The Russian review, and other stories

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Russian review, and other stories
Physical Description:
1 v. (various pagings) : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Dickes, William, 1815-1892 ( Illustrator )
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) -- Committee of General Literature and Education
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Oxford University Press ( Printer )
Publisher:
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge
Place of Publication:
London
Manufacturer:
Clarendon Press
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1879   ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1879   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Oxford

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
published under the direction of the Committee of General Literature and Education, appointed by the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.
General Note:
Date of publication from prize plate inscription.
General Note:
Illustrations by W. Dickes and the six plates are printed in colors.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002236857
notis - ALH7335
oclc - 61514775
System ID:
UF00047793:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text














vM


































intb L ori" I



ly_*lw,.



I





.,accx-C

4( -

{
Ut7'tx-C



7VW- YtT



~ThIuC



U-6-


,-/-t 6k-~I~t



C r~i U



4j0-^.xC C 3



I VC-u/



The Baldwin Library
rm Unvrity
'Iymo'
Ln,~Jn



(



/YiCvtc

,;co



-C(/k4iZI





















THE RUSSIAN REVIEW,

AND OTHER STORIES.










































.4t-;;



''



-> 2.














THE RUSSIAN REVIEW,

AND OTHER STORIES.



"And by serving Love will grow."






PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.








LONDON:
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.
SOLD AT THE DEPOSITORIES:
77 GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS;
4 ROYAL EXCHANGE; 48 PICCADILLY;
AND BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.








































PRINTED

FOR THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE,
AT THE CLARENDON PRESS, OXFORD.


























TO

W., A., A., E.,

WITH ALL LOVE AND AFFECTION.












PREFACE.

IT is hoped that many a happy group of
listening children will enjoy the following
stories, as they have been enjoyed; and learn
from them lessons of obedience, self-control,
unselfish love, that will not pass away.
The verses interspersed may be thought
beyond the age of those for whom the stories
are chiefly meant; but the same family may
well include children of very different ages,
and, besides this, those of the highest mental
powers are usually those who retain the
longest the love of child stories, provided










Viii PREFACE.

their training has been such as to preserve
simplicity, and keep them true of heart.
It may interest some readers to know that
the writer describes from his own remem-
brance the scenes in foreign lands, to which
some of the stories refer.
And now, as no work is too small to be
humbly offered to Him of Whose only gift
it is if we can do any service, may He
accept and bless this effort to make of use
to others what was written long since, for
some much-loved little ones of His fold!















THE RUSSIAN REVIEW.










PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.









LONDON:
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.
SOLD AT THE DEPOSITORIES:
77 GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS;
4 ROYAL EXCHANGE; 4S PICCADILLY;
AND BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.



















THE RUSSIAN REVIEW.



OH, MAMMA," said Svatlee one day, as
he came trotting up, in great glee, "do you
know they are going to choose a pony for the
grand duke against the review, and do you
think they will choose me?"
Svatlee was a beautiful nut-brown pony of
the purest Don-Cossack breed; and, as you,
my friends, may perhaps not know, the eldest
of the young grand dukes is commander of
the Don-Cossack regiment.
My child," answered the mother, what-



J










4 THE RUSSIAN REVIEW.

ever could have put that into your head ? It
is not for such little fellows as you to have
such grand schemes."
So Svatlee was silenced, and said nothing
more; but he could not help thinking what a
nice thing it would be.
Presently, a man came to give Svatlee his
first lesson in carrying people on his back,
and in the obedience that is due from a pony
to his master.
Of all the horses in the world, the Cossack
ones have the most perfect education; and
the first lesson is this: a person gets on the
horse's back, and immediately the horse sets
off at full gallop, and his rider lets him gallop
as much as he pleases; but when he gets
tired, and wishes to go slower, his master
whips him, and makes him go as fast as he










THE RUSSIAN REVIEW.



can, till he is quite exhausted, and so he
learns that obedience which all owe to man.
This, then, was the lesson that Svatlee got
on this occasion; and he had a companion, a
black pony, of the same breed as himself,
called Tchernee. When this their first lesson
was over, they lay down, quite tired out; but,
after a little, they began to talk, and Tchernee
informed his companion that he had overheard
his master say that one of them would cer-
tainly be chosen for the grand duke. Very
flushed and anxious was Svatlee when he
heard this, but he did not feel very much dis-
posed to say anything more to his mamma
about it, so he kept very quiet. That night,
however, he could not get to sleep; so, after
lying a long time in feverish longing and
wishing, he got up, and stole quietly out of



5










THE RUSSIAN REVIEW.



the field, and strolled down to the water-side
to drink. As he stooped down to drink, he
was startled by hearing a voice call to him,
"Well, Svatlee, what are you thinking of? "
He raised his head in some terror, and saw
beside him a very large and handsome horse,
almost white, of a very commanding appear-
ance; so, after a very low bow, he replied
that he was thinking of a great many things.
" Of which," added Moleenee, with a smile,
"the principal one is that you would like to
be the grand duke's pony."
Svatlee, of course, would not deny this,
though he marvelled how the Lady Moleenee
could know of it. She proceeded, Well, sup-
pose I were to give you the power of becom-
ing what you wish? "
Oh, would you really? said Svatlee, with



6





]



THE RUSSIAN REVIEW. 7

his eyes sparkling, and hardly able to speak
from the intensity of the longing he felt.
"Would you really give it to me ?"
Yes, really," answered the Lady Moleenee,
"and even more than this, for I will give you
the power of either having it yourself, or
giving it to Tchernee. Take this," she
added, giving him what looked like an apple,
but far more beautiful than any apple that
ever grew out of Fairyland. Take this, and
whoever eats it, him shall the Grand Duke
choose."
Overpowered with delight and astonish-
ment, the little Svatlee took up that won-
drous golden apple, and, scarce knowing what
he said, was preparing to go home again,
when the Lady Moleenee called to him, Re-
member, Svatlee, that it is not the possessing










THE RUSSIAN REVIEW.



what is great and good that brings us happi-
ness, but rather that love which accounts
others' happiness as its own, as the men, our
masters, have taught us." For even the
horses see what is great and generous in
man, and follow it.
Scarcely knowing what he did, Svatlee
made his lowest bow to Moleenee, and went
away, hugging his precious prize.
And when he got home, he lay down and
went to sleep, scarcely daring to think what
he should do with it. And in the morning
the apple was really there, all bright, golden,
and sparkling. So he hid it in a hole, and
presently he and Tchernee were taken out for
their second day's exercise. That day Tcher-
nee rather flagged, but Svatlee, buoyed up by
the recollection of the apple, kept up most



8










THE RUSSIAN REVIEW.



wonderfully well, to the astonishment of his
rider; and when, at last, they got loose,
the two ponies heard the man say, Well,
the Grand Duke ought, I think, to have
Svatlee."
Poor Tchernee flung himself down, quite
tired out and upset, and said, Do you know,
Svatlee, I heard master say that the day after
to-morrow we are to be taken to the Palace,
and the Grand Duke will inspect us, and
choose one of us. Oh! if he would but
choose me," added he, with a sigh. And
Svatlee smiled to think that after all it rested
with himself; but he said nothing.
Next day it was considered that they were
so nearly perfect that they had but a very
short exercising; and, in the evening, they
had a grand combing, that they might look



9










THE RUSSIAN REVIEW.



their very best when they were brought into
the presence of the Grand Duke.
At last the day came: a bright glad day;
and Svatlee got up so happy and so merry
that Tchernee was quite astonished, and asked
him what he was thinking of. Svatlee said
he would know afterwards; and just then the
groom came to dress them. At the very
last moment, Svatlee whispered something to
Tehernee, and what do you think it was? He
said, "Tehernee, just look out for an apple,
which I have put for you in a little hollow
by the gateway." Tchernee thanked him, and
wondered; and he saw the beautiful apple,
and ate it, and wondered still more, and felt
himself quite invigorated, and almost trans-
formed into another pony.
I need not tell you that the grand duke



