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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00066
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 1, 1904
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00066
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text




I-. Bk IVAR Y

"THE PINE AND ITS PRODUCTS." ,
f'o 6 i:.



WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD D


Published Every Friday, Devoted to the Naval Stores, Lumber and Manufacturing Interests.

AdUptd Sept. 12tha 1902, by the Executle Committee of the Turpentine Operators' Association as its Exclusive Official Organ, and Adopted Sept. Ilth 1902, In Annual Con-
rention, as an Oflcial Organ Also of the General Association. Adopted Sept. I th, 1903. as the only Official Organ of the Trpentine Operators' Association.
Adopted April 27t1. 1903. as the Official Organ of the Inter-Stale Cane Growers' Association. Endorsed by the Seorgia Sawmill Association.


VOL 8. NO. 14.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA


APRIL I, 1904.


SAVANNAH, GA.


$3 A YEAR.


7!5111wwvwilv1v.wwvvm.1-1.Lf1111! ww#19,i0 Xw99w~l P


The Record has, from time to time,
pointed with a great deal of pride to the
careers of successful men in the South,
who first planted their hopes among the
industrial masses.
Among the men who have played the
strongest part in the newer and greater
development of Florida none stand higher
than the subject of this sketch.
His record during this, his first term
in the Senate, both aside from and added
to his work as a public spirited citizen
and as a man of unimpeachable private
character, entitle him to the endorsement
of this people.
That this endorsement will he splendid-
ly given there now seems little doubt.
James P. Taliaferro was born at Or-
range Court House, Virginia, September
30, 1847, and spent his youth and young
manhood in his native State.
He is a descendant of Robert Taliaferro,
who came from England about the year
1650 and settled in Essex county, Virgin-
ia, and who was of the Blenheim branch
of what has since become a numerous
family. Mr. Taliaferro's father was Ed-
'mmnd Pendleton Taliaferro, a prominent
physician of Orange County, who devoted
his entire life to the duties of his profes-
sion in that vicinity.
Mr. Taliaferro was engaged in acquiring
his education in the noted school of Wil-
liam Dinwiddie at Greenwood, when the
war began, and left the school in 1864,
when only 17 years of age, to enlist in
the Confederate army, in which he served
until the close of the war. Returning to
his home after the surrender, he endeav-
ored to resume and complete his studies,
but the misfortunes of war had made
such changes in the condition of the fam-
ily that he decided to abandon his purpose
and enter at once upon the responsibili-
ties of manhood, in the hope of bettering
his own fortunes as well as those of his
family.
SRemoval to a more promising field than
was then offered in his native State ap-
peared to be imperative, and young Talia-
ferro came to Florida, seeking such em-
ployment as might present itself, and
finding it, as many another adventurous
youth has done, at the very foot of the
industrial ladder. Possessing no capital
but health, hope and a sturdy determi-
nation to win, which has ever since been
one of his chief characteristics, he took
service as a lumber marker in a sawmill
-& common laborer, wearing the rough-
est of clothing and living on the coarsest
of fare. He "graduated" thence into a


Baker county logging camp, with little
improvement in his condition; but after
some years of faithful service for others,
he began to look out for himself. Having
become familiar with the lumber busi-
ness "from the ground up," he addressed
himself to the attainment of the high po-
sition therein which he soon achieved, and


er with some of Florida's bravest and
worthiest spirits, helping to bear the bur-
dens of the trial of democrats charged
with violations of republican election
laws; and on one occasion was fined in
contemptt for cheering in open court a
verdict of acquittal in one of those trials.
He served the democracy with unwearied


HON. JAMES P. TALLIAFERRO.


which proved to be the safe basis of his enthusiasni and rare fidelity, without a
later success, thought of personal reward, during the
During the strenuous period of his subsequent years of democratic rule, and
growth as a man and a citizen, Mr. Talia- to such good purpose that he became the
ferro, while making no pretensions as a choice of his fellow democrats as a mem-
politician, became profoundly interested in ewr of the State executive committee, of
the political events of the times, and [ which hbdy he was the chairman for sev-
passed through the trying scenes of the eral years.
reconstruction period shoulder to should- In 1871 Mr. Taliaferro was married to


I


u


From a Florida Logging Camp to the United


Ell-ITT-1-ITTY11TT-13Plrr;Pi,11r


***t WN,,,~,r ~r,,~~~rrL dr~ 6~~~QdCi __ 0,- ~ 666~6dddb~It~


States Senate,


Miss Jessie Hardy, of Norfolk, Va., and
establishing a home in the city of Jack-
sonville. has ever since resided here. Suc-
cess came to him as the due reward of
intelligent effort and upright dealing with
his fellowmen, and honors sought him.
He became the president of the First Nat-
ional Bank of Tampa, a member of the
Florida State Board of Health, and vice-
president of the C. B. Rogers Co. Un-
spoiled by prosperity, he has lived Ta life
of sobriety and self-control, never, for the
past twenty-four years, having touched
ntoxicating liquors.
His election to the United States Senate
;n 1891I was an event of moe than ordi-
,lary significance. In the place of the
excitingg scenes of stubborn contest which
rad characterized similar previous occas-
'ons, there was a calm. quiet, yet deter-
mined eoimetmtraticn of political forces in
'tis direction which resulted in his elec-
tion on the first ballot, taken separately
n the :espective houses of legislature, on
the 18th of April, by a large majority, and
the formal declaration of a like result on
the following day in the joint session,
when he received 49 votes, a majority of
20 and a plurality of 22, of those present
and voting.
Commenting ujn the event. the Times-
Union and Citizen of April 20, uttered the
following remarkable prophesy, which has
been so remarkably fulfilled:
"The whole past life of James P. Talia-
ferro stamps him as the antithesis of the
demagogue--a man of action rather than
speech. who will perform more than he
alares to promise: fair to his foes. loyal
to his friends, unmoved in defeat and
equal in victory a very rock in time of
trouble, but modest and quiet when suc-
cess is assured. The service he has done
left him with wide popularity because he
is not a brass hand campaigner; but the
whole State will soon know this worthy
son of Old Virginia. this citizen of Florida,
as Du"v! County knows and honors and
trusts nim absohltely."
A wide-awake and enthusiastic drum-
mer, who travels in Florida, after a chance
meeting with I. S.Senator Taliaferro on a
train, had the following unique "docu-
ment" printed at his own expense, and is
distributing thousands of copies through-
out the State:

What Happened to Florida.
The right man happened to be in Wash-
ington, D. C.
(Continued on Pare 5.)





2 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
assemea**sse6 *** te*ea**6*66*tte6tt6 tW66***** 446MM4*M t4Me


C. B. ROGERS. PRImSIDNT.


W. A. GALLAHER and E.'A. CHAMPLAIN, VICE-PRESIDRNTS.


C. H..HOI)GSON, SE, and TREAS'E.


DIRECTORS : C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain. H. A McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCE RY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,coo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch ofthe Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries,


Grain, Pro-


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.

Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one'Three-Story Building, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; one one-story building, 80x25c,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind in the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola. Fla., and Savenneh, Ga.


a a #9#9e9 WS~


THE RECORD WILL BE WORTH DOLLARS TO YOU EVERY WEEK.


~siP;onr~,~o~~~~c~i+~r







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 3


TURPENTINE CUPS.

If you expect to use the HERTY cup
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices and all infor-
mation cheerfully furnished on

CUPS, GUTTERS and all TOOLS
used in the Herty system of turpen-
tining. Address

CHATTANOOGA POTTERY CO.,
DAISY, TENN.


m Irr111 I TiIT I- 1r -M--;^ i 1 1 1111 : 14 1-t-
SW. W. CARNES. Pres. W.C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T DUDLEY. Sec. & Treas

Tampa Hardware Co.

I IWholesale
- Hardware
= Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies. Z

Large Stock Council and Holmes Hacks
- and Pullers on Hand. .e N<

TAMPA, LOIDA.

I T11I I I II- I I=I I-=I -I 1 IIII-1-1- 1 I I 1 111 11111 I


... NATIONAL...


Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANN AH. G %.. U. 5. A.


ZINC NAILS
FoR
Turpentine Cups
Approved by Dr. Herty. Made of a
strong but soft light metal. They are
the agoly mils which will not injure
saws when left in the trees.
Salem Nail Co.
279 PewAl St. NOw Yoerk, N. Y.
Also Headquarters for Galvanized and
Tinned Nails, Boat Nails, Spikes, Round
Iron Rods, Etc, Slating and Roofing
Nails, Slaters Tools, Copper Nails and
Tacks.

Grivol; Typewriters
Dy~l-Vpchihrch Buildln.
Jacksonville, Fla.
All makes.
For S1.oo will send you one of our best
ribbons, and i dozen of our best carbons,
and a catalogue of the beat typewriter
in the world-The Wonderful Oliver
Typewriter. It writes in sight.


BOWEN & CO.


JST LIKE FII)IG NEY!















TO TRADE WITH

R. J. RILES.
Railroad Watches,
Diamonds and Jewelry.
225 WEST BAY si nET.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
Watch Repairing A Specialty.


EVERYONE IN I mlK I L
In the Florida East Coast and partic-
ularly DADE County
SHOULD READ
a Newspaper that gives all the news of
the great Veetable and Pineapple sec
tions and Tourist Resorts. Subscribe
now for
tbe "Zropical Sun,
Harry L Brown. Mgr..
West Palm Beach, Fla.
SEMI Wednesdays and
WEEKLY Saturdays ,
$20 A YER. TO ANY ADDRESS IN TIE
2 UNITED STATES AND CANADA.
CYPRESS WATER TANKS
Best in the World.
For delivered prices write,
Cypress Tank Ce-, MobiceAa.


JOHN R. YOUNG.
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


A. D. COVINGTON.
Vice-President.
DIRECTORS:


C. S. FLLIS.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


H. L. KAYTON.
Secretary and Treasurer.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL
WALTER RAY.
A. D. COVINGTON.


J. B. CIESNUTT
G. W. DEEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.


McMurray Livery, Sale and Transfer Co.
HORSES AND MULES.
We carry the largest stock of any stable In the city, and have always
on hand 100 to 150 head of all kinds and prices. If in need of any, give
us a call, or write for what you want.
E. B. DALTON, Manager, Jacksonville.
SI IU11 I -I-I--I-II I I I II II 1 III- II 1--1 1-1-1-;-TI 1-1 I
J. P. PWILLIAMS. President J. A. (G. CARSON. 1st Vice-President.
T. A. JKNNINGs. 2nd Vice-President. J. F. DUeNBUnRT.3d Vice-President. -
H. L. KATroN, Secretary. D. (. White. Treasurer.

J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

NHIll STOR 110 OTTON FlCTR NrO WHOLESIE SlGROERS.
Main Office SAVANNAH, GEORGIA. A
S ranch officer : PE NSACOLA. FLX. BEranch Grocery House.
f JACKSONVILLE, FLA. i COLLMBUS, GA.
Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Us.
1t 1 -T I t -Irl = l 1-(-t- -1: t_+s I I I 1 -1 1 1- -1 T l :-1-1 T 1 1 M t t t 11 + T--


Jacksonville, Fla.


Osteopathy.
The New Scientific Treatment
of the Body.
DR. JOHN \W D"HE.PS.
Chronic and Nervous Troubles
DR. ELIZABETH BRIGGs McELWAIN.
Diseases of Women and Children
211 W. Adams. Jacksonville.

THE CANNON COMPANY


CAPITAL PAID
IN $19,500.00

BARRELS
ALL KINDS.
Our Spirit Barrels hold and will pass the se-
verest American and European inspection.

Plants at MEIGS, CAIRO, OUITMAN, GA,
and MONTICELLO, FLA.
Address orders to home office,
S QUITMAN, GA.


1i00 Imog W0r1 I &Su 4.
BMLDERB AND DRALERO IN


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cottone. aw. ertllser. Oil nd le Ma-
ohinery, and Supplies ad RepD i
CAPACrIT FOR HAND
Maehlne Tool, Wood-Workfi Maebi -
ery. Shafttnag Pullepy. foers. L-itba
and Rubber Belttng sad Home. Rali, e
&ad Mnl hpplue aid TeL
Plans and estimate ftaramishel d l
Plants aid Steel Bridges.
Steam Pmps. ear Water Basim m
Hotlistm Knlgnes.
AUGUSTA. CA.


THE RECORD IS THE SOUTH'S "'- T TRADE JOURNAL.






4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


) Bro.
TT BOCK.


Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.
Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.


I


I


.W.eww ww w w w '- -&io


MORTGAGES.
WILLIAM W. FRAZIER,

Real Estate Broker.


Ill W. FORSYTH STREET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


H, A. Renfroe Co.


T. MURPHY
Jacksonville
Machine and Iron Works
ENGINEER, IRON AND BRASS
FOUNDER AND MACHINIST
Locomotive, Steamboat and Sawmill Machinery Made and Repaired. Iron and
Brass Castings, Phosphor- Bronze Jou rnal Bearings-
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.


SStandard Clothing Company

One Price One Price

FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
Stetson and Hawes Hats. Special Attention Given tn Mail Orders.

1*****6******************** +*+*+**e**e**.**++ .
Do You Want to Sell
Your Saw Mill or Tie Timber?

SDo You Want to Sell your Tur-
pentine Location ?
I If so, write us, we are in touch with many Northern, Western and
SSouthern Millmen who want to buy.

Brobston, Fendig &Co.
Brunswick, Ga. and Jacksonville, Fla.


Cable Address. Florida.

Standard Naval Stores
Company. [
DEALERS EXCLUSIVELY IN?

J ROSIN :
AND TURPENTINE. i
Jacksonville. Fla.
i WWWW4999>99 6- awlgg*-


TAILORS


Stetson Hats


I)* lye u


Suits to Order at ReadyMade Prices
439 W. Bay Street.


Mail Orders Given Personal Attenion.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


rin tiln g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory
service guaranteed. South Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.

M. A. BAKER,
Inventer aon
Manufacturer of the
Baker Improved
Seemless Turpen-
Stire stills.


The Largest and Oldest Copper
Works in Georgia.


VWrite me for prices and outfti
I'. 0. B. any point in Georgia. ]jor-
id;:. Alab;iima or Mississippi. Ala
aI ills sold under a guarantee.
Job work through the
country a specialty.
I3runswick, Ga.


si My specialty is large worms and heavy xbttoms that do not leak.

W. H. BECKWITH W. B. HENDERSON. G C WARREN.
BECKWITH, HENDERSON & WARREN.
LARGE TRACKS OF TURPENTINE AND MILL LANDS.
Rooms 1-2-3, First National Bank Building.
TAMPA, : : : : : FLORIDA.

4II 1 I I Il I -I -I11 II: I II -I I: I :-1:1II:IIl- I iim1111111111

McMillan
Bros.
Florida Cop-
per Works.
SManufacturers of Turpentine Stills and
General Metal Workers.
Old Stills taken in exchange for new ones.
Patching through the country a specialty.
Orders ,y mail or wire will receive prompt
attention at either of the following works:
Fayetteville. N. C. SaLvannah. Ga :
Mobile, Ale.. J Jacksonville. Fla
4 1lltll 1 1 11111 1 11 311 I I-. i I II t II ll 1t Il II I II


DON'T FAIL TO MENTION THE RECORD TO ADVERTISERS.


SJ. A. Craig (


239 W. Bay Street


EVER"


RENTS.


*


1-.-.~-








TITE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


ing colors, it can be readily understood
that the building of the canal means the
digging of two basins in the bay-one by
private enterprise and the other by the


Continued from Pa;- I. government-each sufficiently large to ac-
The Government happened to give Flor- coimmodate a number of deep-water ves- ,
ida for Rivers and Harbors, $2,300,000. sels.
The Government happened to give Flor his \ ill lead to the docking here of a
ida for pensions per year, $100,000. vast amount of coastwise shipping and to
The Government happened to give Flor- the furnishing of a safe harbor to war
ida for Public Buildings, $500,000. vessels of every kind.
The Government happened to give Flor- Lighthouses and beacons will be erected
ida for Light Houses, $100,000. at the entrance to the canal, and all that
The Government happened to give F.or- part of the island improved and fortified ]
ida for Indian War Claims, $1,110,000. by the Government.
The government happened to save the It will iAad to the building of vast docks
State of Florida on Cattle, 40 per cent. to accommodate the shipping.
Total, $4,100,000. I Additional transportation from the city
This happens to be more than $7 per by rail may be looked for when the canal
capital for every man, woman and chihl.d I, completed.
black or white, in Florida. I Lger machine shops and railroad shops
For 40 years this State has been trying ,ill Le needed and will be built.
to have the Indian War Claim happen, i Competition in transportation rates both
but it never did happen until Florida hap- by laud and water will induce the location
opened to get the right man for Senator. here of various factories.
Don't you think it would be a good The rapid growth of the city attendant
thing to happen to send him back and let on tlhse improvements will make the
some more good things happen? draining of the Everglades more of a ne-
i-.3 d,, ,inIU l i tguiigsl


I-(esl y, ianjwi w ri IIiu t uthe ginning auu
completion of that great work.
\\ith open water to the east and the
vast fertile lands of the Everglades at
,our doors on the west, Miami's prospects
Ior future growth and greatness are ex-
ceedingly promising.-AMiami Record.

The Jiritihli barkentine, Peerless, Cap-
lain Byrne, entered last week from Fer-
iandina; no cargo.




* NO FU.RM 1w8o w
S A GROVE OF
=EI *I~~ =


Green Bone.
Green cut bone serves as a highly ni-
trogenous food, provides lime for the shells
of eggs and for the production of bone
in growing fowls, as well as serving to
assist in grinding the food, taking the
place of grit, and is readily accepted by
all classes of poultry. In fact, it is safe
to claim that there is nothing that can
be used as egg-producing food which
serves the purpose better than green bone.
its combination of qualities-nitrogen,
lime for egg-shells, cost, and adaptation to
all fowls and all ages-giving it a place
even higher than meat, which contains ni-
trogen, phosphates and but little mineral
matter. Therefore, in preparing a diet
for poultry, either with a view to in-
creasing the vigor of the bird or develop-
ings its egg-producing organs, such food
should be selected as science and chemis-
try have demonstrated to be component
parts of the structure to which they are
afforded as nutriment and sustenance.
None possesses these qualifications to such
a marked degree as does fresh bone. which
is therefore a necessity for success in poul-
try raising.


