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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00071
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 6, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00071
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text





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"THE PINE AND ITS PRODUCTS."


WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

Adopted Sept. 12tk, 1902, by the Executive Committee of the Turpentine Operators' Association as Its Exclusive Official Organ, and Adopted Sept. Ith1. 1902, in Annual Con-
vention, as an Official Organ Also of the General Association. Adopted Sept. I Ith. 1903. as tae only Offical Organ of the Turpentine Operator' Association.
Adopted April 27ta, 1903. as tah Official Organ of the Inter-State Cane Growers' Association. Endorsed by the Georgia Sawmill Assoclation.


VOL 8. NO. 19.


JACKSONVILLE, IFLA


MAY 6, 1904.


SAVANNAH. GA.


$3 A YEAjI


NEW FERTILIZER FACTORY. phosphates for the year 1903! was 462,90.1
tons. spreading over a vast territory in its
Wilson & Toomer to Erect One Here This ,list ibution, shown by the following fig-
Month. 'res:
The Wilson & Tooimer Fertilizer Comi- To continental l ports.... .......289,700
pany will I, gin at once the erection of a To Baltic prts.. .... .. .. .. 96,443
fertilizer plant in .lacksonville. To United Kingdom ports.. .... 43,299
1 To Meliterranean lorts........ 31,10H
The plant is to cost one hundred tou- editerranean rts. 31,1
sand dollars, and will Iwe located on the For .
tract of land just across Deer ('reek from Fei.. ........... 5
Sl.)omcst ic. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 2,,32
Mct;uire's mill., the location being just mes
north of the prolwised exl)rt terminal ...
yards of the Atlantic Coast Line, in the
eastern suburbs of the city. "This, too. in addition to the home con-
The Wilson & Toomer Fertilizer Corn- sump"tion. Some time ago I was very much
pany was established in IS:3, and during surprised to learn from the Deparment of
the first year of business only sold iM5) agriculture e the small percentage of area
tons of Ideal fertilizer: last year the in Florida under cultivation. 1 am not
sales aggregated more than 15,000( tons. sure just what the percentage was, but it
This indicates briefly the business that has was less than 10 per cent. But every year
Ideal brands. It indicates tlh agricultural the cultivated area is growing larger. A
grown and the growing demand for the few years ago eight or ten carloads pwr
growth of the State, for the Wilson & tay of Florida vegetables would glut the
Toomer companyy have done. up until this I markets, but now it is no unusual thing
time. a business confined to thfe State of to see fifty carloads and more leave the
Florida. and in ss'aking of the proposed State for the Northern markets every day.
industry which his company is to erect, and the prices and demand are better now
Mr. Wilson of the firm stated yesterday than when the production was much less.
that his firm felt justified in making the This shows that the State has establish-
investment upon the growth of the busi- ed a demand for its prdsluces, and that the
ness. as shown by the figures presented. North is bec*toing yearly more dependent
The n ill grease its capital upoin Florida-grown products. This agri-
sthek fnnu l.W t -r t20t.00. cultural growth carries with it also the
stk fro $1. to $250000. growth of the fertilizer demand. In 1895
"There are many significant facts con- 42.000 tons of fertilizers were sold in
nected with the fertilizer business in 1lor- Florida; last year more than 93,000 tons
ida," said Mr. Wilson. "In the first place, w,,re sold.
Florida is the largest phosphate rock-pro- The factor that we will establish will
ducing section in tile world today, and
have a capacity of from thirty to thirty-
this pState practically uakes the price on five thousand tons of complete fertilizers
this product. During the months of Jan-
a year; we will have in our location 2,50
uarv anl Felbruary of this year. 175,719 .
ury any of ts 1 fet of water front, with twenty-four feet
tons of Iphosphate were hilplped from Fior-
tons of hospate ere shi from Flor- depth of water, so the vessels that bring
ida for export alone, and sore thing of ule t S a t
the pyrites from Spain and the potash
territory covered by these shipments may
from ( be gained when it is known that from o w
for entrance: our wharves will reach to
Port Inglis alone the shipments went to t he factory will al,, be
i. o sleep water. The factory will also be
Glasgow. Stettin. Molino, Ilamburg. Kings reached h thAtlantic t ne tracks,
SRottrm re'achedl ,by the Atlantic Coast Line tracks,
Lvnn. and Rotterdam. .
who will build first to our site on its lately
"And along with this large elxort busi ohtine:l concessions in the eastern part of
ness of a Florida product. non,. of it pass- our citv. so it will lie seen that our posi-
ed through tile port of Jack onville. tion will he strong, from a geographical
"And still another significant fact in standpoint."
this connection is that with this immense
production anid possibility. there is at this Lumber Company Changes Hands.
time only one acid phosphate factory In Mr. E. C. \VWelsh has bought the interest
the State. amnd that. the ;ounmling Fertiliz- of Mr. 1). W. Mclaury in the Northern and
er companyy of Pensacola. Southern Lumber company at Cornell
"The production of phosphat, in Florida. eight miles south of tk'ala. The members
while already large. has scarcely begunl" of the firm now are. Mf .I. Roess, F. R
maid Mr. Wilson. "'T'l supply is practical- Pashley and E. C. Welsh. Mr. Roess is
ly inexhaustible, and the demand for it is from Oil City, Pa.. Mr. Peshley is front
always with us. Phosphoric acid supplies lPortlandsville, N. Y., and Mr. Welsh in
the plant fossl for the whole world-it is from (ernan Valley. N. J. They arm
an essential element to plant life. pleased with Florida and anticipate doini
"The total export business in Florida a large business.


Factories Wanted.
Several of the cities in this State,
through their oards of Trade, are reach-
out out for factories to Is' located in their
midst. Miami is taking a strong lead in
this matter, especially for cigar factories.
Lemon City offers an acre of ground near
the railroad depot and five building lots
to any one establishing a cigar factory
there.

Waauchula is not only assured of a crate
mill. but it will be a strictly up-to-date
affair. There is no question now that our
home people will take all the stock that is
offered, and the promoters will not offer
any more stock until they ascertain tlhe
cost of the plant they wish to put in. Mr.
Hudson is now visiting the different crate
mills of the State to learn of the lest and
most satisfactory labor-saving devices.
and it is the intention to adopt the best
for the Wauchula mill. The mill company


hailed iith a goial deal of joy by those
interested. As will le seen by referring
to their card appearing in another column,
this company is thoroughly e|luippel to do
Business satisfactorily and promptly; it
has six -hops located at convenient spots
or the trade and is prepared to fill orders
;t once for any number of barrels needed.
As may lie remembered, this company
was incorlporated with a capital of *100.-
(0)0.00. in order that turpentine operators
wouldd feel sure of obtaining, at all times
and in all quantities. high-grade western
white oak spirit barrels at right prices.
Tlhe advent of this company has been
marked by a surprisingly large number
if orders, more numerous than even the
management had hoped for. It is only
ieccessary to mention the officers of The
'omoperage companyy to show turpentine
:nen the strength of the concern. J. C.
Little is president. John E. Harris, vice-
president, C. II. Barnes, secretary and
treasurerr with E. IH. Mote general man-


nas one great advantage.antht an at i
San ger. The board of directors consists of
unlimited supply of timler at a reason- lohn arris, . Barnes. est,
**John E.. Harris. C. 1. Barnes. .. \\W. West,
able price. having practically access to 30.- .. K W. Powell and W. F.
000 acres of timber. Having an unlimited
('oachmlan. *\We ironhesv for the comnnanvy


supply of raw material and being located a well deserved d si l .s.
a; well ilese:'vedl andi signal success.
in the center of a crate-using community.
the enterprise certainly has great natural
advantages.-Wauihula Advocate. Total Output of Petroleum.

It is not yet half a century since Colo-
The beginning of the work on the jet-
ties for the Miami ship canal will be nel I)rake discovered petroleum on the
watched with much interest by the citizens waters of Oil ('reek. near Titusville, Pa.
of this city. to whom this new and great Men thought themselves civilized in those
improvement means so much. When that lays, but had no notion that petroleum
work is commenced the hopes of an early was amn the necessities of a ldite ex
connection with deep water will be in a
ist'ncee. A tallow dip or a wax candle il
fair way of realization: Miami will take
laminated >uliciently the night's activi-
on new growth, anl every activity wil w lu te tl the nights at
stimuilated.-Miami Record. ties, and a blazing logw(inl fire left no
iroom for desire for another kind of heat
er. Mutton tallow answered for chappedl
The Florida Extract Company started a
hands and bear's grease or goose or oil
up its engines last week. and ground up well enugh fr p Petroleum
m br did well enough for Ipomade. Petroleum
some bark to test the workings of the
plant. Everything a found to e in might have l.Cen counted a superfluity,
plant. Everything was found to li in
,,hut instead it sprang into immediate fa-
splendid working order, and the plant will it sprang into immediate fa
begin Monday with a full force.-l-iami or. and now its list of Ilpular by-prod-
Record. nets grows longer every year. The total
S'production of crude petroleum from 1859
to the end of 190!2 has leen no less than
This morning captainn IHoe demonstrat- 1.lt,1.2S0.727 barrels. That means that 2/.
ed the working of his plant to a represen- feet were allowed for the height of a bar-
tative of the Evening Record. It only took el. and if those barrels filled with all this
ael. and if those Itarrels filled with all this
a few moments to make a corner and a Iminestic oil that has been produced were
half block. This plant is turning out some ;aili so that their heads touched, they
fine curbing and hollow blocks. The ('ap- ,,hi l encircle the earth 2/ times.
tain has discovered an excellent grade ot this total lctin. Pen syl
()f this total production. Pennsylvania
red sand. which makes an excellent brown
rtone.- iam i Re or. and New lYork produced 53.9 per cent,
stone.-Miami Record.
Olhio 24.3 per cent, West Virginia 11.3 per
cent. Indiana 3.9 wpr cent, California 3.6
Spirit Barrels. per cent. Texas 2.1 per cent, leaving .9
The announcement that The (Cooperage ier cent to be supplied by the States of
Company, with headquarters in Jackson- Kansas. (olorado. Louisiana, Illinois, Mis-
ville was ready to supply the trade was souri. and Oklahoma Territory.


e






2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


C. B. ROGERS, PRESIDENT.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, VICE-PRISIDINTB.


C. H. HODGSON, Sec, and TnurAe'.


DIRECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,ooo.
Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one Three-Story Building, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; one one-story building, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind in the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla.., Pensacolae. Fl., end Savennah. Ga.


. eo~e.###~in #s.*9si


r''rrU,,,,,,,,UL~,,,,,r ~C)~,))))I~))~U)))~))~tdddd~d~.' d~d~6~6666~'6CdCCd6tdb~b~ ~C~t~bC~CCtCt~~t~Y


4*MW,**r* 4!'O4!*O*WWW ~ IO 4nrwwww-- --------








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 3


**t****o** ***0#************t*oo$**s*o$********
* U
J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
*..4..444^.gQ*4**O* 4*4- 4*-* 0*4,*.**#* *4** *"** ** *
Headquarters for
Distiller's Pumping .
Outfit. i
SNo plant complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia, 4
1 Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and *
X South Carolina. Write us for particu- *
lars ana prices. We also manufacture
t Engines, Boilers and High
SGrade Machinery,
-" as well as carry a full and complete *
-stockof- *
4 b f Mill Supplies, Pipe,
; B Boiler Tubes, Etc.
B Advise your wants.
Macon, - Georgia.
* A l.eada Specaty a i
* KIMr of Tr Wort for Trpeatbre Strage Prlsrpes
I** 1110 1 1**0 1* 0* 4- 0 0 I 111 ** ******* *

III I III M 1 1-1--l 111 1 I 1 1: 1t II t III IIII 1 1 1 II I I1I 1 II I VI I 1*


SW. W. CARNES, Pres.


W. C. THOMAS, Manager. C. T DUDLEY. Sec. a Trea


DYAL-UPCHURCH BLDG,
Grivot, Jacksonville. Fla.

All makes. $10 Up.


We can save you from $10 to $60
on any typewriter made.


Write us.


ABENT "OLIVER" VISIBLE TYPEWRITER


ZINC NAILS
FOR
Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the emly maMst which ill not injure
saws when left in the trees.
Salem Nail Co.
279 Pearl St. New Yoer, N. Y.
Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.


Elgin & Hampden
Railroad Watches.

SEE

RILES

At His New Store,
15 W. BAY STREET.


('ANJN~f CAMDnANTV


THI


Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
Hardware
Turpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
and Pullers on Hand.


: TAMPA,


BOWEN & CO.


FLOJIDA.


II I 11II I IIIIll --l= III= II I I = I-= II-= I I -II III =I= 1I III :


... NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA. U. S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD,


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.


DIRECTORS:
C. S. ELLIS. B. F. BULLARD
P. 1. SUTHERLAND W. C. POWELL
J B PADGETT. WALTER RAY.
J. R. YOUNG. A. D. COVINGTON.


H. L KAYTON.
Secretarysand Treasurer.


J. B. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.


we


R. THOMAS


GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggies.


Jacksonville, Fla.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,


from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies

Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 and 519 West Bay Street.
JACKSONVILLe, FLA.


CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barrels hold and will pass the se-
verest American and European inspection.

Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, OUITMAN, GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address orders to home office,
QUITMAN, GA.

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Best in the World.
For delivered prices write,
Cypress Tank Ce, MbeAciU a












Loia d Ion WOrks Sh l Co.
aUIWEsB AND DBALERB IN





ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton. Saw. Pertlls r, Oi d le Ma -
ehbnery. and Supplie and Rhsirs.
CAPACITY FOR M HAND-
Machine Tools, Wood-Worklnl Mn-51-
ery. Bhafting. Pulley. Hang~ r, Lmth
and Rubber Beltiag sad Hoss. nlroel
and Mill BuilUee sad TNM.
Plans and estimated furn d sor Pww
Plants amd Steel Bridges
steam Puam. v..d water ant-era w
means lAsml


AUUU*I A, UiA.


r
|
r
|








4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Leaders in
ing and


EVERETT BOCK.


Men's and Boys' Fine Cl1
Up-to-Date Furnishings.


* Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats: largest stock in the
m99999999 QW W 9i


4 MORTGAGES.
WI'

Real
oth- III W. FORSYTH STREET,


City. Hj
s IAIWJ
^y- | H^ ^r


T. MURPHY
Jacksonville
Machine and Iron Works
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat and Sawmill Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron and
Brass Castings, Phosphor-Bronze Journal Bearings.
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


rasaasaaebobe88+Oebe~4e,


RENTS.
LLIAM W. FRAZIER,

I Estate Broker.


JACKSONWVILLE, FLORIDA.


A. Renfroe Co.


Stetson Hats


Wail Crc'cis Civcn Fcttcval Axtecnk.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


suits to Lrdcr at Keady-Made prices
439 W. Bay Street.


P r in tin g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


Standard Clothing Company


One Price


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, - Jacksonville, Florida.
Stetson and Hawes Hats. Special Attentioi Given to Mail Orders


Y~?? *0 6: 6a' 'v v ev. v 'o


*seftseee*****ft***ft******ft e
Do You Want to Sell
Your Saw Mill or Tie Timber?

Do You Want to Sell your Tur-
pentine Location ?
If so, write us, we are in touch with many Northern, Western and
Southern Millmen who want to buy.

Brobston, Fendig &Co.
Brunswick, Ga. and Jacksonville, Fla.


Cable Address. Florida

Standard Naval Stores
O Company.
DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN

SROSIN |
SAND TURPENTINE.
J Jacksonville. Fla.


The Largest and Oldest Copper
Works in Georgia.


M. A. BAKER,
Inventor and
Manufacturer of te
Baker Improved
Seemless Turpen-
Stine stills.
Write me for prices and outftl
F. O. B. any point in Georgia, Fori-
Ida. Alabama or Mississippi. Ala
stills sold under a guarantee.
SJob work through the
country a specialty.
Itrunswicl, Ga.


i0 My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.

R-U - i-alSb&T;^^Li -iSak !! I


S1111 I: !:4 1 in111 I 1144M I1 l II I I I ll i I 1 1 1 111 I1

| McMillan

SBros.

Florida Cop-
Sper Works. -~. ..
Z Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
General Metal Workers.
Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
Patching through the country a specialty.
h Orders by mail or wire will receive prompt
attention at either of the following works:
: Fayetteville, N. C. Savannah. Ga
SMobile, Ale,. Jacksonville, F1
i lll II IIl l ll IIIII I I III III II1 1 ll 111 1i 1ll


DON'T FAIL TO MENTION THE RECORD TO ADVERTISERS.


J. A. Craig (1 Bro.


239 W. Bay Street


W. H. BECKWITH. W.. HENDERSON. G. C. WARREN.
BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.
LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE AND MILL LANDS,
Rooms 1-2.3, First National Bank Building.
TAMPA, FLORIDA.


gl0l~9~999~9~9r9,C90'


J


~-+~r~+9+9+9999919


'LABLULU


Ir


RS









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


Naval Stores Department.

Three Years' Exports.
The total exports from this country
abroad for the season of 1903-4, which
ended March 31 last, was 14.752.18i gallons
of turpentine and 2,7X.1,02 barrels of
rosin.
For ISl92-3 it w.s 15.950,539 gallons ot
turpentine. and 2.6i!).O0;i barrels of rosin.
For 1901-2 it was. 19,895,914 gallons of
turpentine, and 2.643,828 barrels of rosin.
Trading in May-August futures was re-
sumed at Savannah last week, large buy-
ers bidding 52 cents, and with the sale ot
seven hundred casks reported at 521~' to
an exporter.
At London the market for turpentine
spots and futures last week was slug-
gish, .June-December closing at 41s.
Rosins seem to "stick" pretty well, in
fact, they showed an advance all during;
last week. April was the most profitable
month the average producer has had for
years, and May opens with bright auspices.
All values are far alove the minimum tix-
ed by the Operators' Association. and will
hardly hold back any of the grades when
remunerative prices are Ibing paid right
along.
Colonel J. P. Williams, of Savannah.
president of the Georgia, Florida & South-
ern Railway, accompanied by J. O. Hatch,
his secretary and treasurer, were in Tal-
lahassee Monday to examine into the de-
tails of transferring the Tallahassee &


Georgia Railway to Mr. Williams. There
wa" a hitch in the detail,. and the trans-


action went over for a few days. The -_-----dt--__ -_d~b
work will be conplet, satisfactorily in THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
h Jacksonville, Fla.
Foreign Exports. eoCAPITAL $300,000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS $300,000
Since April 20th lilt., foreign exlorts ,f Strenit and ample facilitie.-. Il-ines solicited. Prompt attention to collec-
aval stores he bleen as follows: tions an(d busil.es of customer not living in Jacksonville. Best Safety Deposit
naval stor been as follows: Boxes for rellt.
FIrom New York. Steamship Anglo- Chil- -____________
cain. to llainmlurg. 2,350 casks turpentin'.
17.6-5 barrels rosin. Bark Kamfjord, to
Iivcrls,,. "535:, barrel rosin, ;.."( caski Cochrane's Book Store.
tr-lp..ntie. Bark liols'rtson. to Aberdetn. a n e


{.SSI barrels rosin, 275 casks turpentine.
Slhip Silicia. to (enoa. 725 barrels rosin.
Furn.es.ia to (lasgow. .850 barrels rosin.
Fromn Pensacola. Ihark Elsa, to IRotter-
dano. 5.720 barrels rosin.
From Boston. Ship Oxonean, to Ant-
werpI. i) IO barrels rosin.
Froni Hialtimore. Ship lieninitz, ito Bre-
Imen. 1.001) barrels rosin. Ship Temiplenmore,
to liverpool. 750 barrels rosin. Ship Maine,
to IAnlmon. 2.24 IbaTrrels rosin. Ship Oak-
more. to Antwerp, 200 barrels rosin.
Froni Savannah. Steamship Castleven-
try. to Loindoln. :3.:3I) casks turpentine, 200
barrels rosin.
Mr. M. L. Moore has sold his turpentine
places at Grove Park and Rochelle, Flor-
ida. to Messrs. lHobbs & Holder. We un-
dlerstand that Mr. Moore got a good price
for this sale.


