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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00067
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 8, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00067
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text





L. LIBRARY

"THE PINE AND ITS PRODUCTS." AP 13Ts





WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

Adopted Sept. 12, 1902, by tbe Executlve Committee of the Tmrpentlse Operators' Associatlon as Its Exclusire Official Organ. amn Adopted Sept. INSf. 1902. in Amls Cm..
rention, as an Offcll Organ Also of the Seneral Association. Adopted Spt. II t. 1903, as the only Official Organ of te Turpentine Operators' Associatim.
Adopted April 27th. 1903. as the Oficial Organ of the Inter-State Cane Growers' Association. Endorsed by tAe Seorgal Sawmill Association.


VOL 8. NO. 15.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA


APRIL 8, 1904.


SAVANNAH, GA.


$3 A YEAR.


SWHi E SPRINGS, FLORIDA; And The Neighboring Towns.

By Ralph Edwardes, Special Staff Correapondent of the Industrial Record.


The last Monday in March was doing its gases, vitalized with the hidden forces of Acid, Oxygen,
best to be chilly and disagreeable when nature, laden with the vigor drawn deep ents, as per
the writer got off the train at Watertown. down from the bosom of Mother Earth, bined as follow
The chilliness was not felt long as the bursts through its rocky barriers and Potassic Chlo
warm welcome of Mr. John Paul and his brings health and healing to those that Sodic Chlorid
son, Mr. R. H. Paul, soon melted it. It bathe in and drink its waters. It has Organic Matt
was interesting to go over the East Coast a temperature of 12 degrees, making it Magnesic Sul
Lumber Company's plant-entirely own- warm enough for the most delicate, al- Sodic Carbon
ed by the Paul family, because it is com- though provision has been made for baths Calcic Carbon
paratively a new one and is perhaps the heated to any desired degree-for those Ferrous Oxide
best equipped mill the writer has seen. who prefer them. The following analy- .........
Every new machine or device that may
facilitate work is to be found there and
the completeness of all the arrangements W hite S l r S
there reflect much credit on the young
Mesrs. Paul. The mill is charmingly
situated on the bank of a pretty natural
lake and easily manages to eat, up 600
trees a day, making about 100,000 feet.
The East Coast Lumber Co. have about
50 miles of railroad and in addition to
making lumber, do a very rage turpentine
business. This branch of its business.
too, is handled in the same up-to-date
manner; last year 30,00 Herty cups were
installed, this year the company have
used 150,000 more. The result will be
that the Pauls will he harvesting tur-
pentine from the same trees when the old
style operator will be hunting new fields.
The East Coast Lumber Company em-
ploy 500 hands.
Thence a move was made to Lake City.
the county seat of Columbia County and
the home of the University of Florida.
While there your correspondent had the
pleasure of meeting Dr Thomas H. Talia-
ferro, president of the University Fac-
ulty, Mrs. Taliaferro and many of the
professors, by whom he was treated with
unusual cordiality. The president kindly The Swiming Pool.
showed him over the college grounds and
the experimental farm and conclusively
showed the wonderful progress the Uni- sis shows the exact properties of the Silicic Acid
versity is making. The Messrs. Lang of spring: Prof. N.
the Seminole Lumber Company, are old One million parts contain Solid Mineral
friends of the Record and showed many contents, 188 parts co-i.tilg -of-- As will be
courtesies. Sulphuric Acid .................. 17.02 spring is a
Thence a trip was made to White Chlorine ......................... 12.24 dyspepsia, k
Springs. To say that the writer was Lime ........................... 44.00 and all ne
astonished at what he found there would Magnesia ....................... 8.51 strange to
be no exaggeration. The first visit was Organic Matter .................. 21.32 he is on th<
naturally to the spring. Here rushes Phosphoric Acid, with Oxide of Iron wannee Riv
through a large pool, forty by sixty feet, trace .............................. wherever En
a plunging volume of sulphur water, bub- Salicic Acid (Soluble) ........... 14.40 tiful rapid
bling from Mother Nature's laboratory Potash ..................... ...1. 7.13 White Sprin
and pouring into the Suwannie River Soda .................... ........ 18.20 sequently n(
twenty-five thousand gallons a minute. Carbonic Acid .................. 44.18 mosquitoes.
This water, strongly impregnated with In addition the water contains free spending a
sulphur, bubbling with )health-giving gases, viz: Hydrogene Sulphide, Carbonic net! Summ


SNitrogen. The constitu-
analysis, are probably com-
ws, per 1,000,000 jarts:
ride ............... 11.32
e .......... ..... . 11.23
er ................. 21.32
phate .............. 25.53
ate ................ 20.91
ate or Bi-Carb ..... 80.50
(Phosphoric Acid trabe)
1............. . .40


(Soluble) ........... 14.40
A. Pratt, M. D., Chemist ,
Atlanta, Ga.
readily seen from this, this
specific for rheumatism, gout,
:idney and bladder troubles
nervous maladies. It seems
a newcomer to realize that
e banks of that famous Su-
er, whose name is known
iglish is spoken, and a beau-
running stream it is. At
gs there are no swamps, con-
malaria and, better still, no
Just fancy the pleasure of
summer without a mosquito
ed up in a sentence the writer


knows of no place where one can so en-
joyably spend a summer. There is the
spring, beautiful walks, good fishing and
hunting and all in a section so heallay
that White Springs with a population of
about 1,700, has no cemetery. There are
churches, stores, a bank and a remarkably
good normal school, presided over by
Prof. A. W. Jackson, with eleven assist-
ants. In coming here the visitor does not
have to pay the exobbitant rates so gen-
erally demanded at resorts-of this lass.
Everything is at a reasonable price and
the little town is full of reasonably priced
hotels. The largest of these is the Ham-
ilton, built and managed by Jno. 8. Bow-
en. This is a new, modern high-class ho-
tel, standing on the highest point for
miles around, overlooking the town and
the Suwannee and still close to the
springs. It is built with particular care
to comfort, all outside rooms, 10 feet
halls and over 4,000 feet of broad piazs.
It is lighted throughout by electricity,
having its own plant; plenty of private
baths, electric bells and open fires, and
Mr. Bowen devotes his whole time to
seeing that his guests have every comfort.
The Pritchard House, conducted by Mrs.
Pritchard. is being enlarged to accommo-
date the demands of its guests. Invalids
have every comfort there and the table
is furnished with all the luxuries obtaina-
ble. The Pritehard is close to the springs
and intending guests may feel sure of
being taken good care of by the pro-
priet esn.


Next to this hotel stands the Oaks,
now being completed by Mrs. M. C. Skip-
worth, who will personally manage it.
Mrs. Skipworth has determined that if
new furniture, good rooms, every ob-
tainable comfort and unremitting court-
esy will fill a house, she intends the Oaks
to be packed.
The Kendricks House, managed by Mrs.
J. B. Roberts, is another hotel that has
made an enviable reputation with guests.
It always has been full and the proprie-
tress states that it will not be her fault
if it is not this year. One of her guests
last year was Capt. W. J. Hillman, a
well known turpentine operator.
The New Paxton, owned and managed
by Mrs. E. H. Paxton, is a commodiou
home-like place, where every comfort is
given the visitor. Mrs. Paxton is well
known to the traveling .public, as her
(Continued on Page .)


9 9 0 9 111 : 0000690000*,3


off@ #*0#@off1~~~~~,+1~3 ~ ~ Ft~i~~ 9C





2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


C. B. ROGERS. PInsIDENT.


W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, VICE-PREBIDENTS.


C. H. HODGSON, Sac, and Taxas'l.


DIRECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one Three-Story Billding, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; one one-story building, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind In the South.


CONSOLIDATED GROCERY


CO.,


i Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
I Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola., Fl., nd Savannah. Ga.

S-T--- ** HE RywCOD WILL BE WORT* DOLLARS TO YOU EVERY WEE.w
THE RECORD WILL BE WORTH DOLLARS TO YOU EVERY WEEL







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 3


TURPENTINE CUPS.

If you expect to use the HERTY cup
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices and all infor-
mation cheerfully furnished on

CUPS, GUTTERS and all TOOLS
used in the Herty system of turpen-
tining. Address

CHATTANOOGA POTTERY CO..


DAISY, TENN.


111111 I I l 1tr l1 1 I I IIItt! II II I t I I I I --IIIII- 1 I I I-
- W. W. CARNES,. Pres. W. C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T DUDLEY. See. a Treas

Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
T Hardware
Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

SLarge Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
- and Pullers on Hand.

STAMPA, FLORIDA.
1itt 1 I :1 II It11 1 II I I I111t 1 l 111 111 11 I t I


... NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA. U S. A.


JOHN R. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD,


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.
DIRECTORS:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. 1- SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


B. F. BULLA RD
W. C. POWELL.
WALTER RAY.
A. D. COVINGTON.


H. L. KAYTON,
Secretary. and Treasurer.


J B CHESNUTT
o W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revi-ed.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.


-*-**-*---- -*---*W*W


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
Jacksonville, Fla.
CAPITAL S300,000 X SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS $300,000
Strength and ample facilities. Business solicited. Prompt attention to collec-
tions and business of customers not living in Jacksonville. Best Safety Deposit
Boxes for rent.


------------------~~9~;+3;3



W. R. THOMA5

GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons. Harness and Buggies.


ZINC NAILS
FOR
Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the eajLy Msaf which aill not injure
saws when left in the trees.
Salem Nail Co.
279 PeAwl St. New Yor*, N. Y.
Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc, Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.

Grivot; Typewriters
Dyl-.Upchsurch Building,
Jacksonville, Fla.
All makes.
For $1.oo will send you one of our best
ribbons, and I dozen of our best carbons,
and a catalogue of the best typewriter
in the world-The Wonderful Oliver
Typewriter. It writes in sight


BOWEN & CO.


Jacksonville, Fla.


Osteopathy.
The New Scientific Treatment
of the Body.
DR. JoHN \W PHELPH.
Chronic and Nervous Troubles
DR. ELIZABETH BRIGCa MCELWAIN.
Diseases of Women and Children
211 W. Adams. Jacksonville.


I THE CANNON COMPANY


CAPITAL PAID
IN $19.500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barrels hold and will pass the se.
verest American and European inspection.

Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, QUITMAN, GA.,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address orders to home office,
QUITMAN, GA.


TO TRADE WITH
R. J. RILES.
Railroad Watches,
Diamonds and Jewelry.
226 WEST BAY SI RET.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
Watch Repairing A Specialty.


New Victoria.
Corner Main and Adams.
Jacksonville's New HoteL
Rates $2.oo to $2.5o.
R. BIXLER, Proprietor.

KIRK & JONES
DRUGGISTS.
107 E. BAY ST.

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Best in the World.
For delivered prices write,
Cypress Tank Ce, MeobAla.


lID IMn Work SD W I CI.
BUILURO AND DOALAR8 11


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton Saw,w Fertilizer, Oil and lee M-
teiery, and Supplies md Repalr
CAPACITY FOR HANDS.
Maebine Tools. Wood-Working MaeMa-
ery, hafttin. Pulleys. Hangers. Leathr
and Rubber Belting and Home, RBllro4
and Mill Iupplj1m and Tools.
Plans and estlmates trmlahe for POWa
Plants and Steel Brildg
ateam Pumpjs eead Water Heaters a
Hotatlu g ntnes
AUGUSTA, GA.


THE RECORD IS THE SOUTH'S GREAT TRADE JOURNAL.






4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SJ. A. Craig (UO, Bro.
3 239 W. BSy Street EVERETT BOCK.
2


Leaders in
ing and


Men's and Boys' Fine Clo
Up-to-Date Furnishings.


Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the (


S



th~.


ity.


)RTGAGES.
WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,

Real Estate Broker.


W. FORSYTH STREET,


IRENTS.


JACKSON4VILLE, FLORID.


H, A, Renfroe Co,


T. MURPHY
Jacksonville
Machine and Iron Works
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat and Sawmill Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron and
Brass Castings, Phosphor-Bronze Journal Bearings.
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


Standard Clothing Company


SOne Price One Price
* S
FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
Stetees and HIawes Hats. Special Attention Given to Mail Orders.
*************************h** *********************
k ,*,**k* **.*ft,*>ft,**.**.k
r)~~)))~H)))I N~_)~~))I


Do You Want


to Sell


Your Saw MIII or Tie Timber?

Do You Want to Sell your Tur-
pentine Location ?


ff so, write us, we are In touch with many Northern, Western and
. Southern Millmea who want to buy.

|Brobston, Fendig &Co.
Brunswick, Ga. and Jacksonville, Fla.
* s


Cable Address. Florida

*Standard Naval Stores
SCompany.
DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY INj
S S
ROSIN
AND TURPENTIN E.
Jacksonville. Fla.
I ;****@****O T9 9@****99 99*a@@@OO9* ei* <'*


TAILORS


uits to Order at ReadyMade Prices
439 W. Bay Street.


Stetson Hats


Mail Orders Given Personal Attenion.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


P rin ti g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.

M. A. BAKER,
InveTter and
Manufactrer of the
Baker Improved
Seemless Turpen-
tiue stills.
Write me for prices ad ofiti
F. O. B ay Forint in Geora. Flor-
ida., Alabanja or MlississipPi. Ale
stills sold under a guarmate.
Job woik through the
--- ..- country a specialty.
The Larglet and Oldest Copper unswi G
Works in Georgia. trunsw C, GO.
Or My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.

;=;gSK8iM~aaruLari8&^M8Mfcpam^


W. H. BECKWITH- W. B. HENDERSON. G. C. WARREN.
SBECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.
LARGE TRACTS OF TURPENTINE AND MILL LANOS.
Rooms 1-2-3, FIrst National Bank Building.
TAMPA, : : : : : FLORIDA.

4i 111111 Il llII 11 11 II III I lllllltiilll 11111111111

SMcMillan

: Bros.
Florida Cop-
per Works.
Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
General Metal Workers.
- Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
Patching through the country a specialty.
Orders by mail or wire will receive prompt
attention at either of the following works:
- Fayetteville. N. C. Savannah. Ga
Mobile. Ala.. / Jacksonville. Fla.
SIr ll-ll _l Is I l I I I a Is li I I i ti ll I I 1 l iIIt w


DON'T FAIL TO MENTION THE RECORD TO ADVERTISERS.


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


SAVANNAH'S COMMERCE.


Report of a Year by President Purse of
Board of Trade.
The twenty-first annual meeting of the
Savannah Board of Trade, which was held
at noon Wednesday, was largely attended.
President D. G. Purse read his annual re-
port in which he said: "The year has been
a satisfactory one in the naval stores
trade, prices of both spirits and rosins
having been well maintained. While the
receipts of rosins and spirits have been
disappointing in volume, Savannah's po-
sition as the leading naval stores port
and market has been fully maintained in
the volume of her receipts and the fix-
ation of prices, a position that will be
difficult to wrest from her on account
of her splendid harbor facilities for eco-
nomically handling and dispatching busi-
ness."
The new process for accumulating the
gum has proven a success and much is
expected from it. It is a decedid improve-
ment over former wasteful methods, but
it cannot be claimed that the experiments
to extract spirits of turpentine and other
valuable products from stumps, and other
heretofore rejected waste matter of the
yellow pine, have yet shown an accom-
plished result upon an economic basis for
commercial profits." * *
Referring to the cotton industry, Pres-
ident Purse said: "The South has expe-
rienced another year of fair prices for her
products, infusing new life into agricul-
tural pursuits. This has been especially
true of cotton which, it is hoped, has
permanently risen to a higher plane of
values, for there is no product of the
soil with which the prosperity of Savan-
nah is so closely interwoven as with cot-
ton, contributing as it does more than
all other things combined to make Savan-
nah one of the great ports of the world,
for which she owes so much to the Sa-
vannah Cotton Exchange, which has
guarded the growth of this leading fac-
tor of commerce with intelligent foresight
and unceasing vigilance against the ag
gressiveness of rival ports and former
antagonism of railroads in their compe-
tition for traffic. The advance in prices
has not been entirely due to the work of
speculation, but much of it is undoubt-
edly due to a better appreciation by con-
sumers of the true situation.
"The exports of lumber, the report
stated, from this port, domestic and for-
eign, for 1903, reached 208,000,000 feet,
board measure, being an increase of 20,-
000,000 feet over 1902. Business in this
industry has been satisfactory and prices
-well maintained.
The jobbing trade shows a steady in-
crease from year to year, and its general
character is satisfactory to those engaged
in it.
The rice industry on the Atlantic sea-
board has had unfavorable weather at
home, and a large yield in Louisiana and
Texas to make the season an unsatisfac-
tory one in its net results."
The report referred to the invitation
of the Mayor to the Board of Trade to
co-operate with the city in a movement
to secure appropriation from Congress
for increarg the depth of the river chan-
nel to the ocean bar from twenty-eight
feet mean high water to thirty feet mean
high water. The report further said:
"Lieut. Col. J. B. Quinn, Corps of En-
gineers, U. 8. A., in charge of river and
harbor improvements, has been zealous


and forceful in reporting to Washington
upon conditions existing at this port, and
has been always earnest and untiring in
getting the best results from the appro-
priations at his command." Capt. Purse
then touched upon the selection of the
Panama canal route, and the advantages
that would accrue to Savannah from the
building of the waterway.
The recent visit of President Samuel
Spencer and other officials of the South-
ern Railway was commented upon as
being a forerunner of the further exten-
sion of the road to the territory in and
about Savannah.
The committee of the Board of Trade
having in charge the naval stores exhibit
at St. Louis, of which Mr. John R.
Young is chairman, was thanked for the
efficient manner in which the work was
carried out.
The report closed as follows: "The
unity of thought and action with our
sister body, the Chamber of Commerce,
has been able to inspire the community
is shown in the excellent results of their
labors laid before the recent annual meet-
ing of its members. They have done
much for the city in broad and far-
reaching lines, and laid out for themselves
in their second year a still wider field
of activity. May complete success at-
tend every effort made by them for the
upbuilding of Savannah."
The report was the thirteenth by Pres-
ident Purse, and he announced his re
tirement from the position just before
the conclusion of the meeting.

Planters' "Old-Time" Remedies.
In this issue appears the advertise-
ment of Planters' "Old Time" Remedies,
manufactured by the Spencer Medicine
Co., of Chattanooga, Tenn.
These well known remedies are among
the oldest in the South. The many years
that they have been on the market have
proved their efficacy, and they are no
longer an experiment. The company
does not claim them to be "recent dis-
coveries" of untried merit, but that, on
the contrary, as their name implies, their
origin goes back to the olden time, when
everything depended upon its merit for
popular approval.
The four principal preparations put up
by this company, Planters Nubian Tea,
Benedicta, Cuban Relief, and Cuban Oil,
have become household remedies in the
South, for the diseases for which they are
recommended, and might appropriately
be called in the medicine world "The Big
4". Wherever they have been tried, these
medicines are as popular as that genial.
jovial salesman, Mr. F. M. Plank, who rep-
resents the company in Florida. We be-
speak for this company a liberal share of
the patronage of our readers.