Bright for Miami
Yesterday the actual work necessary to
create a deep-water canal which will per-
mit the landing at the docks in this city
of ocean-going vessels was begun.
Without any fuss or excitement the
work was commenced that is to make
Miami great.
Few can appreciate what the building
of this canal means.
Without at all drawing o nthe imagina-
tion or picturing the future with too glar-


* *
nrit1 Ar ) S MAPE
They Are semo r*A i

GRIFFIN'S CATALOG
TELLS ABOUT THM
* 0
STwenty leading variedte otP
Also a complete line of Fruit sal 0-
Snanental trees and shrabbyT.
SCatalorge Fre.
Address
S THs RIFPINe Io Wr. O..
*JACKSONVILL.. FLA.
~~~~~~~~~3


C. H. HARGRAVES CO.,


WHOLESALE GROCERS

3 Grain, Hay, Feed 3
Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill Men's Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522 -524-526 EAST BAY STREET

Jacksonville, Fla.


From a Florida Logging Camp to the
United States Senate.


132-134 E. Bay Street.


SJ. S. Schofield'







I.



0..






.


- JACKSONVILLE, FLA


9<* Q9 e9. e9e.V 9 e9 e e4e9 e*s.9 -
0
's Sons Company,
,.g..*e* e* e.*e^e e*CC*9 e# 5#e
Headquarters for

Distiller's Pumping

Outfit. .
No plant complete without one. *
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
South Carolina. Write us for p-rticu- -
lars san prices. We also manufacture 4
Engines, Boilers and High ?
Grade Machinery, 4
as well as carry a turi and complete 4
--stock of--
Mill Supplies, Pipe,
Boiler Tubes, Etc.
Advise your wants. 0

Macon, - Georgia.
A Lea.. Srecalty of a 4
Kihs of Task Wrt fw Twpes terae Prmetes *


*u-V~ VV*V V


FIND SUBSCRIPTION BLANK FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE.


Before buying an Automobile

Call and see us. Our repair shop is the finest in the city. High class
work only.

STATE AGENTS FOR
THE FORD AUTOMOBILE.
'Tis the best Automobile on the market for the price. Circulars
and prices on application. Polite and courteous attention to visitors.

FLORIDA AUTOMOBILE CO.,


-----------^ ----------


th. c
stress f this
Thp mres will be large
the tees of th sort are an
th hh nts with pleasure.
JJ imer
W'eLL.dIESERVD tICcOss. Elw
Jackaotnvule the Home of One e tdie
Amertea's Ltadlil Trade Joarman. Flom
The Weekly Industrial Record of Jack-
sonvUle and Savannah has taken its place A]
among the leading trade journals in the
United States. and as an authority on lum- Rig
ber and naval stores It Is being quoted not
only by the best and most carefully edited ai
class papers in this country, but by those
in Europe also A London trade paper or
reaching this office yesterday gives liberal a fe
space to the Record's views on market con- fve
ditions. tot I
This week's Issue of the Industrial Re-, and
ord is even better than usual, and It Is Th
a strong and entistaining general Indus- trial
trial newspaper. in addition to its value Ha
as the champion of the two specific Indus- *
tries It represents. It is brimful of new Johrt
stories of development in the Southeast. plail
among them being the story of a half-mill- fend
Ion-dollar corporation organized In Jack- a(e
moaville yesterday, and the organisation of IH
Several other big corporations during the and
week In Georgia and Florida. W
It has set the pace for enterprise, and It Walt
well deserves the great measure of success wick
it is receiving, both In its subscription and
advertising departments.carrying as It does.
perhaps. one of the largest advertising pat- .
ronages given to any of the Southern tr F
Journals. **
bDEIATK Or A. J. 3ALu.. y sIn
-" T erty.
wasse at rulteh-rne i Is
- T l a . . S t r e e
**-.s. who, This
-1d nedri

:,,,,,------ - - - - - - -I










t THE WEEIC1Y INDUSTRIAL RECO01D*


State Timber Lands.
The State has now on hand approxi-
mately 146,000 acres of School lands, most
of which are in the Sixteenth sections,
and 4,900 acres of Seminary lands, which
are subject to entry at from $2.00 to $2.50
per acre, and 16,300 acres of Internal Im-
provement Lands proper, which are sub-
ject to entry at from $1.25 to $2.50 per
acre at this office. These School, Semi-
nary and Internal Improvement lands
proper, have never been examined and re-
ported upon as to the amount of timber.
and consequently I have no report what-
ever by which I can approximate the
amount of timler on same. but a great
many of these lands being in Lee, Dade
and Monroe Counties. have no timber
value. These lands are scattered all over
the State. and are in small tracts of from
40 to 640 acres.
At one time there was considerable tres-
pass committed upon these lands, but I
have been using every effort to stop the
same, and have always taken up every
case of trespass I could hear of, and made
the parties either pay for the same or buy
the lands; and have written the Sheriffs
whose duty it is to look after these lands.
as set forth in sections 654 to 657, R. S.,
to report all trespass, and have, I think,
about stopped the same.
The State has also 2,9(2,368.53 acres of
the lands granted under act of Congress
of September 28, 1850, and known as
swamp and overflowed lands, which em-
brace 625,867 acres of lands covered by
certificates issued several years ago by
the trustees to John A. Henderson and
certain railroads, and prior to the receipt
of patents. These swamp and overflowed
lands are not on the market now, on ac-
count of suits brought by the railroads
against the trustees, involving this class
of lands. Most of these swamp lands are
in the Everglades and in the counties of
Lee, Dade and Monroe, and have no tim-
ber value.
I send you my last report and would
like you to read pages 5 to 16, which ex-
plains as to the different classes of State
lands.
I will be pleased to furnish you any
further information in regard to the'state
lands you may desire that 1 can. Would
have replied earlier, but it has taken con-
siderable time to get up this data.
Tallahassee, Fla. B. E. M'LIN,
Commissioner of Agriculture.

Jacksonville Wholesale Lumber Market.

(For week ending April a.)
(Corrected for the Industrial Record each
Week).
Merchantab'e.
)ard schedules-$10.50 to $13.00.
Sound and square schedules, .)j.50 to
$12.00.
Merchantable car material-
Average schedule of sills, ;6 feet and
under, 10 inches and under, $13.00 to
$14.00.
Special schedules-according to sizes
and lengths-prices steady.
K. D. Saps-"6" and up 80 per cent
clear, $9.50 to $10.00.
Flooring:
$11.50; No. 4, $8.50.
Cypresa
First and seconds, 4 quarter base, car-
load prices, $34; selects, 4 quarter base,
No. 1, $15.00; No. 2, $13.50; No. 3,
$28; shop, 4 quarter base, $20.
Cypress Shingles-6xl8 A's, per 1,000
pes., $5.25; primes, $4.25; 4x18, A's, $3.50;
primes, $2.75.
Cypress laths, $2 per 1,000.
Cypress market strong. Mills have
more orders than they can fill. Prospects
good for higher prices. Dry stock scarce.


Buyers' Directory

These advertisers are in this issue. If
you want anything, look through this
classified list and write to the firm ap-
pearing therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.

AUTOMOBILES.
Florida Automobile Co.. Jacksonville, Fla
Fred E. Gilbert, Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Mercantile Bank. Jacksonville. Fla.
Central National Bang, Ocala, Fla.
BOOKS.
Cochrane's Book Store. Palatka. Fla.
BRICK.
Gco. R. Foster, Jr.. Jacksonville. Fla.
The Southern Fuel & Supply Co., Jack-
sonville. Fla.
CARS.
South Atlantic Car & Manufacturing Co.
Waycross, Ga.
The Cincinnati Equipment Co., Cincin-
nati, 0.
CATTLE.
Palmetto Park Farm, Ocala, Fla.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
J. S. Pinkussohn Cigar Co., Jackson ville.
CLOTHING.
II. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
Standard Clothing Co. Jacksonville.
J. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville.
CLOTH ING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery. New York City.
M. W. Larendon. New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
COOPERAGE.
The Cannon Co., Quitman, Ga.
Union Cooperage & Supply Co., Savan-
nah, Ga.
Quitman Cooperage Co., Jacksonville.
DRUGS.
The Christie Groover Drug Co., '.7clron-
vile.
Conover Drug Co., Jacksonville.
Kirk & Jones, Jacksonville.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
The Covington Co., Jacksonville.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
ENGINES.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Iombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
J. S. Schoflelds' Sons, Macon, Ga.
FEATHERS.
Florida Ostrich Farm, Jacksonville.
FOUNDRIES.
Gee. T. Gifford Iron Works, Tifton, Ga.
T .Murphy, Jacksonville, Fla.
SS. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
The Southern Fuel & Supply Co., Jack-
sonville.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
II. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksonville.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE
C. H. Hargraves Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
United Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville.
Ellis-Young Co., Savamnah, Ga.
Peacock, Hunt & West Co., Savannah, Ga
White, Waiton & Co., Jacksonville.
J P. Williams Co.. Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville.
HARDWARE.
thomas Roberts Hardware co., Valdosta,
Ga.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Itond & Bo-irs Co., Jacksonville.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Vald.-ta., Go
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
J. D. Weed & Co., Savannah, Ga.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
HARNESS.
McMurray & Baker, Jacksonville.
W. R. Thomas, Gainesville. Fla.
HATS.
H. A. Renfroe Co., Jacksonville.
*Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksonville.
J. A. Craig & Bro., Jacksonville.
HOTELS.
Zaams' European Hotel, Jacksonville.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
New Victoria Hotel, Jacksonville.
IRON WORKS.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works, Tifton, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gust, Ga.


T. Murphy, Jacksonville.
J. S. Schofield's Sons Company, Macon,
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville.
R. J. Riles. Jacksonville.
LIQUORS.
F. Bettelini, Jacksonville.
Chas. Blum & Co.. Jacksonville.
Hanne Bros., Jacksonville.
Bowen & Co., Jacksonville.
LOCOMOTIVES.
The Cincinnati Equipment Co., Cinc:n-
nat. 0.
MACHINE WORKS.
Geo. T. Gifford Iron Works. Tifton, Fla.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta. Ga.
T. Murphy, Jacksonville.
J. S. Schofield's Sons manyan, Macon,
Ca.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
J. S. Schofield's Sons & Co., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
M. A. Baker. Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Jol, G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas Roberts Hardware Co., Valdosta,
Ga.
V. H. Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta,
(a.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
ainmpa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
J. S. Schofields' Sons. Macon. Ga.
MULES AND HORSES.
Dillon & Penuel, Marianna.
W. R. Thomas, Gainesville, Fla.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co.. New York City.
NAVAL STORES.
The Barnes-Jessup Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Consolidated Naval Stores Co.. Jackson-
ville.
The Ellis-Young Co.. Savannah, Ga.
Peacock-Hunt & West Co.. Savannah. Ga.
Standard Naval Stores Ca.. Jacksonville.
Union Naval Stores Co.. Mobile. Ala.
OSTEOPATHY.
Drs. Phelps & McElwain, Jacksonville.
PECANS.
The Griffing Bros. Co., Jacksonville.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.. Valdosta,
John G. Christophe.', Jacksonville, Fla.
Thomas Roberts, Hardware Co., Valdosta,
Ga.
Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
PUMPS.
John U. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
J. S. Schofields' Sons, Macon. Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala.
PAINTS.
1. E. Baird & Co., Jacksonville.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville.
RAILS.
Isaac Joseph Iron Co.. Cincinnati, O.
REAL ESTATE.
Beckwith, Henderson & Warren, Ta'npa,
Fla.
Brobston. Fendig & Co., Jacksonville.
C. Buckman, Jacksonville.
W. W. Frazier, Jacksonville.
The West-Raley-Rannie Co., Jacksonville
ROOFING TIN.
American Tin Plate Co., New York City.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
The Covington Co., Jacksonville.
STATIONERY.
Cochranes' Book Store, Palatka, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
The Clyde Steamship Co., New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Samuel P. Holmes & Co., Jacksonville.
TAILORS.
John B. Ciancaglini & Bro., Jacksonvine.
TANKS.
G. M. Davis & Son., Palatka, Fla.
Cypress Tank Co., Mobile, Ala.
J. S. Schofield's Sons Co., Macon Ga.
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
National Transportatlon & Terminal Co.,
Jacksonvill.


TURPENTINE STILLS.
M. A. Baker, Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
G. M. Davis & Son, Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS.
0. M. Davis & Son, Palatka, Fla.
TYPE WRITERS.
Grivot Typewriter Exchange, Jacksavfile
UNDERTAKERS.
Chas. A. Clark, Jacksonville.
VEHICLES.
McMurray & Bro., Jacksonville.
W. R. Thomas, Gainesville, Fla.
WATCHES.
Grcenleaf & 'rosby Co.. Jacksonville.
Hess & Slager. Jacksonville.
YELLO)V PINE II MBER.
East Coast Lumber Co.. Watertown, Fla.


Business Directory.

CHARLES A. CLARK.
FUNERAL DIRECTOR AND EMBAIAMER
I0 and 42 W. Forsyth St.. Jacksonville. FIa.
Telegraph orders receive prompt atten-
tion. Open always.

JOHN ZAHM'S EUROPEAN HOTEL
128 E. Bay Street.
Saloon and Restaurant. Nceely Furnished
Rooms. Open day and night. Bettilln's
old Stand.

CONOVER DRUG COMPANY.
Stores Bay & Julia, Bridge & Adams Sts
Send us Your Mall Orders.
WE ARE PROMPT.

J. S. PINKUSSOHN CIGAR COMPANY.
51 W. Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
TIHE BEST OF EVERYTHING
TO SMOKE AND CHEW.
The Largest Tobacconists In the South.

H. ROBI'SON Pres. H. GAILLARD. Casher
W. B. OWEN. Vice-Pres.

Commercial Bank,

State Depository.
BRANCHER: Oeala Fla.. Lake City. Fla
Jacksonville, - lorida.



M. W. LARENIII

lol01 SIles 0Cmilo001 Mrchi
138 FRONT STREET.
R4oSIX. TCRPENTINm, TAR,
PITCH, oGU THUS, RIC, Ese.,
New York.




Trade Checks

FOR IHE


COMMISSARY BUSINESS.

THIE INDUSTRIAL RECORD
manufactures more of them
than all the printing and office
supply houses in the South
combined.
Send all orders for Com-
missary Checks, any color, any
denomination, padded or loose
to the

Industrial Record Go.,
JACKSONVILL, - FLORIDA.


TOOLS.
John G. Christopher, Jacksonville, Fla.
The Counoil Tool Co., Wanangsh, N. C. BLY MO
TURPENTINE CUPS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Da"iy, Tenn.
TURPENTINE PROCESS.
The Pine Product Construction Co., Fay- Commission Merchants,
etteville, N. C. NaVal Stores & Cotton
The Pine Belt Construction Co., Raleigh, A SU .
N. C. I 4Og iTO XCBAnO- c IL I..
The Standard Turpentine Co., New York gi YO.K'Is mud. e -Im-
aoty.I shlplmta. Cmf l nem s6eme ente0e,


IF NOT AL RADY A SUBSCRIR, DONPT FAIL TO SUBSCRIBD









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7



SOUTH ATLANTIC CAR & MFG. COMPANY

Waycross, Ga.
MANUFACTURERS OF


Freight and Caboose Cars,

Brass and Gray Iron Castings.

CAPACITY: TEN CARS PER DAY.


Located in the hea* t of the Lumber District gives us advan-
tage of choicest material at lowest cost


Whiskies, Gins, 1904 EDITION

Rums, Lumbermen's

o Yellow Pine and
from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon Cypress
agency for Lewis 1866 and Reference Book
Mount Vernon Pure Rye
Whiskies "THE BEST BOOK OF
ITS KIND PUBLISHED"


NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY
FOR LETTERS PATENT.
Notice is hereby given that the under-
signed intend to apply to the Honorable
Wiliam S. Jennings, Governor of the State
of Florida, at Tallahassee, Florida, on the
llth day of April, 1904, for Letters Pat-
ent, incorporating The Cooperage Com-
pany, under the laws of the State of
Florida, with and under the following pro-
posed charter, the original of which is
now on file in the office of the Secretary
of State of the State of Florida.
JOHN E. HARRIS,
C. H. BARNES,
J. W. WEST,
W. J. KELLY.
W. C. POWELL,
W. F. COACHMAN.

Proposed Charter of The Cooperage Com-
pany.
The undersigned hereby associate them-
selves together for the purpose of becom-
ing incorporated and forming a corpora-
tion, under and by virtue of the laws of
the State of Florida, with and under the
following proposed charter.
I.
The name of this corporation shall be
THE COOPERAGE COMPANY, and its
businesses shall be conducted in the State
of Florida and other States of the United
States of America and foreign countries,
wherever necessary or convenient. The
principal office of said corporation shall
be in the city of Jacksonville, Florida.
II.
The general nature of the businesses to
be transacted by this corporation shall be
to manufacture and produce barrels.
casks, staves, heading, tubs, buckets and
wooden-ware articles generally, and to
buy, sell and deal in the same at whole-
sale and retail; to buy, sell, own, lease,
exchange and develop lands and improve
same; to own, lease and operate saw-
mills, planing mills, cooperage plants and
factories; to own, hold, lease, cut and
operate timber for the manufacture of
staves, barrels and other articles made in
the oooperage business; to buy, sell, man-
ufacture, handle and deal in groceries,
dry-goods, hardware, hoop-iron and all
other kinds of merchandise used in the
cooperage business; to receive payment
of all or any part of its capital stock in
money, property, labor or services at a
just valuation thereof in the discretion
of its Board of Directors; and to have
and exercise such powers as may be in-
cident or convenient to the several busi-


nesses of said corporation, and all of the
rights, powers and privileges of corpora-
tions organized under the laws of Florida.
The foregoing clauses shall be construed
as both independent powers and objects.
III.
The amount of the capital stock of said
corporation shall be One Hundred Thous-
and Dollars, to be divided into one thous-
and shares of the par value of one hun-
Ired dollars each. All or any part of the
capital stock of said corporation shall be
payable in, or issued or used for the pur-
chase of property, labor or services at
a just valuation thereof to be fixed by
the Board of Directors at a meeting to
be called for that purpose.
IV.
The term for which said corporation
shall exist shall be one hundred years.
V.
The businesses of said corporation shall
be conducted by a president, a vice-pres-
ident, a secretary, a treasurer and a
Board of Seven Directors. The offices of
secretary and treasurer may be held by
the same person. The number of Di-
rectors may be changed from time to time
by the By-Laws, but shall not be more
than thirteen or less than three. The Di-
rectors shall be elected by the stockhold-
ers at each annual meeting. All other
officers of this corporation shall be elect-
ed annually by the Directors. The an-
nual meeting of this corporation shall
be held on th second Saturday in April
of each year, at 11 o'clock a. m., unless
otherwise provided by the By-Laws. The
incorporators and stockholders shall meet
at the office of the corporation in Jack-
onville. Florida, n Saturday, April 16th.
;904, for the purpose of adopting by-
!aws, completing the organization of this
company, electing officers for the ensu-
ing year, and transacting any other busi-
ness which may come before such meet-
ing. Until the officers elected at the first
annual meeting shall be qualified, the
businesses of this corporation shal be
conducted by the following officers: J. C.
Little, president; John E. Harris, as vice-
president; C. H. Barnes, as secretary and
treasurer, and J. C. Little, John E. Har-
ris, C. H. Barnes, J. W. West, W. J.
Kelly, W. C. Powell and W. F. Coach-
man, as directors.
VI.
The highest amount of indebtedness to
which this corporation can at any time
subject itself, shall be one hundred thou-
sand dollars.
VII.
The names of the subscribing incorpo-
rators of said corporation, together with


controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin- i
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.


CHAS. BLUM & CO.

.517 and 519 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

the amount of stock subscribed for by
each of them are as follows: John E.
Harris, for 65 shares C. H. Barnes, for 50
shares; W. F. Coachman, for 250 shares;
W. C. Powell, for 250 shares; all the fore-
going residing in Jacksonville, Florida;
J. W. West, residing in Valdosta, Georgia,
for 70 shares; and W. J. Kelly, residing in
Savannah, Georgia, for 65 shares.
JOHN E. HARRIS,
C. H. BARNES,
W. F. COACHMAN.
W. C. POWELL,
J. W. WEST,
W. J. KELLY.