10










THE RUSSIAN REVIEW. 11

chose Tchernee, though he admired Svatlee
very much also; nor how happy Tchernee
was.
And Svatlee became the property of one
of the Cossack police, whose office it is, as
you know, to repress the crowd, and make
way, on all occasions, when the Emperor ap-
pears. And was not he happy in imagining
all the delight of Tchernee, which he had
given him?
At last the great day came; that magnifi-
cent review, which had been the chief thought
and anticipation of all the horses in the em-
peror's service throughout that vast empire.
There, in that vast plain outside Moscow,
was assembled a most magnificent array.
There were the little Circassian horses, who
dashed along like a herd of deer; the stately










12 THE RUSSIAN REVIEW.



black hussar horses, from England; the Cui-
rassiers, all brilliant with crimson caparisons
and banners, from the interior; horses which
had been in the Crimea, and were looked up
to with the greatest veneration by all their
companions; and there were the beautiful
little Don-Cossack ponies, with their perfect
order and discipline, the flower of the army,
and ornament of the field.
Svatlee happened to be stationed close to
the imperial tent, and of course he saw all
perfectly well, and his heart quite bounded
with exultation at that most wonderful sight.
And, at last, he saw his own squadron, the
Don-Cossacks, and, at their head, the young
Grand Duke Nicholas, on his black friend,
Tchernee, who looked most magnificent in
his crimson caparisons, and came with the










THE RUSSIAN REVIEW.



troops, in most noble guise, up to the im-
perial tent, by which Svatlee was stationed.
And shall I say that for one moment
Svatlee thought, "All this might have been
mine;" and he was sad. But then he said
to himself, How foolish I am! Why should
I be wishing for the grandest and best for
my own? Cannot I let others' joy be mine,
by joying in it, and will not this be better
still?"
And then he felt happy again, and his
heart was light and bright.
And this was the turning-point of his life.
He had had the choice given him and
had taken it. He had given up being the
Grand Duke's Pony to his friend Tehernee,
and that was gone for ever. But grand as
that would have seemed, and with all the



13











THE RUSSIAN REVIEW.



real pleasure it would, at times, have afforded
him, it was not equal to that severer pleasure,
which the generous act of having given it up
brought him, and the sweetness to those who
have done like this I shall not describe, for
they will know it who have tried it.
That day he began, and, step by step, he
went on, as opportunities were given him,
ready to give up in lesser things, with the
same generous spirit in which he had given
up in that one great thing; and now he has
the surname of Prekrasnyee-SvATLEE PRE-
KRASNYEE-Svatlee the Good.
"For in Christ obstacles become to us smooth ways,
and the rugged a road, and the impracticable slight and
level."-S. CYRIL.
Shall we then dread the path that lies before us,
Steep and untrodden though it seem to rise?
In Him, who trod a rougher way before us,
Lo! smooth and fair the dreaded pathway lies.



14












THE RUSSIAN REVIEW. 15

Pathless and rough, where none may pass securely,
Our way may seem; yet shall we turn and flee?
Ah, no In Him the path shall open surely,
Rugged no more, if there His footsteps be.

Before us lies some mountain pass defended,
Some task of height beyond all power to gain:
Lo! in His might 'tis done, the task is ended;
The lofty mountain lies a level plain.

Oh! hold we but His hand, Who ne'er forsaketh,
He, in all toil, shall be our help and rest:
The rough way smooth, the crooked straight He maketh;
And, where He leadeth, all in Him is blest.









'- j









*



THE NIGHTINGALES.










PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION,
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.









LONDON:
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.
SOLD AT THE DEPOSITORIES:
77 GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS;
4 ROYAL EXCHANGE; 48 PICCADILLY;
AND BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.
















THE NIGHTINGALES.

MANY years ago, in one of the lower oak
copses, which fringe the shore between-Corinth
and the Pass of Mega.ra, a nightingale had
built her nest. She had four young ones,
the pride and untold joy of her heart.
The eldest, Evaida, was rather a pretty
bird, with grey plumage, and black and white
stripes on the wings, sparkling black eyes,
and a most magnificent voice. His singing
was the delight of all the neighbourhood; but
he was rather conceited and fond of display-
ing himself, and this somewhat marred the
beauty of his song.
The second, Pravesa, was very different:
she was small, very plain, with plumage of
grey, unrelieved by any other colour, and had
a weakness of throat, which prevented her
singing much. On the other hand, she had
scarcely a thought of herself, took the greatest
possible care of her two brothers, Clinny and



_











THE NIGHTINGALES.



Astrophil, who, having been fledged some
little time later than the other two, were more
backward and helpless than they. She would
bring them the juiciest caterpillars and finest
spiders she could find, and was also devotedly
attached to her brother Evaida, who, on his
part, was somewhat exacting.
One very hot summer's day, they had re-
mained all day under the shelter of the friendly
oak, and not till rather late in the evening
did they venture out. It was then exceed-
ingly lovely-not a cloud to be seen in a clear
sky; and the sea, with that deep heavenly
blue that is rarely seen in our part of the
world. They hopped about, and then sat and
looked at it, and Clinny began, How I
should like to cross over there, and see what
is on the other side "
Evaida. Oh but Clinny, you know mam-
ma told us that it would not always be as
hot as it is now, and then she would take us
to Erets-mitsraim, which the great giants we
see call Egypt.
AstropAil. But, Evaida, is that as far off
as over there ?



4










THE NIGHTINGALES.



.Evaida. To be sure, Katsy (as his brothers
often called him), you goose, it's a hundred
times farther.
At this polite appellation, Katsy's feathers
got a little ruffled, for, like little boys, the
young nightingales admired not the great
white goose.
Pravesa, on seeing this, called his attention
to the stars, which were just beginning to
come out; and they sat and admired, and
wondered for a long time what the stars could
be, and why they were there. At last Pravesa
told her two little brothers, that she thought
they had better go to roost; accordingly they
retired with her to the nest, but Evaida re-
mained on the outermost bough, singing with
all his might. When he had finished, Clinny
said, Pravesa, please, I wish you would sing
us a little song, Katsy and me." Pravesa
sang in a low sweet tone; she sang of the
deep sea, with its heavenly blue; she sang
of the bright stars, which were peeping with
loving glances through the oak-tree boughs;
she sang of the lovely rose, with its royal
crimson hue, and celestial fragrance; and the



5










THE NIGHTINGALES.



little birds sank into sweet sleep, to dream
haply of Erets-mitsraim, which the giants call
Egypt, haply of even brighter visions. Pra-
vesa finished her song of love to her brothers,
of praise to Him Whom all do praise.
And it chanced that that evening there
passed by, on his lonely walk from Corinth,
a Greek clergyman. He came slowly on,
sadly musing. The sea was beautiful below
him, with its many-twinkling smile, but it
told of peace, and his heart was not at peace.
Bright shone the stars above him, but they
told of the brightness of service, and to him
it was not bright. And as he went along,
he said, Three-and-thirty years have I served
at Corinth, and what have I done ? No one
heeds me, no one attends, all is as though I
had never been there. To-morrow I will go
to the bishop, and tell him that I will serve
no more."
While he was speaking, he heard a bird
singing; it was Evaida; very sweet it was,
but its sweetness touched him not. Soon it
stopped; and then followed another in thrill-
ing, soothing tones. It was the song of Pra-



6










THE NIGHTINGALES.



vesa, which she sang as her offering of love
and praise, and it fell like balm on the heart
of the clergyman; and when it was ended,
with one upward look of thankfulness, he
turned him back to Corinth, resolving to
work on to his life's end, though all should
seem in vain.
Meanwhile, the ever-watching mother's
eye had observed with pain and alarm how
Evaida put himself forward, and seemed to
think more and more of himself every day.
And so when day came, she said to him,
" Oh! Evaida, oh, my beloved son, your
song is sweet, but sufficeth it not for your
contentment that you should sing to us, who
love you? Why put you yourself forward,
to sing on the outer branch of the tree, as
though our love and approbation were not
enough, but you must needs seek that of
strangers, and of the great giant? But re-
member, my best beloved, that dangers prowl
around; in display there is danger, in fame
there is danger, in quietness and gentleness,
and the home love and rejoicing, is full
security."



