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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00068
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 15, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00068
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text





.L IBR A RY

APR 20 1904

"THE PINE AND ITS PRODUCT .'. Departma.toAgriculture.





WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

Adopted Sept. 12ta. 1902. by ihe Executive Committee of the Turpentine Operators' Association as Its Exclusive Official Organ. and Adopted Sept. 11it. 1902, is Aamal Co
vention, as an Official Organ Also of the General Association. Adopted Sept. 11th, 1903. as the only Offcial Organ of the Turpentine Operators' Assoclatlos.
Adopted April 27ta. 1903, as the Official Organ of the Inter-State Cane Growers' Association. Endorsed by the Georgla Sawmll Association.


VOL 8. NO. 16.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA


APRIL 15, 1904.


SAVANNAH, GA.


$3 A YEAR.


SCase of S. M. Clyatt, Convicted of Peonage, Now Before United States Supreme Court. :


The Record Holds That There Is No Constitutional Authority for the Conviction.
~ # 0 0 0 0 #0*0 ~##** a**iWr*#9ViW 9 ad


Some time during the year 1902, a man
from South Florida went to Tifton, Ga.,
and beguiled away from Mr. S. M. Clyatt,
a prominent turpentine operator of that
place, several of his negro hands, and car-
ried them down to Polk County. Mr.
Clyatt had a contract with these negroes
by virtue of which they were to do work
for him a certain length of time, and re-
lying upon their good faith, he had ad-
vanced considerable money and supplies
to them. As soon as he located them,
therefore, he went down to Bartow and
carried them back to Georgia with him.
The matter being brought to the atten-
tion of a lawyer, who saw in it a possible
opportunity for notoriety and a fee, he
haled Mr. Clyatt before Judge Swayne at
Tallahassee in the United States Court.
Judge Swayne tried the case under the
peonage law of 1867 and having convicted
Clyatt, fined him $2.500 and sentenced
him to five years in the penitentiary. From
this decision Clyatt appealed to the Circuit
Court in session at New Orleans. The
judges of that Court not agreeing, the case
was certified to the Supreme Court at
Washington. where it now goes. Mean-
while Mr. Clyatt is out under heavy bond
Last Tuesday a mass meeting was held
in Tifton for the purpose taking action
in the case. On being informed of this.
our Mr. Hollomon promptly wired Mayor
Timmons, who is also a prominent turpen-
tine man, asking for full details and ten-
dering the Industrial Record's help in tak-
ing the initiative to raise the necessary
money to bring their case properly before
the Supreme Court.
The following is Mr. Timmons' reply:


Attorney, and requested him to give you of the United States of the validity of ute and without the slightest disposition
further information. Mr. Fulwood is ab- the "Anti-Peonage Law" of the U. S., in to invade their personal liberty,, or to
sent, but will return tomorrow, when this the case of S. M. Clyatt vs. the United otherwise oppress employees.
matter will have his attention. States. now pending in that Court upon
Thanking you for your offer of assist- a "certificate for instructions" from the inict ted
ance in this worthy cause, I beg leave to 1. S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New veted in the Circuit Court of the U. S.
for the Northern District of Florida; a
remain, ()leans. it was deemed proper at a meet- for the Nor t hern District of Florid
Yours very truly, ing of employers in these industries held wt of aen e
W. W. TIMMONS. here this day, that an appeal be made to Sttes Circuit Court of Appeal, and the
you, and to all such as will be either di- judges being unable to decide the questions
The circular letter referred to is as fol- rectlv or indirectly affected by the result involved, have certified them to the U. S.
Supreme Court for final determination;
and they will be conclusively settled by
the judgment of that tribunal.
SA penalty most shocking in its severity
Shas been imposed on Mr. Clyatt, and he
has exhausted his means in his efforts to
obtain a reversal of the action of the
Court in which he was convicted.


CAPT. D. G. PURSE
Re-elected this week for the fourteenth time President of
the Savannah, Ga. Board of Trade. This Board and the
Jacksonville, Fla. Board, over which Capt. C. E. Garner so
ably reaides. are two of the strongest commercial nroanlsa


tons in the Southern States.
Tifton. (a., April 12, 1904. Captain Purse also President ot the Inter-State Cane
J. A. Hollomon, Esq Jacksonville, 11a.: Growers' Asociation, the Second Annual Convention of
Dear Sir: I am in receipt of your tel- which will be held in Jacksonville May 4th, 5th and 6th.
egram of this date, making inquiry in re-
gard to the Clyatt case, and beg to thank
you for the interest manifested.
I enclose herewith copy of circular letter lows: of Clyatt's appeal, to assist in providing
I enclose herewith copy of circular letter
which is to be signed by a committee of Valdosta, Ga., April 8th, 1904. fu"ds for the employment of the best
legal talent available, in order that the
Mr. Clyatt's friends, of which I am one, To Facto"s and Dealers in Naval Stores, grave questions involve in o that the
and mailed to all prominent turpentine etc., Savannah, Ga.: d ravosecution o innoeno o in the att
and lumber men. This will give you a Gentlemen: Assured of your interest in eP Courts in the State o org in
short and clear statement of the case. I whatever affects the wellbeing of all who Alabama, MiCsissippi and Louisianaf G ma
also enclose copy of Congressman W. G. are engaged in the manufacture of Naval la rama, Mirsissippi and oeuisiana, may
Brantley's speech in Congress on the ques- Stores and Lumber within the territory p ely te ind
tion of peonage, which fully discusses the I tributary to your city, and realizing th", Hundreds .f such prosecutions have been
principles involved. I disastrous effects that will inevitably re- instituted, as we believe, without author-
I have left copy of your telegram at the sult to producers throughout the South ity of law, against men who were wholly
office of Col. C. W. Fulwood, Mr. Clyatt's I from an affirmance by the Supreme Court ignorant of the existence of any such stat-


Realizing the enormous gravity of the
interests involved, and deeming it not
quite fair or reasonable that he alone
-hould bear the cost of prosecuting his
appeal, we were instructed at the meeting
above referred to, to solicit your assist-
ance in providing a fund for securing the
best legal talent in the country to assist
in the argument before the Supreme Court
of the questions involved. The amount
necessary for this purpose will e large,
probably between $5,000.00 and $10,000.00,
but whatever it may be. we feel that you
will recognize the vast importance to all
who are engaged in industries that necessi-
tate the employment of colored laborers,
of promptly providing it.
As thus far construed and applied by
the Federal Authorities, the mere accept-
ance of voluntary service from an em-
ployee, white or colored, to liquidate a
Just debt due the employer, the Peonage
Statute will subject the employer to im-
prisonment in the penitentiary for a term
of five years, to a fine or $5,000, or both, at
the discretion of the Court, with the fur-
ther penalty of being forever disqualified
to hold any appointment under the Gov-
ernment of the United States.
In view of the appalling penalty im-
posed on Mr. Clyatt, and of the disastrous
consequences that must result to all em-
ployers of labor in the South from an af-
firmance of the judgment in his case, we
submit this appeal to you, trusting that
it will receive prompt and favorable con-
sideration at your hands, and that your
contribution will be measured in amount
by the gravity of the questions involved
(Continued on Page 5)






2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
* **^ M********* 1b) 23 22 ____________________


C. B. ROGERS, PRESIDENT.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, VICE-PRESIDENTB.


C. H. HODGSON, Sac, and TREAB'.L


DIRECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville: the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company. of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one Three.Story Building, 70x200; one two.story building. 50x390; one one.story building, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind in the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


SnHeadquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla. i
*Brnches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola, Fla., and Savannah. Ga.
* *
I*w**wo ano ewmneoa Twwww* w^wwwy


THE RECORD WILL BE WORTH DOLLARS TO YOU EVERY WEEK.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 3


&


i ~ ~ CIus
tin


, -'. 5 :i


TURPENTINE CUPS.

If you expect to use the HERTY cup
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices and all infor-
mation cheerfully furnished on


IPS, GUTTERS and all TOOLS
ed in the Herty system of turpen-
ing. Address

CHATTANOOGA POTTERY CO.,
DAISY, TENN.


r-r- I V I =-- I-I- I I I I I-I --I Il I-i-iII I i I-I I -I i- II I I I I-I- l
- W. W. CARNES, Pres. W. C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T DUDLEY. Sec. Treas

Tampa Hardware Co. |

i Wholesale
Hardware
STurpentine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies. .

Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
- and Pullers on Hand.

TAMPA, FLORIDA.

I I 11 I-I- I- II I -I-I I M~III~ -II i III-I-II I I 11- i II ll II I-- I 1


... NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA. U. S. A.


-- --


Grivot; Typewriters
Dyal-Vpchurch Building.
Jacksonville, Fla.
All makes.
For $x.oo will send you one of our best
ribbons, and x dozen of our best carbons,
and a catalogue of the best typewriter
in the world-The Wonderful Oliver
Typewriter. It writes in sight.


BOWEN &


TO TRADE WITH
R. J. RILES.
Railroad W\atches,
Diamonds and Jewelry.
22a WEST MAY SIaErT.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
L h-- .


C atcn eplrmg A Specalty.
CO.
New Victoria.
Corner Main and Adams.
Jacksonville's New Hotel
Rates $2.oo to $2.5o
R. BIXLER, Proprietor.

KIRK & JONES
E DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.

- MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
ill -..
iartS CYPRESS WATER TANKS
"2O Best in the World.
For delivered prices write,
Cypress Tank Ce, MebleAla.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.
DIRECTORS:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. LI SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
.. R. YOUNG.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY.
A. D. COVINGTON.


H. L. KAYTON.
Secretary.and Treasurer.


J. H. CHESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMONDCAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.


I- -__6**ft66*********6* *
THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
Jacksonville, Fla.
CAPITAL $300,000 X SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS $300,000
Strength and ample facilities. Business solicited. Prompt attention to collec-
tions and business of customers not living in Jacksonville. Best Safety Deposit
Boxes for rent.



W. R. THOMAS

GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons, Harness and Buggies.


Jacksonville, Fla.


Osteopathy.
The New Scientific Treatment
of the Body.
DR. JOHN W\ PHELP.
Chronic and Nervous Troubles
DR. ELIZABETH BRIGGR McELWAIN.
Diseases of Women and Children


211 W. Adams.


Jacksonville.


THE CANNON COMPANY
CAPITAL PAID
IN S19.500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barres hold and will pass the se-
verest American and European inspection.

Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, QUITMAN, GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address orders to home office,
QUITMAN, GA.


LomKIN IMR W0ks 13S101y C.
BUILDERS AND DUALUR8S IN


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton. Saw. FertlUser. 0, an e Ma-
ehinery, and Supplies and Repalrs
CAPACITY PFOR M HAND.
Maehine Tools. Wood-Worklg Mkte-
ery. Shafting. PulleR, Hangem Late
and Rubber Belting and Hosm, RFoalia
mad ill luppllf and Took.
Plans and etilmates furalsed for P.we
Plants and Steel Bridgs.
Steam Pumps. Peed Water Hreatws a
Hoiating Sngines.
AUGUSTA, CA.


THE RECORD IS THE SOUTH'S GREAT TRADE JOURNAL.


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 8


ZINC NAILS
FR
Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the On&ly mais which will not injure
saws when left in the trees.
Salem Nail Co,
279 Pewl St. Now York, N. Y.
Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Ete, Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.






4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J. A. Craig (Q Bro.
239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BOCK.


Leaders in
*-~~~ -_>i


Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
UTTD4a-tAfelm FiVurnishitds.


Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in th City.
Agents for Dunlarp and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.


T. MURPHY
Jaoksonville
Machine and Iron Works
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat and Sawmill Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron and
Brass Castings, Phosphor-Bronze Journal Bearings.
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
.6 a6aa6* Aeee eOee *6* 6&* A eA*At6e 6*6 0e eoe *6 *940


MORTGAGES.


RENTS.


WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,

Real Estate Broker.


III W. [ORSYTI STREET,


JACKSONVILLE. 3LORWA.


H. A. Renfroe Coo


TAILORS


uits to Order at Ready-Mide Prices
439 W. Bay Street.


Stetson Hats


Mail Orders Given Personal Attenion,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


rin tin g 1 Send your order to the Industrial
SRecord. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


SStandard Clothing Company !
* i

One Price One Price

FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida. i
* Stetuse and Hawes Hats. Special Attenlion Given to Mail Orders.
* **** ** *** * 9 I 9 9 I 9 I 9 r 99i 9~-I---


Do You Want to Sell
Your Saw Mill or Tie Timber?


Do You Want to Sell your Tur-
pentine Location ?


If so, write us, we are in touch with many Northern, Western and
Southern Millmen who want to buy.


Brobston, Fendig &Co.
Brunswick, Ga. and Jacksonville, Fla.


I


Cable Address. Florida

j(Standard Naval Storesi
i Company.
DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN

i ROSIN
AND TURPENTINE.
S Jacksonville, Fla.
4twee ww oeee *- a* -- -


The L. -lgest and Oldest Copper
h rks in Georgia.


M. A. BAKER,
Investor and
Manufacturer of the
Baker Improved
Seemless Turpen-
tir e stills.
Write me for prices tod outUs
F. 0. B arT Yoint in Georgia, lor-
Ida, Alabaira or Mississippi- Ala
stills sold uider a guarantee.
I Job work through tLe
country a specialty.
brunswick, Ga.


specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.

W. B. HENDERSON. G. C. WARREN.
W. H. BECKWITH- $
w. -EcwrT ENDERSON & WARREN.
BECKWITH, i. ----- ---
SLARGE TR ACFS OF TURPENTIE AND MILL LANDS.
S National Bank Building.
Rooms 1-2-3, FIr. FLORIDA.
TAMPA,


1W -I I I I- I I I IA I I- I U1 I Ui U:1 I z I 1 1- 1- 1 111


McMillan

Bros.
Florida Cop-


per Works. i
Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
General Metal Workers.
Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
Patching through the country a specialty,
Orders by mail or wire will receive prom"4
attention at either of the followia. -works:.
Fayetteville, N. C. Savannah. Ga
Mobile, Alae. Jacksonville. Fle
,,,,,,, 1111 1199,,,,,,,,.


i


DON'T FAIL TO MENTION THE RECORD TO ADVERTISERS.





14~a~W#8aU~9a~u~Wb'~a~s`ril~~


11 1111-11 AIIII IrII LIVIA,&I) I- A


-


RENTS.


1


)t


I


-^**>.\% *. % #,,lkk 4









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


THE PEONAGE CASE OF S. N. CLYATT. tion may be primary and direct in its


Continued from Page 1.
and the magnitude of the interests, we
are,
Very respectfully yours,


Accompanying the letter was a speech
delivered in Congress March 28th last by
Hon. W. G. Brantley, of Georgia, on the
peonage law, in which he demonstrates-
that the peonage law of 1867 is uncon-
stitutional
During the reconstruction craze, Con-
giess passed several laws indicative of its
temper, Among them were the Civil
Rights Bill, the Force Bill and the Peonage
Bill. All of these except the latter have
already been declared unconstitutional oy
the United States Supreme Court.
The peonage law is as follows:
"An act to abolish and forever prohibit
the system of peonage in the Territory ol
New Mexico and other parts of the Unit-
ed States.
"Be it enacted, etc., That the holding of
any person to service or labor under the
system known as "peonage" is hereby de-
clared to be unlawful, and the same is
hereby abolished and forever prohibited in
the Territory of New Mexico, or in any
other Territory or State of the United
States, and all acts, laws, resolutions,
orders, regulations, or usages of the Ter-
ritory of New Mexico, or of any other
Territory or State of the United States,
which have heretofore established, main
stained or enforced, or by virtue of which
any attempt shall hereafter be made to
establish, maintain or enforce, directly or
indirectly, the voluntary or involuntary
service of labor of any persons as peons
in liquidation of any debt or obligation,
or otherwise, be and the same are hereby
declared null and void; and any person or
persons who shall hold, arrest, or return,
or cause to be held, arrested or returned.
or in any other manner aid in the arrest
or return of any person or persons to a
condition of peonage, shall, upon convic-
tion, be punished by fine of not less than
$1,000 nor more than $5,000, or by im-
prisonment not less than one nor more
than five years, or both in the discretion
of the court.
"Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That
it shall be the duty of all persons in the
military or civil service in the Territory of
New Mexico to aid in the enforcement of
the foregoing section of this act; and any
person or persons who shall obstruct or
attempt to obstruct, or in any way inter-
fere with or prevent the enforcement of
this act shall be liable to the punishments
and penalties hereby provided, and any
officer or other person in the military ser
vice of the United States who shall so
offend, directly or indirectly, shall on con-
viction before a court-martial be dishon-
orably dismissed from the service of the
United States, and shall thereafter be in
eligible to reappointment to any office of
trust, honor or profit under the Govern-
ment.
"Approved March 2, 1867."
The Supreme Court, in 109 United
States on page 20, says:
"By its own unaided force and effect it
(the 13th amendment) abolished slavery
and established universal freedom. Still,
legislation may be necessary and proper
to meet all the various cases and circum-
stances to be affected by it, and to pre-
scribe proper modes of redress for its vio-
lation in letter orspirit and such legisla-


character, for the amendment is not a
mere prohibition of the State laws es-
tablishing or upholding slavery, but an ab-
solute declaration that slavery or invol-
untary servitude shall not exist in any
part of the United States"
And again on page 23, the Court says:
"Under the 13th amienumient, the legis-
lation, so tar as is necessary or proper to
eradicate all forms and incidents of slav-
ery and involuntary servitude, may be di-
rect and primary, operating upon the acts
of individuals, whether sanctioned by
State legislation or not."

