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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00072
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 13, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00072
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text










"THE PINE AND ITS PRODUCTS."


L BRARY
RtOEIVED
MAY 16 0 4

. :Jepartment of Agriculture.


WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

Adopted Sept. I2th. 1902, by the Executive Committee of the Turpentine Operators' Association as Its Ezcluslve Ofrlcial Organ, and Adopted Sept. I1th. 1902. a Ami l Co.
rention, as an Official Organ Also of the General Association. Adopted Sept. I Ift. 1903. as the only OtMaal Organ of th Turpentine Operators' Asseciatlo.
Adopted April 27th. 1903, as the Official Organ of the Inter-Staie Cane Growers' Association. Endorsed by the Seorgia Sawmill Associatlmi.


VOL 8. NO. 20.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA


MAY 13, 1904.


SAVANNAH, GA.


$3 A YEAR.


The Culture of Sugar Cane and Manufacture of Sugar I

in the Gulf States Considered From a Commercial Standpoint

By R. E ROSE, State Chemist, Tallahassee, Florida.
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The following address was made by Cap
tain R. E. Rose, State Chemist of Florida,
at the recent Convention of the South-
eastern Sugarcane Growers' Association.
Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen:
After listening to the addresses of those
gentlemen preceding me. who have so pos-
itively demonstrated the amount and
quality of sugarcane grown per acre,
throughout the Gulf States, and the cost
to produce it; with the testimony of such
men as Dr. H. W. Wiley, Prof. William
C. Stubbs and others, as to the sugar con-
tent of the plant; with the practical ex-
perience of men like Messrs. W. B. IRl-
denberry, C. K. McQuarrie and John Thomr
as Porter as to the cost of culture and
yield per acre; it would be presumptuous
for me to attempt to add to this feature
of the discussion.
I have for years maintained that it
was only necessary to ascertain these facts
as they exist and have been stated here,
of the cost to produce the cane, the yield
per acre in sugar, and to publish them au-
thoritatively, to induce an enormous de-
velopment in the commercial production
'f sugar in the Gulf States. In this con-
nection, I beg to repeat part of my re-
marks made this Association at Macon,
last year:
"The American people are the greatest
consumers of sugar in the world. Ou,
market for foreign sugar is acknowledged
to be thebo t known.
"We import annually. practically four
thousand million pounds, or 2,000.000 tons-
(excluding thbeugw, imported from our
isla4 poss!eOrons). of which 1.600,000
tons is raw, or unrefined, cane sugar; andl
389,000 tons refined beet sugar.
"The importation of strictly foreign
sugar for 1901-1902 was 3.975,000,00.1
pounds. .
"From the American colonisA, Porto
Rico, Hawaii and the Phillippines, 838,
000,000 pounds. Total imports including
the colonies, 4,813,000.000 pounds, or 2,
406,500 tons. We produced in tllh states
of beets, 163,126 tons. Of sugarcane iit
Louisiana. 275.000 tons. A total consump-
tion in the United States proper of 2,-
844,626 tons.
"Recently the production of American
sugar has been very largely increased h)
the establishment of the beet sugar in-
dustries in the West and Northwest, and


'y the annexation of our island colonies.
llawaii. Porto Rico and the Phillipines,
still with this enormous increase in th.-
American production. we produce but
thirty pwr cent of the sugar consumer
within the United States proper. Whil
on this subject I wish to call your at-
tention to the fact that with the exception
of 389.000 tons of beet sugar from Get
many. and 163.000 tons of western beet
sugar, this vast amount is cane sugna
only. The total cane sugar produced inl
the world is 3.775.000 tons, of which the
United States consumes 2.192,000 tons,
not quite two-thirds of the entire cant
sugar production of the world. The in
crease in beet sugar production durin-
the last twenty years under the fosterin.i
rare of Germany. Austria, France and oui
own government, has tben phenomenal.
To-day two-thirds of the world's sugar
is produced from beets. While beet cul
ture has had the intelligent fostering care
of our own, and the various European
governments, with government bounties,
rebates, tariffs and drawbacks. cane has
had neither; on the contrary legislation.
has always been adverse to cane sugar in
our own country and in England, the two.
largest consumers in the world.
"Scientists and trained agriculturists,
men eminent in their professions, have
hlen retained in the interest of beet cul-
ture to breed lup a plant from six to four-
teen per cent sugar content. Vast sums
have been expended in this and other
countries to promote the industry with
wonderful results. Until very recently no
intelligent effort to improve the quality)
of tropical cane. nor the methods of manu
factoring cane sugar, has been made. No
effort %\as made to encourage or educate
the cane grower. to improve his methods.
decrease his cost of culture and manufac-
ture. Recently, I am glad to say, the
I.uisiana Planter's Association, at theii
wn expense, established a sugar expert
mental station, and placed a compete!
man in charge--a practical man as well
as a lost eminent scientist. The results
have justified their faith, and the Louisi-
ana -ugar planters have reaped a rici
reward for their investment. The im
proved methods of culture, fertilizing ano
manufacture, to say nothing of the im
provement in cane, has repaid them many
fold. I am pleased tosay that our general
government and the State of Louisiana


now contribute liberally to the support ot
thle station.
"-That cane 'sugar can be produced in the
cane welt of the South for less cost thaia
beet u~gar in the West, or in Europe, cana
certainly be proven. I believe that but
a small part of the sum expended in tha
effort to establish the beet sugar in Amer
ica, intelligently used-not in experiments
-we have passed that stage years ago-
hut in demonstration of the facts as to
cost of prslouction and manufacture, woulo
!iave long since made America the prin-
cipal sugar producer of the world."
Mr. President. 1 believe the time su
long hoped for by yourself and your as-
sociates hlas come. that a new era in the
history of cane sugar production in Amer
ic is upon us. When I note the inte-est
shown by the head of the United States
Agricultural Department. that eminently
practical farmer. broad-minded agricultu-
rist. and far-seeing statesman, the Hon-
orable .lames Wilson. Secretary of Agri
culture; Dr. H. WV. Wiley. Chief of the
Chemical Bureau of the Agricultural De-
partment, and Prof. W. C. Stubbs, Di-
rector of the nouisiana Sugar Experimen-
tal Stations, and remember that they were
with us at our first meeting in Macon, 1
feel that the long period of waiting for
recognition of the intrinsic value of thin
peculiarly Southern production has passed,
and that the sugarcane of the Gulf States
will now receive that careful, scientific
care and culture and official recognition
of its value that has so long given to its
humble relative e t e eet, which has for
years enjoyed the protective care of omu
own and European governments, and hadl
the consideration of the most eminent
scientists, agriculturists and statesmen ot
both continents, to assist in its develop-
ment. Now that cane has attracted the
attention of statesmen. scientists, and
business men. I have no fear of the re-"li
Though the lset has been wonderfully
developed and the business has grown t4.
enormous proportions. I believe that re
-ent results in cane culture justify me in
predicting a far great r development iit
can, culture. That sugarcane is suscep-
tible of vast improvement by careful selec-
tion and intelligent culture has always
been my contention, though in its r.-tural
-tate it has always been. and is now su-
perior to the most improved varieties of
beets for sugar making.


Recent results in Louisiana under the
practical and scientific direction of Dr.
Stubbs have demonstrated the correct-
ness of these claims made by myself, that
with less cost and labor, and in far shorter
time, greater improvements could be ex-
:)ected from intelligent efforts to improve
a natural sugar plant, than one not orig-
inal!y a true sugar producer. The results
if the work at the Louisiana Sugar Ex-
;erimental Station, covering a period ot
anly ten years, in canebreeding and se
sectionn have recently been published.
In an interview with the New Orleans
Times-Demnocrat. Prof. Stubbs says: "Six
years ago we received a large number ot
various canes from Trinidad. We prompt-
ly began to experiment. We tried to as-
certain which cane was best adapted foi
this climate. We made a score or more
experiments and carefully compared the
results. We wanted to get a cane that
would find ready and congenial growth
here in Louisiana, and that would at the
same time increase the sugar output foi
the acreage in this State.
"I am delighted to say that our pati-
ence has at length been rewarded. We
now have two kinds of cane that are
highly successful. They are unquestion-
ably a great deal more satisfactory than
the best cane known here for many years.
In my opinion, they are the most valuable
canes that can be grown in Louisiana soil.
They make what our agricultural experts
call an ideal specimen. We have classi-
fied them as 'D 95' and 'D 74.'
"To the lay public there is nothing ex-
ceedingly significant in those words 'D 74.
but to the sugar planter they will be
nothing less than startling. This cane
produces thirty-eight tons to the ae.
The juice yields 16 per cent of sugar.
Under a nine-roller mill 81 per cent is
obtained without saturation.
"If you wil compare these figures with
statistics of ra-e now grown you wf-_l,
realize that this new cane will revolution-
ize the sugar industry in Louisiana. The
old cane gives an acreage of thirty to
thirty-one tons, with a 12 per cent. yield
in the juice. Under the roller it gives a
per centage of 71.
"The new cane is long-joitted, greens,
perfectly healthy and beautiful in appear-
ance. It has an excellent stubble and re-
markable vigor. It withstood the tenrife
Continued on Page .)


IT 11 111 11 11111111TYT IT I IT TTTTT'~


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2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
,**),*****,*****,**ff**t*****t*******'**************************


C. B. ROGERS. PRlSIDENT.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, VIcE-PRHsIDENTS.


C. H. HODGSON, 8c, and TREAs'a.


DIR EC1ORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches in Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company. of Savannah.


SWill handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
i visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.
I

\ Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
I attention given all orders through the main office and branches.
*


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one Three-Story Building, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; one onc-story building, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind in the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola. Fla., and Savannah. Ga.


THE RECORD WILL BE WORTH DOLLARS TO YOU EVERY WEEK.


LL~~,~OO~~O,~IC -LYYYII~CL~,I~I~-- -~LL- Llb~~+r~9+i~,,,~e~91~09~S








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 3


J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
* **** ***C**<**********************
Headquarters for
Distiller's Pumping
" Outfit.
SNo plant complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
<0 South Carolina. Write us for prticu-
lars and prices. We also manufacture
Engines, Boilers and High
S- Grade Machinery, n
as well as carry a full and complete ,
-stockof- *
.M Mill Supplies, Pipe,
L .*. Boiler Tubes, Etc.
S Advise your wants.
M acon, -Georgia.
* Ltedog Specialtyf all
* Hds of Tart W. for Turpe.t.e Storae PorPoss
I-o I *t 1* o* j 7-1-T--* .* -4-o 14 T* * ** I-


W. W. CARNES. Pres.


W. C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T DUDLEY. See. A Treas


Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
Hardware
Turpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
and Pullers on Hand.


FLORIDA.


...NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA.. U. S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD,


A. D. COVINGTON.
Vice-President.
DIRECTORS:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L. SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


H. L KAYTON.
Secretaryrand Treasurer.


B F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL
WALTER RAY.
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. B. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


t DYAL-UPCHURCH BLDG.,
GriVOt, Jacksonville, Fla.


All makes. $10 Up.


We can save you from $10 to $60
on any typewriter made.


\Vrite us.


AGENT "OLIVER" VISIBLE TYPEWRITER


ZINC NAILS Elgin & Hampden
FORd Watches
Turpentine Cups Railroa Watch
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a SEE
strong but soft light metal. They are
the only nafls which "ill not injure R I
saws when left in the trees. R I
Salem Nail Co.
279 PearlSt. New York,N. Y. At His New Store,
Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails. Boat Nails, Spikes, Round 15 W. BAY STREET.
Iron Rods. Etc Slating and Roofingh
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.


BOWEN & CO. lom Iron wios Iso ouC.
SUI.Dom AND Da I .IMU
V S^


Jacksonville, Fla.


Whiskies, Gins,


ENGINES, BOILERS.
cotton, Saw, Pertiliser. Oil ad lse M
alnery, and Supplle and Realia
CAPACITY FOR m HAND.
ahbitne Tools, Wood-Wortlag MasiL
r. Shaftin. Puller EHngr s Lea
and Rubber Belting and Howe, Rtlie
aad MIII Bupplies sad Too.
Plans and estimates fuirrrhed or Pwrs
Plants and Steel Brldfe.
team Pumps. Peed Water IReters im
Hoisttine nutnes
AUGUSTA, GA.



: NO FARM 14102SO
SA GROVe OF
P90M&BZ V


Rums,


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly ennmeled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.


We


R. THOMAS


GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine. Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggies.


from S1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866
Mount Vernon Pure
Whiskies


controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl"
van Rye-Agents for Jnngs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 and 519 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


and s A
*URN ANSNA
Rye They Are WOf^AA

SGRIFFING'S CATALOG


* TELL ABOUT T LEM.
Twenty leading vauites a Pat
SAlso a complete line at Fruit andG-A
* namental tram aad bzrbbaM. o
SCatalogCua rIea.
SAddnrs
STHE *MIFFIMO OILL. O0..
*e ssAOK9WaO iVs S. S j .5 5
t********oo*ooo*****


THE RECORD IS THE SOUTH'S GREAT TRADE JOURNAL.


TAMPA,







4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J. A. Craig (b Bro


EVERETT BOCK.


Men's and Boys' Fine Cl
Up-to-Date Furnishings.


Leaders in
ing and


Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the


F-inaam#O w 7-fT FI 1 1-


> MORTGAGES.


R
oth- III W. FORSYTH S


City.


RENTS.
WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,

eal Estate Broker.


STREET,


JACKSONVILLE. FLORIIA.


I A, Renfroe Co,


A$ As AiA* AOA&*A* a Soe*a 9s


T. MURPHY
Jacksonville
Machine and Iron Works
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat and Sawmill Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron and
Brass Castings, Phosphor-Bronze Journal Bearings.
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


Standard Clothing Company


One Price One Price

FASHIONABLE CLOTHItRS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
Stetson and Hawes Hats. Spleial Attention Given to Mail Orders.



SDo You Want to Sell
| Your Saw Mill or Tie Timber?

5 Do You Want to Sell your Tur-
| pentine Location ?
Hf so, write as, we are in touch with many Northern, Western and
Southern Millmen who want to buy.

iBrobston, Fendig &Co.
0 Brunswick, Ga. and Jacksonville, Fla.


Cable Address. Florida

SStandard Naval Stores
Company. N
DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY INN
0
SR.OSIN j
i AND TURPENTINE. :
Jacksonville. Fla.
0 0*-;a*ra a** ;******************** **
* hCH~=oowowowwowwow


TAILORS


i Suits to Order at ReadyMade Prices
439 W. Bay Street.


Stetson Hats


Mail Orders Given Personal Attenion
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


P rin tin g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


M. A. BAKER,
Inventor and
Manufacturer of the
Baker Improved
Seekmless Turpen-
tire stills.
Write me for prices and outflt
F. O. B any toint in Georgia. Flr-
ids. Alabama or Mississippi. Ala
stills sold under a guarantee.
Job work through the
_P... country a specialty.
The Largest and Oldest Copper
Works If Georgia. PrflnsWick, a.
w My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.

W. H. BECKWITH. W. B. HENDERSON. o. C. WARREN.
BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.

Rooms 1-2-3, First National Bank Bwilding.
TAMPA, : : : :. FLORIDA.

I 111 Il 1 1! I r It111l: 1l?1 1 14d 1 1 1 II I I t tI I ii I i i lll 1 1

McMillan

Bros.
Florida Cop-
per Works.
Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
General Metal Workers.
Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
Patching through the country a specialty.
*" Orders by mail or wire will receive prompt -
attention at either of the following works:
SF~yetteville, N. C. SaLvenn~h. Ga.
= Mobile, Ala. Jacksonville. Fla.:
Sll n i! I m il I I II Ia il II 11 I i U Kl i i i II


DON'T FAIL TO MENTION THE RECORD TO ADVERTISERS.


239 W. Bay Street


SA $AALSA 0A *a 9eqB00000


cfiosaaa<6*v







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


A BIG PLANT.
When the Merrill-Stevens Engineering
Company of this city decided to increase
their capital, they already had the largest
ship building and machinery plant on the
coast; the demands on their works were,
however, greater than they could attendto
and so they raised their capital from $50,-
000 to $500,000, and changed the company's
name to the Merrill-Stevens Company. The
officers of tile company are A. D. Stevens,
President; C. R. Merrill, Vice-President.
J. E Merrill. Treasurer, and Frederick
Seeley, Secretary. The new company
found itself in possession of splendidly
equipped workshops, foundry and machine
ery rooms, two marine railways; in fact,
what most people would have considered a
big enough plant for anyone, but improve-
ments were at once commenced, new ma-
chinery erected, new facilities created, and
plans perfected tor a dry dock of the latest
construction. It is interesting to watch
the hundreds of employees at work, ma-
chines clanging everywhere, steam ham
mers pounding, drills perforating steel as
if'it was paper, and yet everything done
without any confusion. The Merrill-Stev-
ens Company have just completed a large
dredge for the U. S. Government, they
have a second already launched and soont
to be completed. Work is being hastened
on the new ferry boat and all the time
tugs and vessels are being repaired and re-
fitted. The plant is the largest industrial
concern in Jacksonville, and one that its
citizens are proud of. By the time deep
water has been given to Jacksonville, the
channel largely dug by the Merrill-Stev-
ens dredges, the dry dock will be ready
to handle any ocean liner that may call at
this 'port.


INLAND WATER ROUTE.
A Convention Proposed in June to Furthel
the Movement.
In reference to the bill intorduced ii.
Congress, providing for an inland water-
way along the Atlantic seaboard and the
proposed convention in the interest of the
project, the Wilmington (N. C.) Evening
Dispatch recently says:
"An interstate convention in the inter-
est of the proposed waterway will be held
early in June. It will be attended by
representatives of chambers of commerce
in the leading cities of Florida, Georgia
South and North Carolina and Penn-yl-
vania. The meeting will probably be l.ciu
in Charleston, which is considered t.l-
most central point. The convention will
take action looking to the advancement .
of legislation in behalf of the waterway
and organization and plans for aggressive:
action before Congress will be considered'

ASSUMES MANAGEMENT.
Mr. M. F. Cunningham has severed lus
connection (after 15 years service) with
the Waltham Emery Co., to assume the
management of the Superior Corundum
Wheel Co., of Waltham, Mass., and is
making a specialty of Emery and Corun-
.lm wheels for the wood working trade.