7










THE NIGHTINGALES.



Evaida promised he would do everything
his dear mother wished; but, alas! if one
makes promises readily and forgets them
with equal readiness, who gains ?
That night Evaida was content to sing
to his father and mother, and dear little bro-
thers; and when he had finished, joyously
did he sleep that night, and fresh and bright
did he wake. But ah! the next night, he
thought, "I do so like to see all that go by,
and the great giant looks tenderly on me
as I sing." And so his promise to his dear
mother was all forgotten, and he sat on the
outermost branch, and poured forth his flood
of song.
And it chanced that two. giants passed
by, and looked at him, but he knew not
what was in their hearts. Said one to his
companion, "How beautifully that bird
sings !"
"," Yes," said the other, "I see him here
every night, on this particular spot; only
yesterday he was not here."
You don't say so, surely," said the other;
"then I will come to-morrow morning, smear



8










THE NIGHTINGALES.



that bough with birdlime, and he shall stick,
and I will take him into the city and sell
him."
Next night, thought Evaida, "Well, this
is much pleasanter than being indoors, and I
don't really think mamma cares much."
So he sat him down and began his song,
and he saw the man approach-one of the
giants he had seen the day before, and he
approached slowly, and there was cunning in
his eye. And Evaida feared, and remembered
that his mamma had told him of enemies that
lurk unknown, and he fluttered to go away.
But, to his infinite terror, he could not stir;
and the giant came nearer and nearer, and
broke off the branch on which he was sitting,
and put a great warm heavy thing upon him,
and carried him off.
Next day he was sold to the Count de
Vincenza, and presented by him to his two
children, Ambrogio and Lucia. He was put
into a large cage, and plentifully supplied
with everything it was thought that a night-
ingale could desire, except liberty. And the
gentle Lucia sang to him:



9










THE NIGHTINGALES.



Oh, my dear little bird, do sing to me,
please do."
And in his deep misery Evaida uttered not
a sound for two whole days, and on the third
day burst forth into a most touching strain
of the deepest agony and bitter wailing.
When Evaida was first carried off. his sister
heard the song suddenly stop, and thought
he was coming home; but as he came not,
she called him, and then went out to look for
him. She could see nothing of him, and in
terror flew back to tell her parents. They
came out both of them, and the father's
watchful eye observed how the bough whereon
Evaida used to sit was rudely broken off, and
he showed it to his mate, and they mourned,
and said, "Our beloved son is killed, or
in captivity; never more shall we behold
him."
But Pravesa, with the undying hope of
childhood, thought he might be somewhere
still, and next day she got leave to look for
him, and she flew everywhere about, all that
day and the next, and returned weary and
sad to the nest, and her mother said, "You



10










THE NIGHTINGALES. 11



i



have looked enough, stay with us now, and
let Clinny and Katsy be no longer deprived
of you."
But Pravesa said, "Nay, mamma, this
once only, this once let me go."
And she consented. That night Clinny
said, "Pravesa, please, dear Pravesa, give us
a song to-night."
Pravesa could not refuse; so with a heavy
heart she sang. She sang of the stars all
covered with clouds, she sang of the rose of
royal red, with its celestial fragrance, but
as hidden from sight. And so they slept.
Next morning, Pravesa rose with the dawn,
and flew to the town; every window she
came to she looked into, to the great astonish-
ment of those who saw. At last she heard
the well-known note, with its tones of bitter
woe; she flew up, and through the open
window, on to the bars of the cage.
"Beware, Pravesa," called out Evaida,
"you will be taken prisoner."
Evaida," said she, "I am come to'be with
you."
At this moment the two children came into










THE NIGHTINGALES.



the room. Intense was their delight at seeing
a second nightingale.
Shut the window quick," shouted Am-
brogio to his sister, as he flew to the cage,
and laid no gentle hand on the fluttering
Pravesa.
Pravesa shook, but with undaunted love
she had resolved to abide with her brother.
After some little petting, she was put into
the cage; and the children watched to see
what they would do. Most affectionate was
their meeting; from that time all Pravesa's
energies were devoted to release her brother.
With this object she was exceedingly tame,
and never shrunk from the children's touch,
so that in time the two birds were allowed to
fly about the room, and Pravesa would come
and nestle in the gentle Lucia's bosom, and
even Evaida got more tame.
So they went on for a month or more, and
the birds were an unfailing amusement to
the two children.
One day, when the birds were flying about
the room, Lucia said, "Oh! dear, there's
the bell, I must go to mamma; now, do



S12










THE NIGHTINGALES.



13



put the birds away, and then you can come
too."
So Lucia ran off; but the birds were afraid
of Ambrogio, and would not let him catch
them. At last he got impatient, and said,
" Oh well, they are safe enough, Lucia must
catch them when she comes back."
So saying, he went away.
Now then, dear Evaida," said Pravesa,
"let us fly away."
They flew against the window, but the
glass stopped them. In great terror at this
obstacle, they tried it with their beaks, and
many other ways. At last, Pravesa flew to
the other end of the room, and then flying
back, with all her force dashed herself against
the glass. It broke, cutting Pravesa under
the left wing and neck, and one little splinter
flew into her eye. She fell on the floor of the
room.
Evaida came to her and said, "Oh! Pravesa,
what have you done?"
She answered, When I came here, it was
to give you freedom, or die in the attempt.
Flee now, I beg you."










THE NIGHTINGALES.



Just then the door opened, and the two
children came into the room-they hesitated
a moment in astonishment. "Fly, dearest
Evaida," said Pravesa, with dying gasp;
"give my best love to papa and mamma,
and dear brothers, and sing to them, and
sometimes think of me, who am dying in
your service."
There was no time to lose. Evaida gave one
last kiss to his sister, and even as she received
it she died, and he flew off home.
By this time the children came up, and
Lucia took up the body of Pravesa, and
bitterly they wept; but tears availed not,
and stronger than life is love.
Swiftly and sorrowfully flew Evaida home,
and poured forth the sad tale of all that had
happened. And daily did they miss the
wonted offices of sisterly love. At length
the time came for setting out for Erets-mits-
raim, which the giants call Egypt. And in
the spring-time they returned home, and
Evaida, Clinny, and Katsy in their turn
built nests, and the first fledged of Evaida's
was named Pravesa, and during the bright



14












THE NIGHTINGALES.



15



long summer nights they learnt to sing of
Pravesa, Evaida's sister, and her life of love,
and loving deeds. And doubt not that it bore
its fruit even among them, for love dies not,
neither do her works perish; wherefore
rejoice, and live, and love.


EASTER LIGHT.

It is past,-the hour of darkness, and the weeping of the
night;
Joy returneth with the morning, with the dawn of Easter
Light.
They who forth with tears and sighing, precious seed
have sadly borne,
Bring their sheaves with songs of gladness in the rising
of that morn.
And the Cross hath pass'd for ever from the place of
earthly shame ;-
Pass'd, but evermore remaineth, evermore a glorious
name:
In its glory it abideth-evermore the blessed sign;
From the place of shame it passeth, on the brow of
kings to shine.
From the Tree the Lord hath reigned; He hath made
the Cross a Throne,
And from henceforth is our glory in that word of grace
alone.

















