt
grains of corn give it color. Two big
eagles made of corn husks add to the
Kansas display a touch of American patri-
otism.
Figures moulded in butter are provide
Iby several of the States, with proper re-
frigerating accommodations. There is an
ingenious imap of Oklahoma Territory
made of the various kinds of woods founu
in that territory.
Indiana has a clock made entirely ol
wood, even to the wheels and mainspring.
As a feature of Alaska's mineral ex
hibit there is an icebox apparently cov
.red with gold leaf, and is designed to
represent the "worthless icebox," as Alas-
ka uas contemptuously called when it was
1murchased from Russian for $7,200,000.

Banana Crop Every Fifteen Days.
"*There is evidently an erroneous idea
abroad concerning the harvesting of the
l,anana crop," said a man who has been
for seven years on a plantation in Hon-
duras.
"The statement that four or five crops
of bananas are harvested a year is en
tin ly incorrect. A crop is harvested an
an average of every fifteen days through-
out the year. Each thrifty banana plant
has many suckers or stalks growing from
a single root at the same time. One om
more bunches of the ripening fruit are
cut front a single stalk, while the other
stalks growing from the same root are
left untouched, and in fifteen days anoth-
er of the stalks is shorn of its fruit. This
process continues incessantly during the
year. In July and August it is necessary
to cut off the ripening bunches every teln
days. while in December and January
alout once a month is sufficient, the aver-
age throughout the year being practically
fifteen days."--lexican Herald.

A Victoria clergyman had an orange
and a pine tree in his garden. One spring
it was noticed that the orange tree was
drooping, and on digging down lie founo
that the roots of the pine which stood


f, ruling his face being dyed to the propel at somen distance, had twisted around the
lue. The figure represents a typical cot- taproot of the orange tree and were
ton plantation darkey. He looks happy, strangling it to death. The offending

WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS MENTION THE RECORD.
.*


roots were untwisted and cut away, and
the drooping plant revived. The tree
eventually died. Then on digging down at
a greater depth the clergyman found the
pine had attacked the orange root lower
ilown and accomplished its murderous end.


NEW BROKERAGE CO.
The Jacksonville Brokerage Co., under
tie management of Mr. T. A. Ausley--n
old turpentine man-has opened handsome
ollices at 112 West Forsyth street. The
concern has private leased wires to New
York, ('hicago and other leading markets
and is the correspondent of the O'Dell Co.,
capital $200,000. The company claims to
have ample financial backing and desires
to get a Iiortion of the patronage of in-
vestors in the State, offering prompt set-
tlements and immediate attention to all
orders.


GEORGIA INTERSTATE.

South Carolina, Georgia and Florida Rep-
resented.
QL(UITAN, Ga., May 18.-At the an-
nual meeting of the Georgia Saw Mill As-
sociation covering South Carolina, Geor-
gia and florida, reports were received
showing an encouraging condition of busi-
n'ss. A committee was appointed to look
into and take action on the Florida car
equipment law. This matter has gone
over for three months. The election of
officers resulted as follows:
'Prsident, H. H. Tift, of Georgia; vice-
Ipresident for Florida, A. G. Cummer; vice-
president for Georgia, W. B. Stillwell;
-ecretary, E. C. Harrell.
(apt. H. 11. Tift, who has been Presi-
lent for many years, was presented with
a handsome silver set as a small token of
Ithe esteem in which the members hold
him.


Southern States Land and Timber Co.
Attention is called to the advertise-
ment in this issue of the Southern States
land and Timber Co. This is one of the
largest corporations doing business in the
city. Mr. Irving H. Welch, the manager
of the company, is a real estate man of
great experience. especially in develop-
mnent work in the Northwest. There are
f: w more enterprising men anywhere than
Mr. Welch and his public spiritedness and
his progressive methods are already being
felt throughout Florida.


---- -- ~~----~~--









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertising patrons of this paper and no

charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention i


For Turpentine. Sawmill or Factory Supplies or Machinery ef Any Kind. For Timber. Farming or Range Lands.
DATE INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main Office. Jacksonville, Fla. I am in the market for lands for the purpose of
In the market for the following
n the market for the followingPrefer in State of Please put me in communication
with responsible parties and give me other information.