Again on page 20, the Court says:
"But it has a iellex character also, es-
tablishing and decreeing universal civil
.ind political freedom throughout the Unit-
d States; and it is assumed that the
power vested in Congress to enforce the
article by appropriate legislation clothes
Congress with power to pass all laws nec-
essary and proper for abolishing all badges
and incidents of slavery in the United
States."
Whatever the contention may be, says
Mr. Brantley in his speech, as to the ex-
act meaning of this language, there are
two facts already established that make
.ts meaning of no importance to our con-
tention The one is that this same decis-
ion announced that without a law author-
izing it, there can be no slavery, and the
other is that there is no law in Georgia
recognizing slavery or peonage It follows,
therefore, that no matter what Congress
.nay have the power to do, a citizen of
,-eorgia cannot be held guilty of an of-
eense that he cannot commit."
The case of Cruikshank, et al., (92 U. S.
p. 542) was one in point. There the Su-
preme Court held that-
"The duty of a government to afford
protection is limited always by the pow-
er it possesses for Lhat purpose.
"The government of the United States,
although it is within the scope of its
powers, supreme and beyond the States,
can neither grant nor secure to its citi-
zens rights or privileges which are not
expressly or by implication placed under
its jurisdiction. All that cannot be so
granted or secured, are left to the exclu-
sive protection of the States.
"The duty of protecting all of its citi-
zens in the enjoyment of an equality ol
rights was originally assumed by the
States, and it still remains there. The
only obligation resting upon the United
States is to see that the States do not
deny the right."
In the case of Eberhart et al., tried be-
fore Judge W. T. Newman, in the United
States Court for the Northern District
of Georgia, published in the Federal lle-
porter, vol. 127, will be found Judge New-
man's opinion dismissing the case on the
ground of unconstitutionality. This was
a case exactly like the case of Clyatt. The
following is Judge Newman's opinion:
"The indictment charges the defendants
with certain acts in restraint of the per-
sonal liberty of named persons of African
descentt, and characterizes these acts as
peonage, and charges the defendants with
holding the persons named as peons, and
with returning them to a condition ot
peonage, in violation of the act of Con
gress of March 2, 1867 (chap. 187, 14 Stat.
L., 546; Rev. Stat., see. 5526; U. S. Comp.
St, 1901, p. 3715). The act of Congress
named, entitled "An act to abolish and
forever prohibit the system of peonage in


the Territory of New Mexico, and other
parts of the Luited States," was aimed
at a system.
"Its purpose was to abolish and forever
prohibit the system known as "peonage,"
as it existed in New Mexico and elsewhere.
A lull discussion of this system and how
it caiue to exist in New Mexico will be
iound in the case of Jaremillo vs. Romero
(1 N. AL 190). It came with the terri-
tory ceded to the United States by the
treaty with Mexico alter the Mexican war.
it was part of the systein of the people
inhabiting that territory. The clear pur-
pose of the act was to deal with this sys-
tem by abolishing it and prohibiting a re-
turn to it. An examination of the act will
show that this is true beyond question.
No such system as this ever existed in
Georgia. African slavery existed, but this
was the ownership of Africans and persons
of African descent as chattels. There
could not be, therefore, in Georgia, any
such thing as holding persons under this
system of peonage or returning them to
it.
"It would be the merest perversion of
this act to attempt to apply it to an ordi-
nary case of restraint of personal liberty,
and the case is not strengthened by the
charge that the person so restrained is of
African descent. However wrongful and il-
iegal some of the acts charged in the in-
.tictment may be, they cannot be punished
under the statute named. The purpose of
,his act, as stated, was to abolish this sys-
tem of peonage and to render null and
void all acts, laws, resolutions, orders, reg-
ulations or usages, in New Mexico or else-
where which established or which sought to
establish this system. The penal part ot
the act will not be enlarged beyond the
scope and purpose of the act as above indi-
cated. The penalty is for holding under,
or for arresting or returning to, this con-
dition of peonage. A person must have
I.een held under this system or arrested
and returned to it; that is, to a pre-exist-
ing condition of peonage.
Mexican Peonage.
"It may be added that even if the act
of Congress on which this indictment is
based could be held applicable in Georgia
the acts set out in the indictment are
nothing like the old system of peonage.
That system seems to have been, even as
it came from Mexico, a voluntary system
of labor and of servitude. The individual,
,n the beginning, at least, voluntarily as-
sumed this service. He was afterwards.
it is true, held to the service against his
will until his contract was discharged, and
lie could be held under it or by the cus-
tom and usages of the country arrested
and returned to it.
"Certain it is, that by the act of the
Territorial legislature of New Mexico of
1852 (Laws 1851-52, p. 184), which was
probably in force when the act of Con-
gress was passed, the service must have
isten voluntarily entered into (Jaremillo
vs. Ilmnero, supra). So that both under
the old system of peonage, as it came
from New Mexico, and also as it was em-
l)odied in the statute law of New Mexico,
the contract was enteral into freely and
voluntarily by the servant. The act of
Congress on which this indictment is based
is inapplicable in Georgia, and, even if
applicable here, the facts set out in the in-
dictment are not sucl as make a case
under the act. To merely characterize acts
in restraint of personal liberty as peonage
is not sufficient to make them such-cer-
tainly not under this act of Congress."


Turpentine operators who get gum from
Uncle Sam's lands are liable to lose it. it
doesn't pay to work for Uncle Sam with-
out wages.

H. ROBINSON. Pres. H. GAILLARD. Cashier
W. B. OWEN. Vice-Pres.

Commercial Bank,
State Depository.
BRANceH m Ocala. Fla.. Lake City. Fla
Jacksonville, --- lorida



/2 Your Herd!
You can find It among our Shorthorn or Here-
ford bulls. The choicest of breeding and rare in-
dividuality. Ready for service, and will price
them right. Will hold our spring auction about
April 1.
PALMETTO PARK FARM,
Z C CHAMBIASS&CO,
Ocala, Fla




t NO FARM IRW' :
S A GROVE OF
* *


UNAF
They Aret *U:


SGRIFFING'S CATALOG"

S TEL ABOUT THEM.
STwenty leading varilt o P Lau .
Also a complete liu of Fruit -a4 OP-
Snamntal trees and hr abbey.
* Catalolr* Fre.
S Address
rT e IPfFIMe tROS. 00.-
SJACKSONVILL,. PLA.
*************************

THE


Bethune


Apparatus.


The New Process.

Extracts the spirts without destroying the
wood fibre. Runs out a charge In less than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-five gallons from cord of wood.
Makes pure water white spirits, free from
the odor of tar or creosote. No chemicals
used in refining the spirits. Needs to be
distilled only once after coming from re-
tort.
No trouble with bi-products, the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
duced and from wood. Only one grade
of spirits produced and that the highest.
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGER FROM FIRE
Built of finest material by high-grade
workmen. The cheapest machine offered to
the public.
We challenge comparison of output and
quality of product. We guarantee output
and quality.
For full particulars, prices, samples,
etc., address-
The rime Belt ConstMctie Cmpany
P. O. Box 643 RALEIGH, N. C.


FIND SUBSCRIPTION BLANK FOR YOUR COnVENLENCC.







6 THTE WEEXClY INDUSTRIAL RECOkD.


SThe Naval Stores' Special Train

To the St, Louis Exposition,

The following letter has been received "'The train \e furnish will be of the
by the Turpentine Operators' Association verv latest style and design, and the ser-


from the Southern Railway relative to tlhe
special naval stores train from Jackson-
ville to St. Louis and return the 1st ot
July. This train will be one of the finest
and most comfortable that ever left Flor-
ida, and it will be a "special" in the com-
plete sense of the word, that is, it will be
a train for the exclusive accommodation of
the naval stores party, going and coming.
The letter follows:


I


vice throughout will be the very best.
"1In order to secure this special train, as
outlined, we are to be guaranteed one hun-
dred (100) or more people, and the tickets
for the party are to be sold to you on or
e'lore June 20, 1904.
"'Your acknowledgment will oblige.
Yours very truly,
-H. F. CARY, D. P. A."


"Southern Railway Company, Otlice of Dis- This schedule gives the party eight days
trict Passenger Agent, Jacksonville, la in St. Louis during tile week of tile -aL-
April 12, 1904. jonal Democratic Convention. This wim
"Movement Turpentine Factors and Ope- give ample time for seeing the \\orld's
rators, Jacksonville, Fla., July 7th, to St. rair at tile very time when it is most
Louis and return account World's Fair desirable to visit it; it aiso provides the
and Democratic National Convention. opportunity for looking in upon the mak-
".Mr. James A. Hollomon, secretary, Jack- ing of a presidential nominee, which is the
sonville, Fla.: most spectacular political entertainment
Dear Sir: Referring to your letter furnished in the world to-day.
March 28th, and our personal conversation The letter from the Southern Railway
March 31st, we have arranged for special specifies in detail as to rates, which every
train, consisting of- one must agree are exceptionally reas-
"Engine. unable for this class of service. As to
"One combination club and baggage car. hotel accoloniodations in St. Louis, Mr.
"Four Pullman sleeping cars; each car liollonlon, the secretary of the T. O. A.,
containing two drawing-rooms and ten sec- will go to St. louis in May and arrange
tions. for this completely, so that the naval
"One dining car. stores people may have every comfort.
To be handled on the following schedule.
approximately: The limit of this special train will be
approximately:
Going. one hundred and we urge every turpentine
"Leave Jacksonville 8:30 p. m., Thurs- man who desires to become a member of
day, June 30; leave Atlanta, 5:50 a. m., this party to write immediately to the edi-
tor of tl'e Record to that effect, so that
Friday, July 1; leave Chattanooga 10:1 tor of the rd t tat effect so that
a. m., Friday, July 1; leave Lexington. there nay be no delay in the arrange-
5:50 p. m., Friday, July 1; leave Louis- ments. Operators are requested to state
ville, 8:30 p. m., Friday, July 1; arrive St specifically how many will be in their
Louis, 6:00 a. m., Saturday, July 2. party. A great many operators will take-
their wives, daughters and other members


SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903,04 AND TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.

Receipts 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
Spirits, casks...... .................. 19a3,(47 292,496 314,846
Rosins. bbis......................... 650,938 940,507 1,071,440
Total .......... ................. ..... 844.585 1,233,0331,385,786
Exports
Spirits casks...... .................. 188,393 296,430 814,876
Rosins, bbls..... ...... ...............-.. 752,270 975.428 1,062,687
Foreign
Spirits, casks. ... ............ 93.884 206,109 217,446
Rosins, bbls .......... .......... ...... 38,171 504,173 535,042
New York
Spirits, casks.......................... 35,658 42,765 53,797
Rosins, bbls............ ......... ..... 87,353 133,121 129,059
Sundries
Spirits, casks........ ................... 59,351 37,556 43,633
Rosins, bbls ................ ........ .. 3826.746 337,734 398.586
The receipts of spirits are less than 1902-03 by 98,849 casks, and of rosins, 289,569 barrels.


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE & RETAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints, Oils and Glass,
Stoves. Tinware, Cou ntry-Holloware.
10 WEST BAY STREET Jacksonville. Fla.



You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?

You Want any Kind of Florida Land?

IF You Mean Business?
0 Call on or Write to
J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS, 0
Ocala, Florida *
; f~9Q~f~96~6a901b)Ol:*~~-:--:


Returning. of their family. BET TELI NI'E
"Leave St. Louis 9.00 p. m., Saturday, I will send by expre
July 9; leave Louisville, 6:00 a. m., Sun- Four full quarts Lincoln County, S
day, July 10; leave Lexington, 9:30 a. nl.. Threatened with Fire. Single Bottles ........................
I will send four full quarts of Some
Sunday, July 10; leave Chlattanooga, 5.20 L. Dowling's big sawmill in West End ding Rye, Holland Gin, Tom Gin.
p. m., Sunday, July 10; leave Atlanta. Whiskey, Gin and Manhattan Cc
10:25 p. ., Sunday, July 10; arrive Jac was threatened with a serious conflagra- One bottle of any of the above .........
0 p. m., Sunday, July 10; arrive JackFour bottles of the following Cali
sonville, 7:00 a. m., Monday, July 11. tion Monday morning, when the inlmmense Catawba .............................
"The berths are of regular size and by log wharf was discovered to be in flames. Single bottles ........................
Five bottles Duffy's Malt ...........
crowding, two people could occupy one By the timely use of the mill's fire-fight- Single bottles ...........................
berth, or four people one section: adrl ing apparatus the flames were subduel Four bottles Wilson Whiskey, cased
five people one drawing room. Howe,',. before they reached the main building. Single bottles .........................
Bulk goods of all kinds. Spec
the best arrangement would be one per The city department was not called out. liquors in jugs from $1.50 to 5.00.
son to each berth or two people to each Live Oak Democrat. f. BETTt LINI. W Bay St., op
section-upper and lower berth; and taIe,:
people to a drawingroom. Bought out Keer Co.
"The charges for this service will be: Bought out Keller Co.
"Railroad rate, Jacksonville to St. loik T'lie Hayes Lunmber Company has bought G eo. T afford
and return, $27.50 per capital. out the Keller Company, of Savannah,s an
"Lower berth, Jacksonville to St. Louis. wlicl Is a large camp on the Olokney O a
one way, $6.50; round trip, $13.00. river and a sawmill at Carrabelle. Mr.
"Upper berth, Jackround trip, 13.. .o A. Hayes, president; Mr. J. F. Nutter. Special attention to Saw
one way, $6.50; round trip, $13.00. general manager.-Quincy Herald and Era. Tifton
"Section, Jacksonville to St. Louis, oi, -- -
way, $13.00; round trip, $26.00. V W
"Drawingroom. Jacksonville to St. Louis,
one way, $24.00; round trip, $48.00. THE COVINGTON CO
"Dining car will he operated on table
de hote plan at $1.00 pe.r capital each
meal $3.00 for breakfast, lunch and din-
ner, Atlanta to Louisville, same amount
returning from Louisville. ol l SHOES AND DRY OODS
"Therefore, under the above arrange- W
ment, figuring the expense for one person NEW YORK 256 Churh Str
from Jacksonville to St. Louis and St. Y 26 t.
Louis to Jacksonville, the expense will b?: W e S ll M erchan
Fare, $27.50 round trip, one berth, $13.00, W e Sell M merchants
round trip. six meals round trip, $6.00-
total expense, $47.00.


SPECIALTY.
ss. prepaid, the following:
unnybrook Rye or Big Horn Rye .. $4.00
.......................................... I.25
rs' Corn, Melwood Rye, Golden Wed-
Peach Brandy, Peach and Honey
icktails-any of the above for........ $.00
... .. .. .. ... ..... ...... i. oo
fornia Wines: Sherry, Port, Muscat,
... ....................................... $2.00
.. ....................................... 0so .
........................................... $ 00
........................................... 1.2B
I............................................ 1 .00
............................................ $1151
fial Prices on application. All kinds of
f. o. b. Jacksonville.
p. Uion Uepot, Jacksonville, fla


Iron Works Co.

id Machinists.
Mill and Turpentine Work.
, Georgia.

"- -- -



MPANY,

i to 641 West Forsyth Street.
Jacksonville, Fla.


Only.


1W - W '- '


WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS MENTION THE RECORD.


F


B WWWWWWWWWWWWW


vv Vvvv







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY

Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.


Located in the heat t of the Lumber District gives us advan-
tage of choicest material at lowest cost


NAVAL STORES NOTES. LUMBER NOTES.
The annual production of turpentine in A tree was cut down in Chehalis County,
Spain is about 800,000 gallons. Washington on February 25th, 1903. That
is, it fell that day. It may have required
Taking the American and London stock' several days to do the cutting. It meas-
of turpentine together the totals on the ured 11 feet in diameter on the log end.
opening of the new season, were 30,34; and 42 feet long, measuring 9 feet ac the
casks against 44, :11 casks a year ago, or little end. It contained 39,000 feet of lutw-
7,466 casks less. her board measure, and weighed I;:'.0 .
--- pounds. It will be one of Waslington'%
Rosins are still ahead of last year's exhibits at the St. Louis F.ir.,
prices.


Spain has a naval stores union capital-
ized at $1,100,000, organized six years ago.
which has accomplished for the craft ini
that country what the T. O. A.'s havt
done here. There turpentine men pull to-
g-ther now instead of cutting each other':s
throats.


The issue of the Southern LJumierman
for April 1st gives a write-up of our re-
cent sawmill men's meeting, which includes
handsome pictures of Messrs H. H. Tift,
A. G. Cummer, B. F. Camp, Sam. A. Sizer,
George Drew, R. H. Paul, Martin F. Am-
orous, and W. B. Stillwell. All being hand-
some men, their pictures are ornaments to
tile sterling pages of our Nashville con-


Savannah factors say that with 60,000 temporary.
casks sold during the winter's operations
in futures, at 50 to 52 cents, the average
price being about 511-4 cents, they are The biggest stick cut lately was by the
confident that the market will be kept Champion Lumber Co., of Orrisburg, Miss.
above 50 cents the minimum price agreed It was a long-leaf pine tree, which scaled
upon. 4,500 fee board measure, and has been cui
Into lumber at the mill of the company
The Belgian steamship Iris, of the Ant-
werp Naval Stores fleet, is in Fernandin;. i FUND FOR CLYATT CASE.
loading with 10,000 casks for London and -
Antwerp. Turpentine and Sawmill Men Urged to
Assist in this Fight.


Will Go Out of Business.
The Union Cooperage and Supply Co..
which has for a long time controlled the
majority of cooperage factories in tine
turpentine belt will go out of business as.
a corporation on the 1st of May. The
business of the company has been com-
pletely reorganized, and the Montgoimey
('operage Co., and the Jacksonville Coop-
erage Co.. both of which will have hand
plants at different points, will continue
as the reorganized interests of the old
Union Company.
Florida is developing into quite a con-
sumer of her lumber in making boxes anwl
crates for her products.


In another column will be found a com-
plete history of the S. M. Clyatt case.
Mr. Clyatt has exhausted his fortune in
lighting this hleal battle and the Record
earnestly urges every turlpntine opera-
tor and sawmill man in the South to
come to the rescue now and contribute
toward a fund to retain the very best legal
talent to properly present this case before
thI United States Supreme Court.
All contributions should be sent to H. A.
lMcEachern, treasurer of the Turpentine
Opera tors' Association, who will receipt
for them and turn them over to the com-
mittee having the matter in hand.


Whiskies, Gins,

Rums,



from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon

Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies


Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.



CHAS. BLUM & CO.

517 and 519 West Bay Street.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


NEW YORK LUMBER QUOTATIONS.

Pine, Yellow (Long Leaf.)
By Sail.
Building orders, 12 in. and under, $20.50
to $22.50.
Building orders, 14 in. and up, $26.00 to
$29.00.
Yard orders, ordinary assortment, $20.50
to $22.50.
Ship stock, easy schedules, $26.50 to
$27.50.
Ship stock, 40 ft. average, $30.00 to $35.00
Heart face siding, 1 in. and 11-4 in., $20.50
to $21.50. ,
1 in. wide boards, heart face, $26.00 to
$28.00.
1 1-4 and 11-2 in. wide boards, $28.00 to
$30.00.
2 in. wide plank, heart face, $30.00 to
$.31.50.
Kiln dried sap siding, 4-4, $18.00 to $18.50.
Kiln dried sap siding, 5-4, $19.00 to $20.00.1
Yellow Pine Box Boards (knotty) $1350
to $14.50.
Yellow Pine Stepping, $30.00 to $35.00.
By steam, add $1.00 to $1.50.
Long Leaf Yellow Pine Flooring.
Clear Heart Face Rift DM&HBk 13-16x
2 1-4 counted 1x3, $44.00 to $45.00.
"A" Rift DM&IIBk 13-16x21-4 counted
Ix3, $32.00 to $33.00.
"B" Rift DM&HBk 13-16x21-4 counted
1x3, $26.00 to $27.00.
"'A" Flat DM&HBk 13-16x21-4 counted
lx3. $21.50 to $22.50.
-'B" Flat IDM&HBk 13-16x21-4 counted
1x3. $19.50 to $20.50.
No 1 Common DM&HBk 13-16x21-4
counted 1x3, $18.50.
For 11-8 in. add $2.50.
Steamer shipment on flat grain flooring $1
less per thousand than above prices.


WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS MENTION THE RECORD.


* 1904 EDITION

Lumbermen's

Yellow Pine and

Cypress

Reference Book
S"THE BEST BOOK OF
S ITS KIND PUBLISHED"
AND

Ulmer's Yellow

j Pine Code
A Complete amn Comprehensve
3 Telegrapiuc Cipher Coee, espec
l aly evisey to meet the rewqir- e
Sments of te
YELLOW PINE TRADE

3 PRICE LIST.
Lumberman's Yellow Pine and Cypress
RHference Book. 1904 Edition,
Separate from Code for Inspectors,
$ .50 per copy.
$* 1.5 per 3 copies.
S2.00 per 6 copies.
Ulmer's Yellow Pine Code combined
werith Reference Book under same cov-
er 00 per copy.
$&5 per 3 copies.
$9.00 per 6 copies.
Deliverinl Charge Prepaid

3 BENJAMIN F. ULMER
? COMPILER and PUBLISHER







0. R. IMR, JR.
MANUFACTURER OI


BRICK.

WRITE FO PRIVY .
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.

'PEHE 390.


!
I


I







8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


YELLOW PINE NORTH.

What the Staple is Doing in the Leading
Markets.
New York.-The staple has shown some
improvement during the past fortnight.
Inquiry for stock seems to be more active
in the yard trade than for general con-
struction work, and it is believed that
within the next thirty days prices will
show an upward tendency.
Philadelphia.-Yellow pine is just now
under more active inquiry than it has
been at any time since last autumn.
All the wholesale dealers are doing busi-
ness. None of them complain as to prices.
Purchases have been made covering deliv-
eries as late as July. Some yards hith-
erto touching yellow pine rather lightly,
are now arranging to carry large stocks
and have made a good start by securing
contracts for supplies.
Buffalo.-Slack conditions prevail in yel-
low pine, but it is only temporary. North-
ern demand is picking up and promises
to be large. There is more actual need
of this wood than ever before.
Boston.-There are no very large or-
ders here for hard pine, and but little in-
quiry pointing to future business. On
small bills, however, there is something
doing. Prices are steady, and for big
sticks decidedly firm. The market may
be quoted for all yellow pines as quiet
and steady.
St. Louis.-Tone quiet, but better. Or-
ders will be plentiful, if good weather pre-
vails. The season is backward, and ship
ments from mills are not prompt.
Cincinnati.-Pine market firm and sales
aggregate a fair volume of business.
List prices are maintained and prospect
for business good.
Baltimore. Duplicate stocks have been
ordered by nearly all the dealers in antic-
ipation of the spirited inquiry, and it
will trouble some of those in the trade tU
handle them. Prices range from 50 cent.
to $1.50 per 1,000 feet higher than a
year ago, and double that on last fall's
prices. No material advance is antici-
pated in prices.