16 THE NIGHTINGALES.

Evermore the Cross our banner, and our watchword in
the fight,
Evermore the conquest cometh by the sign of heavenly
might.

If such glory He hath given to His Cross of woe and
shame,
Raising high the mark of sorrow o'er all signs of earthly
fame,
What the glory He reserveth, wherewith He shall bless
His own,
When the night shall pass for ever, light and joy remain
alone.

Lovelier than the peaceful dawning of the blessed Easter
Light,
Sweeter than the joy that cometh after weeping of the
night;
Brighter than exulting gladness, when the sheaves are
homeward borne,
Shall be the peace-the glory of the everlasting Morn.








r"



I
















THE TWO DOGS.










PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.









LONDON:
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.
SOLD AT THE DEPOSITORIES:
77 GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS;
4 ROYAL EXCHANGE; 48 PICCADILLY;
AND BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.


















THE TWO DOGS.


IN a farmyard in Somersetshire lived a very
fine dog. She was a dog of rank, and could
trace up her pedigree to the reign of King
Alfred, when the Earl Siegfried had given
the founder of her family to one of his yeo-
men, who had saved his life in a. skirmish
with the Danes. The descendants of this
yeoman had kept up the breed, and this dog
was still living in the family of the original
possessor. And she was deeply respected in
the farmyard, over all the inhabitants whereof
she exercised an undisputed rule and sway.
In process of time there were twins born
to her, and she named them Hyperf and
Pinny. They were very beautiful little











THE TWO DOGS.



creatures, with silky ears and tails, and very
bright hazel eyes.
On the day when the puppies were first
able to see, all the inhabitants of the farm-
yard came to pay their respects to them. First
came the cows, headed by Glacty their chief;
then Cyriack the old ass, with her two young
ones; Prissa the sow, with all the pigs;
Conta the guinea-fowl, with her brood;
Ealna the white duck, with the old drake
and her family; Picklees the cock, with his
two hens and their families; and lastly
Eutaso the peacock, with his three pea-
hens.
After they had all paid their respects in
their different ways, and the two little puppies
had wagged their tails in acknowledgment,
Eutaso the peacock came up, and spreading
out his beautiful fan of most lovely feathers,
presented one feather to each, with a very
low obeisance, and begged them to keep them



4










THE TWO DOGS.



as the only token of his service he could
make them; and he concluded by saying,
that he hoped they would grow up with all
kind of goodness, of which the outward
colours of beauty were only an emblem, and
would be in time equal to their mother.
The little dogs did not understand all this,
but they admired the feathers very much,
and wagged their tails most energetically;
and Alley, one of Picklees' two hens, who
was the great gossip of the farmyard, con-
stantly declared that Hyperf even uttered a
low bark, but it was generally supposed that
this was only a stretch of that good lady's
fancy.
Now, as might be supposed, Hyperf and
Pinny were both of them very nice dogs
indeed; but there was this difference between
them, that Hyperf was always thinking of
himself, and his great ambition was to be
the head of the farmyard, while Pinny only



5










THE TWO DOGS.



thought of his mother, and their neighbours
in the farmyard, and was once known to lie
for three hours in the sun without stirring,
because it amused the little chickens to run
round him, and he even let them walk over
him.
And Hyperf, too, did kind things some-
times (for who does not ?), but he was think-
ing of himself all the time, and so, poor little
dog, he became less and less nice.
On one occasion, it happened that he saw
a ragged little girl coming in at the gate,
so he ran out and barked so fiercely that the
poor little girl ran away, and was found about
half an hour after by the farmer's daughter
sitting under the hedge crying, because she had
been told to come to the house, and was afraid
of the little dog. But Hyperf knew nothing
of all this, and so, when his mother came in
(for she had gone out with the farmer), he
came running up and said, Oh, mamma, I



6










THE TWO DOGS.



sent a little girl packing off, I shall soon be
quite a great dog."
His mamma said, My dear Hyperf, I do
not recommend you to try that any more,
for you may frighten away the wrong people,
and our master will not be pleased." Where-
upon Hyperf looked rather ashamed, and was
quiet for the rest of that day.
But a few days after, their master took the
old dog out again with him, and he said to
his foreman, I think we had better take out
one of the little dogs, it will accustom them
to their work."
The foreman replied, Very well, sir; but,
if I might be so bold, had we not better leave
the bigger one behind, he is so very trouble-
some and forward ?"
"' Very well," said the farmer, "just as you
please."
So Hyperf was left behind, but he did not
know the reason why, and when his mother



7










THE TWO DOGS.



and brother were gone, he said to himself:
"They have left me behind, to take care of
everything here. I do believe I am worth
ten of Pinny, he's such a mean-spirited
creature; I wish I knew, though, which of
us was the favourite, especially with Conta
and Eutaso, who are really very nice people."
So saying, he established himself very snugly
in the mouth of the kennel, and resolved to
lay down the law most vigilantly. He had
not long to wait for an opportunity, for very
soon he espied Picklees' little family coming
out, the same with whom Pinny had once
played, and indeed very often, too.
When Hyperf saw them he came out, look-
ing very fierce, and with a low, very low
growl, he said, Get away there, and be off;
I'm not going to play with you, and you've
no business to come so far as this. Get
along !"
The chickens were all very frightened, and



8










THE TWO DOGS.



ran away, except Mikky the youngest, a very
pretty little hen chicken, who was not afraid
of any one, and she answered rather saucily,
" You're not my lord, Mr. Hyperf, and I shall
go where I like; you ought to be ashamed
of yourself, and I advise you to ask Mr. Pinny
to give you a lesson in courtesy." As she
finished she began to hop away; but Hyperf
came out in a great passion, and knocked her
down with one blow of his paw, and said:
"There, get along, and next time you speak
to me, be more respectful." But Mikky did
not stir, she was quite dead, for, being such a
little thing, she was killed by the blow. And
soon Hyperf saw she was dead, and he was
very much frightened, and ran away into his
kennel.
In about an hour after, his mother and
Pinny came back, and Pinny was in very
high spirits, and told Hyperf how their
mother had been sent to drive a flock of sheep,



9










THE TWO DOGS.



and he had helped to keep them together by
minding one or two very refractory old sheep;
and how afterwards he had been sent into the
river, "and," said he, "you can't think how
jolly it is; the sensation of swimming is as
if you had quite a new life in you, only it
isn't quite so nice when you come out, for
your coat feels so funny."
"Do be quiet, Pinny," said poor Hyperf;
"you quite make my head ache."
Presently the cook came out to feed the
fowls, and she saw the poor little chicken
dead, and she was very indignant and vexed,
for it was one of her special favourites. So
she ran into the house with poor little Mikky's
body, and told her master. Oh sir, only
look, that horrid puppy has been and killed
that poor little chicken; he is one of the most
mischievous, good-for-nothing creatures I ever
saw, and the very plague of my life."
The farmer said that the dog must be



10






THE TV



0O DOGS.



beaten. Meanwhile, the dog's mother had
heard of it, for it was talked of all over the
farmyard.
The cook rushed out, and seizing up a stick
in one hand, and carrying poor little Mikky
in the other, called out Hyperf! "
Hyperf knew very well why he was called,
but he came out immediately. Now, he was
no friend of the cook's, because one day he
had run after her favourite tortoiseshell cat,
and had bitten its ear. So she gave him a
tremendous beating, which he received very
quietly, only licking the poor little dead
chicken's feathers.
At last she left him, and he lay where he
was, and did not stir all the long, long night.
He thought over all his dreams of being the
lord of the farmyard, and his longing for
greatness, and how he had longed to be first,
and had despised his brother, and what would
he now give to be like him And he called