H. ROBINSON Pres. H. GAILLARD. Cashier
W. B. OWEN. Vice-Pres.

Commercial Bank,
State Depository.
BBANCHS; Ocala, Fla.. Lake City. Fla
Jacksonville, --- Florida



'/2 Your Herd!
You can find it among our Shorthorn or Here-
ford bulls. The choicest of breeding and rare in-
dividuality. Ready for service, and will price
them right. Will hold our spring auction about
April i.
PALMETTO PARK FARM
Z C. CHAMBLISS a CO.,
Ocala, Fla.


C. H. HARGRAVES CO..


WHOLESALE GROCERS


Grain, Hay. Feed

Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514 516-518 520- 522- 524- 526 EAST BAY S IRLL I

Jacksonville, Fla.


.#e4.a*4ses e$*e 444.* e*.*e #* .o* .*.*ee.oetee
4 4

SJ. S. Schofield's Sons Company,

*++++ S- Headquarters for

Distiller's Pumping

Outfit.
* No plant complete without one.
* + Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
S, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
. Soth Carolina. Write us for pArticu-
* lars and prices. We also manufacture

Engines, Boilers and High
Grade Machinery,
Sas well as carry a full and complete .
stockof
Sf. Mill Supplies, Pipe,
JBoiler Tubes, Etc. *
SiAdvise your wants.

S.. Macon, -Georgia.
*A Leadig Specialty of -a
eMis of Talk Wrk fr Trpes~Store rae Pres
**.**<. fr^^r4 ******


FIND SUBSCRIPTION BLANK FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE.


I ---------- -"---~--------------





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saerek- of this 7 K 3
The mes will bc large
the teee of th sport are ant
th h nts with pleasure.
WBLL--DSEBRVeD 1O RCOCSS. Ilwl
Jaeksnvnlle the Aome Of One o f ie
Amersei's Leadlan Trade Jourmal. Ploe
The Weekly Industrial Record of Jack- Grei
sonvllle and Savannah has taken its place All
among the leading trade journals In the .
United States. and as an authority on lum- RI
ber and naval stores It Is being quoted not aRi
only by the beat and most carefully edited am
class papers in this country, but by those Is
In Europe also A London trade paper
reaching this office yesterday gives liberal a ft
*paoe to the Record's views on market con- ve
ditlons. lot
This week's issue of the Industrial Rec-. and
ord Is even better than usual and It Is Th
a strong and entrtalnling general Indus- trial
trial newspaper. in addition to Its value HR
as the champion of the two specific Indus- vs .
tries It represents. It is brimful of new Johr
stories of development In the Southeast, plais
among them being the tory of a half-mill- fend
Ion-dollar corporation organized In Jack- G
sonville yesterday, and the organlzatlon of H I
several other br corporations during the and
week In Georgfa and Florlda. w
It has set the pace for enterprise, and It Walt
well deserves the great measure of success wick
it Is receiving, both In Its subscription and
advertising departments.carrying as It does.
perhaps. one of the largest advertiing put- ,
ronages given to any of the Southern trad .
Journals. aso
ODAYT or A. j. 9AIUw 1f In
erty.
w*me at Nlates.-4rWin It
Tlas Uerl Stre
o*a,. who- This
'-i1 nsed,
V%^AA~ ~~ ------










TTTE WEEKKLY IMUSTRtAL UECOkD.


WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.
(Continued From Page 1.)

husband managed the Blanche at Lake
City. The Paxton can accommodate one
hundred guests. All these hotels are low-
priced, in fact living at White Springs
is cheaper than keeping house in Jackson-
ville.
To go away from White Springs, with-
out referring to the large mill operated
by Messrs. R. J. & B. F. Camp, would be
like going to Washington and not seeing
the Capitol. Dr. Camp has a fine mill
there, complete in every department, cut-
ting from 80 to 100,000 feet a day. The
Messrs. Camp make a specialty of manu-
facturing berry and fruit baskets and
crates, for which they have a steady de-
mand The mill is running full time and
keeps their log trains on their 35 miles of
track busy. It is very noticeable that
no profanity is ever heard or permitted
in the Camp yards and works, and every-
thing moves along in quiet and regulari-
ty.
The readers of the Record are assured
that they can find no better place to cheat
summer of its sting than by going to
White Springs.


Should be the Wife's Money.
On our recent trip to Kansas City we
saw along the line of the railroad numbers
of cars built for the express purpose of
shipping poultry These cars were filled!
not by those who made poultry an exelu-
sive business, hut by a few from this
farm and a few more from that. They
went from the farms to the packing
houses and from there thousands of them
came South to be sold in markets that uoi
farmers should supply. The money that
should belong to the wi es and daughter-
of the farmers of the South (for these are
everywhere the "chicken men") goes tt,
buy pianos for the wives and daughters
of the farmers of the North and West
while uors run the scale of the washboard
or beat time with a battling stick, because
times are hard. It may look like a smala
business, but the chicken crop of the onm
State of Missouri is worth more than on.
of half a dozen of that State's leadin..
products, and so it should be with us.--
The Stockman.


Jacksonville Wholesale Lumber Market.

(For week ending April 9.)
(Corrected for the Industrial Record each
Week).
Merchantab'e.
iard schedules-$10.50 to $13.00.
Sound and square schedules, j.50 t(
$12.00.
Merchantable car material-
Average schedule of sills, u; feet anid
under, 10 inches and under, $13.00 to
$14.00.
Special schedules- according to sizes
and lengths-prices steady.
K. D. Saps-'-i" and up 80 per cent
clear, $9.50 to $10.00.
Flooring:
$11.50; No. 4, $8.50.
Cypress.
First and seconds, 4 quarter base, car-
load prices, $34; selects, 4 quarter base,
No. 1, $15.00; No. 2, $13.50; No. 3.
$28; shop, 4 quarter base, $20.
Cypress Shingles-6xl8 A's, per 1.000
pes., $5.25; primes, $4.25; 4x18, A's, $3.50;
primes, $2.75.
Cypress :aths, $2 per 1,000.
Cypress market strong. Mills have
more orders than they can fill. Prospects
good for higher prices. Dry stock scarce.


Buyers' Directory

These advertisers are in this issue. If
you want anything, look through this
classified list and write to the firm ap-
pearing therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.

AUTOMOBILES.
Fred E. Gilbert, Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
commercial Bank. Jacksonville, Fla.
Central National Banr;, Ocala, Fla.
Mercantile Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of .Jacksonville.
BOOKS.
Cochrane's Book Store, Palatka, Fla.
BRICK.
Geo. R. Foster. Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
The Southern Fuel & Supply Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
CARS.
South Atlantic Oar & Manufacturing Co.
Waycross, Ga.
CATTLE.
Palmetto Park Farm, Ocala, Fla.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
J. S. Pinkussohn Cigar Co., Jacksonv:lle.
CLOTHING.
II. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
J. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
M. W. Larendon. New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
COOPERAGE.
The Cannon Co., Quitnan, Ga.
Union Cooperage & Supply Co., Savan-
nah. Ga.
Quitman Cooperage Co., Jacksonville.
DRUGS.
Conover Drug Co., Jacksonville.
The Christie Groover Drug Co., '. altron-
ville.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
The Covington Co., Jacksonville.
ENGINES.
J. S. Schoflelds' Sons, Macon, Ga.
.John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
FEATHERS.
Florida Ostrich Farm, Jacksonville.
FOUNDRIES.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works, Tifton, Ga.
T .Murphy. Jacksonville, Fla.
J. S. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
The Southern Fuel & Supply Co., Jack-
sonville.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
II. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE
C. H. Hargraves Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville.
Ellis-Young Co., Savannah, Gae
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga
White, Walton & Co.. Jacksonville.
J P. Williams Co.. Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
HARDWARE.
Thomas Roberts Hardware co., Valdosta,
Ga.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Itond & Bo-rs Co., Jacksonville.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., ValdsMta. Go
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
J. D. Weed & Co., Savannah, Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, F:a.
HARNESS.
McMurray & Baker. Jacksonville.
W. R. Thomas, Gainesville, Fla.
HATS.
1. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville.
.1. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville.
HOTELS.
Hotel Bartholdl, New York City.
Zahms' European Hotel. Jacksonville.
New Victoria Hotel, Jacksonville.
The I(aks, White Springs, Fla.
'I lie Hamilton.. White Springs, Fla.
The' New Paxton, White Springs, Fla.
'ThI- Kendrick House, White Springs,
Fla
Pritchard House, White Springs, Fla.


IRON WORKS.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works, Tifton, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
T. Murphy, Jacksonville.
J. S. Schofield's Sons Company, Macon,
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville.
R. J. Riles. Jacksonville.
LIQUORS.
F. Bettelinl. Jacksonville.
Chas. Blum & Co., Jacksonville.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville.
Bowen & Co., Jacksonville.
LOCOMOTIVES.
The Cincinnati Equipment Co., C'necn-
nati. 0.
MACHINE WORKS.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works, Tifton. FIl
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta. Ga.
T. Murphy, Jacksonville.
J. S. Schofield's Sons "-nmpany, Macon,
Ga.
MATERIALS 1OR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
J. S. Schofield's Sons & Co., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
M. A. Baker, Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros.. Savannah. Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas Roberts Hardware Co., Valdosta,
Ga.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.. Valdoeta,
Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
'lamnpa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
J. S. Schoflelds' Sons, Macon. Ga.
MULES AND HORSES.
I)illon & l'enuel, Marianna.
W. R. Thomas. Gainesville, Fla.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
The Barnes-Jessup Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville.
The EUis-Young Co., Savannah, Ga.
Peacock-Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Ca., Jacksonville.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ahla
OSTEOPATHY.
Drs. Phelps & McElwain, Jacksonville.
PECANS.
The Griffing Bros. Co., Jacksonville.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta,
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas Roberts, Hardware Co., Valdosta,
Ga.
Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., T'ampa. Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
J. S. Schofielde' Sons, Macon, Ga.
lVhite-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
iFrel E. Gilblrt, Jacksonville.
PAINTS.
I. E. Baird & Co., Jacksonville.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville.
RAILS.
Isaac Joseph Iron Co., Cin~ciatI, O.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Tpa'pa.
Fla.
Brobeton. Fendig & Co., Jacksonville.
C. Buckman, Jacksonville.
W. W. Frazier, Jacksonville.
The West-Raley-'Pannie Co., Jacksonville
ROOFING TIN.
American Tin Plate Co., New York City.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
The Covington Co., Jacksonville.
STATIONERY.
Cochranes' Book Store, Palatka, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
The Clyde SteamsMip Co., New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Samuel P. Holmes & Co., Jacksonville.
TAILORS.
John B. Ciancaglini & Bro., Jacksonvine.
TANKS.
G. M. Davis & Son.. Palatka. Fla.
Cypress Tank Co., Mobile, Ala.
J. S. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon Ga.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
National Transportation & Terminal Co.,
Jacksonville.
TOOLS.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
The Council Tool Co., Wananish, N. C.
TURPENTINE CUPS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Daisy, Tenn.


TURPENTINE PROCESS.
The Pine Product Construction Co. PFay-
etteville, N. C.
The Pine Belt Construction Co., Raleg%.
N. C.
The Standard Turpentine Co., New York
(Cty.
TURPENTINE STILL.
M. A. Baker, Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah. Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
G. M. Davis & Son, Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS.
G. M. Davis & Son, Palatka, Fla.
TYPE WRITERS.
Grivot Typewriter Exchange. Jaeksj.vjfli
UNDERTAKERS.
Chas. A. Clark. Jacksonville.
VEHICLES.
McMurray & Bro.. Jacksonville.
W. R. Thomas. Gainesville, Pia.
WATCHES.
R. J. Riles, Jacksonville.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co.. Jacksonville.
Hess & Stager, Jacksonville.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fla.


Business Directory.

CHARLES A. OLARK.
FUNERAL DIRECTOR AND EMBAIAMMR
and 42 W. Forsyth St.. Jacksonville, ia.
Telegraph orders receive prompt atten-
tion. Open always.

JOHN ZAHM'S EUROPEAN HOTEL
128 E. Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant. Nicely Furnibhe
Rooms. Open day and night. Bettlinl's
old Stand.

CONOVER DRUG COMPANY.
Stores Bay & Julia. Bridge & Adams Sta.
Send us Your Mall Orders.
WE ARE PROMPT.

J. S. PINKUSSOHN CIGAR COMPANY.
61 W. Bay Street, Jacksonville. Fla.
THE BEST OF EVERYTHING
TO SMOKE AND CHEW.
The Largest Tobacconists In the South.



M. W. LARENDON,

Naval Stores

Commission Merchants.
ROSIN, TURPENTINE, TAR, PITCH,
GUM THUS, RICE, ETC.
138 Front Street, NEW YOR.



BAILY MOTGOMEiRY,
Commission Merchants.
Neavel Stores & Cotton
Liberal advances made against sip-
ments. Consignments solicited.
COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING,
NEW YORK CITY.




Trade Checks

FOR THE


COMMISSARY BUSImEIS.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, anpcolor, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Industrial Record Go.,
JACKSONVILLE, IFLORIM.


WHEN WRITING ADVERTI SERS MENTION THE RECORD.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7



SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY

SWaycross, Ga.
ScIMANUFACTURERS OF

Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.

Located In the heart of the Lumber District gives us advan-
tage of choicest material at lowest cost.


LUMBER NOTES.
The temporary receivership of the
Kirby Lumber Company, in Houston, Tex-
as, has been made permanent.

Lumbermen have their difficulties same
as other people. In the legal journals
we find every now and then some poor
fellow has had to pass under the bank-
ruptey act. But, taken all in all, when
we consider the complications involved,
the amount of capital tied up and the
snares that beset it, the lumber business
has fewer bankruptcy cases than any
other.

Did you ever notice that as soon as a
lot of Hoo-Hoos get together, some fel-
low gets hungry, and before they sep-
arate they usually sit down to a feast
of good things?

Keeping posted on the standing of cus-
tomers, especially where a credit is in-
volved, is one of those things that rack
the lumberman's brain.

The Central Lumber Company, of 1I
Madison Ave., New York, is a recent ad-
dition to the wholesale lumber trade of
Gotham. It is composed of veteran lum-
bermen in the metropolitan district, such
as H. E. Stevens, Henry C. Morris and
IL E. Stevens, Jr.

The Dorminy-Price Lumber Company,
of Broxton, Ga., made an extensive tim-
ber deal last month, purchasing a large
tract of timber from the Ocmulgee River
Lumber Co., involving several thousand
acres of yellow pine timber.

Revised figures show that Savannah
shipped 208,250,839 feet of lumber last
year; 181,408,486 feet being coastwise
and 26,842,353 feet being foreign ship-
ments.

The sawmill of D. F. Wells at Gum


-PRICES RPIGT. Whiskies, Gins,


S|Rums,

C from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866 and
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
ws-v-----w -. Whiskies

Branch, Ga., was burned last month. controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
The Wilson Cypress Co., of Palatka, nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
has acquired several tracts of timber land Prices on application.
near Hastings, on which a mill is to be
erected for additional operation. S
CHAS. BLUM & CO. .
Big Florida Deal.
Kissimmee, Fla.-The United Land 517 aad 519 West Bay Street. 0
Company has sold all of it holdings in JACKSONVILLE, FLA
Osceola County, with the exception of FL
St. Cloud, Kelleys and some lanu around
Runnymede, to the Consolidated Naval NEW YORK LUMBER QUOTATIONS.
Stores Company. This is one of the larg- Pine, Yellow (Long Leaf.)
est land deals in the State, and probably By Sail.
means that the lands will be placed on Building orders, 12 in. and under, $20.50
the market so that the citizens can se- to $22.50.
cure pasturage. Building orders, 14 in. and up, $26.00 to
Cattle are fattening very fast, and it $29.00.
Yard orders, ordinary assortment, $20.50
will only be a few weeks before the town to $22.50.
of Kissimmee will be supplied with fine, Ship stock, easy schedules, $26.50 to S
fat Florida beef. $27.50.
Ship stock, 40 ft. average, $30.00 to $35.00
Heart face siding, 1 in. and 1 1-4 in., $20.50 *
The Northern Lumber Market. to $21.50. ,
In New York yellow pine schedules for 1 in. wide boards, heart face, $26.00 to S
small stuff are easily placed, and prices $28-00
are fairly satisfactory. Big stuff is ex 1-4 and 1-2 in. wide boards, $28.00 to
tremely firm in price and difficult to 2 in. wide plank, heart face, $30.00 to S
place. $31.50. =
In Philadelphia yellow pine is in de- Kiln dried sap siding, 4-4, $18.00 to $18.50.
mand, small as it is, and the results of Kiln dried sap siding, 5-4, $19.00 to $20.00.
mand, mall as it is, and the results of yellow Pine Box Boards (knotty) $1350 0
some of the inquiries that have been fig- to $14.50.
ured upon for a couple of weeks are being Yellow Pine Stepping, $30.00 to $35.00.
shown. A strengthening in the tone of By steam, add $1.00 to $1.50.
quotations is noticeable. Long Leaf Yellow Pine Flooring.
quatiCons is noti e lear Heart Face Rift DM&HBk 13-16x
In Baltimore the marked impetus given 2 1-4 counted 1x3, $44.00 to $45.00.
to the lumber trade shortly after the "A" Rift DM&HBk 13-16x21-4 counted
fire gave rise to considerable activity and lx3, $32.00 to $33.00.
"B" Rift DM&HBk 13-16x2 1-4 counted
the stocks in hand were drawn upon to 1x3, $26.00 to $27.00.
a large extent. The delay in the adop- "A" Flat DM&IIBk 13-16x21-4 counted
tion of a comprehensive plan of improve- 1x3, $21.50 to $22.50.
ment for the burnt district and the con- "B" Flat DM&HBk 13-16x2 1-4 counted
sequent halting of construction work has Nx3 $19.50 to $2050.
No 1 Common DM&HBk 13-16x2 1-4
checked this tendency for the present counted lx3, $18.50.
and just now the business is rather quiet For 1 1-8 in. add $2.50.
with values firm. Steamer shipment on flat grain flooring $1
In Buffalo reports indicate a big sea- less per thousand than above prices.
son ahead of the lumber trade. Winter
sales have been curtailed on account of The Cedar Creek Lumber Company has
the cold weather, while indications point been incorporated in Mount Vernon, Ala., C
to a general building activity in the East- with a capital of $10,000, to do a gen-
ern States. eral lumber business.
WHEN WRITING ADVERTISZ S lNI TION THE RECORD.


1904 EDITION

Lumbermen's

Yellow Pine and I

Cypress

Reference Book
"THE BEST BOOK OF
ITS KIND PUBLISHED"
AND

Ulmer's Yellow

Pine Code
A Complete and Comprebenaive
Teleraphic Cipher Ctde, esec

ments of the
YELLOW PINE TRADE

PRICE LIST.
Lumberman's Yellow Pine and Cypress
Reference Book, 1904 Edition,
Separate from Code for Inspectors,
$ .50 per copy.
1.25 per 3 copies.
$2.00 per 6 copies.
Ulmer's Yellow Pine Code combined 0
r with Reference Book under same coy-
8:.00 per copy.
5.25 per 3 copies.
09.00 per 6 copies.
Delivering Charge- Prepald.