Wholesale Stationery, Fishing Tackle, Pipes,
Notions, Stencil Ink Brushes, Lumber Crayons.
PALATKA. FLORIDA,
Write for Prices. Have hundreds of articles suitable for the Commissary Trade.


Planters "Old Time" Remedies


NUB14N TEA-For the Liver.
BENEDICTA-Female Tonic.
CUBAN RELIEF, for Cramp Colic. Horse Colic.
WARRANTED TO GIVE RELIEF IN TEN MINUTES.
CUBAN OIL, a Liniment Unexcelled.
Also Golden Crown Specifc. Pink Pills & Horse & Cattle Powders
SPENCER MEDICINE CO..
Chattanooga, Tenn.


Kohn = Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACSONVILLE' FLA.


When you


Visit Jacksonville


Call to see the Record and be at home.


Tell the Record all you know, that will Interest others.


If you want to buy or sell advertise your place.


If you owe the Record pay the bill.


If you don't owe the Record make a bill.


Order your Printed Stationery.


Be sure and give the order for your Commissary Checks.


Call on the Secretary of the 7. 0. A.


Call at the Industrial Record Office.

THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."











6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.




Southern Cane Growers and Syrup Manufacturers


in Annual Convention at Jacksonville,


To-day w witnessed the closing exercises l
of one of their most important conventions
ever assembled in this city in thlie adjourn-
ment of the Second Annual Convention of
the Interstate Sug;r 'ane (rowvers' A'sso- I
citation.
It met last Wednesday. May 4. in the
spacious new auditorium of thie Board of
Trade and after being called to order by
President 1). 4;. Purse of Savannah. the
first session was devoted to welcomes and
responses. The delegate 's were welcomed
to the State by liHon. I). U. Fletcher, rep-
resenting governorr Jlennings, wilho was un-
able to attend. and this was responded to
by Hon. Harvie .Jordan. preside nt of tilhe
Farmer's National Congress.nmember of the
4(eorgia Senate. and chairman of its conm-
mittee on agriculture. The delegates were
then welcomed to Jlacksonville by Mayor
Nolan and (Capt. C. E. garnerr. of the
loard of Trade. and r sponded to by Dr.
.J. M. Spence, of Ware County, Georgia.
Major Healy welcomed them on behalf
of tlie agricultural interests of the State.
and he was responded to by lon. R. 1.
Pcole, Commissioner of Agriculture, of
Alabama. Mr. .1. A. Hollonmon. of the Rec-
ord welcomed them on behalf of the State
Press, anti was. responded to by Hon.
Charles (. Abercrombie, of Montgomery,
Alabama. Although these speeches were
in a lighter vein, they carried many
chunks of wisdom and experience andti
were much appreciated by the Convention.
On the resort of the committee on cre-
dentials it was found that we had with us
delegates from nearly every sugarcane-
growing State in the South, the delegates


threatened. while discouraging in the ex-
treme. are not without their compensat-
ing advantage(. Should they lead to more
thorough cultivation and more econom-
ical maiinufaeture. and make the cane in
cultivation and manufacture a subject of
profounder thought anti more scientific
investigation. these adverse conditions will
proe bicssings in disguise. and through
their chastening influence. discipline us for
the great work ahead for individual ef-
fort and cooperative action through agen-
cieso such as this honorable body, and for
which it is called' into being.
In alluding to sugar it is meant to be
referred to in its generic sense, syrup be-
ing a stage in the manufacture of sugar
and comprehended in it as a lesser result
in the manufacture of the juice of the
cane and in which, for the present at
least, over the greater part of the section
represented in this assemblage, our inter-
est must be chiefly centered.
While it is to be especially regretted.
therefore, that the past year has been so
iinsatisfactory to our manufacturers of
-yrup. and calculated to discourage the
new efforts to rehabilitate and expand
this important industry in our midst, it is
true that the quantity of syrup put upon
;ale exceeded that of any previous year.
and equally true that the great bulk seek-
ing to lie marketed, wa's of inferior grade.
This affected the home as well as distant
markets, and your president has, at times.
almo-t felt that it was a crime to further
agitate the development of the syrup in-
dustry Ibecause of the lamentations that
have gon up from disappointed hopes and


being about three hundred and fifty. unrealized expectations. Poor syrup has
Wednesday afternoon the Convention not alone been the result of faulty prep-
got down to business and the President ration; an unpropitious season has play-
read his report. It is as follows: ied its pa t in this drama, and careful
analysis will place the fault of our Iliad
President Purse's Report. of woes not upon the industry itself, or
F:l low Delegates, ladies and gentlemenn: upon markets able to absorb our entire
In the twelve months that have elapsed output. though this year not receptive
since our gathering at Macon, Ga.. intense for more than a fractional part of it. The
unrt t and uncertainty over two conti- e'aboration of this broad question, is not
nents have impressed themselves upon for a paper like tile one to which you are
everything pertaining to the sugar in- now listening; the object of which has
dustry. Ieen fully accomplished when it has di-
The entrance of the beet into coinlw- l eted your attention to these untoward
tuition with cane as a sugar producer was conditions for to formulate measures even
so gradual that it had obtained mastery in unpropitious seasons.
of the world's market before its suprem- Before leaving this matter of supply and
acy was realized, anti, therefore, was at- demand. I wish to direct your attention to
tended by no great disturbing convulsion. a most interesting experience recently
With prices at their minimum in years. had in Boston. Mass.: In a large whole-
accordingly reciprocity to Cuba struck -:le house in that city, I secured this sam-
tht' sugar industry of this country a stag- I Ie of molasses, which I now hold up to
gering blow. anti no one can tell yet, how your view. It is an importation from
far-reaching may be its effects, as grant- the Island of Antigua in the Lesser An-
ing reciprocity to Cuba may be but the titles group, about 1.200 miles from the
beginning of a policy that will open our city of J.acksonville; polarizes 55 per cent
ports to the cheap labor sugar of the sagar and is sold by cargoes for distri-
worhil. when. indeed, we may be confront- lbution through this section of country, a
ed by most alarming conditions, and in full cargo of it ieing now due at a South
constluence the acreage in cane and beets Atlantic iaurt, costing wholesalers, de-
in this country is nothing compared with livere:I here. 2i c'-nts to 27 cents per gal-
w hat they would le if their products were hI n. It has the sharp, pungent, rummy
protected against the cheap labor systems todor of molasses, and I venture to predict,
of Europe and the tropics, the require- without fear of contradiction, that not
mients of whose civilization are more read- one within tlihe sound of m voice would
ily obtained by pennies than the rapacity weltmime it uponl his table; yet by the
of our hoisted refinement can be satisfied tinrm it reaches the consumer it must be
Iby dollars, stld around :35 cents per gallon to pay
But existing conditions and those any profits to its several handlers, while


I know of my own knowledge. that cane done. when. last winter, the investiga-


syrups in ( eorgia and Florida. superior'
to this dark. opaque mass, beyond anv
power of human comparison, are being
offered at :10 c nts per gallon without pur-
chasers.


tion was taken up by paper manufactu-
rers in New England and carloads of ba-
gasse shipped there for experimental tests,
and you have before you to-day, in tangi-
ble form. tile wonderful r sults of these


I have too recently come upon these experiments.
facts to trace them from importer to con- Thii cardhloard. which I hold up before
sunier, but it is well worthy of investi- you. and a piece of which I carried with
station. and 1 commit it to you for that me in quit- an extended business tour re-
purpose. eently made by me through the Western
While not profitable, at this time any. Northern and Eastern States, whenever
how. to divert our attention from syrup I exhibited it. coupled with the state-
to sugar making, it is not out of place ment that it was the product of bagasse,
in this connection, as a proof of the es erstwhile an almost worthless product of
tablished riclhne-' of our cane juices, to be tile sugar industry, excited the keenest
reminded of the possibilities on that line. interest and was received with surprise,
should it ever become more profitable to and. I must confess that in several in-
carry our syrups to granulation. This stances with doubts as to whether I could
sample, which I present to you. was pro- Ie telling the whole truth.
duced in Decatur County. by the Messrs. As a cardboard, all, I believe that its
A. Cohn & Co.. who have added the cul- manufacturers claim for it, it was thought
tivation of cane to their extensive areas in Boston that from its remarkable text-
in tobacco, and by the association of the il, strength and extreme compactness in
two crops, been enabled to secure steady grain, it might make an admirable substi-
employment for their hands, the working tute for leather in some of the require-
period.s of the two crops admirably har- inents calling for that material. In Pitts-
nonizing. burg and New York experts expressed the
The sample grades "Plantation Cran- opinion that it was quite possible to use
elated," and is very tdry and shows most it for insulation in electrical work.
thorough preparation. Messrs. Cohn & Co. The president of the company manu-
have a first-class Standard sugar plant, facturing this cardboard is with us to-day,
with a capacity for grinding several hun- and has been assigned to a place on our
dred tons of cane daily. It is the first program to explain to you at length his
modern sugar plant erected in (ieorgia. process and its value and the uses to
and the first sugar plant of any character which it can lie put, and lie will tell you
since those erected by James Mamilton that the experiment has been sufficiently
Cooper. Thomas Spaulding and others in advanced to induce the erection of a plant
t(eorgia in the early part of the just closed in Louisiana to work up her present sea-
(entury. Outside of Louisiana and Texas, son's production of bagasse.
it is probably the only plant of its kind These beautiful products of the Cum-
in the South. We are greatly indebted to berland Mills, Maine, show you the pos-
Messrs. Cohn & Co. for their enterprise sibilities in the manufacture of the high-
in this matter, and most heartily congrat- er types of paper front bagasse. These
late them upon the success attained in -amples have been examined, scrutiniz-
I reducing such a handsome sample of su- ingly by experts in Savannah and Jack-
gar. sonville. in the short time I have had
It is an object lesson well worthy of them, who pronounce them equal in qual-
I rofoundest consideration. Wish it was ity to any similar papers they have in
in my power to tell you as to the profit- stock. The experiment in the manufac-
ableness of Messrs. Cohn & Co.'s experi- tuie of this paper has been closely watch-
mient. They will, I am sure. be willing, edi by representatives from the division of
when Ipossible to do so. to give the pub- chemistry, in the United States Depart-
lie the benefit of their experience in sugar- ment of Agriculture, which department
making at Amsterdam, where their ex- has always taken a deep interest in this
t nsive planting interests are established, whole matter of cane culture in the South.
It is with great pleasure that I am per- the manufacture of its juices and the de-
imitted to direct your attention to advances vt lopinent of its by-products. These sam-
made in the utilization of the cane stalk, ph s of paper demonstrate, beyond perad-
after the extraction of the juice, which venture, what can be done, anti it only
are attracting attention over the entire remains now to invent machinery spec-
ciuntry. I can remember years ago. in ally adapted to the manufacture of this
visits to Louisiana. seeing these stalks. 1new source of pulp, so as to determine
technically known as "bagasse," hauled the possibility of profitable manufacture
from the sugar mills and placed upon the with adequate quantities of the material
outside of the levees on the Mississippi at command to justify the erection of
river to fortify them against the erosive Ilants near the centers of supply.
effects of the tides; later used as fuel Dr. H. W. Wiley, chief of bureau of
in sugar mill furnaces, contributing 75 chemistry, whlo has watched this paper-
per cent to eighty per cent of that needed making experiment with profoundest in-
for both grinding and boiling, and, as such tenrst. and whom we are so delighted at
fuel, having an estimated value of $1 per having with us to-day, will. later on dur-
ton, as compared with coal. ing tilhe convention, explain the matter
Attempts to pulp bagasse for paper more fully to you.
n making in Louisiana, have never afford- With us. in this part of the south ba-
ed encouraging results, only the manufac- gasse is often spread over our fields for its
ture of commoner paper being attempted, aIusorptive properties in attracting and re-
and the matter had practically been aban- training imoisture. Last winter, at Way-
Ing


WHEN WRITING ADVERTI SERS MENTION THE RECORD.


!











THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


cross, Ga., Dr. Wiley erected a bagasse
burner, such as is used in Louisiana to
consume the bagasse produced at the syr-
up experiment station of the Government.
under his supervision, and obtained most
gratifying results. The consumption of
bagasse requiring high-priced furnace ar-
rangements. its employment as fuel is
thereby placed beyond the reach of the
average millers of sugarcane, outside of
Louisiana and Texas. The result of the
paplr-making experiments, however, which
1 have just detailed to you, have a pecul-
iar interest for the producers of small
quantities of bagasse, which is now an
expense to them, besides going to waste
because, if a market can be made for
this bagasse, an added value will be im-
parted to cane cultivation much greater
than the benefit that accrued to the cot-
ton planter by reason of the demand crea-
ted for the seed of his cotton for its
value as a producer of oil.
Taking twenty tons, per acre, as an
average for cane, and 75 per cent for
juice extraction, there should result five
tons of bagasse from every acre. As a
fuel this bagasse is considered as worth
$1 per ton, or $5 ai acre.
Taking twenty tons per acre as an av-
erage cotton crop for tle South and 1.500
pounds of seed cotton to produce a 500-
pound bale, each acre would yield 333 1-3
pounds, or 1-6 ton of seed cotton, which
at $16 per ton, would be worth $3.20
per acre. If only $3 a ton were paid for
bagasse it would pay $15 per acre, or
five times as much as cottonseed; but the
price that can be paid for bagasse must
be determined by the economy of manu-
facture, and by the not less important
consideration of securing supplies to jus-
tify the erection of mills specially adapt-
ed for the new fibrous material, which
being settled, may justify even a higher
price per ton than $3.
In extensive travel over the country, 1
have yet to learn anyone who has ever
eaten pure cane syrup who does not cher-
ish a yearning to enjoy its purity and
deliciousness again, and I am constantly
pursued by inquiries from Maine to Cali-
fornia and from the Great Lakes to the
Gulf of Mexico, as to where pure syrup
can be had. All these inquirers, at so mc
time have been driven from the use of
cane syrup by the vile substitutes that
are palmed off on the public under the
name of cane syrup, to their titter dis-
gust and nauseation.
The reputation of cane syrup has been
traded upon and traduced to such an ex-
tent until Chicago syrup manipulators
make bold to put upon their product that
it contains 10 per cent of cane syrup and
90 per cent of corn syrup (glucose), and
I fear their damaging example is finding
followers at home, who are casting sus-
picion and reproach upon the whole myrup
product of the South, and. more than once.
I have heard my own people denounce al-
legiance to Georgia syrup, because they
feared to trust its purity any longer, ex-
cept when obtained fresh from the men
who make it.
Deplorable. indeed, is any industry when
its products undergo discredit in the house
of its friends, yet the lamentable facts
confront us to-day in all its enormous
hideousness, a very hydra-headed mon-
strosity, defying public sentiment and im-
peaching the integrity of wholesome leg-
islation in restraint of the death-dealing
practices of the adulterators of food pro-
ducts.


For an agitation has already begun to
repeal a law, passed by the Legislature of
Georgia last year to protect its syrup in-
dustry, in that I cauise it has interfered
with the sale of low grades of syrup to
mixers, ani has compelled all adultera-
tions of pure syrup to be truthfully la-
belled as to components. This law passed
unanimously Inth houses of the Georgia
Legislature, after an exhaustive examina-
tion into its merits, and it will remain
ilion the statute book. It would In better
for the country, if Florida, and every
other State in the Union, had similar
laws for the protection of their citizens
from tile rapacity of conmmercialism that
is willing to sacrifice even human life
for inordinate gain.
Georgia, in her legislation. was only
reslionding to the demand of the cane
syrup non-producing states of Washing-
ton, Maine. California. Iowa. et al.. whose
statute books have, for years, prohibited.
the sale of adulterated cane syrup in their
territory, altogether, or only as a com-
|iound, and correspondingly lalwlled. The
legislation of these States was made nec-
.,ssary because their remoteness from the
cane fields of the South was availed lby
adulterators and mixers as dumping
grounds for their so-called cane syrups.
in the hope that their practices would I't
slower of detection, if detected at all.
In this way cane syrup has lost its
standing in outside markets, and by the
same agencies it will lose its reputation
at home, unless the power of the law be
invoked to restore confidence at home and
to the markets of the country. Public
sentiment, unfortified by the law. has
proven itself inadequate to the task, and
tile law. however drastic, would be equally
ineffective, unless sustained and backed up
liy a healthy public sentiment.
The syrupmaker has an important part
to perforin in this struggle to regain old
and establish new markets, so absolutely
vital to his own success. In the first place.
lii should hbil his syrup to a consistency
science tells him is more apt to insure
freedom from granulation or fermenta-
tion; s'.condly. pack all syrup to be mar-
keted in new, clean packages. ls- they
barrels, cans or Isuttles. and thirdly, use
selection in the syrup marketed, consume
ing at hloie under grades, or, if too Ipnr"
for hunian consumption, feed to hogs.
rather than sell to adulterators who must
use them to demoralize the better grades
or they could not afford to trade in them.
But there are uses for low grade syrups
that should avoid sales to adulterators
without unnecessary sacrifice. ()ie of
these is an element in a compound ftool
for cattle, now attracting much atten-
tion in Gernmany ain other States of Eu-
rope. It should be a constant study to
find uses for low grade syrups, if only to
keep them out of competition with the
higher grades directly and through adul-
terators. Iwing employed in a manner tot
destroy all markets. No more important
subject will c(olUe lwfore this convention
than the conservation of markets for tlhe
products of sugarcane, and especially with
us at this time, syrup, and I hope those
who are to address you upon this line will
elaborate the proposition more fully than
would Ie the province of your president
in this general review of the situation.
In a recent conversation at Washingtor
with Secretary Wilson, the distinguished
head of the United States D)epartmlent ol
Agriculture. whom we expected to hav-
with us to-day, and whose absence, or