K


te@s~e teeettejpeseam
THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE.
Jacksonville, Fla.
CAPITAL $300,000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS $300,000
Strength and ample facilities. Business solicited. Prompt attention to collec-
tions and business of customers not living in Jacksonville. Best Safety Deposit
Boxes for rent.



Cochrane's Book Store.
Wholesale Stationery, Fishing Tackle, Pipes,
Notions, Stencil Ink Brushes, LtUnber Crayons.
PALATKA. FLORIDA.
Write for Prices. Have hundreds of articles suitable for the Commissary Trade.


Planters "Old Time" Remedies

NUBIaN TEA-For the Liver.
BENEDICTA-Female Tonic.


t


CUBAN RELIEF. for Crmp Colic. Horse Colic.
WARRANTED TO GIVE RELIEF IN TEN MINUTES.
CUBAN OIL, a Liniment Unexcelled.
Also Golden Crown Specifc. Pink Pills & Horse & Cattle Powders
SPENCER MEDICINE CO.,
Chattanooga. Tenn.


ohn = Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACSONVILLE' FLA.-


Visit Jacksonville


Call to see the Record and be at home.


Tell the Record all you know, that will interest others.


If you want to buy or sell advertise your place.


If you owe the Record pay the bill.

If you don't owe the Record make a bill.


Order your Printed Stationery.


Be sure and give the order for your Commissary Checks.

Call on the Secretary ot the 7. O. A.




Call at the Industrial Record Office.


THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."


When you


__











6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


THE CULTURE OF SUGAR CANE AND
MANUFACTURE OF SUGAR IN
THE GULF STATES COMMER-
CIALLY CONSIDERED.

(Continued From Page 1.)
gale that swept over the city on Septemi
her 9th and 10th. It is deep-rooted and
strong, and was the only cane in the fielo
that was not blown either flat or partly
down to the ground. It was not damaged
the least hit Ib the storm.
"We are rtady and willing, to furnisti
this cane to any planter who may apply
for it. We expect to send out more thai.
five hundred bundles in the next f'ew
weeks. Requ-sts for the cane are coming
in on every nail. We shall begin to shiI.
the cane in a few days. Planters through-
out the State show intense interest ano
have strong faith in the new specimens.
Next week we shall send some of the cane
to the experiment stations in Cuba ano
the Hawaiian Islands."
In the "Louisiana Planter and Sugai
Manufacturer" of February 20th appears
the report of Prof. R. E. Blouin. Assist-
ant Director of the I uisiana Sugar Ex
perimnent Station. of the results of this
wcrk in the development and distribution
of these two se-dling canes, selected front
hundreds of seedlings with which they
have experimented; not only the results
obtained at the Station, scientifically ana
experimentally but the field results ot
numbers of our foremost sugar planters
who have cultivated these canes on a comr
mercial scale under ordinary field condi-
tions.
These results are truly phenomenal, and
prove beyond cavil the truth of the as-
sumption that the tonnage and sugar con-
tent of the cane plant can, and has been,
increased in as great a ratio as ever the
beet has. and that the continued strife for
excellence will give us a plant as far su
perior to the original cane plant, as com-
monly grown, as the sugar beet of tht
present day is to the original type. This
report is of too great length to be quoted
here. All those into -ested should procure
the report and study it. I simply sum
marize the results as given by Prof. Blouil.
and follow his figures as to the final re-
sults. He says. "Tlhe canes are known
as 'D 74' and 'D 95,' and have been undei
culture at the station some ten years, and
throughout Louisiana but a few years.'
The summary of the report, taking a field
of five hundred acres as a basis of corn
prison, the field to consist of 250 acres oi
plant cane, and 250 acres of first year'-
stubble.and comparing it with an equal
area of domestic, or home canes, undei
similar conditions of age and culture, is as
follows:

500 Acres Seedling Canes, D 74, Comparea
to 500 Acres of Domestic or Home
Cans:
D 74, tones of cane, 18,187, averaging 36.33
tons per acre; home cane, tones of cane.
15,020, averaging 30 tons per acre; in-
crease, tons of cane, 3.167, averaging 6.3:.
tons per acre.
D 74, pounds of sugar, 3.203.,875, average
ing 6,407.75 per acre; home cane, pounds
of sugar, 2,234,546, averaging 4,469.09 pel
acre; increase, pounds of sugar, 969,324.
averaging 1,)38;i6 per acre.
D 74, valued at 131-2 cts.. $112.135.63,
average $224.27 per acre; home cane, val-
ued at 31-2 ets., $78.212.44, av ragle
$156.42 per acre; increase, $33.922.19, av
erage, $67.85 per acre.


Average increase in tonnage. 20 per cent.
average increase in sugar. 43 per cent.
average increase in value. 43 per cent.
This. gentlemen, should dislpse of tln
pinat. its tonnage and sugar content, an:i
s*how to' the world that we havl" a plant
now the superior of all others for sugal
production: with a soil and climate eini
niently adapted to its culture. in fact.
its natural soil; a plant that will doubt
'ess le iImchl improved by further work
longg the lines pursued by Dr. Stuiib-.,
witl the assistance of the Dlepartun lit or
Agriculture. Which I feel as-ured will be
heartily given. This question-the agri-
:uiltural question-Jis certainly disclosed ot.
The manufacture of sugar, conmmercially
and profitably: Ilere 1 fear I shall cause
a vigo.oiis protest on the part *of thet
.yrup makers present. While I do not
discredit the syrup business, and know
there will always "be room at the top,'
that many will succeed in making large.
returnss from their cane fields and syrup
factories. I maintain that until we produce
llonimnercially, scientifically and economn-
'ally. a ipie granulated or crystallized su-
tar, as do alur friends the sugar mianu-
facturers. we will not become a factor in
furnishing the sugar of America.
Tle American coiisulin r demands, ana
vvill accept nothing but a pure white sugal.
The price does not come into the calcula
tion at all. It is well enough to say we
like. or cven prefer a nice, "yellow clarn-
fied" sugar, or a raw siugr, better thai.
a pu:e white: the facts are we don't usi
it. We can to-day purchase first-class
!i6 per cent centrifugal sugar at tllre
cents per pound, still we pay 4 3-4 to,
5 1-4 cents tor the same sugar, with bult
a trace of coloring matter and the foul
pounds of water reiloved.
A carload of choice. pure, o pen kettle,
or !>6 per cent centrifugal sugar could not
be readily sold in Jacksonville to-mday to
the trade. while tons of granulated or purt
sugar, would find a ready sale. We sliou.u
be willing to recognize this fact as Iha-
the Anertcan Slugar Retining C'oimpany..
the so-called trust. They simply under-
stand the Amlerican demand and neett it.
They buyi raw sugar (or syrup) for as
small a price as they can procure it. I. it
foreign :- doilmestic production, properly
refine or clean it, and sell it to the Amer-
ican public for the highest price they calr
obtain. This is not peculiar to the sulgai
refiners. It is thi business of all manufac
turers to buy( cheap raw materials and
sell the finished product at a profit. This
Applies to all raw products. particularly)
agricultu al proslucts-hides, wool. beel,
;ork, cotton, corn. tobacco or wheat. Tih'
.oniinlrcial value of syrup, or raw sugal,
lepenids solely ion its sugar coltntnt and is
lixe Iby tilhe reliner; hence to pnioduct
large quantilits of raw sugar or syrup
would simpllly l)e to cheapen the cost of
raw material to the r finger, and by no
Leans allect thle pli c of pure (or clean)
, oods to the American public.
I have no reason to change lmy opinion,
that the only method to produce sugal,
olnnimercially, economically and profitably
s to establish central factories at con
,'en:iit points. equipped with the latest
ind nimost ilillrov-ed apparatus of large ca-
.acity: tih grower sell.ng his cane direct
ti t.e fact y vat an ai.;reild price p r toi.
:;-c'I o ti e In:;rlket value oif lpure sugar.
ii. ti e sugar o .ilnt if hlie cane. Thi-
I1 e inly \i aiy by which tlie sugar indlls
ir cain be mliaila prflitabll. andl sullti ssfui,
lite same systellU as is employed in all


sugar growing countries, and universally
adopted by the best sugar manufacturer.
I do not desire to discourage the mann
factur: of first-class svrups. There will
always eli a demand for a really first
c!ass table syrup, well made. and neatl\
packed, in convenient packages. Ilowevei.
the majority of our farmilers have neithli
the means nor the skill required to pro-
luce such an article, and lust expect to,
dispose of his, crop to the central factory
(or retinl ry either as cane. or svyrup
If le makes his crop into syrup. by tile
ordinary process. just one-half thle sugia
will be lost in thle miilling and manuffa-
ture. and lie will lie paid for lint one-hall
of his crop. after lie has grown it, hauleim
it to his factory, and made it into syrup
or raw suga.r-: in fact. ss than half. an
the cost of inanufacture, and packages.
will have to be deducted front thle price
lie receives. In other words, a ton of cane
is worth more at a central factory, welb
equipped and modern in its eonstructiol..
than the syrup the average farmer wii'
obtain from the s aile ton of cane by til
ordinary inethods now used in milling ani
manufacture. To illustrated: The juice ol
average, well ripened cane required to
produce one gallon of good syrup, say
40 per cent Beaunce. cold. will undei
proper conditions, make eight or mort
pounds of pure sugar; if first made into,
syrup, under ordinary conditions, it wil.
yield not more than four pounds of pure
sugar, particularly if it be what is know.
as good s yrup, "thick and not liable tA,
crystalize." 1 cannot Iltter express my
position tlanu to repeat statements niadt
tly myself in this city in 1900.
The sugar planter and inanufacturei
will soon discover that byusing modern
methods, late illprovements in nianipula
tion, with economical and labo--saving de
vices, lie (can for less cost make more re
lined sugar from his cane than lie coulo
formerly make of raw sugar. and sell it
direct to the consumer at prices 25 to 50
per cent more than lie can now get for lI.-
caw product delivered at a refinery. Tht
facts are that a modern central miill can
take the cane direct from the farmer, and.
-.y a no mllans expensive or dilticult pro
.-ess, thoroughly purity the juice. anim
,nake a standard article of granulated
sugar, ready for tile table. equal to any.
at a less cost than can the farmer makf
,1 brown sugar, with his crude and u taste
ful apparatus and niethonls. At the saint
time this iiodle n. central mill will double
the output of granulated sugar fronI each
toll of cane. ;is inip.arel I to the output ol
lie open kettle, or steam train. The bell
sugar manufacturer has recognized tilw
fact, andl makes none but refined sugai
lie is independent of the recliner and sell-
.lirect to the trade.
Louisiana is rapidly learning this lessoi..
,and is noiw building numiier u- central inill-
;r:- refineries, to make refined sugar only
.lirect from the cane.
When the South, with her suitsrior clh
mnate and soil. builds central mills or re
wineries, she caln make sugar at a profit in
spite of free raw sugar from (C'ba, as slhe
will have the assistance of tle Siugai
l'rust. and the Iscet -sugar grower, in nainii
training the price of relined sugar. I.
otliier words, there is a large profit in 1man
:ifacturiiig a tii lii-d article videe. thle si
.ar tr.u st. wViiei a raw product lilials slom\
-ale at reduced prices.
The Soiiuth can make more relin'd sugtma,
lirect fr pound than she at present makes raw su


,ar;: she can increase the yield fully 50
per cent per ton of cane over present con-
litions. and increase the value per pound
:'ully :30 per cent. This is but a matter of
edlucation--when our farmers begin to
think. anll then combine their practical
knowledge and labor with capital and
-kill. now seeking profitable employment,
t'liI question of the American supply of
.ugar will ge solved by the cane belt ot
the United States, making the necessary
iiniount to supply the demand. The beet
zrowecr will smon discover that he cannot
.onilpete with cane. and will naturally
nravitate into the cane belt, where his
profitss will le greater, and his crops more
certain.
A factory to turn out 50,000 pounds of
granulated sugar per day can be erected
for $;7.000. Allowing the raw material
clane or syrup) to cost 50 per cent of the
selling price of sugar, 50,000 pounds will
"ay the grower, $1.125; cost of manufae-
ture (75 cents per 100 pounds), $375; net
;rofit- of factory per day, $750; gross
laily proceeds. $2,250. These figures are
'aisel on present prices of sugar-4. e.,
S1-2 cents for standard granulated. The
actory should run one hundred days,
-howing a net profit of $75,000 per season.
-*uclh a factory will require 300 tons of
-ane (or its equivalent in syrup), per day,
:nd will consume the product of some
1.500 acres of average Florida cane, paying
lie growers $112,500 for the season. There
s not a town or village in the State, from
Pensacola to Jacksonville or from Jackson-
ville to Tanmpa or Miami, that cannot fur-
'lish within a short distance twice the re-
juired acreage for such a mill. A thous-
nid such mills would be required to pro-
luce the 5,000.000,000 pounds imported
annuallyy.
The modern factory will make 175
unds of granulated sugar per ton ot
*ane. pay the farmer $4 per ton, and net
lie factory $2.50 per ton of cane. The
productt of the modern house will find a
eady sale wherever offered.. The open-
hiouse4 sugar can only be sold to a refinery,
is the American public will use none but
lie best granulated sugar. A mill handling
romn 400 to 800 tons of cane per day re-
niieis no g eater number of skilled em-
Iloyces. engineers, sugarmakers, etc., uses
little fuel, the waste of house is reduce
.o a minimum. the extraction is practically
.erfect (SO to 82 per cent), practically no
.alor is required after the cane is place
,n the carrier, the product is ready foa
.ineiielate consumption. Such a house
-hould make none but granulated sugars,
it a cost not to exceed that of crude sugar
r sy rup. with a much greater yield.
I'le-e mills or factories, purchasing their
'ipI'livs from the farmer, can afford to
Iy fr- the cane delivered, a price equal
o the sun now obtained for his crude
ump. now made in a crude and wasteful
iannier, saving the farmer the annoyance
tld cost of manufacture and packages,
ind at thle same time make large profits oil
lhe capital invested.
I advocate the central mill plan, pur-
hliasing cane from the farmers, that the
e't results niay lbe had both in the
i !d and in the factory, the farmer devot-
nig l;s time, skill and labor to producing
le largest pos-ible crop of high-grade
aiim. the nmille to tle most economical
.ethiids of making tihe best sugar. each.
e:ei\ing thle girtattst reward possible foi
iis skill in his particular line.
I hi live the foregoiiln figures are con-
ervative. based ton average conditions, as


ARE YOU A SUBSCRIBER TO THE RECORD?









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


they now prevail; that these profits can,
be largely increased by the intelligent co-
operation of the Agricultural Department
and Experimental Stations, working along
the lines and following the lead of the
Louisiana Sugar Experimenta' Station, in
the development of the plai.t, and im-
provement in methods of manufacture.
That the sugarcane will in the near fu
ture replace the beet as the most econom-
ical source of sugar I have no doubt. I an,
convinced that only apathy and false se-
curity, felt by the canegrower, his neglect
of scientific and economical methods, to
gether with the careful, economical ana
aggressive methods of the beet grower.
backed by Government aid and encourage
ment, in this and European countries, has
temporarily increased the world's supply
of beet sugar as compared to cane sugar.
That the cane belt of the South can,
under the same intelligent system ot
culture and manufacture, exercising the
same care and economy, as in beet culture
and manufacture; produce pure sugar at
a profit when selling at a price less than
the cost of producing beet sugar undei
the most favorable conditions, I believe
can, and will, be demonstrated in the neal
future, and that the American cane grower
will supply not only tue enormous home
demand, but a large part of the foreign
consumption.
That others besides myself are of thib
same opinion is evidenced by this gather-
ing of representative farmers, cane grow-
ers and business men of the New South,
from the Brazos to the St. Johns, from
Carolina to the Keys, this gathering cer-
tainly shows that the cane grower of the
South has awakened to the possibilities ot
the profitable commercial production ol
sugar in the cane belt of America.

Growing Exports of Manufactures.
Statistics just published by the De-
partment of Commerce and Labor show
that exports of American manufactured
goods are increasing satisfactorily in near-
ly all important lines, no less than twenty-
two articles or groups, the annual ex
ports of which amount to more than $1,
000,000 each, showing increases while only
seven similar groups show declines. Tht
aggregate value of the articles in which
important gains were recorded amount
for the first nine months of the fiscal
year ending June 30th, 1904, to $280,000,-
000, while the aggregate value of the arti-
cles showing declines was only $36,000,000
for the corresponding period.
The articles or groups of articles which
show an increase are iron and steel man-
ufactures; mineral oils, copper, leather
and manufactures; agricultural imple-
ments, chemicals, drugs and dyes; manu
factures of wood, cars and carriages, paper
and its manufactures, scientific instru-
ments, manufactures of fibers, manufac-
tures of india rubber, clocks and watches,
paints and oils, gunpowder and other ex-
plosives, brassand manufactures thereof,
soap, marble and stone manufactures;
wool manufactures, jewelry, lamps and
chandeliers, and sugar and confectionery.
The articles or groups showing a decrease
in exportation are cotton manufactures,
paraffine, tobacco, books, maps and en-
gravings, musical instruments, distilled
spirits and glass and glassware.
The twenty-nine articles or groups ol
articles whose exportation is thus com
pared with that of last year include about
95 per cent of the total exports of man.


decrease occurs in exports of manufactures
is cotton manufactures, and this occurs
largely in cotton cloths, of which the price
has materially increased by reason of the
unusually high price of cotton in the last
few months.