BENJAMIN F. ULMER g
COMPILER and PUBLISHER *
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIA.





S0. R. FOS JR.
MANUFACTURER 01


RICK.

WRITE FOR PRIWS.
capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.

'PHO 30.









8 TIHE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
NmmO


FLORIDA'S TOURIST TRADE.

The Money Value of this Feature of the
State's Resources.
In enumerating the many resources
that add millions of wealth to Florida
every year the Record recently mention-
ed the fact that the tourist trade was one
of the most important The tourist sea-
son will close this month, and we have
been at some pains to gather data on
which to base an estimate as to the mon-
ey value of the tourist trade this season.
The hotel register at the Windsor shows
that about twenty-five thousand guests
have taken their ease therein since last
November. Other hotels in this city will
probably show another twenty-five thous-
and. Private boarding houses will prob-
ably add another ten thousand to this.
Total, about sixty thousand strangers
within our gates this season. Through
trains have carried at least twenty thous-
and to points south of Jacksonville, with-
out stopping here.
The validating agent at the upion de-
pot reports having validated 7,000 round
trip tickets so far, and while he has no
means of knowing whether that be a half
or a third of the whole, considering the
thousands that come on straight tickets
and return at leisure by another route,
probably twenty thousand is a safe esti-
mate of those who did not stop in Jack-
sonville. This would make a total of
eighty thousand tourists in Florida this
season.
The average time they remain in the
State is about a month. Many stay all
winter and some spend only a few days,
or make only a flying trip. Aside from
what is paid to the transportation com-
panies and to the storekeepers for sou-
venirs, comforts, etc., the average daily
expense of a tourist is about two dollars
and a half. He pays out therefore seven-
ty-five dollars in hotel bills for his
month's dtay in Florida, and probably
twenty-five dollars more for cabs, curios-
ities and sight-seeing. Total, one hun-
dred dollars per tourist.
Therefore, 80,000 tourists, each expend-
ing $100 in Florida, leaves with us eight
million dollars.
These figures, as stated above, are ex-
clusive of traveling expenses, and are
based on what would seem a most conser-
vative estimate. Some tourists spend,
of course, a great deal more than others.
Some live at hotels that cost $40 a week
and more, others at hotels that cost only
$15 a week, and yet others in boarding
houses and hotels in smaller towns at an
expense of not more than $10 a week. To
say, taken all in all, that each individual
tourist, averaging time limit, and includ-
ing men and women, young and old,
spends an average of $100 in Florida is
making a low estimate and yet a reas-
onable one.


Florida Truck in Frosen Boston.
Cabbages are a little easier on account
of the increasing supplies of green stuff
from the South, which many consumers
prefer to buy than to pay extreme fig-
ures for cabbage. There is also quite a
lot of rather poor new cabbage from Cuba
and the South, the new selling little, if
any higher than the best of the old. Par-
snips are a little lower on account of
large supplies of fresh-dug roots from
New Jersey and Philadelphia. It looks as


though parsnips could not be dug for some
time in this section. Workmen digging in
the streets of Boston report about four
feet of frost. Southern spinach is of good
grade and very plenty, over three hundred
barrels having arrived by boat Tuesday.
Hothouse stuff mostly ranges high.
Growers say coal costs almost as much
as it did last year, the lower price per
ton being offset by the larger quantity
needed.
Old cabbages continue in active demand;
Florida more plenty and lower; steamer
stock seldom exceeded $2.50 to $2.75, and
rail receipts sold mainly rrom $2.75 to
$3.00, though a little fancy brought $3.25
and more. Celery more plentiful and
easier. Eggplant dull. Lettuce firm and
high. Peppers weak. Peas firm for faney,
but poor drag. String beans in good sup-
ply, but few show quality to command
outside figures. Tomatoes are in quite
liberal supply and selling slowly unless
very fancy.
Colorado growers have had good success
in shipping seed potatoes to the South
in cars heated by stoves. Dealers at Mich-
igan shipping points are paying farmers
85 cents for potatoes and buying all they
can get. It looks as if imports from Ger-
many of potatoes were about done for the
present, since prices there are as high
as here, after paying expenses of ship-
ments. The demand for seed potatoes is
reported brisk, the price for Maine stock
in New York being $3 to $3.50 per barrel.
Indications are for a heavy planting of
potatoes this season in all parts of the
country where this crop is usually grown.
Danish cabbages are about used up. This
is the first year since 1898 that many cab-
bages have been imported.-American Cul-
tivator.
New York.-Receipts of oranges were
heavy, which was something of a surprise
to the trade, as the impression was that
arrivals would grow less from now on.
However, the increased supply did not
affect the market. Slick Indian River
fruit sold up to $5 and ordinary down
to $3 to $3.50, while russets held steady
at $2.25 to $2.75. These prices were ob-
tained from the store trade.


NO FRM ************************

NO FRRM "SBW
A QffOVS OF

^mwAjw_ .


4


OWN


:They AreA *) W

GRIFFIN'S CATALOG
TELL8 ABOUT THEM.
STwenty leading valrleti of Pa ses.
Also a complete lie of Fruit amd 0
namental tree and shrbber.
* Catalogue Fmr.
Address
SrTm *RIFPfrIw BROS. 00..
IAOIKSONeVIULa. P A.


Wanted and For Sale


DEPARTMENT.

Advertisements Will be Inserted In This Departmet t the ollowing Rates:
For one week. 20 cents a liue.
For two weeks. 35 cents a line.
For three weeks cents a line.
For tour weeks, 65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Thuraday
morningg to secure insertion in Friday's paper.


Real Estate Catalog.
Illustrated real estate catalogue post-
!paid. Gteo. H. Chapin, Florida House,
St. Augustine, Fla.
For Sale.
Spirit and large dip barrels for sale,
with or without rims. Quitman Coop-
erage Co., Quitman, Ga.
Position Wanted.
Anyone in need of a first-class turpen-
tine woodsman, write to V. M. Marlow,
LaCrosse, Florida. References furnished.
Turpentine Men.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. 1 outfit pumps 2,000
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 cents and
requires no attention while running.
Sta: tel in one minute. J. R. Campbell,
)eala. Fla.
For Sale.
200 tons 48-1b. relaying steel rails West
Virginia and Kentucky delivery. 100 tons
6i0-lb. relaying steel rails, Southern de-
livery. 1.500 tons 56-lb. relaying steel
rails. West Virginia delivery. 150 tons 30-
lb. relaying steel rails, West Virginia de-
livery. Isaac Joseph Iron Company, 525-
53- llunt St., Cincinnati, Ohio.


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


Orange Grove.
Never frozen; 80 acres rich vegetable land
at Clearwater; 500 oranges, many 30 feet
high; 23 to 40 years old; netted $1,200
thi-s season; expect 1,500 boxes and $2,000
income next season; 474 other fruit trees:
house, barn, etc. Price $6,000. Details of
George H. Chapin, Florida House, St Au-
gustine, or owner, J. W. Kimbrough, Web-
ster, Fla.

Horses and Mules.
We have on hand at all times a well
selected stock of horses and mules for
saw mill and turpentine purposes. Can
please everybody in price and quality.
Will have a car of saddle and harness
horses at Marianna April 5th. See our
stock before buying. Dillon & Penuel,
Marianna, Fla.

Business for a Northerner.
In a perfect climate; store and fixtures
near station; postoffiee In store; also two-
story residence; double piazzas, shade
treis; 17 acres; 100 oranges; also fig,
persimmons, peaches, pears, etc. Cost
$3,4600. Price only $1,000. Details of
George H. Chapin, Florida House, St. Au-
gustine. William Arnold, Webster, Fla.


J. W. WADE,
Vice-President.


E... HUGHES,
Sec'y and Tress.


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.


DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.

Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.

Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


I- 11I I-I 111 1I h Il 1III 1111 I I1 i -II 1 4-II I ii II I I I I
" J. P. WILLIAMR. President J. A. G. CARSON. Ist Vice-President.
ST. A. JNNINGsa, 2nd Vice-resident. J.F. DUsrNBUs T.3d Vice-President.
SH. L. KAYTN, Secretary. D. G. White, Treasurer. -


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

N HIIL STORES ID COITONi FICTORS IHO IKI OESLE GRORS.E
WMain Office SAVANN4IH,. GEORGIA.
Brnch Ofi PrACrNVOLCA, FLX. I Branch Grocery Hous,
ranch orw JOAC KbONVILLE, FLA. ( COLUMUn, JU O.

Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Vs.
-it It tiit t t t1 1 t ir st 1 1 11 1II11 1 1-1- 1 -t 1 111111 11 11 i i I


THE RECORD KEEPS PACE WITH SOUTHERN PROGRESS.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


Exposition Notes.

Robert Fitzsimmons, the freckle-faced
pugilist from the antipodes, has obtained
a cafe concession on The Pike at the
World's Fair.

Forty cases of relies of the State of
Nebraska and the Mississippi valley will
be displayed in the Nebraska building at
the World's Fair.

Do not forget that when you plant out
fruit and shade trees you are not only
improving the appearance of your own
property, but also adding to the appear-
ance of the town in which you reside.


One of the odd specimens shown in the
United States National Museum exhibit
at the World's Fair is the restoration of
the stegosaurus. .It is life-size and is
made of paper mache.

A feature of Pennsylvania's agricultural
exhibit at the World's Fair is a series of
cases, showing birds, animals and insects
destructive to farm crops. The exhibit is
made by Professor Surface, the economi-
cal geologist of the State Agricultural
Department. It is said to be the most
complete collection of the kind ever
brought together.

Florida Horticultural Society.
Announcement is officially made that
the annual meeting of the Florida Hor-
ticultural Society will take place in Jack-
sonville April 26th to 29th inclusive, and
not May 10th to 13th as heretofore pub-
lished. The change has been made so
as not to conflict with the primary.
Persons interested in the society and all
cultivators of the soil ought to be, should
bear this change of date in mind and
so arrange their business affairs as to
attend the session. These reunions of
the growers are both pleasant and profit-
able.


FISH IN LAYERS.
"Speaking of catching fish," said J. B.
Thompson at the Windsor Hotel to a
party of friends, "My experience last
summer at Ocean Grove was a unique
one. My son and myself had set a line
fishing for cod, and baited the hooks
with sand eel. When running the line to
take in the catch we found one hook
with four fish on it. There was the sand
eel we used for bait, it had been swal-
lowed by a frost fish, and it in turn had
hen swallowed by a codfish, and that by
a head fish. As there is little to the last
named except his mouth, and he being
a ten pounder, he wound no difficulty in
getting outside the codfish.
"When we pulled the head fish in, we
had to untelescope them, drawing out in
turn the codfish, the frost fish, and the
sand eel. Just how long each fish en-
joyed his meal before he was in turn
enjoyed by his next outside neighbor, I
don't know, hut not very long, I guess,
for when we examined them, in no case
had digestion set in.
Somebody asked, "When you ate the
fish did you detect any difference in the
taste?"
"Well. yes. I thought the cod had the
taste of several kinds of fish."

There is a firm of lumber dealers in
Buffalo known as Chestnut & Slaght.
Good name for coal dealers.

THE OLDEST RECREATION.
The oldest entites we know anything
about are the stars. To look upon them
intelligently, that is, with some knowl-
edge of their groupings, characters and
names, is one of the most pleasing sen-
satios we know of. Time was when the
stars were men's only companions
When the shepherds watched their flocks
by night nineteen hundred years ago it
is fair to asume that the discurese was
about the magnificent celstoal panarama
that was spread out above them. And
this same panorama Is sppread out for
our dedication now every clear night,
and we can get as much pleasure from
gazing upon it as they did.


Notice Regarding Spirit Barrel Situation.
Savamwah, Ga., March 28, 1904.
S To Our Patrons:
In order to prevent the manufacture of spirit barrels being
monopolized, and customers of this corporation being annoyed by pos-
sible delay and trouble in securing their supply, to encourage and
maintain competition among the numerous factories, thereby ensuring
to the producers at all times i protection against excessive prices and a
better quality of barrel than if no competition existed,
We have Become Interested In the Barrel Maawfactsrnlg Buslness,
This corporation and some friendly associates have acquired a
large interest in the Montgomery Cooperage & Hardware Company,
who control and operate an up-to-date machine barrel plant at Mont-
gomery. Ala., as well as hand shops at Oeala, Fla. and Valdosta, Ga
The Jacksonville Cooperage Company, operating a barrel shop
at Jacksoi.ville, and owning an interest in hand shops at Live Oak and
Tampa, Fla.. is also closely allied with this corporation. All of the
above named factories propose to and are making barrels strictly in
accordance with the requirements of the Savannah Board of Trade,
and their barrels will be a good delivery anywhere.
The probable policy will be to eliminate all rebates and commis-
sions heretofore paid and give to the producer a good barrel at as low a
price as is consistent.
We will appreciate your patronage of the shops in which we are
interested, Yours truly,
J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY.
By J. A. G. Carson, 1st vice Pres.


NEWLY BUILT and FURNISHED.

-Write for particulars -


EVERY COMFORT


MRS. M. C. SKIPWORTH, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


KENDRICK HOUSE,

Headquarters for Southern Families.
GOOD TABLE HOME COMFORTS
... For particulars address...
MRS. J. B. ROBERTS, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


THE HAMILTON.

A New, Modern, High-Class Hotel.


ELECTRIC LIGHTS and BELLS


HOT and COLD BATSH


Table Unexcelled.


Every Attention to Invalids


MRS. E H. PAXTON, Owner and Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


THE TELFORD HOUSE

A Large, New, Three.story Brick and Stone Hotel, Newly Fur,
nished Throughout, All Modern Conveniences.
Rates $5.00 to $8.00 Per Week. $1.00 and $2.00 Per Day
CAN ACCOMMODATE 85 GUESTS.
W. B. TELFORD, Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.

A. S. PENDLETON, W. JOnuSON. JAS. LASSITER. W. W. STRIPLINO.
Present. Vice Pres. Gen. Manager. Asst. Treasurer.

5he W. B. JOHNSON CO..


Wholesalesl Grocers


D. M. FLYNN.
WALTER RAV.


"NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIE SUCCESS."


W. W. STRIPLING
JAS. LASSITER.


White Springs. Fla.
On the Suwanee River
The Great Health Resort of the South.
Sulphur Spring 25,000 Gaellns per Minute.
Healing Springs -- Forest Walks -- Shooting & Fishing
NO MOSQUITOES. NO MALARIA.
The Healthiest Summer Resort in America.


THE PRITCHARD HOUSE,


An Ideal Home for Invalids. First-Class Table
ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES.
Write for particulars. .
MRS. S. L. PRITCHARD, Proprietress. WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE OAKS.

A Typical Southern Home


--- For full information write-
JNO. S. BOWEN, Owner and Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE NEW PAXTON.

Commodious, HomeLike Hotel
ROOM FOR 100 GUESTS.


402-404-406-408 East Bay Street. Jacksonville, Fla.
DIRECTORS:
B. i. CAMP A. S. PENDLETON,
THOs DOWLIum, W. .)JOHISON,
N. G. WADE, PERRY r. COLESO%.








10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

fC* J. 56 Pa4rr. Anoan S. HUSBARD.*f ARTHURt F A 4ftY VAiii


J. IR PARooTT, ABcann S. HtBnAiRD. ARBTBU F. PaarB g
President. Vice-President. Cashier.
The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
3 JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
SCa.pita, $200.000. D OS A Surplus. $100.000
STATE DEPOSITARY.
SGeneral Banking. Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes. 6.00 per Year.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week


Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Prce Repts Sales Exp. 1903
Mon., April 4jN.D. 224 310 50
Tues., April 51 52/ 457 1821 295 50
Wed., April 6 521/ 603 550 71 50
Tlur., April 71 521/2 312 299 305 50

Rosin for the Week at Savannah.


Monday, Apri


N .. .. .. .. ..
W G .. .. .. .. ..




S.. .. .... ..
S . . . . ..
C ............

D .. ...... .
ABCl..es 215, re
Sales 215, receipts


1 4. Last Year.
4.10 3.60
3.80 3.45
3.60 3.35
3.35 3.20
3.30 3.00
2.95 2.85
2.70 2.40
2.65 2.10
2.60 2.05
2.55 2.00
2.50 2.00
2.50 2.00


1,090, exports 2,542.


Tuesday, April 5-Unchanged. Receipts
1,297, exports 1,650.

Wednesday. April 6--Unchanged. Re-
ceipts 616, sales 151, exports 5,482.

Thursday, April 7-WW and WG de-
clined 5 cents. Receipts 660, sales 272,
exports 330.

NAVAL STORES ON HAND
At six Southern ports at end of naval
stores year:
Turp. Rosin.
Charleston ................ 7 148
Mobile .................... 132 234
Wilmington ............... 527 35,847
New Orleans .............. 1,834 21,022
Brunswick ................ 638 5,744
Pensacola ................. 178 27,284
Stock on hand at Savannah, Fernan-
dina and Jacksonville has already been
given.

Bailey & Montomery's New York Review.
New York, April 6th, 1904.
Spirits Turpentine-Stock, 522 barrels.
The market during the week has been
another dull one, and at the expense of
values. This was owing largely to the
unsettled conditions of the Southern
markets.
Thursday, March 31-591-2 c. asked.
Friday, April 1-59 c. asked.
Saturday, April 2-581-2c. asked.
Monday, April 4-68" c asked.
Tuesday. April 5-58c. asked.
Wednesday, April 6-57c. asked.
Rosin-Stock, 17,810 barrels.
This market remains fairly steady for
all grades. The business done during the
week has been of fair proportions. We
quote:
AD, $2.80; E. $2.90; F. $2.95; G, $3.00;
H, $30.5; I, $3.30; K, $3.70; M, $3.90;
N, $4.05; WG, $4.20; WW, $4.50.


Tolar, Hart & Co.'s New York Review.
New York, April 5.
Spirits Turpentine---The market contin-
ues stagnant, there being nothing in the
outlook to induce consumers to anticipate
their wants. Weather continues cold,
delaying spring business. Stock, 829 bar-
rels.
Rosin-Low grades are scarce and
wanted at quotations. Mediums are dull.
Pales are steady. We quote:
BC, $2.80; D, $2.85; E, $2.90; F, $2.95:
G, $3.00; H, $3.00 to $3.05; I, $3.30; K.
$3.70; M, $3.90; N, $4.00; WG, $4.25 to
$4.30; WW, $4:60.
TOLAR, HART & CO.

DR. HERTY RESIGNS.