Against Reduction of Output.
Mr. J. A. Bell, president of the J. A.
Bell Lumber Co., of Lake Charles, La..
discussing at New Orleans the reported
project to curtail the production of yel-
low pine, says that the manufacturers of
his territory will not endorse such a plan,
as they can sell all the lumber they can
manufacture. He added:
"The manufacturers of Lake Charles
do not want to curtail production, be-
cause we have been running 10 hours a
day and have not been accumulating such
heavy stocks. We will continue to run
for this time, and we will continue to sell
out our cut.
"Those who want to curtail production
will never accomplish their object. Opposi-
tion will be too strong."


Cypress in Demand.
There is no change in the cypress mar-
ket North so far as official prices are
concerned, although the demand has been
increasing in such volume of late that
figures above the official price list are
being secured on some orders, particularly
for dried stocks. Cypress has more than
held its own during the entire winter
months, and with only a nominal supply


of dry stock in the mills and in first
hands, indications point to an exceedingly
active Spring and Summer in this line.
New York quotations are: 1 inch firsts and
seconds, $44.25; 1 inch selects, $38.25, and
inch shop, $29.25.
Good reports come in from all the
Northern markets.

The Wldte-Blakeslee-Mfg. Co.'s New Fac-
tory in Operation.
The plant of the White-Blakeslee Manu-
facturing Company, at Birmingham, Ala.,
destroyed by fire on the 12th of February
last, as reported in this paper, has been
rebuilt along the lines of the most modern
machine shop construction, with more
than double the floor space of the former
building, and with complete new equip-
ment of tools, of the most modern design
adapted to the production of their line of
manufacture, giving them facilities unsur-
passed anywhere in the world. The re-
building and putting into active operation
of a plant of this size within sixty days
of its complete destruction by fire is a
record unparalleled. We extend our hearty
congratulations to one of the foremost
unbuilders of the New South, and be-
speak for them the liberal support of our
subscribers.

Booming in Georgia.
In spite of the fact that this is a presi-
dential year, it is the consensus of opinion
among lumbermen that business is live-
lier than ever known before at this season,
and that the prospect is the best ever
known in this section. "The lumbermen
are not thinking much about politics," said
J. J. West, of the West Lumber Company,
of Atlanta, in speaking of the situation;
"and, indeed, the presidential election
seems to have had absolutely no effect on
business in this section. I have never
known business to be so good at this sea-
son. In February my own business show-
ed an increase of over twenty per cent
over last year, and the increase this month
will be even greater. The amount of
building that is going on is simply aston-
ishing. Houses are going up on all sides,
and lumber is harder to get than I have
ever known it before." Mr. West's opin-
ion is that of all lumbermen in his sec-
tion.



J. E. GORNTO & CO.
Shipping Trade
a Specialty...
On $3 Orers and over, Express Prepaid

WHISKIES

FROM $1.50 TO $6 A GALLON
Sole Agent

Old Saratoga Rye, $6 Gal.

Old Baker Rye, $6 Gal,

Old Westmoreland Rye, $4 Gal.

Big Horn Rye, $3 Gal.


J. E. GORNTO & CO.,
Valdosta, Ge


wgia


THE RECORD KEEPS PACE


White Springs, Fla.
On the Suwanee River
The Great Health Resort of the South.
Suplpur Sprint 25,000 GaMns per Minute.
Healing Springs -- forest Walks -- Shooting & Fishing
NO MOSQUITOES. NO MALARIA.
The Healthiest Summer Resort in America.


THE PRITCHARD HOUSE.


An Ideal Home for Invalids. First-Class Table
ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES.
Write for particulars. ...
MRS, S. L PRITCHARD, Proprietress. WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.

THE OAKS.

A Typical Southern Home


NEWLY BUILT and FURNISHED.


- EVERY COMFORT


-Write for particulars -
MRS. M. C. SKIPWORTH, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


KENDRICK HOUSE,

Headquarters for Southern Families,
GOOD TABLE HOME COMFORTS
... For particulars address...
MRS, J. B. ROBERTS, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


THE HAMILTON,

A New, Modern, High-Class Hotel.


ELECTRIC LIGHTS and BELLS


HOT and COLD BATSH


For lull information write
JNO. S. BOWEN, Owner and Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE NEW PAXTON,

Commodious, HomeLike Hotel
ROOM FOR 100 GUESTS,
Table Unexcelled. Every Attention to Invalids

MRS. E. H. PAXTON, Owner and Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


THE TELFORD HOUSE

A Large, New, Three-story Brick and Stone Hotel, Newly Fur-
nished Throughout, All Modern Conveniences.
Rates $5.00 to $8.00 Per Week. $1.00 and $2.00 Per Day
CAN ACCOMMODATE 85 GUESTS.
W. B. TELFORD, Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


A. S. PENDLETON, W. B. JOHNSON. JAS. LASSITER, W. W. STRIPLING.
President Vice Pres. Gen. Manager. Asst Treasurer

?5he W. B. JOHNSON CO.,


Wholesale Grocers
402-404-406-408 East Bay Street Jacklseemlle. Fla.
DIRECTORS:
D. M. FLYNN B. F. CAMP A. PENDLETON, W. W. STRIPLING-
WALTER RAV. THOSE DO LING. W.. JO J. LASSITER,
N. G. WADE, PERRY F. COLESON.
WITH SOUTHERN PROGRESS.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


AN INSPECTION BUREAU.

Steps Taken for Organization by the Geor-
gia Interstate Sawmill Association.
At the meeting of the Georgia Interstate
Sawmill Association held at Valdosta this
week steps were taken to secure the or-
ganization of a lumber inspection bureau
whereby much of the friction existing be-
tween sawmills and those who buy there-
from will be averted.
A resolution was adopted appointing
eight members, who are not only sawmill
men, but factors and shippers as well, to
undertake the details of the organization.
The eight men are Wm. Frazier Jones and
N. G. Wade from Jacksonville; F. E. Way-
mer and Thomas Dowling from Fernan-
dina; Martin F. Amorous and Morgan V.
Gress from Brunswick; W. B. Stillwell
and J. W. Dicky from Savannah. E. C.
Harrell will secretary of the Bureau.
These gentlemen will, in pairs, select
inspectors and deputy inspectors at their
several ports of men who will be compe-
tent and honest and who will do satis-
factory work. While the four ports will
act, as far as possible in concert, the de-
tails will be looked after by the two
men named for each. The inspectors are
to be paid by fees of so much per 1,000
feet of lumber inspected.
The main object to be attained by the
movement is uniformity in inspection on
a satisfactory basis, that will, when the
bureau is once established, be accepted as
final by the Northern consignee as well
as the shipper and the sawmill man.
There has existed for many years in
this territory a great deal of friction on
the subject of lumber inspection. There
has been made ugly charges against in-
spectors and against sawmill men, too,
of unfair methods in inspection. The
sawmill men complain that they have
been discriminated against by the inspec-
tors in many cases. The inspectors have
complained that the sawmill men have
not sent forward lumber of the grades
claimed and there has been much throw-
ing out of stuff that, under a bureau of
inspection properly managed would not
have been sent, or would have been ac-
cepted.
The plan is to have a chief inspector
appointed for each port whose duty it will
be to maintain an office force, and a corps
of inspectors sufficient to inspect all the
lumber that goes through that port; each
inspector to be appointed by. and directly
under the chief inspector, and to be as-
signed by him from day to day, where-
ever and to whomsoever calls for an in-
spector, and that the inspector shall work
on a fee, which fee is to be paid by the
mill and the merchant. The chief inspec-
tor and his office to be supported in the
same manner. About 5 cents per thousand
feet will support the latter and about 20
cents per thousand feet will amply pay
the former. It will be an easy matter for
the Association to find an excellent man
at each port for chief inspector.
This plan will entirely remove the re-
sponsibility of the merchant and will put
the inspection of lumber at the various


The Record is glad that this step has
been taken, for in our judgment it is a
very important matter. We will keep
our readers posted as to how it is pro-
gressing.

Death of D. C. Layton.
Mr. D. C. Laytor lied Tuesday morn-
ing at his home in Folkston, Fla., and
was buried Wednesday.
The immediate cause of his death was
blood-poisoning, following typhoid fever
of forty days duration.
He leaves an aged mother, who has been
blind for ten years, an invalid wife and
five boys, the sons of his first wife.
Mr. Layton was about forty-five years
of age. and was a successful business man,
and left his family well provided for. He
owned an interest in several turpentine
stills and in a sawmill, and had consider-
able property in and around Folkston.
Mrs. A. S. Layton will soon come to make
her home with her daughter, Mrs. Wolff.


Old Turpentine Man a Suicide.
A special from \Waycross, Ga., says:
The body of Capt. W. W. Millikin, who, it
was claimed, committed suicide at Abbe-
ville, Ala., was brought to Waycross and
interred in Lott Cemetery Tuesday be-
side the grave of his first wife, who died
here some years ago when Capt. Millikin


Wanted and For Sale


DEPARTMENT.

Advertisements Will be Inserted in This Department at the Following Rates:
For one week. 20 cents a line.
For two weeks, 35 cents line.
For three weeks. 5 cents a line.
For four weeks, 65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittanics- to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. C'o v must be in this office not later than Thursday
morningg to secure insertion in Friday's paper.


Real Estate Catalog.
Illustrated real estate catalogue post-
paid. (;co. It. Chapin, Florida House,
St. Augustine, Fla.
For Sale.
Spirit and large dip barrels for sale,
with or without rims. Quitman Coop-
erage Co.. Quifman, Ga.
For Sale.
Good Turpentine and Sawmill Location
for sale. Reason for selling, have othet
business that requires our attention. Ad-
dress Turpentine Operator, Lynne, Fla.

Turpentine Men.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. I outfit pumps 2,000
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 cents and
requires no attention while running.
Started in one minute. J. R. Campbell,
Ocala, Fla.
For Sale.
200 tons 4S-1lb. relaying steel rails West
Viriinia and Kentucky delivery. 100 tons


lived in this section. :l0-11i. relaying steel rail., Southern de-
livery. l.500 tons 56-lb. relaying steel
A number of the people of Waycross rails. West Virginia delivery. 150 tons 30-
wcr personally acquainted with Capt. Mil- I,. relaying steel rails. West Virginia de-
ersonall auainted wit Capt. il- liver. Isaac .Joseph Iron Company, 525-
likin, who bore a good reputation while 53- Hunt St.. Cincinnati, Ohio.
he resided at lace Pond. in Charlton
County. After leaving here he went to
Alabama. where he engaged in the tur- W. J. L'ENG(IE. J. W. WA
President. Viec
~entine business, in which he had been en-esent.
gaged in Charlton. He was appointed
postmaster at Dothan, Ala., which posi-
tion he was occupying when arrested on U nn
the chargeof criminally assaulting his
sister-in-law, and was in jail on this
charge when he escaped. Capt. Millikin MOBILE, ALA. PENSACO


Orange Grove.
Never frozen; 80 acres rich vegetable land
at Clearwater; 500 oranges, many 30 feet
high; 23 to 40 years old; netted $1,200
this season; expect 1,500 boxes and $2,000
income next season; 474 other fruit trees;
house, barn. etc. Price $6,000. Details of
George H. Chapin, Florida House, St. Au-
gustine. or owner, J. W. Kimbrough, Web-
ster, Fla.

Horses and Mules.
We have on hand at all times a well
selected stock of horses and mules for
saw mill and turpentine purposes. Can
please everybody in price and quality.
Will have a car of saddle and harness
horses at Marianna April 5th. See our
stock before buying. Dillon & Penuet,
Marianna, Fla.

Business for a Northerner.
In a perfect climate; store and fixtures
near station; postoffice In store; also two-
story residence; double piazzas, shade
trees; 17 acres; 100 oranges; also figs,
persimmons. peaches, pears, etc. Camt
$3,600. Price only $1,000. Details of
George H. Chapin, Florida House, St. Au-
gustine. William Arnold, Webster, Fla.


iDE,
e-President.


E. G. HUGHES,
Sec'y and Tress.


lI Stores Co.


ILA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


was a native of North Carolina and came
to this section a good many years ago. NAVAL STORES FACTORS.


Capt. Hillman a Candidate.
The Record is not in politics, but cannot DEALERS IN
refrain from ving God speed to the can Suppies or Turpentine Operator
didacy of Captain W. J. Hillman, who is a fo Turpentine Opera rs.
candidate for delegate to the National
Democratic Convention, which meets in Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
St. Louis in July. Capt. Hillman is one locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
nf Florida's solid, sterling, rugged bust eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
nes s men and, politics aside, is just ths
man to be sent on that mission. He is a solicited.
thorough Democrat and has never been
anything else. This is an office that has Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.
no emoluments. the delegates elected hav-
ing to pay their own expenses. It is ans
honor, though, that any man might well .:h
ovetandin honoring Capt. Hillman Flor- "I P 1. AI I CON. ist l r f-rll- "
-dia would h h lf P. WlIA.Ms. President. J.1. A. G. CARSON. 1st Vice-President .**
dia would honor herself. T. A. JENNIN(;S, nd Vice-President. J. F. DuszNBuRT. 3d Vice-President
!- H L. KAYTON. Secretary. D G. White Tr urnrpr


Lumber is quiet. A few lumbermen |
are getting a fair business, while the most
of them complain of a dull market. In- !'


ports on a very much higher level, and will quiries are coming in. which may be only
secure uniformity, which, after all, is one feelers, or may mean business. The back-
of the chief objects to be attained by lum- ward Spring at the North is doubtless
ber inspection. The gentlemen named to blame for much of the lethargy. On
have taken this matter in hand, and in the whole, however, conditions are better
a short time will have it well under way. than they were a week ago.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY, .


Main orrice sAvAara[nH. GEORGIA.
ers PENSACOLAk, PLw. i Branch Grery Hr[oue, .'
BrahOr s:- JACKSONVILLE,FLA. COLUMBUS, GM.
Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Us.
-l?=; : -)(-(-?(-~-? -~-?-?-? 4 ?-?- t-t-9-? ? ? ?: ;:f ; ::T :]; :T:-? t (-(-!l~ !


"NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIK SUCCESS."


' . . . . .


- -T







10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


**** I i i I i 0****fM***M* f***
tJ. PARROTT, ARCHBR S. HUBBARD. ARTBUR F. PBBR Y
* President. Vice-President. Cashier.
The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
i JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
SCapitha. $200.000. OO r Surplus. $100,000
4 STATE DEPOSITARY.
General Banking. Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes. 15.00 per Year.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week
Spirits for the Week at Savannah. week a decided improvement in the de-
Prce Rcpts Sales Exp. 1903 mand for small lots turpentine. The large
..April l1I5n1 0 large luvyers are inquiring a little, but
Mon., April 12543/, 2 00 0 415 49/ will not buyi until actually forced to.
Tues., April 1254%4 562 280 415 4/ 'tocik continue light both here and South.
Wed., April 13154/4 260 156 395o 491/ Stock. 39,6 barrels. V.g quote Machines
Thur.. April 14541/, 458 410 205 49y'/, 57 12 cents.
Fri., April 15154,/4 440 1 382 186 1491/2 lRosin--All grades up to and including I,
aire scarce and wanted at quotations. H
an d 1 entirely neglected. (hOders for G
Rosin for the Week at Savannah. hn fille i tl Pales about steady.


Monday, April 11. Last Year.
WW ........ .. 3.80 3.50
W G ............ .. 3.65 3.35
N ................ 3.50 3.25
M ............. 3.25 3.15
K .............. 3.20 3.00
I .. .. .. .. .. .... 2.85 2.85
H .. ............ 2.60 2.40
; .... .. ..... .... 2.55 2.05
F ............. 2.45 2.00
E ................ 2.40 1.95
E 2.40 1.95
D .............. 2.35 1.95
ABC( ............ 2.35 1.95
Sales 577, receipts 1,452, exports 1,093.

Tuesday, April 12-WG, N, M, K, 1, and
H declined 5 cents from Monday's figures.
Other grades unchanged. Sales 176, re-
ceipts 1,596, exports 391.

Wednesday, April 13-Unchanged from
Tuesday's quotations. Sales 907, receipts
684, exports 1,165.

Thursday, April 14-No change in quo-
tations. Sales 949, receipts 1,232, exports
2.784.

Friday, April 15--No change in quota-
tions. Sales 1,219, receipts 865, exports
236.

Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosins.
Stock April 1 .......... 6,495 44,550
Receipts April 14 ........ 458 1,232
Receipts previously ...... 5,048 12,572
Total ................ 12.001 58,354
Exports April 14 ........ 205 2,784
Exports previously ..... 4.373 24,246
Total ................ 4,578 27,030
Stock April 14 ........... 7,423 31,324
Stock last year ........ 2,847 95,959


ult very quiet. We quote
1C'. $2Y4.5; D, $2.S.5; E, $2.90; F, $2.95;
(G. 2.97 1- 2 to $3.00; H? $3.00; I, $3.25;
K. :$3.70; M, $3.85 to $3.90; N, $4.00 to
$4.05: WG, $4.20 to $4.25; WW, $4:50.
TOLAR, HART & CO.

AMONG THE OPERATORS.
Mr. 31. L. Moore, of Rochelle, Fla., spent
Several days in the city lately.

Mr. K. Borson, one of the most promi-
nent turpentine operators in the State,
with his business at Denver, Fla., has been
in the city this week.

Mr. G. W. Varn and A. F. Freeman, of
Wiscon. Fla., were in the city this week.

Mr. J. S. Bailey, a prominent sawmill
and turpentine operator of Waycross, Ga.,
was here this week.

Mr. P. Sellers, of the firm of P. Sellers
S(Co.. of Olustee, Florida, has been in the
city this week.

Mr. R. J. Knight, of Crystal River, Fla.,
was here Wednesday.

Af. Coinq. of Rosewood. Florida, was in
hle city this week.

Mr. Walter Ray, of the Clark-Ray-John-
son Co., is in the city.

Another Trespass Case.
The Putnam Lumber Company is suing
the Ellia-YVungr Cflnnanv in the cirnuit


court of Jacksonville, alleging damages at
Turpentine at London. $25.000. The plaintiffs claim damages in
1904 1903 1902 1901 the sum of $25,000 for the alleged taking
tock Mar. 26 15,140a 2,037 30,169 12,9 and removing of 1000 casks of spirits of
el'd this wk ,525b 1,099 1.277 1,43asks of spirits of
since Jan. 1 21,789 17,636 19.761 21,471 turpentine and 3,000 barrels of rosin from
rice 28th March 42-3 43-9 30-6 27- pine timber owned b the plaintiff. The
uly-Dec. .. 40-3 36-3 31-3 26-
(a) includes 497 French; (b) includes arguments yesterday were on a motion
I French., to strike out the first, second and third
pleas for the defendant. Baker & Baker
Tolar, Hart & Co.s Weekly Review. are attorneys for the plaintiff and Cooper
New York. April 13, 1904. .* Cooper represent the defendant. No de-
Spirits Turpentine-WVe note during past vision was rendered.


FOR SALE. -
50.000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill $2 35 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in tt e State.

C BUCKMAN orn trWet
C. BUCKMAN, Jnkovrlle, .-,.


Pumping Outfits F

Turpentine Stills
WITH FIRE PROTECTION CONNECTIONS.