Mr. C. H. Goldsmith, bookkeeper for
Norden & Sax, goes with Eilenberg & Co.,
in the Uedemann Building on the 1st prox.

St. Louis Exposition in Brief.


ufactures. The chief article in which a ing.


14 1 t t I I IT s t ,t t I I I I 441 t.t

MERRILL-STEVENS CO. :
4 .


SBoilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
: SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.

J oJacksonville. Fla.
S11114 I 1t14 1t 4 11 Ii4 *l Itt t | 141 4 144 I I &l I I 1 t4 11

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Co.

Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


Cummer Lumher Co.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Grounds cover 1,240 acres.
Cheese weighing two tons.
For athletic events, $150,000.
Exposition costs $50,000,000.
Rose garden 10 acres in area.
Forty-four States participate.
Automobile speeding contests.
Fifty foreign countries exhibit.
Special pavilion for sculpture.
Giant bird cage; 300 feet long.
Special corn exhibit, cost $50,000.
Indian exhibit; covers 40 acres.
Model Indian school; 100 pupils.
Art pottery works in operation.
Natural garden of wild flowers.
Louisiana history told in flowers.
Queen Victoria's Jubilee presents.
International angling tournament.
Ice plant-300 tons daily capacity.
Mining gulch; 12 acres in extent.
Model school for blind and deaf.
Regular hat factory in operation.
Statue in butter of John Stewart.
Pavilion built entirely of peanuts.
Placer gold mine in mining gulch.
Gem cutting, grinding and polishing.
The widest boiler plate ever rolled.
Typical Pennsylvania coal breaker.
Pure food exhibits cover two acres.
Iron statue of Vulcan; 50 feet high.
Four acres of growing fresh fruits.
Turquoise mine in actual operation.
Full-sized yacht, completely rigged.
Operating lapidary and assay office.
Idaho silver nugget; weight 10 tons.
Phillippine exhibits; cost $1,000,000.
Decorative sculpture; cost $500,000.
Primitive Mexican copper-mine cap.
"Hank" Monk's famous stage coach.
Largest organ-145 stop, 10,000 pipes.
Locomotive tests throughout season.
Models of coal mines and appliances.
Outside live game exhibits; 10 acres.
Factory where paper boxes are made.
A practical shoe factory in operation.
Rainbow gardens, amid the cascades.
Meeting of National Rowing Regatta.
Manufacture of nitrogen from the air.
Athletic sports and games in general.
Fill-size model United States warship.
Liberty Bell in Pennsylvania building.
Four acres of agricultural implements.
Tobacco exhibit; covers over half acre.
Largest gas engine-3,000 horse power.
Turbine engine of 8,000 horse-power.
Live stock, 37 acres; $250.000 in prizes.
Factory for making pens of all kinds.
Airship tournament; $200,000 in prize.
Edison's personal exhibit of invention.
Floral clock; minute hands 2,500 pounds.
Display of jewelry valued at $10,000,000.
Whale 92 feet long; papier-mache cast.
Imitation diamond factory in operation.
Butter and cheese exhibit; over an acre.
Wireless telegraph station in operation.
Athletic contests; all nations and races.
Wireless telegraph garden in operation.
Tree 800 years old from North Carolina.
Bimonthly exhibit of seasonable flowers.
Typical frontier trading post reproduced.
Cafe on balcony in Horticultural build-


R. TOLAR.


J. H. HART. T. H. BLACHLY.
(Eatablished 1872.)


J. R. TOLAR, JR


TOLAR. HART & CO.,
160 FRONT STREET, NEW YORK.


Commission Merchants,
and Jobbers of Navel Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange Orders executed for Cotton Futures.

JOSEPH D. WEED. W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED L CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.


Read the Record Adv't's.


WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS M R TION THE RECORD.


ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER


Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES end CRATES.



I BLAKESLEE PUMPING OUTFIT.
* This outfit can be directly connected to a pump and will
supply sufficient water for general farm and household ae.
Why not have a water works plant of your own at a small
cost, and this is the most desirable power for use in ease
.* of fire or other necessity; it can be started at a moment's
notice. You don't have to wait for the wind; It's always
ready for work.
The engine can instantyl be made ready for other pow-
er purposes, such as grinding feed, churning, etc., by dis-
connecting the ,unrp, This outfit is simple, durable, economical, easily operated,
and ready for work any minute. No country home is complete without this Ideal
labor saver. We build a complete line of pumping plants for mines, Irrigation.
fire protection, railway supply, and Install water works plants for city service.
Will be pleased to furnish any additional Information on request.
WHITE-BLAKESLEE MIG CO. Birminlham. Ala.
Builders of the Blakeslee (Gas and Gasoline and Connected Outfits.
Q"f 6+l++,2*4"yS<++IM^S4Mo!-C S4-<++->SQ+M+ &I*4i"iNr46












8 THE WEEXt' INDUSTRIAL IZECORD.


THE CANAL CONVENTION.

Bomb-Shell Thrown nto the Camp the Sec
ond Day.
The business men of Tampa recently
called a convention of representative men
from all over the South to meet in that
city on the 4th inst. It was attended
by a strong body of financiers and others
directly interested in the blessings expect-
ed to flow from the construction of the
Panama Canal. The first day was occu-
pied in bouquet throwing, and everything
passed off smoothly. The next day, how-
ever, Mr. Porch, chairman, of New Or-
leans, threw a bomb into the assembly
by the introduction of a series of reso-
lutions declaring that New Orleans vwa
the only city capable of handling the great
traffic consequent upon the canal's being
built, and advocating the formation ot
a stock t-ompany to be subscribed foi
throughout the South, whose headquarters
should Ze at New Orleans, and whose
steamships should sail to and from New
Orleans. Objections were made by Gen
eral Gilchrist, of Punta Gorda and by
Capt Garner of this city. Capt. (;arnei
thought it proper that the New Orleans
Board of Trade should adopt the resolu-
tions, but thought the Convention should
not endorse any resolutions that would
not meet with the approval of the entire
South. The South Atlantic cities should
have something to say when the time
comes to act on that question. The reso-
lutions were amended, declaring it to be
a good business proposition and advising
the Southern people to invest in it. As
amended the resolutions were passed.
Resolutions were then passed favorable
to the construction of the proposed Flor-
ida Ship Canal.
A committee was appointed consisting
of Ex-Senator Pasco, J. W. Porch, C. E.
Garner. W. R. Fuller, M. W. Cooper, J.
W. Greer and Charles Scott to recommend
a plan that will give effect to the resolu
tions about the Panama Canal. They re-
ported, recommending the formation of a
Panama Canal Commercial League, to be
composed of members of commercial or
ganizations in the Southern States who
will aid in its purposes and contribute to
its treasury. T~he committee's recommend-
ations were adopted, and the plan will be
gone more into detail at the next meeting
of the association, to be called hereafter
by the executive committee.

ARAGON HOTEL, JACKSONVILLE.
Turpentine and saw mill men will glad-
ly hail the news that H. N. O'Neal has
lea--ed the Aragon Hotel, of Jacksonville,
fcr a term of years. He is well and fa-
vorably known through the Southeastern
States and there can be no doubt but that
he will be largely patronized by our read-
ers. Mr. O'Neal is making extensive and
expensive alterations, in fact making i
new hotel of the place. He has determined
to run it all the year round on the Amen-
can plan and intends to make his visitors
so comfortable that they will be sure to
return to him. The Aragon will make a
special effort to meet the wants of the
commercial travelers and large improve-
me nts are now being made in the sample
rooms. In fact, if money, knowledge,
courtesy and good treatment will fill the
Aragon, Mr. O'Neal intends it shall be
filled every day in the year.


Probably Montgomery.
Captain D. G. Purse, president of the
(anal Growers' Association which recently
met in annual convention in this city, told
a reporter of the Savannah News on his
return home that no place has yet been
selected for the next annual convention,
but that he thought it would be held at
Montgomery, Ala. The matter will be
definitely settled within the next ten days.
Continuing, lie said to the News reporter:
What promises to be one of the greatest
benefits as the outcome of the last conven-
tion was the appointment of a committee
to further the interest of Georgia syrup
by introducing it into new territory, ani
thereby increasing the demand for it. A
regular campaign will be planned and car-
ried out systematically. The main idea is
to have large houses dealing direct with
the consumers handle and introduce the
Georgia cane product. The committee con-
sists of W. B. Roddenberry, of Cairo, Ga.,
1J. A. Cranford of Jacksonville and C. G.
Abercrombie of Montgomery.
"An important resolution that was
adopted by the convention was that in-
troduced by Dr. J. M. Spence, calling on
all syrup-producing States to pass a pure
syrup bill. Much interest was manifested
in the samples of the paper and cardboard
that have been made from bagasse, but
it is hardly expected that the manufacture
of bagasse will be started on any large
scale until machinery has been -ecured for
the economic handling of the material."


JACKSONVILLE COOPERAGE CO.
As our Ieaders are aware, the Jackson-
ville (Cooperage (Company, of Jacksonville.
Fla has recently been organized, its cap-
ital largely increased and its factories en
large. The oflfieirs of the the company
now are: W. T. Riley, President; J. A. G.
Carson, of the J. P. Williams Co., vice
president. and Geo..1. Seovel, secretary and
treasurer.
The company's plant is located most
centrally on the railroad at Eighth street.
and at present consists of a large hand
factory, which is getting more orders than.
it can supply; near it a large building has
been erected in which is being installed
the most complete machine barrel making
plant in the South; near it the boiler and
engines are already ready to do their part.
Mr. Scovel expects to have the new plant
in operation in a very few days and will
then have a combined output that wil;
satisfactorily meet demands. The corn
pany has its own dry kiln there so that its
oak can ie redried before going through
the manufacturing process. It is the
building of such enterprises that make a
city and J.acksonville may be glad that this
company is completing so complete 1i
plant. The old company was well know
and favorably thought of, the new one
with increased capital and much more elab-
orate manufacturing plant, will easily not
only hold its predecessor's reputation, but
add to it. Secretary Scovel is very posi-
tive in stating that none but the very
best material wil be used and none but
the very best barrels shipped by his com-
pany.

Tug Boat St. Johns.
The hull of the new tugboat St. Johns,
built for the Florida Towage Company, by
Z. T. Anderson, was launched ,tonday iii
Hogan's Creek. tHer maehine&- will be
put in at once.


White Springs. Fla.

On the Suwanee River
The Great Health Resort of the South.
Sulphur Spring 25,000 Gallos per Miute.
Healing Springs -- Forest Walks -- Shooting & Fishing
NO MOSQUITOES. NO MALARIA.
The Healthiest Summer Resort in America.


THE PRITCHARD HOUSE,


An Ideal Home for Invalids, FirstClass Table

ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES.
Write for particulars. ..
MRS. S. L PRITCHARD, Proprietress. WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE OAKS,

A Typical Southern Home


NEWLY BUILT and FURNISHED.


- EVERY COMFORT


-Write for particulars-

MRS. M. C. SKIPWORTH, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


KENDRICK HOUSE,

Headquarters for Southern Families,


GOOD TABLE


HOME COMFORTS


... For particulars address...

MRS. J. B. ROBERTS, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


THE HAMILTON.

A New, Modern, High-Class Hotel.


ELECTRIC LIGHTS and BELLS


HOT and COLD BATSH


For full information write

JNO. S. BOWEN, Owner and Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE NEW PAXTON,

Commodious, HomeLike Hotel
ROOM FOR 100 GUESTS.

Table Unexcelled. Every Attention to Invalids

MRS. E. H. PAXTON, Owner and Proprietres, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


THE TELFORD HOUSE

A Large, New, Three-story Brick and Stone Hotel, Newly Fur,
nished Throughout, All Modern Conveniences.
Rates $5.00 to $8.00 Per Week. $1.00 and $2.00 Per Day
CAN ACCOMMODATE 85 GUESTS.
W. B. TELFORD, Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.

A. S. PENDLETON, W. B. JOHNSON. JAS. LASSITER, W. STRIPLING,
President. Vce Pres. Gen. Manager. AssL Treasurer

5he W. B. JOHNSON CO..


Wholesale Grocers


W.T.R ILYN
WALTER RAV.


402-404-406-408 East Bay Street Jackseville, fla.
DIRECTORS:
B. F. CAMP. A. S. PENDLETON,.
THOS. DOWLI G W. JOHNSON.
N. G. WADE. PERRY F. COLESON.


W. W. STIrPLu
MS. L*SSSEn.


THE RECORD KEEPS PACE WITH SOUTHERN PROGRESS


--








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


SA V AI QTII R F Jacksonville Wholesale Lumber Market.


Iu,^ V ^L. V'VP U


Special Train
TO THE

WORLD'S FAIR
AND

National Democratic

Convention.
Train to be operated by special ser-
vice, will consist of:
One combination Library, Club and Bag-
gage Car, four Pullman sleeping cars;
each car containing two drawing-rooms
and ten sections. One dining car. Total,
six cars.
Our schedule will be:
Leave Jacksonville, 8:30 p. m.. Thurs-
day, June 30; Leave Atlanta, 5:30 a. m.
Friday, July 1; leave Chattanooga 10:15
a. m. Friday, July 1; leave Lexington, 5:50
p. m. Friday, July 1; leave Louisville 8:30
p. m. Friday, July 1; arrive St. Louis 6:00
a. m. Saturday, July 2.
The party will therefore spend July 2,
3: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 in St. Louis, and re-
turning-
Leave St. Louis, 9:00 a. m., Saturday,
July 9; leave Louisville. 6:00 a. in. Sun-
day, July 10; leave Lexington. 9:30 a. m..
Sunday, July 10; leave Chattanooga. 5::10
p. m., Sunday. July 10: leave Atlanta
10:25 p. m., Sunday, July' 10; arrive
Jacksonville, 7:00 a. m. Monday, July 11.
This train will be a solid vestibuled one,
composed of the very latest and newest
equipment, and will run through to St_
Louis and return fer the exclusive use
of the Naval tSores people.
Our route will be over the SOI TIHEIR
RAILWAY, going and returning.
The expense of the trip wil' he:
Railroad fare, Jacksonville to St. Louis
adn return, S27.50 each; one lower berth,
Jacksonville to St. ]xlcls. one wva, *$i.50;
round trip. $13.10: ore upl,.'r 1wrth, lack-
sonville to St. Louis, one way, $6.50,
round trip. $13.00; one section, lower and
upper berth, Jacksonville to St. Louis,
one way, $13.00, round trip, $26.00; iraw-
ing-reom. Jacksonville to St. Louis, one
way, $24.00, round trip, $48.00.
The berths are of regular size and will
of course accommodate two people, but.
for a couple it will be better to have a
section, which will be th.e lover andl upper
berths.
Dining car will be operated on table
d'hote plan at $1.00 each Imeal for each
person. Three meals will be served on
the going trip, being breakfast, lunch
and dinner, and these three meals will be
$3.00 for each person.
Three meals will be served on the re-
tur trip, being breakfast, lunch and din-
ner, and same charge will be $3 for each
person.
Under this arrangement, therefore, it
will cost one person on this special train
from Jacksonville to St. Louis and re-
turn:
Round trip, railroad fare ........$27.50
One berth, round trip .. ....... .13.00
Six meals, round trip ............ 6.00
$46.50
Two people will be twice $46.50 and
so on.
The number of passengers on this train
will be positively one hundred.
It is necessary, therefore, in order to
conclude all detailed arrangements for ap-
plications for space on this "Special" to be
filed with the Secretary of the Turpen-
tine Operators' Association, Jacksonville.
as early as possible. Each application will
then be assigned certain space on the
train, and such applicant wil be fully in-
formed in a personal letter.
Addrm.
JAS. A. HOLLOMON,


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


(For week ending May 6.)
Merchantab'e.
sard schedules-$10.50 to $13.00.
Sound and square schedules, .0.50 to
$]2.00.
Merchantable car material-
Average schedule of sills, ;6 feet and
under, 10 inches and under, $13.00 to
$14.00.
Special schedules-according to sizes
and lengths-prices steady.
K. D. Saps-"6" and up 80 per cent
clear, $9.50 to $10.00.
Flooring:
$11.50; No. 4. $8.50.
Cypress.
First and seconds, 4 quarter base, car-
load prices. $34; selects. 4 quarter base,
No. I, $15.00; No. 2, $13.50; No. 3,
$28; shop, 4 quarter base, $20.
Cypress Shingles-6xl8 A's, per 1.000
pcs., $5.25: primes, $4.25; 4x18, A's, $3.50;
primes, $2.75.
Cypress laths, $2 per 1,000.
Cypress market strong. Mills have
more orders than they can fill. Prospects
good for higher prices. Dry stock scarce.


Business Directory.

CHAS. A. CLARK, INC.
FUNERAL DIRECTOR AND EMBAIMABR
Sand 42 W. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Fla
Telegraph orders receive prompt atten-
tion. Open always.

JOHN ZAHM'8 EUROPEAN HOTLF4
128 E. Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant. Nicely Furnished
Rooms. Open day and night. Bettillnl's
old Stand.

Conover's Drug Store, Bay and Julia,
Jacksonville, Fla. Mail us your orders
for commissary drugs. Give us a trial.
J. S. PINKUSSOHN CIGAR COMPANY
61 W. Bay Street, Jacksonville. Fla.
THE BEST OF EVERYTHING
TO SMOKE AND CHEW
The Largest Tobacconists in the South


M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

Commission Merchants.
ROSIN, TURPENTINE, TAR, PITCH,
GUM THUS, RICE, ETC.
138 Front Street, NEW YORK.


BAILY MONTGOMERY,
Commission Merchants.
Naval Stores & Cotton
Liberal advances made against ship-
ments. Consignments solicited.
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
NEW YORK CITY.