He Quits the Government Service to En-
ter into Business.
Dr. Charles H. Herty, who is well and
favorably known throughout the turpen-
tine belt as the originator of the "Herty
cup and gutter system" for turpentining,
has resigned as an expert in the Bureau
of Forestry and will hereafter devote his
entire time to business connected with
the manufacture, marketing and installing
the cups. So successful had been his work
for the Government that chief of the Bu-
reau offered him a flattering increase
in salary to continue for the present in
the service of the department. Dr. Herty
felt. however, that as the day of scientific
experimenting with cup system had largely
past. the question of greater importance
to the industry now was the application,
and as business man and not as a gov-
ernment social he could assist more in this
work.
The Record regrets to see Dr. Herty
leave the Bureau of Forestry, for his
labors under the ausplices of tlie govern-
ment, have been of incalculable value to
all turpentine men; at the .ame time it

recognizes the fact that for this system
decided action taken in manufacturing
and marketing the cups and gutters and it
believes, now that experiments are over,
that Dr. Herty will le of more value as
a business man than scientist, while no
less a scientist, when scientific work is
demanded.
Dr. Herty and his family will reside
for the summer at Green Cove Springs.'

Missouri Fraternal Congress day at the
World's Fair will be Monday, Septem-
ber 26.


FOR SALE. -
50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill S.35 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in the State.

C. BUCKMAN, mokonvrllo ;tr


Pumping Outfits E

Turpentine Stills
WITH FIRE PROTECTION CONNECTIONS.

Best PUMP in the World
From 40 to 700 Gallons of Water per Minute.
Write or call on
FRED E. GILBERT,
Automobile Headquarters
29 West Forsyth St.. Jacksonville. Fla.


R. S. HALL. Pres. T C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KNIGHT, Sec. and Treas.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,


HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.

Herbert A. Ford, Geo. H. Ford, F. L. WateM.
President. Vice-Pres. Cashier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITA L, $50,000.00.
I)IRECTORS: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Clarence Camp, J. K. Christian, Geo.
McKay, Geo. H. Ford. Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicited.

C. H. BARNES, Pres. J. D. SHAW, Vice-Pres RALPH JESSUP, Sec.-Treas.

BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.
Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Cqipany. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonville. Pensacla, Fernandina and Savannah
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
W. FRAZIER JONES. C. H. BARNES. R. JESSUP, W. H. BAKER.
President. Treasurer. Ass't Tres. Secriary.

UNITED GROCERY CO..

Importers & Wholesale Grocers
HAY, GRAIN and FEED.
Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
B. G. LASSETER. JACKSONVILLE FLA.
Vice P".a Gen. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

H. A. BRIGGS, President. HOMER BROWN, 2d Vice-President.
M C. BRIGGS, 1st Vice President. J. C. McDONALD, Secretary and Treasurer



W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.

HARDWARE, MILL and TURPENTINE SUPPLIES.

Council & Holmes' Tools, Bigg's Sterling and Perfection Hacks
and Pullers, Cutters, Files and Whetters, Glue, Batting
and Strainer Wire, Turpentine Wagon Harness
and Collars, Hoop Iron, Coopers'
Tools and Rivets.

Everything in Turpentine Supplies,

Send us your Mail Ordet

W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.,
VALDOSTA, GA.