State of Florida,
County of Duval.
Before me personally appeared John E.
Harris. W. F. Coachman. W. C. Powell, J.
W. West and W. J. Kelly, to me well
known and known to me to be the indi-
viduals described in and who executed the
foregoing articles of incorporation, and
acknowledged before me that they exe-
cuted the same for the purposes therein
expressed.
Witness my hand and seal, in the city
of Jacksonville, said county and State,
this the 27th day of February. 1904.
R. P. DANIEL, Jr.
Notary Public State of Florida at Large.
My commission expires October 16, 1907.
(Official seal.)
State of Florida,
County of Duval.
Before me personally appeared C. H.
Barnes, to me well known and known to
me to be the individual described in and
who executed the foregoing articles of in-
corporation an acknowledged before me
that he executed the same before me for
the purposes therein expressed.
Witness my hand and official seal in the
city of Jacksonville, said county and
State, this 1st day of March, 1904.
R. P. DANIEL, Jr.
Notary Public State of Florida at Large.
My commission expires October 16, 1907.
(Official seal.)


j AND

SUlmer's Yellow

Pine Code I
A Complete and Co...,ehcasive
Telegrapkic Cipher Cede, esec

Sments of tle
YELLOW PINE TRADE

PRICE LIST.
SLumberman's Yellow Pine and Cypress
Reference Book, 1904 Edition,
Separate from Code for Inspectors,
$ ._0 per copy.
$1.25 per 3 copies.
$2.00 per 6 copies.
SUlmer's Yellow Pine Code combined
e with Reference Book under same cov-
.00 per copy.
$5.25 per 3 copies.
$9.00 per 6 copies.
Dellverlnl Charges Prepaid.

S BENJAMIN F. ULMER
? COMPILER and PUBLISHER
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.






O0. R. FOST0 JR.
MANUFACTURER OE



BRICK.


WRITE FO PRICES.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.

'PHOE 90,


WHEN WRITING A1DVERTISBRS MRETION THE RECORD.


A


'U)~rrrrrrrr.rrrrrrr~~rru









8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


THE DADE COUNTY FAIR.

As Seen by Louis J. Brumby of the Fruit
and Truck Grower.

(Written during the progress of the Fair
by L .T. Brumby.)
I believe the present fair in Dade Coun-
ty demonstrates a fact and also estab-
lishes an example. The fact-that with
the extremely varied resources of this
State a proper exposition of the particu-
lar advantages of any one section can best
lie shown by the county fair, that such
fairs can lie more easily managed, that
the advantages of the advertising of the
section are more readily achieved, and
that the interest in their continuation
from year to year be more easily assured;
an example- in that the growth of such
fairs may he in keeping with the gradual
or rapid (as the case may be) growth
and development of that particular sec-
tion in which such fairs are held. I could
wish nothing better for Florida than that
each county should follow the example
set by Dade. True, all of them could not
have that fostering support and encour-
agement given to the producers in Dade
by that notable Florida developer, Mr.
'iagler, but the work in time would bring
to the front strong men in every county,
whose ability and effort would be strongly
augmented by the sure successes that
would attend their efforts.
This is the seventh annual fair of the
Dade County Agricultural and Horticultu-
ral Society. Its history, short as it may
le, is equal in length to that of the mu-
nicipality of Miami, and its birth coninci-
dent with the newer and greater develop-
ment of the lower east coast, a develop-
ment at which the whole country wonders.
Each year the interest in the fair increased
until finally Mr. Flagler erected a hand-
some building for its use. This building
is right on Biscayne Bay, at the foot of
the main street of the city, and faces
the beautiful grounds of the Royal Palm
Hotel.
Both the building and its location are
ideal. All farmers are invited to exhib-
it; there are no entrance fees, and there
are no fees, even of admission. There are
no side shows, no gambling devices, no
fakirs, nothing but the fair pure and
simple. And there never has been such a
fair like it.
The fair of this year is very far ahead
of its predecessors, successful as they
were. First, the exhibits are larger in
extent and more comprehensive in scope,
while in quality as far as can be judged,
the percentage is the very highest re-
corded. All of this is the result of past
experience, of study and interchange of
ideas among the growers in which these
annual fairs have been most potent fac-
tors. Then again is shown the good pol-
icy of the application of business meth-
ods to agricultural pursuits. For in every
case your Dade county farmer is a busi-
nesst man and equally as much so as his
brother, the banker and the merchant.
And right here it might be well to say
the latter class in Miami are pretty good
farmers themselves.
Second, the premium list for this year
was very much larger than ever before,
both in individual and society special pre-
miums. The list offered would do credit
to any State fair in the country.
Third, and I think of very great im-
portance, is the increased interest shown
by the people themselves both in the mat-


ter of exhibits and in attendance. And
this increased interest is shown also by
the army of winter visitors to whom the
displays are in the nature of a revelation.
most especially to those on their first
visit who come down in the preconceivedl
notion that Florida produced largely and
mainly sand, mosquitoes and alligators,
and that the people "lived on fish in the
summer and Yankees in the winter."
"I was more than greatly impressed
with the intense personal interest dis-
played by Mr. Flagler, Mr. Ingraham ant
other ollicials of the East Coast Railway.
Tle ve:y first visitor on the opening day
was Mr. Flagler himself, who came in at
sunrise and during each day was contain
ually in the building and whose interest
was only equalled by his knowledge of tlhe
value and importance of the fair to the
individual grower and how much it adde:l
to the development of his dream of tinh
transformation of a wilderness into an ac-
tive and busy scene of life, of progress.
and one where man "in the pursuit of
happiness" can easily find it. The indi
vidual prizes offered by Mr. Flagler and
the east coast were very large.
It would be idle for me to attAempt to
enumerate the different varieties of fruits
and vegetables shown. Take a big seed-
man's and nurseryman's catalogue and addl
a fairly good per cent to that, and you
may grasp the idea. The fruit display
was very line, embracing all the branches
of the citrus family, many of the small
fruits, pineapples in endless variety, large
bunches of lananas. eocoanuts and so on.
Many of the displays were artistic to a
high degree, notably one in the form of
a big ocean vessel, named Henry M. Flag
ler, and bearing the flag of the Miami and
New York Steamship line. Miami first,
mind you. This vessel was filled with all
the different varieties of vegetables, with
the hull of crates of tomatoes, Dade's
greatest crop. In manufactured articles
front Florida products, such as jellies.
wines, marmalade, pickles and various
condiments, the display was good. These
were from regular maunnactories, located
in the county, and which ship their goods
all over the United States, and even now
a small quantity abroad.
A new department this year, and one
that met with great approval and that
was eminently successful, was the wo-
man's department. Something like a thou-
sand pictures adorned the walls, and many
of tliem were especially good; while in
one section there was every known cre-
ation of woman's dainty handiwork. I
am told this latter was extra good, but
am not an authority.
Taken as a whole, the Dade County
Fair is wortl going very far to see and
I Inith think and hope its example and
influence will be felt in every county in
'lorida. They are particularly fortunate
down there, however, in their secretary.
Mr. E. V. Blackman, editor of the Home-
seeker. They may have some other offi-
cers-1 expect they have, but don't know
---hut Blackman is the wheel-horse, and
his energy and ability are very largely
responsible for the success the fair has
achieved.


/2 Your Herd!
You can find it among onr Shorthorn or Here-
ford bulls. The choieest of breeding and rare in-
dividuality. Ready for service, and will price
them right. Will hold our spring auction about
April I.
PALMFETTO PARK FARM,
Z C. CHAMBLI-S&CO.,
Ocala, la.


Wanted and For Sale


DEPARTMENT.

Advertisements Will be Inserted In this Department at the Followirg Rates:
For one week. cents a line.
For two weeks. 35 centsa line.
For three weeks 5 cents a line.
For four weeks, 65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Leading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. (opv must be in this office not later than Thursday
morningg t,, secure insertion in Friday's paper.


Real Estate Catalog.
Illustrated real estate catalogue Ipost-
inaii. (;eo. 11. (hapin. Florida House,
St. A.ugustine. Fla.
Position Wanted.
A.\inyne in need of a first-class turpen-
tine woodsman, write to V. M. Marlow,
laC:r-osse, Florida. References furnished.
Turpentine Men.
Bluy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. 1 outfit pumps 2,000
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 cents and
requires no attention while running.
Sta. tlA in onr minute. .I. K. Campbell,
O4-a la. Fla.


Orange Grove.
Never frozen; 80 acres rich vegetable land
at ('learwater; 500 oranges, many 30 feet
high; 23 to 40 years old; netted $1,200
tl::s season; expect 1.500 boxes and $2,000
inomite next season: 474 other fruit trees;
house, barn. etc. Price $6,000. Details of
(George H. Chapin, Florida House, St. Au-
gustine, or owner, J. W. Kimbrough, Web-
ster, Fla.

Horses and Mules.
We have on hand at all times a well
selected stock of horses and mules for
saw mill and turpentine purposes. Can
please everybody in price and quality.


N ff 1Will have a car of saddle and harness
Notice. horses at Marianna April 5th. See our
T'lie II cs ( company of llawkinsvilie, sttauk before buying. Dillon & Penuel,
(;a.. will on or about March 1st open a Marianna, Fla.
tcoo, r shop at (;ainesville, Fla., for the
itimantifacture of turpentine barrels. These /sileSS for a Northi rcr.
barrels will lie first-class in every particu- B for a Northe er.
lar. and this company will maintain at In a perfect climate; store and fixtures
(.ainesville the reputation for making good near station; postoffice In store; also two-
spirit barrels that they have earned ati story residence; double piazzas, shade
IHawkinsville. -Orders for barrels sent to trees; 17 acres; 100 oranges; also figs,
this company at Gainesville, or to thel persimmons. peaches, pears, etc. Cost
I'nion ('ooperage and Supply Company, $3,l600. Price only $1,000. Details of
at .laeksonville, Fla., will receive prompt (:eorge I. Chapin, Florida House, St. Au-
attention. gustine. William Arnold, Webster, Fla.

W. J. L'ENGLE. J. W. WADE. EG. HUGHES,
President. Vice-President. Sec'y and Treas.



Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.


DEALERS IN

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.

Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances made against consignments. Correspondence
solicited.

Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


=_ -DOU IoIw W-


pi Florida Ostrich Farm

was a zeMlegleal park. where que
-'*^ ~can sre ISO fine ostriches varils
wild and rare anihnal, r irds
*- BK-- affordihi interesting tntertain-
S..- ent fOr young and old
The Florida Ostrich Farm.


The Florida Ostrich Farm,


"Take feirfield Car."


JACKSONVILLE,


THE RECORD KEEPS PACE WITH SOUTHERN PROGRESS,








THE WEtELY INDUSTRtAt RtCORD. 9


Notice Regarding Spirit Barrel Situation.
Savannah, Ga., March 28, 1004.
To Our Patrons:
In order to prevent the manufacture of spirit barrels being
monopolized, and customers of this corporation being annoyed by pos-
sible delay and trouble in securing their supply, to encourage and
maintain competition among the numerous factories, thereby ensuring
to the producers at all times I protection against excessive prices and a
better quality of barrel than if no competition existed,
We have Become Interested In the Barrel Mannfactorlni Basiness.
This corporation and some friendly associates have acquired a
large interest in the Montgomery Cooperage & Hardware Company,
who control and operate an up-to-date machine barrel plant at Mont-
gomery. Ala., as well as hand shops at Ocala, Fla. and Valdosta, Ga
The Jacksonville Cooperage Company, operating a barrel shop
at Jacksoiville. and owning an interest in hand shops at Live Oak and
Tampa. Fla.. is also closely allied with this corporation. All of the
above named factories propose to and are making barrels strictly in
accordance with the requirements of the Savannah Board of Trade,
and their barrels will be a good delivery anywhere.
The probable policy will be to eliminate all rebates and commis-
sions heretofore paid and give to the producer a good barrel at as low a
price as is consistent.
We will appreciate your patronage of the shops in which we are
interested, Yours truly,
J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY.
By J. A. G. Carson, 1st vice Pres.


W WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.
i An illustrated article on the Springs and Columbia
County will appear in the next issue of the Record.
anno9aw-^munannwan ^ i---9^


*pEe.e~ee~**eeee*~**.13 :dbbr~~dd&~~~~ri :i~e, eti


qi


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE.
Jacksonville, Fla.
CAPITAL S300,000 X SURPLUS and UNDVIDED PROFITS $300,000
Strength and ample facilities. Business solicited. Prompt attention to collec-
tions and business of customers not living in Jacksonville. Best Safety Deposit
Boxes for rent.


White Springs, Fla.
On the Suwanee River
The Great Health Resort of the South.
Suphur Spring 25,000 GaMllns per Minute.
Healing Springs -- Forest Walks -- Shooting & Fishing
NO MOSQUITOES. NO MALARIA.
The Healthiest Summer Resort in America.


THE PRITCHARD HOUSE.


An Ideal Home for Invalids. FirstClass Table
ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES.
Write for particulars. .
MRS. S. L PRITCHARD, Proprietress. WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE OAKS.


X A Typical Southern Home


x


OPERATORS AT ST. LOUIS.

The Details of the Naval Stores Exposition
Special
The Record has received a large number
of inquiries regarding the special naval
stores train to St. Louis and return. This
train, consisting entirely of Pullman draw-
ing room cars, observation and dining cars,
will leave Jacksonville Thursday, June
30th, at 8:30 p. m. and will arrive in
St. Louis, Saturday, July 2, at 6:00 a. m.
The trip will be made over the Southern
Railway via Atlanta, Chattanooga, Lex.
ington and Louisville. The train will be
a special and will take no passengers after
it leaves Jacksonville and none here ex-
cept those who belong to the naval stores
party. The number in the party will
be limited to 100, and there will be four
Pullman sleepers in addition to the other
cars, in order that there may be no crowd-
ing.
The train will be especially conducted
by an official of the Southern Railway
and by the officials of the Turpentine Op-
erators' Association, and will be in many
respects one of the most luxurious trains
ever leaving Florida. The central idea
in the arrangements for this train is for
comfort and convenience.
Returning, the train, which will be the
same identical equipment as going, will
leave St. Louis Thursday evening, July
7th, arriving in Jacksonville Saturday
morning, July 9th, in good time to permit
all operators and their wives to get to
their respective homes for Sunday.
These dates give six full days in St.
Louis, including Sunday, which immed-
diately follows the arrival there, and af-
fords a day of quiet rest and sight-seeing.
The Democratic National Convention
meets in St. Louis Wednesday, July 6th.
The itinerary for this special train has
been arranged at the above dates in order
to give all the operators and their families
an opportunity of looking in on the great-
est indoor event in the history of the


United States-the making of a Presiden-
tial nominee.
In view of the fact that St. Louis will
be crowded to over-flowing during the
great World's Fair, and particularly at
the time when the National Convention
mneets, the secretary of the Turpentine
Operators' Association will go to St. Louis
early in May and make all arrangements
for the comfortable hotel accommodation
of the naval stores party.
With reference to the cost of this trip,
these complete details will be arranged
in the next few days and all turpentine
men notified by circular letter, issued di-
rect by the Southern Railway.

Some Southern Resources.
The South has long furnished the best
timber and lumber, and no one now ex-
pects that staple from Maine and Michi-
gan, as heretofore. The great oyster
business of Baltimore and New Jersey is
fast declining, owing to the vast oyster
beds in Florida, Alabama and Mississ-
ippi. More oyster shuckers came South
this winter to work than ever before, and
the oyster fields here seem to be inex-
haustible, and this industry will grow
yearly into immense proportions, as has
the iron business of Alabama and Ten-
nessee.
With improved water courses and new
railroad extensions, the Southern coun-
try presents a most inviting field for de-
velopment, and the wise and far-sighted
are evidently aware of this fact by aban-
doning the fields North for those South.
Business in every line has constantly in-
creased in this section since 1880, and
tunre is no apparent relaxation. We have
the resources, and their development
means great wealth to those who take
hold of them.

Lakes Maitland, Osceola and Virginia,
near Orlando, are each twenty-five feet
deep.


NEWLY BUILT and FURNISHED.


- EVERY COMFORT


Write for particulars -
MRS. M. C. SKIPWORTH, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


KENDRICK HOUSE.

Headquarters for Southern Families,
GOOD TABLE X X HOME COMFORTS
.. For particulars address...
MRS. J. B. ROBERTS, Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


THE HAMILTON.

A New, Modern, HighClass Hotel.

ELECTRIC LIGHTS and BELLS X HOT and COLD BATHS
--- For full information write
JNO. S. BOWEN, Owner and Proprietor, WHITE SPRINGS, FLA.


THE NEW PAXTON.


X Commodious, Home-Like Hotel


Table Unexcelled.


ROOM FOR 100 GUESTS.
A. Every Attention to Invalids


MRS. E. H. PAXTON, Owner and Proprietress, WHITE SPRINGS. FLA.


wo


R. THOMAS


"NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIUK SUCCESS."


x


GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA,

Turpentine, Log and Phosphate Mules.


Heavy Wagons. Harness and Buggies.


-j~,r rrrrrrrrlLlllllLl~~rr~~~ ~~~LII -~~~LLLC------~--~~


i~;~3~ioio;~;3;oioi~i~~P;00~;0~;9;0~i0;0


~dLICL+~~UIIIII~~~~~~~ --' -


P









1(1 TBIM WEMLT1Y TNDJSThIAt, RtCOUA.


* ,teee*e** I t-66t*******6*4***ftt*******
* 9
SJ. R. PARBrT. ARCHER S. HUBBAsR,. ARTHUR F. PRRY
* President. Vice-President. Cashier.

j The Mercantile Exchange Bank,
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.
SCapital, $200,000. O" Surplus. $100.000
5 STATE DEPOSITARY. I
SGeneral Banking. Interest Paid on Saving Deposits. Safe l)evosit Boxes. 85.00 per Year.



Review of Naval Stores for a Week

Savannah, Ga., April 1.-This is "good seems to be for low grades; mediums and
Friday" and a holiday. pales neglected. We quote:
The year 1903-04 closed yesterday with- BC. $2.80; D, $2.85; E, $2.85; F, $2.90;
out the slightest excitement and "noth- (G. $2.95; HI. $3.00; I, $3.30; K. $3.70; M,
ing doing" in spirits was posted in the $3.90; N, $4.00; WG, $4.20 to $4.25; WW,
exchange. $4.40.
The Standard Oil Co. has been making Market quiet.
small purchases every day for a week, TOLAR, HART & CO.
but yesterday that company deserted the
market, probably having tilled all of the Savannah Naval Stores Statement at Close
contracts it had made for delivery prior of Year 9go3-o4.
to the opening of the new year.
It is well known that the Savannah mar- Spirits. Rosins.
ket for a week has leen fictitious, the Stock April 1 .......... 1,241 145,882
Standard being practically the only pur- Receipts March 31 ...... 634 623
chasers. Receipts previously......193,013 650,315
The receipts the closing day of the
year were not as heavy as expected. Total ................ 194,888 795,820
It will be recalled that one year ago
to-day spirits dropped 12 cents, the mar-' Exports March 31 .... 254 1,118
ket breaking from (12 to 50 cents. The Exports previously ...... 18,267 751,152
Record does not look for a break to-
morrow to a point below 511-2 cents. Total ..............1 88,521 752,270
Receipts are remarkably light for the