account of the demands of official duty,
is thle source of as deep regret to hinm
ais to ourselves. heeause of his .great in-
terest in tile object .f our conveningl to-
day. during an interview, repeatedly hade
ile bear you this imesage. "Tell your ieo-
ple to keep their syrup pure. pack it
well and it will not le long before it
will drive adulterationis fronl the market
and dominate it. andl soon find its wa-
to the markets of Europe. The yield of
mapll syvrulp is ti.o limited to constitute
a competition, and outside of that the
richness and healthfulness of your pure
(-anei sVrulp is witholit a rival in the mar-
ket."
I feel greatly honored in having been
selected to convey this message to you.
so full of hope and enlcouragemient foir you
at tlie close of a seasiin of so many un-
toward and discouraging experiences.
No one 'an doubt lihat lalnrs of sci-
ence will always he in vain in the quest
if some harlilesl s antidote for repress-
ing tlie rebellious spirit of fermentation
milder certain conditions in oin"- best pre-
iaredl syrulps. so ais ito enablel, safe transit
in the cheaper forms of packages to con-
suotning markets, either in tlie treatment
of the syrup itself. or in fashioning the
barrel or package. so as to kIep it in con-
tinued sterilization until emptied of its
contents. Upon tlhe latter line Professor
W. I1. I)lson,. assistant director Ioluisi-
:ant Sugar Experiment Station, Baton
louge. in IBulletin No. 75. second series.
has a very instructive article. in the con-
cluding paragraph of which he says:
'It wivmil seen that there should lie
nothing to hinder preserving syrup in
large tanks by sterilizini the tanks and
introducing the syrup in a sterile condi-
tion while hot friin the pans. and by ad-
mitting air only tlroiugh sterilized cot-
ton and using this kind of faucet for
drawing offt the syrup. the supply could
lie drawn at pleasure, and fermentation
in thie bulk prevented as long as may be
desired."
I have a nulxr of these bulletins, full
of interesting linatt-r an anl a allustration
of faucet referred to bly Professor Dolh-
soni. which I wouhl lie glad to place in
the hiindis of tlihe meiimber.
In tlie Louisiana Planter. 310th ultimo.
IMr. Edward Everett Yoluing, writing front
Chiitcago. contributes ani extremely inttr-
esting laticle ullon the subject of ferumen-
tationl. detailing tile ell'orts being under-
taken lvy Cliaha. II. Fuller's News Agency
to discover some safe and heIalthful means
for suga syriups. In tihe opening
lparagrlaplh lihe says:
"llFor mire thai a i iiarter otf a century
thlie Americtin public has 1 'cen patiently
waiting for a piure slgarcane syrup ini
sullicient quantities to nieet a general de-
imand. Now tlie attitude of that public is
such as says. 'Patience' has ceased to ls'
a virtue.' It says that the question of
I ferlelntation illust lie solved aild that
right early. In tlis fait is enveloped theo
Iposibilities lof w\ealtilh and happiness for
sullilgarilta growers and those interested in
i the handling anmi sale of syrup. It ilmeans
h iope ad evoluttion. Scientific inethtods and
I t inew liusiness."
i The concluding paragraph of this arti-
S-l is soi corrobolrative of tlie message I
liirughlit yo froni Seeretary Wilson, and
i in such perfect accord with nmy own views
i in thi interview. andl as expressed to you
i upon li other ocicasions. that I 'hall make
it the closing paragraph tof this annual
I communication, and luring the conllvention


seek ain occasion to have Mr. Young's able
article read in full to you.
"'The commercial possibilities of a pure
siUgarca.ne syrupl are scarcely realized even
by tlte suigarcane growers. It will meet
every rtequiremlent of syrup and once used,
will never be laid aside for any substi-
tutes. If properly advertised, it is not
too much to say that it will at once sup-
plemient all other syrups and become a
favored article in its line in every house-
hold in the land."
For you, growers of sugarcane, there is
inuclh foos for thought in these utterances,
and I most heartily congratulate you, and
tihe country, that your labors are begin-
ning to be recognized, though tardily, it
is true, and that the clouds that gathered
about your industry a year ago, are be-
ginning to show a fringe of their silver
lining. That they may all become silver
lined rests with you henceforth. One
caution, and 1 close; with receptive mar-
kets assured, see that only the purest syr-
up is permitted to reach the public and
tie victory, complete and for all time,
will be overwhelmingly yours, and an-
other great moin-y (rop be contributing
its annual quota to the enrichment of
,our section.

Other Addresses.
Cane Culture and Syrup Making on the
l"armi was ably handled by C. K. Mc-
Quarrie. of DeFuniak Springs, who was
followed by Dr. W. H. Wiley, chief of
lte bureau of chemistry, U. S. Depart-
Ient of Agriculture, Washington. We
hope to devote some attention to his ad-
dress in the future.
'The evening session was devoted to
a discussion on paper made from bagasse,
led by Tennant lee, president of the Fibre
Board (Company, of Boston. Dr. Wiley
again addressed the convention on the
various kinds of syrup, etc., followed by
N. H. Fogg. of Altamonte Springs, on
lapanese 'ane Culture.
Thursday's program consisted of ad-
dlresses by Prof. Dick .I. Crosby, superin-
tendent of Experiment Stations, U. S.
department of Agriculture, Washington,
Iis theme being, Agricultural Education;
.1 paper by W. L. Vanduzor, of Kissimmee,
int the I)isston Sugar Venture in that re-
gion; Home and Foreign Markets by Col.
('. 1. iGonlyear, of Brunswick, Ga.; The
culturee of Sugarcane and Manufacture of
Sugar in the Gulf States, commercially
considered. by Hon. R. E. Rose, State
'hemlst. of Tallahassee, and several oth-
,-rs. among them, Mr. W. I. Roddenburg,
of Georgia.

Election of Officers.
The old officers of the association were
icelehcted. There was but one change, and
that was the election of Capt. R. E. Rose,
of Florida as first vice-president. The olfi-
vers elected were:
TIm. following officers were elected by
acclamation:
President-I). G. Purse. of Georgia.
First Vice-P'resident--R. E. Rose. ot
Florida.
Second \ice-Presidents-C4. G. Aber-
ilomnbie, for Alabama; C. K. McQuarrie,
for Florida; W. B. Roddenberry, for Geor-
gia; .John Dyinlond, for Louisiana; H. H.
.)verstreet. for Mississippi; John Lawton,
for South Carolina.
Tre-tsurer--.1. A. Ilollomonn of Florida.
Secretary-I. .Martin, of Georgia.
Assistant Secretary-Ralph Eliwardes.
iof Florida.


WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS MENTION THE RECORD.


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.











8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Local Lumber Market.


ILunmwr is in better shape than it has
been for weeks past. The result of inl
quiry is Iringingi orders 0 and most of
tle factotr- are doing a ra;ir business.
As the cool weather North gives way to
warn weather, thlie market dellfand for
Florida h tuff gets better. (;(oo( sized
scl-duiles are now going forward and thi
indications ir'e tliit business for May will
Ih very oodl. A numller of mills Ihave
orders extending over several ntlintlis
in tihe flntuilre antinll ll of tlhem iin- arn, I I%'a

Norden & Sax to Quit.
\e hlarn from the New York Luniiliel
Tiade journall of the Ist instant, tlit an-
notllllncilllent has Ibeein nade lby the Nor en
& Sax Iulnilwr ('Compiany of talt city. with
bIrainch ollit-s in Saannah andi .lackson-
ville. that tlle coniipany w ill pass into
liinidation. All contl rat t at present in tli
lihands (it tli, co((iIny will Ie tilled. anl
Ite lu-ineiss w il be contillned intil ali
matters are finally settled. after which
tlie tirin will cease In-iiness entirely.

The Hebard Lumber Company.
Articles of inco-rioration have been sign
ed for one of the largest cypress nnliber
companies in ( eorgia. at Thomasville, to
lie known as thi Icbhard Lumber ('omllany..
The ineoriporators are ( harles S. lebardl.
lhaniel L. ]Hehlard and .Julia A. Marsden.
and its capital stock is .$2M)N.0(N. It pro
ioses to get its supply of cypress front;
tile counties of ('a:den. Cliarleton. Clinch.
Ehcols. (1 lynn. MeIlltosh and \Wa\re, and
controls larIge tracts in Oketinokee swamp.l

Ntw Lumber Mill on the Seaboard.
The C'lark Brothers Company, of Bel-
niont. N. Y., is to furnish inachlinery foi
tle new saw mill to be Inbilt Iby the Iil-
ton & IDotle Luminier Complany in Bryanil
count (;a.. on the Belfast river albont fo in
miles from Way's Station on the Sealioarid
Air Line Railway. The mill will cost
aliont $200.X04). It will be 2:38 fet long
and (64 feet wide. and 5S feet to tlhe top of
the monitor on the roof. It will be in op-
eration I)b Noveimber 1st, and its capacity
will be alilnit 20011.0NI feet ie'r day.

Cypress and Pine in the West.
Cypress is maintaining its strength in a
satisfactory manner h throughout the West.
as far as it can Iw piroitablly marketed.
But the April demand -was not very great
for it. .anlufaeltrerl's lhave tlie market
well under -ontrol and nothing goes at les-
than list price.

.lolin E. Fay. a llllum rlian of Egypt.
(.a.. was; chllos-en Stat'. Senator at the re-
cent ip:ilnary. defeating Major Rawls. ol
I-uyton. lby a sniall majority.

IHarvey rangere. of the (;ranger-Stubll-
Iilllliber (lCoimpany. of Savannali. will a
I)ranclt ollice in this city, wil take an ex-
tensive Western trip in a few days. taking
in the 'tosmiite and the Pacitfic Const. Mr
(rang r \was raised in this city.

Froml our Norilhern sources we learn
lthe fact that. at New 'York. ('iincinnati
Saginaw. tlie Tolnawandas, l'hiladel)liia
Bailti moire. Albany. Boston and lifialo
the lightning rodsl are iup) for a good luim
Inr t nile. and wliile the outlook is goo l
ait present but little is doing.


.1. W. F. loodall has purchased an inter-
i t ill tlit lllanling Iill blinill ess of Baliskin
& May t Addel. (Ila. A shingle inill is
!hiing, added to the pliant.

inussell's shingle miill at Albeville. (.an.,
wiere Iinrned onn the lI5t of last niontlh.
I.< s-. tlIs).s)iO). Ni insurance.

ire-is haven burned tile Law & Des-
Champili -aw nmill. neir .MeBee. S. 'C.; ilso
tihe ilililin feet of lI(nilir in the Smnith &
.\Alilin- l1In \. val' aI t OI)la, 1La., andl iid
seriess din damage to the linliber yaril and
variety work oif \W.ston & (o.. Ailbany,
(n;i.. last loni ilth.

'Yellohw pine. on the contrary, shows no
inlprovlen, nt, nor is any exilH'ted during
tin' i xt tlhirty days. The compllaint is
tilt tIhe inilis are pirolduing toio mnuchl of
it. Stewks at. tih mills are increasing
an il sales agents anre Iing pullslied for or-
tders.

hlie saw miill of .I. A. & W. P(ill, at
\\oodilliry. Ia.. was inurn'ed on the ]5thi
of la-st. iontlih together wit considerable
lin lila.

20,113,512 Feet of Lumber.
(ivr t wenty million feet of lumber
was ahipiiiel from this liort during tilhe
month of April, just closed. Of this 16,-
2:l3.76i2 was yvlow iine slillned coastwise.
3;.4AS.7.51 was yellow pine. sliiplel abroad,
andl :l91.(1H6) feet of cypress. shipped coast-
w is.
Thi' is ;tit excess of 7.743,!95.3 feet over
.\iril. I!0r.1. and an excess of S.iX7,050 feet
ov-r April, 11902.
Sinne .laniuary 1, the lniihlr sliipinent
f;oi 1 tli i I. )rt ihas ltleni (WS.i.07ti,193 feet.

British Lumber Imports.
'Te value of vwood and timber imported
into thle t nitedl Kingdlonm during the first
lariiirtr of 1904 Iwas in round nillnllers
$15.145.IN0I). lDrin tie sale liwridl of 19103
t was 1\\;l .h1.1i.( NI. Iheing an increase this
\ar;1r of .2.I040.INK).


CYPRESS IN NEW YORK

Cypress Prices Current F. O. B. New York
Market.
Il.unh1er. RouIghl or Dressted.
I'ank stock. 1 inches. .-. ...... ..$4.75
Tl'aink stock. 2 ilnells. .. .. . .. 50.7-
I'ank stock. 21/, inches ...... .... 56i.T
I'ank stock. 3 inches .. ........ 5(6.75
'ir ts and Secondls. 1 incl.. .... 44.25
Forstsa ndi Seconds. 11/4 inches. .. 45.25
'iritts and Setconds, 11/2 inchies.. .. 45.25
i"irlts and S conds, 2 inches .... .. 47.25
yirsts anid SeAonlds. 21/2 inches. 2.75
:-'irsts atIndt Seconlds. inches ...... 52.75
velects. I inchl ..... 3 8.'2;
Selects. I/4 invites. . .. .. .... 39.25
Select-t. 1 i/;, inclis.. .. .. .. . 39).25
Se'c. ts. 2 inches .. .. .... .. .. .. 41.25
Selects. 2/ indices. ... .... 45.25
Setlects. : incies.... .. . . .. 45.25.
S, hop. 1 inchi -.. . . . . .. 29.25
S i, ll. l11i inches .. .. ..... ... .33.25
Shollsp l '/, inches . . . . . 33:.25
Slit. "2 intrl-s .... .-.-. ... 3-:4.25
Shop. 2'., incites . . .. . . 40.25
. Shlip. : inches . . .. 4025
I'or prices on 8-inch add $1 per 1,00 feet.
For prices on 10-inch add $2 per I,(00
feet.
For Ipic, on 12-inchl add $C.50F per 1,6100
feet.


THE RECORD KEEPS PACE


White Springs, Fla.

On the Suwanee River
The Great Health Resort of the South.
Sulphur Spring 25,000 Gallns per Minute.
Healing Springs -- Forest Walks -- Shooting & Fishing
NO MOSQUITOES. NO MALARIA..
The Healthiest Summer Resort in America.


THE PRITCHARD HOUSE,


An Ideal Home for Invalids, FirstClass Table

ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES.
Write for particulars. ...
MRS. S. L PRITCHARD, Proprietress. WHITE SPRINGS, FLA,


THE OAKSI

A Typical Southern Home


NEWLY BUILT and FURNISHED,


EVERY COMFORT


-Write for particulars-
MRS. M. C. SKIPWORTH, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


KENDRICK HOUSE,

Headquarters for Southern Families,
GOOD TABLE HOME COMFORTS
... For particulars address...

MRS. J. B. ROBERTS, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE HAMILTON,

A New, Modem, High-Class Hotel.

ELECTRIC LIGHTS and BELLS HOT and COLD BATSH
For full information write

JNO. S. BOWEN, Owner and Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE NEW PAXTON,

Commodious, Home/Like Hotel
ROOM FOR 100 GUESTS.


Table Unexcelled.


Every Attention to Invalids


MRS. E H. PAXTON, Owner and Proprietres, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


THE TELFORD HOUSE

A Large, New, Threestory Brick and Stone Hotel, Newly Fur,
nished Throughout, All Modern Conveniences.
Rates $5.00 to $8.00 Per Week. $1.00 and $2.00 Per Day
CAN ACCOMMODATE 85 GUESTS.

W. B. TELFORD, Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


A. S. PENDLETON, W. B. JOHNSON. JAS. LASSITER. W. W. STRIPLING,
President. Vice Pres. Gen. Manager. AssL Treamrer.

S5he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers
402-404-406-408 East Bay Street. Jackselville. Fla.
DIRECTORS:
D. M. FLYNN B. F. CAMP. A. S. PENDLETON, W. W. STRIPLIN
WALTER RA', THOSE. DOWLING, W. B. JOHNSON, JAS. LASSITER,
N. G. WADE, PERRY F. COLESON.
WITH SOUTHERN PROGRESS.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


NAVAL STORES


Special Train
TO THE

WORLD'S FAIR
AND

National Democratic

Convention.
Train to 1e operated by special ser-
vice, will consist of:
One combination Library. (lub and Bag-
gage Car. four Pullman sleeping cars:
each car containing two drawing-rooms
and ten sections. One dining car. Total.
six cars.
Our schedule will he:
Leave Jacksonville. 8:.0 p. m.. Thurs-
day, June 30; Ieave Atlanta. 5:30 a. m.
Friday. July 1: leave Chattanooga 10:15
a. m. Friday. July I: leave Lexington. 5:50
p. m y.Frid Julv y i: leave Louisville 8:30
p. m. Friday. .July 1: arrive St. Louis 6:00
a. m. Saturday. July 2.
The party will therefore spend July 2.
3, 4. 5. 6, 7. 8 and 9! in St. Louis, andi re-
turning-
Leave St. Louis, 9:00 a. m., Saturday.
July 9; leave Louisville. 6:00 a. m. Sun-
day, July 10; leave Lxin.gton. 9:30 n. in..
Sunday, July 10; leave Chattanooga. 5:311
p. m., Sanday. Julv 10: lleave Atlanta
10:25 p. m.. Sunday, July 10; arrive
Jacksonville. 7-00 a. m. Monday. July II.
This train will be a solid vestilelel onIe.
composed of the very latest and newest
equipment. and will run: through to St
Louis and return for the exclusive us"
of the Naval tSores iwople.
Our route will bo. over the SOl THI ENX
RAILWAY, going and retuiniing.
The expense of the trip will be:
Railroad fare, Jacksonville to St. Louis
adn return, 827.50 each; one lower berth.
Jacksonville to St. 1.<,iis. ,>,;e ,av.n 4..50:
round trial, $13.00: one upp, r lihrt I..lnJak-
sonville to St. Louis. on,. way. $4i.30.
round trip. $13.00; one -mction. lower and
upper berth, Jacksonville to St. 14Imis,
one way, $13.00. round trip. $2600: Iian-
ing-room. Jacksonville to St. I.ouis, one
way. $24.00, round trip, $48.00.
The berths are of regular size and will
of course accommodate ,two people., hit
for a couple it will be Ietter to have a
'section. whi h will 1i til"he o, er awl upper
berths.
Dining car will be operatedl on table,
d'hote plan at .1.00 cnh l nI.;l ,or t,;i:
person. Three meals will 1,: served on
the going trip. iheing breakfast. lunehr
and dinner, and theslc tli-,e 'ie.ls n i
$3.00 for each person.
Three meals will he served on the re-
tur trip, being breakfast, lunch and din-
ner, and samp charge will Iw $3 for each
person.
Under this arrangement, therefore, it
will cost one person on this .special train
from Jacksonville to St. Louis and re-
turn:
Round trip, railroad fare ....... $27.50
One berth, round trip ........ 13.00
Six meals, round trip ............ 6.00

Two lpeiple. will lbe twice *$4.50 andl
'so on.
The nunlbl,.r of pas-engir-r on this train
will he positively one hundred.
It is necessary, therefore, in order to
conclude all detailed arrangement for ap-
plications for space on this "Special" to lbe
filed with the Secretalry of tlhe Turpen-
tine O)erators' Association. Jacksonville.
a's early as possible. Fach application will
then Ihe assigned certain -,pace on the
train, and such applicant will be fully in-
formed in a personal letter.
Addre..

JAS. A. HOLLOMON,
Secretay,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Jacksonville Wholesale Lumber Marl
(For week ending May 6.)
Merchantable.
lard schedules-$10.50 to $13.00.
Sound and square schedules, ~9.50
$12.00.
Merchantable car material-
Average schedule of sills. ;6 feet
under, 10 inches and under, $13.00
$14.00.
Special schedules-according to s
and lengths-prices steady.
K. D. Saps-"6" and up 80 per
clear, $9.50 to $10.00.
Flooring:
$11.50; No. 4, $8.50.
Cypress.
First and seconds, 4 quarter base,
load prices. $34: selects. 4 quarter b
No. 1, $15.00: No. 2, $13.50; No
$28; shop, 4 quarter base, $20.
Cypress Shingles-f6x18 A's, per 1
pes.. $5.25: primes. $.25; 4x18, A's. $3
primes. $2.75.
Cypress lat.hs $2 per 1.000.
Cypress market strong. Mills h
more orders than they can fill. Prosp
good for higher prices. Dry stock sea


ket.


Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

and
to Advertisements Will be Inserted in rats Department at the Following Rates:
izes For one week. 20 cents a line.
For two weeks, 35 cents line.
For three weeks, 50 cents a line.
cent For four weeks, - 65cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. Copv must be in this office not later than Thursday
car- morningg to secure insertion in Friday's paper.


ase,
. 3,
.000
.50;

have
ects
irce.


Business Directory.

CHAS. A. CLARK, INC.
FUNERAL DIRECTOR AND EMBAIAM1R
!t and 42 W. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Fla
Telegraph orders receive prompt atten-
tion. Open always.

JOHN ZAHM'B EUROPEAN HOTEL
128 E. Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant. Nicely Furnished
Rooms. Open day and night. Bettlllni's
old Stand.
Conover's Drug Store. Bay and Julia,
Jacksonville. Fla. Mail us your orders
for commissary drugs. Give us a trial.
J. 8. PINKUSSOHN CIGAR COMPANY
61 W. Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
THE BEST OF EVERYTHING
TO SMOKE AND CHEW
The Largest Tobacconists in the South


M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

Commission Merchants.
ROSIN, TURPENTINE, TAR, PITCH,
GUM THUS, RICE, ETC.
138 Front Street, NEW YORK.


BIlLY & MONTOMERY,
Commission Merchants,
NaveLv Stores 6 Cotton
Liberal advances made against ship-
ments. Consignments solicited.
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
NEW YORK CITY.



Trade Checks
FOR T HE


COMMISSARY BUSIm 8.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Industrial Record Go.,
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


Horses and Mules.
We have on hand at all times a well
selected stock of horses and mules for
saw mill and turpentine purposes. Can
please everybody in price and quality.
Will have a car of saddle and harness
horses at Marianna April 5th. See our
stock before buying. Dillon & Penuel,
Marianna, Fla.

Five Registered Shorthorn Bulls
One is half brother to "Beauty Boy,"
who was champion at three Texas shows.
Another is half-brother to our 1800 pound
cow. "Mary Spears." All gonl and ready
for immediate service. Prices $100.00 to
$175.00, subject to previous sale.
I'ialnietto Park Stock Farm. Z. C(. (Chali
bliss & Co.. proprietors. (Oala. Fla.

Employment Wanted.
i Ow'ij.r tk c.hanl ne ilii lur ]ullfinei f-we


q


Turpentine Men.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. 1 outfit pumps 2,000
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 cents and
requires no attention while running.
Started in one minute. J. R. Campbell,
Ocala, Fla.

For Sale.
Good Turpentine and Sawmill Location
for sale. Reason for selling, have other
business that requires our attention. Ad-
dress Turpentine Operator, Lynne, Fla.

For Sale.
200 tons 48-lb. relaying steel rails West
Virginia and Kentucky delivery. 100 tons
60-l. relaying steel rails, Southern de-
livery. 1.500 tons 56-lb. relaying steel
rails. West Virginia delivery. 150 tons 30-
lb. relaying steel rails, West Virginia de-
livery. Isaac Joseph Iron Company, 525-
53- Hunt St., Cincinnati, Ohio.


have a faithful woodsman we do not need. For Sale.
whom we can recomnr nil. Salary renas-
onable. Address T. N. Brown & Co.. The right party can buy half interest in
irookfield, Ga. good turpentine business, with 15 crops
virgin boxes, plenty hands, good healthy
place, good outlet, cheap freights. Will
Wanted. take $12,00 to $15,000 cash to buy half
A regular supply of pure spirits of tur- interest. Will sell all if can't get suitable
pentine. Can take to start with 15 to :30 partner, partner preferred that can take
casks per week. Must stand tests. Open charge. Information, address P. O. Box
to consider the purchase of a good tur- 288 Tifton, Ga. Also good saw mill loca-
,entine loation. Applvy l.eidrumin Bros. & tion for sale. Address box 288, Tifton, Ga.
(o.. Jacksonville. Fla. 4t.


W. J. L'ENGLE.
President.


J. W. WADE.
Vice-President.


E G. HUGHES,
Sec'y and Treas.


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.


DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.

Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.

Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.




McMurray Livery, Sale and Transfer Co.
HORSES AND MULES.
We carry the largest stock of any stable in the city, and have always
on hand 100 to 150 head of all kinds and prices. If in need of any, give
us a call. or write for what you want.
E. B. DALTON, Manager, Jacksonville.


"NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIK SUCCESS."










10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J. R. PAsOTrr. ABCHaR S. HUBBARD. ABTB u F. PaRa
President. Vice-President. Cashier.

The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
Capital 200,000. Surplus, $100.000
STATE DEPOSITARY.
General Banking. Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes. 5.00 per Year.



Review of Naval Stores for a Week


rr~"'- --- ---------~~~~-- t--------mr
Pumping Outfits 7OR

Turpentine Stills
WITH FIRE PROTECTION CONNECTIONS.

Best PUMP in the World
From 40 to 700 Gallons of Water per Minute.
Write or call on
FRED E. GILBERT.
Automobile Headquarters
29 West Forsyth St.. Jacksonville, Fla.


The local turpentine situation has much
improved. Turpentine is 55 and all grades
of rosin are steady and firm. Both rosin
and turpentine are coming into this mar-
ket freely, the daily average receipts be-
ing about 300 of turpentine and 1,000 of
rosin.

Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Pree Repts Sales Exp. 1903
Mon., May 2 !54 400 136 302 45
Tues., May 3 54/ 765 364 832 45
Wed., May 4 155 363 610 160 45
Thurs., May 5 155 589 80 390 45
Reoin for the Week at Savannah.


Monday. May 2.


Last Year.


WW ...... .. .. .. 3.80 3.40
WO ............ 3.60 3.30
N ............. 3.45 3.20
M ........... 3.20 3.15
K.. .. .. .. .. .... 3.15 3.00
I.. .... .......... 2.80 2.85
H .. .. .. .. .... 2.70 2.40
G.............. 2.65 2.00
F .............. 2.60 1.95
E .. .. .. .. .. ..... 2.55 1.90
D .... .. .. .. ...... 2.50 1.90
ABC .. ...... 2.50 1.90
Sales 250, receipts 777, exports 7,348.

Tuesday, May 3-Market unchanged. Sales
2.624. receipts 2.348. exports 4.693.

Wednesday. May 4-Several changes in
the market on this date, all grades clos-
ing as follows:
A. B and C, $2.50; D. $2.55: E. $2.60:
F. $2.65; (C, $2.70; H, $2.75: I. $2.80; K.
$3.15; M, $3.20; N, $3.35; window glass,
$3.50; water white. $3.75. Sale& 270, re-
ceipts 982, exports 1.161.

Thursday, May 5-WVW advanced 5 cts.,
resuming the old figure of $3.80, and F
and below advanced 5 cents, all grades
closing as follows: A. B and C, $2.55; D,
$2.003 E. $265; F and G, $2.70; H, $2.75;
I. $2.80; K, $3.15; M, $3.20; N, $3.35;
window glass. $3.50; water white, $3.80.
Sales 1,398, receipts, 1,024, exports, 1,870.

Baily & Montgomery's Review.
New York, May 4, 1904.
Spirits Turpentine-Stock, 586 barrels.


Business for the week has been fairly
good, but as usual most of the business
has been done in arrival lots, and with
better weather the jobbing business shows
considerable increase.
Thursday, April 28,-58 1-2c. asked.
Friday, April 29--581-2c. asked.
Saturday, April 30-58c. asked.
Monday, May 2-58c. steady.
Tuesday, May 3-58c a. m.; 581-2c. p.
m.
Wednesday, May 4-581-2c. asked.
Roosin-Stock. 10,550 barrels.
Business for the week has been fairly
good. prices remained steady.
A to D, $2.85; E, $2.90; F, $2.95; G,
$3.00: H, $3.05; I, $3.20; K, $3.60; 31,
$3.70; N, $3.90; WV(, $4.20; WW, $4.40.

Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosins.
Stowk April 1 .......... 6,495 44.550
Receipts May 5 ........ 589 1,024
Receipts previously ...... 14.411 39,449
Total .............. 21,495 85,023
Exports May 5 ........ 390 1,870
Exports previously ...... 15,422 54,212
Total .............. 15,812 56,082
Stock May 5 .......... 5,683 28,941
St(ok last year ........ 7,806 122,417

Range of Turpentine and Rosin at Sa-
vannah for Three Years.
I 1903-4 II 1902-3 i| 1901-2
Spirits | 45 651 42 65 131 53
Rosin


VV W
VWG......
K. .....
F .. .. ..
D . ... ..


.,3_04. 3o t.0u4.zO
..3.104.40 3.253.85
.2.804.15 2.403.20
. 1.65 2.90 1.202.10
. 1.55 2.80 1.102.05


z.zo a.430
2.00 3.70
1.65 2.45
1.10 1.50
1.00 1.40


Turpentine at London.
S1904 1903 1902 1901
Stock Apr. 16 14.351a 24,926 23.285 9,572
Dpl'd this wk. 1.731b 1,319 2,906 1.521
Since Jan. 1 25.978 21.797 26,685 26,876
Price Apr. 18 42-9 43- 32- 26-6
July-Dec. .. 41- 34-9 32-3 25-6
(a) includes 391 French. (b) includes
40 French.
Reported by James Watt & Son.


Crops of Spirits and Rosins for Three Years.


Crop
Spirits.
Wilmington ...... ....16,511
Charleston.. .... ..... 2,409
Savannah.... .. ....176,418
Brunswick...... .... 55,002
Mobile.. ...... ...... 12,315
New Orleans.... ....... 36,017
Carrabelle ..... ......closed
Georgetown......... 7,515
Pensaaola.. ...... .. 42,554
Jax. & Ferndina.. .... 187,210
Tampa ...... ........closed
Totals...... ......535,915


1903-04.
Rosin.
89,667
3,159
650,938
184,527
50,480
133,126
closed
44,214
205,982
653,210
closed
2,020,925


Crop 1902-03
Spirits. Rosin.
18,883 113,968
3,007 11,835
270,670 940,507
68,947 244,106
18,969 79,272
.33,103 108,033
3,394 32,148
10,307 46,899
38,275 192,205
91,976 375,211
13,565 40,664
571,096 2,184,818


Crop 1901-02
Spirits. Rosin
16,921 109.484
3,004 13,270
313,085 1,071,440
79,669 286,125
21,080 88,572
21,038 94,336
8,177 47,497
8,458 50,515
37,786 154,350
70,000 245,000
15,424 51,779
593,492 2,212,413


FOR SALE.
50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill. $2.35 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in tle State.

C. BUCKMAN, "Ar .-.. ret
a p Jenkeonville, grlee.


R. S. HAI... Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L J. KNIGHT, Sec. and Treas,


MARION HARDWARE CO.,


HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.


Herbert A. Ford,
President.


Geo. H. Ford,
Vice-Pres.


F. L. Watson,
Cashier.


The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA. FLORIDA.
CAPI TA L, $.0,OO.OC.
DIRECTORS: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Clarence Camp, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicited.

C. H. BARNES, Pres. J. D. SHAW, Vice-Pres. RALPH JESSUP, Sec.-Treas.

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonville, Pensacola, Fernandina and Savannah
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


W. FRAZIER JONES. C. H. BARNES. R. JESSP. W. H. BAKER.
President. Treasurer. Asst Tres. Secretary.

UNITED GROCERY CO.,

Importers & Wholesale Grocers
HAY, GRAIN and FEED.
Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
B. G. LASSETER. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Vice Pres. and Gen. Mir.

M. A. BRIGGS, President. HOMER BROWN, 2d Vice-President.
H C. BRIGGS, 1st Vice President. J. C. McDONALD, Secretary and Treasurer



W. H, BRIGGSHARDWARE CO.

HARDWARE, MILL and TURPENTINE SUPPLIES.

Council Tool Co., & Holmes' Tool Co.. Tools,
Brigg's Sterling and Perfection Hacks and Pullers,
Cutters, Files, Whetters, Glue, Batting, Strainer Wire,
Turpentine Wagon Harness and Collars,
Hoop Iron, Coopers' Tools and Rivets.

Everything in Turpentine Supplies,

Send us your Mail Orders,

W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.,
VALDOSTA, GA.


THE RELIABILITY OF OUR ADVERTISERS VOUCHED FOR


-r------- ------ r rlr


----------------------------U







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11
**fAft****6*****ft6ftdt666ft tftestt *6tf


Machinery

Bar Iron, Iron Pipe and Fittings, Bolts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tools, Lumberman's Tools,
Packing of All Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corrugated
Roofing.


JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER,
uACKSONVILLE, FLA.


and


Mill


Supplies.


State Agent For:
ATLAS ENGINES and BOILERS, SOULE STEAM FEED,
WORTHINGTON STEAM PUMPS, JENKINS' VALVES,
DISSTON'S SAWS, FUNTKOTE ROOFING,
CURTIS MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Mill Maceinery.
DeLOACH SAW MILLS, GILBERT WOOD PULLEYS,
HOYT's LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SPRING anl RUBBER COMPANY
Belt anm Rubber lese.
SOLVENTINE BOILER COMPOUND.
DODGE MANUFACTURING COMPANY,
Cast Irem Sprit Pulleys.
McCAFFREY FILES, MONARCH EMERY WHEELS,
DANIEL'S PPP STEAM PACKING,
A. LESCHEN & SON, Wire Rpe.


$(1o,ooo Judgment for Damages. .1. S. laskins with 1,250,000 cypress shin- man & Sons. The cargoes of the GeorgeI
In the Circuit Court for Escambia Coun- _rles for Salisbury. Maine. Farwell and Eva Danenhower are con-'
ty at Pensacola, Fla., last week attorneys The Batchelor Cypress Lumber Co., of signed to the J. C. Turner Cypress Lum-
Avery & Avery and C. M. Jones for the Panasoffkee, loaded the schooner John her Co.. at Irvington-on-the-Hudson, N.
J. C. Turner Cypress Lumber Co., of New. \AV. Hall with 375,000 feet of cypress V.
York, took judgment for damages in the lumber and 3,000 bundles of 6x18 in. shin-
sum of $150,000 against the Hagerman gles. consigned to the J. C. Turner Cypress
Lumber Co., of Pensacola. The cause of Lumber Co., at Albany, N. Y. The same MAKING A MARKET FOR SYRUP.
the supit was the alleged failure on the company furnishes 270,000 feet of the car- Last week we spoke of the value of or-
part of the Hagerman Lumber Co. to go for the steamer George Farwell, now ganization in the sugarcane industry.
furnish to plaintiff a balance of 19.000, loading at the S. A. L. docks. This steam- There is no more important use organi-
000 feet of manufactured cypress lumber I r received as the balance of her cargo zation can be put to than that of finding
due to be delivered on a contract for from Hodges & O'Hara, of Buffalo Gap, a market for the output. Assuming that
twenty million feet. The judgment is in 9.7,000 feet of cypress lumber and from syrup has been properly asked, and the
full for the amount sued for. the Standard Cypress Co., of Jacksonville, package as well as the syrup thorough-
Cypress Manufacturers Doing Business. 1 53.000 feet of lumber and 350,000 shingles. Lv sterilized, the syrup maker is anxious
Cypress shipments for this week from lThe schooner Evan Danenhower is re- to sell it to the best advantage. Unlike
Jacksonville and Palatka indicate that cy- ceiving a cargo of cypress lumber and I cotton, turpentine or live stock, it cannot
press is in demand. Messrs. Tilghman shingles at Palatka fro mthe Wilson Cy- J be kept long as fresh as when packed.
& Sons, of Palatka, loaded the schooner presi s (C, Hodges & O'Hara and Tilgh- Like a mortgage, it will work while we


sleep, and when we least expect it, the
barrel explodes.
There is, therefore, a necessity that it
be promptly marketed, and this can be
done by an organization better than by
an individual. A travelling representa-
tive employed by the organization, hunt-
ing up new markets and promptly dis-
posing of syrup, especially of the lower
grades, can fill a long felt want. In fact,
the organization could establish branch
houses in the various large cities of the
country where syrup could be sent, with
instructions to sell it at once. Managed
like the Florida Fruit Growers managed
before the freeze in selling their oranges,
there should be no difficulty in selling the
entire output of syrup of the members.


IA -- ----- .--- U


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels


Capital $100,000.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.


OFFICERS:


J. C. LITTLE, President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager.


JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


DIRECTORS:


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


C. H. BARNES, J. W. WEST,
W. F. COACHMAN.


W. J. KELLY


THE RECORD'S SPACE HAS A BIG MONEY VALUE.


99WWW WW*^V3;99W9**^999iOP;Oi0~;3iOP;~;0; 03;~;3F~Pi~ i99;0- - -*- -9 - -


---------U------- --U


c









12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

JAMES A. HOLLOMON,
Editor and Manager.
Published Every Friday.
S aouerTIOn, (Domestic).. .3.00 Per Annum
WCIP ( ION (Foreign) .... 3.50 "
"The Pine and Its Products."
All communications should be addressed
The Industrial Record Company.
Jacksonvillel. Fla.

Braa h Editorial and Business Office at
Savannr.h, Ga.

Entered at the Postoffice at Jacksonville,
Fla., as second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association. Sep-
temper 12, 1902. as its exclusive official or-
ga. Adopted in annual convention. Sep-
tembr .11 as the organ also of the general
association.
Adopted April 27th, 1903 as the official
ergan of the Inter-State Cane Growers'
association. Adopted Sept. 11, 19M as the
only official organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Bawmlll
Association.

COPE FOR ADVERTISING.
Advrtstais e*opy (ehanges or new
srvertisements) should resea us
T aesdy rmerlin to insure Inserties
An the Iss of the mae week.


CANE GROWERS' CONVENTION.

Jacksonville has earned the reputation
she now enjoys as the "Convention City.'
The cane growers of the South Atlantic
and Gulf States met here last Wednesday.
this being their second annual meeting.
Distinguished gentlemen holding high offi-
cial positions in several of the Southern
States were among the number. Able,
exhaustive and interesting papers have
been read and speeches delivered having
for their themes some portion of sugar
and syrup production. Ir. Wiley, the
chemist of the Department of Agricul-
ture, addressed the convention here, his
theme being the chemical problems involv-
ed in soil, climate, fertilizers, treatment in
manufacturing syrup, etc., and he handled
them all in a masterly manner. "How to
Avoid Fermentation," wa's one of his
theme, and it is needless to say that it
was listened to with acute interest.
The Federal Government is doing its
part in experimental work to show to our
people the best brands of cane to raise,
how best to cultivate, and how best to
manufacture both syrup and sugar. One'
important feature of the present meeting
is the bringing of this information before
cane growers, and this was done in a re-
port of progress by Dr. Wiley and others
in experiments so far made.
It was demonstrated at the meeting
that forty tons of cane can le raised from
one acre as easily as four tons, and that
five times as much can Ie made on an
acre of sugar cane as can be made on an
acre of cotton. Many other important
facts were brought out for the information
of the cane growers.
This meeting fully demonstrated tlhe
power of organization. Friction evolves
light and the rubbing together of the
brains of the experimentalists threw a
flood of.light on the subject of cane grow-
ing.
Men attended the convention who
thought they knew it all. but admitted
that they learned that they knew little or
nothing.
The Record is proud of the prominent
part it has taken to foster this organiza-
tion and shall look forward with interest
to see its work blessed with the grandest


organization of its kind in the South. In a
few years the Inter-State Cane Growers'
Association will be one of the most impor.
tant factors in Southern progress and
prosperity.


THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION.
Last Saturday the Louisiana Purchase
Exlpsition at St. Louis was opened with
appropriate ceremonies. The proceedings
were actually set in motion by a touch
upon a golden key in the White House by
President IRoosevelt. This touch commun-
icated to the far-distant scene the current
which liberated all the mechanical activ-
ities of the great fair-a striking illustra-
tion. among many of the strides that havy
been taken in developing the means of
communication during the century thaL
has clasped since the acquisition of th?
great territory beyond the Mississippi
gave space for the nascent republic to
grow toward the West. The exposition
at St. Louis covers more ground and com-
plri:ss a greater number of buildings than
:any other that has preceded it anywhere.
In cost its equipment has been exceeded
only once, namely, in the great Columbia
Exposition at Chicago in 1893. In addition
to the numerous attractions that modern
taste and ingenuity will contrive to make
the city a place of interest for the traveler
while the exposition remains open, patri-
otic memory will conspire to make St.
Ilouis a Mecca for Americans during the
year.


MONEY IN NEW YORK.
It often happens that money is a drug
on the market in New York City. Such
is the case just now. Of course, as it is
the financial clearing house for the West-
ern Continent, money in New York will
always le more plentiful than elsewhere.
In many ways the present position of
New York financial institutions is with-
out precedent, and, on the whole, it is ex-
tremely difficult to foretell the future be-
cause of the numerous novel factors that
cannot le guarded by precedent. The
mcre fact that loans and deposits of tlhe
associated banks are far above all previ-
ous records is not in itself significant, since
tlie nation has been steadily advancing
in tinmancial supremacy, and new high-wa-
ter marks are to be expected. Moreover,
cash holdings are much larger than in re-
cent ears. providing an ample surplus re-
serve. Non-nmenlhsr banks that clear
through members of the New York Clear-
ing House Association also carry a large
surplus albve the 25 per cent. of deposits,
although most of the institutions in this
class are State banks that are only re-
quired to carry 15 per cent. of their de-
posits in cash.
Several causes have contributed to the
present complex monetary situation, not
the least of which is the concentration of
(;overnnmnt funds in preparation for the
I'namina ('anal payment. As this sale has
been duly ratified by the Paris stockhold-
ers, there is reason to hope that one artili-
cial element will soon be removed. Even
on this point there is much difference of
opinion, for it is frequently asseverated
that little gold will le exported, shipments
having already discounted the operation,
while bankers are believed to have accumu-
lated a large supply of bills for transfer
instead of specie.
Actual movement of specie thus far this
season has been significant. Owing to
.Japanese purchases of supplies here and


in Europe. the receipts at the Pacific Coast
have reached such proportions that the
San Francisco mint has established a new
high record of coinage. April exports of
gold from New York city have exceeded
those of any months since November, 1901,
when another peculiar condition existed,
growing out of the purchase of Northern
Pacific stock held abroad in the etfort to
secure control of that property. Last
Tuesday week's steamer carried the larg-
est consignlment evr senlt from New York
to Paris on a single ship, although there
was a cargo of $78.36i.500 in November.
1901, but part of that gold was for iGer-
many.

BEET SUGAR INDUSTRY.
,Just at this time when the attention of
the whole South is looking to Jackson-
ville's meeting of the cane growers, some
data about the beet sugar industry of the
world should lie interesting.
Tlie following is a comparative state-
ment showing production of beet sugar, in
metric tons. in European countries last


Germany . .. .. .. ....
Austria .. .. .. .. .. ..
France .. .....
Russia........
lIelgium .......
Htolland...... ......
Sweden.. ..........
)Den a ilak .... ........
Italy. .. .............
Koumania.. .. ..
Spain. .. .. .. .. .. .
Other countries. .... ...


1903-04.
.... 1,960.000
. 1,175,000
810.000
.... 1,200,000
220,000
.. .. 125,000
10. .500
.. .. 49,001)
. .. 120,000
18,000
. . 11 ,000
.. 10.50)
__ (W~


Total.................. 5.910.000)
'lTe following is a comparative state-
iment showing hlow much sugar was con-
sulmedl by each iinhaiitant of Europe and
the IUnited States during last year:
Pounds.
(erniany...... ............. 2S.31
Austria.. ................... 17.8;4
France. .. .. .... ........ 23.56(
Itussia. ...... ........ .. ..17.SS
lBelguim.... .............. ..22.37
IHolland. .. ... .. .... .. 30..)5
Swedlen andi Norwav... ... ...... 39.5 .
I)enmark. ..... ......... ..51.97
Italy .. ......... ..... .. 7..37
Spain.. ........ ......... .1091
l ulinmania...... .. ........ . t.73
IPortgal and Madeira l .. ...... .. 14.41
Switzerla nd. .. .. .. .... . .. 2.83
EIngland .. .. .... .. .. ... .. S.s
. united States .. .. .. .. ... (i..39


REBUILDING BALTIMORE.
Since the disast rous lire that nearly de-
stroyed the monumental city last month
iumlilc-rnmien have Is-en figuring very exten-
sively on being at hand to supply the
stuff that will lie needed in rebuilding it.
Wlhen Jacksonville was destroyed three
years ago. the ashes were hardly cold le-
fore our people set to work to rebuild, and
in three years our record in the city re-
building line is without a parallel. Not-
ably the idea prevailed that Baltimore
would rebuild as rapidly as Jacksonville
did, and men engaged in the business of
furnishing supplies of all kinds needed for
such work hiked forward to a brisk busi-
ness, anl laid in stock at Baltimore a
great supply of it in all lines. Lumbermen
in Baltimore whose yards were already full
ordered more lumbiur. Speculartors from
elsewhere rushed large consignments of
lumber there.


But Baltimore is different from Jackson-
ville. The fire. while disastrous, left quite
a h:rge area of its business portion intact
where men could get into temporary quar-
ters and resume business. Those were oc-
cupiid and the business men of Baltimore
decided not to be in too big hurry to re-
build. A few months delay would be well
to consider, not only individual plants,
but also tile best way to build the new
city. An opportunity was afforded them
to act in concert and accomplish more
lasting results by going slow. The result
has Iwen that while Baltimore will be re-
built more grandly than before, the sup-
ply men who rushed in to get the business,
are very much overstocked with stuff.
And the lumbermen are in it as deep as
tle others. The fire did not destroy the
lumler yards, and probably there was
enough lumber already on hand in those
yards to meet the actual demands.
While we are proud of the reputation
.Jacksonville enjoys of being the only city
in the United States where more buildings
have been erected than were destroyed by
a twenty million dollar fire within three
years after the fire, we fear that Jackson-
ville will live to regret that she was quite
so fast in her rebuilding. It would doubt-
less thave been better had we taken a lit-
tle more time and rebuilt onr stores and
residences to withstand the ravages of
time instead of rushing them up with
poorly cured material, and before their
foundations had time to thoroughly set.


INSIGHT INTO THE LUMBER TRADE.

Many persons wonder what it is that
keeps thle lumler trade going. It is not
like the dry guods trade, where a mer-
clhant keeps on hand a stock of goods to
lie examined and sampled before being
sold. True there are lumber yards, but
tlhes are only for a display of samples,
so to speak. While orders are filled from
yards occasionally, most of the stock, es-
pecially in large lines, is never seen in a
lumilxsr yard.
The way it works is something like
this. A man finds that he will need a bill
of lumber. either a few feet or more up
to 5.IN.).IMM) feet. As soon as he knows
how iu.ch and how many kinds of lumber
ie will need. he makes out a schedule and,
if the hill be a small one, he mails copies
of it to two or three yards; if it be a
large one, lie mails copies to factors do-
ing a large business. They in turn send
thle '-chedule to their buyers near the
source of supply, and often to the mills
themselves. Thlise are called inquiries,
and lids are asked for to fill them, either

at the shipping pmint or at some point
near the buyer. Thus factors are put to
bidding against each other, and when the
bids are all in. if the inquirer is still in
tle notion of buying, he places the order
with the factor or mill that gives him
thel chliest figures.
Of course there are sales going on all
the time between mills, factors and regu-
lar customers, but the bulk of the busi-
ine1s is probably done through inquiries.
)cca-nionally, when orders are slack, fac-
tors and mills will send consignments of
luImls'r to the leading markets of the
North. and have some one dispose of them
on an ival. or store them in lumber yards.
fOne of the good things that can be said
alout the lumber business is that nearly
everyone who has followed it as a busi-
ness in this section for the past five years
lhas made money.


IF YOU ARE PROGRESSIVE, ADVERTISE IN THE RECORD.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


11NO. 8888.

THE ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE.
CAPITAL PAID IN. $350,000.00.
OPEN FOR BUSINESS AUGUST i, 1903.
OFFICERS:
Edward. W. Lane, President. Fred W. Hoyt, Vice-President.
Thomas P. Denham, Cashier..


Freight Claims. H. ROBIN SON Pres. H. GAILLARD. Cashier
*i*t These have always Iwen sore things to W. B. OWEN. VicePres.
tL mostt business people. \Whle it is truo Com m ercial Bank,
i0 that the railroad and transportation con- S
S panies are willing and anxious. to ettle State Depository.
Small claims against then:, still there are BBANCHIS' Ocala. Fla.. Lake City. Fla
o so many rules and forms to be observed Jacksonville, - -Florida
in presenting these claims that the aver
S age business man gets hopelessly entan
gled. Following the lead of the larger Calhoun County, Florida.
cities, Jacksonville now has the headquar- trat i ithi
terhalf miles of Dalkeith Landing, with three
under the management of an experienced lines of river steamers passing regularly.
railroad man, P. E. 1'eck. The agency i. Has never been touched by turpentine
incorporated, having as its pre,-;dent, loi |i nwn. A rare chance for a turpentine farn,.
D. Baker, of Baker & H s C y l)aily mail from Wewahitchka to Dalkeith.
). Baker, of Baker Hlme (m ny; ill cut out all waste and give you tim-
as vice-president, C. W. Bartleson. ',f C.- bered lands. Want to realize at once. Ap-
, W. Bartleson Co.; as general counsel, Ba- ply to W. D. Barnes. National Bank of
lm ker & Baker, and as secretary and treas- Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Fla. 4t


' h urer, P. E. Peck.
This agency has proven a signal suc-
cess, its charges are low and as the claims
given it are correctly presented, the set
tlement is never long in coming. It ha.
proved a boon to the trade. Amongst
others who endorse it are the Consolidated
Grocery Co., Florida Electric Co., Baker
& olmes Co., Thos. Nooney & Sons. '.
SW. Bartleson Co.. and the Wholesale Uro-
cers' Associatin. In addition every rail-
road company and steamship line has
endorsed the agency; it saves them
a i trouble, because the claims are properly
pr presented and consequently relieves them
S of the odium of not promptly settling
them.
SEvery shipper in Florida should join
this money-saving and worry-sparing
fr agency.
Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Review.
New York. May 3, 1904.
Spirits Turpentine-Thle market has
ruled quiet during the past week. Stocks
keep light, thie demand being mainly sup-
plied by arrivals. Stock, 121 barrels.
Rosin-The demand. while light, is
about sufficient to care rtr lots about as
fast as samples are placed on tables. We
call all grades steady at quotation's.
BC, $2.&5; D. $2.!W): E. $2.95; F, $3.00;
G, *3.00 to *3.05; I. $.i.A5 to $3.10; 1,
$3.15 to $3.20; K, $3.60; M. $3.65: N.
$3.85; WG(, $4.15 to $4.20; WW, $4.25 to
$4.30. TOL(),A, HART & CO.

New Victoria.
Corner Main and Adams,
Opposite Board of Trade Building.
Jacksonvile's New Hotel
Rates $.o00 to $2.50
R. BIXLER, Proprietor.


Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.


CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS

AND VATS.


S Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
G. M. DAVIS & sON, PALATK-KA, FLA.


THN

Bethune

Apparatus.

The New Process.
Extracts the spirts without destroying the
wood fibre. Runs out a charge In less than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-five gallons from cord of wood.
Makes pure water white spirits, free from
the odor of tar or creosote. No chemicals
used in refining the spirits. Needs to be
distilled only once after coming from re-
tort.
No trouble with bi-products, the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
duced and from wood. Only one grade
of spirits produced and that the highest.
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGER FROM FIRE
Built of finest material by high-grade
workmen. The cheapest machine offered to
the public.
We challenge comparison of output and
quality of product. We guarantee output
and quality.
For full particulars, prices, samples.
etc.. address-
The rine Belt CMnstuction Company
P. O. Box 543 RALEIGH. N. C.


The West.Raley-Rannie Company,
114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
A. I. WEST, Pres. E. E. West. Vice-Pres. W. R. Rannie, Vice-Pres. M. V. Raly. Sec. Treas.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

M an 1aa1S21e>a+sAAASaa t++n*wi+++ Lau b4U*g i4e


THOMAS DIXON. JR.. President, B. W. KIL6RE. Vice-PresideCt.
New York. Raleigh, N. C.
F. 6. HA* IC.K Secretary and Treasurer, New York.
W. H. KRUV, Cheiist, New York.


PRESIDENT'S OFFICE: 96 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORI.


Standard Turpentine Company


Builders of Wood Distilling Plants,
by the New Krug Patent Steam
Pressure Process. .


CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
AND INSPECTION OF WAYCROSS PLANT IS INVITEE

REFERENCES: Garlleld National Bank. P ew orrk R. 6. Dun & Co.


JNO. W. THOMPSON,


Superintendent Sales Agencies,


- WAYCROSS, 0


4


U
4


I







9t
Is
U





as

28
40
A:


E. H. TOfILINSON, Special Agent,
Corner Hogan and Forsyth Streets, - JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
*Xs<"M-S4^.>S8<4^<&<-&SW4->S8*- *.>*4**= **M*<<^S<^S<^fr88r *


0
a


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.
Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINGAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Flavius T. Christie,
President.


Frank C. Groover,
Viee-Pres.


Marshall W. Stewart,
See. and Tres.


THE IGRISTI-f ROONER DR O.


Wmles0le Oliggis.


Jcsonillie,


- Fl.


N.

We Solicidt Tf e Iro Lumber l nul sTeile CohIM ss DOmitWMl.

il Wers Our Seclolit. Coneson0eace Soliclite. We iII el Tolt


"FAIR, IRDEPINDENT AND PROGRESSIVE."


II


-iU;
.tLr










14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.


SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE.
To United Kingdom. in gallons:
Month IS0-4 1l-M4 1901-02
April.. .... ... 186.61 186.12 366.6
May .... .. .. 60,315 i,22 1,1b .364
June ...... .. 795,037 1,480.18 1,562550
July ..... .. .73759 289.934 1530,070
August.. .... ..SM8, 1,767,874
September .. 773211 646,257 09.700
October ......... 711.434 t8316 1,059.
November .. 661,638 1,295,769 922,991
December .. 1,659,656 1,531,779 576,784
January. .. 228,850 373,240 164,330

To Belgium and Netherlands, in gallons:
Month 1103-04 1902-03 1901-02
April ........ 286,812 90,447 Included
May .. .. .. .. 23,-06 515in all other
June........... W7.S, 267,210 Europe
July .. .. .. .. 76.UL. 819,217 86.83b
August.... .. 489.387 238.490
September.. .. 265,4 7A8201 4389621
October ...... 1130.14 1.0001 121.480
November .. 133,695 349,726 381,226
December .. 100,372 58,659 672,164
January .... 168,879 241,150 174,367

To Germany. In gallons:
Month 1903-04 1902-0 1901-02
April .... ............ 114,04 112,5=1
May .. .. ... 311283 48.436 230,56
June.. ...... 14.000 331,672 490,042
uly .... .... 38,116 180,412 78,787
August ...... 61,85 578,437
September... 226,960 506.981 713,967
October ...... 57,316 1.644 148,597
November .. 179,010 110,153 81,780
December -
January .... 132,600 54,607 153,898


To all other E
Month
April ......
May...... .
June........
July ........
August ......
September....
October ...
November
December
January ...

Total Foreign
Ing everyth


Europe in Gallons:
oMw 6 1902-03 1901-02
.. .. 60 18.475 260,065
... 6,068 31.047 674.311
. 145,23 1.000 636468
. 124.284 48,46
.. 2.500
. 4.36 38.040 21,000
.. 10000 42.832 17,05).
32,500 17,800 94,837
47,306 89,591 23,000
11,000 --

Exports. in gallons, includ-
ing outside of the United


States:
Month 1903-04 1902-3
April .... .. ... 14,083 566.815
May .. .. .... 18.78 260.144
June.. .... ....1,838.000 222..253
July ....... ..t2.81,80 1.651,015
August ... ... 1.734,l1 2.906.458
September. .. .474.145 2154,665
October ...... 1.4 M6 1002.87
November .. 1,851,068 1,932,183 1
December .. 1993529 1,794336 1
January ... 700292 820,253


1901-02
946.676
2,268.065
2,947,821
2.493.849

2.36.980
,66274
,850,175
629,990


ILOSINS.
To United Kingdom, barrels 280 lbs:
J.onth 1903-04 1902-02 101-02
April ........ 79,243 5.,387 63,41
May .. .. .. .. 60,316 ,22 68,994
June .... .. .. .0,748 67,542 61,62
July .... .... 82,948 9,235 65,510
August .. .. .. 7469 62.613
September.. ... 8,471 42,89 73,309
October ...... 46,641 41,034 90,057
November .. 71,107 95,735 88,643
December .. 61,455 64,455 72,502
January .. 53,506 42,769 60,518

T Be U~lu, anl Ne~herla ndsf bwrrel 2i


S. P. Holmes & Co.'s Market Letter. iiot mmuch of a time to be short of cotton.
\Ve cannot put too much emphasis on
Stocks.-The stock market has been un this. cTere is a short interest in the
S(hil and O 1 t this. There is a short interest in the
usually dull and narrow. On Monday, the
busiest day of the week, less than 300.00 orneirktul and first thin w e know some-
shares were traded in, and almost every .ill be cornering July and sending the
sale marked a decline. Since Monday thl !iric u1 i.l hap anlll bounds. It may not
daily transactions have averaged only "e a gial time to invest in cotton, we do
alout 170.000 shares, and the market has say it is, but this does not mean that
shown a slight recuperative tendency. As a its a 'hance to go short and one hat
result of the week's operations a large ilol not In issedr. A great many are
proportion of the railway list is fraction- ellig new cr months. e don
tlike tii srll short when the crop is hardly
ally lower. Norfolk & Western declined like to sl short hi n the crop is hardly
point on the report of a proposed plan for t f the ground. e will begin the next
a new bond issue. Erie was notably weak irop year with less cotton on hand than
on its net earnings for March. Pennsvl- an tim since the (ivil War in al proba-
*inlitv. TI'ls would lbe a fine condition to
vania Twin City Rapid Transit and alexi- lt. This u a fine
"ie shIort of cotton on. this woulhl Ie a tine
can Central ire the only active railway ehort ths ou b a n
contlltinll to lbe sliort of cotton on, should
issues that closed higher than last week.
crop news turn Issir. We may see a grad
h-al and slow sag for some weeks, and
S. P. Holmes & Company's Cotton Letter. then prices will go up more in two days
Jacksonville. Fla., May 5, 1904. than they went down in two months. Do
The upturn in July cotton today should i:ot he short of cotton for a while yet, un-
less it is simply scalping the market. It
be enough to keep anyone from the short
is too dang rons a game with no reserve
tide of the market. It will not be hard to e no e
.iIPIppl to fall ack ( on.
for anyone to se:, that July might easily
sag off as it has been doing for weeks and
get as low as 13% or even 13 cents and Teams loaded with palmetto roots for
then go up a cent in two days. When you the tannic acid factory are now conspicu-
have a cotton famine on your hands its