Trade Checks
FOR THE


COMMISSARY BUSINESS
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Industrial Record Go.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


LUMBER NOTES.
Lumber is still holding its own. Ship-
ments front this port for the first ten days
of May were 5,923.851 feet. Large sched-
ules are gong forward, but prices are not
as stiff as should be expected. Last month
shipments were over twenty million feet.
and indications are that May will equal
if not exceed April.


J. N. Woollett, of the American Lum-
ber and Manufacturing Company, Balti-
more, is in the city.
T. S. Wyley, Jr.. president of the Wy-
lIy-Gabbett Lumber Company, Savannah,
is in town. It is rumored that this com-
pany will take the offices of the Norden
& Sax Co. on the first of June, as that
coniipany closes up its Jacksonville busi-
ness on that date.


Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advertisements Will be Inserted in This Department at the ollowing Rates:
For one week. 20 cents a line.
For two weeks. 35centsaline.
For three weeks. 50 cents a line.
For four weeks, 65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Thursday
morningg to secure insertion in Friday's fraper.


Five Registered Shorthorn Bulls For Sale.
One is half brother to "Beauty Boy," 200 tons 48-lb. relaying steel rails West
who was champion at three Texas shows. Virginia and Kentucky delivery. 100 tons
Another is half-brother to our 1800 pound 60-lb. relaying steel rails, Southern de-
iow. "Mary Spears." All good and ready livery. 1.500 tons 56-lb. relaying steel
for immediate service. Prices $100.00 to rails. West Virginia delivery. 150 tons 30-
$175.00, subject to previous sale. lb. relaying steel rails, West Virginia de-
Palmetto Park Stock Farm. Z. 'C. Cham- livery. Isaac Joseph Iron Company, 525-
bliss & (Co.. Proprietors. Ocala. Fla. 53- Hunt St., Cincinnati, Ohio.


Employment Wanted.
Owing to a change in our business, we
have a faithful woodsman we do not need.
whom we can recommend. Salary reas-
onable. Address T. N. Brown & Co.,
ltrookfield, Ga.
Turpentine Men.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. 1 outfit pumps 2,000
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 cents and
requires no attention while running.
Started in one minute. J. R. Campbell,
Ocala, Fla.


W. J. L'ENGLE.
President.


For Sale.
The right party can buy half interest in
good turpentine business, with 15 crops
virgin boxes, plenty hands, good healthy
place, good outlet, cheap freights. Will
take $12,00 to $15,000 cash to buy half
interest. Will sell all if can't get suitable
partner, partner preferred that can take
charge. Information, address P. O. Box
288 Tifton, Ga. Also good saw mill loca-
tion for sale. Address box 288, Tifton, Ga.
4t.


J. W. WADE.
Vice-President.


E . HUGHES,
Sec'y and Treas.


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.


DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.

Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.

Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.



McMurray Livery, Sale and Transfer Co.
HORSES AND MULES.
We carry the largest stock of anv stable in the city, and have always
on hand 100 to 150 head of all kinds and prices. If in need of any, give
us a call, or write for what you want.
I. B. DALTON, Manager, Jacksonville.


---










10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

a---*- --*-- --**----- ------** M *****-- AA----- ------


J. R. PABTTrr, AncnaB S. HUBBARD. ARTBUB F. PLaRRY
President. Vice-President. Cashier.

The Mercantile Exchange Bank,


S Ca pites. S200.000. Surplus, $100,000
STATE DEPOSITARY.
SGeneral Banking. Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes. 1.00 per Year.



Review of Naval Stores for a Week


Pumping Outfits FO

Turpentine Stills
WITH FIRE PROTECTION CONNECTIONS.

Best PUMP in the World
From 40 to 700 Gallons of Water per Minute.
Write or call on
FRED E. GILBERT,
Automobile Heakdquarters
29 West Forsyth St., Jacksonville, Fla.


Rosin for the Week at Savannah.


Monday, M
W W .. .. .. .. .. ..
W ........ .....
N ........ ... .. ..
M ..............
K ..................
1 . . . . . . .
H ...... .. ... . .

E . . . . . . .
D ........ .. ...
ABC .. .. .. .. .. .
Sales 255, receipts 2,1
tone firm.


ay 9. Last
3.85
3.55
3.35
3.20
3.15
2.80
2.75
2.75
2.70
2.65
2.60
2.55
71, exports


SYeai.
3.55
3.35
3.25
3.20
3.10
2.95
2.35
1.85
1.80
1.75
1.75
1.75
4,618;


Tuesday, May 10-ABCD and E off 5
cents. Other grades unchanged. Salek
319, receipts 935, exports 404. Tone firm.

Wednesday, May llth-No change from
Tuesday. Sales 734, receipts 2,592, ex-
ports 590; tone firm.

Thursday, May 12-Unchanged from
Tuesday's quotations. Sales 1,946, re
ceipts 2,249, exports 1,828; tone firm.

Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosins.
Stock April 1 .......... 6,495 44,550
RIeeints May 12 ........ 906 2.249


Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Prce Rcpta Sales Exp. 1903
Mon, May 9 154% 713 I 575 472 147
Tues., May 10 |541 935 1 319 404 47
Wed., May 11 154% 1037 79 100 471
Thurs., May 12154% 906 I 200 302 471/

Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Report.
New York, May 11, 1904.
The Industrial Record, Jacksonille, Fla.
Spirits Turpentine-The business dur-
ing past week has been fair. While orders
have mostly been for small lots, they have
been coming along quite frequently.
Stock 469 barrels. We quote machines,
581-2 cents.
Rosin-The demand continues fair.
Stocks do not accumulate. Low grades
are scarce and firm. We quote:
BC, $2.90; D, $2.921-2; E, $2.95; F,
$3.00; t;, $3.05 to $3.10; H, $3.10 to $3.20;
1, $3.20; K, $3.c5; M, $3.85; N, $4.00;
W;, $4.20; WW, $4.30.
TOLAR. HART & CO.
Turpentine at London.
1904 1903 1902 1901
Stock Apr. 23 12,481a 24,670 21.233 7,953
Del'd this wk 1,8701 1,206 2.052 1.620
Since Jan. 1 27,848 23.003 28,737 28,49(i
Price 25th April 42-6 43- 32-71/ 27-6
July-Dec. .. 41- 34-6 32-7'/2 25 9!
(a) includes 351 French. (b) includes
40 French.
Reported by James Watt & Son.


Receipts previously ...... 19,296 50,978 SUPERVISING INSPECTOR.
Total ................ 26,697 97,77 theBoad of Trade to
Savannah Wants the Board of Trade to
Exports May 12 ........ 302 1,828 Make the Appointment.
Exports previously ...... 20,320 64,868 At the Board of Trade meeting in Sa-
T 0M vannah Wednesday, before the represent
Total ............... 20,62"2 66,bqJ
tatives of that organization met the dele
Stock May 12 .......... 6,075 30,681 gates from the Savannah Lumber Asso
Stock last year ........ 7,567 108,629 ciation. Mr. I. F. Cooper Myers intro-
duced a resolution looking to the appoint-
Range of Turpentine and Rosin at Sa- nment of the supervising inspector'of na
vannah for Three Years. val *tres by the combined Board of
| 1903-4 1| 1902-3 11 1901-2 Trade- of Savannah and Brunswick. Tht
Spirits 1 45 1 65 |i 421 65 | 311 53 office at the present time is a state al,
Rnoin I I pointment and made by the Governor.


ww
WG.. ..
K. . ..
F ..
D ..


.. 3.30
..3.10
..80
..1.65
. 1.55


1.75 3.04.2 Z6
4.40 3.25 3.852.00
4.15 2.403.20 1.65
2.90 1.202.10 1.10
2.80 1.102.06 1.00


Send us your orders for Commissary
checks. The Record prints more commis-
sary checks than all the printing houses
in the South combined.


Crops of Spirits and Rosins for Three Years.
Crop 1903-04. Crop 1902-03
Spirits. tosi i Spirits. Rosin. S8
Wilmington ...........16,511 89,667 18,883 113,968 1I
Charleston.. ......... 2,409 3,159 3.007 11,835 3
Savannah.... .... ..176,418 660,938 270,670 940,507 31
Brunswick............ 55,002 184,527 68,947 244,106 7f
Mobile ... ...... ..12,315 50,;,0 18,969 79,272 21
New Orleans........ .. 36,017 133,126 33,103 108,033 21
Carrabelle.. .. ........closed closed 3,394 32,148
Georgetown.. ...... 7,615 44,214 10,307 46,899
Pensacola.. ...... .. 42,554 205,982 38,275 192,205 3
Jax. & Ferndina.. .... 187,210 653,210 91,976 375,211 7
Tamps ...... ........closed closed 13,565 40,664 1
Totals....... ......535,915 2,020,925 571,096 2,184,818 59;


Crop 1901-02
spirits. Rosin
,921 109.484
1,004 13,270
1,085 1,071,440
1,669 286,125
1,080 88,572
1,038 94,336
8,177 47,497
8,458 50,515
7,786 154,350
0,000 245,000
5,424 51,779


3,492 2,212,413


FOR SALE.
50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill $2.35 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in tie State.

C. BUCKMAN, M..oR....it..
Jeok .onville, Frim


R. S. HALL, Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KNIGHT, See. and Treas.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,


HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.


Herbert A. Ford,
President.


Geo. H. Ford,
Vice-Pres.


F. L. Watsou,
Cashier.


The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.


CAP1 TA L,


- $.50,000.00.


DIRECTORS: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Clarence Camp, J. K. Christian, Gco.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford. Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicited.


C. H. BARNES. Pres.


J. D. SHAW. Vice-Pres.


RALPH JESSUP. Sec.-Treas.


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonville. Pensacola, Fernandina and Savannah
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


W. FRAZIER JONES, C. H. BARNES. R. JESSUP. W. H. BAKER.
President. Treasurer. Ass't Tres. secretary.

UNITED GROCERY CO.,

Importers & Wholesale Grocers
HAY, GRAIN and FEED.
Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
B. c. LPASTER. deMr JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

M. A. BRIGGS, President. HOMER BROWN, 2d Vice-President.
l C. BRIGGS, 1st Vice President. J. C. MCDONALD, Secretary and Treasurer



W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.

HARDWARE, MILL and TURPENTINE SUPPLIES.

Council Tool Co., & Holmes' Tool Co.. Tools,
Brigg's Sterling and Perfection Hacks and Pullers,
Cutters, Files, Whetters, Glue, Batting, Strainer Wire,
Turpentine Wagon Harness and Collars,
Hoop Iron, Coopers' Tools and Rivets.

Everything in Turpentine Supplies,

Send us your Mail Orders,

W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.,
VALDOSTA, GA.


Vni


--------- --------


mammemm mammm__emmmmmemmemam


"


A


- -






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11




AMERICAN SHEET adnd


TIN PLATE COMPANY


Frick Building,


Pittsburgh, Pa.


Manufacturers of all varieties of

IRON and STEEL SHEETS and TIN and TERNE PLATES,

offer


VALUABLE INFORMATION

to persons engaged in the

METAL and BUILDING TRADES.


An Artistic Booklet, issued by the American Tin Plate Company, contains a
brief history of iron and its application to roofing, and traces the manufac-
ture of roofing tin from the early days to the present time, also a full de-
scription of "How to Construct a Tin Root," and further a great deal of
very valuable tabulated information useful to every person interested in the
bui ding trades.

A Handsome Booklet, issued by the American Sheet Steel Company, con-
tains fine illustrations of the several Sheet Mills, also tables showing weights
of sheets and bundles of standard sizes of Galvanized Sheets. Woods'
Refined Sheets, Wood's Patent Planished Iron and Corrugated
Sheets, net prices per pound and per square foot at given rate of
discount, etc.. etc.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR BOOKLETS.


Ei her or both Booklets will be sent free. and postpaid
to any interested person who will cut out and
fill in the coupon and mail as indicated.


W. C. Creme yer,
Adver. Agent,
310 Carnegle Blg., Pittsbrgh, Pa.
Dear Sir: Please send......Copy of Book-
let on Roofing ......Copy of Booklet with
sizes and weights of Standard Sizes of Sheets.
N AME .....................................
OCCUPATION .................................
ADDRESS. ....................................
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


THE RECORD'S SPACE HAS A BIG MONEY VALUE.










12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

JAMES A. HOLLOMON.
Editor and Manager.
Published Every Friday.
SunasTion i (Domestic).-.l3 .00 Per Annum
(Foreign) ... 3 50
"The Pine and Its Products."

Al communications should be addressed
The Industrial Record Company.
Jackeonville. Fla.

Branch Editorial and Business Office at
Savannah. Ga.

Entered at the Postofflce at Jacksonville,
Fla., as second-clam matter.

Adopted by the Executive committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association, Sep-
temper 12 190L as Its exclusive offcal or-
ga. Adopted In annual convention. Sep-
tember U. as the organ also of the general
asuoclatlon.
Adopted April 7th, 1U.3, as the official
ergan of the Inter-State Cane Growers'
asoclation. Adopted Sept. 11, 19, as the
only official organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
reslutlon adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Assmoeation.

CO00r OR ADVERTISING.
AdAertItaed eapy (ehamnfe or new
advertisementa) should reach am
Tuesday mormiaa to immure Iusertlfo
to the Imue of the same week.

REVIVAL OF SHIPBUILDING.
The country is on the eve of a great
revival in shipbuilding. Tih rapidity with
which we have forged to the front as a
first-class world power is demanding more
American bottoms. It is time to call a
halt on foreign bottoms carrying Amer
ican freights from American ports to othci
ports now owned by America.
There is indeed a better day dawning
for the American shipbuilder. There is ;.
wider market opening for the Americain
shipowner. He that anticipates the open
ing of the market is the one to reap the
lion's share of the harvest. The important
thing is to be ready when the doors t<,
the Phillippines and to Panama are opeli
From every point of view, now is the
time to place orders for ships.
Moreover, there exists, and will always
exist, the necessity for the replacement
of tonnage through the natural wastage or
the elements.
Ships will not last forever, and many
of them are now ready for the ship lone
yard. We need new ships, not only for
our increased demand, but to take the
place of the old ships now carrying their
last cargoes.
One must also consider that the mat
ket for the American ship is widening.
Already the coast laws have been ex-
tended to include the Piillippine Islands.
which means that every pound of freight,
transported between the United States ana
the Philippines and between the Phillip
pines and the United States must be car-
ried in a vessel built in thl- United States.
This trade is already considerable and is
growing by leaps and bounds. Two years
hence, which is the time when the coast
laws will embrace the Phillippinm s, it will
probably have trebled. The demand foi
supplies in a primeval country. such as,
is the Phillippines, increases in a sort ot
geometrical progression with the advance
of civilization. The Phillippines are to Ib
exploited. Railways are to be built thert
and enterprises of all sorts are to be a
tablished. Both production and consume ,
tion in the islands will vastly increase.
which is equivalent to saying that both,
the imports and exports must inevitable)
grow.


All this means work for the American
ship. here are probably American ships
enough in existence to care for this over-
sea interchange of products as it exists
to-day, but there are not enough for the
trade of two years hence. Consequently,
ships must me built, and now is the time
to build them. Moreover. the trade to
the United States ports via the Isthmus
of Panama is coastwise trade. In addi-
tion the movement to include the actual
canal zone itself within the coasting laws
has already crystalized in a bill, and
there is assurance that it will be passed
at the next session of Congress. This
means that the enormous consumption
that the construction of this canal will
entail must go forward in American ships.
It is impossible to overestimate the im-
portance of this commerce, for ii will
mean a constant stream of supplies fo.
a period of eight years. The leverage
that this will afford in the struggle of
capital to gain South American markets,
both on the eastern and western coasts,
wll lie ilmiiense. To have a halfway stop
an assured thing makes conquest of ports
further on a reasonably sure thing. This
is one great advantage that arises from
the extension of the coastwise laws to
the Phillippines. It will make the trade
to China. Japan and the Orient more easy
of acquisition; and the same must be truek
in regard to South American ports by re-
serving the Panama canal trade exclusive-
ly to American vessels.
Here, then, are certain markets for
American ships. These ships have got to
be built. There is no way out of it. It.
is better to build then now than to wait,
for at present both labor and capital
are stable. A ship costs a certain sunm
to-day; it is likely to cost more a year or
two hence.


MAY DAY STRIKES.
May Day strikes were not so important
throughout the country this year as last,
but still they numbered 45,000 men, in-
cluding coal miiners in West Virginia ana
Ohio, boiler makers and shipbuilding hands
at New York, vesselmen on the lakes, ma-
chinists in railway shops in the south-
west and general building hands at a
number of cities. Strikes of bakers at
('Chicago and Boston have caused the ship-
inent of large quantities of bread from
other cities. From January 1 to date
about 170.000 men have struck, or about
half the number striking up to the same
late in 1903.

M'NAMEE DEFEATED.
The Hon. Robert McNamee, who is
known by every turpentine man in Florida
as being the author of the infamous Me-
Naimee inspection bill. which was over-
whelmingly d feattal in the last legis.la
ture. has just been defeated for Congress
in the First District by an equally over-
whelming majority. Congressman Spark
man. who has served the people faithfully
and well in that district for several years,
has been rnominated in the primary by
a imo-t gratifying vote. It is safe to say
that every turpentine operator in the First
District opposed Mr. McNamee and this
positionn to him had a tremendous ffeetc
at the polls. The Record was satisfieol
early in the campaign that the business
interests of that great section of Florida
did not want Mr. McNamee in Congress.


19. THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


IP YOU ARE PROGRESSIVM, ADVERTISE IN THE RECORD.


MONEY IN CIRCULATION.