Best PUMP in the World
From 40 to 700 Gallons of Water per Minute.
Write or call on
FRED E. GILBERT,
Automobile Headquarters
29 West Forsyth St., Jacksonville, Fla.


R. S. HAI... Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KNIGHT, Sec. and Treas.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,


HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.

Herbert A. Ford, Oeo. H. Ford, F. L. Watson,
President. Vice-Pres. Cashier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITAL, $50,000.00.
DIRECTORS: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Clarence Camp, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H1. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicited.

C. H. BARNES, Pres. J. D. SHAW, Vice-Pres. RALPH JESSUP, Sec.-Treas.

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonville. Pensacola, fernandina and Savannah
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
W. FRAZIER JONES. C. H. BARNES. R. JESSUP. W. H. BAKER.
President. Treasurer. Ass't Treas. Secretary.

UNITED GROCERY CO.,

Importers & Wholesale Grocers
HAY, GRAIN and FEED.
Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
B. G. LASSETER.
Vi G P o. and GeR. Mr. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

H. A. BRIGGS, President. HOMER BROWN, 2d Vice-President.
M C. BRIGGS, 1st Vice-President. J. C. McDONALD, Secretary and Treasurer



W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.
HARDWARE, MILL and TURPENTINE SUPPLIES.

Council Tool Co., & Holmes' Tool Co. Tools,
Brigg's Sterling and Perfection Hacks and Pullers,
Cutters, Files, Whetters, Glue, Batting and Strainer Wire,
Turpentine Wagon Harness and Collars,
Hoop Iron, Coopers' Tools and Rivets,

Everything in Turpentine Supplies.

Send us your Mail Orders,

W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.,
VALDOSTA, GA.


THE RELIABILITY OF OUR ADVERTISERS VOUCHED FOR.


St
D
S
P
Ji
3(


- . . . . . . . . . . . .


----------- -~-----------'












THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11


S. P. HOLMES & CO.'S MARKET
LETTERS.

Stocks. It will not do to be deceived
into the idea that certain stocks have had
their rise simply because they halt. This
is pertinent to Union and Southern Pa-
eific. The manner in which these stocks
are being advanced is calculated to encour-
age the short interest and keep it alive.
There has been exceptionally good buy-
ing in these two issues and from the indi-
cations they both will sell substantially
higher. As was pointed out in this letter
a week ago, the talk of a corner in Union
Pacific is silly. The general opinion ap-
pears to be that the interest representing
this property are right in their contention
that Northern Pacific solely should be dis-
tributed to them under the dissolution of
Northern Securities instead of both North-
ern Pacific and Great Northern. It will
give Union Pacific control of the Northern
Pacific road and redound remarkably to
the strength of the position of it and allied
properties. Apart from the very strong
position of these two roads in the west-
ern railway situation their earnings are
exceptionally good. For February Union
Pacific reports a gross increase of $704,000
and net gain of $477,000. Southern Pa-
cific for the same month gained $904,00
gross and $406,000 net. These are stocks
of the hour and should be bought upon
any dip. Atchison continues to show
strength and heavy buying has developed


in Rock Island. It is manipulative, no
Doubt, but an upward movement has start-
ed in this stock, and it looks like a money-
making purchase. Among the lower prices
issues, we are likely to see pronounced
moves in Erie and Southern Railway. It
seems quite in the line of logic to sup-
pose that the heavy buying of Chicago
Great Western on Tuesday was a more
serious purpose than throwing away mon-
ey in commissions. Barring occasional re-
actions, such as that of to-day, for ex-
ample, we feel that the tendency of the
market should continue in favor of im-
provement. The right sort of people seem
to be behind the rise and the manner in
which they are conducting it indicates
that the culmination is probably some
distance in the future.



Cotton. It is an interesting question
now of supply and demand. That is, spec-
ulation has become much less aggressive
than prior to the Sully failure. Northern
spinners have taken about 150,000 bales
more than they did a year ago up to this
time and Southern consumption is about
the same. Exports have been something
like 700,000 bales less. Current opinion
is that the crop will be about 10,200,000 to
10,250,000 or practically 500,000 bales
smaller than a year ago. Consequently
the decrease in demand to date seems to
about offset the shrinkage in the yield.
Of course, the visible supply is low, prac-


tically in England, which makes a strong the Northwest, with their markets quite
position when emphasized by the decrease strong. Considerable profit taking was


in imports. It seems to be a question
now as to whether spinners here and
abroad can keep out the market as com-
pulsory buyers and thus force prices up.
Of course, steps are being taken every-
where among the manufacturers to curtail
consumption and hold off as as far as
possible until the new crop comes upon
the market. The action of the spinners at
Fall River is about the most important
step yet taken in this direction. The con-
dition created by heavy speculative buy-
ing, leaving the placing of a great per-
centage of the crop in speculative con-
tinues. If spinners have to buy cotton,
this speculative element will be in clover
and dictate prices, but if on the other
hand the consumer keeps out of the mar-


I indulged in by the Northwest who
bought September and there were scattered
outside buying orders, accompanied with
crop damage reports. The local crowd
were inclined to be skeptical on the crop
news and there was selling by Cudahy.
There was realizing and selling by local
Ihnar< towards the close, but crop damage
news is becoming sensational. We would
favr purchase of September on all dips.

Provisions. Estimated stocks here show
but little change from April 1st, and
while there was strength early, there was
free selling of July pork, ribs and lard
by the Cudahys with shippers buying lard
futures. Local sentiment is bearish, ow-
ing to the attitude of the packers, and
with any advances appearing, we would


ket, the speculators will be anxious to favor sales.
stand from under before the time for the
new crop and later deliveries come around. S m' P H m es& C
Of course, this position might be altered S I Holm es o.
in some respects by the creation of an ex- (Members New York Cottom Excheage)
tensive bear account, and the market must Stocks, Bonds, Cotton,
be watched for this. Grain and Previsions.
We think the recent decline of over 150 Correspondents Miller & Co.,
points has eliminated the weak long in- 100 Broadway, New York.
terest and the market should be purchased.
Chicago, 111, April 14th. Wheat There New York otok Exchange,
has been some good buying of July and Members New Orleans Cotton Exchge.'
September, principally in the latter, weath- l Chicago Board of Trade.
er conditions not showing any improve- Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Sa h s b r Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
ment and heavy snows being reported in Phone 83 Baldwi Block
belson 5


To United Kingdom, In gallons:
Month 10 44 1902-03
April.. ....... 196,81 186128
May ...... .. 60,3156 3,22
June ....... .79,07 1,480,186
July ........ ..73759 289,94
August.. .... ..m6,890 1,77,74
September.. ... 773211 64657
October ......... 711.434 4M
November .. 661,638 1,295,769
December .. 1,659,656 1,531,779


1901-02
166,346


1,530.0T



922,991
576,784


To Belgium and Netherlands, in gallons:


Month 10S-O4
April ...... .. 286,812
May .. ..... .. 2706
June.. ......... 607,Q
July .. .. .. .. 57,188
August........ 489,387
September..... 265,45
October ...... 30,914
November .. 133,695
December .. 100,372

To Germany, in gallons:
Month 1.03-04
April .. .. .. .........
May .. .. .... 328
June.. ...... 104.000
July .. ..... 18,16
August ...... 651,85
September... 226,950
October ... ... 37,31
November .. 179,010
* December


190-01 1M01-92
90.447 Included
61.613in all other


267,210
819,217
68,490
758,201
210,001
349,726
58,659



11U034
46.416
321672
18,412
578.417

1.644
110,153


To all other Europe in Gallons:
Month 1903-04 1902-03
April .......... 610 18,475
May.. .... .... 586.0 31.047
June..... ... 14,233 L000
July ......... 5,000 124,284
August ........ 2000 2.00
September.. .. 43,68 38,040
October ...... 10.000 42,832
November .. 32,500 17,800
December .. 47,306 89,591

Total Foreign Exports, in gallons,
Ing everything outside of the
States:
Month 190-04 1902-03
April .. ...... 614,088 5666815
May .... .... 198,782 210.144
June.. .... ....1,838,000 2.22,.53
July ...... ..2,181.805 1,61,015
August....... 1.734,.16 2,908.458
September.. .. 474,145 2,154,56
October ...... 1.40.21 1.002.897
November .. 1,851,068 1,932,183 1
December .. 1,993,529 1,794,336 1


Europe


428,621
12,480
381,226
672,164



112,523
220,066

78,787

713367
14&897
81,780









21,0050
17,0-)
94,837





1901-02
946.676
172,2,05




2,947,821
23,000



,652,574
,859,175


Course of t


iROSINS.


To United Kingdom, barrels 280 lb: Apr 1 Apr. 3 Apr.
Month 1903-04 1930-03 1801-02 NL ND 60
April ........ 79,243 65,387 6C,4.i June 6 June 12 Jun
May .... .. .. 60,316 63,22 68,89 4 3-4 4
June .. .. .. .. .0,748 67,542 61,22 Aug. 14 Aug. 21 Au
July .. .... .. 82.948 56,25 65,61u 52%-53 63% 6
August ...... 74, 49 62,613 Oct. 22, Oct. 29, Nc
September..... 98,471 42,869 73,300 56 661-2
October ...... 46,641 41.034 90,s05 Jan. 22, Jan. 28,
November .. 71,107 95,735 88,643 (15
December .. 61,455 64,455 72,502 Mch. 30
-- 57
To Belgium and Netherlands, barrels 238
pounds:
Month 19034 10-3 1301-f WW
April .. .. ... 1,708 63,016 Included April 1 . ... 390
May .......... 2,76 51,Sl3in all other April 3 ..... 3.75
June .. .. .. 3,sS 633 burope April 10 . .. 3.60
July .... .. .. 26,61 19647 40,21 April 17 . . .50
August ...... ,03 47.63 April 24 . ... 3.40
September..... 46,3.3 10,819 34,737 May 1. ..... .3.35
October .... .. 37,131 64408 23,01 May 8. .... .35
November 3,991 60,020 31,504 May 16 ..... 3.47%
December .. 37,077 13,325 20,940 May 22 .. .. .65
May 29....... .65
June 5 ......3.60
To Germany, barrels 280 Ibs. June 1 ...... 60
Month 030190 1902-0 1901-02 June 19 ...... 3.30
April .... .. .. 40,568 37.844 .S68 June 2i6 .... 3.30
May ...... .. 331 ,28 67.,74 July 3 ......30
June .. .. .. .. 410 401 48,8 July 10 ...... 3.30
July .. .. ... 100,3 34.874 531 July 17 .. .... .40
August ....7.. 7,834 4.921 i July 24 .......345
September.. .. ,167 9.48 WM i July 31 .......3.40
October .. .. .. 82.75 38,654 .78 August 7 3.40
November .. 56,763 42,841 23,373 August 14 .. 3.50
December .. 15,407 39,171 6,482 August 21 . 3.50
August 28 ......3.70
To all other Europe, barrels 280 Ibs: September 4.. 3.70
Month 1903-04 190-08 101-02 September 11 .3.80
April ........ 35,848 30,142 86,731 September 18 .. 3.90
May ........ 27.110 40,72 s W.U September 256. 4.25
June .. .... ... 14,044 9,682 1.3C6 October 2 . 4.45
July ........ 45,513 51,612 14,184 October 8 ...... 4.70
August .. .. .. 8,865 0,11 October 16 ... 4.45
September.. .. 27.494 17,386 165,3 October 22 ......420
October ...... 34,480 16,442 18 October 29 .... ....4.20
November 13,328 6,415 25,01 November .. .. ..3.90
December .. 25,299 48,701 39,816 November 13 .. ..
; November 25 .. 3.50
Total Exports of Rosin, barrels 280 pounds, I December 3 .. 3.50
Including Asia, Africa and America out- December 17 .... 3.50
side of the United States: December 10 .... 3.50
Month 1903-04 1902- 1901-0- December 31 ...3.566
April ........ 196,681 186,128 o January 14 .. 4.00
May ...... .. 198,83 20,144 4.60 JLanuary 22 ....4.50
June ........ 178,289 210,03@ z216, January 28 ......4.60
July .... .... 306.580 187,193 19'8.U February 11 ..3.75
August .. .. .. 239.166 228,6n February 18 ...3.65
September... 333.80 23,O. 23L&4 ,February 25 ...3.70
October .... .. 20.823 275,7 192,163 March 0 ...... 3.80
November .. 184,860 231,543 222,479 March 24 ...... 4.00
December .. 210,457 202,056 191,440 March 31 ...... 4.10


te Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE
10 Apr. 17 Apr. 4 May 1 May 8 May 15 May 22 May 2
49 47 45 1-2 461-2 411-3 47
e 19 June 26 July 3 July 10 July 17 July 24 July 31 Aug. 6
47 47 47% 47 3-4 48 50 60 4
g. 27 Sept 4 Sept. 11 Sept 18 Sept. 25 Oct. 2 Oct. 8 Oct. 15
h1 56% 54 -4 57 ND 56 67 1- 56 1-20 -4
iv. 6, Nov. 19, Nov. 2,Dec. 3, Dec. 10, Dec. 17, Dec. 31, Jan. 14
66 56 56 56 56 56 1-4 66 1-4 3 1-2-64
Feby. 11, Feb. 18,Feby. 25 Mch. 3 Mch. 10 Meh 24
64 62 60 59 60 58



KOSINS


WG N M


$3.50
3.50
3.36
3.25
3.16
3.15
3.15
3.17%
3.25
3.2u

3.00
3.11
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.10
3.10
3.05
3.06
3.15
3.16
3.25
3.40
3.50
3.60
3.95
4.35
4.35
4.20
3.80
3.60
3.10
3.10
3.20
3.10
3.05
3.00
3.05
3.10
3.35
3.95
3.%S
3.35
3.35
3.35
3.40
3.50
3.60


S3.40
3.40
3.20

2.10
L10
3.10
3.10

3.20
3.20
3.15
2.96
2.95
2.96

3.90
3.00







3.45
3.00
2.95
3.50

3.55





too
3.15
3.30
3.45
3.60


2.90
4.30


2.90
3.00
3.80
3.30
2.90
2.90

2.90

2.95
2.90
2.90
2.95
3.15
3.90
3.90
3.30
3.30
3.20
3.35
3.35
3.35


$3.60
3.60
&45
3.35
3.25
325
3.25
327%
3.35
3.35
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.1
3.10
3.20
325
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.30
3.50
3.50
3.65
275
4.10
4.40
4.40
4.40
3.90
3.90
3.30
3.25
3.35
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.30
3.60
410
4.10
3.45
3.45
3.50
3.60
3.70
3.80


THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.


K
$3.2
3.20
3.00
&9O
3.w
3.00
&3o
3.00
3.02%
2.1
3.10
3.06
2.86
2.t6
2.86
32.8
2.SO
2.10
290
2.La
2.85
2.95
2.96
3.1
3.30
3.40
3.45
.70
4.16
4.10
3.L5



2.90
2.60
2.80
2.80
2.80
2.85
3.-%
3.15
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.30
3.30
3.30


I
1
2.86
2.86
2.85
.85
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.87%
300
3.06
3.00
2.80
2.70
2.65
2.65
2.65
2.75
2.75
2.70
2.70
2.80
2.80
2.90
3.00
3.10
3.20
3.35
3.50
3.50
3.25
3.05
2.70
2.70
2.70
2.70
2.60
2.55
2.55
2.56
2.60
3.00
3.10
3.30
3.20
3.05
2.95
3.05
2.95
2.95


H
2.40
2.40
2.40
240
2.25
2.25
2.25
1.27%
2.35
2.40
2.40
2.30
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.30
2.30
2.20
2.20
2.30
2.30
2.40
2.50
2.50
2.60
2.65
2.70
2.70
2.70
2.60
2.60
2.60
2.35
2.45
2.40
2.35
2.35
2.35
240
2.95
290
3.15
2.85
2.70
3.60
2.75
2.70
2.70


G
2.20
2.20
2.10
2.05
2.06
1.85
1.80
1.80
1.75
1.85
1.90
1.90
1.75
1.70
L80
1.&J
L.30
1.85
175
1.45
1.85
1.85
2.00
2.15
2.065
2.15
2.30
2.45
2.55
2.55
2.45
2.55
2.55
2.30
2.46
2.30
2.30
2.25
2.30
2.30
2.8
2.70
2.90
2..5
2.70
2.55
2.70
2.65
2.65


F
2.10
210
2.06
2.00
2.OO
1.80
1.75
1.75
1.70
1.80
1.85
1.85
1.70
1.65
1.75
1.75
1.70
1.75
1.65
1.6"
1.7b;
1.75
1.90
2.05
1.95
2.05
2.20
2.30
2.40
2.50
2.40
2.50
2.50
2.25
2.35
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.25
2.70
2.65
2.85
2.80
2.65
2.50
2.65
2.60
2.60


E
LO6
2.06

.00
1.63
1.95
1.75
1.70
1.70
1.65
1.7b
1.80
1.80
1.65
1.60
1.70
1.70
1.r6
1.70
1.60
1.60
1.70
1.70
1.85
.00
1.90
2.00
2.10
2.20
2.30
2.35
2.35
2.35
2.35
2.10
2.25
2.10
2.15
2.20
2.20
2.25
2.65
2.60
2.85
2.75
2.60
2.45
2.60
2.55
2.55


D

2,6
3.oo
2.00
1.96
1.56
1.75
1.70
1.70
L w
1.65
1.70
1.80
1.75
1.60
1.56
1.45
1.46
1.60
1.66
1.56
1.5566
1.70
1.70
1.80
1.90
1.86
1.95
2.00
2.06
2.05
2.25
2.26
2.25
2.30
2.05
2.15
2.10
2.15
2.20
2.20
2.25
2.50
2.46
2.76
2.70
2.55
2.40
255
2.50
2.50


C-A

2.8
2.W6
LK6
1.5

1.76
1.70
1.70
1.60
1.10
1.75
1.7
L70
L66
1.6
1.3
1.40
1.60
1.6


1.70
1.70
LO
1.36
1.76
1.80

1.590
L90
2.15
2.18
215
2.0
2.50
2.1
2.10

2.20
2.70
2.26
2.50
2.45
2.75
2.70
2.55
2.40
2.55
2.50
2.50


SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE.


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.


- --


P











12 THE WEEMTA' MNrnJSI1AL fECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

JAMES A. HOLLOMON.
Editor and Manager.
Published Every Friday.
So.scarrron t (Domestic) -.3.00 Per Annum
U(Foreign) .... $350 "
SThe Pine and Its Products."
All communications should be addressed
The Industrial Record Company,
Jacksonville, Fla.

ranch Editorial and Business Office at
Savannah. Ga.

entered at the Postoffce at Jacksonville.
Fla., as second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association. Sep-
temper 12. 1SL. as its exclusive official or-
ea. Adopted in annual convention, Bep-
itmber 11. as the organ also of the Leneral
association.
Adopted April 27th, 190. as the official
organ of the Inter-State Cane Growern'
aociation. Adopted Sept. 11, 101, as the
only omical organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by spedal
re0olutlon adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
ocisation.
COPt arO ADVBRTIrSlG.
Advertlelas espy (ehamwes or Nevr
ad vertrsemenes should reach us
tuesday mernimsi to insure Immertloe
in the iumeo of the same week.