Weekly Industrial Record: w9UIII I I VIIIIeOI VL
Why not the sawmill men consolidate Stocks, Bonds, Cotton,
and form a stock company to sell their Grain and Provisions.
I product to tlhe consumer. If some one MEMBRS
would start the ball rolling evi ry saw mill NEW YORK GOTTON EXCHANGE
mian would take from one share to as high CHICAGO BOARD Of TRADE
as he was able. Those that did not take direct private wires to all exchanges.
sick at first would take stock later. Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Iet us have our own managers, inspectors Bell Phone 853 Baldwin Block


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE
Apr 1 Apr. 3 Apr. 10 Apr. 17 Apr. 24 May 1 May 8 May 15 May 22 May 2
NL ND 50 1 47 45 1-2 461-2 41-2 47
June 6 June 12 June 19 June 26 July 3 July 10 July 17 July 24 July 31 Aug. C
45 -4 46 47 47 47 47 3-4 48 50 50 4
Aug. 14 Aug. 21 Aug. 27 Sept. 4 Sept. 11 Sept 18 Sept. 2 Oct. 2 Oct. 8 Oct. 1
52%-15 63% 53% 6% 54 3-4 57 ND 56 57 1-2 65 1-0 1-4
Oct. 22, Oct. 2, Nov. 6, Nov. 19, Nov. 25Dec. 3, Dec. 10. Dec. 17. Dec. 31, Jan. 14
56 561-2 56 56 56 56 61-4 56 1-4 3 1-2-44
Jan. 22, Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18,Feby. 25 Mch. 3 Meh. 10 Mch 24
65 o0 64 62 60 59 60 58
Mch. 30
57
IKOSINS


pounds:
,.) 1 WW WG N M K I H G F E D C-A
Month 0304 102-0 101-02 April 1 .. ... L.90 $3.60 3.50 $3.40 $3.20 2.85 2.40 2.20 3.10 2.05 2.05 2.
April ...... .. 16,70 6,016 Included April 3 ..... 3.75 3. O 3.50 L40 3.20 2.85 2.40 12.2 2.10 2.05 2.0 2L.O
3uay ...... ...... ,706 51 n all otnr April 10 . . OD 3.45 .5 3.0 3.00 2.86 2.40 2.10 2.05 .LO 2.00 2.L
June ........ 3. .8 ,673 Europe April 17 . . .650 3.35 3.25 3.15 3.00 2.85 2.40 2.05 2.00 1.6 1.96 L6
July ... .. ... 646 19647 40,271 April 24 . . 3.40 3.25 3.15 3.10 36 2.8 2. 2.05 2.00 1.56 L8 L19
August .. .. .. 43,0 437.2 Ma-y 1. . .. 3.3 25 31 3.10 3.00 2.85 2.25 185 1.80 1.75 76 1.7
September ... 45, 10,819 34.7o May 8 . ... 3. 3 6 3. 1 3.10 3.00 2.85 2.25 1.80 1.75 1.70 170 1.70
October ...... 37131 6440 3012 May 16 . . .3.47% 3.27% 317% ;.12% L% 2.87% 2.27% L80 1.78 1.70 1.70 1.70
November .. 3,991 60,020 31,504 May 22 . . 3.65 3&35 .25 320 3.10 3.00 2.35 1.75 1.70 1.65 1.4 1.0
December .. 37,077 13,325 20,940 May 9 . . 3. 3.35 3. 3.20 & 10 3.05 2.40 1.85 1.80 1.75 1.70 L70
Jneua5mr ... ,0,e73 24,192 1.051 June . . 3.60 3.30 3.0 3.15 3.06 3.00 2.40 1.90 1.85 1.80 1.80 L75
January .... 60,739 24,192 15,951 June 1. . . 3.40 .10 3.00 2.95 2.5 2.80 2.30 190 1.85 1.80 75 1.70
June 19 ..... 30 3.10 3.05 2.65 2.85 2.70 2.25 1.75 1 .70 1.60 L
To Germany. barrels 280 lbs. June 26 ..... 30 3.10 3. 3.10 3 .95 2.85 2.65 2.26 L70 1.45 1.0 L56 L66
month 1903-04 1902-0 11-2 July . .... 3.30 310 3 3. &0 2.90 2.80 2.65 2.2 1.80 1.76 1.70 16 1.
April ...... .. ..6,40.8 7,844 0.68 July 10. . . 3.30 3.10 3.00 20 0 2.65 2.25 1.b0 1.76 170 1. L 6
May .. ...... ..33,28 69,43 6,774U july 17 ... .. 40 L3.20 L 10 .00 2.10 2.75 2.30 10 1.70 .LI 1.60 LO
June ....... 41,64 49,632 48.80 July 24 ... . 45 3.25 3.10 3.00 2.90 2.75 2.30 1.85 1.76 1.70 1.65 1.5
July .. ...... 100,26 34,874 55,31 July 31 .... .3.40 3.20 3.05 2.85 2.85 2.70 2.20 L75 1.65 1.60 1.55 1.5
August .. .... 78.834 34.921 August 7 . . 3.40 3.20 3.05 2.9 2.85 2.70 2.20 L75 1.65 10 1.56 1.5
September.... 160.167 96,48 22 August 14. . 3.50 3.30 3.15 3.0 2.96 2.80 2.30 185 1. 1.70 L70 L70
October .. .. .. 82,756 38.654 3,7 August 21 .. . 3.0 3.30 3.15 .05 2.96 2.80 2.30 1.85 1.75 1.70 170 1.
November .. 56,763 42,841 23,373 August 28 . .. .3.70 3.50 3.2 3.15 3.10 2.90 2.40 2.00 190 1.85 1.80
December .. 15,407 39,171 6,482 September 4. . 3.70 3.0 3.40 330 3.30 3.00 2.50 215 2.05 2.00 L90 1.1
January .... 34,762 54,052 99,273 September 11 . 3.80 3.0 3.50 3.4 3.40 3.1502.50 2.05 1.95 1.90 1.85 1.75
September 18 . 3.90 3.75 3.60 3.4 3.20 2.60 2.15 2.05 2.00 1.96 1.30
To all other Europe. barrels 280 lbs: September 25... 4.25 4.10 3.95 L.9 3. .7 3.35 2.65 2.30 2.20 2.10 2.00 1.5
Month 1903-04 1102-03 101412 October 2 . 4.4 4.40 4. 4.230 4.1 3&50 2.70 2.45 2.30 2.20 2.0 1. L90
April ..... ... 26,38 30.14 258,731 October 8 ...... 4.70 4.40 4.3 4.25 4.10 3.50 2.70 2.56 2.40 2.30 2.105 10
May ....... 27,102 40,731 N,U1 October 1. .... 45 4.40 4.0 4.00 .85 3.25 2.70 2.55 2.50 2.35 2.25 2.1
June....... 14044 9.682 2,2.I October 23 .... 20 3.90 3.L8 30 .815 .05 2.60 2.45 2.40 2.25 2.25 2.15
July .. ....... 465.13 51.612 14.1 October 29 .. .... 4.20 3.90 3.60 3.30 3.00 2.70 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.35 2.5 215
August .. .... 88,5 30,119 November 6 .. ....3.90 3.30 3.10 2.90 2.80 2.70 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.35 2.30 2.30
September ..... 27,494 17.386 1539 November 13 ......3.50 3.25 3.10 2.90 2.80 2.70 2.36 2.30 2.26 2.1 0 2.0 2.0
October 4 e 5,442 lS November 19 .. .... November 1 3.60 3. 3.20 00 2.90 2.70 2.45 2 2.4 2.35 2 2.1
November .. 13328 6,415 25,01 November 26 .... 3.0 3.26 3.10 2.90 2.80 2.60 2.40 2.30 2.20 2.10 2.10 2.10
December .. 25,299 48,701 39,816 december 3 .... 3.50 3.25 3.05 2.90 2.80 2.55 2.35 2.30 2.20 2.16 2.15 2.15
S.. 9December 17 ....3.50 3.2 3.00 2.90 2.80 2.5 2.35 2.25 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.20
January ... 17,124 7,148 24,629 December 10 .. .. 3.0 3.2 3.06 2.9 2.80 2.5 2.35 2.30 2.20 0 2. 2.30 2.29
-- - December 31 ....2.5 3.30 3.10 2.96 2.86 2.602. 402.30 2.26 2.26 2.26 2.25
Total Exports of Rosin, barrels 280 pounds, January 14 ....4.00 3.60 3.35 3.15 3 3.00 2.95 2.80 2.70 2.65 2.50 2.50
Including Asia, Africa and America out- January 22 .. 4.50 4.10 3.26 3.90 3.15 3.10 290 2.70 2.68 2.610 2.45 2.45
side of the United States: January 2 .. .... 4.50 4.10 3.6 3.10 3.26 3.30 3.15 2.90 2.28 2.85 2.72 2.75
Month 1903-04 190.-0 1901-02 February 11 ..3.75 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25 3.20 2.85 2.85 2.90 2.75 2.70 2.70
April .......... 13,681 186,128 2",061 February 18 ...3.65 3.45 3.35 3.30 3.25 3.05 2.70 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.55
May ........ 196.822 260,144 25.*9 February 25 ..3.70 3.50 3.35 3.20 3.25 2.95 3.60 2.55 2.50 2.45 2.40 2.40
June ...... .. 20658 187,133 19024 March 10 .... 3.80 3.60 3.40 3.35 3.30 3.05 2.75 2.70 2.65 2.60 255 2.55
August ...... 2.. s.1 228,632 March 24 .... 4.00 .3.70 3.50 3.35 3.30 2.95 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.50
September.... 33850 234,2 S1.4 March 31 ......4.10 3.80 3.60 3.35 3.30 2.95 2.70 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.50
October .. .. .. 200.823 25,766 1 .16
November .. 184,860 231,543 222,479
nDecember 210,457 20205 191,440 For Prompt Delivery Send Us Your Commissary Check Orders.


THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.


of the coming week, and will begin turning
out is valuable product.-Miiami Record.


The Georgia Interstate.
The next annual meeting of tlOh Georgia
Interstate Sawmill Association will be
held at Quitman, Ga., on the 17th of
May, 11.)1, at 10 o'clock a. m. Officers
will le elected at this meeting to serve
during the next twelve months, and
other important matters will also come
lup for consideration. An enjoyable time
is promised all members who attend.
After the meeting, Mr. J. W. Oglesby, of
the Oglesby Lumber and Manufacturing
Company, expects to entertain those at-
tending at his magnificent home.

Suggestion for Saw Mill Men.
Grove Park, Fla., May 2, 1904.


our own offices. North, East, West and
South. The company could take a small
aiiiount ,out of every thousand feet to
go in treasurer's hands for expenses. We
never know when lumber is up or down.
If lumber is up our dealers South get the
benefit. Where one man won't take an
order at a low price, another will, so this
keeps prices down. This will be a suc-
cess if some of the extensive sawmill men
will take hold of it in the right way.
M. M. GAY.


Railroad Ties.

The prices of railroad ties, yellow pine,
in New York. are quoted as follows: 8
ft. ties, 6ix in., 66 to 68 cts; 81-2 feet
ties. ix9 in., li to 70 cts; 7x8 in, 61 to
63 cts.

CQm9l D H1lmA 1 PC










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


CREDIT MEN ORGANIZE.
A Strong Association of the Wholesale
Men Formed.
An organization recently formed among
the wholesale merchants and jobbers of
this city is the Jacksonville Credit Men's
Association. Its plan of operation is
practically the same as in use by the
Credit Clearing House Association, having
branches all over the country. The local
company is composed of the Jacksonville
wholesale houses.
The officers of the association are: C.
W. Bartleson. president; C. M. Lewis, first
vice-president: F. T. Christie, second vice-
president; .1. W. (lark. secretary; J. C.
Darby. treasurer. The IH ard of directors
is composed of R. V. Covington. chairman;
W. A. Bours. Frank S. Gray. J. D. Holmes
and F. T. Christie. The office of the as-
sociation is in the Board of Trade building
and J. W. Clark, the secretary, has charge
of it. Mr. Clark is an experienced credit
man, having been connected with the At-
lanta office of the Credit Clearinghouse
Association, and came to Jacksonville just
a short time ago to accept the position of
secretary with the new organization.
The association, as organized, consists
of fo: ty business firms of this city, who
have associated themselves together for
the purpose of mutual protection in the
matter of extending credits. To illus-
trate the practical working of the asso-
ciation, a certain party applies tA, a melm-
her of the association for credit; this mnem
ber puts the ;secretary of the association
in possession of the fact, and asks for
a report as to his standing. The secretary
proceeds then to canvass the members of
the association to ascertain if this party
has been granted credit by any of them,
and to get a full history of the transac
tion. This information is given by each
of the members who has had transactions
with the applicant, and this information
is compiled without comment in the office
of the secretary and a copy of the com-
piled report is furnished to each of tho
members who has had dealing with the
party, the source of this information being
undivulged.
The merchant to whom application ha.,
been made can arrive at a conclusion a.
tothe granting credit to the applicant,
using, of course, his individual discretion.
The information furnished is nothing
more than a history of the business tran-
sactions with the members of the asso-
ciation. It is shown how long the goods
were sold, the amount of the highest cred-
it he has obtained, his present indebted-
ness, and any past due, orders on hand
unfilled, and such data as is needed to
judge the risk intelligently. When in-
quiry is made an opportunity is given
to the applicant to place his own state-
ment on file with the information re-
ceived from the members selling him. The
information received bv the association
is neither published nor sold, and is de-
liveredl exactlyy as given by the secretary
to the firms interested and to them only.
For instance, if fifteen members of the
Jlacksonville Association are interested in
selling a man, or in halving sold him, the
report on that party will Iw sent to fif-
teen parties intere-tcd, and not to the
entire membership.
The association is regarded as filling a
long-felt want in mercantile circles in
Jacksonville, and in order to get what


KIRK & JONES

DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.


MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903.04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.


was wanted the merchants found it nec-
essary to organize an association after
their own ideas. It is nothing more than
an organization for interchange with each
other the ledger facts possessed by each
regarding debtors, or applicants for
credit.
The work thus far is progressing with
encouraging prospects, and the members
and hoard of directors are well pleased
with the results.
Air. R. V. Covington, chairman of the
I.oard of directors has been at work for
several months in formulating articles
and organizing the association, with the
cooperation of the other officers. There
were many obstacles in the way, as can
readily be seen. in the organization of
such an association, and the success that
has attended the efforts made in that di-
rection is very good evidence of the tact
and ability of the men behind it.

NEW YORK LUMBER QUOTATIONS.

Pine, Yellow (Long Leaf.)
By Sail.
Building orders, 12 in. and under, $20.50
to $22.50.
Building orders, 14 in. and up, $26.00 to
$29.00.
Yard orders, ordinary assortment, $20.50
to $22.50.
Ship stock, easy schedules, $26.50 to
$27.50.
Ship stock, 40 ft. average, $30.00 to $35.00
Heart face siding, 1 in. and 11-4 in., $20.50
to $21.50. ,
1 in. wide boards, heart face, $26.00 to
$28.00.
11-4 and 11-2 in. wide boards, $28.00 to
$30.00.
2 in. wide plank, heart face, $30.00 to
$31.50.
Kiln dried sap siding, 4-4, $18.00 to $1850.
Kiln dried sap siding, 5-4, $19.00 to $20.00.
Yellow Pine Box Boards (knotty) $1350
to $14.50.
Yellow Pine Stepping, $30.00 to $35.00.
By steam, add $1.00 to $1.50.
Long Leaf Yellow Pine Flooring.
Clear Heart Face Rift DM&HBk 13-16x
2 1-4 counted 1x3, $44.00 to $45.00.
"A" Rift DM&HBk 13-16x21-4 counted
1x3. $32.00 to $33.00.
"B" Rift DM&HBk 13-16x21-4 counted
lx3, $26.00 to $27.00.
"A" Flat DM&HBk 13-16x21-4 counted
1x3, $21.50 to $22.50.
"B" Flat DM&HBk 13-16x21-4 counted
1x3, $19.50 to $20.50.
No 1 Common DM&HBk 13-16x21-4
counted 1x3, $18.50.
For 1 1-8 in. add $2.50.
Steamer shipment on flat grain flooring $1
less per thousand than above prices.


902-03 I 1901-02
292,496 314,846
940,507 1,071,440
,233,038 1,385,786

296,430 314,876
975,428 1,062,687

206,109 217,446
504,173 585,042

42,765 53,797
138,121 129,059

37,556 48,633
337,784 398,586


The receipts of spirits are leas than 1902-03 by 98849 casks, and of rains, 289,569 base



The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE Q RETAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints. Oils and Glass,
Stoves, Tinware, Country-Holloware.

10 WEST BAY STREET Jacksonville. Fla.



You Want a Turpentine Location?

You Want a Sawmill Location?

You Want any Kind of Florida Land?

IF You Mean Business?
-* Cwll on or Write to
f J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS,
y Ocala. Florida 4


BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will send by express, prepaid, the following:
Four full quarts Lincoln County, Sunnybrook Rye or Big Horn Rye .. .00
Single Bottles ................................................................. .5
I will send four full quarts of Somers' Corn, Melwood Rye, Golden Wed-
ding Rye, Holland Gin. Tom Gin, Peach Brandy, Peach and Honey
Whiskey, Gin and Manhattan Cocktails-any of the above for........ L.LO
One bottle of any of the above ......................... . .... ....... . ...... 1.00
tour bottles of the following California Wines: Sherry. Port Muscat.
Catawba ............................................. .........................
Single bottles ..................................................................
Single bottles ......................................................................
Four bottles Wilson Whiskey, cased.................................. SL
Single bottles .................................................................. .
Five bottles Duffy's Malt ........................................ ..............
Bulk goods of all kinds. Special Prices on application. All kinds of
liquors in jugs from $l.50 to $5.00, f. o. b. Jacksonville.
F. BETTELINI, W Bay SL, opp. U'ion Pepet. Jacksonville, Fla


Geo. T.Gifford Iron Works Co.

Founders and Machinists.
Special attention to Saw Mill and Turpentine Work.
Tifton, Georgia.


READ THE ADS IN THE RECORD.


THE COVINGTON COMPANY,

Wholesale SHOES AND DRY GDl. 635 to 641 West Forsyth Street.
Whlesale SHOES AND DRY GOODS. "' T'*""I

NEW YORK: 256 Church St. Jacsonvile Fla.

We Sell Merchants Only.