THE RLTALTT ITTY OF OUR ADVERTISERS VOUCHD nOR.


~~~~~~~~~~~L~~~~~~~LI~~


NA-94- IRA 04 "A


I











TIME WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11


& P. HOLMES & CO.'S MARKET RE-
VIEW.
Stock.-Dealings in the stock market
have of late been a reminder in a modest
way of three years ago. The old time
stories of community of interest buying
and buying for control have again been
pressed into service and rapid advances
in individual issues have been the result.
The bulk of the business upon the stock
exchange has been between brokers who
usually act for important interests and
as the price changes for the week show
the purpose has been of such a nature as
to advance prices. To some minds the
dealings reflect a well organized and exe-
cuted campaign to advance stocks. To
others it appears that there has been buy-
ing with a more serious and permanent
purpose than that of making a specula-
tive turn. It looked last week at this
time, as though leading speculative in-
teresta had taken profits to a considera-
ble extent. In some respects it looks so
again now. The upward movement, how-
ever, was resumed with energy last Mon-
day, and there is no tangible sign that
this will not be the case again.
The manner in which activity and inter-
est has centered upon Union Pacific, St.
Paul and Southern Pacific, also Atchi-
son and Missouri Pacific to a lesser ex-
tent is certainly indicative of something
more important than a purely specula-


tive campaign. The report which has the day before will have plenty of chances
tickled most greatly speculative imagi- to get out at a profit. We don't like to
nation, probably because it is the most talk bull on cotton in the Spring of the
plausible of those that have been put year at 15 cents a pound It looks like
around, is that Rockefeller interests have financial suicide, but as far as evidences
bought considerable quantities of Union go, the crop is a short one and it's worse
Pacific There are important traffic ar- than financial suicide to be short. This
rangements between St. Paul and Union means traders while believing that prices
Pacific which are of great help to the are high and knowing they may slip off,
former road, and with the readjustment just as they have this week, still ad-
of the Northwestern situation through here to the buying side on good breaks.
the dissolution of the Northern Securi- Not buying on a bulge, but selling oiib
ties Company, coming ownership of Union cotton bought lower and waiting the
Pacific stock by St. Paul interests is chance to buy back on a weak spot.
conceivable with the desire of the lat- Caution on the buying side will return
ter. the money. Any unfavorable crop news
While the tendency of prices is upward, would start things going just as they
the thing to do is to follow the market did in the summer of 1900.
and trade on the long side. Wheat-The market has been quite ir-

Cotton.-The recession of 1-2 cent per regular, some strength appearing entirely
pound early this week was but natural on firm Liverpool bullish cash situation,
after the shop recovery following Sully's while a number of local operators were
failure. Neither the advance nor declines sellers especially of September on contin-
are as violent nor sudden as was the ued favorable reports from the South-
case when Mr. Sully was in the market west, although heavy snows in the North-
and although cotton cannot be said to west with seeding operations delayed
be a particularly safe trading commod- wai a bullish feature. The early break
ity under present conditions, it is rap- in corn created weakness for a while, but
idly improving in this respect. The im- the market was very stubborn and there
provement in speculative conditions is was a gosl commission house buying of
bound to be a market difference. old July with equally as good selling.
The small movement can be depended We look for an unsetled market, but
upon to hold the market for some time would favor purchases on soft spots.
to come. This means that the buyers Corn.-The market was very erratic,
on such a break as we had yesterday and j turning quite strong early but breaking


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.


SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE.


To United Kingdom, in gallons:
Month 0114-0 19-"6
April.... .... U1561 186,13
May.... .. .. .603215 9.22
June .. ...... 7k167 1.40186
July .... .... 710 13 281.14
August.. .. ...N .M 1.7 7J.4
Beptember..... 712.211 64257
Otober .. ....... 711.44 48.26
November .. 661,638 1,295,769
December .. 1,86IX 1,531,779


To Belgium and Netherla
Month ISM-04
April ........ M,8312
May .. .. ... 23.71
June.. .... ..... 507,11
July .. .. .. .. m1881
August...... .. 48.87
September.. .. 2,466
October .. .. .. 30,14
November .. 133,695
December .. 100,372

To Germany. In gallons:
Month IM-04
April .. .. .. ........
May .. .. ... M
June.. .. .... 11,00
Jly .... .... s..l11
August ...... 651.86
September.. 22.160
October .. ... 257.314
November .. 179,010
December ..


1111-63


1.562.550
1,66.576


922,991
576,784


nds, in galleis:
1902-08 3P01-04
90,447 Included
S61.12in all other
27,210 Europe
81,n7 3813M

7568201 438.21
210,00 121.480
349,726 381,22d
58,659 672,164


192e-8
114.034

331,172


351.64
110,153


To all other Europe In Gallons:
Month 19U-04 1914-0
April ........... 510 18,475
May.. .... .... 65858 31.047
June........ 145231 1.000
July ....... .. 560 124,24
August ........ 2000 2.56
September..... 42.1 38.040
October ...... 10,000 4.83
November .. 32500 17,800
December .. 47,306 89,591


1M1-02
IM412

421,05
78,787

711967
148.597
81,780

IN-

1901-01
20.065
574,11

40.482

21.00
17.650
94,837
23,000


To United
Month
April ....
May ....
June ....
July ....
August
September..
October ..
November
December


LROSINS.
Kingdom, barrels 280 Ibs:
903-0t 108-03 1

.... 6(,315 63222
.... 80,748 537,25
... 74.60 62.13
S.. 8,471 42.863
.. .. 4Ma 41.86M
71,107 95,735 8
61,455 64,455 7


To Belgium and
pounds:
Month
April ........
May ..........
June .... .. ..
July .... .. ..
August ......
September.. ...
October .... ..
November .
December .. 3


91-02

58,4
61,632
(6,al0

7MO
90,051
8,643
2,502


Netherlands, barrels 380


19034)4
16,70


42.036
056=1
46,321
37.131
3,991
17,077


19M02-01
616
63.715
526735
19,47
47.263
10.819
64.406
60,020
13,325


To Germany, barrels 280 Ib.
Month 16-04 192-08
April ...... .. 4568 37,844
May .... .. .. 35,281 88.4
June ........ 41,564 49,3
July ...... .. 100,2m 34,874
August ...... 78.814 34.921
September.... 1,157 96,4
October ...... 82,758 38654
November .. 50,763 42,841
December 15,407 39,171

To all other Europe, barrels 29 Ib
Month 113-04 1902-01
April ... .... 35,848 0,.142
May ........ 27,1 40,731
June.. ...... .. 14,044 9,82
July.......... 45,51 51,612
August .... .. 8,5 30,119
September.. .. 27,4 17,356
October ...... 34.438 15.442
November .. 13,328 6,415
December .. 25,299 48,701


Total Foreign Exports. In gallons, includ- Total Exports of Rosin, barrels 280
Ing everything outside of the United Including Asia Africa and Amer
States: side of the United States:


Month 1903-04 190-08
April ........ 514.08 56.815
May .... .. .. 1.73 20,144
June.. .... ....1.23,00 2.22.253
Jly .... .. .. ..181,s80 1,651.015
AMiUt ...... 1.734.15 25064658
pt ember.. .. .14 146 2,154.6
tob .. .. .. .4911 1.061.W2
November ..1,851,068 1,932,183
December .. 1,993,529 1,794,336


1101-2
914.616





1,662,74
1,869,175
21.47.382





1,859,175


Month 190304
April ...... .. 195g1
May .. .. .... .1m.82
June ........ 178,26
Jqly .. .. -- .. M.5O
August ...... A.156
September.... .33,850
October ...... 0S,8
November .. 184,860
December .. 210,457


19M-08
186.128
20,144
210.038
187,19u
228k,2
333,032
27E.735
231,543
202,056


1901-M2


badly, July especially, on heavy selling,
numerous rallies appearing however, but
the tone is heavy. It looked very much
as if Wall Street was a buyer of July,
but it was evident that Armour was a
seller on a large scale, but there is no
telling which direction his operations will
be connected. Many of the crowd are
all at sea, although a number of local
operators are bearish.
Provisions.-Packers were liberal sellers
of hog product and there is also com-
mission house liquidation. Shorts cover-
ed freely, but hogs were weak, cash de-
mand slow and Armour a seller, princi-
pally of ribs. Rallies are due.

Interest in the tupelo gum tree is in-
creasing, as other woods are growing
scarce. It is good to make into crates
and boxes, although we apprehend the
saws would gum while cutting it.


Sam'l P. Holmes& Co.
(Members New York Cottra Exchange)
Stocks, Bonds, Cotton,
Grain and Provisions.
Correspondents Miller & Co.
100 Broadway, New York.

New York Stock Exchange,
Members New York Cotton Exchange.
New Orleans Cotton Exchge,'
SChicago Board of Trade.
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Bell Phone'853 Baldwin Block


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE
Apr. 1 Apr. 3 Apr. 10 Apr. 17 Apr. 24 May 1 May 8 May 15 May 22 May 2p
ND ND 50 4 47 46 1-2 461-2 11-2 4f
June 5 June 12 June 19 June 26 July 3 July 10 July 17 July 24 July 31 Aug. 8
453-4 4 47 47 47% 473-4 48 s5 50
Aug. 14 Aug. 21 Aug. 27 Sept. 4 Sept. 11 Sept 18 Sept. 25 Oct. 2 Oct. 8 Oct. 15
52%-53 63% 62% 5% 64 -4 57 ND 6 s 67 1-2 66 1-2@0 -4
Oct. 22. Oct. 2, Nov. 6. Nov. 12, Nov. 5,Dec. 3, Dec. 10, Dec. 17, Dec. 31, Jan. 14
56 561-2 66 6 S6 56 66 1- 56 1-4 63 1-2-04
Jan. 22, Jan. 28, Feby. 11, Feb. 18,Feby. 25 Mch. 3 Mch. 10 Mch 24
(15 bZ 64 62 60 59 60 58


Mch. 30
57


ww


Included April 1....... ..3.90
all other April 3 . ... 3.75
Europe April 10 . . 60
40271 April 17 . s.50
April 24. . 3.40
34.737 May 1. . .. .335
2.01 May 8. . ... .35
31,504 May 1 . . .3.47%
20,940 May 22 . .3.65
May 29. ... . .3.65
June . . 60
June 12..... 3.40
1901-02 June 19. . ... .30
0.658 June 26 .... 3.30
657740 July 3 ..... .30
48,6 July 10 . ... .30
56,39 July 17 . .. 3.40
July 24 ...... .45
378 July 31. . .. 3.40
X5.12 August 7 . 3.40
23,373 August 14. . 3.50
6,482 i August 21 . . 50
SAugust 28..... 2.70
*: September 4. . 70
191-02 September 11. 3.80
6.,731 September 18 . 3.90
1.11u September 26. . 4.25
3.37 October 2. . 4.4
14,10 October 8 ...... 4.70
October 16. ... ...45
A5~B October 22 .... ..4.20
11.89 October 29 .. ......4.20
25,014 November 6 .... ..3.90
November 13 .. ....3.50
39,816 November 19 ......3.60
November 25 .... 3.50
pounds. December 3 .. 350
lea out- December 17 .... 3.50
December 10 .... 3.50
1901-0~ December 31 .. ..3.5
66.061 January 14 ...4.00
354K 0 January 22 .....4.50
January 28 ... 4.60
1I9, February 11 ..3.75
February 18 .. .3.65
Z1a.84 February 25 ... 3.70
1214ts March 10 ...3.80
222,479 March 24 ..... 4.00
191,440 March 31 ......4.10


' WG N M
$3.60 $3.50 3.40
3.0 3.50 3.40
3.45 3.35 20
3.35 325 3.15
325 315 .10
3.25 .15 3.10
&32 3.15 310
3.27% 3.17% 3.12%
3.35 3.25 3.1
3.35 3.26 3.20
30 3.30 3.15
3.10 3.00 2.15
3.10 3.00 2.95
3.10 .00 2.96
3.10 .00 2.90

310 3.00 290
320 3.10 2.00
3.25 310 2300
3.20 3.05 2.15
3.20 3.0 2.96
3.30 3.15 3.05
3.30 3.15 3.06
3.50 3.26 3.15
3.50 3.40 3.3
3.65 3.0 &.4
3.75 3.60 L.
4.10 3. 3.15
440 4.35 4.30
4.40 436 4.25
4.40 4.30 4.00
3.0 3.80 3.80
3.90 3.60 3.30
3.30 3.10 2.90
3.25 3.10 2.90
3.35 2.20 2.00
3.25 310 290
3.25 305 2.90
325 3.00 2.90
3.26 3.6 2.90
3.30 3.10 2.95
3.60 3.36 3.15
4.10 15 3.90
4.10 3.5 390
3.45 3.35 3.30
3.45 3.35 3.30
3.50 3.35 3.20
3.60 3.40 3.35
3.70 3.50 3.35
3.80 3.60 3.35


ROSINS


I H
2.85 2.40
2.86 2.40
2.86 2.40
2.85 2.40
2.86 2.26
2.8 2.35
2.86 2.2
2.87 215
2.87% 127%
3.00 2.3

2.80 2.30
2.70 2.25
2.65 L2.
2.76 2.26
2.65 2.25
2.75 2.30
2.75 230
2.70 2.10
270 2.20
2.80 2.30
2.80 2.30
2.90 2.40
3.00 2.50
3.10 2.50
320 2.0C
3.35 2.5
3.50 2.70
3.60 270
3.25 2.70
305 2.60
2.70 2.60
2.70 2.60
270 2.50
2.70 2.35
2.70 2.45
2.60 2.40

2.55 2.35
2.56 2.36
2.56 2.35
2.60 240
3.00 2.95
3.10 290
3.30 3.15
3.20 2.85
3.05 2.70
2.95 3.60
3.05 2.75
2.95 2.70
2.95 2.70


TX RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.


------- --


-v w










12 THE WPEEXLY MIMUSTfIAL ftECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD

JAMES A. HOLLOMON,
Editor and Manager.

Published Every Friday.
SueaCRIPTiOn 1 (Domestic). .3.00 Per Annum
(Foreign).... $3.50

The Pine and Its Products."

All communications should be addressed
The Industrial RLecord Company.
Jacksonville. Fla.
Branch Editorial and Business Office at
Savannah, Ga.

Entered at the Postofflee at Jacksonville.
Fla., as second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association, Sep-
temper 12. 1902. as its exclusive official or-
gan. Adopted in annual convention. Sep-
tember 11, as the organ also of the general
association.
Adopted April 27th, 1902 as the official
ergan of the Inter-State Cane Growers'
association. Adopted Sept. 11, 190, as the
only official organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.

COPT OlR ADVERTISING.
Advertisimnt epy (ebanmes owr ew
advertisements) whoeld reach us
Tuesday moraisn to immure nmsertloe
ia the Isae of the same week.

THE NEW INSPECTION RULES.
It is gratifying to have the approval of
old and wise heads on the new lumber
inspection rules adopted by the Georgia
Interstate Sawmill Association, which met
in this city last month.
The New York Lumber Trade Journal
of the 1st inst. has this to say editor-
ially on the subject:
"The subject of the necessity of a
change in the Savannah rules of 1883 in
order to place the manufacturers on a
basis commensurate with the present
available timber supply, has been under
discussion for the past two or three
months, and the fact that whatever dif-
ference of opinion may have existed as
to the exact line on which such classifi-
cation should be drawn, has been adjust-
ed through the adoption of the new rules
as of March 15, 1904, should be a source
of gratification to the entire membership
of that progressive body. That it is so.
is best evidenced to by the fact that
the new rules were adopted unanimously
and that their adoption was followed by
resolutions looking to the extension of
the influence and work of the association
in the Southeast.
"The new rules as adopted, while not
the original ones proposed some time ago,
as published in the Journal, will nev-
ertheless, it is believed, prove of much
advantage to the manufacturers in the
premises, while at the same time fair
and reasonably meet the requirements and
approval of the users of Yellow Pine.
"With the constantly decreasing supply
and growth of Georgia and Florida Pine
and the consequent advance in the price
of stumiipage, it is obvious that a change
in rules which governed twenty-one years
ago was believed by the association to Iw
not only wise and expedient, but a neces-
sity to the interests involved in its manu-
facture.
"The new rules will be the official and
only rules of the association for coast-
wise business, and it therefore follows
that the Savannah rules of 1883 will no
longer be printed or in any way officially
recognized by the association."


DEATH OF STEPHEN POWERS.
Stephen Powers, secretary of the State
Horticultural Society, and for six years
agricultural editor of the Times-Union,
died in this city last Saturday after-
noon, after a brief illness. For fourteen
years previous to 1898, he was editor of
the Florida Farmer and Fruit Grower,
and was without doubt the best posted
man in the State upon all matters per-
taining to horticulture and agriculture.
His death will be deeply regretted by
the members of the society and agricul-
turists, horticulturists and people gene-
rally throughout' the State, who were
familiar with his writings.
Stephen Powers was born July 22, 1840.
in Waterford, Ohio. He was educated in
the Ohio public schools, and received the
degree of B. S. at Ann Arbor, Mich., in
1861.
During the Civil War Mr. Powers
served as war correspondent for the New
York Herald, the Atlantic Monthly and
the Cincinnati Commercial. After the war
he made an extensive European tour, and
represented these periodicals, sending
them much interesting and valuable mat-
ter concerning his travels.
One of the most interesting and sensa-
tional features of Mr. Power's life was a
pedestrian tour he made from Port Ra-
leigh, S. C., to San Francisco. He de-
scribed his various experiences on this
trip in a book entitled Afoot and Alone
from Sea to Sea.
For several years the deceased served
under Maj. J. W. Powell, of the United
States Bureau of Ethnology. A full des-
cription of the results of his researches
were published by the United States ge-
ological survey, and have been highly
praised by ethnologists and geologists.


VIRGINIA DEMURRAGE LAW SUS-
TAINED.
At its last session, the Virginia legis-
lature passed a law in reference to rail-
road demurrage. In it the railroads are
required in a certain length of time to
deliver and unload cars, and upon fail-
ure to do so within the prescribed time,
are liable for demurrage; that freight
must be moved at the rate of one hundred
miles a day under a penalty of one dol-
lar per day for failure to do so. Ship-
pers are allowed forty-eight hours in
which to load, and are liable for one dol-
lar a day for all time in excess. In sub-
stance the rules simply make the rail-
roads liable with the shippers and con-
signees in regard to demurrage. The new
law also makes common carriers liable
for the loss or damage to property while
in transit.
Subsequent to the adoption of the law
by the Commission, the Supreme Court of
Appeals was asked for an opinion, and
in a decision rendered last week, upheld
the Commission on all points.
There is some difference between the
Virginia law and our own recent stat-
ute, but the principle is the same in both,
that is, the railroads are placed upon the
same footing as are the patrons for
laches.


The Baltimore Manufacturers' Record
was burned out by the fire of Feb. 7th,
and the weekly issues since then have
been from Philadelphia. In its issue of the
24th of March it announces its return
to Baltimore.


NAVAL STORES NOTES.
On the 26th ult. the Dutch steamship
Zeeburg cleared with 3,570 barrels of
rosin for Rotterdam.


The last week of the naval stores year
Savannah exported 2,094 casks of tur-
pentine and 4,611 barrels of rosin.

The voice of the adulterator of turpen-
tine is no longer heard in the land.

The Ellis-Young Company, of Bruns-
wick, sends forward nearly a carload of
material to form a part of the Naval
Stores Exhibit to be made by the Savan-
nah Board of Trade, which will form
a part of the Georgia exhiibt at the St.
Louis Exposition.

In their last trip out from New York
the Lombardea took 203 barrels of rosin
to Genoa; the Corinthian took 450 bar-
rels to Glasgow; the Buenas Air tooks 300
barrels to Genoa; the Minneapolis took
58 barrels to London.


The Britsh steamship Texan cleared for
New Orleans on the 16th ult. with 281
casks of turpentine for Liverpool. On
the 21st the steamship Asian cleared with
1,000 barrels of rosin for London, and
on the 23d the steamship Cliff cleared
with 204 casks of turpentine for Liver-
pool.


Marvin Lumber Co.
J. A. Minter ,who was in the sawmill
business with J. A Minter & Co., of Lees-
burg, has moved to Marven, Ga., and or-
ganized the Marven Lumber Company.


Buys Hilton & Dodge Co.
The Georgia-Florida Lumber Company
have purchased the Hilton & Dodge Lum-
ber Company for $75.000. The company
takes over the lumber yards of the Hilton
& Dodge Lumber Company at Twentieth
Street, South Brooklyn. It is generally
understood that parties identified with
the Yellow Pine Company are associated
in this enterprise with the Georgia-Flor-
ida Lumber Company.


Buys on the Oklawaha.
The Espenola Lumber Company, of
Prairie Creek, has purchased a tract of
20,000 acres of timber land on the Okla-
waha river, the consideration being $60,-
000. it has one of the largest and best
equipped plants in interior Florida. This
concern was formerly the Kelly-McDon-
ald Company, but their plant was recently
bought by A. J. Patterson and others, of
Texas, and the capacity of the mill has
been increased to keep pace with its grow
ing business.

New Palatka Corporation.
The Stanton Foundry and Machinery
Company has file articles of incorpora-
tion at Palatka, Fla., Christopher Stanton
and H. M. DeMontmolin, of Palatka, Fla.,
and E. N. McNabb, of Racine, Wis., being
the incorporators. They will make and
repair all kinds of castings, machinery,
boilers, gas and steam engines, etc. The
capital stock of the company is $16,000.
The officers are Christopher Stanton,
president; E. N. McNabb, vice-president;
and H. M. DeMontmolin, secretary and
treasurer.


LUMBER NOTES.
A. T. Squire, a sawmill man from
Omega, Fla., was in town last Saturday.


Mr. Powell, of Abernethy & Powell,
Graham, Fla., was in the city Friday.


A. P. Bliss, of Bliss & VanAuken, who
has spent some time in Florida, left this
week for Saginaw, Mich.


Arthur Cummer has just returned from
J. D. Rounds, a lumberman of Haylow,
Ga., is in the city.


M. H. Holly & Son have just erected a
sawmill at Summerfield about 20 miles
below Ocala. They are from South Caro-
lina.


Lumbermen report lumber as being un-
usually dull for this time of the year.
Usually something is doing in April, but
this week matters are very quiet. The
reason they give for this is the continued
strike in New York City of carpenters
and builders. The spring season is also
very backward all through the North.


Saner Kraut Factory.
Florida has a good prospect for a saner
kraut factory, the same to be located at
Lake Helen. The cabbage from which
the krautt" is to be made will be raised
on the McNeal turpentine lands.-Sen-
tinel Reporter.

Makes Pelham Headquarters
The Hutchinson Lumber Company, Cor-
dele, Ga., having assumed control of the
Higgston Lumber Company's mills at Pel-
ham, Ga., have decided to combine its
offices with general headquarters at that
point, and ask that all future corree-
pondence be directed to the Hutchinson
Lumber Company, Pelham, Ga. They will
continue to handle the output of the mills
o fthe Gray Lumber Company, at Lelia-
ton, and Pinebloom, as also its product
of shingles and lathes manufactured at
various points throughout the State.

Prominent Lumberman.
Mr. and Mrs. Jas. A. Potter, of Provi-
dence, R. I., are spending a few days
in Savannah. Mr. and Mrs. Potter have
been spending some time at the Florida..
resorts and stopped off in Savannah for
a short time o their way home. Mr.
Potter is the senior member of the well
known firm of Jas. A. Potter & Co., of
Providence. Mr. Potter's firm has the
distinction of having furnished all of
the yellow pine lumber which was used
in the make-up of the cup defenders
"Columbia" and "Reliance"


Big Lumber Blase.
Caryville, Fla., April 7.-Tuesday night
just before 10 o'clock all Caryville was
called to witness one of the biggest fires
ever known in West Florida. The watcb-
man at the big mill of the Sanford Lum-
ber Company discovered an abandoned
planing mill on fire and blew the mill
whistle fire alarm.
In a short time the entire mill crew
was at work, but the flames spread rapid-
ly to the great piles of lumber stacked
in the yard, and by daylight next morn-
ing more than six million feet of lum-
ber was consumed.


TV Vnlrr Alowundw-.1mo IMEWS!VW f Ncru










THE tWEEKILY 1NDtSTRIAL RECORD. 13


O 0. 6888.

STHE ATANTIC NA IONAl BANK OF JACKSONiILE. I
CAPITAL PAID IN. $350,000.00.
OPEN FOR BUSINESS AUGUST I, 1903.
OFFICERS:
Edward W. Lane, President. Fred W. Hoyt, Vice-President.
Thomas P. Denham, Cashier.
*9-9^999999999-9gagggggagg ?


MAKES WRONG STATEMENT.

Hillmn-Sutherland Co. Misrepresented by
Savannah Naval Stores Review.
Editor Industrial Record:
The last issue of the Naval Stores Re-
view, of Savannah, contained the follow-
ing:
"Mr. Henry Elsen, who has sold his in-
terest in the Jacksonville Cooperage Co.,
it is understood will be in charge of the
marketing of products of the Hillman,
Sutherland & Co., prominent Florida op-
erators, who will open an office in Jack-
sonville and market their products inde-
pendently."
Please do us the favor to correct the
Review's statement above in the next is-
sue of your paper. The Hillman-Suth-
erland Co. are producers and not factors.
They do not intend becoming factors.
They market their products through the
Consolidated Naval Stores Co. They are
thoroughly satisfied in doing so and they
do not intend to change and have never
contemplated it.
Yours very truly,
HILLMAN-SUTHERLAND CO.,
By W. J. Hillman, President.

New Telford at White Springs.