THE PEONAGE LAW.
The peonage law now in the federal stat-
utes is a relic of the reconstruction craze.
Originally enacted to protect the Indians
in tne territory of New Mexico, Congress
tried to make its application general.
Had it been limited in its operations to
exclusive federal territory, such as the
territories, government buildings, and the
like, it probably would have served its
purpose.
We hold that it is unconstitutional as
applied to sovereign States, and it was
left to men who owe their judgeships to
their partisanship, to revive what has long
since been regarded as a dead letter.
Laws are the enactment of public de-
mand where needed. They are intended to
regulate conditions. Conditions in the
South at this time, require laws regulat-
ing the duties and obligations existing be-
tween employers and employed. These
laws, let us say in passing, are enacted
by the several States. If any State law
contravenes any expressed authority dele-
gated to the federal government, the fede-
ral courts will decide it unconstitutional.
No federal criminal law is operative unless
there be found for it expressed authority
in the federal constitution. This has been;
held time and again by the federal courts.
Judge Newman, an upright federal judge
in Georgia, tried a man named Eberhardt
under this peonage law several years ago.
and dismissed the case, deciding that *!.e
law was unconstitutional. Eminent coun-
sel have maintained the same view.
The S. M. Clyatt Case must be brought
properly before the United States Suprenme
Court. Every Southern man who has to
deal with negroes is interested in this case.
It is not Mr. Clyatt alone. We dislike to
see him punished for doing what he L.'-
lieved to be morally right, and not l:.. ly
wrong; again, should Swayne's decision
stand it will put a premium on negro
thriftlessness, irresponsibility, and treat i-
ery that will seriously disrupt labor con-
ditions in the South to-day. Above all.
however, there are hundreds of the best
men in the South, many of them turpen-
tine and sawmill operators who have in the
past been necessarily forced, in the pro-
tection of their own property interests,
and even personal liberty in some cases,
to take practically the same course at


times that Clyatt did, and if this decision
is sustained by the United States Supreme
Court, it will place an opportunity in the
hands of a coterie of shyster lawyers in
these States to prosecute and blackmail
and otherwise give trouble to scores of
good citizens, who are as law-abiding as
any, and whose proper regard for the exe-
cution of law and order cannot be ques-
tioned.
\e must go to Mr. Clyatt's relief. A
fund must be raised to retain the best
legal talent in the country in order to get
the case properly argued before the court
of last resort.
The Industrial Record does not condone
wrong doing; it does not believe in tem-
porizing with justice; it does not believe
in any unfair treatment of labor; it does
not believe in taking advantage in the
slightest degree of any man because ot
race or color or previous condition of ser-
vitude; but it does believe in fair dealing,
and it does believe in the right and sta-
bility of contract. Further, it believes
in tile sovereignty of the States.

AFTER TWENTY-THREE YEARS.
In 1880 the value of lumber products
in the South was $39,000,000. Last year
it wavs $200,000,000, increase of 412 per
cent.
Inl 1880 the value of manufactured prod-
ucts in the South was $457,000,000. Last
year it was $1,600,000,000, an increase of
251 per cent.
In 1880 our foreign exports through
Southern ports were worth $261,000,000.
Last year they were worth $508,000,000,
an increase of 90 per cent.
In 1880 we had 26,000 miles of railroad
in operation in the South. Last year we
had 60,000 miles, an increase of 191 per
cent.
In 1880, the Southern cotton crop was
worth $313,696,000. Last year it was worth
$625,000,000, an increase of 99 per cent.
In 1880 all of the agricultural products of
the South were worth $660,000,000. Last
year they were worth $1,700,000,000, an
increase of 154 per cent.
And the South has just begun to grow.

PLENTY OF MONEY.
According to official statistics, there is
more money in circulation in the United
States now than ever before in its history
during peaceful times. Our national popu-
lation is increasing at the rate of from one
to two million per annum, and the increase
in money output is much greater than
that. The increase in national products
does not keep apace with the increase of
either our population or our money. The
consequence is that the cost of living is
increasing along with the other incre-
ments. The trust, while baleful, is only
an incident. If the trusts be done away
with, individuals would take their places
and corners would be formed to control
temporarily or permanently some given
output that offered an opportunity for
profit by cornering ft. The way to break
up trusts and combines, is not by preach-
ing anarchy, but by producing in large
quantities those products that go to make
up the staples of industry and of life.
Whence this increase in money? Surely
the government is not issuing any more
greenbacks, and we hear of but few nat-
ional banks emitting bills. One source is
that balance of trade is in our favor. In
other words, we are exporting much more
than we are importing. Another is the
output of our gold mines is greater, and
more gold is being coined into money.


Those disturbing elements that have for
the past eight or ten years upset values
have been put down and timid capital, that
hid its head during the disturbances, is now
creeping forth from its hiding place, and
finding investment in many directions.


SHOULD ADVERTISE.
The Record has most of the time a stall
correspondent travelling in Georgia and
Florida. Amongst other things our rep-
resentative has noticed, one fact stands
out undisputed: When calling on a saw-
mill man he has invariably noticed that,
if the mill was advertised, the owners had
plenty of orders. The reverse was also
as true; where the mill owner did not ad-
vertise the fact that he was on the earth,
the Eastern buyer seemed to absolutely
ignore him, with the result that he has to
tight with others for tenders sent out by
the middlemen. As a result the economi-
cally inclined sawmill man saves a couple
of hundred dollars a year by not making
himself known, and pays ten times that
amount to the middleman who alone knows
where to find him. Be assured that, in
this age, a man who does not let his "light
shine" will never make the money his
advertising competitor will. There is no
question but what a small advertisement
in this paper will repay the sawmill man
one hundred per cent.


HIS LITERARY SIDE.
The Industrial Record is the recognized
trade paper of the naval stores man, the
lumberman, the cattle-breeder and the
cane-grower. It endeavors to cover the
entire field embraced in its title in making
a record of the industries now develop-
ing within its radius, but its chief mission
is to foster the specialties above alluded to.
to.
The average man engaged in either of
them will be found to be something more
than an ordinary man. He has energy,
push, business judgment and discretion.
He has something more than this. He
has tastes, literary, ethical and artistic.
lie enjoys classical reading, good music
and other luxuries that come to bless a
superior intellect. After reading the trade
news, items, quotations, advertisements.
etc., of the Record, there is still something
in his makeup that wants something else,
something besides trade, quotations and
advertisements. He craves a modicum of
literary pabulum. It is in part to gratify
this that we have added four more pages
to the Record and it is our purpose here-
after to devote more or less space to,
bright little literary gems, bits of humor.
poetry, reminiscence, etc, an appetizing
dessert, as it were, to top off the hearty
business meal we have furnished him
withal.
Every good business man has a literary
side. and it shall be the purpose of the
Industrial Record, while not neglecting
any business which it protects him in.
to tickle his fancy and add a few hap-
pier hours to his weeks.


UNPRECEDENTED.
The Industrial Record is undergoing a
regular boom in its subscription depart-
ment. Already reaching practically every
turpentine man in the Southern States, a
large number of sawmill operators, and a
very fair list of other manufacturers anti
business people generally, within the past
ten days over one hundred new subscribers
have been added. The Record is already


recognized as one of the leading weekly
trade journals in this country.

VAPORIZING AS USUAL.
The Savannah Naval Stores Review in
its last issue attempts to construe a re-
cent article in the Record on trade condi-
tions and prospects into a confession that
the Record erred in urging turpentine men
to organize to protect the market. Our
remarks will bear no such forced construe-
tion, and the Review is vaporizing as usual
in tryinf to make it. It is very certain
that prices can be maintained much easier
by co-operation where all are agreed on
a policy, than when such papers as the
Review are trying to break them down.
In the meantime the Record again asserts
that the minimum prices agreed upon will
be maintained.

WHEN JACKSONVILLE GETS DEEP
WATER.

What will be the result of deeper water
over the bar and up to the wharves of
Jacksonville? The answer to this ques-
involves so many evident truths that it
is difficult to mention them all. We are
assured ot 21 feet at low tide in the river
and on the bar, within one year Irom date.
that means 26 to 29 feet at high tide.
Last week a ship came from the sea to
Jacksonville wharves drawing over 19 feet,
the greatest rLalt up to date. A.ow busi-
ness is almost confined to the coastwise
trade. With vessels drawing 28 feet, Jack-
sonville will have them coming from every
deep water port in the commercial world,
iauen with the wealth thereof, and going
uence in return with the products, not
only of Florida, but of all ports of the
South, even to New Orleans ana beyond
Jacksonville is as far west as Cleveland,
Oluo. \Why should she not ve the gate-
way for the West Indies, and the Ba-
hamas .
Take the single item of phosphate.
I lorida exports between 800,000 and 1,000,-
000 tons of it pei year. Not one ounce of
it has been exported through this port
for several years past. There is no rea-
son why one-half of it at least should not
be shipped from the port of Jacksonvill.
Most of it goes abroad. Then there are
the lumber and naval stores trades, that
now find their bulk shipped from 'other
ports. The deeper water will bring much
more of that to Jacksonville than now
comes here. And so with other products.
Those which are now shipped from Flor-
ida by rail to Northern ports and there
shipped abroad will come here. In fact all
except the perishable products that re-
quire speed and special handling, will be
shipped direct from Jacksonville to the
outside world.
And Jacksonville as a port of export will
get anl increasing share of business from
the Paciiic coast by the Southern Paciie
railroad, consigned to the East. That rail-
road is never frozen up in winter. It is
always open to business. Jacksonville
will be the natural eastern terminus of all
those products hunting a European mar-
ket. By a glance at the map it will be
seen that San Francisco is much further
from New York than Los Angeles is from
Jacksonville, and the route is nearly all
semi-tropical.
Now this city is holding its own and
gaining steadily with less than twenty
feet of water to the ocean. A year hence,
when ships can come to our wharves draw-
ing 26 feet of water, she will eclipse all
records in the amount of business she will
do. A. 0. WRIGHT.


I









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


I THE ALANTIC NA1TIOIN BANK OF JACI
CAPI FAL PAID IN, $350,000.00.
OPEN FOR BUSINESS AUGUST i, i
* OFFICERS:
SEdward W. Lane, President. Fred W. Hoyt, V
* Thomas P. Denham, Cashier.
2--*a *9lr.


b*** The WestsRaley-Rannie Company,


U81NYILLE. .114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
A. f. WEST r E. West, VcePres W. Ranale, Vice-Pres. V. Raey, Sec- rreas.
O3.,
ice-President. We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
IW W9999 9 UlrIte IKr e -ind urban > fha 2+ r.;< *1, n.... adT',m r..,.


Turpentine Still Burned at Surrency.
The turpentine still, fixtures, several
barrels of crude gum, dip barrels, etc., of
.. A. Ross, at Surrency, Ga., burned Tues
day. Mr. Ross had placed the cotton bat-
ting in the vat for straining the rosin,
and was drawing the fire, preparing to
turn out the charge, when the sparks from
the furnace set the batting in the vat on
fire, burning the whole outfit. There was
no insurance.

Embraced the Wrong Man.
It was in a barber shop. Two men,
total strangers to each other, were be-
ing shaved, and the lather covered their
faces so entirely that neither could have
been recognized by his wife-as it
proved.
Suddenly a lady rushed in and going
to one of the men, put her arms around
him, kissed him, lather and all, and ex-
claimed, "Good bye, dear. I've decided
to go by an earlier train so am in a
great hurry. Be a good boy," and she
was gone in an instant.
The man who had been thus cuddled,
raised up in his chair and asked the
barber:
"Who was that woman?"
The barber did not know.
"I'd give a day's wages to know who
it was that hugged me like that. Does
any one know her?"
"Yes," said the occupant of the other
chair, who was wiping the lather from
his mouth. "I know her. She's my wife.
There's a picnic on Pablo today and
she's going to take it in."
"What made her kiss me?"
"Don't Know unless she mistook you
for me. I can stand it if you can."


Female Language.
There is sex in language. Of course
when we hear a lady talking we can ree-
ogniz! that she belongs to the feminine
gender. The tones of her voice and the
phraseology of her sentences are both
feminine. But suppose we were reading
her utterances in cold type, and were
limited in our judgment by the phrase-
nolov onlv without the intonation \\'o


ceived by men from women where they
were puzzled as to the sex of the author.
but even then experts can tell the sex of


Url~U a TV %A1 ifI1 L V L, LY 1111414kc ull U t-C YUUI
headquarters.

aa r ~ V rrrrrt~nrinwrrsr y .V V Vwr


And it is right that this is so. A4 TIOMAS DIXON, JR., President, a. W. KILGOR,. Vkce-Presiret.
the wr oitek Ra- T -fs .t C.in We
masculine woman is as abnormal as an New 6or. ae ecretyYork.
effeminate man. Both belong not to hu- r. .RICI. S. secretary la treNsrew York. rort.
manity, .,ut are monstrosities. Hail then Ie, isr, ew o
then woman.y woman. Her femininity
asserts itself in all her words and acts. PRESIDENT'S OFFICE: 9t PIFrT AVE.. NEW YORK.
And the more womanly, the more should
she be worshipped.

The House Boat.
SThe Hoe Bt II Standard Turpentine Company
The house boat is a craft that has
all the way from one to one hun- 4
dred tons ot pastime. In it's construc- Builders of Wood Distilling Plants,
tion the engine, boiler and machinery are PajT Stam
all omitted in order to leave that much y the New Krug P tent S ea
more rom for pastime. It has no mo- Pressure Process.
tive power for it needs none. It has
lots of motive, however, a'l of which is
for pastime. Its decks are roomy and
well suited for promenading and loung- O RESP DENCE O
ing. Its indoor arrangements are con- CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
structed for the comfort of its occupants. 4 AN
ritrbeiedf er the amft no businessun. AND INSPECTION OF WAYCROSS PLANT IS INVITED.
it being understood that no husines,
shall be transacted on board, nothing but
pastime.
There are quite a number of these REFERENCES: Sarfteld National aks ew York; R Dam Co.
house boats in Florida. As most of the
large streams of this State are tidal, that
is, running alternately in opposite direc-
tions every day, the boats can be trans- J THO MP N
ported up or down the stream with tne JNO. W. THOMPSON, 0
tide, without being towed. All that is
needed is a good stout pole or two to Superintendent Sales Agencies, WAYCROSS,
push with when underway to guide it to
the proper haven. An anchor to ho-ld s
it while at rest, and a small row boat or
two for its occupants when they wish to E. H. TOIlLINSON, Special Agent,
go ashore or to a shallow cove to fish, Corner Hogan and Forsyth Streets, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
completes the outfit.
One great advantage the house boat 04S4"0SS> S^ SS 4< O4' 896B *S @ft I has over other craft. It cannot be upset
by too much canvas for it uses no sails
at all, and no license is required for ain .,an'm R liable "
engineer or pilot.
\When life grows monotinous how easy R i .
it is to up anchor and drift to a new
spot. Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Many Northern tourists own their own'
house boats on the St. Johns and In Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON-EARTH.
dian Rivers, and the happiest part of
their year's experience is passed on these
in making life for the time a pas- Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
time. ket rice. Your natronage is resirectfllv solicited. See auotations-


could still tell that it was a woman's thispaper.
language. Did you ever analysize a wo- 3,ooo Acres of Long Leaf Virgin Pine in KINOAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
man's utterances and see how essentially Calhoun County, Florida.
they were? There are tricks of ex-pres
sion that reveal her sex in spite of her. Thlle abov tract is within one and ow-
Have you never observed it? The next half miles of Dalkeith Landing, with three
time you hear a woman talk just taken lines" of river -tea"mers passing regularly.
mental note of the fact that not only Hlas never been touched by turlwntine
ology is also feminine. I v daily lail from W\\ewahitchka to Dalkeith.
%\ill cut out all waste and give you tim-
Sometimes women try to talk like Iwred lands. Want to realize at once. Ap- advertising columns reach all
men. In her writing she can control this ply to W. D. Barnes. National Bank of
to some extent and letters have been re- J.i-ksonvi.lle Jack- son, ill ** ** 4 t *3 a
Whoi Falal 4etean sorsc


Built Upon Honor


.

-Sold Upon Merit. Who handle the pine and its products.


CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS

AND VATS.

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
IS & SON, PAL.ATKA, FLA.


The Up-To-Date Farmer
KEEPS POSTED BY SUBSCRIBINO TO A FIRST-CLASS FARM PAPER.
FARr1, FIELD AND FIRESIDE,
CHICAGO,
is the leader of its class. Strong Writers, Good Illustrations, LateMarket
and Stock Sale Reports. A chance for agents to make money.
Write for terms.
tL--.-THE HOWARD CO., Clicahk .


"FAI, INDEPENDENT AND PROGRESSIVE"


(];. M. IV


=








14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


HE PUT I. IN THE BILL.
It is related of a commercial traveler
"epresting a Jacksonville firm among the
hills of Georgia one cold winter's morn-
ing that he encountered several of the
craft representing other Jacksonville
houses. He had not been In the business
very long ana on this morning was shiv-
ering on a railway platform without an
overcoat, when the following dialogue
took place between him and one of the
craft. For convenience we will call him
Green:
"Say, Green, why don't you wear an
overcoat?"
"I don't own one."
"Why don't you buy one and put it
into your expense account."
"I didn't know that this could be
done."
"Sure. You see each of wears a hand-
some overcoat. We got them that way."
Green at once bought a fine $50 overcoat
A word to the wise was sufficient.
and when the boss looked over his ex-
pense acpun. he encountered this item:
"I overcoat, $50."
"See here, Mr. Green," said the boss,
"we do not clothe our drummers. You
should not have put this as an expense
against the house. I'll just scratch it
out and charge it up to your account."
"But," said Green, "the boys on the
road told me that it was the custom."
"The boys were kidding you. Next
time you will know better." The item
was stricken out and was charged up
against Green.
The next time he met the boys on the
roaL this is what was said:
"Look here, boys, you all got me into
trouble. You told me to buy an over-
coat and put it into my expense ac-
count. Well, I did so. My boss struck
it out."
"You don't mean that you put it in


as an overcoat, do you?" Average schlicole of sills. :,i feet and $ 5 RAR
"Of course. How else should I put it under, 10 inches and under, $13.00 to O -EW AR D.
in?" $14.00. Sirmans, Ga., April It, 1904.
"Oh, but you are well named. Greeny. Special schedules according to sizes ,
You should not have put it in that way. and lengths---prices steady. \Ve will pay $25.00 reward for arrest
The way I put mine in was to "pad" K. 1). Saps--';" and up 80 per cent and detention of one E. G. Gamble, a
every lczitimate item in my expense ac- cl.ar, $9.50 to $10.00. black nero, 6 feet high, weighing about
count. i added several dollars to my I lcoring: 1 i5 pounds; has small mustache and side
railroad fares, several more dollars to $11.50: No. 4, $8.50. whiskers, connecting with his hair in tem-
my hotel ills, until t e c o plce and running down cheeks for about
my hotel bills, until the entire cost of Cypress. inches. Claims to be a preacher and has
my overcoat was covered." First and seconds, 4 quarter base, car a black suit of clothes with Prince Al-
"Oh." said (iren, 'tlhat's how you h:adl prices,. .$4; selects. 4 quarter base, lrt coat which we wears on dress pa-
worked it. WVe:l. l'll do that myself with No. i, $15.00: No. 2, $13.50; No. 3. rade. Also rides on A. C. L. Railway
my next expense account." $2;8 shop, 4 quarter base. $20. Ministerial Permit. Is a turpentine dis-
Accordingl.y, \when lie handed in his (ypr.ess Shingles -ix8 A's, per I.000 tiller and will be hunting that kind of
next expense account, Green stood by pcs., $5.25: primes. $4.25: 4xlR, A's, $3.50: wrk. Very loud talker, walks fast, with
while his boss checked off and 0. Kd primes, $2.75. his head drooped; wears black hat with
every item therein. iCypress 'atls. $2 per 1,000. brim about 4 inches wide. Left our place
,he's all right this time, ain't she (jCypress market strong. Mills have albut 25th of March.
boss?" cmre orders than they can fill. Prospects
"Oh, yes, she is all right this time." I ol for higher prices. Dry stock scarce. B. G. Lastinger 6 Co.
"You don't see any overcoat in it this
time."
No, indeed. we do not see any over- Planters "Old Tim e" Rem edies
oat in it this time."
"I didn't think you would, but now
that it has been O. K'd, I think it my
duty to inform you that she's in there NUBI'N TEA-for the Liver.
just the same."
And Green quit drumming. BENEDICTA-female Tonic.