Remarks
Please notify where same can be secured. Signed
SineSigned
Signed

State specifically the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or second-handed DATE

Location for Turpentine, Sawmill or Factory, or for Any Industrial Enterprise. For Commissary Office or Household Supplies, Sawmill or Turpentine Mules
D E Horses, Wagons, Etc.
DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla. DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla.
Please advise the undersigned regarding a good location in (state or section of
state) for In the market for
together with full information about labor conditions, taxes, transportation facilities,
local encouragement, etc.
Remarks Please give me information as to best places to buy, etc.

Signed Signed


De Yeo Want to Sell Something? Are You Thinking of Investing?
DATE r TE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville. Fla.
Have for sale the following Can you give any information as to the reliability of the following firm or corpora

tion
Remarks
Can you suggest a purchaser?
Signed Signed


Do You Want to Employ a Man? Do You Want Employment?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville. Fla.
Want a man to fill the position of Want a position as

with the following requirements Refer to the following

Can you suggest such a man Can you assist me?
Signed Signed




CLIP THIS COUPON
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD
When you are answering an advertisement from the columns of this paper, whether you are making an inquiry or placing an order, please cut out the coupon
below and attach it to the letter. It will pay you.


COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the Industrial Reocrd, issue dated

Signed


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonville. Fla.. and Savannah. Ga.. is the South's great
weekly trade journal.



The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.



"THE PINE AND ITS PRODUCTS.


I II r_









20 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commissary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 27
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 28
10 .. 29
A. C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 18
Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... Market
S 50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-lb tin. ............

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 16


Granulated
At


Sugar
Sugar, bbls.....
5 bbls..
10 bbls..
s" acks..


500
495
495
500


Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb.................. 80
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 10
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 8
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages....... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ages.............. market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum..l.... 14
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 50
English B'fast, 10 lb.. 45
S Formosa, 10 lb....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 5 and lOc size
10 lbs to case, per pound-.. 40

Salt


200-lb sack................
100-lb sack................
Ice Cream, 200-lb sacks.....
S 100-lb sacks...
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-lb....
2-lb....

Pepper


100
50
100
50
265
275


Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin..............
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box
sifter t)p, per doz......
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and


Corn


Car Lot
W.Corn,1101b, 143
1001b, 1 29
Mxd corn,1101b.1 14
S 1001b,l 25


100 Sk Less 100
Lot Sk


145
1 81
140
1 27


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


Car Lot
W.clip'd,1251b,2 20
S 1001b,1 75
White 1251b, 2 10
White 1001b. 1 67
Mixed 1251b 2 5
S 1001b, 1 64


100 Sk
Lot
2 22
1 77
222
1 69
2 7
165


Less 10'9
Sk Lots
2 25
1 80
2 15
1 72
2 10
168


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice..... 165
." fancy..... 1 70
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 5 75
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 lb sack .........5 75
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 5 75
Pillsbury's Best ..... 6 00
S Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal ... ..... 6 25
S bbl.... ....
Meal
Meal, per barrel........... 3 50
92-lb sacks.......... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 3 60
S92-lb sacks....... 1 60
Rice
Good ...................... 5
Choice...... ............ 5j
Fancy Head........,..... 6
Broken .................. 8
Canned Vegetables
Doz.
Tomatoes, 3s, Chief....... 90
Tomatoes, 2s ........ 80
Clayton, 3 ................ 45
Clayton, 2s ............... 70
Sifted Peas, 2s............1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........ 1 20
Lima Beans,2s ............ 1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8........... 90
Baked Beans, Is........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............ 1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s........
Beauty Beets. 3s...........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ........... 85
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s .............. 90
Hay


car lots


1 48 Choice ... 1950
1 84 No.1 Tim 18 00
143 No. 2 17 00
1 30 No.1 Cl'ler 17 00


100 bale
lots
2000
1850
1780
1750


less
quantity
20 50
1900
1800
1800


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 85
Candy
Mixed 30-lb pails, per lb... 7
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
lb ........ .......... 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8