The attention of our readers is specially
directed to the card of the New Telford
at White Springs. This is an entirely new
hotel, which is being run on the most
satisfactory principles, the owner mak-
ing it a point to take personal care of
each and every customer.

New Mississippi Corporations.
Governor Vardaman, of Mississippi,
has approved the following charters:
W. B. Young Turpentine Company, Mc-
Henry, Harrison County; capital, $30,
000; incorporators, W. B. Henry and
others.
Yazoo Cooperage Company, azoo City
capital, $10,000.
Bostick Lumber Company, Saunders-
ville, Jones County; capital $10,000.

Briggins--"What is a bore?"
Buggins-"What is a bore?"
Juggins-"A bore is that fe'lwo who is
always so fond of airing his own ail-
merts and grievances that he gives you
no chance to air yours."


In Receiver's Hands
The Standard Pole & Tie Company, of
Brooksville, Fla., has gone into the hands
of a receiver. This is the mill of which
Leroy C. Harding, the alleged swindler,
who was arrested and later released and
subsequently arrested and taken to Cin-
cinnati, was superintendent.

Another Georgia Short Line.
A charter for the Garbutt & Dono-
van Short Line railway, which will run
from a point in Emanuel county, Ga.,
on the Millen & Southwestern to Lyons,
has been granted to R. M. Garbutt, W. O.
Donovan and others. The capital stock
of the company is $30,000. The road
will be used almost exclusively for haul-
ing lumber from the mills of its owners.

Big Deal Pending.
Skaggs & Crow, of Chicago, are ne-
gotiating for the purchase of a tract of
40,000 acres of yellow pine and hardwood
timber in Neoshoba County, Mississippi.
The deal represents an investment of
about $300,000, exclusive of the cost of
the extensive saw mill plant to be erect-
ed. The Mobile, Jackson & Kansas City
road is to pass through that county, and
a great development is expected in it
after the work is fairly well under way.

The Perry Naval Stores Co.
Messrs. F. J. Spain, J. W. Oglesby,
Z. W. Oglesby, R. C. McIntosh, S. S.
Roundtree, D. G. Mallory and J. H. Mal-
lory have organized a naval stores com-
pany at Perry, in this State, with a cap-
ital stock of $60,000. The rights of the
West Coast Lumber and the timber hold-
ings of the Maliory Bros. are said to be
merged in the new company, which will
control a large body of virgin timber.
The company has applied for a charter.


How Is This?
The following correspondence recently
passed in the lumber trade:
Lumber Dealer-Please ship me an-
other car of stock same as last.
Wholesaler-Cannot ship anything un-
til last car is paid for.
Lumber Dealer-Cancel the order. Can't
wait so long.


CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS

AND VATS.

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
IS & SOIN, PALA.TKA, FLA.


The West.Raley-Rannle Company,

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
A . WEST. Pres. E. E. West, Vice-Pres W. R. Raw-le, Vice.Pres. M. V. Raley, Sec. Treas.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
ber Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
headquarters.

SSS9f4'6$" fS4 >Si,,i^S4,>Sf4,.,Oi, i^gg,^, @*S !S9 K0, < 2,
THOMAS DIXON, JR., President, a. w. KILGORE, VYce--Pressdet.
New York. Rakelh. N. C.
F.. AMRICK, Secretary and Treasurer. New York.
W. N. IERVU Cemrlst, New York.

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE: 96 FIFTl AVE.. NEW YORE.



Standard Turpentine Company

Builders of Wood Distilling Plants,
by the New Krug Patent Steam
Pressure Process. .


CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
AND INSPECTION OF WAYCROSS PLANT IS INVITED.


REFERENCES: earlleld National Bank, New York: R. 6. Dn a Co.


JNO. W. THOMPSON,
Superintendent Sales Agencies, WAYCROSS, GA


E. H. TO1ILINSON, Special Agent,
Corner Hogan and Forsyth Streets, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.

Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINGAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


V. E THOMAS
PremdenL


E E. DELE
Secrxtar & Trerw.


Thomas P Roberts Hardware Co,

Wholesale & Retail



Turpentine



And Mill Supplies


Hardware, Doors, Sash and Blinds, Paints and Oils


3 1. Ax.


VADOT, ERGA


Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.


T. E. MRBTS
VicePrde


__


--rru Irwm~r~--r r~- -------~ __


VALDOSTA,,


GEORGIA,










14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

HIe ful service for the turpentine industry. tish to fish for, and the best way to turned loose in Florida they are just like
SIt must le recalled that when he began catch them. two-vear-old colts turned out to pasture
JokesandSketches0 to make the experiments that subse- In rowing. no man can excel her in after .eing housed up all their precious
*Jokes d S t quently proved so successful, lhe was ac- feathering an oar. That beautifully moul- lives. They seem to be new creatures,
[This dep[ r inc wil coria each week of a tuated entirely and only by a desire to deil aran knows just how to handle it,and and drink in the exhilaration of our
lry. bumnrous ad othemrse. guarding some aid, if possible, in perpetuating the in- keep friim "catching crabs." Florida climate to the full. To see them
pr dCnik d in tue enktirel alri oflye da dr to the lrfe ko jue how tn n k ex o our
Se ir a t dustry, in prolonging the life of the for- In lhuting slhe does not equal manr, enjoy life in Florida one would think
I est. He did not merely "invent" some- Iteause she is more tender-hearted. that here pastime was a pleasure of the
*M*ii ##*##p*#99 U thing and then from mere mercenary mo- It is nut her province to take a horrid feminine gender.
In another column of the Record to- ties try to put his patent upon the mar- ol, gun and -hot down in cold blood one
day it is announced that Dr. Charles H. ket. Instead he put on his overalls and ,,f old's s creatures and call it sluirt. The British schooner Admiral, Captain
Herty, the founder of the "Herty euU went into the wo.sls and worked-worked l a p t
systemy" has resigned fro the uea like a Trojan. t that time he was not It you js ought to see her play golf. Pearce. was entered Tuesday from Dun-
system," has resigned from the Bureau like a Trojan. At that time he was notere in Jackson more Town; no cargo.
of Forestry, with which he has bee n of a ficial of the government, and the ex- lle have a gllf 'i here n Jackson ore Town; no cargo.
ficially identified for some years. periments lasting for months were made uill woihl yiu believe it, the good
Dr. Herty is a scientist of wide rep- at a sacrifice of his own time and money-- w mna golfers outnumber the nlen?
r. .rtynlirida and at eachll fi n d woom wdrtu r J. E. GORNTO & CO.
this country and in Europe, and when the guaranteeing an expense not to exceel i an o will fin women
United States Government became in- $150. It was only after the Bureau of ** ..e- doing the best playing or a very Shipping Trade
terested in his experiments, he was of- Forestry had become interested in his ex- .o-c seemed. And so it is with a'l the a Specialty. ..
fered a position as "expert" in the Bu- perinmnts and satisfied that he was pay- "ut loor sports where skill and a firm
reau. which is an official title, that is ne- ing the way for a revolution in the in- hand are ncededl, she adds a grace to the 0n $3 Ore r all Ier,, Expr Pfrpa
essarily thrust upon every scientist em- dustry that it offered him a position to pI'y unattainable by any mere man.
played by the government and assigned continue the experiments, and to work out Tradition runs that woman's sphere W HISKIES
to research work. In accepting this po- the solution of the matter in hand under is vcuned to the drudgery of the domes-
sition, therefore, which Herty did sim- the auspices of the government. At that tIc circle. That may Ie tlte case at the
ply to broaden his opportunities for the time Dr. Ilerty was a professor in the XNrthl where it is said that some of the FROM $1.50 TO $6 A GALLON
accomplishment of what he had under- University of Georgia. He resigned and people have no better judgment than to
taken for the good of the naval stores accepted the government position, and make slaves of their women as the sav- Sole Agent
industry, he became a full-fledged "ex- since that time, without cost, he has been ages did. But in Florida she is either
pert,". so far as official distinction goes. at the Service of the turpentine men of quleen or divides her sway with man, al- Old Saratoga Rye, $6 .
About this time, September, 1901, th, the South, and has been of remarkable lowing him ain oeeasional say. ("ose in- d Ba r
first meeting of the Turpentine Opera- value to them. ve-tigation will show that she is facile Old Baker Rye, $ al.
tors' Association was held in Jacksonville. In resigning now from the government principia in doors and out. Take it here d Wes rl B 4
Operators generally were in a bad fix and it is gratifying to know that his work in ih .lacv.snville. We have more whist Old Westmoreland Rye, $4 Gall
worse humor. Everybody realized the the interest of the industry will not cease. 'ln!s than ('a:ter had oats, and nine- Ho
necessity for organization, but they were As a private citizen and business man tenth s of thli. are of the feminine ge. Big Hon Rye, $3 Gal.
slow in getting settled. Few of them and not as a government official, he will der. Time was when the ganie was fre-
knew each other. President A. D. Cov- have more license, and can enter more quently inte erupted with lovely woman s
ington, who was in the chair, had met heavily into the commercial end of his inquiry alsiot every two. minutes.. OR TO C
Dr. Herty in the forenoon and asked him labors. The success of his system has l '. lat's Trumpsl, ?" "Whnose play is it?"
to address the meeting in the afternoon, already been demonstrated. "\ho took that last trick?" "What Valdosta, Gergia
At the afternoon session, therefore, Herty made you trump when you had a suit
was in the front row, awaiting his call. In this connection the Record feels card in your hand ?" and other silly
Beside him sat a well known operator called upon to thank the Department of iquetions indicating either a weak mind $25.00 RKEW A R D.
from interior Florida, coat off and per- Agriculture and through this department or an inattentive one. This would be Sirmans, Ga., April 1st, 1904.
spring. The two were not acquainted. the lurea uof Forestry, for the inter- 'aried by such ejaculatives as, "Didn't We will pay $25.00 reward for arrest
"Gentlemen of the Convention," said est it has taken and the expense it has i Sara look horrid in that horrid red and detention of one E. G. Gamble, a
black nero, 6 feet high, weighing about
President Covington, "we have with us incurred in evolving a method of turpen- dress last nightt" or "what are you go 165 pounds; has small mustache and sid
to-day one of the most distinguished tining that will, as it gradually beconwi ing to wear to the yacht club hop?" whiskers, connecting with his hair in lt-e
men in this country, a representative of more in use, prove a great saving to the, I'at is not the case any more. Lovely ples and running down cheeks for abog
the Bureau of Forestry and an 'expert' operators and prolong for the Southeast- vwomlan takes her seat at the whist table inches. Claims to be a preacher and has
a black suit of clothes with Prince Al-
in turpentine"- ern States an industry that is now turn- ant,, goes through the game with as much Is'rt coat which we wears on dress pa-
"What the h--l does that blamed 'ex- ing millions of dollars annually into the earnestness. watching the play as close- rade. Also rides on A. C. L. Railway
pert' know about boxing a pine tree?" channels of trade. ly and playing as silent'y and as scientifi- Ministerial Permit Is a turpentine dis-
asked Herty's companion of him, aloud call. as any male whist fiend would, tiller and will be hunting that kind of
Work. Very loud talker, walks fast, with
as Covington concluded his introduction. \hat is true of Jacksonville is true of -his head drooped; wears black hat with
"Wait a second and I'll tell you," OIMEN'S IPASTIME IN FI)O1A. nany places in Florida where female brim about 4 inches wide. Left our place
smiled Herty, as he stepped to the ros- No State in the Union e luals Florida lovers of pastime do congregate. allut 25th of March.
trum. in affording both sexes an equal pleas- \nd our lady tourists. When they are B. G. Lastinger & Co.
Dr. Herty was in the Record office one ure in outdoor sports. Hardly any yacht-
afternoon busily engaged in reading an ing larty is Tcomplete without my lady.
article in the American Soap Journal She is almost ais skilled at te engine Planter Old Tim e Rem edies
A half dozen "cups" were on the edi- at the ropi-s or at the he'm as her lord.
tor's desk. A couple of visiting news- And they looked nobby, too, diked out in
paper men came in. their yachting suits. which become them NUBI N TEA-for the Liver.
"Fixing for a conservatory, eh?" asked better than almost any other costumes BENEDma Toni
BE1EDICTA-female Tonile
one, glancing at the earthen vessels. tl'*v wear. walking the decks as jaunt-
"No, they are the Herty turpentine ily as though to the manner born. CUBAN RELIEF, for Cramp Colic. Horse Colic.
cup." And in fishing. The old story almut WARRANTED TO GIVE RELIEF IN TEN MINUTES.
"Is that what that government scient- a woman being afraid to pull a fish out CUBAN OIL, a Liniment Unexcelled.
ist is doing down here?" of the water. may be the case up North
where women ddn, not have time to fish. Also Golden Crown Specifc. Pink Pills & Horse & C.stle Powders
"That's the story." hut Iere in Florida, the wmen.,i ctizen SPENCER. MEDICINE CO.,
"Well, well, conundrum for you, John! and tourists, cain give tIhe eii n I points
If it takes an 'expert' scientist to evolve aIilit tlie best places to the 1 est Chatt&noogae. Tenn.
these little old clay flower-pots, what
kind of a mental monstrosity must a n Furt Co
clhina-man Ihe?"

"Gentlemen, I fail to see the joke," said
the genial Herty, peeping out from be-
hind his paper. WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Introductions followed and everybody Dry Goods, Clothing, (ents Furnishings and Hats.
went out for a--smoke.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
Dr. Herty has accomplished a wonder- JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

KOP TOS' DRLTAwCE "







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15













I










Always Specify

U. S. Eagle Ni or MF

Brands of Roofing Tin
the best ternes on the market to-day for all
purposes. Made entirely by the palm oil pro-
cess, hand dipped, perfect in coating of richest
tin and new lead, they furnish the greatest pro-
S tection, and require least repairs.
For more than sixty years the M F brand has
been recognized as the standard terne, because of its
reliability under all conditions of weather, location and atmos-
phere. The U.S. Eagle N M (new method) ternes are the result
of a still higher development of the M F process, giving a roof-
ing material much nearer to copper in its resistance to corrosion.
If you have not seen it, we would like to send you a sample.
O prdcts are fersale by al first classwholesale metal koms.
"A Fifty Year Roof," a comprehensive work on roofing, with scores
of helps to writers of specifications and estimates, free zn request.
W. O. ORONEMEYER, ADVERTISING AGENCY.
AMERIQAN SHEET AND TIN PLATE COMPANY,
FRICK BUILDING. PITTSBURG, PA.









"THE PINE A"D ITS PRODUCTS."










16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

THAT TRESPASS CASE. Railroads and Car Equipment SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903404 AND TWO
F. E. Waymer, J. Lee Ensign, J. B.
Verdict in Naval Stores Suit in the Conrad, W. Frazier Jones and Capt. H. H. PREVIOUS YEARS.
United States Court at Savannah. Tift, president of the Georgia Interstate Receipts 1903- ( 1902-03 I 1901-02
Saw Mill Association, represented that Sprits, casks........................... 1,647 22,46 14,
A suit ws decide in the United States body at the meeting of the Florida Rail- i ........................... 650,938 940,5071,071,440
Court in Savannah last Tuesday wherein road Commission held at Tallahassee, Fla., Ros bb ............................650,938 940,507 1,071,440
the United States was plaintiff and the road Commission held at Tallahassee, Fla., Total................................. 844585 1,233,033 1,385,786
the United States was plaintiff and the March 21st, for a hearing from the rail- Exports
Southern Naval tSores Company was de- roads in reference to their compliance ts .............................188, 296,430 14,876
fendant, involving a trespass upon gov- with the law relating the equipping of o casi, bbls. ... ...75 ,270 975.430 81,062,687
ernment lands in Florida. It was tried flat cars for the transportation of lum- Forign 752,270 975.428 1062,687
before Judge Emory Speer and a jury, her. All of the railroads were represent- Spirits, cass....4 206,109 217,446
Hon. J. N. Stripling, U. S. District At- ed and the matter was discussed at great Rosins, bbls ....... ....... 938,171 206,109 217,446
torney for the Southern District of Flor- length, and finally ruled that these rail- New 338 1 504,173 535,042
ida, prosecuting, roads must comply with the law forth- Spits ca ............................ 35,8 42,765 3,79
The defendant company was charged with or rebate the mill men $1.50 a car iits, cbbls ................. .... ........ ,85 133,121 129,059
with receiving naval stores from operators where they furnish the stakes and per- 8 133,21 129059
who had obtained them from Government form the labor of putting the car in Spirits, cask........... ..... 5 51 7, 4,
land. The court ruled that unless the shape for hauling. The railroads are again Rosins, bbls.............................3 746 37,74 398,5386
fact appeared that the defendant company asking for an extension of time in which The receipts o spirits are e than 1902-03 by 98,849 casks, and of resins, 289,569 barr
knew the stuff came from Government to comply, declaring their inability to se-
land s it w s nn.t frim inallv liable hut. ... . .. .. .


that if, as a matter of fact, the turpen-
tine and rosin were made from Govern-
ment land, the aforesaid company was
liable civil. After testimony was taken
the Court ordered the jury to bring in a
civil verdict against the defendant com-
pany, which was done, the damages being
assessed at $300. The case has been ap-
pealed to the Supreme Court of the Unit-
ed States.
It seems that turpentine operators
years ago bought up a lot of tax titles
in this State and used the land passing
under them for turpentine purposes.
Mixed up with these tax title lands were
several tracts of Government land, and
some operators were not as careful as they
should be in scrutinizing and cut over and
boxed the government land as well.
Thousands of acres of government land
were thus worked and their products
consigned to Savannah factors, among
whom was the Southern Naval Stores
Company.
There are several other eases pending
in that court against others, which will
doubtless be disposed of along with the
one now going to the higher court.


Petroleum in Florida.
The Record was informed yesterday by
a prominent lumberman with large land
holdings in Lafayette Taylor Counties,
Florida, that there were several oozings
of petroleum on his land. He has had the
fluid analyzed, and it showed up all right.
He is preparing to do a little boring and
will no doubt "strike oil."

Death of W. P. Blasiname.
Walter P. Blassingame died in Talla-
hassee, Fla., Sunday night. He was a
well known lumberman, who had opened
an office and established a lumber yard
in that city recently. He was from Amer-
icns, Ga., and was about thirty-five years
old. His remains were taken to Amer-
icus for interment.

New Mobile Company.
The McGowin Lumber Company, with
offices at Mobile, Ala., has been incorpo-
rated with capital of $20,000, to do a gen-
eral lumber and milling business. The
principals are chiefly Bobile, Brewton and
Chapman. Ala, business men. J. F. Me-
Gowin, of Mobile, is the president; A. M.
McGowin, of Brewton, vice-president; J.
G. McGowin, of Mobile, secretary and
treasurer; J. C. McGowin, of Blackshear,
Samuel Foshee ,of Brewton, and S. J.,
W. .- and L. J. Foshee, of Chapman.


cure a satisfactory solution of the mat-
ter. The outlook is that they will event-
ually rebate the mill men and, tiring of
this expense, will then find a means of
equipping their cars whereby they can
be loaded and unloaded with the same
ease as when the ordinary wooden stakes
are employed.


A Model Playground will be an attract-
ion on the Model Street at the World's
Fair. An open air playroom for a kinder-
garten and a pergola pavilion hung with
lifty hammocks will be provided. One
building will contain a complete gymna-
sium, tennis court, handball court, etc.

THE


Bethune


Apparatus.


The New Process.

Extracts the spirts without destroying the
wood fibre. Runs out a charge in less than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-five gallons from cord of wood.
Makes pure water white spirits, free from
the odor of tar or creosote. No chemicals
used in refining the spirits. Needs to be
distilled only once after coming from re-
tort.
No trouble with bi-products, the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
duted and from wood. Only one grade
of spirits produced and that the highest.
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGER FROM FIRE
Built of finest material by high-grade
workmen. The cheapest machine offered to
the public.
We challenge comparison of output and
quality of product. We guarantee output
and quality.
For full particulars, prices, samples,
etc., address-
The rile Belt Cmstactm Cempany
P. O. Box 543. RALEIGH, N. C.


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE a RETAIL

HARDWARE

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints. Oils and Glass.
Stoves. Tinware, Country-Holloware.


10 WEST BAY STREET


Jacksonville. Fla.


SYou Want a Turpentine Location?

You Want a Sawmill Location?

You Want any Kind of Florida Land?

,Il You Mean Business?
Coll on or Write to
t J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS,
SOcala, Florida
+ ++4099******+99+++++++++ + *~66++++++++*M++++++ +4>46

BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will send by express, prepaid, the following:
Four full quarts Lincoln County, Sunnybrook Rye or Big Horn Rye .. $4.
Single Bottles .................................................................. L
I will send four full quarts of Somers' Corn, Melwood Rye, Golden Wed-
ding Rye, Holland Gin, Tom Gin, Peach Brandy. Peach and Honey
Whiskey, Gin and Manhattan Cocktails-any of the above for........ $.00
One bottle of any of the above ............. .. .......... .... $.00
Four bottles of the following California Wines: Sherry. Port, Muscat
Catawba ...........................................................................
Single bottles ..................................................................
Five bottles Duffy's Malt ......................................................
Single bottles ............................................................ .
Four bottles Wilson Whiskey, cased ............................................
Single bottles ................................................................... L
Bulk goods of all kinds. Special Prices on application. All kinds of
liquors in jugs from $150 to 5.00, f. o. b. Jacksonville.
F. BETTELINI. W Bay St., opp. Union Depot. Jacksonville, fla


Geo. T.Gifford Iron Works Co.

Founders and Machinists.
Special attention to Saw Mill and Turpentine Work.
Tifton, Georgia.


I THE COVINGTON COMPANY,


Wholesale SHOES AND DRY GOODS3. 35 t 1 et Frsy Strt.

NEW YORK: 256 Church St. Jacksonville,Fla.

We Sell Merchants Only.


W. nWm W Va V 4-1 --- - - -


DEALINGS.


- ~ w . . . .- - - -


. .. . . . . ..- -m


b


Ah' J"' L Al AOL 0, & dh, A&L dk Ah, .da, do. j1h, .% AN, Ali, A, da, A& 'A'


dIll rEIV



t
t

>
t








'THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


Profit on a Farm in Florida.
I will give you my plan of farming on
Florida pine lands. The contest is for the
money crop. Well, I commence by plow-
ing my oats first week in January. I lay
off my lands eight feet wide. Sow my
oats one and one-fourth bushel per acre.
Turn my land about five inches deep with