11










THE TWO DOGS.



to mind a host of unkind things he had done
to all the different animals, and thought how
they must despise him, and wished he could
die. And so he lay in intense misery.
At last morning came, and in the morning
his mother was let loose, and the first thing
she did was to run down to where he lay;
and she told him he had better get up; but
he was so stiff with the beating and lying
there all night, that he could not stir, so she
licked him all over, and talked to him all the
while; and by-and-by he had other visitors,
and among them Picklees, who, being very
tender-hearted, though a great gossip, had
come to console him, and beg him not to take
on so.
From that night Hyperf began to change;
for how could he aim at being chief, after
what he had done ? and, as soon as he began
not to think of himself, he became loving
and gentle. Thus he went on for three years,



12










THE TWO DOGS.



during which time he lost his brother; for
the farmer offered one of his dogs to a friend
of his, who chose Pinny in preference to
Hyperf.
One night, when Hyperf was about four
years old, and was now a grown-up dog, he
happened to be lying awake in the middle of
the night, and he thought he saw something
move. lHe listened most attentively, but
could hear nothing; at last, he saw it again
very dimly, and it seemed to be approaching
the hen-coop. So, stepping very quietly in-
deed, he went towards the hen-coop, and sure
enough he found the fox trying to get at
Mrs. Picklees' new brood, which had only
been hatched about a week.
With a very low but determined growl,
Hyperf sprang upon the fox, and a battle
ensued, in which, after a little struggling,
Hyperf came off victorious.
In the morning, Picklees came to thank



13










14 THE TWO DOGS.

him for his prowess and skill, and he was
that day appointed lord of the farmyard in
the place of his mother, who was getting
rather old, and he ruled with all his mother's
gentleness and sweetness, and with valour;
and while he ever bore in mind his early life,
all his loving subjects remembered only the
present, and regarded him with the utmost
reverence, as an undegenerate and glorious
descendant of his noble family. And his
mother rejoiced all her life long, that her
beloved son had become all and more than all
she had hoped.












THE TWO DOGS.



15



WAITING FOR THE SPRING.

Our soul hath patiently tarried for the Lord. But
what if we do not hold out in this patience ? Surely we
shall hold out: for He is our help and our shield. He
aids in the strife. He leaves thee not: bear, endure."
ST. AUGUSTINE.

Keen the March wind and high:
Not yet the breezes soft;
More bitter than mid-winter oft,
The gale when spring is nigh.

Fairer the winter snow
Than the March dust that lies
Thick in our path, obscuring e'en the skies
Oft as the rough winds blow.

Ah! yet in patience bide!
Thus are sweet blossoms nurst,
Close folded now, but soon all fair to burst,
When cometh the spring-tide.

They are not dark-these hours,
Ere cometh calm and bright
The glow of spring, the morn of glorious light,
Glad songs and sweetest flowers.












16 THE TWO DOGS.

Not drear-these sunless days,
These coldly quiet hours;
These we must bide,-but then bright Easter
flowers,
Then songs of Easter praise.










































V-
Z~rU-. IC~i Jd a -7~-
















THE SQUIRRELS.









PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.









LONDON:
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.
SOLD AT THE DEPOSITORIES:
77 GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS;
4 BOYAL EXCHANGE; 48 PICCADILLY;
AND BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.


















THE SQUIRRELS.



IN the huge hollow of an old oak tree a
squirrel had her nest. In due time she had
three young ones, whose names were Leu-
kourias, Lampromath, and the youngest, a
most beautiful and very good little creature,
was called Calleth. Leukourias was a very
handsome squirrel, with a bushy tail all
white, and his body the colour of the beech-
tree leaves in early autumn. He was very
brave and active, but rather inclined to be
vain of himself, while Lampromath was very
gentle and timid, and easily led by others.
One day their mamma sent them out to
play, and they were jumping about, chasing
each other from bough to bough, when Leu-
kourias said, "Well, I really think I could
get up to the top of this tree."










THE SQUIRRELS.



"Oh, Lik"-as his brothers sometimes
called him for short-"you know we have
never been so far from home. I don't think
mamma would like it."
"But mamma never told us not to, you
know, Cal," was his reply.
"No; but I think we had better not to-
day; and then, you know, we can ask
mamma next time."
"Nonsense, Cal," said Lik, "I shall go.
Will you come, Lap?"
"I don't know," said Lampromath. "I
should like to very much."
Oh dear Lap," said Calleth, you won't
go, I am sure."
"Very well, then, I'm off," said Lik;
and off he was; and, being a very active
squirrel, he soon reached the top; and after
resting there a little while, he thought he
might as well descend. As he was coming
down, in very high spirits, he met Ivrount,
the aged rook, who was the head of the
great rookery, and reputed to have lived
one hundred and fifty years.
She addressed him. Good-morning, Leu-
kourias. You are far from home."



4










THE SQUIRRELS.



"Yes, madam. I have been to the tree-
top all alone."
"Let me give you one piece of advice,
then, Leukourias," replied she. "Take care
how you go so far alone, for your family
has many enemies; and, above all, my dear
friend, honour your mother with all your
heart."
Leukourias hardly stayed till the last
words, when, making a kind of bow, he
was off. He soon rejoined his brothers, and
they went home.
But Queen Ivrount was not the only one
who had seen Lik. The old magpie, Mrs.
Naquir, besides being intensely fond of mis-
chief, hated the whole family, because Lik's
papa had once told her he thought she would
do well if she did not indulge in so much
gossip.
So Mrs. Naquir thought she might be
revenged, and she went and told Mr. Lop-
kins, the fox, that one of the young squirrels
had already learnt to go out without leave,
and she did not doubt that if he took a
little pains, he might entice him within his
power.



5










THE SQUIRRELS.



Mr. Lopkins thanked Mrs. Naquir for
her kindness, and next day, when the young
squirrels were out, he appeared at the foot
of the tree, and, addressing Leukourias, told
him he was delighted to see how active and
clever he was getting, and that if he would
do his cousin the favour of walking with him,
he would show him a still higher tree at no
great distance. Lik said he was very much
obliged to him; but he hesitated, for they
had been positively forbidden ever to go
down from the tree, or to speak to any
beast. Calleth proposed that they should go
and ask mamma, to which, of course, Mr.
Lopkins was very averse; and he said that
he knew their mamma was out, and that he
was their cousin, and he was sure she would
not mind their walking with him.
Here little Lap, feeling frightened, he
knew not why, withdrew a little further,
and Lik seemed to get bold in proportion,
and was evidently wavering, when a voice
was heard calling Leukourias. Calleth and
Lampromath both exclaimed joyfully, "Oh !
that's mamma," and off they skipped. Leu-



6










THE SQUIRRELS.



kourias followed, but with evident reluct-
ance.
Mr. Lopkins went away muttering to
himself, "You have escaped me this time,
but I will have you yet."
And in the course of that very afternoon,
he bribed Mrs. Naquir to entice Lik to jump
across. "I," says he, "will lie in wait
every evening an hour before dusk, and if
you can persuade that conceited coxcomb
that he can jump into yon tree, I will
seize him as he falls, which he must do,
and I will give you the breast of a fine fat
hen the very next day."
Meanwhile, the mamma, said to her three
little ones, Whom were you talking to just
now?"
Lik remained silent, but Lap said, "Oh!
mamma, we saw a gentleman down below,
who said he was our cousin."
"Yes, and he wanted us to take a walk
with him," put in Calleth.
"What was he like ?"
"Oh! mamma," said Calleth, "he was
something like me, only rather larger. His



7










THE SQUIRRELS.



tail was very much like mine, only he did
not cock it up, but stuck it out."
"And, mamma," said Lampromath, "I am
sure he was not a good gentleman, for he
had such ugly green eyes."
I think you're right there, my darling,
for he is a fox, the worst enemy of creatures
like us; but you must not judge people in
that way. And, oh! my children, go not
near the ground, nor far from the nest."
They promised to obey, and Lik made
plenty of good resolutions, and kept them for
some time, but as he had not taken the only
right step of confessing his disobedience, how
could he hope to keep his resolutions ?
A few days after this, as they were playing
about, not very far from home, they saw Mrs.
Naquir coming. Calleth, (from the intuitive
perception of what is evil which the right-
minded seem peculiarly to possess) felt a
dread"of her, and whispered to Lik, See,
Lik, here comes Mrs. Naquir. Let's get out
of the way."
Why should we?" said Lik, pettishly.
"I like Mrs. Naquir very much."