110,~~~I A& 11, 10 19hIA ILla l m


Receipts 1903-04 1
Spirits, casks ........ .................. 193,647
Rosins, bbls....... .................... 650,988
Total ......... ............... ..... . 844,585 1
Exports
Spirits casks........... ....... ......... 188,398
Rosins, bbls......................... .... 752,270
Foreign
Spirits, casks..-...... .. ............ .... 93,884
Rosins,bbls...................... ...... 338,171
New York
Spirits, casks ........... ............... .. 35,658
Rosins, bbls............ .......... .. .. ..87,353
Sundries
Spirits, casks ....... ............. .. 59,351
Rosins, bbls. ....... . ...... .......... 826.746


. . V -- V V V V V W











16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

These advertisers are in this issue. If
you want anything, look through this
classified list and write to the firm ap-
pearing therein. The Record guarantees
.a prompt response.
AUTOMOBILES.
Fred E. Gilbert, Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville. Fla.
Central National Bana, Ocala, Fla.
Mercantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOOKS.
Cochrane's Book Store. Palatka, Fla.
BRICK.
Geo. R. Foster, Jr., Jacksonville. Fla.
The Southern Fuel & Supply Co., Jack-
sonville. Fla.
CARS.
South Atlantic Oar & Manufacturing Co.
Waycross, Ga.
CATTLE.
Palmetto Park Farm, Ocala, Fla.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
J. 8. Pinkussohn Cigar Co., Jacksonville.
CLOTHING.
H. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
J. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
M. W. Larendon, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
COOPERAGE.
The Cannon Co., Quitman, Ga.
The (ooperage Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
DRUGS.
Conover Drug Co., Jacksonville.
Kirk & Jones. Jacksonville.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Christie-Groover Drug Co. Jacksonville,
Fla.
J. E. Gornto & Co., Valdosta, Ga.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
J. S. Pinkussohn Cigar Co., Jacksonville.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
The Covington Co., Jacksonville.
ENGINES.
J. S. Schoflelds' Sons, Macon, Ga.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
FOUNDRIES.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works, Tifton, Ga.
T .Murphy, Jacksonville, Fla.
J. S. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
The Southern Fuel & Supply Co., Jack-
sonville.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
J. A. Craig & Bro, Jacksonville.
H. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksonville.
GROOERS-WHOLESALE
W. B. Johnson Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
C. H. Hargraves Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville.
Ellis-Young Co., Savasmah, Ga.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga
White Walton & Co., Jacksonville.
J P. Wilamin Co.. Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
HARDWARE.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Itond & Bo'rs Co., Jacksonville.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.. Valdjo.ta, Go
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
J. D. Weed & Co.. Savannah. Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
HARNESS.
McMurray & Baker. Jacksonville.
W. R. Thomas, Gainesville, Fla.
HATS.
II. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville.
J. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville.
HOTELS.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
Zahms' European Hotel. Jacksonville.
New Victoria Hotel. Jacksonville.
The Oaks. White Springs, Fla.
The Hamilton., White Springs, Fla.
The New Paxton, White Springs, Fla.
The Kendrick House, White Springs,
Fla
Pritchard House, White Springs, Fla.


IRON WORKS.
Geo. T. (ilford Iron Works. Tifton, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
T. Murphy. Jacksonville.
J. S. Schofield's Sons Company, Macon,
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville.
R. J. "Riles. Jacksonville.
LIQUORS.
F. Bettelini. Jacksonville.
Chas. Blum & Co., Jacksonville.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville.
Bowen & Co., Jacksonville.
MEDICINES.
Sljneer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
MACHINE WORKS.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works. Tifton, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
T. Murphy. Jacksonville.
J. S. Schotield's Sons "-impany, Macon,
(.a.
MATERIALS 1FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
.1. S. Scholield's Sons & Co., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
M. A. Baker, Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta,
Ga.

Marion Hlardware Co.. Ocala, Fla.
'Iampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
J. S. Schofields' Sons, Macon. Ga.
MULES AND HORSES.
)illon & Iennel. Marianna.
W. R. Thomas, Gainesville, Fla-
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
The Barnes-.lessup Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Consolidated Naval Stores Co.. Jackson-
ville.
The Ellis-Young Co., Savannah. Ga.
Peacock-Hunt & West Co.. Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Ca., Jacksonville.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile. Ala-
OSTEOPATHY.
Drs. Phelps & McElwain, Jacksonville.
PECANS.
The rilingig Bros. Co., Jacksonville.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta.
John (;. Christopher. Jacksonville, Fla.
.1. I. Campbell, Ocala, Fla.
Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
J. S. Schofields' Sons, Macon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
Fred E. (illbert. Jacksonville.
PAINTS.
I. E. Baird & Co., Jacksonville.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville.
RAILS.
Isaac Joseph Iron Co., Cincinnati, O.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith. Henderson & Warren, Ta'npa.
Fla.
Brobeton. Fendig & Co., Jacksonville.
C. Buckman, Jacksonville.
W. W. Frazier, Jacksonville.
The West-Raley-Rannie Co., Jacksonville
ROOFING TIN.
American Tin Plate Co., New York City.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
The Covington Co., Jacksonville.
STATIONERY.
Cochranes' Book Store, Palatka, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
The Clyde Steamship Co., New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Samuel P. Holmes & Co., Jacksonville.
TAILORS.
John B. ('inncaglini & Bro., Jacksonvile
TANKS.
G. M. Davis & Son.. Palatka, Fla.
Cypress Tank Co., Mobile, Ala.
.1. S. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon Ga.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
National Transportation & Terminal Co.,
Jacksonville.
TOOLS.
.John G. Christopher. Jacksonville. Fla.
The Council Tool Co., Wananish, N. C.
TURPENTINE CUPS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co.. DaIsy. Tenn.


FROM $1.50 TO $6 A
Sole Agent

Old Saratoga Rye, -

Old Baker Rye, -


GALLON


$6 Gal.

$6 Gal.


Old Westmoreland Rye, $4 Gal.

Big Horn Rye, $3 Gal.


J. E. GORNTO & CO.,
Valdosta, Ge


wtia I


O. R [oSR, JR.
MANUFACTURER OF



BRICK.


WRITE FOR PRICES.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.

'PHONE 390.


TURPENTINE PROCESS.
The Pine Product Construction Co.. Fay-
etteville, N. C.
The Pine Belt Construction Co., Raleigh,
N. C.
The Standard Turpentine Co., New York
City.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
M. A. Baker. Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
G . Davis & Son, Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS.
G. M. Davis & Son, Palatka, Fla.
TYPE WRITERS.
Grivot Typewriter Exchange. Jacksiaville
UNDERTAKERS.
('has. A. Clark, Inc., Jacksonville.
VEHICLES.
McMurray & Bro., Jacksonville.
W. R. Thomas. Gainesville, Fla.
WATCHES.
R. .. Riles. Jacksonville.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co.. ,acksonvil'e.
Hess & Singer, Jacksonville.
YEOIIW PINE IAMBiER.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fla.



J. E. GORNTO & CO.

Shipping Trade
a Specialty. .

On $3 Orders and over, Express Prepaid


WHISKIES


"The" PAINT STORE,
I. E. BAIRD Mi CO., Jecksonville, Fla,,
\\all paper, pictures, frames, painting and all interior and exterior decorating.
Hardware, glass, etc. If you are build ing a fine home, get Baird & Co. to do
tOne decorating that it may be in keeping with the building. Oldest and most ex-
perienced house in Fo:rida.

t- t tIT t-II t-!-!-!- 1t : !t IT -1- -t-t= ?-1-t -t- t -- t t =1 -t-IT-T I 1 2I I t-1I : l :l


* J. P. WII.IIAMs President
* T. A: JENNIN;S, ,-ind Vice-President.
SH. L. KAYTON, Secretary.


.1. A. (. CAKSoN. 1st Vice-President.
.1 F. DusritNBtur. 3dVice-President.
D. ;1. White. Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

1111 STORES ND COTTON FACTORS INRD WHOLESILE GROCERS.
Main Office SAVAINNIH, GEORGIA.
Branch Otfic.s: PENSACOLA. FLA. Branch Grocery House,
Branch Of ice JACKSONVILLE, FLA. COLUMBUS. CA.

Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Us.
t* I ?-! - I I' t s t ? t- t T- *1 I:- T:?: 1- ? 1 : t l _!: I- 1 t -1: t


JOHN D. BAKER. Pres. C. V. BARTLESON. ViccPres. BAKER & BAKER. P. E PECK.
(Baker & Holms cCo.) (C. V. Batksn Co) Genral Counsd. Sc. & Tres

FLORIDA FREIGHT CLAIM AGENCY
(INCORPORATED.)
We can collect your Freight Claims against
Railroads and Steamship Companies.
Charges Reasonable. Your Membership Solicited.
We save you all worry and trouble. Endorsed by all Public Bodies
In the City and Transportation Companies.
216 Dyal-Upchurch Bldg.. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


This Space Reserved for



Gus Muller & Co.

Wholesale



Liquor Merchants


Proprietors



Jacksonville Bottling Works


.. Agents...


ACME BEER




Send all orders for printing for the tur-
pentine aad commissary trades to the
Record office to insure prompt delivery.


!








--I W111EET K I -I-I 1-Y-1 i-i-i-i-I-I-I--IM -I-i1--I -rI i l IT It-Ir---1iii 1DSTRI RECOR .1 1


The


Covington


Company


Capital, $200,000.00.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


Shoes==Wholesale


Dry Goods--Wholesale


Boston Office:
26 Lincoln Street.

New York Office:
256 Church Street.


Each department is complete. Our customers advertise us. Be our
customer and you will be pleased.

OUR OFFICERS:
R. V. COVINGTON, President. H. L. COVINGTON, Vice-President.
DIRECTORS;


H. A. McEACHERN,
E. W. LANE.


R. CAY, C. DOWNING,
H. L. COVINGTON.


JOHN D. BA
R. V. COVINGTON.


KER. -


I I I- ;I lA-iiALA -I:I 1 --I::I -I -I-I- I-I-- i I I I Al l -I-A-I-AA A -A A A A A A- A A A A A -1-1-A 1---1- AI 1 -l=ll 1--li'lA--- I- L I l-l-- I -l L ilA-IV I I A i- I -Ak:- I AAllIA I-IIA-I-i -17- -I- I I I I I


Special Notice.

Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are

McMILLAN BROTHERS'
Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.
Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the
condenser. Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.
Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.

McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS,


SAVANNAH, GA.
MOBILE, ALA.


J CKSONVILLE. FLA.
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.


ONE OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PAPERS.


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


17










18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.






Industrial Record's Department of Information



This department is conducted for the benefit of the subscribers and advertising patrons of this paper and no

charge is made for any information supplied or service rendered. Fill in any one or more of the blanks following, as

you may require, clip out and mail to this office and the same will have prompt attention


For Turpentine. Sawmill or factory Supplies or Machinery of Any Kind. For Timber. Farming or Range Lands.
DATF INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville. Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Main Office. Jacksonville. Fla. I am in the market for lands for the purple of
In the market for the following Prefer in State of Please put me in communication
with responsible parties and cive me other information.

Remarks
Please notify where same can be secured.
iSigned
Signed

State specifically the kind of machinery wanted and whether new or second-handed DATE

Location for Turpentine. Sawmill or factory. or for Any Industrial Enterprise. For Commissary. Office or Household Supplies. Sawmill or Turpentine Mules
DATE florses. Wagons. Etc.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonvle, Fla. DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla.
Please advise the undersigned regarding a good location in (state or section of
state) for In the market for----- ._
together with full information about labor conditions, taxes, transportation facilities,
local encouragement, etc.
Remarks Please give me information as to best places to buy, etc.

Signed Signed --


De You Want to Sell Something? Are You Thinking of Investing?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville. Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville. Fla.
Have for sale the following Can you give any information as to the reliability of the following firm or corpora

tion
Remarks
Can you suggest a purchaser'
Signed Signed


Do You Want to Employ a Man ? Do You Want Employment?
DATE DATE
INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville, Fla. INDUSTRIAL RECORD. Jacksonville. Fla.
Want a man to till the position of Want a position as

with the following requirements Refer to the following

Can you suggest such a man? Can you assist me ?
Signed Signed




CLIP THIS COUPON!
TO ALL READERS OF THE RECORD
When you are answering an advertisement from the columns of this paper, whether you are making an inquiry or placing an order, please cut out the coupon
below and attach it to the letter. It will pay you.


COUPON.
Your advertisement was seen in the Industrial Reocrd, issue dated _

Signed


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD of Jacksonville. Fla.. and Savannah, Ga.. is the South's great
weekly trade journal.



The Record takes a personal interest in every Reader and

Advertiser,and in benefitting one it hopes to benefit the other.



"THE PINE AND ITS PRODUCTS."









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 19



SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY

Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY..


Located in the heas t of the Lumber District gives us advan-
tage of choicest material at lowest cost.

----------- --------------- ---- VVVVVM- Every time I light one of these cigars I fortification against the bleak winds of
QUALITY FIRST-PRICES RIGHT. contribute something. for there is a tax cruel winter, will carefully survey the
< .o. n every match, and so on through the space directly in front of the long mirror.
m list. I have paid already on war account, i ";ive me, some of that," he will say sus-
E I and on education account, since I surren- piciously. as he points to a long-necked
dered, nearly one-half of your bill and I little witl a ten cent look.
c -. ; was thereuion entered on the bill for $200, the lalel and. with a wistful, sorrowing
a leaving a balance of $21i.S4. air. he pushes it away as Caesar did the
S"':/ 3 "All right." said the Colonel, as he folded crown-reluctantly.
) -* up the bill and put it into his vest pocket, "Let me have some with the union Ia-
"When I have paid in the balance due I'll lel." he will say to the white-aproned ser-
Scall around and get a receipt in full," and vitor.
bidding the officer "good day," he left. "Shure!" the servitor will reply, and
66_ Many years after he nmet that officer delving into the hidden recesses of ice and
Again, and producing the bill, asked him pipes he will emerge with a receptacle that
S T D W I O to receilt it in full, as according to his bears the stamp of the Distillers' and Rec-
hen T e Jay's W ork IS ver calculations he had consumed sufficient tifiers' Union.
taxed stuff for the tax due to be paid. Then the unionist will drink health to
09000004W r The officer made the required entry. each initial of "Central Federated Union."
Colonel Cheeryble's Pardon. paid in on this account?" asked the Col- "'Now, if you please. I'll accept a pardon, If to this trio he adds a bumper to each
One of the last of the ex-'onfederat.c to onIl. as Uncle Sam and I are square," and he capital letter in Distillers' and Rectifiers'
apply for pardon for having, engaged in "C'ertainly. but 1 am not advised that forthwith qualified as a full-fledged Amer- Union. he (oes so at his own peril, and at
the war against the Union in 1,:1-;.3 w\is O Col. Tobias Cheet-yble. of Floiida. lie tlie ollicer. ble one ever since, lightly is even union labelled whiskey to
stoutly refused for a long time to appll. "That does not prove that I have not The day after lie received his pardon le dealt with.
for a pardon. giving as a reason that le ,lone so. however. I have been paying back a friend offered him a cigar. "Excuse me," It was after a speech made before the
had simply done his duty as lie saw it in that det ever since( tli, surrender. By the said he. "I don't snoke." Central Fedarated Union by John F. Mur-
what lie did to help his beloved South. way. why. didn't you bring this bill around "But I saw you smoking yesterday." phy. delegate from the Distillers and Ree-
In vain did his more progressive friends when I surrendered. You didn't say any- "'Al, that was before I was square with tifiers, that the organization resolved upon
plead with him. assuring him that it .was thing about any bill then. I believe it Uncle Sam. I settled with him yesterday this course. There were charges of "epi-
only an empty form. and lie would have i- outlawed by thle statute of limitations, in full. Don't owe him a cent now, and uireanism.' 'etc.. but unionism prevailed,
to do it wbforel he could vote or h.old of- ainyhow. But I am not the man to plead am at liberty to quit smoking if I choose, and woe betide the organized toiler if a
fice. that statute against a just debt. All I and I have chosen." That was fifteen walking delegate finds him pouring a
He was known as a Democrat. and his ask is that I be given credit for all pay- years ago. lie has never smoked since. **smile" from an unlabelled bottle.-N. Y.
Democratic friends insisted that lie shoull icnnts made on account, and while I do Evening Telegram.
lay aside his foolish qualms and qualify not admit that I owe this, being a man of Union Label Tody.
himself as a full-fledged American citizen peace now that the war is over, I'll pay
once more. Here is how the matter was it. Iheceipt it." This was carrying the Even a jag must bear the union label. Arithmetic.
finally adjusted. One day a friend called imattfer further than the officer contemplat- ()nce the organized workingman was told When I was ten and you were eight,
at his office and took him up to the reg- e.. so lie informed the Colonel that he was tlat he must look for the label on every Two years between us stood,
istration office which at that time was nuot authorized to collect money on account pair of shoes he purchased; later each We used to meet at Daddy's gate-
also the same place where applications for "f it. bit of wearing apparel, even to his hat, A stolen kiss was good.
pardon were prepared. lie assured the "That's all right. I can settle it on the mlust be duly endorsed by each union
officer that he was unwilling to enter into installment plan then, byI paying to Uncle handling it; then came bread and its union When I was twenty-quite a boy.
any bargain with Uncle Sam whlil e lie Sam all sums on account, as I have been tamp. and beef with its union brand-and You still were my heart's queen,
owed hint anything. The officer, to humor 'oi"ing ever -ince the surrender, only I de- now the Central Federated Union comes But grown of kissing somewhat coy,
him, told him that Uncle Sam, had an m"and that youi enter upon that bill credit forward with an admonition that when its You see-youre quite sixteen!
unsettled account against him. anil he for all piaym.nts made up) to date." The I; members drink whiskey they must care-
could settle it without paymlunt ly sim- ,tlier agreed t do this, and asked for fully utinize the Iuttle for the lall of hen I was thirty, bronzed and tall
ply applying for and receiving Uncle Sam's ite.s the Distillers' and Rectifiers' Union. With sweethearts, too, in plenty,
Let it not be inferred that the Cefltral I et ou at the Wilsons' ball-
pardon teams s nothing." ejaculated the Colonel. FederatedI met you at the WVilsons' ball-
F. ederated Union officially approves of the
"If I owe the government anything 1 "' fo"'r'aw that you fellows would try to drinking habit. In its corporate capacity You told me you were twenty.
don't know it. Fetch in your bill. and if Iringi some me of this kind on me, it enjoins all mem rs to be sober and
it enjoins all forybowrs to be sober and
it iN all right, I'll settle. then I'll accept ."jut as so-on as I surrendered I learned industrious, and even bars from member- forty, no a little more-b
t industrious, and even bars frol mI) Time, yo ruthless bandit!
your pardon, and not until then." said the h"w t" smoke, and have averaged six ci- .hip those who drink to excess, However, you t wenty-four--
Colonel. The officer knew something of g"-"s |.''r day sillce I surrenderedl to General it reomniz7*s tle fact that many will I*anno"-ytn'1 twenty-four-.
the Colonel's past, so he deliberately made r n in .." rink as long as li r is sldt understand it.
drink as long as liquor is sold, and with
out the following bill: '"What lis that to do with it?" asked an affiliated lboly of rectifiers and dis- -Clifton Bingham.
"Tobias Cheryble. to Uncle Saml. Dr. It" oflicvr in lewilderment. tillers under its wing. it therefore says.
To cost of education at Naval School. "It has everything to do with it. Every "When you during. drink union whiskey." If yor are thiMl1n of buying a*
$400. To your share of expense incurred iigar I sno,ke, I pay into the United States For a member to lbe caught with a jag place, ellims the one you have eor
in conquering you, $l16.4: to tal. $41(i.S4." rI aiiiury ouit of imy hard earned savings is disgrace; but a non-union jag is in- vestimn in any idI strys itf ro want
This he gravely handed to the (olonel., anywhere froin one-tenth to a half-cent, famy. to bur maehklery of any klra, ar
"Don't 1 get any credit for what I have in th e way of internal revenue taxes. Henceforth the son of toil, when seeking tell Igltrlal ro orr a poal tas".