Dried Fruits


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
6" 3 hoop........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz....... 1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
S 'nested ......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 60
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. .. 1 20


Washboards


Per
Dozen


78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay...............3 00
175 Diamond Glass .........8 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per doz 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
doz .......... ... .. 95
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 75
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 65
Salmol Is, Tale 4 doz to case
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon, Is, 4 doz to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz .
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
tC4


Evaporated Peaches Extra, ',Jdnn, nominy, oVi...... u
25-lb box, per lb ....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches. Salt Fish
25-lb box, per lb....... 8. New Cape Shore Mackerel,
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 13 20-lb pails.............. 8 50
Ex. Choice " .... Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25 lbs to box........... 2 40
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25 Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lb. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 "f 2 52 Kingan's Meats.
Currants, cleaned, 36-lb. case 8 60,
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb "Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge ... 141-4
b.x, 40-50............. 6.. "Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avge .. 14
Pruiaes, Calf cleaned 25-lb "Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avge 131-2
Pru.ies, C-alf cleaned -lb ::"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge.. 91-4
box, 0-60. .. ..... ....7.. .. "Reliab!e" California Hams, 6-8 9
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb ,reakfast Bacon, light av. .... 131-2
box, 60-70............. 8.. 1). S. Bellies, 16-18 av. ........ 834
L. L. Raisins, 3 crown..... 1 85 D. S. Bellies, 20-22 av. ......... 81-2
. L. Risis, 4 crwn......1 90 D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av .......... 81-8
L.L. Raisins, 4 crown ...... 1 D. S. Plates .................. 71-2
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 12 Bacon Plates ................... 81-2
Citron, 10-lb box ......... 1 50 D. s. Butts .................. 63-s
Bologna Sausage ............... 7
Peanuts sausage in oil ................ $&75
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 6 Btter and heee.
Extra H P, 5 Strawberry" Creamery, 60-lb tub 215
Seed Peanuts, .... OB, .. 261-2
..60., 1s... 261-2
New Nuts "Ladybird" full cream cheese .. 121-2
Kingaa's axd.
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11 "ndiana" Pure Le ........... market
Almonds............ ..... 18' ea-Foam" Compound .........market.
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Peaczils .. ................... .... 12 Kingan's Canned Meats.
Feacans.... 12 Reliable" Corned Beef, Is ...... $125
Filberts................... 12 .. Corned Beef, 2s ......
alO nuts............ ...... 14 Roast Beef, Is ........ 1.2
Roast Beef, 2s ........ 2.2
COtton Seed Meal Potted Ham and Tongue
Car 100 Less I 1-4s .......................... 3
lotq Sk. Lot Sk. L Sliced Beef, 1- .. .. 1.15
Cottonseed Meal 27 00 27 50 280 Vienna Sausage, 12. .. .85
S Hulls 1150 12 50 130 Tripe .................. .10


GET A COPY OF THE NAVAL STORES BLUE BOOL





THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 21
19 8 18t e t o 14et* 9*rrrr mMieiel4 roletoile*tiot* i *m rr >i ' olmer m *** * o *Q* ** **********
* President W. C. POWELL; Vice-President a, who with the Prelsdent constitute the Directory and Board of Managers, W. F. COACHMAN. B. F. BUL-
LARD, H. L. COVINGTON. H. A. McEACHERN, JOHN R. YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS. C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.
0'
0'


HO1A NAVAL IOR ICPANY,


Jacisoilli, Flu.


Savonn8o, G.


Peisacola, FI.0


-c~NR!RL STORES FACTORS.


Proi i Cofoil lSI c, 12,500.000.


Owned min Coololld i Prtical o01eoors


Small Imonti 01 1 loc Yel i Reseve 10 S ell lo Oner los Who Git Ar[nlle I But .


Tie CoMsolioled is Prely a Coop live Comln.


01 le Pirodiucs.