8










THE SQUIRRELS.



But I don't think mamma would like us
to stay."
Nonsense Mamma knows Mrs. Naquir
very well, and she never told us not to talk
to her."
By this time Mrs. Naquir had come up, so
they could say no more; and they all stayed;
Cal, because he did not like to leave his
brother, and Lap, partly from the same
reason, and partly out of curiosity, for Mrs.
Naquir was a great gossip. After some talk
about different things, Mrs. Naquir said,
"By the way, Leukourias, have you ever
been out of this tree ?"
"No, madam, never. I do so long to go.
Papa said he would take us some day and
show us a place a hundred times larger than
this tree, where he says a kind of animal lives
ever so many times as big as us," said Lap,
" and I should like to go very much."
"I," said Mrs. Naquir, "have been nearly
over the world, and, I assure you, it is very
delightful and instructive; but, if you want
to see that place, you can see it very well
from the top of the tree opposite."



9











THE SQUIRRELS.



How nice," said Lik; "but we must not
go on the ground by ourselves."
Oh, but such an active fellow as you are
might easily leap across to that bough close
by; and then you can climb up quite easily."
"Oh," said Lik, I had never thought or
that. I am sure I could do it."
"Oh! pray don't, Lik," said Cal. I am
sure mamma would not like it."
"Nonsense, Cal. I am older than you,
and I know quite well what mamma would
like."
So saying, he made a sudden spring and
reached the elm-tree, to the great surprise of
all. Mrs. Naquir, though deeply vexed, ex-
pressed great delight, and Lap cheered, but
Cal was too astonished at his daring to leave
the tree to say anything.
They watched him in silence climbing up,
his white tail now and then appearing through
the leaves, marking his progress. At last
Cal said they had better go home, and Lap,
sighing, followed.
They found their mamma just going out to
collect acorns, and Cal, half crying, said,



10










THE SQUIRRELS.



"Oh! mamma, do you know Lik is gone to
the great tree out there. Mrs. Naquir per-
suaded him to go."
How did he get there? said she, rather
angrily.
Oh! mamma, he jumped-hejust did it."
"Lap, you stop here, and you Cal come
and show me the place."
So they went. When they reached the
place where Lik had left them, they did not
see him, for it was now dusk, but his mamma
saw the twinkling green eyes of Mr. Lop-
kins, from the hole where he lay concealed,
and knew what he was after. "When did
you last see your brother? "
Oh mamma, he had just got to that tall
bough there when we left. Mrs. Naquir told
us we could see the great place from the
top."
"Well, I must go across to him. Tell
papa I hope to return soon." So saying she
too took the leap. She was not strong,
but strong above all on this earth is the
power of mother-love, and with that she got
safe across, and sat to wait and watch and



11










THE SQUIRRELS.



listen for her child, for it was too dark to fol-
low him. Patiently she waited, now and then
turning to look at the green eyes which
glared unmoving in the increasing darkness.
At last, she heard a rustling above her, and
she knew it was he, her child. But far other
was the result to what she looked for.
Leukourias had strained his paw in his
leap across, but had hardly felt it in his
eagerness; and the wearying ascent had in-
creased it very much. He reached the top,
and rested there awhile, and then fear of
the dark, and the memory of his mamma
looking out for him, as he thought, at
home, came on him most sadly. The descent
was painful and very slow, for he was nearly
worn out. At last, just as he was reaching
the spot where his mamma waited for him in
anxious hope, his foot slipped and down he
fell to the ground. Immediately the green
eyes glared more fiercely, and, with a look of
savage triumph, the fox darted forth to
seize poor Leukourias, but his mamma, too,
saw. Quick as lightning, with one bound,
she reached the spot where her darling lay.



12










THE SQUIRRELS.



She snatched him in her mouth. She rushed
up the tree with all the strength and speed
of love and fear together.
The disappointed fox turned in baffled rage
to his hiding-place. But Leukourias had
broken his leg in his fall, having fallen on a
projecting root, and so all that night he lay
moaning with pain, in an uncomfortable bed,
far from home, and his mamma watched by
him in sorrow and deep thankfulness, and,
now and then, she licked the broken limb.
At last dawn came, and with it sweet sleep
to poor Lik; and, when he awoke, his mamma
took him in her mouth again and ran across
to their home, and there they nursed him.
He got well again in about a week, but could
not jump about any more, but still and quiet
he lay, and his brothers used to go out and
bring him the finest acorns and beech-nuts
they could find; and, he, poor Leukourias,
patiently and humbly bore his life-long lame-
ness; and afterwards, when his brothers had
families of their own, he lived with them, and
told their little children how he had been
preserved through his waywardness; and do







13












14



THE SQUIRRELS.



not you think he gave such praise as beasts
can give to Him Who had preserved him, and
had given him such love?



"For faith is a buckler, and, so to speak, expands the
mind for the reception of the Divine light."-S. CYRIL.
Pledged beneath the banner
Of the Cross to fight,
Ere the strife beginneth,
Learn where lies thy might.
'Tis no bloodless warfare,
"Tis no painless strife;
Foes thou hast, assailing
More than mortal life.
Many a bitter arrow,
Fierce envenomed dart,
Thou must meet unyielding:
What shall guard thy heart?
What shall be the buckler,
Back the dart to throw,
Quench the burning arrow,
Take unharmed the blow?
Faith alone can shield thee,
Faith alone hath might
Thus to blunt each arrow-
Guard thee in the fight.












THE SQUIRRELS. 15

Closely, closely to thee
Bind the holy shield;
Then, in sternest warfare,
Thou shalt never yield.

O'er thy pathway lowering,
Dark the clouds may be:
Faith, a shield bright shining,
Shall be light to thee.

Dark is earthly wisdom,
Dim its brightest shine:
Faith thine heart unfoldeth
To the light Divine.

Dark the field of battle,
Where the strife may be:
Faith thine eyes shall open,
Heavenly light to thee.

Fear not then, O warrior,
In life's battle field.
Hold but ever closer
Faith, the stainless shield.






I



s.iL.



F. &







. ,. '
LI
















THE CHICKENS.










PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CBHISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.









LONDON:
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.
SOLD AT THE DEPOSITORIES:
77 GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS;
4 EOYAL EXCHANGE; 48 PICCADILLY;
AND BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.



















THE CHICKENS.