season. Stock March 31 ........ *6,495 44,550
Stock last year .......... 1,476 111,071
Spirits for the Week at Savannah. *One hundred and twenty-eight casks
Pre Rcpts Sales E receipts from Standard Oil Co. included
Prce Rcpts Sales Exp. 1903 stock.
Mon. Mch 28 58 137 119 3501
Tues., Mch. 29 57 257 120 442 Bailey & Montgomery's Review.
Wed. Mch. 30 57 243 144 62New or, arch 30, 1904.
Thur. Mch 311 N.D. 634 0 254 Spirits Turpentine-Stock. 861 barrels.
Friday, April 1, Holiday (Good Fri ay). The market for the week under review


Monday, March 28.
WW .. .. .. .. .. ..4.00
WG .. .... .. -. 3.70
N ...... ...... 3.50
M ........ ...... 3.35
K ..3.. .. .. .. .. 3.30
I .. .. .. .. .. .. 2.95
H .. .... ..... 2.70
G ........ 2.65
F ....... 2.60
E . .. .. ..... 2.55
D ... .. .. 2.50
ABC ...... .. .. .. 2.50


Last Year.
4.00
3.75
3.60
3.40
3.20
2.85
2.40
2.20
2.10
2.05
2.05
2.05


March 29-WW advanced 5


Wednesday, March 30-Same as Tues-
lay.

Thursday, March 31.-The three top
notches, VW. WG. and N were advanced.
the former being put up 5 points anil
the two latter grades 10 points each. F
and E were sent down 5 cents.
Friday. April 1-Holiday.

Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Review.
New York, Mar. 29, 1904.
The Industrial Record. Jacksonville, Fla.
Spirits Turpentine-The market has
been demoralized for past week. offerings
of turpentine 3 to 4 cents under Savan-
nah quotations keeping buyers out of
the market. It is to be hoped that in the
near future official quotations may ac-
tually quote market. Stock. 1,037 bar-
rels. We quote Machines, 59 1-2 cents.
Rosn.-Whr.t little inquiry there is


has been another dull one, and spirits in
any luiantity has Iben hard to sell. Bus-
iness is almost entirely confined to job-
bing character.
Thursday. Marth 24-581-2 c. asked.
Friday. .March 25-58 1-2 c. asked.
Saturday, larch 2(-68 1-2 c. asked.
Monday. March 28-581-2 c. a. m.;
59 1-2 c. p. m.
Tuesday, March 29-59 1-2 c. asked.
Wed~l-sday. March 30-591-2 c. steady.
Rosin-Stock.i 21,430 barrels.
This market has been fairly active dur-
ing the week and some saleh of Strained
antd ood Strained were made at $2.80.
To-day the market is easier on those
grades.
ABt'D. $2.70 to $2.75: E. $2.85 to $2.90:
F. $o2.0 to $2.!9: (. $2.95 to $3.00; 11.
$3.00 to $3.0.; 1. $3.30; K. $3.70; M. $3.90
to $4.00; N, $400 to $4.03; W(, $4.15 to
$4.20; W\V, 4.30.

Range of Turpentine and Rosin at Sa-
vannah for Three Years.
| 1903-4 || 1. ,-3 1lI .Jl,-L


Spirits
Rosin
\VW ...
.. .... ..
F)....


1 45, 1 65 11 42j 1>5 113t 53
I I I I F
. .304.75 304252.253.95
3.104.40 3.253.2.003.70
S2.804.15 2.403.20 1.652.45
S1.65 2.90 1.2012.10 1.10 1.50
.. 1.55 2.80 1.102.05 1.00 1.40


Six Years' Receipts at Savannah.


1899n-00..
1900-01
1901-2 0
19R3-04


Spirits. Rosii.
329,466 1.123.942
300.465 1,076,81. 5
3:137,452 1.119,957
313,340 1,071,440
292,49.i 940.507
193,647 650,938


-iFOR SALE.
50,000 acres timber land in Western Florida. Tract will cut one hundred and
fifty million feet merchantable lumber. Has been turpentined and ready for the
mill $2 35 per acre. Mill near the timber can be leased for term of years, or can
be purchased. One of the best opportunities in the State.

C. BUCKMAN, 11 ogn tret
g Jenkeenrville, pCe.


Pumping Outfits FOR

Turpentine Stills
WITH FIRE PROTECTION CONNECTIONS.

Best PUMP in the World
From 40 to 700 Gallons of Water per Minute.
Write or c;all on
FRED E. GILBERT.
Automobile Headquarters
29 West Forsyth St.. Jacksonville, Fla.


R1. S. ALL. Pres. T C. HALL, V. '. and Mgr. L. J. KNItIIT, Sec. and Treas.


MARION HARDWARE CO.,


HARDWARE, MILL AND

TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,

OCALA, FLORIDA.

Herbert A. Ford, ieo. H. Ford, F. L. Watson,
President. Vice-Pres. Cashier.

The Central National Bank of Ocala
OCALA. FLORIDA.
CAPITA' L 0,00().( )( .
DIRECTORS: R. L. Anderson, R. S. Hall, Clarence Camp. J.. K. Christian, Gco.
McKay, Geo. 11. Ford, Herbert A. Ford.
Accounts of Turpentine Operators and Saw Mill Men Solicited.


T. D. SHAW, Vice-Pres.


RALPH JESSUP. Sec.-Treas.


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed. N
Deliveries at Jacksonville. Pensacola, Fernandina and Savannah
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


C. H. BARNES.
Treasurer.


R. JESSUP.
Ass't Treas.


W. H. BAKER.
Secretary.


UNITED GROCERY CO..

Importers & Wholesale Grocers
HAY, GRAIN and FEED.
Naval Stores Supplies a Specialty.
B. G. LASSETER. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Vice Pros. and Gen. Mr.__ JACKSONVILLE FLA.

H. A. BRIGGS, President HOMER IRKOWN, 2(1 Vice-President
M C. BRIGGS, Ist Vice President. .I. C. MlIX)NALD, Secr tary and Treasurer



W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.

HARDWARE, MILL and TURPENTINE SUPPLIES.

Council & Holmes' Tools, Brigg's Sterling and Perfection Hacks
and Pullers, Cutters, Files and Whetters, Glue, Batting
and Strainer Wire, Turpentine Wagon Harness
and Collars, Hoop Iron, Coopers'
Tools and Rivets.

Everything in Turpentine Supplies.

Send us your Mail Orders,

W. H. BRIGGS HARDWARE CO.,
VALDOSTA, GA.


THE RELIABILITY OF OUR ADVERTISERS VOUCHED FOR.


Rosin for the Week at Savannah.


C. H. BARNES. Pres.


Tuesday,
cents.


W. FRAZIER JONES.
President.


--~-~---- ~----- -- -- -- ---


--~rrrrrrrr-rr---------------u









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11


S. P. HOLMES & CO.'S MARKET RE-
VIEW.

Stocks. The stock market this week has
been very strong, with special activity
in Union Pacific. It is evident that pur-
chases of this' stock have been concentrat-
ed for some object. The violent manner
of the rise of the stock would in all prob-
a ability enuse recessions in other stocks
if tihe general public had 4len buying to
any extent. It is evident that every one
had underestimated thlie magnitude of the
out-ianding general short interest.
The Northern Securities decision con-
tinues widely discussed. especially tile
j1rolilein brought to light by it. As for
the Wall Street opinion as to the de-
cision. naturally those closest to the mar-
ket will Irok upon it with spectacles col-
ored rose or blue. as the market is strong
or weak. Along with th1e rise of the mar-
ket nuist of the factors that are pre-eni-
nently before such people as are interested.
naturally wieigh heaviest en til( optimistic
side.
The crop outhilk has itnprov;'.d. (General
business fl'rt,1 s"onwe sections of the coun-
try is reloirte.I hackward. yvt in Centra'
Penn-.hlvaania alone. their are eight miles
of lhadill ears awaiting motive power.
The world's mark t- have uniiiiouith
ween relieved y thlie dlis-ilption of In
dotubhts over thle raiilroa! conilillations in
this ountr v. or by the Icturin of cotton
trading to more normal conditions: bli


an ea.-ying tendency of money all over the
world. and by the change in climate con-
ditions whereby the crops elsewhere are
given a more auspicious start. On the
oti hr hand. the lIanks of the country are
"'highly loaned up," and not a few of the
smaller institutions are succumbing. Our
exports a-e not up to the winter figures.
and the technical position has been weak-
enedl by the elimination of the short in-
terest.
Our own opinion is that the good rail-
road ',stoks in the country are the cheap-
est andi best foiml of investment to be
found anywi here in the world, and as such
ian Is, liiiught either as an investment
o:- speculative purposes on declines in the
ia:;rket. \e do not feel however, that
the balance of the position on the opti-
mistic side is strong enough to warrant
lbuing stocks on the big bulges.


March 31, 1904.
Cotton. .\s compared with the greater
ni jority iof events heretofore this season.
develounments of the last few days have
1:o\.d oif a rather uninteresting nature,
anI lacking these sensational and exciting
characteristics they have been of absorb-
;ng interest. The net result of four days'
bulsiie-s has been to reveal the strength
of tlhe cotton position. After the sharp
advance to 15.50 following the Cencus Re-
port. the market broke to 14.75, and then
recovered to 15.25. The reaction was


quite to be expected after the advance, to go naked. People have got to be cloth-
but the steady improvement in the face! ed whether cotton sells at 10, 15 or 20
of opposition by several of the more im- cents a pound. If the census report is
portant intere-ts in the local market can i anyw here near right, the question of prices
le taken as re dealing a stronger cotton is not likely to enter into the problem.
psmitiotn than the most enthusiastic re- Under the circumstances we cannot but
gardedl as lposileh at this time. Trading continue our attitude on the same side
lias Ien along narrow lines; the outside of the account prevailing heretofore this


interests are very small and the majority
of professionals are inclined to ie bearish
in their attitude. Short sellers have been
compelled to ,Iuy in cotton at an absence
,of these profits that bears like to see. All
of whlihl goes to show that no matter how
unattractive tlite 'situation may be to buy-
e s. it is extremely dangerous to short
ci;tton this season. Loo king over the cot-
tii situation broadly the outhlsk is cer-
tainly liewihlering. It is all well enough
for some of the mill men and dealers in
spoit cotton to say that consumption can-
not go (n at 15 cents a pound, but with
Liverpol .toeks the smallest since the
('ivil \War. and the interior movements
almost nothing, it is an open question
whether the larger mills can really close
up shop and throw employees out of work
anl stop niachinery. The next few months
in tle cott0m market w-ill be traveling
through unknown country with no land-
marks to guide the voyager, and there is
in one old enough or with experience
enough in the cotton business to say that
15 cents is going to stop cotton production
of manufactured goods, leaving the world


Season. and while advising caution, we be-
lieve cotton should not be sold short, but
purchased on good breaks.
Wheat. The market has been irregular
iand 'i"ite unsettled through conflicting
'rop| rleports onl winter wheat, although
~,iile iiiiprovenent was noted, but it can't
It, \Nell determined until the issuance of
the ;ioverninent report on April 10th.
State report, in advance will have a bear-
ing. andl to a certain extent will prove im-
portant factors. T'Ihe strength of the cash

('

Sam'I P. Holmes&Co.
(Members New York Cotton Exchange)
Stocks, Bonds, Cotton,
Grain and Provisions.
Correspondents Miller & Co.,
100( Broadway, New York.

SNew York Stock Exchange,
Members- New York Cotton Exchange.
NM s ew Irleans Cotton Exchge,'
Chicago Board of Trade.
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Bell Phone 853 Baldwin Block


SPIRIT tS OF TURPENTINE.
To United Kingdom, in gallons:
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
April.. .. .. ... 196.681 186.128 366.346
May .... .. .. 60.315 63.222 1,183.364
June ........ 795.037 1,480,186 1.562.550
July .... .. .. 973,759 289.934 1,530,070
August.. .... ..968.890 1.767.874
September.. ... 773.211 646.257 909.700
October .. ...... 711.434 498.240 1.059.89;

To Belgium and Netherlands. in gallons:
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
April .... ... 26,812 90.447 Included
May ........ 23,706 51.5131n all other
June........... 507.693 267.210 Euruoe


ROSINS.
To United Kingdom, barrels 280 Ibs:
Month 1903-04 1902-0 1901-02
April .. .... .. 79.243 65,387 63.49:
May ........ 60,315 63,222 58.994
June ........ 60.748 67,542 51.632
July ........ 82,948 59,235 65,510
August ...... 74.649 62.613
Septemb r. .. 98,471 42,869 73309
October .... .. 46,641 41.034 90,057

To Belgium and Netherlands, barrels 280
pounds:
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
April........ 16,709 53.015 Included
May ...... .... 23,706 515131n all other
lim 3 K F EK 3t ET u illronr


Course of the Savannah Naval Stores Markets.
1903- -1904.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE
Apr 1 Apr. 3 Apr. 10 Apr. 17 Apr. 24 May 1 May 8 May 15 May 22 May 2
NI ND .50 49 47 45 1-2 461-2 491-2 47
June 5 June 12 June 19 June 26 July 3 July 10 July 17 July 24 July 31 Aug. 0
45 3-4 46 47 47 47% 47 3-4 48 50 50 4
Aug. 14 Aug. 21 Aug. 27 Sept. 4 Sept. 11 Sept 18 Sept. 25 Oct. 2 Oct. 8 Oct. 15
52%-53 53%1 53% 56% 4 3-4 57 ND 56 57 1-2 55 1-20 3-4
Oct. 22, Oct 29 Nov. 6, Nov. 19, Nov. 5,Dec. 3, Dec. 10, Dec. 17, Dec. 31, Jan. 14
56 561-2 56 56 56 56 56 56 1-4 5614 63 1-2-64
.aln. 22, .lan. 24, Feby. 11, Feb. 18,Feby. 25 leh. 3 Mcli. 10 Mch 24
65 4 62 6() 59 60 58
Mlel. 30
.57
ROSINS


WW


164 40 Arl.... .. ....... April ......3.90
July ...... .. 576,18s 815,217 S9.3 July ......... 26.646 19.647 40,2 April 3 3.75
August... .... 489.387 358.490 August ...... 43035 47.263 Ap .... 3.
September..... 265,455 758.201 438.621 Sept mber..... 45,32 10,819 347 April 10 .. 3.60
October ...... 30.914 :10,001 121.480 October .. .. .. 37,131 64,408 23.019 Aprl .50
.... April 24. .3.40
To Germany, in gallons: To Germany, barrels 280 lbs. May I ...... 3.35
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02 Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02 May 8. . . 3.35
April .. ............. 114,34 112.533 April. 40.558 37.844 09.68 May 15 . ..3.47%
May ........ 33.283 68.436 230,056 May.... 33.283 8,43 5774 May 22 3.65
June.. ...... 104.000 331.672 190.042 June ...... 41,554 49.632 48,80 May 29. 3.65
July .. ...... 36.116 180,412 78,787 July 100.236 34.874 655391 June 5 ..... 3.60
August ...... 51.856 578.437 Augus 784 34921 12. . . 3.40
September..... 226.950 566.981 713.967 September .. 160,157 9,468 42.28 June 19. .. 3.30
October ...... 257,316 91,644 148,597 October .... 82,756 38.654 357 June 26 ..... 3.30
S July . .. ..3.30
To all other Europe in Gallons: To all other Europe, barrels 280 lbs: July 10. ..... 3.30
Month 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02 Month 1903-04 1902-0 1901-02 July 17 . . 3.40
April .......... 510 18.475 260.(66 April .... .... 35,848 30,142 85,731 July 24 . .... 3.45
May...... .... 58,058 31.047 574.311 May ...... .. 27.102 40,729 M.11 July 31 ...... 3.40
June........ 145.233 1,000 O9G.468 June.. ........ 14.044 9.682 3.367 August 7 3.40
July ......... .5000 124.284 48.462 July ........45.513 51.12 14.1a August 14. 3.50
Augus ...... 2.000 2.500 August ...... 5 30,119 August 21 . . 3.50
September.... 43.368 35.040 21.000 September.. 27.491 17.386 1B.3 August 28 .. .. 3.70
October ......10000 42,832 17.0,) October ...... 34,480 15,442 1.86 September 4. . 3.70
September 11 . 3.80
Total Foreign Exports. In gallons, includ- Total Exports of Rosin. barrels 280 pounds. September 18 . 3.90
!in everything outside of the United Including Asia, Africa and America out- September 25 . 4.25
States: side of the United States: ot i r 2 .. 4.45
Month 1904410 1902-na lq01--fr Month 190-04 1902-03 1901-0: October 8 ...... 4.70
April ........ 514.088 555.815 94- 676 April ...... 196.681 186.128 2.4 l'61 Oet hbr 15 .... ..4.45
May ...... ..19".782 260.114 2.26..01r May .. .. .. .. 19.R22 260.144 4. e tber 2 ..4.20
Jue.. .. .. .....I. .K00 2.221.2.5 2.947.821 June ...... ..178.269 210,032 21.59 Novmber 6 ..... .. 0
July .........181.80l 1.651.015 2.493.849 Jly ......... 306.580 187.193 1981 November 13 .. .... 350
Aurus.t ...... 1.734.1.3 2.906.498 August ...... 239.156 228.632 November 19 ...... 3.60
Septen.ber.. .1474.14.1154.56 2.224.94) September.. .. 3330 233.032 231.64 November ... 3.50
October ...... 1.480.261 1.002,897 1.527.3? October ... .. 209.823 275.766 191--1 uomuhe, 3 .. .50
December 17 .. .. 3.50
D December 1 .. .. 3.50
. . ..December 31 .. ..3..55
January 14 .. ..4.
The Weekly Industrial Recor Jary 2 .. .. ..4.50
January 28 .. .. ..4.50
adlvertising colutins reach all Fe"'irnry ..3.75


W ho he p n an ir 25 ..c. .3.70
Who hanle the pine ndirch 24 ...... 4.00~c
; March 31 ...... 4.10


WG N M
$3.60 $3.50 $3.40
3.60 3.50 3.40
3.45 3.35 320
3.35 3.25 3.15
3.25 3.15 3.10
3.25 3.15 3.10
3.25 1.15 3.10
3.27% 3.17% 5.12% i
3.35 3.36 3.&0
3.35 3.25 3.20
3.30 3.20 3.15
3.10 3.00 2.95
3.10 3.00 2.95
3.10 3.00 2.95
3.10 3.00 2.90
3.10 .00 2.90
3.20 3.10 3.00
3.25 3.10 3.00
3.20 3.05 2.95
3.20 3.05 2.96
3.30 3.15 3.05
3.30 3.15 3.05
3.50 3.25 3.15
3.50 3.4C 3.30
3.65 3.50 3.45
3.75 3.60 3.60
4.10 3.95 3.95
4.40 4 4.30
4.40 4.35 4.25
4.40 4.20 4.00
330 3.M 1.90
3.90 3..) 3.V0
3.30 310 2.90
3.25 3.10 2.90
3.35 3.20 3.01
3.25 3.10 2.90
3.25 3.05 2.90
3.25 3.00 2.90
3.25 3.05 2.90
3.30 3.10 2.95
32. 3..5 3.15
4.10 3.95 3.90
4.10 3.56 390
3.45 3.3.5 3.30
3.45 3.35 3.30
3.50 3.35 3.20
3..C0 3.40 3.35
3.70 3.50 3.35
3.80 3.60 3.35


I
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.8K
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.87%
3.00
3.05
3.00
2.80
2.70
2.65
2.65
2.65
2.75



2.80
2.90
3.00
3.10
3.20
3.35
3.50
3..5,

3.M5
2.70
2.70
2.70
2.70
2.B
2.55
2.55
2.S5
3.00
3.10
3.30

3 05
2.95
3.05
2.95
2.95


H
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.27%
2.35
2.40
2.40
2.30
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.30
2.30
2.20
2.20
2.30
2.30
2.40
2.50
2.50
2.60
2.65
2.70
2.70
2.70
2.60
2.60
2.60
2.35
2.45
2.40
2.35
2.35
2.35
240
2.95
2.90
3.15
2..5
2.70
3. CA
2.75
270
2.70


THE RECORD CIRCULATES ALL OVER THE WORLD.


The Exports of Turpentine and Rosin.


1








12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD

JAMES A. HOLLOMON.
Editor and Manager.

Published Every Friday.
SUiaIPrrIow (Domestic) ..3 .00 Per Annum
TO (Foreign).... $3 50 .

"The Pine and Its Products."

All communications should be addressed
The Industria.l Record Company.
Jacksonville. Fla.
Branch Editorial and Business Office at
Sav&nnMh. Ga.

Entered at the Postoffie at Jacksonville.
Pla.. as second-elass matter.

Adopted by the Executive committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association. Sep-
temper 12 19. as its exclusive official or-
ga. Adopted In manual convention. Sep-
tember 11. s the organ also of the general
ssoelation.
Adopted April 27th. 102. as the omelal
rgan of the Inter-State Cane Grower-'
amociation. Adopted Sept. 11. 102. as the
only official organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.

COPr POR ADVIrTISING.
AdVertslmal e*py (ehaargem or new
advertsmements) should reach mm
Tumeday momeemn to Immure mnsertiem
It the lmea of the esme week.

JAMES P. TALIAFERRO.

On another page of the Record to-day
we publish a very interesting sketch of
United Staates Senator James P. Talia-
ferro. This is not published especially
for the purpose of familiarizing our read-
ers with the life and works of this dis-
tinguished Floridian, for they are gene-
rally known. It is with especial pride,
however, that we point to the fact that
Senator Taliaferro first planted his hopes
in Florida among industrial classes and
graduated, so to speak, from the log
camps and the lumber yards. The Indus-
trial Record, as a paper devoted to the
"pine and its products," is pleased to hold
up Mr. Taliaferro as an example for the
hundreds of worthy young men who are
engaged in industrial pursuits to-day,
and to illustrate with him the possibil-
ties of the industry in which he began
his life of usefulness to the young man
who is not afraid to work, and who backs
the labor of his hands with the alert-
ness of his head and the sincerity of his
heart.
Senator Taliaferro has very fittingly be-
come known as "Florida's business Sen-
ator." To have a State, young in de-
velopment, but full of industrial and com-
mercial possibilities, successfully repre-
sented in the United States Congress, it
necessarily becomes a business proposition.
The professional politician may make
more noise on the floor, may attain more
newspaper notoriety, may swear louder,
play better poker and make more money
fot himself, but when it comes to accom-
plishind result for his State, the quiet,
dignified business man, who works in the
committee room, and has the interest of
his constituency first in mind is the man
who always succeeds. It is results that
a State wants. When we say that Sen-
ator Taliaferro is such a man we point
to his record for five years in the Senate.
The Record is not in politics. It does
not aspire to be. This paper is too busy
in trying to foster the industrial devel-
opment of our section and the game of
politics in itself plays a small part in
this work; but it is important that we
keep .men in Congress who can aid and


abet this development and we believe the
industrial and business interests of Flor-
ida would suffer if Senator Taliaferro
was not returned to the good work he
has so well in hand.
So here's to the boy of the logging
camp-worthy son of an humble but noble
beginning.


CANE GROWERS' CONVENTION.
The cane growers' convention that
meets in this city next month represents
a constituency that is well organized, with