Jacksonville Wholesale Lumber Market. CUBAN RELIEF, for Cramp Colic. Horse Colic.
WARRANTED TO GIVE RELIEF IN TEN MINUTES.
(For week ending April 15.) CUBAN OIL. a Liniment Unexcelled.
lerchantab'e.
,ard selidules- o1050 to A1300 Also Golden Crown Specifc. Pink Pills A Horse & Cattle Powders


Sound and square schedules. ,.).50 to
$12.00.
Merchantable car material-


K


SPENCER MEDICINE CO.,
Chattanooga, Tenn.


ohn = Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


When you Visit Jacksonville


Call to see the Record and be at home.


Tell the Record all you know, that will Interest others.


If you want to buy or sell advertise your place.


If you owe the Record pay the bill.


If you don't owe the Record make a bill.


Order your Printed Stationery.


Be sure and give the order for your Commissary Checks.


Call on the Secretary of the 7. 0. A.


Call at the Industrial Record Office.


THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


"THE PINE AND ITS PRODUCTS."


rl~rLIrr~rrrrrrr~---- ---------UUC----~~~~U


-~~~LIIl)~~-~~-~UIULL~-UU---~~--UUYYYUYY











6Ii THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Way Down Upon the Suwannee River.
Years ago there was located on the
east bank of the Suwanee River a board-
ing house, in the then thriving town of
Columbus. Both Columbus and the board-
ing have long since joined the things
that were. Among the boarders was a
sick gentleman from New York who spent
several weeks there. He could be found
* rly every morning at the Cowpen
where he ri.nnk freely of the fresh milk.
He was a fine singer and an excellent
musician. His health was almost restor-
ed but he died several years after, of
consumption. Before he left Columbus,
one afternoon in spring, on the ledge of
rocks which skirts the springs, he wrote
that ballad which will be sung so long
as time lasts, "Way down upon rte Swan-
nee Ribber." The author's name is Wil-
liam Christy. of Christy's Minstrels.

The Pleasures of Cribbage.
There is a peculiar pleasure that comes
to the enthusiastic player of cribbage not
enjoyed in any other game. In whist
tnere is pleasure in looking over the thir-
teen cards constituting a hand. and in
the gradual disposal of them the mind is
on a tension to determine just who holds
the unplayed cards. In pinochle there is
pleasure in noting the kaleidscopic
changes that each play and draft dis-
closes; the mind is worried to determine
what to hold with hope of meetingg."
and what to break. And so it is with
other games at cards. They involve an
element of worry and an effort of the
mind that remains with the play: iuti
the play is done.
In cribbage, however, the elements of
worry and mental effort are lacking.
There is pleasure in scanning the hand,
even in the momentary hesitation as to
the wisdom of the discard. The turn of
the trump causes the mind to adjust it to
tue cards in hand.
Then the play. That dread of having
a card matched, and the dread of the
matcher of being matched with a third
on the kind, are but momentary anxieties
which add zest to the game. The "fif-
teen two" and the "thirty-one" score is
always a pleasure to the player who
makes it. Care'essness in playing con-
secutive cards, or those with only one
spot intervening meets with its punish-
ment when a "run" is scored as a re-
sult. Then after the cards have been
played there is a pleasure in scoring, es-
pecially if the score be a good one.
The anxieties and pleasures follow each
other very rapidly in cribbage. Playing
it is much like drinking soda witter. Any
sensation invoked, be it one of risk or
response, is over in le-s time than it
take to tell it. Frothy. sparkling, and
absorbing for a few seconds, it is a sort
of mental friction involved in an intel-
lectual bout, with frequent resting spells
between dea!s.
Show me a person who enjoys a game
of cribbage, and I will show you one
w..ose intelligence is much above the av-
erage. for as much as in any other game.
it is a measure of intellect.
Lookers on; and listeners who do not un
derstand the game wonder stupidly why
tihI played s go into extacies over a "fif-
teen-two.' or "two for his heels." utter-
e'l by the scorer in his most enthusiastic
manner. Anil when a third or a fourth
card is played. in matching, the scorer
raises the roof off the house. they stare
at him as though he were a fit subject
for the insane asylum. Iht the players
know what tney a:e about. and hold in
sympathetic contempt any one who is too
densely ignorant to rejoice with them in
their big scores.
It will be one of the purposes of
'"Pastime" to bring about a renaissance
in cribbage playing and pertinent article
vill appear in its pages from time to
time in favor of this great game.


Buyers' Directory

These advertisers are in this issue. If
you want anything, look through this
classified list and write to the firm ap-
pearing therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.

AUTOMOBILES.
Fred E. Gilbert, Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Central National Banzc, Ocala, Fla.
Mercantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOOKS.
Cochrane's Book Store. Palatka, Fla.
BRICK.
Gep. R. Foster. Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
Thn <5,althnp-n ll Xr 5lnnliv (Cno. Jack-


IRON WORKS. TURPENTINE PROCESS.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works, Tifton, Ga. The Pine Product Construction Co., Pay-
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au- etteville, N. C.
gusta, Ga. The Pine Belt Construction Co., Raleigh,
T. Murphy, Jacksonville. N. C.
J. S. Schofield's Sons Company, Macon, The Standard Turpentine Co., New York
JEWELERS. City.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville. TURPENTINE STILLS
Hess & Slager, Jacksolle. M. A. Baker. Brunswick, Ga.
R. J. Riles. Jacksonville. McMillan Bros., Savannah. Ga.
LIQUORS. TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
F. Bettelini, Jacksonville. G. M. Davis & Son, Palatka, Fla.
Chas. Blum & Co., Jacksonville. TURPENTINE VATS.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville. G. M. Davis & Son, Palatka, Fla.
Bowen & Co., Jacksonville. WITERS.
TYPE WRITERS.
LOCOMOTIVES. Grivot Typewriter Exchange. Jacksavilli
The Cincinnati Equipment Co., C'ncen- UNDERTAKERS.
nati, 0. Chas. A. Clark, Jacksonville.
MACHINE WORKS. VEHICLES.
Ge. T. Gifford Iron Works, Tfton, Fla McMurray & Bro., Jacksonvlle.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au- W.R. Thomas, Ganesville. Fla
gusta, Ga. Gai
T. Murphy, Jacksonville. WATCHES.
.1. S. Schofield's Sons "-mDanv. Macon. I J. Riles, Jacksonville.


sonvlle, Fla. Ga.
CARS.
South Atlantic Car & Manufacturing Co. MATERIALS OR TURPENTINE PRO-
Waycross, Ga. CESS.
CATTLE. .1. S. Schofield's Sons & Co., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
Palmetto Park Farm, Ocala, Fla. M. A. Baker, Brunswick, Ga.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO. McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
J. S. Pinkussohn Cigar Co., Jacksonville. MILL SUPPLIES.
CLOTHING. John G. Christophler, Jacksonville, Fla.
H1. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville. Thomas R oberts Hardware Co., Valdosta,
J. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville. Ga.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville. W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Valdoeta,
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE. a.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville. Mio Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Ilaillipa llardware Co., Tampa, Ela.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS. J. S. Schofields' Sons, Macon. Ga.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City. MULES AND HORSES.
M. W. Larendon, New York City. )illon & I'enuel, Marianna.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City. W. R. Thomas, Gainesville, Fla.
COOPERAGE. NAILS.
The Cannon Co., Quitman, Ga. Salem Nail Co., New York City.
Union Cooperage & Supply Co.. Savan-
nah. Ga. NAVAL STORES.
uitinan Cooperage Co., Jacksonville. The Barnes-Jessup Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
DRUGS. ville.
Conover Drug Co., Jacksonville. The Ellis-Young Co., Savannah, Ga.
The Christie Groover Drug Co., 'a. l-on- Peacock-Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
ville. Standard Naval Stores Ca., Jacksonville.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville. Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ali.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE. OSTEOPATHY.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville. Drs. Phelps & McElwain, Jacksonville.
The Covington Co., Jacksonville. PECANS.
ENGINES. The Gritfing Bros. Co., Jacksonville.
j. S. Schofields' Sons, Macon. Ga. PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla. W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta,
Lomnbard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au- loli (G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
gusta, Ga. Thomas Roberts, Hardware Co., Valdosta,
FEATHERS. Ga.
Florida Ostrich Farm, Jacksonville. ;Ga.
FOUNDRIES. Tampa Hardware Co., T'mpa, Fla.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works, Tifton, Ga. Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
T .Murphy, Jacksonville, Fla. PUMPS.
.1. S. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon, Ga. John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
FUEL. J. S. Schofields' Sons, Macon, Ga.
The Southern Fuel & Supply Co.. Jack- White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
4onville. Ala.
GENTS' FURNISHERS. Fre.I E. Gills-rt, Jacksonville.
II. A. Kenfroe Co., Jacksonville. PAINTS.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville. i. E. Baird & Co., Jacksonville.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville.
C. H. Hargraves Co., Jacksonville, Fla. RAILS.
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Isaac Joseph Iron Co., Cincinnati, 0.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville. REAL ESTATE.
Ellis-Young Co., Savannah, Ga. Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, T-npa.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga Fla.
White. Walton & Co., Jacksonville. Brobston. FendSg & Co., Jacksonville.
J P. Williams Co.. Savannah, Ga. C. Buckm'an, Jacksonville.
IIATS-WIIOLESALE. W\. V. Frazier, Jacksonville.
Kohn. Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville. The West-Raley-Rlannie Co., Jacksonville
HARDWARE. ROOFING TIN.
Thomas Roberts Hardware co., Valdosta, American Tin Plate Co., New York City.
Thomas Roberts Hardware co., Valdosta, SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Ga.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla. The Covington Co. Jacksonville.
Itond & Bo-irs Co., Jacksonville. STATIONERY.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., ValdJaa.1, Go Cochranes' Book Store, Palatka, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla. STEAMSHIPS.
J. D. Weed & Co.. Savannah, Ga. The Clyde Steamship Co., New York City.
Marion Hardware Co.. Ocala, r:a. STOCK BROKERS.
HARNESS. Samuel P. Holmes & Co., Jacksonville.
McMurray & Baker. Jacksonville. TAILORS.
W. R. Thomas, Gainesville, Fla. .lohn B. Ciancaglini & Bro., Jacksonvinle.
HATS. TANKS.
H. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville. G. M. Davis & Son.. Palatka, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville. (Cypress Tank Co., Mobile, Ala.
J. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville. J. S. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon Ga.
HOTELS. TANK STORAGE.
Hotel Bartholdl, New York City. National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Zahms' European Hotel. Jacksonville. Ga.
New Victoria Hotel. Jacksonville. National Transportation & Terminal Co.,
The Oaks. White Springs. Fla. Jacksonville.
The Hamilton., W~hite Springs. Fla. TOOLS.
The New Paxton, White Springs, Fla. John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
The Kendrick House, White Springs, The Council Tool Co., Wananlsh, N. C.


Sla TURPENTINE CUPS.
Pritchard House, White Springs, Fla. Chattanooga Pottery Co., Daisy, Tenn.

PATRONIZE LCOaRD ADVERTISERS FOR SATISFACTORY DEALINGS


Greenleaf & Crosby Co.. Jacksonville.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fa.


Business Directory.

CHARLES A. CLARK.
FUNERAL DIRECTOR AND EMBAIAMR
0 and 42 W. Forsyth St., Jacksonville. na.
Telegraph orders receive prompt atten-
tion. Open always.

JOHN ZAHM'S EUROPEAN HOTEL[
12S E. Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant. Nicely Furnisae
Rooms. Open day and night. Bettlllnl'
old Stand.

Conover's Drug Store. Bay and Julia,
Jacksonville. Fla. Mail us your orders
for commissary lnrgs. Give us a trial.

J. 8. PINKUSSOHN CIGAR COMPANY.
51 W. Bay Street. Jacksonville, Fla.
THE BEST OF EVERYTHING
TO SMOKE AND CHEW.
The Largest Tobacconists in the South.



M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

Commission Merchants.
ROSIN, TURPENTINE, TAR, PITCH,
GUM THUS, RICE, ETC.
138 Front Street, NEW YORK.



BAILY & MONTGOMRY,


Commission Merchants,
N&val Stores & Cotton
Liberal advances made against sLp-
ments. Consignments solicited.
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
NEW YORK CITY.



Trade Checks
FOR ITHE


COMMISSARY BUSINESS.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Industrial Record C0.,
JACKSONVILLE, flORIDA.


I






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


WORKING WITH THE CYPRESS.

Bureau of Forestry has a Man in Florida
on a Good Mission.
Cypress timber deadened at certain
times of the year will at once be attacked
by pinworms, also the sap of the trees
will blue and stain; deadened at the prop-
er time the trees will stay sound for a
period of three or four years, without
injury from pinworms or stain. A. D.
Hopkins, of Washington, D. C., who is
in charge of Forest Insect Investigation,
Division of Entomology, U. S. Department
of Agriculture, has been calling on the
manufacturers of cypress lumber in Flor-
ida during the last two weeks, with a
view towards determining the most prac-
tical time for deadening cypress timber.
Mr. Hopkins has secured the promise of
co-operation along this line of investiga-
tion from the most successful operators
in cypress and it may be expected that


the experiments now being made will with-
in a few months enable the Forestry De-
partment to give valuable information
about this important matter and save
many thousands of dollars to the cypress
millmen.
Jacksonville Anti-Trust Suit.
In the United States Court in Jackson-
ville recently Judge Lock issued an order
granting an extension of ninety days for
taking testimony in the suit brought by
the United States against the Baker a
Holmes Company and the other members
of the Wholesale Grocer's Association.
This is the suit brought under the Sher-
man anti-trust law, and has as its object
the prosecution of the members of the al-
leged trust or combination, which, it is
claimed, is illegal and contrary to law.
Great interest has been manifested in this
suit, but the proceedings have been very
slow. The case was referred to a master


some time ago, but no testimony has as
yet been taken.


Cooperage Plant Burned.


35 years, four times longer than the life of
of other tics. It is noted by the Wil-
mington Messenger that the inroads upon
the pine fortsts by lumbermen and by
railroads seeking crossties is threatening


The plant of the Colquitt County Coop- to destroy the turpentine business in sev-
erage Company, at Moultrie, Ga., was de- eral sections. It says that in years gone
stroyed by fire on the 1st inst. The value by the majority of railroads in its sec-
of the plant was about $6.000, and it was tion could secure crossties from the ter-
insured for $3,700. The fire originated at ritory through which they ran, but that
the glue furnace at the noon hour when now, except where roads have been re-
the men ere away. gently built, nearly all the timber suita-
ble for crossties has been cut down, and
Sthe supplies have to be brought from a
Catalpas for Ties. distance.
Sixty-five acres of land four miles fromI
Pensacola, will be planted by the Louis- Along the banks of the streams of East
ville & Nashville Railroad in catalpa trees. Florida there abound ash, maple and mag-
This is in line with the plans of a number nolia. These when used for inside work
of leading railroads of the country to pro- can Ie made as ornamental as cypress.
vide themselves sources of supplies for The Record would like to hear from some
crossties. It is estimated that ties made lumberman who has tried the market with
of catalpa wood have an average life of either of them.


.**s*****.,,L~p&de&eepppeeedee* e~&~&d&d~L &&Q&&dtCdd ~ &dCdtUld


Machinery

Bar Iron, Iron Pipe and fittings, Bolts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tools, Lumberman's Tools,
Packing of All Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corrugated
Roofing.



JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER,
,JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


and


Mill


Supplies.


State Agent For:
ATLAS ENGINES and BOILERS, SOULE STEAM FEED,
WORTHINGTON STEAM PUMPS, JENKINS' VALVES,
DISSTON'S SAWS, FLINTKOTE ROOFING,
CURTIS MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Mill Machinery.
DeLOACH SAW MILLS, GILBERT WOOD PULLEYS,
HOYrs LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SPRING and RUBBER COMPANY '
Belt and Rubber Iose.
SOLVENTINE BOILER COMPOUND.
DODGE MANUFACTURING COMPANY,
Cast Iran Sprit Pulleys.
McCAFFREY FILES, MONARCH EMERY WHEELS,
DANIEL'S PPP STEAM PACKING,
A. LESCHEN & SON, Wire Repe.
eassaeas-assema<6-amsesse s8B ss a*---


Special Notice.


Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are----



McMILLAN BROTHERS'


Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.


Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the


condenser.


Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.


Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.



McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS,


SAVANNAH, GA.
MOBILE, ALA.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.


ONE OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PAPERS.


3;31~i3~;3;313;3;3~9;3;3;9;9;3;3i3~9F~


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TIHF, WEEKLY INIUTSTfIAL IRMCORD


BLUE EYES. .
Blue! 'Tis the blue of heaven-the do-
main of Cyntlia-the bright place of
the sun. The tent of His perus and all
his train, the bosomer of clouds, gold,
gray and dun.
Blue! Tis the life of waters--Ocean,
with all its tributary streams, pools
numberless may rrge and foam and fret,
but never can subside, if not to dark
blue nativeness.
Blue! Tenth cousin to the forest
green. Married to green in all the sweet-
est flowers-For-get-me-not; the blue-
bell, and that Queen of secrecy, the vio-
let. What strange powers.
Hast thoL:, as a mere shadow, but
how great when in an eye thou art, alive
with fate?

THIS IS FLORIDA.
Florida is a cosmopolitan aggregation.
People from every State in the Union
will find homelike surroundings here.
kjorida is made up of contributions in
population from every part of the civil-
ized world.
We are spending more money for com-
mon school education in proportion to
population than any State in the South,
and are giving more and more attention
each year to higher education.
Florida is a liberal State, numbering
among its inhabitants people of almost
every shade of religious belief.
It is wide awake and progressive, as is
shown by a larger newspaper circulation
per capital than any other State in the
South. Almost as large as any State in
taie Union.
This State is capable of muchdiversity
of employment. Everything that is grown
in the temperate zone is grown here. So
far as this country is concerned, we have
almost a monopoly of tropical products.
And our fruits and vegetables, such as
are grown in other States, suffer little
by competition. They are placed on the
market so soon that they command fan-
cy prices.
'lorida is a great raw material State,
and that means that it is the state that
offers more advantages to manufacturers
than they can find anywhere else. These
advantages are bound to tell sooner or
later, and will make this one of the
greatest manufacturing States of the
Union.
Nature has been lavish of her gifts
here, and our State is so sparsely settled
that there is plenty of room for all who
wish to come among us to share them.

HOW THE GOVERNOR FAILED.