ONCE upon a time there lived a hen, who
had five chickens. Their names were Gatty,
Kally, Cary, Haggy, and Pully. Gatty
was considered most like his father, and it
was thought he would be a very nice cock in
time.
Kally, whose history especially this is, was
a very timid chick. One day, as he was
taking a little walk in the farmyard, he saw
a little mouse. He ran, shrieking, to his
mother, crying out, Oh, mamma, the lion
will eat me !"
Another day, when he was told to go










THE CHICKENS.



across the farmyard to drink, he refused to
go by himself, saying, he was quite sure the
great house-dog would eat him.
Of the remaining three chickens, Cary
was the only hen-chicken. She was very
much liked for her beauty of form, and the
extreme gentleness of her manner to the
whole farmyard.
Next was Haggy, who was the most de-
lightful chicken ever known, and had a most
clear and melodious voice, and it was thought
he would be a most beautiful chanticleer,
when he grew up.
Lastly, Pully must be mentioned. He was
a very little chick indeed; but so obedient,
he might well shame others who know
better.
One day, Kally came slowly up to his
mamma and said, scarcely able to speak from
emotion, Oh, mamma, I should so like to
do some great thing !"



4










THE CHICKENS.



His mamma said, My child, it is good-
ness not greatness that we should wish for;
but how will you begin?"
"How, mamma?"
"Do you see that barn ?"
"Oh yes, mamma."
"Can you get to the top ?"
"Oh yes, mamma."
"Go straight up at one bound."
"I cannot," said Kally, opening his eyes,
and cocking up his comb.
Why not ?"
"It is too high for me to hop."
"How, then, will you do it ?"
First, I hop to the top of our coop, then
on to the water-butt, then to the wall, and
hop on to yon rails, thence to the roof, and
then I hop along till I reach the top."
Just so, my child, must you act, if you
wish to become great."
How, mamma?"



5










THE CHICKENS.



By little steps. If you will do whatever
you are bid cheerfully and at once; if you
will give up to little Haggy, Cary, and
Pully; if you are ready to oblige the other
families of chickens you meet; if you do not
snatch greedily at the best crumbs, but let
others take them,-by little things of that
kind you may become good; and then, if it
is right for you, you may be able to do some-
thing great."
"Thank you, mamma," said Kally, and off
he hopped; and from that day forward he
tried, and, amid repeated failures, he suc-
ceeded, and became at last a most amiable fowl.
About a year after this, He, whom worms
and feathered fowls" do praise, and who
"heareth the young ravens that call upon
Him," granted Kally his desire. One day
he and Cary had gone out of the farmyard
along a little lane, as fowls often do; and, as
they were returning, a fox came out of the



6











THE CHICKENS. 7

hedge, and seized poor little Cary. Kally,
who by this time had learned to consider all
rather than himself, flew at the fox, and
picked out one of his eyes.
The fox, in pain and rage, let Cary drop,
and ran home; but, as Kally was following,
the fox seized him, and crunched all his
bones. And thus Kally's wish was granted;
for who is greater than he, who in love and
the stern path of duty, saves another's life at
the sacrifice of his own ?



ALL SAINTS' DAY.
On the first November day,
Often at the dawn of morn,
Cold the dews on every spray,
Dark the drops upon the thorn
Hang, untouched by ray of light,
All thick-shrouded in the mist of night.



Yet, ere long, the sunbeams keen
Have the dark veil pierced through,












THE CHICKENS.



And at noon-day we have seen
Skies of clearest, calmest blue;
And the cold dew glitters bright,
Every spray o'erhung with drops of light.

Surely 'tis a dawning meet
For a day so calmly glad,
Making mournful thoughts so sweet,
Making grief to be not sad;
Meet our festal days to close
In this stillness bright, this fair repose.

For a cloud, more dark and deep
Than the mist of autumn morn,
Veils the home of saints that sleep,
Till the brightness of the dawn
Giveth to our longing eyes
Fairer sight than autumn's clear blue skies.

Like the cold dews of the night,
Tears may o'er our pathway lie;
But a sun of higher might
Soon shall clear the darkened sky,
And, all clouds of sorrow fled,
Gems of light shall shine where tears were shed.



8



















4,




4: A



lh



X



L
















THE PIGEONS.









PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.









LONDON:
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CIHRISTIAN KNOW LEDGE.
SOLD AT THE DEPOSITORIES:
77 GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS;
4 ROYAL EXCHANGE; 48 PICCADILLY;
AND BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.















THE PIGEONS.


IN the venerable and world-famed city of
Moscow, live, as every one knows, some
thousands of pigeons. Amongst all these
were two, named Heeresk and Neeresk.
Heeresk was a very beautiful pigeon of the
purest white, except on his wings, where
there was a little tinge of brown. His sister
Neeresk was not so handsome a bird; she
was nearly black, with a glossy purple on
her breast, and two white feathers in her
wings. They had never been left alone since
they were hatched; but, one day, their
mamma thought that they were getting old
enough to take care of themselves, for at least
a time, so she said:
"My children, your papa and I are going
out for some hours; we shall leave you here;
you can hop about the yard as much as you
please, but you must not attempt to fly
about, for the mighty Okba, king of hawks,
is not far off."










THE PIGEONS.



So saying, she left them; and they, after
remaining a little time in their hole, where
their nest was, thought they would like to go
out. Just then a large piece of black bread
was thrown out into the yard, and many
pigeons flocked round it.
"Come, sister," said Heeresk, "let us go
down;" and down they went, but there was
such a crowd that they were glad to get out
of the way.
Presently, they returned again, and there
was a little swallow who had come in for a
share. He drew back when he saw them, in
all courtesy and respect, but Neeresk said to
him, There is plenty for all, pray join us."
And the swallow made his little graceful
bow and joined them. And then they hopped
about and talked: at last, Heeresk said,
"Where do you live?"
Said the swallow, I live in our great city,
Cheldonopol, it is about two minutes' flight
from here; every evening we come out to
have a grand supper of mosquitoes, and you
may see about five hundred of us: it is such
fun flying round and round after them."



4











THE PIGEONS.



Then said Neeresk, timidly, But do you
never meet the hawk?"
"Oh, yes, very often, but we generally
manage to get out of his way; but soon,
soon, the winter will come, and then we shall
be off to grand far-off beautiful places, where
there are no hawks. Ah me, how I wish it
were winter !"
"Please what is winter?" said Neeresk.
Why, you goose," said her brother, "it is
the time when everything will be as white as
I am, and we shall have to sit indoors all day
long!"
"And do not you sit indoors all day long,
too?" asked Neeresk of the swallow.
"Oh, no," said he, we shall fly far away,
over great blue water as big as all the world
we can see here, and then we shall come to a
beautiful place, and be so happy there !"
Thus they talked, till at last Neeresk
exclaimed:
"Oh, there is mamma come back!" and
the little swallow made his graceful bow, and
flew off.
The brother and the sister returned home,



5










THE PIGEONS.



and presently Heeresk said, "Oh, mamma, I
do so want to fly all about, and see every-
thing."
Why," she said, "what has put that in
your head?"
Oh, mamma," said his sister, "we have
had such a pretty little bird to see us, and he
says he will fly away very soon, and see all
kinds of nice things."
"Nonsense, child," said she; "it is all very
well for them to fly away, but we were
meant to stay here."
So they went to supper and to bed, safe
under the mother's wing; but Heeresk was
all the time longing to be abroad, flying
about like that little swallow.
Next day, they were left alone; they
hopped all round the yard, and at last
Heeresk yawned, and said :
"Oh, dear! I really must take a fly up
on the roof."
"Oh, don't, please," said his little sister;
and he stopped.
Next day he yawned still worse, and said:
"Now, sister, I am going."