Once more the official report of total
nmnney in circulation has established a
new high record, both as to aggregate and
the per capital amount, which is $31.02 on
an estimated population of 81,637,000. A
total of $2,532,645,135 on May 1st comr
pares with $2,516,639,223 a month previous
and $2.374.353,720 a year ago. The only
significant changes for the month were
gains of $14.600,i000 in gold certificates ana
alibt $5.000.000 in gold coin and bullion.
Bank note circulation remained practically
unchanged. Including Treasury holdings
the total for the country is now at a new
high point of $2.14.g95,446, compared with
$2,808,!i0,136. on April 1. Gross gold was
$1.3.51.984,577, an increa.M- of over $3,000,-
000. notwithstanding large exports.


DELEGATE HILLMAN.
Returns from Tuesday's primary elect-
ion in Florida are so slow coming in that
it is impossible to say whether Capt W.
.1. llillman has been elected delegate-at-
large to the National Democratic (onven-
tion, or not. From returns already re-
ceived, however, tle indications are he has,
been elected. Certain it is that he has led
the ticket in a number of counties.
Captain Hillman entered the race as an
ininstructed candidate at the eleventh
hour. after the people had generally un-
derstood that there would be no opposition
to the Hearst instructed candidates and
his large vote is a compliment to his ster-
ling character.
Captain Hillman is one of Florida's
most prosperous naval stores men.


TALIAFERRO'S VICTORY.
The Record believes that the business
interests of Florida generally rejoice at
the nomination of James P. Taliaferro
to succeed himself in the United State,,
Senate. The primary election on Tues-
day demonstrated the will of the people
in such a convincing manner that the mis-
guided leaders of the opposition should
realize that any policy of populism, social-
ism and anarchy is forever stamped out
in Florida.


Cummer Lumber Co.
This company from its first advent here
has always held the foremost place in the
rank of lumler mills. Aocated at Pan
a ma Park on the beautiful St. Johns, tin-
plant stands as a model of what a mill
should be. In addition to the sawmill
itself, there are dry kilns. planing mills,
a large Iox and crate factory and a ship-
building yard, all working along in hart
inony. There are plenty. of millmen com-
plaining just now of a scarcity of orders.
but the Cummer company y are running
full time in all their departments and
their planing mill is now running day ani
night to fill orders just booked by Mi.
A. G. C( Cummer on his last trip to Ne w
York. Even their box and crate factory,
only just completed, has all the orders it
can cope with. It is quite evident that
the hard times that are so much feared
in presidential years will fall lightly on
Panama Park alnd its 700 employees.
It must he added that since the Messrs.
C'ummer :settled here. they have left notih-
ing undone to advance the inter-sts or
the country they are in. They are prom-
vnent members of the Board of Trade ann
che.rrfully support any plan that seems
t promise gain to Florida.


Saw Mill Man's Protet.

May, 10, 1904.
Editor Industrial Record:
Dear Sir: I see that some weeks ago
you published an account of a proposed
bureau of inspection and on the represen-
tation of its Iackers, pronounced it good.
For a fact it does look like a good sug-
gestion. but-like a green persimmon-
it looks better than it tastes. Mr. Editor,
I know that you always intend to have
tle Record on the side of the producer
and therefore ask you to allow this pro-
test to go on record. The proposed new
rule was introduced in the Sawmill Men's
Association by a middleman. It is won-
derful. Mlr. Editor, how anxious middle-
mien always are to benefit other people-
never themselves. So philanthropic have
they been in this connection-or so per-
sistent in tlwir efforts at supremacy-
that to-day, at the meetings of this As-
sociation, intended solely for millmen or
producers, nine-tenths of the talking is
lone by men who, while technically mill-
owners, are really lumber brokers. In
others words, attempts are made to run
the Sawmill Men's Association by the very
I oplle whose interest it is to make money
out of them. Hence this proposed rule.
It aims to place another tax on the unfor-
tunate lumber maker and save inspection
expense to the buyer. That's the whole
thing in a nutshell. Even then, the major-
ity of lumber brokers are averse to the
rule. considering it unfair and not needed.
In Fernandina a meeting was promptly
held to denounce the proposed rule, in
Jacksonville. I understand, a majority is
against it. In fact, it seems to have been
intalroduced to help one or two jobbers out
of some difficulty or other.
Mr. Edtior, when the Sawmill Associa-
tion ceases to be under the influence ot
half a dozen jobbers and when the man in
the woods does his own legislating, then
will the Association, already possessing
a wise sawmill man as President, grow
until it will be in a position to dictate
to the brokers instead of being ruled by
them. May that day soon come.
SAW MILL OPERATOR.


Hastings at St. Louis.
The Farmer and Trucker, of Hastings,
proposes to make an exhibit of Hastings
products at the St. Luis Fair, and to issue
a mainmotlh exposition number on the 1st
of July next, of 20,000 copies, to be su-
perbly illustrated, that will show to the
world a belt of fertile and productive ter-
ritory, which it claims has no superior
and few equals anywhere on the face or
the earth.


To Detect Petroleum.
Put ten drops of spirits turpentine in a
watch glass and float the glass in a quart
of water having a temperature of 170 deg.
Fahr. If tle spirits be absolutely pure,
it will evaporate and leave the glass quite
dry in seven minutes. If there be as much
as five per cent. petroleum, it will not
have completely evaportated in that time.


.1. A. MclDoald & Co., lumber dealers
at Miami. are arranging to extend their
business. Since they opened their yards
they have carried a full stock of every-
thing pertaining to the lumber business
except sash. doors and blinds. They are
now preparing to erect a large building.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


S. i68N8. The WestsRaley-Rannie Company,
I THE I LANIC NAli TIO L BAK OF IACKSONYI LL1. 114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
CAPITAL PAID IN, $350,000.00. A. WEST. Pres. E. E. West. VIce-Pres. W. i Rannle. Vice-Pres. M. V. Ra y. Sec. Treas.
OPEN FOR BUSINESS AUGUST I, 1903.
Edward W. Lane, President. FFICE d W. oyt, Vce-President. We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
Tomas P. Denham Cshier... ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
*6"d* 6********** headquarters.

Captain John R, Young,
President Savannah Board of Trade, s 4-0. < :- --:::* *s -+--z+^ +
__________ THOMAS DIXON, JR., President, B. W. KIL6ORE, Vice-President.
New York. Raleigh. N C.
The Savannah Lumber As-*wiation amal- roads. the extension of the River street F. 6. HAMRICK, Secretary and Treasurer, New York.
gamated with the Board of Trade of that railway to connect with the wharf ter w. I. aKRV. C.la-mst, New York.
city at a joint meeting Wednesday after finals of the Central system on the west
noon. Tie merger of the two bodies was and the Plant system on the east wa PRESIDENT'S OFFICE: 96 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORi.
consummated without opposition. and the urged. and the encouragement and stimu-
meeting was characterized by the most lus w ere given the South Bound Railway
perfect harmony. enterprise.
According to the terms of the coalition Mr. Young's three years of executive standard T turpentine C om pany
the lumlbemen were promised the vice ~on presidency of the Board of Trade, and its impress upon that lodly, for during
representatives on the board of directors that period it assumIed greater importance Builders of Wood Distilling Plants,
and the various standing committees. Mi. .as ; comme -cial organization. Mercar by the New Krug Patent Steam
.1. J. Cummings was the unanimous choice, tile andl manufacturing enterprises ain,
of the lumbermen for president. the office interests received greater attention, and P pressure Pr C .
made vacant by the election of Mr. John naval stores ceasing to be so much the
R. Young as president of the Board ot dominating influence.
Trade, in place of ('apt. I). (. Purse. Mr. Young is one of the most prom CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
Capt. Purse, who was recently unanimous- nent naval stores factors in the South.
ly elected for the 14th time as President lie is president of the Ellis-Young Co.. AND INSPECTION OF WAYCROSS PLANT IS INVITED.
of the Board of Trade. resigned a few vice-president of the Consolidated Naval
days ago. Store (Co.. and president of the National i
It is understand that when President Tank and Export Co. REFERENCES: 6artleld Natlonal an, Aew York: R. Dan Co.
Young announces the new committees that The Record congratulates the griat busi- I
the name of Mr. William B. Stillwell will ness interests of Savannah on their wis'-
head the lumber committee. Other lunm- selection of a presiding officer for its lead- JNO. W THOMPSON,
hermen will have places on the various ing commercial and industrial organiza
committees. tion. Superintendent Sales Agencies, WACROSS, A
The new president of the Board ot t
Trade is thoroughly qualified to till the FOREIGN EXPORTS. p A
duties of the office. He has been closely E. H. TOMLINSON, Special Agent,
identified with the organization for a turpentine and Rosin Sent Abroad Since Corner Hogan and Forsyth Streets, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
number of years and has been at the Recrd's Last Report
helm on several occasions during Capt. F ii:--- en-acorlast :M : S-.ark Patagonia, to l9o~-4
Purse's enforced absence from the city. FHarm rg. 6.250 barrels rosi a to
Hamlburg,. 1.25.0 barrels rosin.
He succeeded to the vice-presidency it ,romn ilmington. bark Passepartout.
the Board of Trade upon lhr death of to Lndon,. 5,465 barrels rosin. rt K in g ia n 's R liablee"
ic resident, and was elected MeNeil, April 30, From New Orleans. steamship Xiearau-
o1887, and was elected pubriqdent of the "o a. to Liverlpol. 220 c-asks spirits tur- Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
lowing year, earning the soubriquet of the nluntine: bark Ingomar to (.utujew~ki.
Boy President, and was re-elected twice 4.8S barrels rosin; steamship oloniatl Canned Meats, Butter, 'IHE BEST ON EARTH.
thereafter.
to lmondn. 250 casks spirits turpentine.
During Mr. Young's executive direc- From Baltimore. ship Indore. to Liver- Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
tion quarantine improvements and harbor I ool. 200 barrels rosin. i ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
work were the subject of intelligent con From Philadelphia. ship Manchester thispaper.
sideration, and renewed efforts were made M.erchant to Manchester, 949 barrels rosin. KINOAN CO., Ltd., E. BA ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
to stimulate the City Council to take ac Front New York. ship British King, t& CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST. JACKSONVILLE FLA.
tion in the former, and the general govern- Antwerp. 170 barrels rosin.
ment to manifest greater interest in the Frm,ni Savannah. steamship Schartzfels.
latter. to Hamburg, 4.803 barrels rosin; to Flavius T. Christie, Frnk C. Groover, Manhall W. Stewart
Official quotations of stocks and lumdn 1.1 men. m) barrels rosin, and to ('al- President. Vice-Pres. See. and Treaa.
were secured for the loard rooms, greater -utta. 500 biar.ls rosin; steamship Man
accommodations for the increasing nava, ningtry to Hamburg. 900 barrels rosin,
stores trade were secured from the raii to Rotterdam. 250 barrels rosin.

Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit. W\l.\ OrB gls



CYPRESS TNKS, TUBS, oo ile

AND VATS. 1 ,

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat- e Solici T oe Lumber Io TID iioe m is O Delul
alogue for the asking.
G. M[. DAVIS & JsoNY, PALATKXA, F IN hi Il(er S 1Speci. c1Tresp0ce S0icl. Wit wil 10 Tfill

"FAIR, INDEPBEDENT AND PROGRESSIVE."











14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


S. P. HOLMES & CO.'S WEEKLY COT- It does not show very much gray matter ing the wheat crop and this area has been Sam 'I P HAlm es .Co.
TON LETTER. or originality to insist upon th bull side replanted to cotton. When rains begah Sam P. Holm es& Co.
New York, Frida May t Whi of the market from year to year and we in the Southwest they came in such abun- Stocks, Bonds, Cotton,
New Yrk Friday May 1l do not want our customers to feel that dance that the deficiency has all been Grain and Prvisins.
prices have been gradually working lower, we are always to be found on the same made ilup and some sections now shows
there has been no appreciable change inh -ide. But the fact of the matter is that -evel al inches excess rainfall. It is stilh
the cotton situation. Liverpool continue every, indication points to extremely liin raining in th se regions and tlh weather NEW YORK GOTTON EXCHANGE
to be weak sister, and notwithstanding ited r serves of old cotton to Ib carried report slates that Texas fields are getting CHICAGO BOARD Of TRADE
the fact that the cotton shortage exists into the new year. Had it not been foi very grassy. You need not be toll that Direct private wires to all exchanges.
in Great Britain, trade conditions there the war in the Far East and the gen this is one of the worst things that can, Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
do not appear such as to warrant pru- eral trade reaction in this country, cot- happen to the crop. With the reports Bell Phone 853 Baldwin Block
chases for advancing prices. This ha. ton would not be selling at 13.50 on a eatingg that "hole fields are dying in the -
been the nature of the case for some we.ks .rop of 10.250.(W0. In addition to the lightly t quo g
S .\tlantic, Stat. s, %% are simply quoting the
and developments recently have thrown nn reserves, this will be an enormous de rls t rt i nl ass THE CANNON COMPANY
additional light on the outlook. Slowly mand for the first new crop irrespectiV.e of te rel)rt itself, and gass CO PA
fields n Texas. it does not seem as though
and with frequent upturns, the prices of the yield itself. Stocks of raw material liels i not seel a. thouCAP
the old crop positions appear to be work- and manufactured gosls are both limit conditions were all t should e to raise APITAL PAID
ing lower, and without decided speculat- and this insures an active demand for the. l e ranges IN $19.500.00
in a day. but until it is changed, there is
ive change or unfavorable crop news, first pickings. The new crop positions are of the new crop under these conditions.
there appears to be no inducement to buy selling at a discount of 2 cents and overlik to be a l from the Atlaic c A R R E L S
July cotton under 13.50 cents than was under the present price of spot cotton ana r.eion and it woull not le safe to 1e short
the case over that figure. It has been and the condition of the growing crop is not \s we said last week, we would like to
still is a most unsatisfactory market to at all brilliant. Everything now depends ALL KINDS.
trade in. But facts are facts, and must be on the progress of the next crops. In the :;e able to get October under 11 cent. Our Spirit Barrels hold and wil pass the se
recognized and since Liverpool is not ai, weekly weather reports this week. tht verest American and European inspection
encouraging factor in the situation it 'arolinas, Georgia, Alabama and portion. Timber. an English lumber journal, says
would be foolish to advise purchases as of Mississippi reported improvement sec inquiries are being received from South Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, QUITMAN, GA.,
long as the situation remains in its pres-
ent apathetic condition. On the other tons suffering for rain. For three months Africa. but they are considered in the and MONTICELLO, FLA.
hand, there is a great deal to be said luring the winter there was a serious mture of -pumping" to see how low prices Address orders to home office,
against the short selling of the new crop. Irouth in the Soutlh which resultA d in kd;- an lw obtained. QUITMAN, GA.
Q


SPIRIT S OF TURPENTINE.


To United Kingdom, in gallons:
Month 103-04 1902-03
April.. .... ... 1.681 186.128
May .. .. .... 60,315 63.222
June ........ 5,037 1,480,186
July .. .. .... 973.75 289.934
August.. .... ..96.890 1,767.874
Sept mber..... 773.211 4C.257
October .. ....... 711.44 4M$40
November .. 661,638 1,295,769
December .. 1,659.656 1,531,779
January. .. 228,850 373,240


1901-02
366.346
1.183.364
1.562.550
1,5i0.170

909.700
1059,81.u
922,991
576,784
164,330


RLOSINS.
To United Kingdom, barrels 280 lbs:
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1
April ........ 79,243 65.387
May .... .... 60,315 63,222
June ........ 60.748 67,542
July ........ 82.948 59.235
August ...... 74.649 62.613
September.. ... 98.471 42.869
October ...... 46.641 41.034
November .. 71,107 95,735 8
December .. 61,455 64.455 7
January ... 53,506 42,769 6


901-02
63.49'.
58.994
51.632
656.10

73.309
90.057
8,643
2.502
0,518


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE
Apr 1 Apr. 3 Apr. 10 Apr. 17 Apr. 24 May 1 May 8 May 15 May 22 May S
NL ND 50 0 47 45 1-2 461-2 41-2 47
June 5 June 12 June 19 June 26 July 3 July 10 July 17 July 24 July 31 Aug. 6
453-4 46 47 47 47 47 3-4 48 50 sM
Aug. 14 Aug. 21 Aug. 27 Sept. 4 Sept. 11 Sept 18 Sept. 25 Oct. 2 Oct. 8 Oct. 15
52%-53 63% 53% 56% 4 3-4 57 ND 66 67 1-2 5 1-20 3-4
Oct. 22 Oct 29, Nov. 6, Nov. 19 Nov. 5, Dec. 3. Dec. 10, Dec. 17, Dec. 31, Jan. 14
56 5 1-2 56 6 66 56 56 561-4 561-4 3 1-2-4
Jan. 22, Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18,Feby. 25 Mch. 3 Mch. 10 Meh 24
65 b- 64 62 60 59 60 58


Mch. 30
57


To Belgium and Netherlands, in gallons:
Month 1903-04 1902-03 101-02
April ...... .. 286812 90.447 Included
May .... .... 23,706 51,513in all other
June...... .... 607,1 267,210 Europe
July .... .... 576.188 819,217 869,38
August...... .. 489.387 58.490
September..... .456 78.201 438.631
October .. .. .. 30.14 210,001 121.480
November .. 133,695 349,726 381,226
December .. 100.372 58,659 672,164
January .... 168,879 241,150 174,367

To Germany, in gallons:
Month 1303-4 1902-02 1101-03
April .... ........... 114.034 112.5=3
May .. .. .... 3.283 68,436 230, 66
June.. .. .... 104.000 31.672 0,.042
wuly .. .. .... .68,111 180.412 78.787
August ...... 51. 46 678.437
September.. ... 26.950 566.81 713.167
October .... . 257.316 91.44 148.597
November .. 179,010 110,153 81,780
December- -
January .... 132,600 54,607 153,898

To all other Europe in Gallons:
Month 1903-04 102-03 101-02
April ........ .. 610 18.475 260.065
May.. ........ 68.058 31.047 674.311
June.. ...... 146.23 1.000 6.46
July .... ... .000 124.284 48,462
Augus .. .. .. .. 2000 2.500
September... 4.2.16 38.040 21.000
October ...... 10.000 42.32 17.01M
November .. 32,500 17,800 94,837
December .. 47,306 89,591 23,000
January ... -11,000

Total Foreign Exports. In gallons, includ-
Ing everything outside of the United
States:


Month


1903-4


-April .... .... 614.fM1
May .. .. .. .. 198.7,2
June.. .... ....1.838.000
July .... .. ..2.181.8(1
August ...... 1.724.12M
September.. .. .1.474.145
October ...... 1.480.21a
November .. 1,51.068
December .. 1,J.3.529
.January ... 700,292


1902-03
UB.816
26.144
2.223.253
1.651.015
2.906.458
2.154.566
1.002.897
1,932,183
1,794.336
820,253


1901-0.?
946.676
2,M26.06
2.947.821


2.224.9S0
1.127.32
1,652,574
1,859.175
629,90


To Belgium a
pounds:
Month
April ......
May .......
June .... ..
July .. .. ..
August ....
September..
October .. .
November
December
January ....