P-w- wra-ra'e-rr-- ,--- a- "MIy name is Ike."
S"Ike what? What is your other
W k 0 name."
w O k IS O ver, "In slavery days, when I belonged to
old Col. Williams up in Leon County,
(ley just called me Ike. But now, since
freedom I calls myself Ike Johnson."
were trying to stop it. This proceed- "AAh. Mr. Jolnson, how do you make a
ing was pushed to a finish and arguments living':"
Wvere heard before .Iulge Call pro and "By peddling lunches here about the
V',l. It \\is maintilind by the prosecu- depot."
Iing o linerss thal the State law imposingI Do you cook tlem them yourself?"
a Icna tly against those who were about i "No. sir; Kesiah. dat's my wife, she
tol meet and liight by appointment cov- cooks "em.
1red the cae. It was called a fight and "'Mrs. Johnson cooks them, does she?
they were l..re to fight it by appoint- And do you lind much difficulty in get-
rmen t. The counsel of Corbett and Mitch- ting the material'-
iell claimed that the gentlemen were pro- "I show does."
fe-sional athletes, who were exponents of "The flour, ior instance, that is need-
the manly art of self defense, and their ed to make your biscuits and pies, I sup-
pr4oposed "meeting" \as for tle purpose pose you buy it here, or how do you man-
of exemplifying that noble attribute for age it?"
the instruction of all those who were "Buys it of course. Ain't nobody
wiling to pay $25 for the privilege; that furnishing stuff for nothing."
contending for a prize in the ring was "You have fried chicken, too. How do
matter of emulation rather than of cen- you get your chickens, raise them, buy
sure. tlem, or-?"
Judge Call, in deciding the case, held "Old Ike, was getting bored. His
that the penal statute prohibiting men "friend" hadn't spent a cent with him
from meeting to tight by appointment and other customers were being neglect-
lhai reference to fighting when men met, ed. "Look "re white man. You to'e
with guns in their hands and with Inur- me you was from Boston. You axes me a
lier in their hearts for the pur- whole lot of questions, and tells me dat
pose of lighting a-duel; that contending you is my friend. And yet you axes me
for a prize, either by wrestling or box- where I gets my chickens from. Now,
ing was not contemplated by the framers let me tell you dis. Any man what
of the law invoked nere. lie therefore comes all de way from Boston to ax a
granted the injunction. Even then many colored man where he gets his chickens
were very dubious auout the fight com- from is no friend of the colored race,"
ing off. There was no telling what Gov- and he left the Boston man in dis-
ernor Alitche.l had up his sleeve. The de- gust.
cision was rendered the day before the
tight; but even while they were gather- MINISTERING ANGELS.
ing at the ling side the Attorney Gen-
eral of the State was contemplating what They are roaming far and holding out
to do next. But the decision settled the their gentle guiding hands; to the weak
matter and while the Governor and oth- and broken-hearted, counting life's swift
e:s wo w iere opposed to the light were failing sands. They are lingering on
susted withe goose to the ightturn matters were the threshold of the sick and hungry
uIsgusted with tie turn matters took,no who in humble trust are wait
further steps were taken to stop it. I" 'or, who in humble trust are waiting
An amusing incident is related of a for 'lie angel at the door.
member of the City Council. That body They are in the rich man's mansion.
ly ordinance legalized the contest "pro- where sad sorrowing hearts abide, for
vided the contestants wore four ounce the daring of a household, ere the dawn-
gloves." A city wag told the council- ing, there hath died; and an angel softly
man referred to that the ordinance read answers a fond mother's wailing prayer:
-four pound" gloves and that as he had "HI ehas entered the grand portal, and
looked forward to enjoying the bout with waits thy corning there."
some pleasure, at once hastened to have 'They are watching tottering foot steps
the counsel reconvene and change the 4on the very verge of crime; and they
word "pound" into "ounce." His zeal, whisper, .lake and effort-make it while
although unnecessary brought the laugh yeet is time to avoid the demon's pow-
on hliii, in which lie heartily joined. er; oh, despair not, strive again, for the
Jackonville was pretty well known be- haven of love will offer to a heart with-
fore the prizefight took place, but as a out a stain."
result of it she was put on every map Wien thel come and sweetly whisper
and loomed up as a metropolitan city of to al soul t expressed with care, do not
the first clas.bt 'tis anges pleading, for they w
The S'ate troops called out to sup- erbt 'teis aev els leading llfor they wand
press the fight were ordered from Ocala, 'l ely, 'Tis _lessiah 's great command,
Leesburg, Sanford and Orlando. Messrs. tlht through faIt and deeds of kind-
Corbett and Mitclell's case being tried t tru a and deds
tried by the courts, the troops, although s e ust reach the p la.
under arms here, were only onlookers.
A number of them witnessed the tight. WHAT DOUBLING DID.


Florida has been the scene of more --
queer proceedings, than the average maln DOUBTFUL FRIENDSHIP.
imagines. Without enumerating them, we lie was from Boston and was on his
will cite one that stands out in the his- first trip South. While not a profession-
tory of the sporting world in glaring al philana ropist he determined to make
array. We refer to the famous Corbett an investigation tor himself as to tlhe
and Mitchell prizefight that occurred in condition of thlu colored people here, how
this city ten years ago. Governor they were treated by their former own-
Mitchell declared that the fight should er, and any other information along
not takfle place i- Florida. He called; that lillne ..,at miiht be offered. He was
out the State troops and did everything en route to South Florida and awaiting
a well regulated governor could do to his train at the Union depot during a
stop it. The courts were invoked and short stop over, looked about him. While
public meetings were held to denounce doing so an elderly darkey peddling
it. But all to no purpose. The fight lunches approached him with:
came off according to schedule and was "Want a lunch, lo,ss?"
witnessed by many distinguished men "W\Vhat have you?"
who sneaked into Jacksonville, saw tile "ILook in this basket and see. Here's
fight and sneaked away again hoping not hami sandwich, eggs, fried chicken, bis-
to be found out. cuits, and almost anything you want for
It was a saying at the time that Cor- Ipie."
biett knocked out one Mitchell while "l aml not hungry, but I would like to
Bowden (our own Jet Bowden, who ak you a tew questionss. I am from Bos-
managed the Floriua end of the affair) i ton and have come down here as your
knocked out the other, meaning his Ex- friend and the friend of your race, to
cellency, Governor Mitchell. lind out for Imyself just how you are
Several legal proceedings were taken, getting along. Lkon't you have a hard
among them an injunction at the in- time '"
stance of the prize-fighters against all "Yes, bIsc. I has a hard time."
and singular the sheriff and others who "What is your name?"


Two gentlemen were playing cards in
a hotel lobby, being overlooked by prob-
ably half a dozen others. One of the
later remarked.
"(entlineln, I had a remarkable run
of luck at cars the other night. We were
playing seven-up and I won nineteen
straight games.'
"What was tle stake?" asked a by-
stander.
"W'e commenced at a dollar apiece, but
doubled the stakes each game."
"Was all the money put up each
time '''
certainly and we used nothing but sil-
\er dollars."
"How much did your winnings amount
to?"
"I forget now, but recall that I found
it rather cumbersome to cariy away."
"'Let us figure a little on it," said the
inevitable mathematician, twho pulled out
a pencil and paper and soon tilled a page
with figures. Then-"I should say it
wtIs rather cuniiersome for any one man
to carry. If what you say be true you
left that room carrying on your person
$.2-,.258 in silver donars."
"Jerusalem! I knew it was a large
sum, but had no idea it was that much."


RECREATION IN NUMERALS.
(an there be any fun in figures? Does
the Arabic method of notation afford
amusement, \\e answer, yes. That is,
no outburst of laughter may be pro-
voked by them. but a glance at what fol-
lws will interest and entertain you, if
you enjoy quaint and curious facts not
gicnrally known. If you wish really to
enjoy this recreation go through the work
yourself. and you will be startled (unless
onu have already been startled) at the
result.
Get a piece of paper and a pencil and
write diwn one million and a 1 and six 0's.
Hiave you done it? Now divide that I,-
KO).tnni by 7. Have you done it? You
will get for an answer, 142,857 with 1
for a remainder, which if you continue
the division decimally you will get
hle amne number as a repetend. We
wi 1 not bother about the decimal re-
petend. Now if you will multiply the
142,857 by 2 you will get for a product
2S85,714. Let us look at this product for
a moment. You will observe that it has
the same figures as the 142,857 and ar-
ranged in tne same order, except that
the first begins with 14 and the second
ends with A4.
Now multiply the 142,857 by 3 and you
get for a product 428,571. The same fig-
ures and in the same order as the I un-
her 142,S57 except that the one begins
with I and the other ends with 1.
Again, multiply 142,d57 by 4 and the
product is 571,428. The same figures and
in the same order, except that the for-
nier ends with 57 a-d the latter begins
with 57.
Again, multiply by 5 and'get as a prod-
uct 714,85. Same figures, same order
except the latter begins --ith 7 and the
former enus with 7.
Again. inu.tiply 142,857 b;'v 6, and the
pr-o'lidct is 857,142. Same fi~gres, same
order except tnat the- one be-;ins with
142 and the other ends with 14?.
We have now multiplied out 142,57 by
all the numbers from one to 6 and .oow
that the same figures and the same or-
tier applies. And now multiply tCe
142,8.57 by 7 and add to the product th'
1 l'ett over as a remainder at the start,
of course we get as a result 1,000,000,
thus bringing us back to the starting
point.

PHOTOGRAPHS IN ADVERTISEMENTS.
wocs it not surprise you to see the
patent Imlleicine caricatures that fill the
advertising columns of the dai y press
lpo.ing as photographs of real persons?
Among them we find grave Senators
("grave" is just the word to express it
here), and members of Congress, gover-
nors of states and judges of supreme
courts. and testify that the medicine has
cllre.t them. and yet, if we were to be-
lieve the testimony of their pictures,
tliesc victims are not very far from the
grave. There is a gentleman living in
tis city who took one of these medicines
and claimed that it cured him. His pic-
ture appeared in many papers with his
testimonial as to the efficiency of the
i:e.lieine. Have you observed his pie-
tllur( It makes him look like he was in
the last stages of driveling imbecil-
ity. iHe might have received a benefit
from, the medicine, but one would not
tlinkk so to see his picture.
The proprietory medicine men are
iea Iy inflicting an injury, not only upon
mankind at large, but upon art. Half
tume pi'ctlure are very cheap now and
there is no excuse for these men, here in
thle beginning of the twentieth century
|a lining off such pictures on a helpless
public, when they can publish better
pictures at less price.
Anl Ibetter pictures would help their
Iusinessll. too. There are lots of women
whli are neither as young nor as pretty
as they were years ago, who would cheer-
fully furnish good testimonia s (provid-
ing. of course, the medicine was
meritorious and we speak only
of that kind), and pictures of themselves
nl.st gratefully, if the pictures made
thiem the monlels of youth and beauty
that they once were.


THE RECORD'S SPACE HAS A BIG MONEY VALUE.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 19


THE OCALA STOCK SALE.

Prices Not High, but Interest in Stock Im-
provement Growing.
It is quite natural that a sale of thor-
oughbred cattle should take place at Ocala;
Marion County is one of the most progres-
sive counties in the State and to-day has
in it more blooded stock than any half-
dozen other counties. Judging from the
sale this will not long be the case, how-
ever, as buyers were present from all parts
of the State and the enthusiasm created
by the organization of the Southeastern
Stockbreeders' Association is growing
daily.
Some fifty registered Shorthorn and
Hereford cattle were sold and about thirty
grades. All those offered were, with the
exception of five owned by Mr. Campbell
Russell, Hereford, Indian Territory, owned
by Z. C. Chambliss & Co., and their ap-
pearance testified, more strongly than
words, the excellence of Mr. Chambliss'
judgment and the care given them at the
Palmetto Park Farm. The farm itself is
an ideal spot for growing cattle and has
every appliance that serves to make the
work efficient. The stock was auctioned
by Col. R. E. Edmondson, a veteran in
his profession, and known to all from
Chicago to El Paso and the sale ring was
surrounded by two hundred visitors,
amongst whom were several ladies, who
took great interest in the animals paraded.
Col. Edmondson considers the lot sold the
finest ever offered in Florida and predicts
a great awakening in stock grading.
Prices were generally more satisfactory to
the buyer than the seller, but then this
was a missionary sale
Among the purchasers-who hailed from
all parts of the State-were: E. L. Wart-
man, Citra; J. C. Howell, Anthony; S. A.
Rawls, Ocala; R. E. L. Turner, Parrish;
H. L. Brownleaf, Starke; J. A. Cranford,
Jacksonville; W. M. Gist, McIntosh; H. A.
Barrow, Monticello; Garrett Murphy,
Braidentown; J. C. Matthews, Flemington;
Walter Ray, Leroy; James Sims, Esmeral-
da; H. G. Bystea, Holder; J. C. Hickman,
Hickman; Edwards Bros., H. L Anderson,
L. P. Miller, H. H. Whitworth, Ocala; Wil-
liam Edwards, Hickman; Greer & Co., Ply-
mouth; Judge Geo. W. Holcombe, Arcadia.
Several fine pigs were also sold, the prop-
erty of Messrs. S. H. Gaitskill, Wm. Gist,
H. H. Whitworth and the Errol farm and
was purchased by Z. C. Chambliss, M.
Tison, S. A. Rawls and Edwards Bros.,
Ocala; R. W. Storrs, DeFuniak Springs;
E. L. Howell, Anthony; and E. L Wart-
man, of Citra, Fla.
A pleasant trip was tendered your cor-
respondent, while in Ocala to the convict
farm, by Mr. S. A. Rawls, who has charge
of all the State convicts. The farm is
used for the prisoners who are too weak
or sick to work in the woods, and is in
charge of Col. R. F. Rogers, an enthusiast-
ic stockgrower and farmer. Although la-
boring under great difficulties the farm is
already making wonderful progress. One
hundred acres have been planted to pecan
trees, and there is besides an extensive
nursery of the same trees that are making
fine growth. The herd of Jerseys, headed
by a pedigree bull, will soon be furnishing
the State with the best milkers known and
the graded Hereford stock, for which Man-
ager Rawls purchased a magnificent thor-
oughbred bull, is doing remarkably well
and will furnish model beefers in a short
while. The farm has made wonderful
progress and bids fair soon to be a model
for farmers throughout the State.
RALPH EDWARDES.


RATES FOR DELEGATES. C. H. HARGRAVES CO.,
o W^AC. H. HAR.GRAVES CO.,
Announcement of Interest to Cane Grow- HOLESALE RERS
ers andWorticltriHOLESALE GR-OCERS

The Jacksonville Board of Trade comn-
mittee on entertainment has secured from Grain, Hay, Feed
the various hotels of the city the rates
that will be charged the delegates to the Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirements
annual meeting of the State Horticultural A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
Society and the Interstate Sugarcane
Growers' convention, which are to be held 514 5i6- 518- 520- 522- 524- 526 EAST BAY STREET
in this city shortly. .I lca, 1A ,* E1-


The number of guests each house can
entertain and the rate each house will
charge is as follows: Windsor, 250, at $2.50
per day and upwards; Duval, 200 at $2.50
and upwards; Aragon, 200 at $3; Everett,
25, at $1 (European plan); Victoria, .,
at $2; Travelers, 30, at $2; Acme, 30 at
50 cents and $1 (European plan); West-
moreland, 25 at $2; Windle, 30 or 40 at
$2; Grand View, 75 at $2 and $2.50; Lenox,
20, at $1.50; Mrs. Ochus, at No. 125 Ocean
St., 6 or 8, at $1.50. Other boarding
houses have not yet reported.

Big Cypress Deal.
The Louisiana Construction Company, of
Philadelphia, has bought 109,000 acres of
land in Avoyelles parish. The considera-
tion was $950,000. A large portion of
the land is cypress timber land that has
never been cut over. The cleared land,
which is 1,000 acres, will be put in cotton.
Sawmills will be erected for the manufac-
ture of lumber.

Recent Decisions.
The following recent decisions are of
interest to the craft. They have been ren-
dered recently and fix a precedent for seve-
ral knotty questions:
Where no bills of lading are issued, the
carrier is justified in delivering the goods
to the consignee without the production of
receipts or other evidence of ownership
that may have been issued to such con-
signee. (96 N. W. Reu., 959.)
A mere delay by a common carrier is
wholly insufficient to create a liability. It
must be an "unreasonable delay, which is
such as involves some want of ordinary
care or diligence" on the part of the car-
rier. (106 Ill. App., 563.)
Where a person takes over the entire
stock of another, and publishes a notice
that he has assumed the debts for goods
purchased by the previous owner, the cred-
itors of such former owner are entitled
to sue the purchaser in their own names.
(55 Atl. Rep., 1051.)
Present Busy Scene.
The lumber yards and planing mills of
the East Coast Lumber and Supply Com-
pany, at Eau Gallie, have presented a very
busy scene for the past two or three weeks.
The large force of men in the yard and
in the shops have not been able to keep
pace with the business, and it has been
found necessary to operate the mills at
night until 10 o'clock. The steamer Spar-
tan, with two lighters, is making regular
trips from Hobe Sound, bringing up the
cargo of cypress lumber from the wrecked
schooner Martha Thomas, the schooner
Sunny South is also engaged ii this
work. There is nearly a half million feet
of this lumber to be brought up. A i0-
horsepower boiler and engine and other
machinery has been ordered, and will he
installed at once for the purpose of work-
ing up this lumber, and will also be op--
rated in future to keep up with the ever-
growing business of the company.-Titus-
ville Star.


IJ. S. Schofield's




Di


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S*" lars

*
S. En

40 -le as

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a iKMIsi


woW eXX-X O atW -7eX e ls tal


%3MVE IL a %- 9 eIS


Sons Company, ,
.~rb~~r~i~k~~t)~I


Headquarters for +

stiller's Pumping

Outfit.
o plant complete without one. *
idreds of them in use in Georgia, ..
rida, Alabama, Mississippi and
th Carolina. Write us for prticu-
and prices. We also manufacture
gines, Boilers and iigh i
Grade Machinery, f
well as carry a full and complete *
--stockof-
II Supplies, Pipe,
Boiler Tubes, Etc.
Advise your wants.

acon, -- Georgia.
A Leadfi Specilty of aN
s of Tak Werk far Twrpemtie Strae rureesf
L**8o*o, *9eoeog,@at


ARE YOU A SUBSCRIBER TO


thn C
h"auek.. ., t " > "
sre of thisOe 7 V Of
The Vmes will bel large
I he ,teet of th snort are anti
) th nts with pleasure.
W PL^L-DESERVED BUCOcss. lww1
Jacearvllle the Home or one of t0
Amerrea'. Lteadiea Trade Journals.
The We-kly Industrial Record of Jack- Flom
sonvUle and Savannah has taken its place Ali
among the leading trade Journals in the torsi
United States, and as an authority on lum- I
her and naval stores It is being quoted not amo
only by the best and most carefully edited I
class papers in this country, but by those
In Europe also A London trade paper fo
reaching this office yesterday gives liberal a fe
apace to the Record's views on maricet con- five
ditione. lot I
This week's issue of the Industrial Rec- and
ord is even better than usual, and it is
a strong and entertaining general indus- trial
trial newspaper. In addition to its value HS
as the champion of the two specific indus- .
tries It represents. It Is brimful of new Johr
stories of development In the Southeast. plait
among them being the story of a half-mill- fend
Ion-dollar corporation organized In Jack- Ge
monvlle yesterday. and the organization of H I
several other big corporations during the and
week in Georgia and Florida. w
It has set the pace for enterprise, and It Wait
well deserves the great measure of success wick
it is receiving, both in its subscription and
advertising departments.carrying as It does.
perhaps, one of the largest advertising pat-
ronages given to any of the Southern tr .
Journals. m.
str,
DOATU OF A. J. .AIiNFBSi In
erty.
waUse at h1t -4aStre
---e TlWh Metal .. enln t
Ssines. who. This
-iU nedrt


THE RECORD?


I









20 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commissary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market. fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 27
A. C. Creamery, 80 " .. 28
10 .. 29
A. C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream.......... 13

Lard
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... Market
S 50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-lb tin. ...........


Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........

Sugar


Granulated
.4


16


Sugar, bbls.....
5 bbls..
10 bbls..
sacks..


16


500
495
4 95
500


Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb ................. 30
Simon Pure, 80 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ........ 10
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 8
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages....... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ages.............market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 14
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 50
SEnglish B'fast, 10 lb.. 45
Formosa, 10 lb....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 5 and lOc size
10 lbe to case, per pound'.. 40

Salt
200-lb sack................ 100
100-lb sack................ 50
Ice Cream, 200-lb sacks..... 100
S 100-lb sacks..... 50
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-lb.... 2 65
" 2-lb.... 275

Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin.............. 21
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box
sifter top, per doz...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and 80

Corn


Car Lot
W. Corn,llOlb, 143
1001b, 1 29
Mxd corn,ll01b,1 14
S 1001b,1 25


100 Sk
Lot
1 45
181
140
1 27


Less 100
Ski
1 48
1 34
1 43
1 30


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon....

Oats


Car Lot
W clip'd,1251b,2 20)
1001b,l 75
White 1251b, 2 10
White 10011). 1 (67
Mixed 12511 2 5
1001b, 1 64


IW0 Sk
-,t
222
1 77
2 22
1 6t)
2 7
165


Less 10 .
Sk Lots
2 25
1 80
2 15
1 72
2 10
168


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
-IA.* 4,+ I r* .lo Tl .- r* ;-


Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice .... 1
fancy..... 1
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..