a defined policy and has its work thor-
oughly in hand. While sugarcane is con-
fined to the South Atlantic and Gulf
States, those who cultivate it are in ac-
cord, and have commingled much with
each other. They know what they want
and how to go about getting it. The
coming meeting will be to them simply a
milestone, but it will mark an era in
the business that will be far-reaching.
The Industrial Record early espoused
the cause of the turpentine operators
and demanded that they perfect a com-
pact organization. They did so, and the
result is well known. The Record also
took up the question of' the cattlebreed-
ers' organizing. They met in this city last
month and organized, and the Record looks
with great interest to the future of that
organization. The Record over a year ago
demanded a thorough organization of the
cane growers, and the Macon meeting last
summer was the result.
Our amntlings are all growing and pros-
pering. What organization has done for
the T. O. A. and is now doing for the
cane growers, it will do for the cattle-
breeders. But the future is pregnant with
results which these three organizations
will have upon the South.


OPENING THE NEW YEAR.
The naval stores year begins to-day.
In naval stores circles the opinion seems
to be that while the prospects are bright
for a good business the coming year, it
will undoubtedly be beset with many un-
certainties. The presidential election, the
war in the East. the more or less unsettled
conditions of labor throughout the coun-
try are all conditions that may affect it
somewhat. The year just closed is mark-
ed with a white stone, for it was a most
excellent year in every respect in the na-
val stores business. When we consider
the elements that will enter into it this
year which were unknown last year, we
will do well if we hold our own.
A number of naval stores men were
seen by the Record this morning and asked
for an opinion as to the year just closed
and the conditions and prospects for 1904-
05.. While not caring to be quoted in-
dividually. they all expressed the opin-
ion that probably the business would be as
gosl. if not better, this year than last,
notwithstanding the uncertainties above
alluded to. There was no difference of
opinion among them, however, about the
proposition that if we do as well the com-
ing year as we did last year, we will do
well.


NEW USE FOR WASTE WOOD.
Many plans are in contemplation, and
others in actual use in utilizing the
waste of slabs and sawdust. The actual
possibilities of utilizing this waste have
just begun to be realized. Uses hereto-
fore unconsidered are sure to be devised
and processes for practical reduction of


waste to valuable and merchantable pro- the business placed on a new, live and
ducts are sure to be invented that will active basis. This increase of prosperity
materially enhance the value of every par- has resulted in great activity in the way
ticle of the log. Evidences are not want- of improving the farms, that is, in erect-
ing to sho what, in spite of the rapid ing new and first-lass tenant houses,
advance in economics of this sort in re- better fences and other buildings, and this
cent years, the surface of this proposition condition is general and very noticeable
has yet but barely been scratched. In to any person travelling through the
short, it seems a fair proposition that country. Besides, a great delay of land is
manufacturers stand to make more in being cleared and put under cultivation,
this way in the future, with expanding and old places that have been lying waste
methods and ideas, than they ever did in for a number of years are being reclaimed
the past, despite recent rapid strides in and improved. The interest rate, as a
that direction. consequence of these conditions, has de-
Yellow pine has, probably, received more creased appreciably, still, on account of
attention in the utilization of its waste the big amounts being expended in im-
than any other wood. because it is richer provcments, there is a fairly active demand
in other elements than used merely as for money, and opportunities for invest-
lumber and timber. Its sawdust and meant are very good.
slabs are an enormous overplus. A late And there is a regular tide of immigra-
idea is wood fiber-plaster. While it is tion flowing into Florida, which also adds
not absolutely new, yet it is a feature to the active demand for lands, sales are
in point, and the industry, now in its in- made on easy terms, and home-seekers
fancy, promises to assume large propor- have no difficulty in obtaining good pros-
tions. Only the refuse of the soft wood pects on a reasonable basis, all things con-
is used now, but there seems no 'good sidered, and on satisfactory term. The
or inherent reason why the refuse of all returns of money thus invested, both
yellow pine and the hardwoods also may on the products of the land and its in-
not be utilized. It would seem to be but crease in value on account of the improve-
the matter of modifying the process of ments are very flattering.
manufacture to levy contributions on any
kind of a wood-working institution for
this purpose, providing only that the waste Death of James S. Turner.


is beyond what can be economically uti-
lized for making steam.
Wood-fibre plaster is said to be a good
wall covering, or rather wall material, in
which the wood-fibre practically displaces
the old-fashioned and time-honored mix-
ture of sand, lime and hair. It has one
merit. It is much cheaper.


A WAY AND A TIME.
Tallahassee has organized a gun club.
It contains a number of the leading citi-
zens of Florida's capital city. Every true
sportsman is anxious to protect the game,
and it is to be hoped that the Tallahassee
gun club will crystallize the sentiment
that no unsportsmanlike shooting or trap-
ping of game will be permitted, either
in kind or time. There is a way to kill
and a time to kill, and the observance of
the one is as important as the observance
of the other.


FARMERS HOLDING THEIR OWN.
Timbered lands in Florida that were
selling a few years ago at from 25 to 50
cents per acre, are now selling anywhere
from $3.50 to $10 per acre, according to
quantity, quality and location. Improved
agricultural lands have increased from 50
to 100 per cent in value, and there is a
general disposition among the farmers and
planters not to sell at any price, as there
is an abundance of money to be made at
present, or even lower crop values. The
general improvement in agriculture and
in other lines has placed the farming in-
terests on a very solid basis, and has en-
abled a great many planters to obtain
the necessary advances for operating their
business without being required to secure
them by crop lien or mortgage; in fact,
a great many of the more successful plant-
ers have sufficient funds in hand out of
last season's crop to practically or entirely
finance the current year's operations.
The general indebtedness of the farm-
ers has been very materially decreased
during the last two or three years, and
old mortgages that have been running
for a number of years have been mostly
paid off and the record closed up, and


Mr. James S. Turner died at his home
in Levy County, Fla., last Monday. Mr.
Turner was well advanced in years, and
has been one of Florida's leading busi-
ness men. He owned the Duval Hotel
in this city. In his death Florida loses
one of its best citizens. Peace to his
ashes.


Changed Their Plans.
F. P. Conroy and F. S. Hodges had an-
nounced heir intention of engaging in the
wholesale grocery business in this city, go-
ing so far as to arrange for a charter, and
engaging warehouses and offices for that
purpose. And Mr. Conroy, who had had
charge of the Armour business in this
city had resigned that position. Smith
& Richardson, the beef men, offered him
a business connection, and he has ac-
cepted it instead. Mr. Hodges, who is
quite largely interested in stock-raising
and timber business in this State, will
have his hands full looking after those
interests.


Rafts at Wilmington.
There is a humorous conflict on at the
Wilmington, N. C., wharves. Under an
old custom, rafts of timber, rosin, etc.,
are tied up at any wharf in the city over
night, to be removed only at the pleasure
of the raft owner. The wharf owners
are trying to break up this custom, and
on the 234 ult. they held a meeting in
that city for that purpose. It was agreed
that all present should go in a body to
the Board of Commissioners of Navigation
and Pilotage, and ask that organization to
pass a regulation designating some place
where rafts could be tied up and accom-
modations provided for raftsmen.


Florida MackereL
The mackerel season is now on in Flor-
ida. The fishermen at Fort Pierce are
catching them at the rate of 10,000 pounds
a day. The price is 2 1-2 cents a pound,
and the fishermen are contemplating a
strike for 3 cents a pound. The fishermen
use naptha launches while engaged in
fishing.


IVVATV PMOGU6IVZ, WVYII=SE IN T---








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


I THE AIIl C NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONYVILE.
g CAPITAL PAID IN. $350,000.00.
OPEN FOR BUSINESS AUGUST I, 1903.
~ OFFICERS:
t Edward W. Lane, President. .FrrCe W. Hoyt, Vice-President.
Thomas P. Denham, Cashier.
wwwww~w w wnw*- nw ?t


IN PHOSPHATE CIRCLES.

What is Going on with the Florida Miners
and Shippers.
The market at present is inactive, but
the prices remainfirm and steady. The
annual meeting of quite a number of the
big mining and shipping concerns took
place in February. among which we note
that of the Palmetto Phosphate Co., the
Peace River Phosphate Co. and the Port
Inglis Terminal Co.
At the meeting of the Palmetto Phos-
phate Co., which took place at Bartow, the
following were present: J. H. and Thos. E.
Cottman, R. W. L. Rasin and Wm. Mar-
burg, of Baltimore; H. C. Mortimer and
Jos. Willetts, of New York and the fol-
lowing ocers were elected: Chas. E. Bish-
op, president, and J. H. Cottman, secre-
tary and treasurer. The Palmetto Co. op-
erate two plants in the land-pebble dis-
trict, among which is the famous "Tiger
Bay" plant, which is one of the largest
mining concerns in the State.
The annual meetings of the Dunnellon
Phosphate Co. and the Port Inglis Termi-
nal Co. were held at the offices of these
companies, at Rockwell, Fla., on February
16th. The officers were all re-elected, those
of the first named being Jno. L. Inglis,
president; Jno. W. Auchinloss, vice-presi-
dent; Ralph Barker, secretary; Hugh D.
Auchinlose, treasurer, and Dr. C. U. Shep-
ard, chemical director, who, with Alex.
Whylie and P. B. Bradley, constitute the
directors.
The officers of the Port Inglis Co. are
Hug D. Auchinloss, president; Jno. L. In-
glis, vice-president and general manager;
Ralph Barker, secretary, and Jno. W. Au-
chincloss, treasurer. The directors include
the above and 0. T. Green, A. G. Bigelow,
Alex. Whylie and S. D. Auchincloss.
Although last year was the first com-
plete year in using Port Inglis as an ex-
porting port, it has proved successful from
every standpoint. The Dunnellon Phos-
phate Co. shipped over 95,000 tons of hard-
rock phosphate through the port, in 32
vessels with good dispatch and without
the least hitch. The company are now
preparing to add another powerful tug to
their large fleet, and will build several
new barges, the latter to be built entirely
of steel. Beside these, the company will
erect a marine railway and shops at Port
Inglis, anl, through the new combination
arrangements of shipping and selling be-


T


A. ]



be

ht


tween the Dunnellon Phosphate Co. and J. Ie
Buttgenhach & Co., the business of this
port will soon be swelled to nearly double, I
as it is the intention of J. Buttgenbach &
Co. to export their production through
Port Inglis just as soon as they can com-
plete the new railway which is being built
from their mines to Rockwell, where they *
will connect with the railway of the Dun-
nellon Co.

Through a decree from the judge of the
Circuit Court of Suwannee County, Jos.
Bell, as special master, sold the property
of the Tuscawilla Phosphate Co. to T. B.
McGregor, the complainant, at Live Oak,
Fla., on March 7th.

The International Phosphate Co., who
were recently organized to operate in the
Iebble region, will shortly commence the
erection of a large plant. The officers of
this company are Geo. C. Beal, of Boston.
President; .1. W. Parmenter, of Boston,
treasurer, and Fred Beatey, of Bartow,
general manager.

The Ross Phosphate Co., another new or-
ganization, composed of W. M. Ross, Jas.
MI. Graham and S. G. Moyer, capitalized
at $50,000, have applied to the State of
Florida for letters patent. This company
will take over the mines and plants now
operated by W. M. Ross.

The Dutton Phosphate Co., of Gaines-
ville, have gotten out a neat and attract-
ire calendar, and. besides the unusual style .


in which it is arranged, there are differ-
ent views of the various enterprises ope-
rated by this company on each page. As
the Dutton Phosphate Co. operate 11
mines, and a railway from the mines to
the Atlantic seaboard, they had quite a
large field to draw from for material for
illustrating.

Florida Fruits and Vegetables.
Thirty carloads of Florida fruits and
vegetables passed through this city on
Saturday and Sunday last on their way
to the markets of the North and West.
A large part of the vegetables consisted
of tomatoes, and much of these were
trans-shipped via the steamship Seminole
for New York. One carload of celery was
consigned to Denver, Colorado. Straw-
berries are coming through now in large
lots. They bring good prices.


Built Upon Honor-Sold Upon Merit.




CYPRESS TANKS, TUBS

AND VATS.

Any size, Any shape. Our Cat-
alogue for the asking.
G. M. DAVIS & SON, PALATKA, FLA.


he West'Raley-Rannie Company,

114 W. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
W. WEST. Pres. E. E. West, Vice-Pres W. R. Reile. Vice-Pres. M. V. Rfley, Sec. & Trees.


We can furnish you with whatever you want in Tim-
r Lands, Saw Mills, etc., and can sell your property.
Write us and when in the city make our office your
adquarters.


THOnAS DIXON, JR.. President, B. W. ILGSORE, Vice-Presidet.,
New York. Raleish. N. C.
F. 6. IIAMRICA. Secretary and Treasurer. New York.
W. f. KRV6. Chemist, ewr York.

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE: 96 FIFTH AYE.. NEW YORE.



Standard Turpentine Company

Builders of Wood Distilling Plants,
by the New Krug Patent Steam
Pressure Process. .


CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
AND INSPECTION OF WAYCROSS PLANT IS INVITED.


REFERENCES: Sartield National Bank, New York: R. 6. Dun Co.


JNO. W. THOMPSON,


WAYCROSS, GA


E. H. TOrILINSON, Special Agent,
Corner Hogan and Forsyth Streets, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
,i44 2,,0,,-,444,*,,4, 64,-4*F, 4, S .


"Kingan's Reliable."

Hams, Lard, Shoulders, Cheese, Bacon, Sausage,
Canned Meats, Butter, THE BEST ON EARTH.

Eastern and Western Dry Salt Meats. Orders filled at lowest mar-
ket price. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. See quotations-
thispaper.
KINGAN & CO., Ltd., E. BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


V. E THOMAS
Prsdeft.


E. I. DLEK
Sean'day & Treiuer.


T. E. IROEBS
VimPRe


Thomas Roberts Hardware Co.

Wholesale & Retail



Turpentine



And Mill Supplies


Hardware, Doors, Sash and Blinds, Paints and Oils.


VALDOSTA,


X GORGM


"FAIR, INDEPENDENT AVT ,ROGRESSIVE."


Superintendent Sales Agencies,








14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Address of Z, C, Chambliss
. Jacksonville, March 22nd.

At the Cattlemen's Convention
* a aaasJaaa aaa
u _ _ _ _ _ _


Mr. President andGentlemen of the Con-
vention: When I was a boy in Sunday-
scholol, I read of the disturbance between
Moses and Aaron about the golden calf
and ever siner that time calves and gold
have Iben mixed up in my head. For a
long time I endeavored to get enough
gold to go into the calf business, but at
last learnmw- my error, and am now raising
calves trying to get into the gold busi-
ness.
The subject assigned to me by your com-
mittee, What the Cattle Industry Has
Done for Florida, necessarily calls for
facts of history, and, unfortunately, the
class of people who know most about it,
are unwilling to take the trouble to give
them. I am, however, under obligations
to Dr. II. T. Lykes and James Summerlin
for valuable assistance.
About the year 1840 the pioneers began
to come into the peninsula, and all of
them brought more or less cattle. They
were much harassed by wolves and In-
dians, but, as the wolves were poisoned
with strychnine, and the Indians driven
further South, the cattle were allowed to
scatter, and increased very fast. The
ranges were at that time good, and no,
pastures were known or needed. The
"Heart II" brand was one of the stocks
which ran to numbers very fast, and fi-
nally reached 30,000. Other very promi-
nent brands marking great herds were the
"A" the "22" and the "S. S'" Like notes
hearing compound interest, these cattle
added to themselves, while their owners
wer asleep or at play. As a rule, all in-
te:ested in a range, would hunt together
at gathering time, round up everybody's
cattle, mark and brand the calves and di-
vide the mavericks according to the inter-
ests represented. Then all cattle were
turned out again. Very little provisions,
except bread, were carried on these round-
ups, as the practice was to kill the fat-
test beef for meat, no matter to whom
it belonged. Occasionally, there was a
cattle owner who would not hunt with
his neighbors, because, in hunting alone,
he got all the mavericks he could find.
Cattlenmen soon became the moneyed
men of the country, although marking and
branding was the only attention given to
their stock, except to sell out the steers
for beef. There were, however, some
who went into the range and lived with
their cattle, and it was the boast of one
oll lady that she had personally brandedl
every calf in her large stock for a nunm-
her of years. In cases of this kind, their
rattle and money increased very fast, and


In those days, stock cattle were worth
only about $3 per head. Notwithstanding
the large increase in numlbrs, the price
gradually increased, and in 1870 great ex-
portations to Cuba began, and from that
date to 1882, from Punta Rassa alone.
which was the principal loading point,
360.000 head of beef cattle we:e shipped.
for which the rangemen received an aver-
age of $16 per head, which, with $2.50
per head to the speculators, gave the
State the enormous sum of $6.360.000
During the same period about 300.000 stock
cattle were shipped, and for these the
rangemen received, in round numbers, $3,-
240,000. or a total for all cattle shipped.
$9,600.999. These cattle averaged in
weight about 600 pounds gross, or 300
pounds net. Then came a cessation of
exports to a large extent, and I have no:
figures for the next sixteen years. lie-
ginning in 1898 another boom came on,
and though the stocks had become very
inferior in grade, falling to an average
weight of 480 pounds gross, the Cuban
trade took from the State:
In 1898, 6,000 head beef; in 1899, 30.000
head beef; in 1900, 30.000 head beef and
10.000 head stock; in 1901, 30.000 head
beef and 10,000 head stock; in 1902,
20.000 head beef and 15.000 head stock;
in 1903. 20.000 head beef and 20,000 head
stock. Total, 141,000 head beef and 55,-
000 head stock.
This inferior lightweight cattle aver-
aged $15 per head for beef, making $2,115,.
000, and $9 per head for stock, making,
$495.000. or a total in the six years ,"!
$2.610.000, which added to the previous
exports, gives a grand total of $12.210,-
000 from Cuba alone. When it becomes
known that the local State markets take
an average of 30,000 head per annum.
these figures are more than doubled, as
the local markets were taking cattle for
the sixteen years when there was little
shipping to Cuba. The rangemen advised
ne that Cuba would have taken larger
numbers the past few years if they could
have been had; and also, that the local
markets would have taken those which
went to Cuba, if they were kept fat enough
to kill in winter. Notwithstanding the
fact that cattle have been reduced in
weight from 600 pounds to 480 pounds
gross, by the ranges giving out, and from
continuous inbreeding of the same stocks,
the demand for meat is so strong that the
price per head remains about the same.
When human beings marry relatives, the
offspring is weakened in constitution,
and are often idiots and deformed. Every


,,,an,,,s ,, g ortunes were m.. rangeman knows that cattle inbreed much
As a rule. these people were accommodat- 4 closer, and, of course, tle effect is much
ing and generous, willing to divide any- Ireater.
thing in their homes and camps. Theyt o t l s o