To Germany,
Month
April ......
May ......
June ......
July .. .. ..
August ....
September....
October ....
November
December
January ....


nad Netherlands, barrels 280

1903-04 1902-0 1901-02
16,709 53.015 Included
... 23,706 51513in all other
.. .866 63,673 Europe
.26.646 19.647 40,27'
43.035 47.26
S45.323 10,819 34.737
37.131 64.408 23.019
3,991 60,020 31,504
37.077 13.325 20.940
60,739 24,192 15,951

barrels 280 ltI.
193-04 1902-0 1901-02
40.668 37.844 A0.68
.. .282 68,436 57.74A
41.564 49.632 48.801
100,236 34,874 86,391
7S.8S4 34.921
S160.157 96.468 6M.28
.. 82.756 2&8.654 3.7-A
56,763 42,841 23,373
15.407 39.171 6,482
34,762 54,052 99,273


To all other Europe. barrels 280 Ibs:
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
April .... .. .. 5.8 20,142 85,751
May .... .. .. 7.102 40,729 99.116
June.. ........ 14.044 9,682 6S.67
July .. .. .... 45,513 51.12 14,10
August .. .. .. E.5 30.119
September.. ... 27.494 17.36 15.358
October .. .... 34.480 15.442 11.88
November .. 13,328 6,415 25,014
December .. 25299 48.701 39,816
January ... 17,124 7,148 24,629

Total Exports of Rosin, barrels 280 pounds.
Including Asia, Africa and America out-
side of the United States:
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
April ...... .. 196.681 186.128 26.01
May .... .... 198.X22 260.144 24.950
June ........ 178269 210.035 11.559
July ...... .. 0.580 187.193 198.813
August .... .. 231.155 228.32
September.. 33.50 23.032 231.54
October .... .. 29.825 275.786 12S.13
November .. 184,860 231,543 222,479
December .. 210.457 202.056 101.440
January ... 192,471 170,966 247,684


LOSINS


WW WG N M K
April 1. ...... ...390 3.6 3.50 3.5 40 $3.20
April 3 . ... 75 3.60 .50 3.40 320
April 10 . 3.60 .4 &.35 3.20 3.00
April 17. . .50 3.35 3.25 315 3.00
April 34. .. 340 3.25 316 3.10 3.00
May 1. . .. .35 3.25 2.16 3.10 2.00
May 8 . . 3. 3 25 315 310 3.00
May 15 . . 47% 27% 3.17% S.12% .02%
May 22 .... 3.65 3.5 3.25 20 3.10
May 29. .... .3.665 3.35 3.26 .20 310
June 5 .... 3.0 3. 3.20 .15 3.05
June 12. .... 3.40 310 3.00 2.9 285
June 19 ..... .3.30 3.10 .00 2.96 2.8
June 26 ..... ..32 3.10 .00 2.95 2.8
July 3.. . 3.0 310 3.00 &0 2.8
July 10. . . 3.0 3.10 2.90 2.10
July 17 .... ..40 .20 3.10 360 210
July 24 .. . ..4 .25 3.10 3.00 2.90
July 31 ..... 3.40 3.20 10 30 3. 23.
August 7 . 40 3.20 3.0 2.9 2.83
August 14.. 3.50 3.30 3.15 3.0 2.95
August 21 . ..5 .0 3.5 3.06 2.95
August 28 ...... 2.70 .60 3.25 2.16 .10
September 4 .. 370 3.50 3.40 3.30 3.0
September 11 . .0 2.66 250 3.4 .40
September 18 . 3.90 375 3.60 3.60 3.4
September 25 . 4.25 4.10 3.95 3.90 370
October 2 .... 4.46 4.40 4.35 4.0 4.16
October 8 ...... 4.70 4.40 4.C6 4.2 4.10
October 16.. ..4.45 4.40 4.20 4.00 3.86
,October 22 ......24.0 3. 3.80 3.90 &15
, October 29 ........4.20 3.90 3.60 3.30 3.00
November 6 ..3.90 3.5 3. 2.90 2.80
November 13 ......3.50 3.25 3.10 2.90 2.80
November 19 ......3.60 3.2 3.20 3.00 2.90
November 25 .. ..60 3.25 3.10 2.90 2.80
,e-cember 3 .. ..50 3.25 .06 2.0 2.80
December 17 .. 3.6 3.2 3.00 2.90 280
December 10 .... .50 .25 3.06 2i 2.S0
December 21 ....356 3.30 3.1 2.95 2.85
January 14 ....04.0 3.60 2.*5 3.15 3.%.
January 22 .. ....4.50 4.10 3.6 3.90 315
January 28 ......4.0 4.104 3. 0 3.26
February 11 ..3.75 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25
February 18 ...3.65 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25
February 25 .. .3.70 3.50 3.35 3.20 3.25
lvarch 10 ......3.80 3.00 3.40 3.35 3.30
March 24 ......4.00 3.70 3.50 3.35 3.30
March 31 ......4.10 3.80 3.60 3.35 3.30


For Prompt Delivery Send Us Y


I
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.8-
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.87%
3.00
3.05
3.00
2.80
2.70
2.65
2.66



270
2.80



3.10
3.20
3.35
2.50
3.50
3.25
3.05
2.70
2.70
2.70
2.70
2.60
2.55
2.565
2.56
2.60
3.00
3.10
3.30


H
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.27%
2.35
2.40
2.40
2.30
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.30
2.30
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.30
2.40
2.50
2.50
2.60
2.65
2.70
2.70
2.70
2.60
2.60
2.60
2.35
2.45
2.40
2.35

2.35
240
2.96
290
3.15


3.20 2.&5 2.95 2.80 2.75 2.70 2.70
305 2.70 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.55
2.95 3.60 2.55 2.50 2.45 2.40 2.40
3.05 2.75 2.70 2.65 2.60 255 2.55
2.95 270 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.50
2.95 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.50



our Commissary Check Orders.


THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Best in the World.
F For delivered prices write,
Cypress Tank Co, MoblleAla

KIRK & JONES
DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.


MAIL


ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will send by express, prepaid, the following:
Four full quarts Lincoln County, Sunnybrook Rye or Big Horn Rye .. $4.00
Single Bottles .......................................... .................. S.
I will send four full quarts of Somers' Corn, Melwood Rye. Golden Wed-
ding Rye, Holland Gin, Tom Gin, Peach Brandy, Peach and Honey
Whiskey, Gin and Manhattan Cocktails--any of the above for........ SLS.
One Ib tile of any of the above .... ......... .......... ...... ......... ......1 00
rour bottles of the following California Wines: Sherry, Port, Muscat.
Catawba ......................................................................... 2.00
Single bottles .................................................................. c.
Single bottles .............................. ................................... ..........
Faur bottles Wilson Whiskey, cased........................................... L2
Single bottles ...................................................................... O
Five bottles Duffy's Malt ........ ................................................ 60
Bulk goods of all kinds. Special Prices on application. All kinds of
liquors in jugs from $1.50 to $5.00. f. o. b. Jacksonville.
F. BETTt LIN. W Bay St.. opp. U -ion vepot, Jacksonville, Fla


CAROLINA CONSTRUCTION CO.
The Record is in receipt of the pros-
pectus of the Carolina Construction Co..
chartered under the laws of North Caro-
lina. having for its officers %Major W. A.
Snith, president, of Ansonville, N. C.;
C. S. McCall, and J. W. Moore, of Dillon,
S. C., vice-presidents; F. L. Willcox, see
retary and treasurer, Florence, S. C., and
C. M. Palmer, general manager, New Lon
don, N. C.
The object of the company is to erect
and operate distillery plants for the man-
ufacture of wood turpentine and all by
products that may be found in dead pine.
such as stumps, roots. knots, etc. The
company claims that the ordinary process,
of procuring turpentine by boxing tht
tree and letting the sun force the gun
from the trees is becoming a thing of tht
past and cxlie.ts the new method to takt
its place.
It has investigated a numlw-r of pro
cesses and adopted the one under patent:
controlled by its general manager, as being.
the best in use. It consists of retorts.
each holding a cord of wood cut into pieces
about six to twelve inches longr. The re


torts are set in fire brick with furnaces al THE
their sides and are hermetically sealed andm
steam from boiler and heat from furnac- eth u n e
is applied. The wood in retorts by thi-
steam and artificial heat produces oil A ^&Ta rU S
known at the plant as No. 1, when most
of which has escaped. the steam is cul The New Process
off and the fire is raised in the furnace The New Process.
when the remainder of the oil is drive, Extracts the spirts without destroying the
off, also the creosote, tar and finally lea% wood fibre. Runs out a charge in less tha
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
ing nothing in the retort but charcoal forty-five gallons from cord of wood.
thus utilizing every part of the material Makes pure water white spirits, free from
put into the retorts. These oils are then the odor of tar or creosote. No chemicals
used in refining the spirits. Needs to be
distilled producing. according to this ct(hl distilled only once after coming from re-
pany's claims, good water white turpentim tort.
No trouble with bi-products, the spirits
for all commercial purposes. The residue p pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
is creosote, tar and charcoal. duced and from wood. Only one grade
ood turpentine an thus e ma o spirits produced and that the highest
Wood turpentine can thus he mad( ABSOLUTELY NO DANGER FROM FIRF
every day in the year. and only eight hours Built of finest material by high-grade
is required to extract the fluid. It take workmen. The cheapest machine offered to
the public.
about twenty hours additional to obtain. We challenge comparison of output and
the by-products. quality of product. We guarantee output
A cord of fat pine contains from tei, and quality.
For full particulars, prices, samples.
to forty gallons of this wood turlpntine. etc.. address--
(ve:age eighteen gallons, from thirty to, Th i C Y
sixty gallons of ta.: and creosote, average i The rie Boxelt C3 stoctiGH CN 'ra
S a an f P. O. Box 43. RALEIGH. N. C.
forty allons,. and front twenty-five t.,


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE ti RETAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints. Oils and Glass.
Stoves. Tinware, Country-Holloware.
10 WEST BAY STREET Jacksonville. Fla.



THE ARAGON
NOW OPEN
under new management. Thoroughly
BS ... renovated and repaired throughout, in-
"ans cluding new electric elevator aLd ou
electric light light plant.
-W H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.


W. T. RILEY,
President.


J. A. G. CARSON,
Vice-President.


6EO. J. SCOVEL,
Sec. and Trea s


Jacksonville Cooperage Co.


MANUFACTURERS OF


BEST WHITE OAK SPIRIT BARRELS


Machine and Hand Factories,


8th Street R. R. Crossing,


JACKSONVILLE.


FLORIDA


ggagaggag


9. ....... .gv.... 4YU 'V 'g'V gVWV
SYou Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
*IF You Want any Kind of florida Land?
IF You Mean Business?
SCll or~ or Write to
J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS
Ocal


la, Florida


Geo. T.Gifford Iron Works Co.

Founders and Machinists.

Special attention to Saw Mill and Turpentine Work.
Tifton, Georgia.


thirty bushels of charcoal.

New Victoria.
Corner Main and Adams,
Opposite Board of Trade Building. THE COVINGTON COMPANY
Jacksonville's New HoteL CO
Rates $.oo0 to $.-50.
SBIXLE, ropietor. SHOES AND DRY GOODS 635 to 641 West Forsyth Street.
H. ROBIN SON Press. H GAILLARD. cashier h
W. Co mercalBank,-P NW ORK: 256 Church St. ille, Fla.
Commercial Bank, N
State Depository. W e Sell Merchants Only.
BRANcHBI; Ocala Fla.. Lake Ctty. Fla
Jacksonville,. - - Florida

READ THE ADS IN THE RECORD.


- -


~"''*


"""""""A











1a THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

These advertisers are in this issue. If
you want anything, look through this
classified list and write to the firm ap-
pearing therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.

AUTOMOBILES.
Fred E. Gilbert, Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Central National Banz, Ocala, Fla.
Mercantile Bank. Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOOKS.
Cochrane's Book Store. Palatka, Fla.
BRICK.
Geo. R. Foster, Jr., Jacksonville. Fla.
The Southern Fuel & Supply Co.. Jack-
sonville, Fla.
CARS.
South Atlantic Oar & Manufacturing Co.
Waycross, Ga.
CATTLE.
Palmetto Park Farm, Ocala, Fla.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
J. S. Pinkussohn Cigar Co., Jacksonville.
CLOTHING.
H. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
J. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksonville.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn. Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery. New York City.
M. W. Larendon. New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
COOPERAGE.
1 he Cannon Co., Quitman, Ga.
The C'ooperage C:., Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
Conover Drug Co.. Jacksonville.
Kirk & Jones. Jacksonville.
DRUGS-WHOLEbALE.
Christie-Groover Drug Co. Jacksonville,
Fla.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
J. S. Pinkussohn Cigar Co., Jacksonville.
DRY GOODS--WHOLESAL.E.
Kohn. Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
The Covington Co.. Jacksonville.
ENGINES.
Terrill-Stevens (o.. Jacksonville. Fla
.. S. Schofields' Sons. Macon. Ga.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Iombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works. Tifton. Ga.
T .Murphy, Jacksonville, Fla.
.1. S. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
The Southern Fuel & Supply Co., Jack-
sonville.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
J. A. Craig q- Bro., Jacksonville.
I. A. Renfroe Co.. Jacksonville.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksonville.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE
W. B. Johnson Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
C. H. Ha:graves Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Grocery Co.. Jacksonville.
Ellis-Young Co.. Savannah, Ga.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co.. Savannah. Ga
White. WaIton & Co., Jacksonville.
J P. Williams Co.. Savannah. Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
HARDWARE.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Itond & Bo'irs Co., Jacksonville.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Valdj-.ta. Go
Tampa Hardware Co.. Tampa, Fla.
J. D. Weed & Co.. Savannah. Ga.
Mlarion Hardware Co., Ocala, F:a.
HARNESS.
McMurray & Baker. Jacksonville.
W. R. Thomas, Gainesville, Fla.
HATS.
II. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksonville.
J. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville.
HOTELS.
The Aragon. Jacksonville. Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi. New York City.
Zahms' European Hotel. Jacksonville.
New Victo-ia Hotel. Jacksonville.
The Oaks. White Springs, Fla.
The Hamilton.. White Springs, Fla.
The New Pnxton. White Springs, Fla.
The Kendrick House, White Springs.
Fla
Pritchard IIouse, White Springs, Fla.


IRON WORKS.
Geo. T. Gilford Iron Works, Tifton, Ga
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta. Ga.
T. Murphy, Jacksonville.
J. S. Schofield's Sons Company, Macon,


JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co.. Jacksonville.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville.
R. J. Riles. Jacksonville.
LIQUORS.
F. Bettelini. Jacksonville.
Chas. Blum & Co., Jacksonville.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville.
Bowen & Co., Jacksonville.
J. E. Gornto & Co., Valdosta, Ga.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
MACHINE WORKS.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works, Tifton, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
T. Murphy. Jacksonville.
J. S. Schofield's Sons company Macon,
(-a.
MATERIALS 1OR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
J. S. Schofield's Sons & Co., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
M. A. Baker. Brunswick. Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
lohn G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta,
'!a.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
:nampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
J. S. Schoflelds' Sons, Macon. Ga.
MULES AND HORSES.
Dillon & Penuel. Marianna.
W. R. Thomas, Gainesville. Fla.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co.. New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
The Barnes-Jessup Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jacksom-
ville.
The Ellis-Young Co.. Savannah, Ga.
Peacock-Hunt & West Co.. Savannah. Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Ca., Jacksonville.
Union Naval Stores Co.. Mobile, Ala.
PECANS.
The Griffing Bros. Co., Jacksonville.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
\V. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta,
John G. Chiristoplie:, Jacksonville, Fla
.1. I. Campbell, Ocala, Ila.


Ga.
I'ampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
M;arion Hardware Co., Ocala, Ila.
PUMPS.
.'errill-Stevens ('o.. .lacksonville, Fla.
lihn G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
J. S. Schoflelds' Sons, Macon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
.c l E. Gilbert. Jacksonville.
PAINTS.
1. E. Baird & Co., Jacksonvi:le.
llii.l & Bours Co., Jacksonville.
RAILS.
Iraac Joseph Iron Co., Cincinnati, O.
REAL ESTATE.
Peck with, Henderson & Warren, Tanpa
Fla.
t;robston. Fendig & Co.. Jacksonville.
C. Buckman. Jacksonville.
\\. W. Frazier, Jacksonville.
I he \\'st-l;aley-liaunie Co., Jacksonvillk
ROOFING TIN.
American Tin Plate Co., New York City.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
The Covington Co., Jacksonville.
STATIONERY.
Cochranes' Book Store, Palatka, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
The Clyde Steamship Co., New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Samuel P. Holme & Co., Jacksonville.
TAILORS.
lohn B. (Ciancaglini & Bro., Jacksonville.
TANKS.
G. M. Davis & Son.. Palatka, Fla.
Cypress Tank Co., Mobile, Ala.
.'. S. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon Ga.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
XN tonal Transportation & Terminal Co.
I.Jcksonville.
TOOLS.
John (. Christepher. Jacksonville, Fla.
The Council Tool Co.. Wananish, N. C.
TURPENTINE CUPS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Daisy, Tenn.