ARE YOU A SUBSCRIBER TO THE RECORD?










20 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commissary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 27
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 28
10 .. 29
A. C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 18

Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... Market
50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-lb tin. ............

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 16

Sugar


Granulated
5'


Sugar, bbls.....
5 bbls..
10 bbls..
S sacks..


500
495
495
500


Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb.................. 80
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 10
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 8
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages....... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ages ............ market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 14
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 50
English B'fast, 10 lb.. 45
Formosa, 10 lb....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10c size
10 lbs to case, per pound'.. 40

Salt


200-lb sack...............
100-lb sack...............
Ice Cream, 200-1b sacks.....
"6 100-1b sacks.....
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-lb....
" 2-1b....


100
50
100
50
265
275


Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin.............. 21
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box
sifter top, per doz...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and 80

Corn
l0 Sk Less 100
Car Lot Lot Sk
W. Corn,llOb, 143 1 45 1 48
S 1001b, 1 29 1 81 1 34
Mxdcorn,1101b,l 14 140 143
S 1001b,1 25 127 130


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


Car Lot
W.clip'd,1251b,2 20
S 1001b,1 75
White 1251b, 2 10
White 1001b. 1 67
Mixed 1251b 2 5
1001b, 1 64


100 Sk
Lot
222
1 77
222
1 69
2 7
165


Less 10o'
Sk Lots
2 25
1 80
215
1 72
2 10
168


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice. .... 1 65
fancy..... 1 70
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 5 75
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 lb sack.........5 75
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks..... ...... 5 75
Pillsbury's Best ..... 6 00
Pillsbury's Beet bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal ... ...... 6 25
bbl .... ....
Meal
Meal, per barrel........... 3 50
92-lb sacks........... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 8 60
92-lb sacks....... 1 60
Rice
Good................ .... .. 5
Choice...... ............ 51
Fancy Head............. 6
Broken................. 38
Canned Vegetables
Doz.
Tomatoes, 3s, Chief........ 90
Tomatoes, 2s ........ 80
Clayton, 3s................ 45
Clayton, 2s ...............70
Sifted Peas, 2s........... 1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s........1 20
Lima Beans ,2s ............1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 3s........... 90
Baked Beans, is........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............ 1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets, 3s...........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ........... 85
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s.............. 90
Hay


I car lots 100 bale
lots
Choice....19 50 2000
No.1 Tim. 18 00 18 50
No. 2 17 00 17 80
No.1 Cl'ler 17 00 1750


leas
quantity
2050
1900
1800
1800


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, 3s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz...............
Brandy Cherries 2s percase3 85
Candy
Mixed 30-lb pails, per lb... 7
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, per
lb ........ .......... 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 8t
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice " "
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lb. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 36-lb. case 3 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 40-50............. 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 50-60........... .. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 3 crown..... 1 85'
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 90
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 12
Citron, 10-lb box ......... 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 64
Extra H P, .... 5
Seed Peanuts, ...
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ ..... 18
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Peacans.... .............. 12
Filberts................... 12
al0 nuts.................. 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car o00 Less 10t
lots Sk. Lot Sk. Lo
Cottonseed Meal 27 00 27 50 28 00
Hulls 11 50 12 50 13 00


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop........2 20
3 hoop .........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz.......1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
nested ......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 60
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. ..1 20

Washboards Do',
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay...............3 00
175 Diamond Glass .........8 25
O. W. D.. 17 inch, per doz 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75
Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
doz ................... 96
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 75
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 3 65
Salmon Is, Tale 4 doz to case
per doz Alaska......... 90
Salmon, Is, 4 doz to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 1b....... 95

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box............ 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge ... 141-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avge .. 14
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avge .. 131-2
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge.. 91-4
"Reliable" California Hamn, 6-8 9
breakfast Bacon, light av. .... 131-2
D. S. Bellies, 16-18 av. ........ 834
D. S. Bellies, 20-22 av. ......... 81-2
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av. ......... 81-8
D. S. Plates .................. 71-2
Bacon Plates .................. 81-2
l. S. Butts .................. 63-8
Bologna Sausage ............... 7
Sausage in oil ...............$3.75
Butter and Cheese.
"Strawberry" Creamery, 60-lb tubs 25
30-lb tuba 251-2
60s, Is... 261-2
"Ladybird" full cream cheese .. 121-2
Kingan's ard.
"indiana" Pure Leaf ........... market.
";.ea-Foam" Compound .........market.
Kingan's Canned eats.
"Reliable" Corned Beef, Is ...... $1.25
Corned Beef, 2s ...... 225
Roast Beef, is ........ 1.26
Roast Beef, 2s ........ 2.2
SPotted Ham and Tongue
1-4s .......................... 3
Sliced Beef, 1-2a .. .. 1.15
Vienna Sausage, 12s .. .86
Tripe ................. L1 0


GET A COPY OF THE NAVAL STORES BLUE BOOK




THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 21


etemam at at ~a a ttAAIl at a


teaatttataaatatatat~atatosilto!014@iiiieoeeiee*.~..eeee9~~


President, W. C. POWELL; Vice-President who with the President constitute the Directory and Board of Managers, W. P. COACHMAN. B. P. BUL-
LARD, H. L. COVINGTON, H. A. McEACHERN, JOHN R. YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.


IONSOIAT NAVAL 81R8 I OMPAHY,


jlksolille, Fi.


Svonnoh, i.


Pensacola, la.


* NA VAL STORE FR IORS


Pil in l l II oc, 2,500.000.


Owed ond c olled Ib Paltical opelors


Smoll moulnl 01 1loc Yet in Resele 1o lll 10 0per1lo1 Who Cn Arnl e 10 Bu1.


The Consoliled is Purely Coo00erlivie Comany.


01 the Prolucers.


Its Ineresls are Idenicol Willh ose


he Palronage o Tuienline Oper olrs everywhere miled


PlenM ol Monei and Plent of limer for Eveybody.


YARDS AT JIACSONYILLE, 81IAHAH, FERNR DINA nd PESA mOIA.


All Prucers ore nviled 1 o Coill or Co1resion


THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."






22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


wGl


BLAKESLEE PUMPING OUTFIT.
This outfit can be directly connected to a pump and will
supply sufficient water for general farm and household use.
Why not have a water works plant of your own at a small
cost, and this Is the most desirable power for use In case
of fire or other necessity; it can be started at a moment's
notice. You don't have to wait for the wind: it's always
ready for work.
k The engine can Instantyl be made ready for other pow-
er purposes, such as grinding feed, churning, etc.. by dis-
connecting the pump. This outfit Is simple, durable, economical easily operated,
and ready for work any minute. No country home is complete without this Ideal
labor saver. We build a complete line of pumping plants for mines, irrigation,
fire protection, railway supply, and Install water works plants for city service.
Will be pleased to furnish any additional information on request.
WHITE-BLAKESLEE MFG. CO. Birmingham. Ala.
Builders of the Blakeslee Gas and Gasoline and Connected Outfits.


1l** L, #~ #,# t~L~ IeeI I~ ~s299e 99a49~99s9 4-99


R. TOLAR.


J. H. HART.


T. H. BLACHLY.


J. R. TOLAR, JR.


(Established 1872.)
TOLAR, HART & CO.,
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


Commission


Merchants


and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange Orders executed for Cotton Futures.
JOSEPH D. WEED.
J. D. WEED CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.
Wholesale Hardware,
Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF
Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.


r I I-uei ana Building Material.
The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Aulhracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.

'Naval Stores MarKet
and StocK Report
I Published Daily in The


Jacksonville Metropolis,
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.
$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.

BIG PRIZES:
A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposi'icn, to
Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.

Carter & Russell Publishing Co.
Jacksonville, Florida.


Half Tones=Zinc Etchings


Illustrating and Engraving Department


OF _


THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.

Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved


and artistic fashion.


Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.


I SPECIllLT IS IDE[ OF 1DSIGNING, RETOUHING il EMBELISHING PHOTOGRAPHS IND PICTURES.


IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


AdLI~FAIUUMUC~U(I~UR -------------------- ~99~31


1


- -- -I


P










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 23


McMURRAY & BAKER,


Sow mill Oind Tnrnpfiog HoUw. L Scorner Bay ind
Sow Mill and Tu1enfilell Halll Liberty Streets.


We are rec~iing daily up-to-date pleasure and bumnes vehicles, M1 styrls.
Laprobel, whip, haness and horse furnihings, we have a nobby lne. PrIme
md goods in touch with all. Turpentine wagons and harness a speeatty. Don't
forget we can beat the world on hand-made harness.

M RRliY R T BIKE, 401 0 413 E. BI ST.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnicent steamships of this line are appointed to sail as follows, calling
at Charleston, S. C. both ways.
Fram New Terk, From Jackaoenvlle for
(Pler -4 Nerth Rter). STEA MIER. Clarlestem and New York.
Friday, April 15, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE .. Wednesday, April 20, at 7:30 am
**xHURON ..... Thursday, April 21, at 8:00 am
Sunday, April 17, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS .... Saturday, April 23, at 10:30 am
Tuesday, April 19, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Sunday, April 24, at 11:30 am
Wednesday, April 20, at 3:00 pm .**SEMINOLE ..Monday, April 25. at 12:30 pm
Friday, April 22, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ... .Wednesday, April 27, at 1:30 pm
**ALGONQUIN .. .. Friday, April 29, at 4:00 am
Tuesday, April 20, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ........ Sunday, May 1, at 5:30 am
Thursday, April 28, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS ....Tuesday, May 3, at 7:00 am
Friday, April 29, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE ..Wednesday, May 4, at 7:30 am
**xHURON ........ Friday. May 6, at 8:30 am
Monday, May 2, at 3:00 pm ..ALGONGUIN ...... Sunday, May 8, at 11:00 am
Wednesday, May 4, at 3:00 pm .. !IROQUOIS .... Tuesday, May 10, at 12:30 pm
Friday, May 6, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE........ Wednesday, May 11, at 1:00 pm
,..*xSEMINOLE ....Friday, May 13, at 4:00 am
Monday, May 9, at 3:00 pm .ARAPAHOE ........Saturday, May 14, at 4:00 am
Wednesday, May 11, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE .... Monday, May 16, at 5:00 ant
Friday, May 13, at 3:00 pm. .ALGONQUIN ...... Thursday, May 19, at 7:00 am
Sunday, May 15, at 3:00 pm ..!IROQUOIS ........ Saturday, May 21, at 9:00 am
"xHURON ...... Saturday, May 21, at 9:00 am
Tuesday, May 17, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE........ Sunday, May 22, at 10:00 am
Thursday, May 19, at 3:00 pm .ARAPAHOE ......Tuesday, May 24, at 12:00 n'n
Saturday, May 21, at 3:00 pm .COMANCHE ..... Thursday, May 26, at 1:00 pm
S.**SEMINOLE .... Saturday, May 28, at 4:00 am
Tuesday, May 24, at 3:00 pm ..ALGONQUIN .... Sunday, May 29, at 4:30 am
Thursday, May 26, at 3:00 pm ..!IROQUIS .... Wednesday, June 1, at 6:30 am
Friday, May 27, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE..... Wednesday, June 1, at 6:30 am
Monday, May 30, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ...... Saturday, June 4, at 8:30 am
**xHURON ........ Sunday, June 5, at 9:00 am
***After May 1, Steamship Seminole will not carry passengers.
x-Freight only. *-Boston via Charleston and New York.
--Boston via Brunswick --d Charles ton. *--Boston. via Charleston.
THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Direct Sertee Between Jaeksomville, Boston and Providemee and all East-
ern Ponlts, Oalllrn at Cbarleston Both Ways.
SBMI-WE NLY SAILINGS.
Southbound.. .... .. .. .. .. .... .. ........ .. ... rom Lewis Wharf, Boston
Northbound.. .. .... .. .. ...... .... .. From foot of Catherine Street. Jacksonville
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jackasnvill and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor. St. Francis, Beresford (De Land) and Intermediate
landings on St. Johns river.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
Is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville, Sundays, Tuesdays and Thurs-
days. 2:30 p. m. Returning. leave Sanford. Monday. Wednesday & Fridays 9:30 a. m.
BOUTH IBOUND.I NORTHBOUND,
Read down, I I Read up.
Leave 2:30 p. m.I ...................... Jacksonville ............... ....... IArrive 2:00 a. m.
Leave 8: 5 p ... m .... .......Palatka .......... ..... ILeave :00 p. m.
Leave 3:30 a. m....... .... .......... Astor................ ..... ........jLeave 2M0 p. m.
Leave 4:0 a. m. .. ... ........ .....t. rancis.... .......... Leave 100 p. m.
.............. ....1.... ...... ....Beresford (DeLand).............. ......... eave 12-00 noon
Arrive 8:0 a. m. ...... ......... .......Sanford........ .......... ......ILeave 910 a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m................... Enterprise .................. Lv. 10:00 a. m.
GEMERAI. PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE. 204 W. Bay St.. Jackvrlle.
P. M. TRONMONGER. JR.. Asst. Genl. Pass Acent, 204 W. Bay St.. Jarksonville. Fl
W. G. COOPER, JR.. Local Frt Agt.. Jack'ville. C. P. LOVELL. Asst. Supt.,Jack'vlIl
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
A. C. HAGOORTY. G. P. A., New York, CLYDE MLNE, G. F. A., New York
THEO. 0. E eR, WM. P. CITYDE CO.
General Manager. General Agents.
Che ebrough Building, 19 State Strett. New York.


C. H. HARGRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed

Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY SIKjLL
Jacksonville, Fla.


SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
30 YEARS RELIABILITY.

Hess 8 Slager,
, Diamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry
t CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND t1 & 13 MAIN.
Bo'o- o-o6'--or--ror -oT-rr rn-o- ioro-- o o T-o nrr'o'o-Tn-o -Trr-royrs -



East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.

WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


--- -- ------- ----------------1111-






the eeof th sport are an




sonville and Savannah has taken its place AlR
United tt and as an authority on lu


ber and nav l stores It aI bein quoted nota
only by the best and most carefully edited asno
hs papers in this country, but by thoe
in Europe also A London trae aper fo



to the Record views on maret c- five
This week's issue of the Industrial e -. and



orad Is even better than usual and It lIs 'h
e strong and entreha s tan gene i ndus- trpal



trial newspaper, in addition to Its value r
as the champion of the two specific indus- vs.
tries It represents. It ih brimu o new Jo
among them beadng trade tory oals -milln fend





ion-dollar corporation organized in Jack- G*
soaUited estr anda a n authe orianaty on of H.






several other bia corporations during the and
ber and n stores It s beinda. quoted not





only by the best for erpris and ca l ited
ll dpaperves this country but by tme re o cess
In Europe also A London trade paper for I





St hi receiving, both yn terday vesripion and
space to the Record's views on market con- ive





dert n departmentcarryn as t does
prThas, ones of the largest advetriing pR- ad
Ord Is even better than usual and It Is Trh
a strong and entsrtalnlin general Indus. trial
trial newspaper. In addition to Its value ITS
a the champion of the two specific Indus- vs* I
triee It represents. It Is brimful of new Joh701



tores gven to any o the Southe r st. Plai.
among them belng the story of a half-mill- rend
Ion-dollar corporation organized In Jack- Ge
oal yesterday and the oianlxation of H.
ev eral other MXg corporations during the and
Swek In QxemrxU and Florida. W
It has set the Pace for enterprise. and It Wait
well deserves the great measure of suecsj wick
It Is receiving., both In Its subscription and
adrertsing departments.carryng as It does.
Dpraxai one or the largst advertlping pat-
ronage given to any of the Boutbern t M
Wernis am
EAlTU A. V. VLIlq/i ~ In


til ned t
0 ,who" This








24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J H CROSBY. President


C N FULLER. Vice-Presidont


JAS F LANE, Secy I Trees


DepabuehIts


Greenleaf &

Crosby Company


3efteern anb

bilbeimr t!tbo


41 West Bay Street

Jacksonville

Th lar t ad finet sto. in this prt of the
soMers States. Prompt attention to man orders


Diamonds and Other Precious
Stones


Fine Gold Jewelry


American and Foreign Watches
and Clocks


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


. B i
r
,iBL^

^*s


Fine China Dinner Sets and
Fancy Pieces


European Novelties


--------------------

STHE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
S of Wananish, N. C.,
Formerly of Council's Station, N. C., are still selling Diamond Edge
Hacks at $.00, Black Joe and Standard at $t.00, Old Style and Patent
Pullers at $.00 a dosen. They should average a little better than ever.
S We have brought out a new brand, the Blue Line Hacks at $8.00 and Pull-
era at $8.00 which are warranted. All wholesale dealers in naval stores
supplies carry our lines and should supply operators.
0 _________________C~t~t~CF~9i


D. G. McKETHAN, Praldent.
Jacksonville, Fla.


ALFRED A. McKETHAN, L't U. S. N.
Ret'd Sec'y and Treas, Constructing
Engineer. Fayetteville, N. G.


Pine Product Construction Co.
INCORPORATED
Fayetteville. N. C.
Spirits of Turpentine, Oil of Tar, Creosote, Tar, Disinfectants; Wood Preservative,
Paints. Wood Stains, Etc., and Charcoal, from Lightwood Stumps. Box-facings.
Profits increased. Time of distillation reduced. Condensation controlled at will.
No danger from fire. Plant erected complete, and men taught the process. FPr-
ther information, write Alfred MacKethan. general manager. Fayetteville, N. C.

THE PHILADELPHIA TAILORS
JOHN B. CAINGAGLINI & BRO.,

MERCHANT TAILORS AND IMPORTERS
48 W. Bay Street. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

HOTlL BARTHOLDI, BROADWAY AND 23d ST.,
HOTEL I//IBARTHOLDI, NEW YORK CITY.
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout. S
* Near all Big Stores and Places of Amusemenit. Cars Pass
* the Door fr all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings.
Large Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
0 find no grand and magnificent decorations: no luxurious
S grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill i
of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
0 Speak to You. No Employees In Any Way Inattentative.
* But just a cozy, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the
hearts of those who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plain American cooking, and affable and courteous treatment.
SIM.TON ROBLEE, PrepieMor,
* W*y w^ w wraM


SJohn R. Young. President. C. S. Ellis. Vice-President.
J. W. Motte Jr., Secretary and Treasurer.


Th ELLIS-YOUNG CO.

SCommission Merchants
NAV AL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

| Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.


J. W. HUNT. President. J. E. HARRIS. Sd V. Pres. C. R. SHOUSE. Sec. A Tras.
P. L. PEACOCK. Ist V. P" W. J. KLLY. 3d V. P. H. L RICHMOND, Asst See'y-Trea

Peacock-Hunt & West Company,
General Offices: 20 Bay Street, E,, Savannah, Ga and
SWest Ruilding, Jacksonville, la.
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutual. We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that buys spirit
Turpentine and rosin.)

WHOLESALE GROCERS,
Hay, Grain anJl Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our Specialty
-SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wilson & Ghilds'
Philadelphia Wagons.

Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga., and Jacksonville
and Fernandina, Fla.


I~llabid
118111


Incorporated
1896


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