IIl litleR s re identical Wilh hose


Ie Plronage 0ol lrpenine Oer1tors ieellwhre Invited


Plt ot Money and PIlenl 0 Tilmer for ElMebod


YARD AT JAKSON1IL, 1 AANNA, FER NANIINA d PEN SCOilA.


All ProdBucer8 re Invileld o till or Il oresl o


.iaEnwaalleldaltililammiaa


1io19i1. 9IITi 1COi l I IS TE OPEATO tI R101 ** **I**** ******IL
THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE"





22


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.
I SPECIALTY IS MID OF DISIGIIN, RETOUCHING lil EMBEISHIi PHOTOGRAPHS ANm PICTURES.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED

A Florida Enterprise. Try It.
EL

When you Visit Jacksonville

Call to see the Record and be at home.
Tell the Record all you know, that will interest others.
If you want to buy or sell advertise your place.
If you owe the Record pay the bill.
If you don't owe the Record make a bill.
Order your Printed Stationery.
Be sure and give the order for your Commissary Checks.
Call on the Secretary of the 7. 0. A.

Call at the Industrial Record Office.
IF YOU DON'T FIND IT II THE RECORD WRITE US.


Moak









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 23


McMURRAY & BAKER,


n Unrnn corner Bay and
Sow Mill oN l Tupellnie Holles. ':uLiberty Streets.
We amr reedingr daly up-to-date plesmre and buane vehTles 1 styles
Laprobs. wblps, harnea and hore furnishings, we have a nobby Une. Praem
sad goods In touch with all. Turpentine wagons and harnaes a spelalty. Don't
forget we can beat the world on hand-made harnms.

MiMURRIY BIKER, 401 10 413 BIY ST.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHA RLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnificent steamships of this line are appointed to sail as follows, calling
at Charleston, S. C. both ways.
Frem New York, Prom Jaeksonville for
(Pier 36 North Rver). STEAMER. Charleston and New York.
Friday, May 13, at 3:00 pm..ALGONQUIN ...... Thursday, May 19, at 7:00 am
Sunday, May 15, at 3:00 pm .. IROQUOIS ........ Saturday, May 21, at 9:00 am
Tuesday, May 17, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE........ Sunday, May 22, at 10:00 am
Thursday, May 19, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ......Tuesday, May 24, at 12:00 n'n
Saturday, May 21, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ......Thursday, May 26, at 1:00 pm
..*"SEMINOLE .... Friday. May 27, at 4:00 am
Tuesday, May 24, at 3:00 pm ..ALGONQUIN .... Sunday, May 29, at 4:30 am
Wednesday, May 25, at 3:00 pm ...... ***xHIRON 'Tuesday. May 31. at 5:30 am
Friday, May 27, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ...... Thursday. June 2, at 7:00 ant
Monday. May 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Saturday. June 4, at 8:30 am
Wednesday, June 1, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE .Monday, June 6, at 10:30 am
Friday, June 3, at 3:00 pm ... .ALGONQUIN ..Thursday, June 9. at 12:00 n'n
*xSEMIN()LE .... Thursday, June 9, at 12:00 n'n
Tuesday, June 7, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE .... Sunday, June 12. at 4:00 am
*xHURON ........ Monday, June 13. at 4:00 am
Thursday, June 9, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Tuesday, June 14. at 4:30 am
Saturday, June 11, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ..Thursday, June 16, at 6:00 am
*NAVAIIOE ....Sunday, June 19, at 9:00 am
Tuesday, June 14, at 3:00 pm ..IROQU(IS .... Sunday, June 19 at 9:00 am
Wednesday, June 15, at 3:00 pm..ALGONQUIN ..Tuesday, June 21, at 11:00 am
Friday, June 17, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE .... Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'n
*xSEMINOLE. .Wednesday, June 22, at 12:00 n'n
Monday, June 20, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAIOE ....Saturday, June 25, at 1:30 pm
Wednesday, June 22, at 3:00 pm..COJMANCHE ..Monday, June 27. at 4:00 am
*"xHURON........ Tuesday, June 28, at 5:00 am
Friday, June 24, at 3:00 pm....IROQUOIS ..Thursday, June 30, at 6:00 am
"NAVAHOE ......Saturday, July 2, at 7:00 am
Tuesday, June 28, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE ......... Sunday, July 3, at 8:00 am
Thursday, June 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Tuesday, July 5, at 9:30 am
x-Freight only. *-Boston via Charleston and New York.
--Boston via Brunswick *'d Charles ton. *--Boston. via Charleston.
THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Diroot Servle Between Jaeksorville, Bostoi and Providenee and all Mast-
era Points, Calllan at Charlestom Both Waya.
SEMI-WEEKLY SAILINGS.
Southbound.. .. .. .. .. ... ... ...........From Lewis Wharf, Boston
Northbound.. .......... .. .. .. .. .... From foot of Catherine Street, Jacksonvlle
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jaeksonvill and Samford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Frandcs. Beresford (De Land) and Intermediate
landings on St. Johns river.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Ja:ksonville. Sunday, Tuesdays and Thurs-
day., 1:30 p. m. Returning. leave Sanford. Monday. Wednesday & Fridays 9:30 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND NORTHBOUND,
Read down, I Read up.
Leave 3:30 p. m.. ...............Jacksonville........ ....... ....... Arrive 2:00 a. m.
Leave 8:4 p. m ........... ......Palatka..................... ...... JLeave ") p. m.
Leave s20 a. m.I.......... .. ..........Astor................ ............. Leave 2:30 p. m.
Leave 4:0 a. m. .......................St. Francis............. ......... Leave 1:00 p. m.
................. ....... .....eresford (DeLand)..................... Leave 12:00 noon
Arrive 8 0 a. m. ...... .... ...... .....Sanford........ .. ....... ......[Leave 9:0 a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m.l................ .Enterprise .................... |Lv. 10:00 a. m.
GnlE RA. PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE. 204 W. Bay St.. Jack'ville.
1. M. TRON'NMNGER. JR.. Asst. Genl. Pa-s Agent. 204 W. Bay St.. Jacksonvlle. Fla
W. G. COOPER, R., Local Frt. Agt., Jaek'vtlle. C. P. LOVELL. Asst. Supt.,Jack'vtlll
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
A. C. HAGGERTY. G. E. P. A., New York, CLYDE MTLNE. 0. F. A.. New York
THEO. 0. IGeaR., W P. CLYDEB A CO.
General Manager. General Agents.
Chesbrough Building. 19 State Street. New York.


C. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,


WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed

Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.

514-516-518-520-522-524- 526 EAST BAY STREET
Jacksonville, Fla.


9 .0_99J I0_J0A 0_ J 1 oo 0_0 O 000 2 JP00 Q o_0 I 9_0_0 Q0_ o oJo oOJ__g_gJ )J Q xe
SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
30 YEARS RELIABILITY.
Hess 8o Slager,
Diamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry
CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND 11 & 13 MAIN.




East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.

WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


WRITE THE RECORD FOR ANY INFORMATION DESIRED.


--- - --- --- --




the nts with pleasure.
ler
WELL-1iESERVED SUtl4CgSS. Iwl
SAmerica's Lendln Trade Jour als. o
The Wekly industrial Record of Jack- r
sonville and Savannah has taken its place Al
among the leading trade journals In the
United States, and as an authority on lum- Rig
ber and naval stores It Is being quoted not
only by the best and most carefully edited i
class papers in this country, but by those
In Europe also A London trade paper for a
reaching this office yesterday gives liberal a fe
apace to the Record's views on market con- five
4ditons. lot I
This week's Issue of the Industrial Rec- and
ord Is even better than usual, and It Is 'Th
a strong and entertaining general Indus- trial
trial newspaper. In addition to its value Ha
as the champion of the two specific indues- V .
ties It represents. It Is brimful of new Johr
stories of development In the Southeast, plail
among them being the story of a half-mill- fend
Ion-dollar corporation organized In Jack- Ge
0mnvillle yesterday and the organization of H I
several other big corporations during the and
week In Georgia and Florida. W*
It has met the pace for enterprise. and It Wall
well deserves the great measure of success wick
It Is receiving, both In Its subscription and
advertising departments.carrying as It does,
perhaps one of te of largest advertising pat-
ronages give to any of the Southern. I
Journals.
DBAMT OlP A. J. a3lVS In
A. erty.
*me at Pat--Pia II '
~ This Meor al Btret
-ne, who- This
- -1 ned-----
as hecbmpo~ o te rospcte ndaAA AAAAA