.On account of tile large sales of West-
werce, as a general thing, scrupulous i n e t d
ern Ibef. tle demlandl for hone-raised meat
the keeping of their obligations, even
though improperly drawn, as they often
ucre. As a ialedium of exchange they al-
\ ays prc'crred gold, one reason being lil I K o h n F
tI hey had no l.anks and had to bury or ecoun-
ceal their cash, but more likely, because
cattle and gold have always beleonged to
te .same owners. Many interesting stories Dry d Cl
lave been told relative to coin buried Dry UOO s, C ot
which could never be found, and also of
instances where large sums were found M
and taken by the wrong parties.


requires it to be fed. There are so many
poor individuals among the home-raised
steers, that the profit in feeding good ones
is largely reduced by the inferior ones.
If the feeding quality of our steers can
lie raised, feeding will become more gen-
ereal; the demand will be sharper; prof-
its larger and the home trade will con-
sume then all.
If, by pure blood and increased interest.
we produce more good beef than local
markets will take, we are within one hun-
alre I miles of phosphate ports, which
nre full of tramp steamers for foreign
ports; whereas, Iowa and the great West
are hundreds of miles from Chicago, and
more than 1.000 miles to port of ship-
anent. The exporters now decline to buy
2.000 pound steers, once wanted so much.
and piay more pe:-e iound for what they
term "handy weights," averaging 1,200 to
1,400 pounds. This change is also in our
favor. I recently met on the train Mr.
*I. R. Miller, of Virginia, who told me
that buyers for export come right to their
farms. lie thinks the best of Florida
lands, with intelligent breeding will give
us a steer to go anywhere abroad. United
States Government exlpriments show fed
cattle to dress an ave:-age of 52 1-2 pounds
to 100 pounds live weight; and moderately
good animals, produced by crossing with
the beef breeds, dress 60 pounds. Fig-
uring a loss of only 5 per cent. on the
slaughter test, of all the 672,740 head of
cattle now on the tax books of Florida.
the enormous total of 16,818,500 pounds
loss is indicated, representing a money
value of $840,925, figuring dressed meat
at only 5 cents per pound. Besides this
loss in weight, the quality, by crossing.
would also enhance the price per pound.
It may be argued that Southeren feeds
will not produce meat as good as that
from the corn ielt, but on January 8
last, sixteen steers fed without corn at
the Louisiana Experiment Station toppe.l
the Chicago market, selling for $5.65 per
hundred, live weight. It may also be
ef interest to know that the crossbred
Shorthorn-Hereford steer "Soupbones,"
bred in the Indian Territory, but finished
on our farm, was made to weigh 1,300
pounds gross, and dress 788 pounds net.
at two years and nineteen days old. He
was sold to the Florida Meat and Pack-
ing Company of Ocala at 10 cents per
pundls, which, with his hide and tallow,
produced $81.20. The Windsor, the best
hotel in this city, paid the Packing Com-
pany $24.35 for one loin and rib roast
for (hristmas dinner, which is more than
the whole of the best Florida scrub steer
will bring.
Twenty years ago not a bale of hay
was packed in Marion County. In 190;3
one farm the:e made 4,000 bales, and ev-
ery farmer makes enough for his own use
and some to sell. Ten years ago it was
said that our pine timber would not
make turpentine in paying quantities;
now, Florida turpentine men are the na-
hobs of the country. We will surprise
the world at least once more with market-
Stopping beef cattle. After reviewing the


great things which the cattle industry has
done for Florida. had we not best look
somewhat into the future, and see if
greater things cannot be done? Having
seen that Cuba restocked herself after her
ten-year war. and quit taking our cattle
from 1882 till another war came on in
189,. had we not better face the fact that
-he is again tranquil in government, large-
ly restocked with cattle, and will soon
again supply largely her own demands for
beef? As already stated. our shipments
there practically ceased from 1882 till
IM88. If we had been, at that time, able
to supply high-bred cattle, this would
not have been. It is a very significant
thing that her beef growers are no longer
satisfied with the quality of animals we
have sent there. and that she is buying
lIlohslel bulls in Texas, and that one of
hIr citizens recently paid $450 for a pure-
bred beef ct,w at Auburn, Ala., taking
half a dozen bulls at the same time, at
aloiIt the same figures. This shows that
if we still use her markets, we must com-
pete with high-class meat; if we give up
her market, we must compete at home
with Western meat. People in Florida mw;:
no longer cat work oxen, old shelly cows,
or young steers, if not fat. They have
tasted fed Florida and Western meats,
and they are going to eat one or the other.
.1Men who are feeding Florida steers must
have, and are willing to pay outside prices
for really gond ones. The first cross of
pure bred bulls, of any of the beef breeds,
is a revelation in improvement, and
though I have tried to avoid all reference
to persons and breeds, in order that you
mlay imt have to accept my statement,
I take the libe-ty of inviting you to Mar-
ion county where you may see for your-
selves what one good Shorthorn bull has
done for calves out of the cold-blooded
scrub cows~ owned by Silas H. Gaitskill.
But don't stop with one cross-put on
two at least; one with good blood and
one with gaxn pasture. Anybody can make
hay. Stop fighting grass; it is a fight
against nature ('rabgrass, blanket grass,
lyaw vines. Il-ggarweed and sorghum all
make themselves with a little help. Vel-
vet beans anl cassava, with a little cot-
to nsecd meal. make the best and cheapest
feel tlhec United States have. Let Flor-
ida rut her timber: fence her lands; raise
'ood Shorthorn and Hereford steers, and
you will soon see great packing houses
within her Islriers; great deckloads of fed
i.e',f leaving her pIrts on European ves-
rest: relined lmmnles in her country dis-
tricts. 'with pianos in every parlor. You
will hear riblbsns rustle and smell perfume
whenever you meet a farmer's daughter.


A new hank has just been organized in
T'amlpa. to be called the American National
Ihank of Tanipa.


The State Forestry Association, of Ten-
ness-c has elected Col. J. B. Killebrew,
of Nashiil'e. president. and Prof. Charles
.. Keller. of Knoxville, secretary.


rchgott = Company.

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN

hing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
IL ORDERS lIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA..


READ EVERY LIUE IN TI L RECORD


f......I 4:.. -.. r.l.- r _. -_ _--_-_ i -:. i











THflE WKEIMiLY tN"ItSTRIAL tICORD. 15


Jokes and Sketches,

[This deparbnten will consist each week of a
SItory, h.norous and otherwise, regarding some
Sprominies individual in the industrial life o the
South. Editor.


A good story is going the rounds on
P. L. Sutherland. the "silver-tongued ora-
tor of the Turpentine Operators' Associa-
tion." and. by the way, one of the larg-
est and most successful producers in Flor-
ida. A prominent turpentine man who is
wealthy approached a young friend who
is poor with a gigantic business propo-
sition, involving several thousands of dol-
lars.
"Good proposition," said the young fel-
low, "but, my dear man, I haven't got
the money."
"Humph!" replied the older, "it don't
always take money to figure in big deals,
just look at P. L. Sutherland."


This reminds us of a couple of printers'
"devils," one from the pressroom and the
other from the composing room, who were
lunching together in the rear of the ma-
chine room along about 12:30. Their con-
versation was overheard by the foreman:
"Say, Bill," said the older, "I'm getting
blamed tired of this devil business-let's
break aloose and make some money."
"What doing?" drawled the younger.
"Why, start a bank."
"Bank! Gee whiz, kid, where in the name
of goodness would we get the money."
"O, it don't take no money, just put up
a good front."
"May be so," concluded the younger.
"but I'm thinking a gsalo backing would
be a darned sight Iwtter."

What a power the combination must
be! Sutherland had both.

Speaking about banks, though, it is re-
called that Sutherland is now president of
the Bank of Green Cove Springs, Fla.
When this bank was first organized, Suth
erland, Arthur F Perry, cashier of the
Mercantile Exchange Bank, and a mutual
fro-nd were talking.
"Bank, eh?" said the friend, "What
do you know about loaning money," ad-
dressing the new president.
"Ask Perry," said Sutherland.
"Don't know a thing about his 'loaning'
qualities," said Perry, "but I can vouch
that he is a post-graduate in the art of
borrowing."

Joking aside, P. L. Sutherland is one
of the most remarkable young men in the
naval stores business. It is no secret that
he came to Florida five years ago without
a dollar that he didn't owe. He has madi
a comfortable fortune already in the in-
dustry that he loves, and his career, as a
business man and developer,- has just be-
gun. he owes a great deal to friends who
assisted him in his early investments, but
without a keen intellect, a boundless en-
ergy and a noble character, lie could not
have succeeded, though a thousand hands
had held him up. He has succeeded first
of all, because he has deserved to succeed.


Erecting Big Cooperage Plant.
The Cooperage Company, recently organ-
ized in .Jacksonville by prominent factors
and operators with .. C. Little, of the
Consolidated, president. will hoid its first
annual meeting on the l1th of April. At
that time the chapter will be accept-d andt
the permanent organization perfected.
The company was organized for the pur
pose of doing a general cooperage busi
ness, particularly for the manufacture ol
spirits barrels at a saving to the pro


ducers. Already customers are being sup-
plied from plants at Columbus, Ga., and
Leesburg, Fla., and a large machine plant
is in course of erection in Jacksonville
and should he in full operation in three
months. Hand plants will be established
at convenient points throughout the tur-
Ientine belt.

JACKSONVILLE SHIPMENTS.

Figures for March as Compared with Pre-
vious Months and Years.
The lumber shipments during March
amounted to 13.415,249 feet, of which 10,-
463.272 feet were shipped coastwise and
2.961,977 feet were shipped to foreign
ports.
During the preceding month the lumber
shipments amounted to 15,960,186 feet,
and during March a year ago the ship-
nients amounted to 18,885,334 feet. The
shipments during March last year were
nearly eight million feet in excess of the
shipments during March, 1902, and six
million feet in excess of March, 1901.
The lumber shipments from the port of
Jacksonville for the first quarter of the
year amounted to 44,962,681 feet, a
monthly average of 14.987,560 feet, the
shipments being as follows:
1904. Feet.
January .. .......... ..15,587,246
February ...... ........15,960,186
March ................13,415,249

Total ........ ...44,962,681
During the month 111 vessels crossed the
bar at the mouth of the St. Johns river
and entered and cleared at the Jacksonville
customhouse. Of this number 13 sailing
vessels entered front foreign ports and 18
sailing vessels sailed for foreign ports;
there was also one yacht entered foreign
andl cleared foreign.
From coastwise ports 19 steamships en-
tered and 18 steamships cleared for coast-
wise ports. There were 28 sailing ves-
sels entering from and 15 sailing vessels
clearing for coastwise ports.
The total tonnage of the vessels enter-
ing port was 60,238, and the total tonnage
of vessels clearing was 51,432. Of the
coastwise entrances the tonnage of the
steam vessels wa 43,681, and of the sail-
ing vessels, 13,457. Of the coastwise clear-
ances the tonnage of the steam vessels
was 41,127, and of the sailing vessels
61.678. The tonnage of all vessels enter-
ing from foreign ports was 3,100, and
the tonnage of all vessels clearing for
foreign ports was 3,627.
The cargoes of the vessels clearing for
coastwise ports consisted of 10,463,272 feet
of lumber, 46.000 barrels of naval stores,
960 bundles of moulding, 8,725 sacks of
kaolin. 1,500 bales of cotton, 120 bales and
175 barrels of tobacco. 46,150 packages of
fruits and vegetables and 42,860 packages
of miscellaneous merchandise.
The exports to foreign ports during the
month consisted of 2,951.977 feet of lum-
Ier. 246.300 shingles, 550 gallons of gaso-
line, 10.000 laths, 70 palmetto piling, 2
spars and 947 packages of miscellaneous
merchandise. The total value of the for-
eign exlpot:i was $44,796.01. During
March of last year, the value of exports
to foreign ports was $33,563.26.
One of the items of the coastwise ship-
ments which shows a large increase is that
Sof crossties. During March, 1903, the ship-
Sment of crosmties was 39,550, while in
March, 1904, the shipments amounted to
93,170. an increase of 53,620 for March,
* 1904. There were 60,013 crossties ship-
Sted during February of this year, which
. shows an increase of 33,157 in one month.


THE CATTLE INDUSTRY.
Capt. W. H. Towles, of Fort Myers.
Iought 5,000 head of beef cattle from
King Brothers and Hendry & Whiiden,
at Arcadia, the past week. The price
paid was about $75,000.


Hun. J. W. Bryant, of Kathleen, closed
a deal last week with Mr. E. E. Skipper
for twenty head of fine full-blooded Dev-
in heifers, which Mr. Skipper recently
shipped in from Texas. Mr. Bryant pur-
chased several head of the same kind of
stock from Mr. Skipper on a former ship-
ment and they did so well and he was so
much pleased with them that he decided
to increase his nunber.-Bartow Courier.


A number of large business deals were
consummated here this week in which
citizens of Arcadia and vicinity are prin-
cipally interested. King Bros. have pur-
chased the entire stock of cattle of Mr.
T. O. Parker, for which they paid $10.00
per head. The stock is estimated at about
3,500 head. In the deal Mr. Parker pur-
chased the orange grove of King Bros. in
tle vicinity of Calvinia, for which he pays
$25,000. The grove contains about sixty
acres and is one of the finest in the north-
ern portion of the county. It is estimated
that it will bear between five and six
thousand boxes of fruit this year.-Arca-
dia News.

Mr. R. E. Whidden also purchased from
Mr. Joseph Mizell this week the remainder
of his stock of cattle, consisting of about
700 head, for which lie paid in round
numbers the sum of $6,500.

Fernandina March Shipments.
The following were the shipments for
March from this port:
Lumber, 10,842,489 feet.
Crossties. 35,150.
Total lumber and crossties, 12,398,731.
Phosphate, 7,645 tons.
Rosin, 25,039 round barrels.
Turpentine, 1,100 casks.
Cotton linters, 277 bales.
Of lumber, 8,008, 754 feet went coast-
wise, 2,743, 735 feet foreign. The cross-
ties equaled 1,156, 142 feet of lumber.

Fernandina Lumber Inspectors.
The Associated Lumbler Inspectors of
Nassau County, Florida, organized this
week at a meeting held at the office of
W. A. Evans. F. S. Burr was elected
president and H. F. Starbuck secretary.
A committee was appointed to draft a
constitution and by,-laws. The association
intends to see to it that all persons acting
as lumber inspectors are provided with a
license.

A. R. Sax, of Nerden & Sax, N. Y., is
again in the city.

Lumber is dull this week. Dealers artc
adhering to list prices, and have some in-
quiries, but there is little doing. Aside
from the temporary lack of steamship
tonnage the great builders' strike now
on in New York City. our best market,
is no doubt tile main cause of the lull.

There is .ommleuiiing doing in cypress.
While prices remain unchanged, the de
mand is growing more active all the time.
Indications are that prices will be ad-
vanced in the near future. This Florida
staple, like yellow pine. is entering more
largely into tile economy of house con-
struction at tile North, especially for in-
side work.


NAVAL STORES NOTES.
D. J. Huger, a naval stores operator
of Yulee, Fla., has sold out for $6,270.
Huger is a colored man and has been a
good operator.

There is a feeling prevalent among op-
erators that pale rosin is going to sell
well this year.

There is a future for crude rosin as a
mixer with macerated paper for fuel.


Naval Stores Steamship Line.
The Standard Naval Stores Co., of Jack-
sonville, is planning to put on a regular
line of steamers from this city to New
York just as soon as the work in deep-
ening the water permits.


Jacksonville Cooperage Company.
The plant of the Jacksonville Cooperage
Company is nearing completion and will
be in operation in a few days. The com-
pany has recently been reorganized, Mr.
J. A. G. Carson, of the J. P. Williams Com-
pany, of Savannah, having acquired the
interest of Mr. Henry Ellson. The capital
stock of the company has been increased.
It expects to manufacture its own staves
and heads, as well as barrels. Mr. J. G.
Scovel, of the Union Cooperage and Sup-
ply Company, will be the company's man-
ager.

Agricultural Journalists.
Prof. W. G. Johnson and Mr. T. A. Bar-
rett are in Orlando. Prof. Johnson is edi-
tor of the American Agriculturist, and Mr.
Barrett is business manager of the Orange
.Judd Farmer, both papers founded by the
late Orange Judd, of New York. These
gentlemen are touring the State in the
interests of the agricultural industry and
will publish an extended report of the
present and future of the agricultural
condition of Florida.

To Test Southern Waters.
The United States Geological Survey,
through its division of Hydro Economics,
has commenced an investigation into the
character of the waters of the States of
Florida and Georgia. The investigation
will include the ground waters, or those
coming from wells and springs, and the
surface waters, or those which flow in
rivers.
The character -. the Georgia waters in
general is comparatively unknown. A few
analyses have been made for special pur-
Ipses, but until recently little or no at-
tempt has been made to make a careful
survey of the general water supply of the
South.
The value of the investigation will, of
course lie in its applicability in respect
to the various water problems obtaining
in that part of the country. Of first im-
portance is the water supply of munici-
palities, while only second to this is con-
sideration of the character of water for
use in manufacturing and in boilers.
It is therefore an investigation which
will be of interest to the manufacturing
circles of Georgia and Florida, and of great
value to the railr~d municipalities.
The work is under the supervision of
Mr. M. O. Leighton, chief Division of
Hydro Economics, while the field work
is being carried on by Mr. Titus Ulke,
assistant chief Geological Survey.


"THE P15E AND ITS PRODUCTS"









16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


S. P. Hlmes & Co.'s Market Review.
(Continued From Page II.)
situation hereand elsewhere, the small
movement in the Southwest, where bull-
ish factors that were made most conspicu-
ous, but were offset by a decrease of only
450,000 bushels in the visible on Monday.
The commencement of Spring wheat seed-
ing in the Narthwest, predictions have
been made of a large decrease in Spring
wheat area. European, Indian and Aus-
tralian crop reports are favorable. Rus-
sian uncertain, while rain in Argentine
still continues to cut down its exportable
surplus.
Corn. The concentrated buying of the
futures disclosed a very large short inter-
est, and with unfavorable weather, result-
ing in light receipts that were picked up
by he sugar people, and Armour, at en-
hanced prices, with a scare among the
farmers that created a big demand for
seed corn, with the most bullish features
that have yet developed. There is a de-
mand from all quarters. Argentine ad-
vices as very bullish and indicates a stiff
foreign buying movement. The Armour
house is in close with the Sun and open
buyers of May and July.
Provisions. Were very heavy on a big
hog prospect. It was reported that the hog
receipts for the next week would be very
small and this started the shorts to cov-
ering.
S. P. HOLMES & CO.


Turpentine at London.
1904. 1903. 1902 1901
Sock Mar. 12 21,046a 31,121 32,485 10,533
Del'd this w'k 1,571b 1,491 1,617 1,977
Since Jan. 1 18,883 15.526 16,945 18,455
Price Mar. 14 42-6 44-3 30-6 26-7/.2
Sept.-Dec. .. 40-6 37- 31-3 25-71
(a includes 555 French. (b) includes
57 F'rench.
Reported by James Watt & Son.
WILL MAKE MORE CUPS.

The Chattanooga Pottery Company De-
cide to Treble Its Present
Capacity.
Mr. C. L Krager, manager of the Chat-
tanooga Pottery Copny y, of Daisy,
Tenn., was in Jacksonville this week
attending a meeting of the directors of
that company. The Chattanooga Pot-
tery Company is now devoting its en-