Avery plow. I seldom have my oats kill-
ed. They are rooted deep. In these cen-
ter furrows I plant velvet beans and give
one furrow round them before cutting
oats. After I cut oats off I plant two
rows of peas between beans and cut all
off for hay. My next planting is two
acres garden. I plant in this everything
usually grown in a garden, fertilizing well
and working as fast as it will do. Next
I plant my corn about middle of March,
using about 200 pounds commercial fer-
tilizer when I plant and about 200 more
when about knee high. Then I plant
about one acre in blue cane land by lay-


ing off my rows three feet, then I plant
every alternate row in peanuts; cotton
same. This makes my cotton six feet
apart in the rows. I use the same amount
of fertilizer as I would if I planted every
row in cotton.
I get more cotton than I did when I
planted every row in cotton using the
same amoutn of fertilizer. Then my pea-
nuts yield me eighteen or twenty bush-
els per acre. On these I make my pork
and gather for market, too. I have a
market for every surplus at Century, three
miles away. Now from these crops and
garden I sell everything I do not need on
the farm. While the cotton would be
termed my money crop. I realize a profit
on everything I plant. Oats are $20 aton;
hay, $17.50. On my oat land the pursly
grows about knee high after I quit culti-
vating it, so beans, peas and pursly hay
all cut together is as fine feed as can be
found. From my garden I sell all the


surplus as fast as ready. I have removed
all the stumps off the farm and can use
the best of cultivators for potatoes. I
plant on hammock land where I get a
better yield than on high pine land. At
this writing my corn is now made, and
about twenty-five bushels per acre. My
cotton is from waist to shoulder high,
and not shedding much. I think a safe
1,000 pounds seed cotton per acre, besides
my peanuts are very promising. So my
money crop is the farm. More anon.-G.
M. Gentry, Bluff Springs, Fla., in South-
ern Ruralist.


customhouse records show that within two
months there has been more rough logs
brought through this port than at any six
month's in the port's history. All of the
logs are imported by the firm of Mengel
& Co., box manufacturers, and it is the
intention of that firm, so the railroad
people are in formed, to bring at least
8,000,0000 feet in at Pensacola during the
next few months. A lot of this amount,
has already found its way in at Pensacola,
and now two steamers and a schooner are
engaged in the trade.


The nineteenth annual report of tUe
Importation of Mahogany. Bureau of Animal Industry, Department
of Agriculture, has recently been issued.
The importation of mahogany at Pen- It contains 613 pages, besides the index,
nacola, Fla., has reached a surprising mag- and an immense number of engravings
nitude during the past few months. With' of a high order of excellence. There are
the arrival from Belize, British Honduras, several articles replete with information
on live stock topics, of hwieh the ehiet
of the Norwegian steamship Hydra, the in interest to Florida readers are those
record of the port has been made for the on the poultry and egg industry and on
handling of this item of import, and the feeding native steers.


Machinery

Bar Iron, Iron Pipe and fittings, Bolts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tools, Lumberman's Tools,
Packing of All Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corrugated
RoofingJ .



JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER,'
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


and


Mill


Supplies.


State Agent For:
ATLAS ENGINES and BOILERS, SOUL STEAM FEED,
WORTHINGTON STEAM PUMPS, JENKINS' VALVES,
DISSTON'S SAWS, FUNTKOTE ROOFING,
CURTIS MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Mill Maduery.
DeLOACH SAW MILLS, GILBERT WOOD PULLEYS,
NOYT's LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SPRING and RUBBER COMPANY
Ielt and Rbber loese.
SOLVENTINE BOILER COMPOUND.
DODGE MANUFACTURING COMPANY,
Cast Irem Sprit Pwlleys.
McCAFFREY FILES, MONARCH EMERY WHEELS,
DANIEL'S PPP STEAM PACKING,
A. LESCHEN & SON, Wire Iepe.


Special Notice.


Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are



McMILLAN BROTHERS'


Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.


Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon


and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to


say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made


by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the


condenser.


Twenty (20) outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.


Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.



McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS,


SAVANNAH, GA.
MOBILE, ALA.


J4CKSONVILLE, FLA.
FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.


ONE OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PAPERS.


~d~b~b~dddd~ddd~d~db~d(C~t~bd~b~ddd~b~B~ ~&~&d~t~d&~&d&~&~t~d~ddddd~dddddd~d~Ut~C


asarrTa Tasseeas Taee


oro~io;o;o;o~;3io~;o;o~;sw~;9


~0~3;0~0;0;0~0~


Eai _7r iT iTaiY : I FTayTTT_








18 TffE WEERLY INDUSTRIAL kECbfD.


The Hastings Potato Crop. as to time. Cars leaving here Monday
S 1 are landed in New York for the following
A representative of the News last Sat- are ended in ew rk for the following
urday drove over portions of the potato Friay rning's market.
sections. Some of the crops examined The association intends to sell all pos-
were those of F. S. Hickok, C. C. Rob- sible f. o. b. An inspector will be ap-
shaw, William Thigpen, W. H. Erwin, pointed and every tenth barrel will be
Estes & Erwin, G. W. Leonard, F. E. Bag- opened and classified. This insures good
by and i'r. Maltby. The vines look green stock to go through the association. i he
and thrifty and many of the growers are marketing will be incharge of Manager
busy spraying. Fear of blight has caused XlcClung, under the supervision of the
much care this year, and if there is any seven directors, three of whom consti-
virtue in Bordeaux mixtures, there will be tute the executive committee. The as-
no blight in Hastings. In addition t, sociation will likely be incorporated next
the careful spraying, much of the seed year. It is the general feeling that it
was treated before planting. will eventually be better to market every-
The industry is so great that the Flor- thing through the association.
ida East Coast road will be asked for During tile marketing this year the ex-
special trains. The most cars ever loaded ecutive committee will meet daily at 10
here in one day were twenty-three. That o'clock and read all telegrams. The man-
is a full trainload. After the digging ager will then recommend what he deems
fairly begins the average will be fifteen best, and the committee must approve.
cars a day, which is a train. The grow- A record is to be kept of these daily meet-
ers believe they are entitled to have an ings, so there can be no complaint after
engine from St. Augustine whenever a the sales are reported. Any grower who
trainload is ready, and because of the prefers can have his potatoes consigned.
perishable condition and importance of The association will market the crops of
getting to market early a special freight any non-members at 1 per cent. This
should be run to Jacksonville, where cars gives the grower every chance to do as lhe
could be distributed quickly. The freight likes.
to New York is $1.02 a barrel, all rail. While the association has pledged 1,500
The potatoes could be shipped to Jack- acres, there are a number of acres which
sonuille and to New York over the Clyde it will not control. There is considerable
Line at 76 cents a barrel. This would feeling between those outside of the asso-
save 26 cents a barrel, and as half the ciation and the members. R. C. Harris
crop of 75,000 barrels goes to New York, is one of the leaders outside of the asso-
if shipped by boat it would be a saving of ciation. lie will control the 60 acres of
nearly $10,000 in freight. The Clyde Line the llastings Potato Growing and Devel-
leaves Jacksonville only three times a; oping company and half the 85 shares of
week. The days when the boats did not F. S. Hickok. Bahrenberg, Bro. & Co.
leave the potatoes could be run to Sa- are interested in 220 acles, and the D. 'M.
vannah and catch the boat at that point. Wygant Co. in 160 acres These interests
The all-rail service has been satisfactory include Federal Point and Armstrong.


When you


Those outside the association claim that Iing the industry was the object of met
not over half the potatoes will go through severe condemnation.
the association. They want the buyers to The growers have been forced to action
come to Hastings, and they will sell as by the disastrous condition in which the
they did last year. As the association industry has been led by certain men and
is figuring on selling f. o. b. there will corporations who have been trusted with
its destinies.
likely be plenty of buyers.-Fruit and The conviction is spreading with ama-
Produce News. ing rapidity that the fruit industry has
been betrayed, plundered and sold out for
Marion Live Stock Association. the season of 1903-04.
On a permanent This season, by all tokens, should have
On March 10th a permanent organiza-
tn a or h g or it ro been the best ever seen in Southern Cali-
tion was formed having for its purpose, u at i h
the promotion of the live stock interests fornia. Instead, up to date, t has b
of this county, including cattle, hogs, the most disastrous ever experienced.
horses and sheep, and especially the two Taking the figures of the corporation
great beef breeds, viz: Shorthorns and chiefs themselves for an estimate, the
Herefords. A permanent organization growers will sustain a straight cash loss
of between $5,000,000 and $8,000,000 from
was effected and the following officers of between $5,000,000 and $8,000,000 from
the results of previous years. This is in
elected: Z. C. Chambliss, president; J. L. previous years. This is in
the face. of the fact that the crops have
Edwards, 1st vice-president; S. H. Gaits- the face of the fact that the crop have
kill, 2d vice-president; S. A. Rawls, sec- been larger, the market wider and the
retary and E. L. Wartmann, treasurer, prosperous country better able than ever
to buy California oranges.
A combination is said to exist by which
Must be in It. the railroads control the handling of the
The Times-Union has undertaken, alone crop and get their exorbitant charges
and unaided, the herculean task of having whether the fruit sells for anything or
every portion of Florida represented at not. In some cases fruit has not brought
the World's Fair to be held in St. Louis.
To this end three special editions of this the charges and in numerous instances
great paper will be issued-one edition for the profit has been but a few cents a box.
the east coast, one for the west coast and According to the Orange Trust's own
one for middle Florida-and will be dis- fi the average
tribute at the Fair by the young lady e average profit on all sale to
commissioners who were recently elected late has been but 29 cents per box for the
to this work by Times-Union patrons, grower. A great many growers have re-
These editions of millions of copies will ceived but 10 or 15 cents a box. On a crop
contain some tighty pages, the regular of 24,000 carloads two years ago about
size of the Tiems-Union, will be on tihe
best paper and illustrated in the highest $12,000,000 profit was returned to the
style of art. growers and turned into the channels of
trade.
California Orange Situation. This season, with a crop of 30,000 car-
Last night at Santa Ana and Fernando loads, present conditions promise about
mass meetings were held at which the $4,000,000 to the growers.-Los Angeles
combination which is charged with ruin- IExaminer.


Visit Jacksonville


Call to see the Record and be at home.


Tell the Record all you know, that will Interest others.


If you want to buy or sell advertise your place.


If you owe the Record pay the bill.


If you don't owe the Record make a bill.


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Call at the Industrial Record Office.


THE RECORD'S SPACE HAS A BIG MONEY VALUE.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


A FLORIDA PRINCE AND PRINCESS.

By Mrs. Ellen Call Long. -
Florida in the year 1825 was talked of
as an acquisition, out a forced one. Gen-
eral Andrew Jackson, with all his indom-
itable courage marched into the Spanish
Territory, with little or no authority,
found a population of Indians, suspected I
of treacheery toeighboring United States.
He was urged on by speculative English
pedlars, who were really the special ob-
jects of the great soldier. The shooting
of Ambrister and the hanging of Arbrith-
not gave the expedition a name, though
this shocked the world as assassina-
tion.
Beside the climate of the Territory
hedged northward by crowded forest,
made it a dream-nursed on one side by
the Atlantic, and the Gulf on the other.
Though some of more practical scrutiny,
came and went describing the new Ter-
ritery as fields planted in frogs, and
fenced by alligators, nevertheless it was
found to be a new land needing govern-
ment and culture. After battle and
sieges it became a "Purchase," and to it
were sent those capable to hold it and
to develop and nourish it.
Among the nrst of the Government
Executives was one Byrd Willis, of the
land of "Old Virginia never tire," as
songsters celebrated it, ad with him,
was his family, and of it a daughter, a
widow, young and beautiful-Mrs. Cath-
erine Grey.
About the same period Napoleon had
fallen, and his brother, nephews and
relatives and friends and sympathisers
were seeking refuge and asylum over the
world-and Florida The recent Spanish
Territory, received her share of these
mixed refugees. Among these was Prince,
the eldest son of Soachim Murat, King
of Italy, who had married the sister of
Napoleon Bonaparte. This son, known as
Achille Murat, meeting Florida's repre-
sentatives in Washington City was pre-
suaded to come to their territory, which
he aod, locating at St. Augustine.
However, luxurious so ever had been
the habits of the Prince in Royal do-
main, he was in republican presence
most abandoned in his modes, and care-
less to reproach in his dress and appe-
tites. The use of tobacco, a common pipe
the vehicle-with the frequent libation
of brandy-made his appearance other-
wise than neat. hls boast was that he
never drank water, which he said, was
only made for beasts.
Tallahassee was now the Capital of
Florida, at that time only a town of
few houses congregated around the Cap-
ital, to which the forests approached, but
people lived outside, making homes on
plantations, often protected by forts of
timber and mounted with guns.
The Legislative Hall was a frame
building to one side of a liberal square,
which more often held church service and
dancing delight, than a law making body,
but it was nere that the Council met,
with Governor William P. Duval presid-
ing.
Tallahassee was gay from the start,
for her people were officeholders with
cultivated families, used to the best so-
cial lines of Washington City, and of
Tennessee and Kentucky. Oratory and
toast drinking were the accomplish-
ments. The Indians made hunting of
game a specialty, among whom con-
spicuously was Tiger Tail afterwards so
prominent in war.
Socially the waltz was condemned as
improper, and there were scarcely ladies
sufficient to form a cotillion or reel.
Prince Murat was called as representa-
tive in the Council of 13 to the Capital,
and here he met the beautiful widow
Grey. He looked like Napoleon, which
made him popular, for did not Florida
unite with a clan or plan to rescue the
Uncle from Elba? But he was not dap-
per enough to win in love without long
time devotion to cou'esy. His bachelor
habits made humor for the domestic


American, wao told of his sleeping on
;he cold cabin flor with a log for a pil-
ow, gun and flask at his side, while pipe
ind brandy were the stimulants.
In his courting visits he was accom-
panied by a shaggy dog, whose fleece
served as a receptacle for the rejected
ambia from chewing the weed, which
was a gracious submission to the moth-
er, Mrs. illis, who was a special Vir-
ginia housekeeper.
Notwithstanding all his peculiarities,
the Prince and lovely widow were mar-
ried by a justice of the peace in Talla-
hassee in the month of July, 1828,
amidst the few neighbors of the new vil-
lage.
A plantation in Jefferson County was
tneir home, near enough to make Talla-
hassee their social rendezvous. Even in
plantation life there was odd develop-
ment. There was not one house there
only, but a had dozen, consisting of one
bedroom each, surrounding a square
filled with orange trees and other tropi-
cal shrubbery, flowers and garden prod-
ucts, with a house in the center of this
square, a house more in ordinary, afford-
ing parlor or reception room and dining
hall, where luxurious entertainment was
tendered to guests of madam, whose re-
fin.ment rendered all that was curious,
attractive and acceptable.
Here time was passed in planting cot-
ton and other crops. To his slaves he
was humane and considerate, especially
and singularly so, that when he had not
money to secure fod for them, he did
exact work, and this did occur some-
times, making his force troublesome to
neighbors, for negroes must eat, and
without work they steal. The Prince's
diversions besides pipe and brandy, was
experiments with plants, discovering
many rare dyes and physics, and thereby
a good story was told of his wife's re-
turn home from a neighboring visit to
find many of her mantles and garments
exposed to dry in the sun, after a dip
in what the Prince called "a beautiful
rose color."
Colonel Murat was a good citizen, how-
ever. During the Seminole war, he serv-
ed gallantly and bravely on the staff of
General Richard Keith Call, which was
when protecting his own plantation and
general neighborhood from Indian at-
tack.
Finally ambition developed and a trip
to Europe was considered. France was
forbidden as we!l as Italy, to any Bon-
aparte, so that Belgium was made the
objective point and by the sovereign
power of that state he was given com-
mand of a regiment of troops, mostly
subjects of his Father King of Naples,
who had been shot for his treachery.
But these soldiers made so many demon-
strations of devoted affection to their
commander, that France and perhaps
others demanded his dismissal from the
position by the King of Belgium and
thus in an address of seven different lan-
guages, owing to the polyglot character
of the whole, the Prince bade farewell
to his regiment, or as might be said-
his last hope.
The trip to Europe was finished in a
sojourn of some months in London,
where they found genial society with
Washington Irving and other Americans,
beside Louis Napo'eon who was there,
sour in disappointment after his signal
defeat In rebellion.
Then again was Florida the alterna-
tive, whence the Prince and his wife re-
turned in fixed disappointment, but
with cheerful resignation, abandoning
all prospects of the Bonaparte restora-
tion. Of course the Prince had been ed-
ucated as a Catholic, but now he declar-
ed himself as an Agnostic, of which he
gave proof in a duel-when life was at
stake-for there with pistol in hand, he
turned to his "second" saying, "you
know I believe in no future." But lhe
escaped with the loss of a finger only.
A few years more brought decay andl
sickness, and a Catholic priest estab-
lished himself in his home at Lipona, so
if religious faith was renewed, the so-
cial world did not learn, but with many
friends surrounding the scene of his fu-
neral, he was buried in the Tallahassee
Episcopal cemetery.


PRINCESS ACHILLE MURAT. eye of the, sometimes, fastidious stran-
The revolution that banished Louis ger. We admit that there are too many
Phillipe from the throne of France made one shot holes, but none of these one
Louis Napoleon President, afterwards a shot holes are alike, and they offer eon-
sovereign emperor, and awakened claims siderable difficult puzzles to even the
to all of Bonaparte's exiled kindred, best of players. 1he putting greens will
One Murat, brother of Florida's Achille, be a surprise to those golfers who have
lived in Braidentown, N. J., where his read of sand and clay "browns." Of
wife kept a girls' boarding school, and course they vary in excellence. At some
Joseph, brother of Napoleon Bonaparte times of the year they are not good, but
was here also a refuge. Our Achille was the Club generally contrive to have them
dead three years past, otherwise it is n very god shape for the many enjoy-
supposed that he would have succeeded able games in February, March and Ap-
Louis Phillipe. ril. No golfer, properly vouched for,
But Madam Kate was here and so soon will regret a season's play in Jackson-
as the revolution was quieted, she went vill. te he as good as the best, there
abroad to visit her husband's cousin, are some pawky golfers to be found ine
Louis Napoleon, whomn she hlad met a the Club that will make it quite inter-
few yeais previously in lmndon at the testing tor him.
time of her husband's experimental visit Then how can a golfer grumble when
to Belgium. le finds Jim Foulis, of Wheaton, in com-
Madame Achille was a Virginia lady mand ieaud) 1 rescue the erring neo-
with limited education, could not speak phyte from the effects of his sins of
French, so that life in Paris presented omission and commission, to warn the
no alluremcnts and Florida was her unwary that golf is nocr o simple as she
home, wherein hei hospitality, charity seems, ad to cheer, but not inebriate,
and amiatulity she ranked high among the fainted hearted-ones who have tem-
women and society. She confided to porarily lost their follow through, or
Louis Napoleon the financial condition their approach?
in which her husband had left his prop- Mr. Flagler has been a great friend of
erty, which was still unrelieved of debt, the wandering golfer on the East Coast
the negro slaves and landed property be- of Florida. From St. Augustine to Mi-
ing all mortgaged to the Union Bank, ami he ..as planted like oases in what
established in Tallahassee, by English was a golfless desert, links that hold the
capital. lHer confidence found sympathy attention and admiration of thousands
\with the receipt of $50,000 from her hus- of devotees, as long as Mr. Flagler's ho-
band's cousin, with which she returned tels keep open. It is not the object of
to Florida, and at once paid off the mort- thus article to advertise any particular
gage ou her husband's estate a few %ea-r course, and it might be individious to
only before the negroes were emancii- praise one links over another.
pated. These last were conspicuously Golfers are safe to visit any. You pay
gatelul and generous to her for a time- your money and you take your choice.
when Louis Napoleon (now emperor) At all there is a golfer's welcome, and
hearing of her impoverished condition, sn.y an old golfer knows thoroughly all
settled an annuity of :10,000 upon her, that term means. Picked professional
which she enjoyed in hospitality, good talent awaits the amateur at all the
deeds and travel for nearly three years, iinks. Household names in the realm of
when death seemed cruelly to take her golf and genuine players and instructors.
from us. And now her remains lie be- On the top of his game and eager like
side her husband Achille Murat within Alexander, for more worlds to conquer,
the Tallahasse cemetery, of which tour- the golfer boards the cars and is whirled
ists make a mecca, and where old friends to the interior of the State. On his en-
go in rememberance of her loveliness in tranced gaze, the links of Kissimmee
person and character, with its splendid turf and bordered by
Mrs. Ellen Call Long was a daughter the sparkling land burst-verily a gol-
of Governor Richard Keith Call and has fear's dream of the Elysian fields. With-
spent her life at Tallahasse where she out doubt Kissimmee can be made the
yet resides. She writes from personal "Golfer's Rest." Just the place for a
observation in much that she says in man desirous of winning his way to the
this memoir.-Ed. foremost ranks to choose to study the
more difficult shots in the game in bu-
colic quiet and enjoyment
Golf, the Queen of Games. But Speed Malchus, speed. Our space
is short to describe the remaining hay-
It is only a few years since golf, the ens for the golfer. Ocala has her course,