Flour
Highest Grade Patent in )bbls
per bbl................ 5
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 11 sack.........5
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-11) sacks............ 5
Pillsbury's Best .....6
Pillsbury's Best bbl ..
Flour, Gold Medal .. -.- .... 6
bl .... ..
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 3
92-lb sacks........... 1


65
70




75

75

75
00

25



50
50


Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 60
92-lb sacks....... 1 60

Rice
G ood ...................... 5
Choice...... ........... 5
Fancy Head........,...... 6
Broken .... .. .. ..... 8

Canned Vegetables

Tomatoes, 3s, Chief........ 90
Tomatoes, 2s ........ 80
Clayton, 3s................. 45
Clayton, 2 ............... 70
Sifted Peas, 2s ............1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes. 2s .......1 20
Lima Beans,2s ............1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8s........... 90
Baked Beans, Is........... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s.......... .. 1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s........
SBeauty Beets, 3s..........
SSauer Kraut, 3s .......... 85
Sauer Kraut, keg.........
Pumpkin, 3s ...... ...... .. 90

Hay


car lots N1O bale
lots
Choice.. .. 19 50 2000
No.1 Tim. 18 00 18 50
No. 2 17 00 17 80
No.1 Cl'ler 17 00 1750


less,
quantily
20 50
1900 1
18 o0
1800


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz.... .... 1 40'
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz.......... ~ 00
Peaches, 28, two doz to case,
per doz......... ..... 1 90
Peaches, 3s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s percase3 85


Candy
Mixed 30-lb pails, per lb...
10--lb "
Gum drops, 0-lb 1 ails, rer
lb .................. .
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb.................
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box.
assorted, per lb........

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb.......
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb.......
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes.
Ex. Choice '" "
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.... .4
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes... ..2
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lh. packages
Ev. Apples, 24 2
Currants, cleaned, 36-lb. case 3
Prunes, Calf cleaned 2f,-lb
bL.x, 40-50............ .
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 50-60 ............
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-1b
box, 60-70..............
L. L. Raisins, 3 crown..... 1
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ...... 1
Seedless, 1-lb packages ....
Citron. 10-lb box ......... 1

Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound....
Extra H P, "
Seed Peanuts, ...
New IVuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxos.........
Almonds.............
Brazils ...... ............
Peacans.. ..............
Filberts..................
alO nuts..................
Cotton Seed Meal


Car 100 Leo s 100
lots Sk. Lot Sk. Lo
Cottonsred Meal 27 00 27 50 28 00
Hulls 11 50 12 50 1800


9'

84
18

25
25!
.801


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop ........2 20
"' 3 hoop ......
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz. ...... 1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
." nested ......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 60
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. .. 1 20

Washboards Do,
78 Crown Combination.... 2 20
178 Blue Jay...............3 00
175 Diamond Glass .........8 25
0. W. D., 17 inch, per doz 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75


Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
doz. ................ 95
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 75
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 8 65
Salnio" Is, Tale 4 doz to case
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon, is, 4 doz to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz
Beard ley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 31b...... 95

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box............. 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8


52 Kingan's Meats.
60
'"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge ... 141-4
l "Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avge .. 14
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avge 131-2
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge.. 91-4
7-.. -Reliable" California Hams, 6-8 9
u.reakfast Bacon, light av. .... 131-2
8.. i. S. Bellies, 16-18 av. ........ 83-4
S'D. S. Bellies, 20-22 av. .......... 81-2
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av......... 81-8
90 D. S. Plates .................. 71-2
12 Bacon Plates .................. 81-2
50 U. S. Butts .................. 63-8
SBologna Sausage ............... 7
Sausage in oil ................$3.75
o6 !Butter and Cheeae.
5 "Strawberry" Creamery, 60-lb tubs 25
30-lb tub 21-
.60, is... 261-2
i ladybird" full cream cheese .. 121-2
Kinan's arnl


-indiana" Pure Leaf ........... market
.,ea-Foam" Compound .......market.
Kingan's Canned Meats.
-Reliable" Corned Beef, Is ...... $1.26
Corned Beef, 2s ...... 262
Roast Beef, Is ........ 1.2
Roast Beef, 2s ........ 2.25
Potted Ham and Tongue
1-4s .......................... 36
Sliced Beef, 1-2a .. .. 1.1
Vienna Sausage, 12. .. 8
S Tripe .................. 1.0


GET A COP1r OF TEE NATAL STORM BLUE BOOX I


I -1 .a)o ul u u~l


1





THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
** ^ - * ^ 9.A a L.1 9 A ?


*.q.~.~q t I~~..~IVV~ *V.W** ~ q**~93~~~
rr r r)~iyiw~i ~i~ i^- 9ii( i~wiw~ii^wiw~^* rrv*** ^* *** * **** **4*** *****
U
4
*
President, W. C. POWELL: Vice-Presidents, who with the Prepident constitute the Directory and Board of Managers, W. F. COACHMAN. B. F. BUL-
LARD. H. L. COVINGTON, H. A. McEACHERN, JOHN R. YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, C. DOWN-
*
4
ING.J. SANDES. B.ROGRS;Audior.JOH HENERSN.
*a


CONSOLlOATED NAVAL STORES COMPANY,


J csonuille, Flu.


Savonna G


penscol, Fl[.


, N!RLR STORES FROTORSJ


i in i B oilol I locK, 2,500.000.


Owned n Conolled i Prical opealors


mSi llll i lofi Yel in Reseve 1o iell lo p0er11 ors IWo In AIxage I t Biy.


The Consliiolel is Purely a Cooerlive Commny.


0 Ihe Plrodcers.


11ls Inltrel re lical W1th Tose


Tle Polironge o 0 Tllurpelin Oper1ors eveiywhere Inri


Ple of Money inl Plell o0 limber 1or ielio.


YARDS AT JAIKSONYlE, SAVANNAH, FRNANDINA in PENSAIOII.


I ll PrOcers ore Mnvle to Gall or gCores on
,, II o. 1l-1 0 1 9 1;-- 9 I !- I IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE." 9 9
I I I I | I < | 1 < !* THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."


At& I tAL*


~ ,,--~----,.,,,l-lr~~---r





22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Flavius T. Christie, Frank C. Groover, Marshall W.
President. Vice- Pres. Sec. and

THE HRIIE-GR R DUG GO.
^< ... . .-


Stewart,
Treas.


Fuel and Building Material.
The Southern Fuel and Supply Co.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


W Wnoilesal DlUgiSS Naval Stores Market
Jlnillen\ i\. -FiG and Stock Report
Published Daily in The
Re Soli,.l Td lor ,uaber 1d Ttinije CMo SSir Doilienl. Jonvi l Iio
Muilnit imkillidi. eill iiit 1Twlve t onS ix te hourOsIll a ihead poan th


Cochrane's Book Store.
Wholesale Stationery, Fishing Tackle, Pipes,
Notions, Stencil Ink Brushes, Lumber Crayons.
PALATKA. FLORIDA.
Write for Prices. Have hundreds of articles suitable for the Commissary Trade.


Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.
'$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.


JOSEPH D. WEED. W. D. KRENSON BIG PRIZES:
J. D. WEED AI CO. A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Expositicn, to
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA. Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Wholesale Hardware, Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
W aascription contest. Write for particulars.
Bar, Hoop and Band Iron. Carter & Russell Publishing Co.

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc, Jackso.ville, Florida.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department


OF


THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.


I SPECIALTY 13 MADE OF DISIGNING, REITOCHING IH EMBEISHING PHOTOGRAPHS IDM PICTURES.
WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.

A Florida Enterprise. Try It.


I YOU DOT D IT T W
IF YOU DON'T FIND IT IN THE RECORD WRITE U&


IN








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 23


McMURRAY & BAKER,

w Mill n Turentine Harness. Coiner Bay dtrt
Sow1 gill ON 111 lmpCII Hll 'Liberty Streets,

We a* reedving daily up-to-date pleasure and bumneas veheles, 1MI tyles
Iaprobe, whips, harness and bore furnllhings, we have a nobby line Prtw
and Sood in touch with al. Turpentine wagons and hanes a specalty. Don't
forget we can beat the world on hand- made harness.

IcMURRRr BIKER, 401 I1 413 T BLR ST.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The Clyde Steamship Company


BLAKESLEE PUMPING OUTFIT.
This outfit can be directly connected to a pump and will \
supply sufficient water for general farm and household mue.
Why not have a water works plant of your own at a small
cost, and this is the most desirable power for use in case
of fire or other necessity; it can be started at a moment's
notice. You don't have to wait for the wind; it's always
ready for workL
419 E *"Theengine can Instantyl be made ready for other pow-
er purposes, such as grinding feed, churning, etc., by dis- O
connecting the pump. This outfit Is simple, durable, economical, easily operated, *
and ready for work any minute. No country home is complete without this ideal
labor saver. We build a complete line of pumping plants for mines, irrigation. *
fire protection, railway supply, and install water works plants for city service.
Will be pleased to furnish any additional Information on request.
WHITE-BLAKESLEE MFG CO. Birmingham. Ala.
Builders of the Blakeslee Gas and Gasoline and Connected Outfits.
X:..::.:* ::*K++ 2<+:-> S++ 4-S+++uo <4^S""


J. R. TOLAR.


J. H. HART.


T. BLACHLY.


J. R. TOLAR, JR.


(Established 1872.)

TOLAR, HART & CO..
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnificent steamships of this line are appointed to sai as follows, calling
at Charleston, S. C. both ways.


F em New York,
(Pier as North River).


STEAMER.


Pr o Jacksonville for
Charleston and New York.


Commission


Merchants


and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on (onsignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


"The" PAINT STORE,
I. E. BAIRD ( t CO.. Jacksonville, Fla,
\ all paper, pictures, frames, painting and all interior and exterior decorating.
Hardware, glass, etc. If you are building a fine home, get Baird & Co. to do
tne decorating' that it may be in keening with the building,. Oldest and most ex-


Tuesday, Mar. 15, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ....Sunday, Mar. 20, at 6:00 am perienced house in F:.rida.
**HURON ..Monday, Mar. 21, at 6:30 am
Wednesday, Mar. 16, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS, ....'luesday, Mar. 22, at 7:30 am
Friday, Mar. 18, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ..Wednesday, Mar. 23, at 8:30 am w. H. Huger, W. T. Riley, 0. J. ove
Tuesday, Mar. 22, at 3:00 pm .......... ***SEMINOLE, Sunday, Mar. 27, at 12 n'n President. Vlce-President. Seey and Treas
Friday, Mar. 25, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ....Wednesday, Mar. 30, at 4:00 am
Sunday, Mar. 27, at 3:00 p. m. ........ IROQUOIS, Saturday, April 2, at 6:00 a.m.
*ALGONQUIN .... Saturday, April 2, at 6:00 am
Tuesday, Mar. 29, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Sunday, April 3, at 6:30 am I
Friday, April 1, at 3:00 pm ....COMANCHE ....Wednesday, April 6, at 9:00 am (INCORPORATED.
"xHURON Wednsd'y, April 6, at 9:00 am (INCORP
Tuesday, April 5, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ......Sunday, April 10, at 12:30 pm MlIl 1I
Tuesday, April 5, at 3:00 pm ."SEMINOLE ....Sunday, April 10, at 12:30 pm K 111
Thursday ,April 7, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ...Tuesday, April 12, at 1:30 pm D LERS RI l 01 C
Friday, April 8, at 3:00 pm ......ARAPAHOE Wednesday, April, 13, at 1:30 pm
***ALONQUIN ..Friday, April 15. at 4:00 am
Tuesday, April 12, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ....Sunday, April 17, at 5:30 am
Friday, April 15, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE .. Wednesday, April 20, at 7:30 am
"xHURON ..... Thursday, April 21. at 8:00 am SIIS TURP E B ELS S I.
Sunday, April 17, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ....'Raturday. April 23, at 10:30 am WITH ISTRIBUTI POIS TURP BRRS OWS
Tuesday, April 19, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAIIOE .... Sunday, April 24, at 11:30 am
Wednesday, April 20, at 3:00 pm ..'"*SEMINOLE .Monday, April 25. at 12:30 pm
Friday, April 22, at 3:00 pm .COMANCE .... Wednesday, April 27, at 1:30 pm ATLANTA. COLUMBUS, BAINBRIDGE. MACON. BAVANNAH. VALDOS
*ALGONQUIN .... Friday, April 29, at 4:00 am TA. TTFTNON. HAWKINSVILL GA.; OCALA. PENSACOLA. LIV OAK
Tuesday, April 20, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ........ Sunday, May 1, at 5:30 am LEESBITRG, LAKE CITY, JACKSONVILLE. TAMPA, FLA:; MONTGOMERY.
Thursday, April 28, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS ....Tuesday, May 3, at 7:00 am ALA.: CHARLESTON. S. C.
Friday, April 29, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE ..Wednesday, May 4, at 7:30 am
"*xHURON ........ Friday, May 6, at 8:30 am ALL ORDERS TO ABOVE POInII' OR SAVANNAH OFWICM WILL U WCr
PROMPT ATTENTlIOIN.
X-Freight only. *-Boston via Charleston and New York. PROMPT ATT
--Boston via Brunswick *'d Charles ton. *--Boston, via Charleston.
THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES. SS LOLLOQ _2 LLLLL9Qs oQ 2JU J Q OL(Loo jS..jtojjs _o.o_..O.j99. .p 0
DIreet Service Between Jacksonvltle, Boston and Providecee amd all Eat-
P s, all..*at C.harleston ot W.ay. : SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
SEI-WEEKLY AILING. SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
Southbound.. .. ...... .. .. .... .. .... .... .. .. ..From Lewis Wharf, Boston 30 YEARS RELIABILITY.
Northbound.. ...... .............From foot of Catherine Street, Jacksonville
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE Hess lager,
Between Jaelrks.a ll and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor. St. Francis. Beresford (De Land) and Intermediate Diamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry 3
landing on Bt. Johns river.
landings on W_ Johns river. ' CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND 11 & 13 MAIN. o
STEAMER "CITY Of JACKSONVILLE" s- ns s -a-ar-
is appointed to sail as follows: Leave JaIksonville, Sundays, Tuesdays and Thurs-
days, 3:30 p. m. Returning. leave Sanford. Monday, Wednesdays & Fridays 9:30 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND.7 NORTHBOUND,
Read dow II Read up.
Leave 2:3 p. m.1..... ............. .Jacksonville .................. Arrive-00 a. m.
Leave 8:5 p. m.I... ......... Pat................... ...... Leave 8.00 p. m. E a st L u m b e r
Leave 3:0 a. m. .............. ..........Astor............. ........ .......Leave 2:30 p. m.
Leave 430 a. m......... ...s .........St. Fancs..................Leave 1*00 p. m. ROUGH AND DRESSED
........ .......... ... ... ....Beresford (DeLand)...................L.eave 12:00 noon
Arrive :30 a. m....... .... ...... .......Sanford......... ......... .......Leave 9:30 a. m.E .
Ar. 10:00 a. m. ...................Enterprise..................... .Lv. 10:00 a. m. LONG LEAF ELLOW PINE.
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE. 204 W. Bay St.. Jack'vllle.
F. M. TRONMONGER. JR.. Asst. Genl. Pass Agent. 204 W. Bay St.. Jacksonville. Fls
w. G. COOPER, JR., Local Frt. Agt., Jack'vlle. C. P. LOVELL. Asat. Supt..Jack'villl Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Foot Hogan Street. Jacksonville.
A. C. HAGGERTY. G. E. P. A., New York. CLYDE MILNE, G. P. A.. New York. Steamer Shipments a Specialty.
TiEO. o. EOER, WM. P. CLYDE & CO.
General Manager. General Agents.
Chesebrough Building. 19 State Strect. New York. W ATERTOW N, FLORIDA.

WRITE THE RECORD FOR ANY INFORMATION DESIRED.








24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J H CLOSBY. President


CM NFULLER. Vice-Preskidnt


JAS F LANE. Secy & Treas


Incorporated
1896


Deplanbueisit


Greenleaf -

Crosby Company


Diamonds
Stones


and Other Precious


Fine Gold Jewelry


3ebfeknr anb

bilberromitfr


41 West Bay Street

Jacksonville

The latest and finest sto. in this part of he
soutdae States. Prompt attention to mail orders


Write for Catalogue


is -

~------~ - p7-Val4.


American and Foreign Watches
and Clocks


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


Fine China Dinner Sets and
Fancy Pieces


European Novelties


m-------- ---e eeead eea*****e


"THE COUNCIL TOC
of Wananish. N. C.,
* Formerly of Councils Station. N. C., are still selling
S Hacks at 16.00 Black Joe and Standard at $5.00. Old S
S Pullers at $800 a dozen. They should average a little be
0 We have brought out a new brand, the Blue Line Hacks
* ers at 8.00 which are warranted. All wholesale dealers
supplies carry our lines and should supply operators.
* ...w # w ,, wgq3,,I*e3**,,,,,


D. G. McKETHAN, President.
Jacksonville, Fla.


ALFRED A. McK
Ret'd Sec'y and
Engineer. Fa


Pine Product Construct
INCORPORATED
Faeyetteville,. N. C.


Spirits of Turpentine, Oil of Tar, Creosote, Tar, Disinfectants; Wood Preservative,
Paints. Wood Stains, Etc.. and Charcoal, from Lightwood Stumps. Box-facings.
Profits increased. Time of distillation reduced. Condensation controlled at will.
No danger from fire. Plant erected complete, and men taught the process. Fur-
ther Information, write Alfred MacKethnn. general manager. Fayetteville. N. C.

THE PHILADELPHIA TAILORS
JOHN B. CAINGAGLINI & BRO.,

MERCHANT TAILORS AND IMPORTERS


48 W. Bay Street.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


* eA***m**e**)~~~'*llE**~l**d*d6 *.


CaddaCg


Il BROADWAY AND 23d ST.,
HOTEL BARTHOLDI, BROADWAVAND STd
HOTEL. II L I NEW YORK CITY.
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout.
Near all Big Stores and Places of Amusen.-2,t. Cars Pass
the Door for a!l Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings.
Large Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
find no grand and magnificent decorations. no luxurious
grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
Speak to You. No Employees In Any Way Inattentative.
But just a cozv, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the
hearts of those who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plain American cooking, and affable and courteous treatment.
MTOM ROWLEE, Proprnitor.


toe


LI 111wummuw...-1 ------ - ----- D


11 11 i 11 1FT IlVY 111111 I rll 11 111 11 ri TT I I I 1 11T Ili 11TT111 IT1T ] i

L CO., John R. Young. President. C. S. Ellis. Vice-President.
J. W. Motto. Jr. Secretary and Treasurer.
Diamond EdgeYOUNG
tyle and Patent
tter than ever.
at $8.00 and Pull-
in naval stores
__ Commission Merchants
ETHAN, L't U. S N.
Treas. Coantructing NAVAL STORES ACTORS
ayetteville, N. G.
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

iOn Co. |Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.

t inl lit ill il ll l11, i iit lit I i n l li t i t I ill 111 I ll Ill ll111111 I ili


EIm(lmmmYUmIu'Ym mIWmninumlI~m mIUI' '() Y'U


J. W. HUNT. President
P. L. PsACOCK, 1st V. P"


J. M. HARRIS. 2d V. Pres. C. R. SHOUSE. See. & Tres.
W. J. KZLLY, 3d V. P. H. L. RICHMOND. Asst Sec'y-Treas


Peacock-Hunt & West Company,
General Offices: 20 Bay Street, E,, Savannah, Ga. and
GWest Bulldin~ Jacksonville, Fla.
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutual. We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that buys spirits
Turpentine and rosin.)


WHOLESALE GROCERS,

Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our Specialty
-SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wilson & Ghilds'
Philadelphia Wagons.

Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga., and Jacksonville
and Fernandina, Fla.


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