tire plant to the manufacture of the
Herty turpentine Cup, and so successful
has been that system wherever tried that
the company is forced to increase its ca
paucity to meet the demand. During the
past year the company manufactured
about three million cups, and could have
placed twice that number and more had
the capacity of the plant been equal to
the demand. The company, therefore,
is now installing several thousand dol
lars worth of new machinery, and will
provide an equipment fully capacitated
to make eight million cups during the
coming year.

W. B. Johnson Grocery Co.
The W. B. Johnson Grocery Co. held its
annual meeting Wednesday at its offices
in this city, all the stockholders being
present. The statement of business done
last year, and present renditions was
most flattering. The esmaq y increased
its stock from $26,000 to $100,000, which
was promptly taken by the stockholders
present, several of whom re stockholders
of the Independent Naval Stores Co., of
this city.
The officers elected for the ensuing year
are as follows: A. S. Pendleton, president,


Valdosta, Ga.; W.B. Johnson, viee-presi- SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903,04 AND TWO
dent, Valdosta, Ga.; Janws Lasseter, gen-
eral manager and treasurer, Jacksonville; PREVIOUS YEARS.
W. W. Stripling, secretary, Ocala; board
of directors, W. B. Johnson, Valdosta, Ga.; Receipts 1903-04 1902-03 I 1901-02
N. G. Wade, Jacksonville; D. M. Flynn, I Spirits, casks............................ 193,647 292,496 814,346
Monthrook, Fla.; Walter Ray, Leroy, Fla.; Rosins, bbls .............................. 50,938 940,507 1,071,440
Thomas Dowling, Live Oak, Fla.; Perry Total ........................... ... .44.585 1,233,033 1,385,786
M. Colson, Gainesville, Fla.; T. W. Shands, Exports
Otter Creek, Fla.; A. S. Pendleton, Valdos- Spirits casks ............. ........ 188,393 296,430 814,876
ta, Ga.; James Lasseter, Jacksonville, and Rosins, bbls....... ............ ..... 752,270 975.428 1,062,687
J. T. Butler, Live Oak, Fla. Foreign
Spirits, casks................... ....... 98.384 206,109 217,446
Rosins, bbls .............................. 338,171 504,173 535,042
Standard Poultry Farm. New York
On the 15th of next month Mr. T. A. Spirits, casks .............................. 35,658 42,765 63,797
Lewter will have a grand opening to show Rosins, bbls.................... ....... 87,5: 138,121 129,059
off the splendors of his magnificent poul- Sundries
try farm near Orlando, Fla. He claims Spirits, casks. ...... .... .. .............. 59,351 7,556 48,633
to have a fine display of high-grade fowls. Rosins, bbls. ............................ 26.746 337,74 398.536
The receipts of spirits are lea than 1902-03 by 98,849 casks, and of rosins, 289,569 barrle


THE


Bethune


Apparatus.


The New Process.
Extracts the spirts without destroying the
wood fibre. Runs out a charge in less than
twenty-four hours. Makes from twenty to
forty-five gallons from cord of wood.
Makes pure water white spirits, free from
the odor of tar or creosote. No chemicals
used in refining the spirits. Needs to be
distilled only once after coming from re-
tort.
No trouble with bi-products, the spirits
pronounced to be far the finest ever pro-
duced and from wood. Only one grade
of spirits produced and that the highest.
ABSOLUTELY NO DANGER FROM FIRE
Built of finest material by high-grade
workmen. The cheapest machine offered to
the public.
We challenge comparison of output and
quality of product. We guarantee output
and quality.
For full particulars, prices, samples,
etc., address-
The rime Belt CMstuctiu Cempany
P. O. Box 543 RALEIGH. N. C.


New Victoria.
Corner Main and Adams.
Jacksonville's New Hotel
Rates ($.oo to $2.5s
R. BIXLER, Proprietor.


KIRK & JONES
DRUGGISTS.
07T BAY MW


The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLESALE q RETAIL

HARDWARE
Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints, Oils and Glass,
Stoves. Tinware, Country-l olloware.


10 WEST BAY STREET


Jacksonville, Fla.


p YYou Want a Turpentine Location?
*You Want a Sawmill Location?

You Want any Kind of Florida Land?
S You Mean Business?
C Cal on or write to
+ .J. H. LIVINGSTON & SONS.
Ocala, Florida *
-*
BETTELINI'S SPECIALTY.
I will send by express, prepaid, the following:
Four full quarts Lincoln County. Sunnybrook Rye or Big Horn Rye.. ML.
Single Bottles .................................................................. .. m
I will send four full quarts of Somers' Corn. Melwood Rye, Golden Wed-
ding Rye. Holland Gin. Tom Gin. Peach Brandy, Peach and Honey
Whiskey. Gin and Manhattan Cocktails-any of the above for........ SL
One bottle of any of the above ......................... ......00
Four bottles of the following California Wines: Sherry, Port, Muscat
Catawba .... .. .................................... ....
Five bottles Duffy's Malt ......................................................
Four bottles Wilson Whiskey, cased................ .............. .. $
Single bottles ............. ...... ............
Bulk goods of all kinds. Special Prices on application. All kinds of
liquors in jugs from $1.50 to 1$.00. f. o. b. Jacksonville.
F. BETTLLINI W Bay St., opp. Union uepot, Jacksonville, Fla


Geo T.Gifford Iron Works Co.


SFounders and Machinists.

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED. Special attention to Saw Mill and Turpentine Work.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. Tifton, Georgia.





THE COVINGTON COMPANY,


j 01s.1 SHOES AND DRY GOODS. '"' '
Whlsrele SHOES AND DRY GOODS. 635 to 641 West Forsyth Street.

NEW YORK: 256 Church St. Jacksonville, Fla.

We Sell Merchants Only.



PATRONIZE RECORD ADVETISERS FOR SATISFACTORY DEALINGo








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


First Car of Cabbage. Raise More Hogs.
To R. M. Chamberlain, of Tacoma, one Mr. B. F. Holland has successfully cured
of the most progressive and successful some of the finest bacon we have seen for
truckers of Alachua County, belongs the many a day. He bought nine pigs last
distinction of shipping the first solid car- September, the weights ranging from 37
load of cabbage from Alachua County to 70 pounds each. These he turned into
this season, and to the Gainesville and his corn and velvet beans, keeping them
Gulf Railroad belongs the distinction of there for a little more than three months.
hauling the car. It was billed to Cincin- Our cold storage plant not being ready
nati. he kept the meat in a large refrigerator
Mr. Chamberlain is an extensive planter at the city market for three weeks, using
of vegetables and melons. He has a vast less than three blocks of ice. He is smok-
acreage in one of the prettiest and most ing the meat now, and yesterday he show-
fertile sections of the county, and annual- ed the reporter about 800 pounds of the
ly ships a great deal of truck of all kinds, prettiest meat we have seen.
He is a young man of remarkable shrewd- llis experience demonstrates the fact
ness, and some time ago conceived the that our farmers can cure their own bacon
ucces..fully, and emphasises the neceses-
thought that cabbage would prove a profit- itv for a cold storage plant. This enter-
able crop this season. He acted accord- prise will, we understand, be ready for
ing, planting twenty-five acres on his. business next season. We shall have a
farm, and the present conditions prove further expression from Mr. Holland in re-
gard to hi;- experiment, giving it more In
that he was correct, as cabbage are bring- detai. I tee menti, we advise the
ing to-day upon the market a better price farmers to arrange to raise more hogs.-
than any other vegetable. Bartow Courier-Informant.


The Orange Crop. the orange grower, but don't be a pesei-
Last fall agents of commission houses mist. Remember that's the business of
who traveled through the State for the the buyer.-Bartow Courier Informant.
purpose of buying orange crops on the


trees caused to be published very exten-
sively their estimates of this season's crop,
putting their figures at 2,000,000 boxes.
This high estimate was made to weaken
the faith of the growers that they (the
agents) might purchase the fruit cheap.
The Courier -Informant will possibly rec-
ollect that I then, in this column, caution-
ed the growers that the estimate was too
high. At the same time I predicted that
the crop would not exceed 1,500,000 boxes.
The truth of my estimate is now being
partly verified. Th official figures of all
the railroads in the State give 1,100,000
boxes as having been shipped up to the
present date. It is doubtful if there are
400.000 boxes of oranges now on the trees,
and they are mostly tardiffs and grape-
fruit. Optimism is not a characteristic of


Oranges Parxllence.
A box of as fine oranges as ever seen
on the New York market was presented
last Saturday to the Fruit Trade Journal
by Heard & Reynolds, Arcadia, Fla., the
well known packers of fancy oranges
The fruit was of their celebrated "Golden
Eagle" brand, thin-skinned, juicy and of
exquisite flavor. The Fruit Trade Journal
sent a dozen of the oranges to the leading
and highest-priced private sanitarium for
nervous patients in New York, where a
great many oranges are used. This insti-
tution is kept by a Southern lady, who
knows good oranges, and endeavors to
get the best in the market. She pro-
nounced the Golden Eagle samples by far
the best oranges she bad tasted this sea-
son, and the equal of any she had ever
eaten-even in Florida.-Friut Trade Jour-
nal.


Machinery

Bar Iron, Iron Pipe and fittings, Bolts,
Nuts, Cut and Cast Washers, Black-
smith's Tools, Lumberman's Tools,
Packing of All Kinds, Railroad Material,
Painted and Galvanized Corrugated
Roofing.



JOHN C. CHRISTOPHER,


and


Mill


4


%JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
seeseeesease * a na wwwwww> wn ewen9^9e%


Supplies.


State Agent For:
ATLAS ENGINES and BOILERS, SOULE STEAM FEED,
WORTHINGTON STEAM PUMPS, JENKINS' VALVES,
DISSTON'S SAWS, FUNTKOTE ROOFING,
CURTIS MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Mm Maery.
DeLOACH SAW MILLS, GILBERT WOOD PULLEYS,
HOYTs LEATHER BELT,
NEW JERSEY CAR SPRING ae n RUBBER COMPANY,
Belt and Rubber lose.
SOLVENTINE BOILER COMPOUND.
DODGE MANUFACTURING COMPANY,
Cast Iron Sprt Plleys.
McCAFFREY FILES, MONARCH EMERY WHEELS,
DANIEL'S PPP STEAM PACKING,
A. LESCHEN & SON, Wire RIe.


Special Notice.


Spirits and Rosin are on a Boom, and so Are



McMILLAN BROTHERS'

Celebrated Stills and Fixtures.


Every operator that has used one made by us realize a saving from a gallon to a gallon
and a half of spirits to a barrel of gum, to say nothing of the improved grade in rosin made
by using our large, rapid condensing worm and smooth boiling kettle, which heat uniformly
and generate the steam in a manner that no spirits are allowed to dry up before reaching the


condenser.


Twenty (20)


outfits shipped last month, but a full stock left to select from.


Write for full particulars and place your order with this reliable firm and save annoyance and
loss by negligence and delays. Repair work through the country a specialty.



McMILLAN BROTHERS' SOUTHERN COPPER WORKS,


SAVANNAH, GA.
MOBILE, ALA.


J ICKSONVILLE. FLA.
FAYETTEVILLE, N C.


ONE OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST TRADE PAPERS.


~dd~Ld6~dd~C~Q B&Q~,~~&&~(~C~Q&&&Q~&-+~-~~'L' ~&84~&b~d(~g~C&Q~b~L6~&QC B~C~Ctd~L~dd~6~ ~t~it~b~C(t(CCCI


~St~ri0~;8~i0;OFOFOiO~i0~~ OF0~3~3;O~P;OiOP~;O;3~3;3;3~~









18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

No Poison in Florida Cabbage. of seed will be sufficient for an acre; if country. Sporadic attempts have recently for them. They contracted for 30,000
B. D. Anguish, who is an extensive sown broadcast, from three pecks to a been made to revive it in California, Kan- crates, and as they have men on the
handler of the vegetable, says: bushel. It may be cut for hay at almost sas, Georgia and Utah, and experiments grounds who are superintending the cut-
"A paragraph in an article in last week's any period in its growth from the time are now also being made on Staten Island, ting, packing and shipping of these goods,
News in regard to damage to Florida cab- of flowering until the pods begin to ripen. N. Y. But to-day the masses are unfa- the result is that they are coming in look-
bage does the growers of that State an One hundred pounds of the hay contains miliar with the practical details of silk ing fine and dandy. They have handled
iniustice. It tells of a worm that is said 88.7 pounds of dry matter. Of the 51 culture, and therefore the great silk ex- 20 cars to date and not a complaint from


to be injuring the growing cabbage and
making it unfit for human consumption.
The butterflies go over the cabbage patches
and lay a worm that attacks the plant
and eats into it. When they have gorged
themselves they die. They will sometimes
eat a head of cabbage down to a little
ball, but it will grow again and become a
good head. In all my experience I have
never known of a worm that poisoned
cabbage. Some one ignorant as to cab-
bage, or desiring to injure Florida glow-
ers, started the story about worms poison-
ing cabbage in that State. The conditions
I have described exist in all cabbage grow-
ing sections.
"There is always more danger in ship-
ping cabbage to the South than to any
other part of the country. A car shipped
to New York or any other Northern city,
if frozen, will thaw out and remain in
good condition, but if frozen before ship-
ment or transit to the South, it will be
apt to open up in bad condition. The
heads will be soft and slimy, and it will
be almost worthless for human consump-
tion.-Fruit and Produce News.

Soja Bean.
This may be considered, if not the equal
of the cowpea, at least second to it. June
is the best time for planting in all re-
spects like the cowpea. It is a rapid
grower, and requires but little, if any,
cultivation. If drilled, two to three pecks


The


-- W .


Covington


hibit at the world's fair or 1904 will be any buyer. They are all clean, medium-


interesting to all.
Silk culture is a charming industry, for
thle reason that man here works harmon-
iously with some of thO mnrt intfriata an.l


sized heads, in solid, well made crates.
They are selling these goods at $3 jobbers'
list,


Company


Capital, $200,000.00.


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


Shoes-Wholesale





Dry Goods--Wholesale


Boston Office:
26 Lincoln Street.



New York Office:
256 Church Street.


Each department is complete. Our customers advertise us. Be our

customer and you will be pleased.


OUR OFFICERS:
R. V. COVINGTON, President. H, L. COVINGTON,
DIRECTORS;


Vice-President.


H. A. McF


333 :1! 31 t-14 I mII


iACHERN,
E. W. LANE.


R. CAY, C. DOWNING,
H. L. COVINGTON.


JOHN D. BAKER.
R. V. COVINGTON.


-11 t -1-11 tilt,! lit?!t i- Itt 1 -1 I XII-I I I-11111 +1--1 1-1- IA 1A 1 11 til!I! It 1T1-TI1A1-1 1 Tl TII I-?-?! Ift tTl Ut~~ r I


THE RECORD'S SPACE HAS A BIG MONEY VALUE.


1r--11---11--1 r-r1--1 1 1- ------! t-I-III--~~-- !-- -II r----!-!Ir-; 11--11--11 TT I T-1-1-1-1-1 1-1-1-T- ?A I~1--:-!-1 --:!r--- --l:1-!1---r-rrrr


pounds of digestible substance, 10.8 pounds
are crude protein. The ripe soy bean
contain- 4 per cent of protein, 17 per cent
of fat antd 33.S per cent of carbohydrates,
making it one of the richest of all vege-
table foods. In 100 pounds of seed there
arc po(n(i. i ,ls of digestible food, which
consists of 29.(; pounds of protein, 16
pounds of fat. 2.6 pounds of fiber, 17.0
pounds of carbohydrates, 10.8 pounds of
water and I pound of ash. From six to
thirteen tons of green forage may be
grown to the acre, and the yield of seed
varies fr mi 20 to 10 bushels to the acre,
the average being about that of Indian
corn. In some parts of the South both
the soy beans and the cowpeas are sown
between the rows of corn at the final cul-
tivation. When so sown these crops add
immensely to the value of the "pickings"
after the corn is gathered. Let any far-
mer Nwho reads this try it, and he will Ie.
convinced that the cowpeas or soja beans
so planted will do much to winter his
cattle and hogs at an expense that will
hard, be felt. The running cowpeas are
better for this.

The Miracle of Silk Culture.
Silk culture was an industry which the
European kings attempted to foster in
their colonies in America, but it failed to
thrive. With the exception of a few un-
succvssful attempt at revival the industry
has always amounted to nothing in this!


buiful withAn Important Event.
beautiful processes of nature. The pro- An Important Event.
action of silk gins with the egg. and l:eistered Shorthorn and Hereford cat-
duction of silk begins ith the e. and ti can now be find in nearly every Flor-
these eggs are sold in the open markets ida county- and still they come
of Japan, China, Italy and France. Es-' T'ie cattle imnlistiy is being rapidly de-
pecially in Japan, China and Italy there veloped, and inuch of the good work is due
are large numbers of people who devote to the efforts of Z. C. Chambliss. S. H.
their time in looking after the production n;itskill and Editor Storrs of the DeFun-
iaik Stockman.
of silk-worm eggs for the market. Not and witht he
AAt great expense, nndl without hope of
only is great care required in feeding the profit to himself in the beginning, Mr.
worms, but after the silk worms spin Chanmbliss went into the markets and
their cocoons, it is necessary to keep a Iolught registered. acclimated stock, which
their cocoons, it is necessary to keep a will e sold at auction, thus arousing the
close watch until the chrysalis develops intero t of the liople and getting Florida
into the butterfly. Fifteen days after the cattlemen started in the right direction.
worm spins the cocoon, the moths or but- So successful was his first sale that
terflies appear. Six hours after copula- Mr. Chamibliss now announces another to
tion, the female begins to deposit the take place at his Palmetto Park farm,
near (icala. April 12 and 13.
egg. The silk culturist wraps these eggs ae will. prfifty regt b ,
lie will olrer lift registered bulls, heif-
in cloth or paper, and keeps them in a ers and brel cows. also eight head of
cool place until the next season, when the grades belonging to Mr. Gaitskill.
white mulberry trees furnish the only food This stock will be sold at public sale on
on which the silk worm thrives. Then the the easiest sort ot terms-half cash, bal-
eggs are put in a temperature of 72 de- a;nce in six months, with S per cent inter-
est. and a positive guarantee against
agrees, where they hatch in about six days. death fiom a ly disease for six months
front date of sale.
Visitors will be entertained at a lunch-
Florida Cabbage Deal eon. including barbecued meats, at noon,
Cincinnati, March 19.-When J. B. Ham- Al ril 13.
Mr. ('hambliss is the pioneer in the in-
mer Co., and Armacost, Riley & Co. got troduction into Florida of Shorthorn and
together and completed their deal in Hereford registered cattle, and they have
Florida cabbage, they certainly closed neve.- yet made a sale that was not en-
what is turning out to be a good thing tirely satisfactory in every particular.-
what is turning out to be a good thing Florida Tis-Union.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 19


_____- - - - L-t - - - I


ARE YOU A SUBSCRIBER TO THE RECORD?


L--------------- -








20 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Record's Special Quotations on Staple Goods.

(For the Regular Retail and Commissary Trades.)


The following wholesale prices, subject to market fluctuations, are corrected each week and are published by the Rec-
ord for the benefit of the large commissary interests throughout the South reached by this paper:


Butter And Cheese
A. C. Creamery, 60 lb. tubs.. 27
A. C. Creamery, 30 " .. 28
10 .. 29
A C. Creamery,50, 1 lb. prints
Fancy Full Cream ... ....... 13
La: d
Compound Tin.
50-lb tin.... Market
*' 50-lb tub....
Leaf Tin.
50-lb tin. ............- -

Vinegar
Red Apple Cider bbl........ 16

Sugar


Granulated
**


Sugar, bbls.....
5 bbls..
10 bbls..
1" sacks..


495
490
490
4 85


New
Ga and Fla,
barrels, per


Syrup
in cypress
gallon.... -


Oats


Car Lot
W clip'd,1251b,2 25
S 10011,1 80
White 1251b, 2 15
White 10011). 1 72
Mixed 12511h 2 10
S 1001b, 1 68


100 Sk
Lot
2 27
1 82
227
1 74
2 12
1 70


Less 103,
Sk Lots
2 30
1 85
220
1 77
2 15
1 73


Car lots consisting of Hay, Oats,
Corn, of 20,000 pounds, same as
100-sack prices. Cash, 1 per
cent in 10 days on Grain.
Wheat
Wheat, 100 lbs., choice..... 1 65
S. fancy..... 1 70
Va. Seed Rye, per bushel..
Flour
Highest Grade Patent in bbils
per bbl................ 5 75
Highest Grade Patent, 96,
48 or 24 lh sack........ 5 75
Highest Grade Patent, in
12-11) sacks............ 5 75