(quien of games, invaded Florida. tl most beautiful of all the courses for
\Vhen coll winter's blasts drove the situation. On rolling land, with solid
Northern enthusiasts to the shelter of turf, the golfer here lingers fondly. Play
their magnificent club houses, and cov- here once and you are bound to return,
ered the fair green with its snow man- drawn by the sylvan beauties of nature,
t e, the ardent golfer, who desired to adorned for the worship of Goddess Gol-
keep up his game, had to flee across the final. Then ever Westward Ho, as the
seas, and never dreamt that, in Florida, surf of the mystic Gulf of Mexico sings
%%as to be found the happy golfing in our ears, we alight at the portals of
ground for all. the Belleview Hotel at Bellaire. Here
I can remember when a golfer was one of the pioneers of Florida Golf (Mr.
looked on askance in the streets of Jack- Morton Plant) doth reign and has es-
sonville, his clubs were suspected to be tablished a nine-hole course second to
a menace to the public weal, and his none in the South. Skilfully planned,
garb a betrayal of a vacant mind!! and lavishly completed, the links is an
But we have changed all that. The abiding charm to all lovers of the game.
voice of hde caddie is heard in the land. And surely we recognize that swing, so
T lu frozen golfer, alighting at Jackson- well known to Glenview. Why is it the
ville from the North, is speedily thawed Ochterlonie, ranking among the highest
Iyv tIhe genial smile of his brother golfers. of the princes of golfdom. Surely,
lie is a welcome guest in every hostelry, wearied by our travels, we can say:
and the Floridans vie with each other .here we rest" and, like the lotus eat-
to make him feel at home. ers, soon forget home and distant friends
It is no exaggeration to say that a content to remain forever, willing slaves
carload of the- tourists now streaming to the seductive and all powerful god-
carload of golf clubs come down every dess of golf.
swe.k amriong the baggage of the tourists Other links there are in Florida, but
now streaiingi ever southward. space is denied to me at present to lay
"The (;olf Stream" has this year set their advantages before the wandering
in with its usual serenity, and the bras- golfer. But a time will come.
sic and cleek lord it over the baseball "TIHE COLONEL"
bat.
Let us drift for a few moments with
the stream, and see on what golf greens The president of a big stove factory of
we will be cast upon. St Louis has announced to its employees
We do not have far to drift, for, at that a solid week will be given them to
the Florida countryy Club, within the view the World's Fair. The factory will
Ibrders of Jacksonville, we find a golf be shut down for a full week and the
course ready for us in its well kept garb, men given full pay, in advance, for the
and where every prospect pleases the week.


ARE YOU A SUBSCRIBER TO THE RECORD?








20 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commissary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 27
A. C. Creamery, 30 " .. 28
10 29
A C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream .......... 18

Lard
Compound Tin.
S 50-lb tin.... Market
S 50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-lb tin. ............

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 16


Granulated
..


Sugar
Sugar, bbls.....
5 bbls..
10 bbls..
S sacks..


500
4 95
495
500


Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb................ 30
Simon Pure, 30 1-lb cans to
case, per lb............. 22
Green Coffee good. ........ 10
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 8
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages......' market pfice
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ages ............. market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum....... 14
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 50
English B'fast, 10 lb.. 45
Formosa, 10 lb....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10c size
10 lbs to case, per pound-.. 40

Salt
200-lb sack................ 100
100-lb sack.............. 50
Ice Cream, 200-lb sacks..... 100
S 100-lb sacks..... 50
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-lb.... 265
'" 2-lb.... 275

Pepper
Whole Ground Pepper,
10-lb tin.............. 21
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box
sifter top, per doz...... 45
Ground 1-16 glass pepper
boxes, per doz......40 and 80

Corn


Car Lot
W.Corn,110lb, 143
1001b, 1 29
Mxd corn,1101b,1 14
1001b,1 25


100 Sk
Lot
1 45
1 81
140
1 27


Less 100
Sk


New Syrup
Ga and Fla, in cypress
barrels, per gallon.....
Oats


Car Lot
W clip'd,1251b,2 20
1001b,1 75
White 1251b, 2 10
White 10011). 1 67
Mixed 1251b 2 5
S lO01b, 1 64


100 Sk
Lot
2 22
1 77
222
1 69
2 7
165


L
S


30


ess 10M)
>k Lots
225
1 80
2 15
I 72
2 10
168


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 1001bs., choice. .... 1 65
fancy..... 1 70
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbls
per bbl................ 5 75
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 lb sack.........5 75
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-lb sacks............ 5 75
Pillsbury's Best ..... 6 00
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal ......... 6 25
. bbl .... ....
Meal
Meal, per barrel............ 3 50
92-lb sacks........... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel............ 3 60
S92-lb sacks...... 1 60

Rice
Good...................... 5
Choice.... .. ............ 54
Fancy Head.............. 6
Broken...................
Canned Vegetables
Doz.
Tomatoes, 8s, Chief..... .. 90
Tomatoes, 2s ........ 80
Clayton,3s................ 45
Clayton, 2s ............... 70
Sifted Peas, 2s ............1 40
Rose L. J. Peas ........... 80
Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........1 20
Lima Beans,2s ............1 00
String Beans, 3s........... 90
String Beans, 2s .......... 70
Baked Beans, 8s........... 90
Baked Beans, is.:......... 45
Corn, fancy, 2s............ 1 40
Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
Beauty Beets, 3s...........
Sauer Kraut, 3s ........... 85
Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Pumpkin, 3s .............. 90

Hay


car lots


1 48 Choice....19 50
1 84 No.1 Tim. 18 00
1 43 No. 2 17 00
1 30 No.1 Cl'ler 17 00


S100 bale
lots
2000
1850
1780
1750


less
quantity
20 50
1900
1800
1800


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case, per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, 8s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case.
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s percase3 85

Candy
Mixed 30-lb pails, per lb... 7
10-lb 8
Gum drops, 0-lb pails, rer
Ib................... 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box.
assorted, per lb........ 8

Dried Fruits
Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb....... 9
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb....... 81
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes. 18
Ex. Choice " .
Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lb. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52
Currants, cleaned, 86-lb. case 8 60
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
b(.x, 40-50............. 6..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 0-60. ............. 7..
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb
box, 60-70............. 8..
L. L. Raisins, 3 crown..... 1 85
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 90
Seedless, 1-lb packages .... 12
Citron, 10-lb box ........ 1 50
Peanuts
Fancy, H P, per pound.... 64
Extra H P, .... 5
Seed Peanuts, ....
New Nuts
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11
Almonds............ ..... 18
Brazils ...... ............. 12
Peacans.... .............. 12
Filberts................... 12
al0 nuts.................. 14
Cotton Seed Meal
Car 100 Less o0o
lots Sk. Lot Sk. Lo
Cottonseed Meal 27 00 27 50 28 00
Hulls 1150 12 50 13 00


Matches
Atlantic, per gross......... 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop.. ......2 20
S 3 hoop ........
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz....... 1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18......1 00
S nested ......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 60
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. ..1 20
Washboards Per
Dozen
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay...............3 00
175 Diamond Glass ......... 25
O. W. D., 17 inch, per doz 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75

Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2 doz to case, per
doz. ................ 95
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 75
Sardines, 5 case lots........ 65
Salmon is, Tale 4 doz to case
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon, Is, 4 doz to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned, Hominy, 31b...... 96

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails.............. 8 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40
lbs to box............ 2 40
Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8

Kingan's Meats.
"Reliable" Hams, 8-10 avge ... 141-4
"Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avge 14
"Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avge 131-2
"Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge.. 91-4
"Reliable" California Hams, 6-8 9
Asreakfast Bacon, light av. .... 131-2
D. S. Bellies, 16-18 av......... 834
D. S. Bellies, 20-22 av. ......... 81-2
D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av.......... 81-8
D. S. Plates .................. 71-2
Bacon Plates .................. 81-2
D. S. Butts .................. 63-8
Bologna Sausage ............... 7
sausage in oil ................ 3.75
Butter and Cheese.
"Strawberry" Creamery, 60-lb tubs 26
30-lb tube 251-2
6s, Is... 2e1-2
"Iadybird" full cream cheese .. 121-2
Kingan's aid.
"Indiana" Pure Leaf ........... market.
"'Sea-Foam" Compound .........market.


Kingan's Canned Meats.
"Reliable" Corned Beef, Is ......
Corned Beef, 2s ......
Roast Beef, s ........
Roast Beef, 2s ......
Potted Ham and Tongue
1-4s .........................
Sliced Beef, 1-2 ..
Vienna Sausage, 12 ..
Tripe ..................


$1.25
226.
1.25


I
296

1.16
.5
A10


GET A COPY OF THE NAVAL STORES BLUE BOOL




41,1111|194 101910.16141 11011
President, W. C. POWELL; Vice-Presidents,
LARD. H. COVINGTON
IN


COi







0li 0i001 010 o

Tip C lli l L
T- he Consolilll is Pitel

i PInI


as,


I#IIlTI IIHE#I l11 101 WEEKLY9 INDUSAL REC, + RD. 4 21lk~l 4i,* *
who with the Preildent constitute the Directory and Board of Managers, W. .- COACHMAN. B. F. BUL-
r. H. A. McEACHERN, JOHN R. YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, C. DOWN-
G, J. R. SAUNDERS. C. B. ROGERS: Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.


IOAIT NiAVL 0TOR1 COMPANY,


Sovonnh, G.


PeinaolI, FuI.


NAVAL STORES FROTORS.


52,500.000


Own d old io PR ilcol operoirs


Yel in Resene I0 lll 0o Oeilos nWo C( AI line 10 By.


Its Ileres oare ien ol With Tose


The Pol0tloe ol T10li0E 00er0osrs evrIwhere Mil
I o MoneI nd Plen o Timbler Ior Evelbody

ONYILLE, SAVANNAHM, FERNANDINA r PENSACOIA.

ers ore Inviled to Coil or Couresond
T0 E 1 ECO IS TE 01 OPlle TOiS' 11ENCE
THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."


Sa Coomeraie Comini.


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


21


21












JcsoMille,


o. .


22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Flavius T. Christie, Frak C. Groover, Marshall W. Stewart,
President. Vie-Prea. Sec. and Treas.
-Whlesole ono gisls
.P'_/II0I030


Fuel and Building Material.
The Southern Fuel and Supply 0o.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.
Naval Stores Market
and Stock Report
Published Daily in The

Jacksonville Metropolis,
Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.
$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.

BIG PRIZES:
A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposition, to
Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.
Carter & Russell Publishing Co.
Jacksonville. Florida.


le Solicil Trle In lio abel i TODI liine Commissai DOelenl
rll Oir 8go Silll. CorresimidaI Soliciled. We Wonal Tr Node
Cochrane's Book Store.
Wholesale Stationery, Fishing Tackle, Pipes,
Notions, Stencil Ink Brushes, Lumber Crayons.
PALATKA. FLORIDA.
Write for Prices. Nare hundreds of articles suitable for the Commissary Trade.
JOSEPH D. WEED. W. D. KRENSON
J. D. WEED I CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.
Wholesale Hardware,
Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF
Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc,


Half Tones=Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department


OF


THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.


I SPECILTY IS 110DE OF DISIGNING, RETOUCHING 10 m LISHING PHOTOGlIS ID PICTURES.


IN WRITING


A


OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.

Florida Enterprise. Try It.


IF YOU DON'T FIND IT IN THE RECORD WRITB US






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 23


McMURRAY & BAKER,



Saw Mill anid Iu0ell e Horlie. Librty Stret,
,. Librt! Stzs


We ae reeting dally up-to-date pleasure and bumkne vehles. ME t-e
tawrobes whip, baress sad bore furnilDtla. we have a nobby Ita Prmes
mad goods to tUch with i. Turpentine waw and harnem a spedlaty. Doa't
foret we can beat th world on hand- made harrn.

M IYR l B KER, 401 10 413 E. BIY ST.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The Clyde Steamship Company


I


BLAKESLEE PUMPING OUTFIT.
This outfit can be directly connected to a pump and will
supply sufficient water for general farm and household use.
Why not have a water works plant of your own at a small
cost. and this is the most desirable power for use in case
of fire or other necessity; it can be started at a moment's
notice. You don't have to wait for the wind; it's always
ready for work.
The engine can Instantyl be made ready for other pow-
er purposes, such as grinding feed. churning. etc.. by dis-
connecting the pump. This outfit Is simple, durable, economical, easily operated,
and ready for work any minute. No country home is complete without this ideal
labor saver. We build a complete line of pumping plants for mines. Irrigation,
fire protection, railway supply, and install water works plants for city service.
Will be pleased to furnish any additional information on request.
WHITE-BLAKESLEE MFG. CO. Birmingha&m. Ala.
Builders of the Blakeslee Gas and Gasoline and Connected Outfits.
-------- ----


IE90WV99caY ~399 ~~W;P~09~~9~~


J. R. TOLAR.


J. H. HART. T. H. BLACHLY.
(Established 18T2.)


J. R. TOLAR, JR.


TOLAR, HART & CO..
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnificent steamships of this line are appointed to sail as follows, calling
at Charleston, S. C. both ways.


Prom New York,
(Pier North River).


Irf- Jacksonville fr
STEAMER. Charlesrto and New York.


Tuesday, Mar. 15, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ....Sunday, Mar. 20, at 6:00 am
**HURON ..Monday, Mar. 21, at 6:30 am
Wednesday, Mar. 16, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS, ....Tuesday, Mar. 22, at 7:30 am
Friday, Mar. 18, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ..Wednesday, Mar. 23, at 8:30 am
Tuesday, Mar. 22, at 3:00 pm .......... ***SEMINOLE, Sunday, Mar. 27, at 12 n'n
Friday, Mar. 25, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ....Wednesday, Mar. 30, at 4:00 am
Sunday, Mar. 27, at 3:00 p. m. .. .. ..IROQUOIS, Saturday, April 2, at 6:00 a.m.
*ALGONQUIN .. .. Saturday, April 2, at 6:00 am
Tuesday, Mar. 29, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Sunday, April 3, at 6:30 am
Friday, April 1, at 3:00 pm ....COMANCHE ... .Wednesday, April 6, at 9:00 am
*xHURON Wednsd'y, April 6, at 9:00 am
Tuesday, April 5, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ...... Sunday, April 10, at 12:30 pm
Tuesday, April 5, at 3:00 pm .**SEMINOLE ....Sunday, April 10, at 12:30 pm
Thursday ,April 7, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ....Tuesday, April 12, at 1:30 pm
Friday, April 8, at 3:00 pm ......ARAPAHOE Wednesday, April, 13, at 1:30 pm
**ALGONQUIN ..Friday, April 15, at 4:00 am
Tuesday, April 12, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ....Sunday, April 17, at 5:30 am
Friday, April 15, at 3:00 pm .... APACHE .. Wednesday, April 20, at 7:30 am
**xHURON ..... Thursday, April 21, at 8:00 am
Sunday, April 17, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ....Saturday, April 23, at 10:30 am
Tuesday, April 19, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Sunday, April 24, at 11:30 am
Wednesday, April 20, at 3:00 pm ..***SEMTNOLE ..Monday, April 25, at 12:30 pm
Friday, April 22, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ... .Wednesday, April 27, at 1:30 pm
**ALGONQUIN .... Friday, April 29, at 4:00 am
Tuesday, April 20, at 3:00 pm ... .APACHE ........ Sunday, May 1, at 5:30 am
Thursday, April 28, at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOTS ....Tuesday, May 3, at 7:00 am
Friday, April 29, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE ..Wednesday, May 4, at 7:30 am
*xHURON ........ Friday, May 6, at 8:30 am
--Freight only. *-Boston via Charleston and New York.
--Boston via Brunswick "d Charles ton. *--Boston. via Charleston.
THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
DtIre Serviee Between Jackenvillie, Boston and Prwovdemee and all East-
erm Point, Callns at Cbarlestom Betb Way.
SEMI-WEEKLY SAILINGS.
Southbound.. .... .. * * ............. .... rom Lewis Wharf Boston
Northbound.. ........ .. .... .. .... .. rom foot of Catherine Street, Jacksonville
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jaeksonvtll and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor. St. Francis. Beresford (De Land) and Intermediate
landings on St. Johns river.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jasksonville, Sundays, Tuesdays and Thurs-
days, <30 p. m. Returning. leave Sanford. Monday, Wednesdays & Fridays 9:0 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND, I|ORTH BOUiND,
Read down, I I Read up.
Leave 0 p. m..................Jacksonville........ ....... ....... Arrive 2a0 a. m.
Leave 3:4 p. m..... .... ......Palatka................... ...... Leave 8:00 p. m.
Leave : a. m. ........ ..............Astor...........................jLeave 2:30 p. m.
Leave 43 a. m. ...... .... .....St. rancis.......................|Leave 1:00 p. m.
...... ........... .. .. ... ....Beresford (DeLand).................... Leave 12:00 noon
Arrive 0 a. m. ...... ......... .......Sanford.......... ....... ......|Leave 9:0 a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m. ...................Enterprise ..................... Lv. 10:00 a. m.
emENRAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OPPICE. 204 W. Bay St.. Jaek'vvlle.
F. M. IRONMONGER. JR.. Asst. Gent. Pass Agent. 204 W. Bay St.. Jacksonville. ila
W. COOPER, JR., Local Frt. ASt., Jack'ville. C. P. LOVELL, Asst. Supt..Jack'vill1
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
A C HAGGERTY. G. .P.P. A., New York, CLYDE MITLN, 0. F. A., New York
TeaO. a. BGER, Wm. P. CLYDE a CO.
General Manager. General Agents.
Chemserough Building. 19 State Street. New York.


Commission


Merchants


and Jobbers of Navael Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


"The" PAINT STORE,
I. E. BAIRD (D CO., Jacksonville, Fla,
vaall paper, pictures, frames, painting and all interior and exterior decorating.
Hardware, glass, etc. If you are building a fine home, get Baird & Co. to do
tne decorating that it may be in keeping with the building. Oldest and most ex-
perienced house in F.arida.

W. l. Huger, W. T. RIley. 0. J. seove.
Preaddent. Vice-Preedent. Sec'y and Tres


UNION COOPERATE AND SUPPLY NO.
(INCORPORATED.)

RW NERS ll Klnds 01 C00eoopIeg
DEA IN 11 a ur a


SPIRITS OF TURPETINE BARRELS I SPECIALTY.

WITH DISTRIBUTING POINTS FOR TURPENTINE BARRELS LOCATIIE AS FOLW S:
ATLANTA. COLUMBUS. BAINBRIDGE, MACON. SAVANNAH. VALDOS
TA. TIFTON, HAWKINSVILL, GA.; OCALA PENSACOLA, LIVE OAK
LEESBITR,. LAKE CITY, JACKSONV ILLE TAMPA, FLA:; MON'IOMERT
ALA.; CHARLEBTON. K C.
ALL ORDERS TO AMOVE POINTS OI SAVANNAH OrFICE WILL RCmIVEB
PROMPT ATTrETION.

0 9..Pgjj 9 ., Q jQg.9._ J _9 I.-jLoJ.JLa JLUJ.Lg Q..-O o 0o o Q ok o e
SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
30 YEARS RELIABILITY.
Hess 5 Slager,
Diamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry
CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND 11 & 13 MAIN. o
S-s ob"oo oo---,"ear-- Iao' a" a o"u0-5"so10- osoo r -~or- -o



East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.

WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


WRITE THE RECORD FOR ANY INFORMATION DESIRED.


L, -- -- - -mn ~ ~ PdLbM~rMI~P~~M P P






24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J H C.OSBY. President


C M FULLER. Vice-President


JAS F LANE. Sency Trees


tobbilnied
11"


iacorpors,
MG


Greenleaf &


Crosby


Depawl ueWt'


Diamonds and Other Precious
Stones


Company


Fine Gold Jewelry


eboverkro anb

bidberonhitbo


41 West Bay Street

Jecksonvifle

1hn l'gas and fi~t .oc in tih part of the
se06"m t Prompt ausonm. tE man orders


Write for Catalogue


4.Z


American and Foreign Watches
and Clocks


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


Fine China Dinner Sets and
Fancy Pieces


European Novelties


- >----1-------- *aa~r ~~ w-

STHE COUNCIL TOOL CO.
g or Wananish. N. C.,
S Formerly of Councl's Station, N. C., are still selling Diamond Edge
Hacks at .I.L Black Joe and Standard at $.00, Old Style and Patent
S Pullers at n.M a dosn. They should average a little better than ever.
* We have brought out a new brand, the Blue Line Hacks at $S.00 and Pull-
* ers at S8.00 which are warranted. All wholesale dealers In naval stores
S suppies carry our lines and should supply operators.
* en^4^^^ n


D6 G. M1EctHAN, PrldmLt.
Jackonvlle, a.


Pine Product Co
INCORPOR
Fyettevillh
Spirits of Turpentine. Oil of Tar, Creosote, Ta
Paints, Wood Stains, Etc., and Charcoal, fro
Profits increased. Time of distillation reduc
No danger from fire. Plant erected complete
their Information, write Alfred MacKethan.


ALFRED A. McKETHAN, L't U. S. N.
Ret'd Sec'y and Treas, Constructing
Engineer, Fayetteville, N. G.

instruction Co,
ATED
e, N. C.
r, Disinfectants: Wood Preservative,
n Lightwood Stumps. Box-facings.
ed. Condensation controlled at will.
e, and men taught the process. Fur-


general manager. Fayetteville. N. C.


THE PHILADELPHIA TAILORS
JOHN B. GIANCAGLINI & BRO.,

MERCHANT TAILORS AND IMPORTERS


48 W. Bay Street.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


HOTI ARTHI i BROADWAY AND 2,3d ST,
HIIUO L DBARTHOLDL NEW YORK CITY.
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout.
Near all Big Stores and Places of Amusemeet. Cars Pass
the Door for all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings. I
Large Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you 0
find no grand and magnificent decorations. no luxurious
grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
* Speak to Yoe. No Employees In Any Way Inattentative.
But just a cozy, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the
hearts of those who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plain American cooking, and affable and courteous treatment.
e LTWAGLEE P J(%l
*Ma******* W wwwwwoy w g


John R. Young. President. C. S. Ellis. Vice-President.
SJ. W. Motte. Jr.. Secretary and Treasurer.


I ELLIS-YOUNG CO. e

Commission Merchants
NAVAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

| Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.


J. W. HUNT. President J. Z. HARRIS. ad V. Pres. C. R. SHOUSE See. & Teas.
P. L. PsACOCI, Ist V. P* W. J. KIL.LY, 3d V. P. H. L RICHMOND. Asst See'-y-Tre

Peacock-Hunt & West Company,
General Offices: 20 Bay Street, Savannah, G. and
t West Bufdlndi Jacksonvile, Fla.
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutual. We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that buys spirils
Turpentine and rosin.)

WHOLESALE GROCERS,
Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our Specialty
-SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wilson & Ghilds'
Philadelphia Wagons.

Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga., and Jacksonville
and fernandina, Fla.