6










THE PIGEONS



THE PGEON



"Oh, please don't, dear Heeresk, I beg
you will not leave me;" and again he staid.
But on the third day, after they had been
all round the yard, they heard a noise just
above them; it was Mrs. Blaboo, the jack-
daw, and she said, Won't you come up
here and sit by me, it is so very pleasant ?"
And again Heeresk was for going, and
again his sister kept him back; but Mrs.
Blaboo chattered to them all the same, and
told them the stories of how she got through
the windows into the houses round about, and
got such a lot of pretty things. She had
quite a large store, all gold and silver and
diamonds. And the little pigeons did not
know that it was not real gold and silver,
and they wondered very much: and Heeresk
especially got very discontented indeed.
His mother saw that there was something
wrong, and asked them what they had been
doing all day.
Neeresk replied, "Oh, mamma, we have
been sitting under the roof, and Mrs. Blaboo
has been telling us such funny stories of all
the pretty things she has got."



7










THE PIGEONS.



Their mamma replied, "My children, I do
not wish you to talk much with Mrs. Blaboo:
another time you had better not go near
where you see her."
Neeresk answered, "Yes, mamma."
But Heeresk said nothing: he was very
cross and naughty.
That night he was so full of longings to
fly away somewhere, that he could not keep
still, and disturbed his mamma so much that
she scolded him and told him to be quiet;
and then he was still, and at last he went to
sleep.
After a very unquiet night, he awoke with
a resolution to fly away as soon as he could,
and thought he would go to Cheldonopol, and
pay a visit to their acquaintance there. His
mother saw that there was something wrong,
though she did not know what, so she called
him to her, and said, "Heeresk, my child,
what is the matter with you?"
"Nothing, mamma, only I am tired of
this place; I want to fly about."
"And do you think, my child, you would
be happier if you were to fly about ?"



8










THE PIGEONS.



"Yes, mamma, I should."
"No, dear child, you would not; there are
dangers all round you; there is Okba, the
great hawk, ever on the look out for a stray
pigeon, and other dangers; and there is only
safety in staying at home, and in obedience."
And, so saying, she embraced her child, and
his heart was touched. And he thought he
would not go. But, alas! when their mamma
was gone, and they were down in the yard,
Heeresk said:
"Now, I am really going to have a good
fly."
"Oh, my darling brother," said she, "do
not please go away."
"Nonsense, Neeresk," said her brother,
"I shall not be gone for very long, and you
can wait here for me." So saying, he was
up on the roof-top, and there he found
Mrs. Blaboo with her grey apron on, and she
applauded his courage in having at last
ventured to leave the ground.
So, elated at this, and with his little head
stiff and erect, he hopped up the slope of the
roof. There, on the highest summit, stood



9











THE PIGEONS.



the aged rook Palmosoph. He addressed
Heeresk, "My little friend, beware of the
hawk."
And proudly and naughtily the little
pigeon replied, "Am not I as safe from the
hawk as you?"
But the aged Palaeosoph replied:
"My little friend, I am here as sentinel,
and in duty is safety, but not in idle and
needless going into danger."
But Heeresk would not mind the wise old
bird, but advanced to the summit, and thence
entered on his flight. The sun was hot, and
the little pigeon's wings not strong, and,
after flying some time, wearily he alighted in
the street, some way off. Weary and hungry
he was, and bewildered with the noise and
strange faces all around him; and when he
tried to partake of the crumbs that were
thrown out to the pigeons, the others stared
at him, as a stranger, and he was afraid and
slunk away. Then he hopped down the
street, nearly run over by all the carriages,
for they were so many that he did not know
what to do.



10










THE PIGEONS.



At last he crept into a hole to rest, and
then he thought he would take wing again.
In early morning he had set out, and now
it was late in the afternoon. Up he flew
in a state of despair, and then he saw in
the distance the great golden eagle that soars
on the top of the highest summit of Chel-
donopol (the swallows say it is in honour
of the mighty eagle that once slew the hawk,
their deadly foe).
At length he reached this place, but it was
late in the evening, and all the swallows were
out hunting their supper; and, besides, how
should he recognize his acquaintance amongst
so many? So he alighted, and began to hop
slowly about, and at last the swallows began
to return, each with his note of thankful joy
and praise, in the bright evening light, and
each sound of joy fell heavily upon the heart
of the poor little pigeon, in his weariness and
unrest.
Soon he saw his acquaintance returning
home with some others, and flew right up to
meet him, saying, "I am come to see you,
you see."



11










THE PIGEONS.



Very much astonished was the swallow,
and he said, Why, what could have brought
you here, and at such an hour, too?"
Then Heeresk began to recount his troubles
to the swallow, and the swallow compas-
sionated him, and said he would try to procure
him some supper. But as Heeresk did not
eat mosquitoes, this was no easy matter, but
his host contrived to find out an acquaintance
of his who had a small store of black bread-
crumbs, and with these he supplied his guest.
Then he asked him whether he meant to
return that night, or where he should sleep.
He said he was so tired he could not possibly
return, but did not know at all where to
sleep.
The swallows said their town was quite
full, but he believed there was a little lodging
somewhere on the ground. They went to
look, and found a small hole under the wall,
into which the pigeon crept, and the swallow
left him promising to return early next day.
Poor Heeresk was very unhappy, as he
thought of his sister safe and happy under
his mother's wing, and himself cold and



12










THE PIGEONS.



miserable. Presently, he saw two bright
eyes looking at him, and he trembled all
over (for it was a mouse's hole that he was
in), but fortunately the mouse was as much
afraid as he, and hid herself. There then
stood poor little Heeresk on one leg, very
wretched, and just as he was dropping asleep,
quite exhausted, there came a horrid noise,
like a great scraping outside his hole, and
then a great crash like thunder, which came
against the side of his hole. It was the
closing of the great gate of the tower, behind
which his hole was.
At last he dropped asleep, and very early
in the morning came his friend the swallow
to him; but poor Heeresk could not get out,
for the gate had closed up the entrance to his
hole. And then he had to wait three dreary
hours more till the gate was opened, and then
he came out feeling quite ill.
The swallow had begged some more bread-
crumbs for him and gave him some breakfast,
and then took him up to one of the heights of
the lofty Cheldonopol, and said, "Now you
had better not lose any time in going back.



13











THE PIGEONS.



Do you see that great mass yonder ?" Yes."
" That is the direction in which you must go;
that is inhabited by a large tribe of your'
nation, and you had better go there first."
Heeresk remembered what reception he
got from the stranger pigeons the day before,
but said nothing. The swallow proceeded:
" When you have passed that, you must turn
a little to the right till you come to a tall
green rock, and then from there straight on.
And mind, if you see the hawk, fly high, and
keep above him, and then he will not hurt you."
Heeresk thanked him and flew off, and first
he reached the great white mass occupied by
his own nation, and there he stopped to rest,
but took care to keep out of their way, and
then proceeded on his way. Many times he
had to stop and rest, and at last, very tired,
he reached the green rock, and from there he
could just see the top of the roof where his
home lay.
He nerved himself for the last flight; it
was towards evening; high he soared, when
he heard a sharp, shrill shriek, and, looking
up, above him he beheld the hawk, proudly
soaring.



14










THE PIGEONS.



Transfixed with terror, and all unmindful
of the directions of the swallow, he remained
motionless in the air, and towards him came
floating slowly and majestically, with wings
sparkling in the bright evening sun, the
dreaded foe, the hawk.
Heeresk stirred not, the hawk was close
upon him, when suddenly Heeresk dropped
his wings in terror, and fell down to the
ground. The hawk followed him, but Heeresk
fell into a yard where there was a man at
work cutting wood, so the hawk dared not
follow.
Heeresk lay, his wing broken with the fall,
in intense pain. The hawk was not far off,
watching; by-and-bye the man had finished
his work, and went in. His wife said to
him, "Is that a pigeon lying on the ground
there ?"
Yes, mistress; he has broken his wing,
poor creature."
The good woman ran out, and got to the
place where he lay just as the hawk was
slowly dropping down. She carried him off
to the house, and dressed his broken wing,



15