TURPENTINE PROCESS.
The Pine Product Construotion Co., Fay-
etteville, N. C.
The Pine Belt Construction Co., Raleigh,
N. C.
The Standard Turpentine Co., New York
City.


TURPENTINE STILLS.
M. A. Baker, Brunswick. Ga.
McMIllan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
G. M. Davis & Son, Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS.
G. M. Davis & Son. Palatka, Fla.
TYPE WRITERS.
Grivot Typewriter Exchange, Jacks3>avlle
UNDERTAKERS.
Chas. A. Clark, Inc., Jacksonville.
VEHICLES.
McMurray & Bro., Jacksonville.
W. R. Thomas. Gainesville, Fla.
WATCHES.
R. J. Riles, Jacksonville.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonvil'e.
less & Shager, Jacksonville.
YELLOW PINE I,'MBER.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fla.
SHIP YAkDS.
S Merrll-StevwLs ('o.. .Jack-onville. Fla.


J. E. GORNTO & CO.

Shipping Trade
a Specialty...
Oi $3 Orders and ever, Express Prepaid

WHISKIES

FROM $1.50 TO $6 A GALLON
Sole Ageiit

Old Saratoga Rye, $6 Gal

Old Baker Rye, $6 Gal.

Old Westmoreland Rye, $4 Gal,

Big Horn Rye, $3 Gal.


J. E. GC
Valdosta,


G0O. R. OS JR.
MANUFACTURER OF



BRICK.


WRITE FOR PICES.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.

'PHONE 390.


This Space Reserved for



Gus Muller & Co.

Wholesale



Liquor Merchants


I Proprietors


Jacksonville Botting Works


...Agents...



ACME BEER


I


)RNTO & CO., Send all orders for printing for the tur-
pentine aad commissary trades to the
Georgia i Record office to insure prompt delivery.


JOHN D. BAKER. Pres. C. V. BARTLESON. V;cecPres BAKER & BAKER. P. E. PECK.
(Biker & Holmes Co.) C. V. Btleson Co.) General Counsel. Sec. & Trea

SFLORIDA FREIGHTt CLAIM AGENCY
(INCORPORATED.)
We can collect your Freight Claims against
Railroads and Steamship Companies.
Charges Reasonable. Your Membership Solicited.
'e save you all worry and trouble. Endorsed by all Public odies
In the City and Transportation Companies.
216 Dyal-Upchurch Bldg.. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.





"The" PAINT STORE,
I. E. BAIRD (. CO.. Jacksonville, Fla.
\\all paper, pictures, frames, painting and all interior and ex.arior decorating.
Hardware, glass, etc. If you are build ing a fine home, get Baird & Co. to do
tue decorating that it may be in keeping with the building. Oldest and most ex-
perienced house in F:arida.


'I LII I1I -E I I -- I -I i -II -1 1--T I- l -; IT-I=-1 : i: I I I i 1T I I IIIIIIII- I
SJ. P. WI.I.IAMS PResident J. A. G. CARSON. 1st Vice-President.
T. A. JENNINNGS, %nd Vice-President. .1 F. DUSENBURY.3d Vice-President.
H. L. KAYTON Secretary. D. G. White. Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

NAIVL STORES IND COTTON FACTORS AND WHOLESALE GROmsER.
lMain Office SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.
Branch Offrrice: PENSACOLA. FLX. ( Branch Grocery Houme,
I JACKSONVIL E.FLA. COLu.MBUS.GA.
Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Us.
I t t++t It l t1 Tl-TlT:Ti TT T t:T-t T? t- l t t- It T I: tt i t t ItI 1l I 1


PATRONIZE V Oan ADVERTISERS FOR SATISFACTORY DEALINGS


----


~- ~~---







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


Machinery and Mill Supplies.




















JOHN G. CHRISTOPHER, -- Jacksonville, Fla.



Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are

McMILLAN BROTHERS'
Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.

Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS,
SAVANNAH, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
MOBILE, ALA. FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.


ONE O THE WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PAPERS.











18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG.'COMPANY


Waycross, Ga.

MANUFACTURERS OF


Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.


CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.


Located in the heart of the Lumber District gives us advan-
tage of choicest material at lowest cost.


SWhen The Day's Work s Over,

see*-----^--9 9*SB


Bull Run or Manassas.
(By James R. Randall.)
The sham fight to be inaugurated on
the historic field of Bull Run or Manassas
will no doubt revive many recollections
and discussions' of that famous contest.
along with other issues of the war be-
tween the States. The rout of the Federal
army was much greater than that the
Japanese recently inflicted upon the Rus-
sians. There will always be dispute about
the failure to follow up the victory b)
the Confederates. One serious mistake
pointed out by General Beauregard, who
favored an advance, was in the Richmond
administration's failure to procure a fleet
in London and an abundance of small
arms. The East India fleet of arned
steamers were procurable for $10,000,000
at a great bargain, and the supply ot
small arms easily obtainable. We had
the cotton to pay for them; but tile com-
missions sent to England were either ham-
pered at headquarters or wanting in sense.
A hundred thousand volunteers were lost
initially, for want of arms and enthu
asm was paralyzed.
Another grievous error was in scatter-
ing our forces. Stonewall Jackson ad-
vised the concentration of two mighty
armies, East and West, and letting the
rest of the country take care of itself.
We had to win quickly or not at all.
When it became a war of waiting or pro
longation, with dissipated strength on the
coast, the cause was lost, for the North
not only had a vast population to drawt
upon but the whole of Europe for a re
cruiting ground, while we were sealed up,.
practically, by the Federal navy. Lan-
don Knight, in the Pilgriml. -sl.us up thus.
"In the fall of 1861 Mlr. Daivis was elect-
ed president of the Confederate States foi


a term of six years, and on the 21st ot
February in tile following year he was
inaugurated. This message may hardly
he called a state paper, as it was devotenl
rather to a capitulation of the events ot
tlie war than to discussion of measures
or the recommendation of policies. Tin
tone of the message was hopeful, for, not-
withstanding the fall of Forts Donelsonl
and Henry, and the evacuation of Bowl-
ing Green. the fortunes of war were de-
cidedly with the South. However, in those
catastrophes, which Mr. Daavis passed
lightly over, the ablest general in the
Southern army saw the first results ot
the fatal policy of attempting with limit-
edl resources to defend every threatened
point of a vast irregular frontier reach-
ing from tile Rio Grande to the Potomanc.
The 300,000 men in the Confederate arlni
at that time could have captured Wash-
ington or localized tie whole Federal army
in its defense, but scattered over more
than 1,500 miles, strength was dissipated,
and at every point they were too weak
to attempt more than a defensive policy.
I'ponI this point, however, Mr. Davis was
inflexible, and absolutely refused to aban-
don any place however insignificant front
a strategic point of view, even when tile
soldiers holding it might have been u-eu
most effectively elsewhere."


Ilad Albert Sidney Johnston possessed
an army of 75,000 at Shiloh, Grant and
his whole force would have been captured.
Colonel (laiborne Snead is confident tuat
had General Lee listened to Stonewall
.laekson and followed up the great victor '
at Fredericksburg. Burnside and his w hole


It was this fatal policy of diffusion
and delay that enabled the North to pro-
cure nearly 500,000 European mercenaries,
182,000 negroes and 300,000 Southern To-
ries in arms.
General Toonlbs' remark that the South
"'wore herself out whipping tile Northerhn
armies" had an element of fact and Mir.
Stephens used to say that "had Stonewall

Jackson been in supreme command, in the
field, tle war would have ended, one way
or another in a year."
Of course there is much to be said on
the other side of the controversy, and we
are not disposed to disparage the great
leaders who performed wonderful deeds
and who survive in the "Pantheon of
Famne.'" But, to our mind, the most il-
luminating sook on the war is that ot
generall Beauregard, who, despite his prej-
udices and personal grievances, knew how,
as a great strategist, to point out unerr-
ingly why tile Confederacy failed.
However, it is past history and tlhe
South is emerging from all of her disas-
ters, and, more and more, the conserva-
tive men East and West, are agreeing
that the fundamental principle of tlhe
South, Constitutional Liberty and local
,elf-governuient are still the cornerstones
of the temple of liberty, erected by the
Fathers of the Republic. 'Tis the Cause,
not the fate of the Cause, that is glor-
ious."


[Mr. Janes R. Randall is the author of
ihat popular war ballad, "aMaryland, My
Alaryland."--Ed. Industrial Record.]


One Difference.
There is not much ditlerence betweeti
lawyer and sawyer. An L is often takeii
tor an S and vice versa. The sawyei
saws (woods and tlie lawyer saws words.
Ti' sawyer says nothing, tile lawyer is
all "say." The writer hereof, althougli
giving his occupation to the director
makers as a lawyer, was published to tle
world as a sawyer, and was thus known
all during 1903.


Getting It in Early.
Florida enjoys the reputation of leading
the markets of this country for tropical
fruits and early vegetables and also foi
early fruits. We held the string all win
ter oil our oranges, and later on our pine
apples. Then caine our strawberries, canl


army would have been captured or irre- tailolles. tomaltoes and other garden truck.
Ilmeiliably route., and tlere was no otler Now we are rushing forward our peaches.
organized force between \Vashiingtohi, Florida sets tIhe iae, furnishes the fi:st
Itlltimlore or 'lhiladelphia that could have Irlit, that whlet the nation's appetite anu
-stiio illp against the Confederates for an as our supply. is exhiauteld, it i. taken up
hour. hy the States north of us.

WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS MENTION THE RECORD.


A Kitten's Fear.
In a recent issue of the New Orleans
Lumber Trade Journal appeared the fol-
lowing poem. Anyone who has ever been
in active concatenations realizes that this
IpHnm expresses the feelings of many kit-
tens. It was read by Douglas Mallock,
a candidate for admission into the light ot
Hoo Hoo.

O, Great Black Cat.
O' Great Black C-Cat, I tremble at the
in-mention of your name,
To g-gaze upon your picture sends co-cold
shivers through my f-frame.
Your seller's pointed straight at m-me,
it makes my face turn pale,
Your b-back is arched ferociously and
th-thereby hangs a t-ale.
I aml an unwashed k-kitten, my eyes
scarce open y-yet,
But y-you, I th-think, will open them be-
fore 1 loose am 1-let.
You are so b-black the ace of spades looks
g-ghostly by compare,
And I-lightning, when they stroke your
fo(irm. conies f-flashing from your hair.
I know but little of your f-faith, or else
1 night f-feel worse;
I know not what it is to b-be Snark of
the Universe.
I would not he a Jabber w-wock, not even
if I c-c-c-could,
In Arcanoper c-could not be, not.even if
I would.
(f course, what's really difficult about the
entire biz,
Is being something when you d-don't know
what that something is.
But treat me gently, Great Black C-Cat,
quite gently, sir, I pray,
I ldeiialid it by the sh-shadow of the
i-mighty IB. A. .J.-
A sh-shadow that should f-fill you with
a r-reverence profound
icc-cause it is your father and it c-covers
so much ground.
I au a playful kitten, I-lured in this awful
fix
1o w-warble on the roof with you and
dodge Ixiotjacks and bricks.
Now go ahead, I am res-signed and do not
give a dd-d-d-n,
Inut leave iim-me so my w-wife at h-home
\will know Hoo Hoo 1 am.


Counsel for S. M. Clyatt
lion. \. \. Timmnons. mayor of Tifton,
<-a.. and a pironinent turpentine operator,
liau. just returltd from New York and
Washington whe.e he went in the interest
of- Mr. S. M. Clyatt. He was successful in
lii florls and the services of eminent
collnsel wass secured.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


-U


Industrial Record's Department of Information


This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertising patrons of this paper and no

charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attentions


or Turpentime, Sawmill or Factry Supplies or Machinery of Any Kinm. For Timber. Farming or Range Lands.
DATE INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main Office, Jacksonville, Fla. I am in the market for lands for the purpose of
In the market for the following
In the market for the foowng Prefer in State of Please put me in communication
with responsible parties and give me other information.
Remarks
Please notify where same can be secured.
Signed
Signed

State specifically the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or second-handed. DATE

Locatin for Turpentine. Sawmill or Factory, or for Any Industrial Enterprise. For Comnmissary, Office or eoseeold Supplies, Sawmill or Turpentine Mules
E Irses. Wagons, Etc.
DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla. DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla.
Please advise the undersigned regarding a good location in (state or section of
state) for In the market for
together with full information about labor conditions, taxes, transportation facilities,
local encouragement, etc.
Remarks Please give me information as to best places to buy, etc.

Signed Signed


De You Want to Sell Something? Are You Thinking of Investig ?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Have for sale the following Can you give any information as to the reliability of the following firm or corpora

tion
Remarks
Can you suggest a purchaser?
Signed Signed


De You Want to Emply a Man? Do Yeo Want Employment?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville. Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.
Want a man to fill the position of Want a position as

with the following requirements Refer to the following

Can you suggest such a man ? Can you assist me ?
SSigned Signed




CLIP THIS COUPON!
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD.
When you ae answering an advertisement from the columns of this paper, whether you are making an inquiry or placing an order, please cut out the coupon
below and attach it to the letter. It will pay you.


COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the Industrial Reocrd. issue dated

Signed


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonville. Fla.. and Savannah, Ga., is the South's great
weekly trade journal.



The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser, and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.



"THE PIE AND ITS PRODUCTS."
OYTHB Pll AN ITS PRODUCTS."









20 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commissary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 27
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 28
10 29
A. C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 18

Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... Market
50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-lb tin. ............

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 16

Sugar


Granulated
(6


Sugar, bbls.....
5 bbls..
10 bbls..
sacks..


500
495
495
500


Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb...... ....... .. .. 80
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 10
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 8
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
Ib packages....... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ages............. market price
Roasted, 100lb. drum....... 14
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 50
English B'fast, 10 lb.. 46
Formosa, 10 lb....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10c size
10 lbs to case, per pound-.. 40

Salt


200-1b sack................
100-lb sack................
Ice Cream, 200-lb sacks.....
100-lb sacks.....
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-lb....
" 2-lb....


100
50
100
50
265
275


Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lbtin.............. 21
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box
sifter top, per doz...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and 80

Corn


Car Lot
W. Corn,1101b, 143
1001b, 1 29
Mxd corn,ll01b,1 14
S 1001b,1 25


100 Sk
Lot
145
1 81
140
127


Les 100
Sk


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


Car Lot
W clip'd,1251b,2 20
S 1001b,1 75
White 1251b, 2 10
White 1001 1 67
Mixed 1251b 2 5
S 1001b, 1 64


100 Sk
Lot
2 22
1 77
222
1 69
2 7
165


L
S


80


oss 100
ik Lots
2 25
1 80
2 15
1 72
2 10
1 68


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice. .... 1 65
C" .. fancy..... 1 70
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour


Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl ................ 5 75
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 lb sack.........5 75
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-1b sacks............ 5 75
Pillsbury's Best ..... 6 00
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 6 25
bbl .... ....
Meal
Meal, per barrel........... 3 50
92-lb sacks1.......... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 8 60
S 92-lb sacks....... 1 60


Rice
Good................. .....
Choice...... ............
Fancy Head...... ......
Broken..... ..............


5
54
6
38


Canned Vegetables
Doz.
Tomatoes, 8s, Chief........ 90
Tomatoes, 2s ....... 80
Clayton, 3s................ 45
Clayton, 2s ............... 70
Sifted Peas, 2s ............1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........1 20
Lima Beans ,2s ............1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, Bs........... 90
Baked Beans, Is........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............ 1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets, 3s. .........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ........... 85
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s.............. 90
Hay


car lots


1 48 Choice....19 50
1 84 No.1 Tim 1800
1 48 No. 2 17 00
1 30 No.1 C'ler 17 00


100 bale
lots
2000
1850
17 80
1750


less
quantity
20 50
1900
18 00
1800


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ .1 40
Cherries. 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz ................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz ................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, 3s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per doz.......... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz ................
Brandy Cherries 2s per case 3 85
Candy
Mixed 30-lb pails, per lb... 7
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
lb...... ............ 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 81
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice "" "
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lb. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 36-lb. case 3 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
bt.x, 40-50............. 6..
Pru:es, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box. 50-60........... 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 3 crown..... 1 85
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 90
Seedless, 1-11) packages .... 12
Citron, 10-lb box ......... 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 6.
Extra H P, .... 5
Seed Peanuts, ....
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ ..... 18
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Peacans..... ............. 12
Filberts................... 12
alO nuts.. ... .... ..... 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 Less I
lots Sk. Lot Sk. L.
Cottonseed Meal 27 00 2750 28 00
Hulls 1150 12 50 13 0


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
3 hoop .........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz ...... 1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
nested ......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 60
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. ..1 20


Washboards


Per
Dzea


78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay................3 00
175 Diamond Glass .........8 25
0. W. D., 17 inch, per doz 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75
Canned Fish
Oysters, is, 2 doz to case, per
doz .................. 9
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 75
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 65
Salmo- Is, Tale 4 doz to case
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon, is, 4 doz to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fsh 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 81b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-1b pails............. 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box............ 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge ... 141-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 arg .. 14
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avge .. 131-2
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge.. 91-4
"Reliable" California Hams, 6-8 9
breakfast Bacon, light ar. .... 131-2
D. S. Bellies, 16-18 av. ........ 83-4
D. S. Bellies, 20-22 av. ......... 81-2
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av. .......... 81-8
D. S. Plates .................. 71-2
Bacon P'ates .................. 81-2
D. S. Butts .................. 63-8
Bologna Sausage ............... 7
Sausage in oil ................ $3.75
Butter and Cheese.
"Strawberry" Creamery, 60-lb tube 26
30-lb tubs 251-2
"* B60, Is... 261-2
"Iadybird" full cream cheese .. 121-2
Kingan's ard.
"indiana" Pure Leaf ........... market.:
bea-Foam" Compound .........market.
Kingan's Canned Meats.
"Reliable" Corned Beef, Is ...... $1.25
Corned Beef, 2 ......
Roast Beef, Is ........ 1.s
Roast Beef, 2s ........ .
Potted Ham and Tongue
1-4s ..........................
Sliced Beef, 1-2s .... 1.15
Vienna Sausage, 12 .. .86
Tripe .................. L.U


A COPY 01 THE NAVAL STORES BLUE BOOK




THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 21
I 1E1O iItttO I*1* I.I.,.tI, rmI19 ,1,,4,oO1616 19 19 19198 r#I9t r1 e****.****** ************
President, W. C. POWBLL; Viee-Predident .a who with the President constitute the Directory and Board of Managers, W. r. COACHMAN. B. F. BUL-
LARD. H. L. COVINGTON, H. A. McEACHERN, JOHN R. YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMIILAN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor. JOHN HENDERSON.