24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J H CR.OSBY. PreatderIt


C M Ir'"I.LER, Vice-President


JAS F LANE. Secy Q Treas


Depamtfnieuts


Greenleaf &

Crosby Company


Diamonds and Other Precious
Stones


Fine Gold Jewelry


3eWwdero anb

bilberomittbj


American and Foreign Watches
and Clocks


41 West Bay Street

Jacksonville

The largest and finest st in this part of the
Soa hen States. Prompt attention to mail order


Write for Catalogue


--^&-- -- ^^ 1-
U':.-i"'


a


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


Fine China Dinner Sets and
Fancy Pieces


European Novelties


STHE COUNCIL TOOL CO.0
of Wananish, N. C.,
Formerly of Council's Station, N. C., are still selling Diamond Edge
Hacks at 6.0O, Black Joe and Standard at $5.00, Old Style and Patent
Pullers at $6.00 a dozen. They should average a little better than ever.
We have brought out a new brand, the Blue Line Hacks at $8.00 and Pull-
ers at 8 00 which are warranted. All wholesale dealers in naval stores
supplies carry our lines and should supply operators.
. -- 3 w ... ,lr, [..,- mw......W ...


D. G. McKETHAN, Prcsidet.
Jacksonville, Fla,


ALFRED A. McKETHAN, L't U. S. N.
Ret'd Sec'y and Treas. Constnucting
Engineer, Fayetteville, N. G.


Pine Product Construction Co.
INCORPORATED
fayetteville. N. C.
Spirits of Turpentine, Oil of Tar, Creosote. Tar. Disinfectants; Wood Preservative,
Paints, Wood Stains, Etc., and Charcoal, from Lightwood Stumps, Box-facings.
Profits Increased. Time of distillation reduced. Condensation controlled at will.
No danger from fire. Plant erected complete, and men taught the process. Fur-
ther information, write Alfred MacKethan, general manager. Fayetteville. N. C.

THE PHILADELPHIA TAILORS
JOHN B. CAINGAGLINI & BRO.,

MERCHANT TAILORS AND IMPORTERS


48 W. Bay Street.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


l9 NEW YORK CITY.
HOTEL BARTHOLDI, BROADWAY ODT ST .,
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout.
S Near all Big Stores and Places of Amuseme-'t. tars Pass
the Door for all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings.
g Large 8amp'e Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
0 find no grand and magnificent decorations no luxurious
* grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
Speak to You. No Employees In Avn Way Inattentative.
But just a czy. h',me-like 1,ttle hotel that will appeal to the
* hearts of those who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
Slain American cooking. and affable and courteous treatment.
* MILTON ROBLEE, Prsqprleor .
* adrato


SJohn R. Young. President. C. S. Ellis. Vice-President.
J. W. Motte. Jr.. Secretary and Treasurer.


| p ELLIS-YOUNG CO. J

Commission Merchants
NAVAL STORES FACTORS I
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

SSavannah and Brunswick, Ga.

IIUU Ii


J. W. HUNT. President.
P. L. PEACOCK, Ist V. P"


J. 9. HARRIS. 3d V. Pres. C. R. SHOUSE. Sec. Tre.
W. J. KELLY, 3d V. P. H. L. RICHMOND, Asst See'y-Treas


Peacock-Hunt & West Company,
General Offices: 20 Bay Street, E,. Savannah, Ga. and
ral Offices: West Ruilding, Jacksonville, fla.
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutual. We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that buys spirits
Turpentine and rosin.)

WHOLESALE GROCERS,
lay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our Specialty
-SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wilson & Ghilds'
Philadelphia Wagons.

Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga., and Jacksonville
and fernandina, Fla.


Calablis


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