SPillsbury's Best ..... 6 50
Pillsbury's Best bbl ....
Flour, Gold Medal .... ..... 6 25
bbl .... ....
Meal
Meal, per barrel......... 350
S 92-lb sacks........... 1 50
Grits
Grits, per barrel........... 3 60
92-lb sacks....... 1 60
Rice


Coffee
Reception Blend Moch and
Java, 30 1-lb cans to case,
per lb.............. ... 80
Simon Pure, 80 1-11) cans to
case, per lb........... 22
Green Coffee good. ......... 10
Green Coffee, medium ...... 9
Green coffee, common....... 8
Arbuckles Roasted Coffee, 1
lb packages....... market price
Lion Brand Coffee, 1 lb pack-
ages.............. market price
Roasted, 1001b. drum...... 14
Ground coffee, 10-lb. pail.. 15

Tea
* Extra fine quality.
Caddy Green Tea, 10 lb..... 40
S Gunpowder, 10 lb.... 50
English B'fast, 10 lb.. 45
Formosa, 10 lb....... 44
Pagoda Tea, 5 and 10c size
10 lbs to case, per pound-.. 40


Tomatoes, 3s, Chief.......
Salt Tomatoes, 2s ....
200-lb sack............... 1 00 Clayton,3s................
100-lb sack........ ........ 50 Clayton, 2s ...............
Ice Cream, 200-lb sacks..... 100 Sifted Peas, 2s ............ 1
S 100-lb sacks..... 50 Rose L. J. Peas ...........
Pocket Salt in bbls., 8-lb.... 2 65 Okra, Tomatoes, 2s ........1
" 2-lb.... 2 75 Lima Beans,2s............1
String Beans-, 3s..........
Pepper String Beans, 2s ..........
Baked Beans, 8s..........
Whole Ground Pepper, Baked Beans, ls...........
10-lb tin.............. 21 Corn, fancy, 2s............ 1
Ground 1-8 tin, 8 doz to box Born Tomatoes, 2s.........
sifter top, per doz...... 45 I Beauty Beets, 3s ..........
Ground 1-16 glass pepper I Sauer Kraut, 3s ...........
boxes, per doz......40 and 80 Sauer Kraut, keg..........
Corn Pumpkin, 3s ..............
10 00 Hay
100 Sk Less 00 car lots 100 bale I1
Car Lot Lot Sk lots 1ba
Lot s lots qu


W.Corn,1101b, 1 39
S 1001b, 1 25
Mxd corn,ll01b,1 10
S 1001b,1 21


1 41
1 27
136
1 28


Choice.... 19 50
No.1 Tim. 18 00
No. 2 17 00
No.1 Cl'ler 17 00


2000
1850
1780
1750


2
1
1
1


5
54
6
31


Good ................. ...
Choice.... .. ...........
Fancy Head...............
Broken..................


entity
050
900
800
8001


Canned Fruits
Pineapples, sliced, 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 10
Pineapples, fancy 2s, 2 doz
to case, per doz........ 1 40
Cherries, 2s, 2 doz. to case
per doz................ 1 30
Apples, 3s, 2 doz to case, per
doz.................... 90
Apples, one gall, one doz to
case. per doz........... 3 00
Peaches, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................ 1 90
Peaches, 3s, two doz to case
per doz................ 1 40
Peaches, pie, 2s, two doz to
case, per doz........... 1 75
Blackberries, 2s two doz to
ease, per doz........... 1 00
Damson, 2s, two doz to case,
per doz................
Brandy Cherries 2s percase3 85
Candy
Mixed 30-11) pails, per lb... 7
10-lh 8
Gum drops, 0-lb I ails, ier
lb ........ .......... 7
French cream, 80-lb pails,
perlb................. 8
Sticks wrapped, 25-lb box,
assorted, per lb........ 8
Sticks unwrapped, 25-lb box.
assorted, per lb........ 8
Dried Fruits


Evaporated Peaches Extra,
25-lb box, per lb.......
Choice Evaporated Peaches.
25-lb box, per lb.......
Fancy Apricots 25 lb boxes.
Ex. Choice " "


9

8i
13
.. o.


Matches
Atlantic, per gross........ 47
Woodenware
Cedar Pails, 2 hoop.. ......2 20
3 hoop . ....
Nest Measures, 5 pieces..... 80
Twine, boxes, per doz....... 1 50
Sieves, per doz. No. 18...... 1 00
nested ......2 00
Bucket,2 hoop pails,per doz 1 40
Scrubbing Brushes, per doz.. 60
Ax Handles
Two doz crates per doz.. ..1 20

Washboards Pen
78 Crown Combination.....2 20
178 Blue Jay...............3 00
175 Diamond Glass .........3 25
0. W. D., 17 inch, per doz 1 05
Clothes pins, five gross to box 75

Canned Fish
Oysters, Is, 2doz to case, per
doz. ................. 95
Sardines, American, 100 to
case, per case ........ 8 75
Sardines, 5 ease lots....... 8 65
Salnmo" Is, Ta'e 4 doz to case
per doz Alaska........ 90
Salmon Is, 4 doz to case,
per doz Col. River ... 2 35
Salmon, 4 dz to case, per doz .
Beardley's Shredded Cod Fish 90
two doz in tins........ 1 80
Canned. Hominy, 31b...... 95

Salt Fish
New Cape Shore Mackerel,
20-lb pails............. 50
Sea Sides, 1&2-lb brick, 40


Ev. Apples, 50-lb. boxes.....4 25 lbs to box............. 2 40
Ev. Apples, 25-lb. boxes.....2 25 Grand Bank Codfish, per lb. 8
Ev. Apples, 48 1-lh. packages 80
Ev. Apples, 24 2 52 Kingan's Meats.
Currants, cleaned, 36-lb. case 3 60 "Rliable" Hams, 810 age ... 141-4
Prunes, Calf cleaned 25-lb "Reliable" Hams, 10-12 avge .. 14
b.x, 40-50............. 6.. "Reliable" Hams, 12-14 avge .. 131-2
Pru;.es, Calf cleaned 25-lb "Reliable" Shoulders, 7-9 avge.. 91-4
box, S0-60............. 7.. "Reliable" California Hams, 6-8 9
Prunes, .Calf cleaned 25-1b breakfast Bacon, light av. .... 131-2
n, a anI) S. Bellies, 16-18 av. ....... 83-4
box, 60-70............. 8.. D. S. Bellies, 20-22 av ......... 81-2
L. L. Raisins, 8 crown.... 1 85 D. S. Bellies, 25-30 av. ......... 81-8
L. L. Raisins, 4 crown ......1 90 D. S. Plates .................. 71-2
Seedless, l-lb packages.... 12 Bacon Pates .................. 81-
Citron, 10-lb box .. o S. Butts .................. 3-8
Citron, -l box........Bologna Sausage ............... 7
Peanuts Sausage in oil ............... $3.75
Butter and Cheese.
Fancy, H P, per pound.... Butter and Cheese.
Extra H P, per pound.... 5 "Strawberry" Creamery, 60-lb tube 25
r .. 30-lb tubs 251-2
Seed Peanuts, .... 60s, Is... 261-2
New Nuts "Ladybird" full cream cheese .. 121-2
Kingan's ard.
Mixed, 25-lb boxes......... 11 "Indiana" Pure Leaf ........... market
Almonds............ ..... 18" "bea-Foam" Compound .........market.
Brazils ................... 12 Kingan's Canne eats.
lPeacans.... ......... 12 "Reliable" Corned Beef, Is ...... $1.25
Filberts................... 1 Corned Beef, 28 ...... 225
al nuts .................. 14 Roast Beef, Is ........ 1.25
Roast Beef, 2s ......... 2M
Cotton Seed Meal Potted Ham and Tongue
Car 100 Lesl0 10 -4s .........................
lots Sk. Lot Sk. Lo Sliced Beef, l-2s .. .. 1.1
Cottonseed Meal 27 00 27 50 28 Ot Vienna Sausage, 12s .. .A
Hulk 1150 12 50 18 0 Tripe .................. LW


GET A COPY OF THE NAVAL STORES BLUE BOOK


Canned Vegetables
Doz.




THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 21
SelemteIi 1 I li9i i 9 9 1 4 -e1o14 t! o 4 1 i el I 101 ot9*4 I f1m4"! @i,*** ****** *I *** * **
o *
President, W. C. POWELL; Vice-Presidenta, who with the President contlitute the Directory and Board of Managers, W. P. COACHMAN. B. F. BUL-
SLARD. H. L. COVINGTON, H. A. McEACHERN. JOHN R. YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN. C. DOWN-
ING, J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.
* 4.


CONSOU DATED NAYAL 810R[8 COMPANY,


JaonoIvile, Flu.


Sovonnlp G.


Penicol, fia.


~ ~ NAVAL STORES FAGTIOS. ~


Piid in Coilol SIoK, 2,500.00.


Ogid Monl rolled i Proci Nl o Irolon


Small Ailnol01 l0ck Yl in Resee 0lo ell 10 O0ero1ors Who 0on Arlane lo B.


The Consolidaed is Prelty a Cooerlie Compani.


01 Ihe Proicers.


I Interests l re Idenlicol Wlhi lose


TIe Palrongle of Tulenlin Operaors eierwmhere viled


PI ol Money and Plent o1 limber lor Everody


YAR AT IJA CSONYVIi SA1 ANNAH. FRNANDINA 1 nd PNS ACOIA.


All Prolters ore l vll lfe o Coll or Colrespof


THE RECORD IS THE "OPERATORS' RELIANCE."


19I ttsi f is *r m8 @l n I fi9e 1$1 M 959191r 1r189 1419 i or1o64 i &***6****- ****- *** **&*





22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


nta tM T. C ristl rnak C. Groover, arhall W. tewm t,
Preidet. Vioe-Pre sal d Traa
THE 1 1HRIS0EROOER0 DRUG O O.


Fuel and Building Material.
The Southern Fuel and Supply Co.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime. Cement, Brick, Paints.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.


Naval Stores Market
and Stock Report
Published Daily in The


MWholesl1e Pi.gisl


1ac03n6IRe


. .. la


Iee S o liNs L I 0lTr Dud Tumen1line C Molmmss DOlle- nille M e r
nlormiepil. SciTa co dee Soliclited.snmWoo l r f J cks RU vlll M t ll llUUII


Cochrane's Book Store.
Wholesale Stationery, Fishing Tackle, Pipes,
Notions, Stencil Ink Brushes, Lumber Crayons.
PALATKA. FLORIDA.
Write for Prices. Hare hundreds of articles suitable for the Commissary Trade.
JOSEPH D. WEED. W. D. KRENSON
J. D. WEED I CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.
Wholesale Hardware,
Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF
Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc,


Twelve to Sixteen hours ahead of any other
daily Florida newspaper. Subscribe for it now.
$5 A YEAR; $2.50 SIX MONTHS.

BIG PRIZES:
A trip to Europe, to St. Louis Exposi'icn, to
Saratoga, to New York and to Asheville N. C.
Absolutely Free to the winners in the Great Metropolis Sub-
scription contest. Write for particulars.
Carter & Russell Publishing Co.
Jacksonville, Florida.


Half Tones=Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department


THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc.


I SPECIALTY IS MADE OF DISIGNING, RETOUCHING I EMBELISHING PHOTOGRIPHS 1N) PICTURES.


IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


IF YOU DON'T FIND IT IN THE RECORD WRITE US.


L m7A







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 23


McMURRAY & BAKER,


Sow Mill and Turentine Hortess. Liberty Str
Liberty Shuets,


We are receiving daily up-to-date pleasure and busmnes vehicle., DM sUyls.
Laprobes, whips, harness and horse furnldhings, we have a nobby line. Prieee
and goods In touch with all. Turpentine wagons and harness a speealty. Don't
forget we can beat the world on hand- made harnm.


MMURRIY & BRIKE, 401 Io 413 E. BIY ST.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



.4
IA
.3.

*



I

I


The Clyde Steamship Company ". TO


J. H. HART. T.H. BLACHLY.
(Established 1872.)


J. R. TOLAR, JR.


TOLAR. HART & CO.,
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The maslileent steamships of this line ar rpprointed to sll as follow.-
calling at Charleston, I. C., both ways.
From New York, Prom Jaclksonvlle far
(Pler 36 North River). STEA MER. Charleston and New York.
Tuesday, Mar. 15, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE ....Sunday, Mar. 20, at 6:00 am
**HURON ..Monday, Mar. 21, at 6:30 am
Wednesday, Mar. 16, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS, ....'luesday, Mar. 22, at 7:30 am
Friday, Mar. 18, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAIIOE ..Wednesday, Mar. 23, at 8:30 am
Tuesday, Mar. 22, at 3:00 pm .......... "*SEMINOLE, Sunday, Mar. 27, at 12 n'n
Friday, Mar. 25, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ....Wednesday, Mar. 30, at 4:00 am
Sunday, Mar. 27, at 3:00 p. m. .......IROQUOIS, Saturday, April 2, at 6:00 a.m.
"*ALGONQUIN .. .. Saturday, April 2, at 6:00 am
Tuesday, Mar. 29, at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE ....Sunday, April 3, at 6:30 am
Friday, April 1, at 3:00 pm .... COMANCHE .... Wednesday, April 6, at 9:00 am
"xHURON Wednsd'y, April 6, at 9:00 am
Tuesday, April 5, at 3:00 pm ..APACHE ......Sunday, April 10, at 12:30 pm
Tuesday. April 5, at 3:00 pm ."SEMINOLE ....Sunday, April 10, at 12:30 pm
Thursday ,April 7, at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ...Tuesday, April 12, at 1:30 pm
Friday, April 8, at 3:00 pm ......ARAPAIIOE Wednesday, April, 13, at 1:30 pm
***ALONQUIN ..Friday, April 15. at 4:00 am
Tuesday. April 12, at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE .... Sunday, April 17, at 5:30 am
Friday, April 15, at 3:00 pm ....APACHE .. Wednesday, April 20, at 7:30 am
"xHURON ..... Thursday, April 21. at 8:00 am
Sunday, April 17. at 3:00 pm ..IROQUOIS ....Saturday. April 23, at 10:30 am
Tuesday, April 19. at 3:00 pm ..ARAPAHOE .... Sunday, April 24, at 11:30 am
Wednesday, April 20, at 3:00 pm .*"SEMINOLE .Monday, April 25. at 12:30 pm
Friday, April 22. at 3:00 pm ..COMANCHE ... .Wednesday. April 27, at 1:30 pm
"*ALGONQUIN .. .. Friday, April 29, at 4:00 am
Tuesday, April 20. at 3:00 pm .. APACHE ........ Sunday, May 1, at 5:30 am
Thursday, April 28. at 3:00 pm ....IROQUOIS ....Tuesday, May 3, at 7:00 am
Friday, April 29, at 3:00 pm ....ARAPAHOE ..Wednesday, May 4, at 7:30 am
"xHURON ........ Friday, May 6, at 8:30 am
x-Freight only. --Boston via Charleston and New York.
--Boston via Brunswick -~d Charles ton. ***-Boston. via Charleston.
THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Direct Service Between Jacksonville, Boston and Providence and all East-
era Points, Callnlm at Charleston Both Wayn.
SEINI-WEEKLY SAILINGS.
Southbound.. .. ... .... .. .. .. ...... .. .. .. ...rom Lewis Wharf. Boston
Northbound.. ...... ... .. .. .... ... From foot of Catherine Street, Jacksonvlll
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jacksomvill and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatka. Astor. St. Francis. Beresford (De Land) and Intermediate
landings on St. Johns river.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville, Sundays. Tuesday and Thurs-
days, 3:30 p. m. Returning. leave Sanford. Monday. Wednesday & Fridays 9:30 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND,jI NORTHBOUND,
Read down, I I Read up.
eave 3:30 p. m. ............. ......Jacksonville ........ .......... I Tive :00 a. m.
Leave 8:45 p. m I ........ ......... Palatka..................... ...... |Leave 8:00 p. m.
Leave 3:30 a. m. ............ .. .........Astor............................. Leave 2:30 p. m.
Leave 4:30 a. m.j...... ..................St. Francis.............. .........jLeave 1:00 p. m.
...... ............ . ... .....Beresford (DeLand)...................... Leave 12:00 noon
Arrive 8:30 a. m ................ .......Sanford......... .......... ......|Leave 9:30 a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m.1 ................. Enterprise .................. ... Lv. 10:00 a. m.
C.G~ERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE. 204 W. Bay St.. Jaek'ville.
P. M. IRONMONGER. JR.. Asst. Gent. Pass Agent. 204 W. Bay St.. Jacksonvlle. Fla
W. G. COOPER, JR., Local rt. Agt. Jack'ville. C. P. LOVELL. Asst. Supt..Jack'vll.
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
A. C. HAOGERTY. 0. E. P. A., New York, CLYDE MTLNE. G. r. A.. New York
THEO. G. EGER, WM. P. CLYDE & CO.
General Manager. General Agents,
Cbeebrough Building. 19 State Stre t. New York.


Commission


Merchants


*nd Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


"The" PAINT STORE,
I. E. BAIRD d. CO, Jacksonville, Fla,
Wall paper, pictures, frames, painting and all interior and exterior decorating.
Hardware, glass, etc. If you are buildTng a fine home, get Baird & Co. to do
tne decorating that it may be in keeping with the building. Oldest and most ex-
perienced house in Florida.

W. E. Huger, W. T. Rlley, 0. move.
President. Vice-President. Se'y and Tras


UON COOPERAGE AN SUPPLY o.
(INCORPORATED.)

M REA D IIs 111r K inds of 1ooperage
DIRIERS IN

SPIRIS OF TURPENTINE BiRRELS I SPECIALTY.

WITH DISTRIBUTING POINTS IOR TURlPETINE BIRRES LOITE RS fO1lWS:
ATLANTA. COLUMBUS, BAINBRIDGE, MACON, SAVANNAH. VALDOB
TA. TfrrON, HAWKINSVILLE, OA.; OCALA, PENSACOLA, LIVl OAR
LEESBITRG. LAKE CITY, JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA. FLA:; MONTGOMERY.
ALA.; CHARLESTON. S. C.
ALL ORDERS TO ABOVE POINTS OR SAVANNAH OFFICE WILL RICSrV
PROMPT ATTENTION.

ooaa AL0g @ Sk a a aLIaUL a a fA JU 9 jJJ.-9Q P Q09_9Q9.U0ia" 0.A9 l-0 0.JJJ9
SPECIAL BARGAINS IN DIAMONDS.
30 YEARS RELIABILITY.
Hess & Slager,
SDiamonds, Silverware, Watches and Jewelry.
CORNER BAY AND CEDAR STS. AND 11 & 13 MAIN.
;on rra naaarararna nnnnrannnnnnraar n0norr rrrrm



East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipmnets a Specialty.

WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


WRITE THE RECORD FOR ANY INFORMATION DESIRED.


9~E 3J*~P00455_E"Cc SOI&"n-Co


~P~t~0930~CI:~"~:":~cz~;;~';~:'~;~r~'~ W99CljX~ O~;~Srj~(~9=C~O~S~"~+~9993P934


__


'


BLAKESLEE PUMPING OUTFIT.
This outfit can be directly connected to a pump and will
supply sufficient water for general farm and household use.
Why not have a water works plant of your own at a small
cost, and this is the most desirable power for use in case
of fire or other necessity; it can be started at a moment's
notice. You don't have to wait for the wind; it's always
ready for work.
-"he engine can Instantyl be made ready for other pow-
er purposes, such as grinding feed, churning, etc., by dis-
connecting the pump. This outfit is simple, durable, economical, easily operated.
and ready for work any minute. No country home is complete without this ideal
labor saver. We build a complete line of pumping plants for mines, Irrigation,
fire protection, railway supply, and install water works plants for city service.
Will be pleased to furnish any additional information on request.
WHITE-BAKESLEE MFG. CO. Birminghem Ala.
Builders of the Illakeslee las' and gasolinee and Connected Outfits.







24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


J H CI.OSSY. Pres"dert


C M FULLER. Vice-President


JAS F LANE. Secy a Trea


Depanilnents


Greenleaf &

'rssby Company


3ftrnkrs anb

bi*berenhitbo


41 West Bay Street

Jacksonville

Mre lseet am finest .to" in thi part of the
Soar~ Stea. Prompt attention to mai oders


Diamonds and Other Precious
Stones


Fine Gold Jewelry


American and Foreign Watches
and Clocks


Sterling Silverware

Electro Plated Ware

Choice Cut Glass


"^^^B^S-ii EH
L-"
----- 7:
I'-


Fine China Dinner Sets and
Fancy Pieces


European Novelties


----- --r~-~- ad I~~Y~b~ b

STHE COUNCIL TOOL CO.I
of Wananish. N. C.,
Formerly of Council's Station, N. C.. are still selling Diamond Edge
Hacks at $6.0, Black Joe and Standard at $5.00, Old Style and Patent
P Pullers at L.0 a dozen. They should average a little better than ever.
We have brought out a new brand, the Blue Line Hacks at $8.00 and Pull-
S era at $8.00 which are warranted. All wholesale dealers in naval stores
1 supplies carry our lines and should supply operators.
,ad_ -fefi 6040000606-10 0000#4* 0 *N 4*4-TmiVTK
D. G. McKETHAN, Prudent. ALFRED A. McKETHAN, L't U. S. N.
Jacksonville. Fla. Ret'd Sec'y and Trea., Constructing
Engineer, Fayetteville, N. G.


Pine Product Construction Co.
INCORPORATED
Feyetteville. N. C.
* fte i or Tuvriptlne Oil of Tar. Creosote, Tar, Disinfectants; Wood Preservative,
Paints, Wood Stains, Etc., and Charcoal, from Ughtwood Stumps. Box-facings.
Profits increased. Time of distillation reduced. Condensation controlled at will.
No danger from fire. Plant erected complete, and men taught the process. Fur-
ther information, write Alfred MacKethan, general manager, Fayetteville. N. C.

THE PHILADELPHIA TAILORS
JOHN B. GIANCAGLINI & BRO.,

MERCHANT TAILORS AND IMPORTERS
48 W. Bay Street. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
*~a gI.~ A.


* U TEI DAbTnft hI, BROADWAY AND 23d ST.,
HOTEL BARTHOLDI, oNEW YORK CITY.
Facing Madison Square Park. N' *'- iished Throughout.
Near all Big Stores and Places -.. ...eme'lt. t(ars Pass
the Door for all Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings.
Large Sample Rooms for Commercial Travelers: Here you
find no grand and magnificent decorations: no luxurious
grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no elaborate bill
of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
Speak to You. No Employees In Any Way Inattentative.
But just a cozy, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the
hearts of those who are looking for solid comfort. Good.
plain American cooking, and affable and courteous treatment.
MFrIT ROaEE, P qp eor


SJohn R. Young. President. C. S. Ellis. Vice-President.
E J. W. Motto. Jr., Secretary and Treasurer.


The[ ELLIS-YOUNG CO.

Commission Merchants
NAVAL STORES FACTORS
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS

| Savannah and Brunswick, Ga.


J. W. HUNT. President J. E. HARRIS. 2d V. Pres. C. R. SHOUSE. See. a Trem.
P. L. PEAC(tK, Ist V. P" W. J. KELLY. 3d V. P. H. L RICHMOND. Asst Sec'y-Tres

Peacock-Hunt & West Company,
Gen-ra! Offices: 20 Bay Street, ,, Savannah, Ga. and
tWest Buliding. Jacksonville, F a.
NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
(We are strictly Factors. Our interest and the producers' is mutual. We
never take to account, nor are we interested in any company that buys spirits
Turpentine and rosin.)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
Hay, Grain and Heavy Harness.
Coopers' Tools and Naval Stores Hardware Our Specialty
--SOLE AGENTS FOR-
The Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes and Wilson & Ghilds'
Philadelphia Wagons.

Naval Stores Received at Savannah, Ga., and Jacksonville
and Fernandina ,fla.


is.


1-corprrale
1a14


Write for Catalogue


------- -- -- ----- --


2-


~-C- ------------T -IT -1 T T y IF 77=7-4~


1