ONO[lDA[ NAVAL S TORES COMPANY,


Jotloville, Fl.


Savannah, Go.


Penll ola, F[I.


** NAAL lSORES FiCTOR.

Pi inl oil locK, 2,500.000. Omned toil Coolled hi Prloicol 0perlors
S l imol l oi 0 loc Yet in Rese 1o Sell 10 00polors Who C o Aftaine o B.


ne CoMsolidle is Purell o Cooerlive Compil. Its nltertsl ore
o01 he Ploducers. Te Plronage .01 Turpenlin Operators evlm i
Pleny o0 Money 1 an PenM o1 limber for ErbIolM .


Idenflcl iti l se


here inilled


YARDS A JACKSONVE11, 1SAVNNAH, F[RNA1NDIA ond PNS COI A.


All Prodterl ore nvied 1 o Cill or CroesDond


Pr9 1I 19 199 i I rI I551 99


4I i.I~i~iE RECOD IS THE "OPEi RTOS' iRP ELANC1*** s .
THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."








22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Lumber Exports.
During the nine months ending March
last this country exported 1,093,500 M feet
of lumber, the export price being $21,749,-
572. We have not the data at hand, but
from what is generally known as to yel-
low pine's taking the place of other lum-
bers within the past few years, it is safe
to say that at least one-half of this was
yellow pine. It was shipped to the fol-
lowing countries in the following propor-
tions: United Kingdom, 157,615 M feet;
Belgium, 35,343 M feet; France, 22,744 M
feet; Germany, 55,521 M feet; Italy, 16,-
441 M feet; Netherlands, 68,952 M feet.
Other Europe, 29,194 M feet; Canada 118,-
230 M feet; Central America, 5,011 M feet,
Cuba, 65,284 M feet; Mexico, 95,776 M
feet; other West Indies, 31,574 feet; Ar-
gentina, 11,659 M feet; Brazil, 24,890 M
feet; Chile, 26,047 M feet; other South
America, 41,504 M feet; Chinese Empire,
19.565 M feet; Japan, 1,775 M feet; Aus-
tralia, 75,451 M feet; Phillippine Islands,
22.943 M feet; Africa, 66,465 M feet.

Your Attention.
We want Planters "Old Time" Remediks
to become a household word with all the
customers of the "Saw Mill Men" and
"Turpentine Men" in the South.
Send us your orders, also your mailing
lists, and we will have the old Plantei
visit every home, and leave a booklet which
will tell the people exactly what they need.
We are expecting your orders and mailing
lists. Please send them by return mail;
they will each receive our prompt attend
tion; or at least write us for prices on
these famous remedies, and we will makt
you an interesting proposition in the way
of free goods.
Spencer Medicine Co.. Chattanooga, Tenn


A Fine Sample of Sugar.
The Record is in receipt of a sample
of sugar made by M. L. McMillan near
Brookfield, Ga., which is of a superior
quality. It is clear and would class readily
with the higher coffee grades of commerce.


Naval Stores MarKet

and Stock Report
Published Daily in The
II I


Current Business News.
The United States secretary of legation U i U III 11 I
at Petropolis, Brazil, Mr. Thomas C. Daw- M luW VV
son cabled to the Department of State on Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
April 17, 1904, that the President of Bra- daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.
zil had signed on the preceding day, a de-
cree by which Brazil grants tariff conces- A A ; 0 SIX TH
sions to the United States on the follow- $ L $2.50 IX M O
ing articles to the amounts given: Flour,
40 per cent; rubber manufactures, 25 per
cent; paints and varnishes, 25 per cent:
condensed milk, 25 per cent; clocks and B IG P RS
watches, 25 per cent. Minister Thomp-
-on, in a previous cable, says that this A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposiicn, to
puts American flour a fraction better than Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
on a level with the mils of Rio de Janeiro, Absolutely ree to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
Santos and Sao Paulo, and our manufac- A olt Free o in t rat metropolis
turtrs in easy command of all Brazil north scription contest. Write for particulars.


of Rio de Janeiro.
The State Department is u receipt ot
the following cablegram from Minister
Powell at San Domingo, under date of
April 30: "This government issues a
new decree to-day on tariff. Sugar pays
10 cents per quintal; increased duties on
hides, tobacco and a few other things.
No duty on coffee."
According to a bulletin issued by the
Chamber of Commerce of Cadiz, the pro-
ducton of cork n Spain is estimated at
28.450,716 pounds; that of Portugal at
32,515,104 pounds; Algeria and other cork
producing countries together, about 20,-
321.940 pounds-making the world's total
annual cork production 81,287,760 pounds.


Carter & Russell Publishing Co.
Jacksonville. Florida.

The Up=To-Date Farmer
KEEPS POSTED BY SUBSCRIBING TO A FIRST-CLASS FARM PAPER.
FARTI, FIELD AND FIRESIDE,
CHICAGO,
ii the leader of its class. Strong Writers, Good Illustrations, Late Market
and Stock Sale Reports. A chance for agents to make money.
Write for terms.
*C---THE HOWARD CO., Chicago.


Half Tones=Zinc Etchings



Illustrating and Engraving Department

OF


THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.


Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved


and artistic fashion.


Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.


SPECAlLTY IS MADE OF DI11SGING, RETOUCHING 110 EfISHING PHOTOGRAPHS AND PICTURES.

IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


IF YOU DON'T FIND IT IN THE RECORD WRITE US.


a










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 23


McMURRAY & BAKER,


Sow Mill nd Tulpentine Hrness. CLibert Bay Stretsand
611 111111 ill 1 l 180 l 1lb M\W. Liberty Streets.
We ar receiving daily up-to-date pleasure and business veholes, IN style.
Loprobe, whips, harness and horse furnishings, we have a nobby lne. Price
ad goods In touch with all. Turpentine wagons and harness a speelalty. Don't
forget we can beat the world on hand-made harness.

MCMURRY BIKERI 4901 1 413 I. BlY ST.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHAIRLEST_570 AND fLORIDA LINES
*The magnificent steamships of this line are appointed to sail as follows, calling
at Charleston, S. C. both ways.
PFSom NHew York, Prom Jacksonville far
(Pier 86 North River). STEA MER. Charleston and New York.
Friday, April 15, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE .. Wednesday, April 20, at 7:30 am
*xHURON ..... Thursday, April 21, at 8:00 am
Sunday, April 17, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ... .Saturday, April 23, at 10:30 am
Tuesday, April 19, at 3:00 pm .ARAPAHOE ....Sunday, April 24, at 11:30 am
Wednesday, April 20, at 3:00 pm .."**SEMTNOLE ..Monday, April 25. at 12:30 pm
Friday, April 22, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ....Wednesday, April 27, at 1:30 pn
**ALGONQUIN .. .. Friday, April 29, at 4:00 am
Tuesday, April 20, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE ........ Sunday, May 1, at 5:30 am
Thursday, April 28, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS ....Tuesday, May 3, at 7:00 am
Friday, April 29, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE ..Wednesday, May 4, at 7:30 am
**xHURON ........ Friday. May 6, at 8:30 am
Monday, May 2, at 3:00 pm ..ALGONGUIN ...... Sunday, May 8, at 11:00 am
Wednesday, May 4, at 3:00 pm ..!IROQUOIS .... Tuesday, May 10, at 12:30 pm
Friday, May 6, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ....... Wednesday, May 11, at 1:00 pm
."xSEMINOLE ....Friday, May 13, at 4:00 am
Monday, May 9, at 3:00 pm .ARAPAHOE ........Saturday, May 14, at 4:00 am
Wednesday, May 11, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE .... Monday, May 16, at 5:00 am
Friday, May 13, at 3:00 pm..ALGONQUIN ...... Thursday, May 19, at 7:00 am
Sunday, May 15, at 3:00 pm .. !IROQUOIS ........ Saturday, May 21, at 9:00 am
"xHURON ...... Saturday, May 21, at 9:00 am
Tuesday, May 17, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ........ Sunday, May 22, at 10:00 am
Thursday, May 19, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ......Tuesday, May 24, at 12:00 n'n
Saturday, May 21, at 3:00 pm .COMANCHE ......Thursday, May 26, at 1:00 pm
S.."SEMINOLE .... Saturday, May 28, at 4:00 am
Tuesday, May 24, at 3:00 pm ..ALGONQUIN .... Sunday, May 29, at 4:30 am
Thursday, May 26, at 3:00 pm ..!IROQUIS .... Wednesday, June 1, at 6:30 am
Friday, May 27, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ..... Wednesday, June 1, at 6:30 am
Monday, May 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ...... Saturday, June 4, at 8:30 am
"xHURON ........ Sunday, June 5, at 9:00 am
*After May 1, Steamship Seminole will not carry passengers.
x-Freight only. *-Boston via Charleston and New York.
*-.Boston via Brunswick *'d Charles ton. *--Boston. via Charleston.
THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
ODret Serv le Between Jaksonville, Boston and Providence and all East-
ern Points, (allig at Charleston Both Ways.
SEMI-WEBKLY SAILINGS.
Southbound. .. .. .. .......... .. .......... ..From Lewis Wharf, Boston
Northbound.. .. .. .. .. .. ....* .. From foot of Catherine Street, Jacksonville
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between JaekslonvIl nad Samford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor. St. Francs., Beresford (De Land) and Intermediate
landings on St. Johns river.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville, Sundays, Tuesdays and Thurs-
days. 3: p. m. Returning, leave Sanford. Monday. Wednesday & Fridays 9:30 a. m.
SOU 1 HBOUND,I NORTHBOUND,
Read down, I I Read up.
Leave 13: p. m. ............... .....Jacksonville........ ....... ....... Arrive 2:00 a. m.
Leave 8:46 p. m.j..... .. .. .. ......Palatka.................... ...... Leave 8:00 p. m.
Leave 3: a. m. .....................Astor.............. .............[Leave 2:30 p. m.
Leave 4:3 a. m. ...... ... ... .... ...St. Francis............. ......... Leave 1:00 p. m.
... .............. ... ..........Beresford (DeLand)......... .... ..... Leave 12:00 noon
Arrive *s: a. m. ...... ......... ........Sanford......... .......... ...... Leave 9:30 a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m.I ................. Enterprise ..................... Lv. 10:00 a. m.
an RM.EAL PAIsMNGBR AND TICKET OFFICE. 204 W. Bny St.. Jack'vllle.
F. M. TRONMONGO R. JR.. Anst. Gen. Pass Agent. 204 W. Ray St.. Jacksonville. PIs
W. G. COOPER, JR., Local Frt. Agt., Jack'vllle. C. P. LOVELL. Asst. Supt..Jack'vll,
Foot Hogan Street, JacksonvIlle.
A. C. HAGGERTY. 0. P. A.. New York, CLYDE MILNE, G. P. A.. New York
TBEn. 0. EanR. WM. P. CLYDE & CO.
Bleneral Manager. General Agents.
Cbmerougb Building, U State Street. New York.


C. H. HARGRAVES CO..

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed

Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522- 524-526 EAST BAY STREET
Jacksonville, Fla.


SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
30 YEARS RELIABILITY.

Hess & Slager,
Diamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry
CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND 11 & 13 MAIN.
,s 'o ara wa orrr arern anr ra ro -aTe croawrt norevrwrn7war



East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.

WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


WRITE THE RECORD FOR ANY INFORMATION DESIRED.


surtene- of this 3 P
The mPs will be large-V
the tee. of th sport arP antitc.
th nts with pleasure.
U"ELL-IESERVED SECCCV Iwe
JacksonvrlHle the Home of Onre ofI '
iAmuerlesag Leadlng Trade Jourals.
The Weekly Industrial Record of Jack- Oree
sonvUlle and Savannah has taken its place A]
among the leading trade Journals in the f
United States, and as an authority on lum- R
ber and naval stores It Is being quoted not a
only by the best and most carefully edited amo
class papers in this country, but by those I' $
In Europe also A London trade paper for
reaching this office yesterday gives liberal a fe
apace to the Record's views on market con- five
ditlons. lot I
This week's issue of the Industrial Rec- and
ord Is even better than usual, and It is Th
a strong and entr~malning general Indus- trial
trial newspaper. In addition to its value He
as the champion of the two specific indus- v -
tries it represents. It Is brimful of new Johr
stores of development In the Southeast. plais
among them being the story of a half-mill fend
Ion-dollar corporation organized In Jack- Ge
nonville yesterday, and the organization of H 1
several other big corporations during the and'
week In Georgia and Florida. w
It has set the pace for enterprise, and It Wal
well deserves the great measure of success wick
it Is receiving, both In its subaeription and
advertising departments.carryling as It does.
perhaps, one of the largest advertising pst-~
ronages given to any of the Southern tra .
journals. s
DBA'TK OP A. J. MAIN In
-" e erty.
wesme at hulten-Wt- erty.
-- This a rma trhe
1**s, who' This
mlii ned,








24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J H CROSBY. President


C M FULLER. Vice-President


JAS F LANE. Secy A Trees


Depa&-ment%


Greenleaf 6

Crosby Company


Diamonds and Other Precious
Stones


Fine Gold Jewelry


3efDkers anb

,bilbermitbo


American and Foreign Watches
and Clocks


41 West Bay Street

Jacksonville

Th lWgest and fiest stom in this part of the
Southern States. Prompt attention to mail orders


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware
Choice Cut Glass


Fine China Dinner Sets and
Fancy Pieces


Write for Catalogue


European Novelties


a ii


STHE COUNCIL TOOL CO.I
| of Wananish, N. C.,
Formerly of Council's Station, N. C., are still selling Diamond Edge
Hacks at $ .00, Black Joe and Standard at $5.00, Old Style and Patent
* Pullers at 36.00 a dozen. They should average a little better than ever.
4 We have brought out a new brand, the Blue Line Hacks at $8.00 and Pull-
ers at $800 which are warranted. All wholesale dealers in naval stores
supplies carry our lines and should supply operators.
* *- ****1* *..******.* *sP*--- -a


D. G. McKETHAN, President.
Jacksonville, Fla.


ALFRED A. McKETHAN, L't U. S. N.
Ret'd Sec'y and Treas. Constructing
Engineer. Fayetteville, N. G.


Pine Product Construction Co.
INCORPORATED
Iayetteville. N. C.
Spirits of Turpentine, Oil of Tar, Creosote, Tar, Disinfectants; Wood Preservative,
Paints. Wood Stains, Etc., and Charcoal, from Lightwood Stumps. Box-facings.
Profits increased. Time of distillation reduced. Condensation controlled at will.
No danger from fire. Plant erected complete, and men taught the process. Fur-
ther Information, write Alfred MacKethan, general manager, Fayetteville, N. C.

THE PHILADELPHIA TAILORS
JOHN B. CAINGAGLINI & BRO.,

MERCHANT TAILORS AND IMPORTERS


48 W. Bay Street.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


I,,lTIim o*rkT fl,,ll BROADWAY AND 23d ST.,
HOTEL BARTHOLDI, BROWAYVAND1 ST.
.IU/LL D uuR/ in-ijUJ, NEW YORK CITY.
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout.
S Near all Big Stores and Places of Amusement. Uars Pass a
the Door for all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landiigs.
* Large Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you 1|
S find no grand and magnificent decorations- no luxurious
S grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
Speak to You. No Eaployees In Any Way Inattentative.
S But just a cozy, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the
i hearts of those who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
* plain American cooking, and affable and courteous treatment.
* MAIrTO ROBLEE, Pr ontw.r
**.V 3;... y;....a;; am S


SJohrR. Young. President. C. S. Ellis. Vice-Proident.
T h J. W. Motte. Jr.. Secretary and Treasurer.


Ie ELLIS-YOUNG CO.

Commission Merchants S

NAVAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

SSavannah and Brunswick, Ga.

IlA iUAiA&iMAAiArihii WUA&JiiU AM&MJMMIMErt


J. W. HUNT. President.
P. L. PEACOCK. Ist V. P-


J. E. HARRIS. Id V. Pres. C. R. SHOUSI. See. TrI.
W. J. KILLY, 3d V. P. H. I. RICHMOND, Asst See'y-Tr


Peacock-Hunt & West Company
General Offices: } 20 Bay Street, E,, Savannah, Ga. a
West Building, Jacksonville Rl

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutual. W
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that buys sprit
Turpentine and rosin.)

WHOLESALE GROCERS,

Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our Specialt
--SOLE AGENTS FOR
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wilson & Ghdld
Philadelphia Wagons.
Naval Stores Received at Savannah. Ga., and Jacksenvl
S and fernandina, fla.


ebbhbhed


Incorporated
1896