• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The Story of a Toadstool
 Moonbeam and the Birdies
 Old Prickles
 Blob, the Spider
 Back Cover






Title: Merry elves, or, Little adventures in fairyland
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047784/00001
 Material Information
Title: Merry elves, or, Little adventures in fairyland
Alternate Title: Little adventures in fairyland
Physical Description: 95 p. : col. ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Murray, Charles O ( Illustrator )
Seeley Jackson & Halliday ( Publisher )
Publisher: Seeley, Jackson & Halliday
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1879
 Subjects
Subject: Fairies -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Elves -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Magic -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1879   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1879   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with twenty four illustrations by C.O. Murray.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00047784
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002234249
notis - ALH4668
oclc - 50815238

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
    The Story of a Toadstool
        I:The Toadstool
            Page 5
        II: The Toad
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
        III: A Retreat
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
        IV: A Look-out
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
        V: Revenge
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
        VI: A Ride
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
        VII: Two Upon One
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
        VIII: A Cold Bath
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
        IX: A Warning
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
    Moonbeam and the Birdies
        I:The Nest
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
        II: Minding the Babies
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
        III: Learning to Fly
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
    Old Prickles
        Going Home to Supper
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
        A Robbery
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
        III: Supperless
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
        IV: A Fall
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
        V: A Ride
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
        VI: The Last of Gobble
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
    Blob, the Spider
        Rosywing
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
        II: A Carriage-and-Four
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
        III: An Enemy
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
        IV: A Warning
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
        V: Caught Asleep
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
        VI: Perks, the Woodpecker
            Page 94
            Page 95
    Back Cover
        Page 96
        Page 97
Full Text
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SEELEY, JACKSON, & HALLIDAY,
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THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



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1.

THE TOADSTOOL.

" We won't worry ourselves with work,' said Dandelion;
'let us climb up this great toadstool, and
have a dance upon the top.'"












MERRY ELVES


O R,


LITTLE ADVENTURES IN FAIRYLAND.



WITH TWENTY-FOUR ILLUSTRATIONS


C. URABY
C. O. MURRAY.



SEELEY, JACKSON, & HALLIDAY, 54, FLEET STREET.
LONDON. MDCCCLXXIX.













THE



STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.


I.
THE TOADSTOOL.
FOUR little Elves were coming out of the Elfin Court,
which was held in the hollow of a great oak. They
had each been receiving their orders for the day;
and Buttercup and Bluebell, two good little Elves,
were starting for their work in high spirits, when
they were overtaken by Bindweed and Dandelion.
Ho, ho! Buttercup, how much butter will you
make to-day ?" said Dandelion, as he knocked his
cap off; "you'll have a hard day's work of it; and
you, Bluebell, have got a pleasant task, to ring the
bells all day for the King's state banquet to-night.
Ho, ho! I don't envy you both."
But, alack we've got to work just as hard,"
said Bindweed, ruefully, swaying to and fro; I
have to go climbing about in all directions, and
you, Dandelion, have to be making clocks all day;
so we are in the same hard case."
Not we," said Dandelion; "we won't worry our-
selves with work. Let us climb up this great toad-
stool, and have a dance upon the top."



5









THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



II.

THE TOAD.

THEY were two curious little Elves. Dandelion was
of a yellowish colour, with hair like tawny bristles
on his fat little head: Bindweed, though loose and
unsteady in the legs, was rather vain of his ap-
pearance, and wore a flower cap.
It was not very easy to climb the toadstool, the
top hung over so much; and they decided to assist
each other in this difficult and dangerous ascent.
So Dandelion began to climb, while Bindweed
supported him; but when he reached the top he
suddenly let go his hold, and fell upon Bindweed,
who was nearly senseless with fright and pain.
"What was it?" whispered Bindweed, trembling
in every limb.
A monster Toad," gasped Dandelion, "with an
immense wrinkled neck, and a mouth big enough to
bite your head off; with eyes-oh, such eyes large
and glazy and horrible-starting out of his head!"
Perhaps he'll come down !" said Bindweed, look-
ing as white as a daisy.



6



I










THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



II.
THE TOAD.

"So Dandelion began to climb, while Bindweed
supported him ; but when he reached the top, he suddenly
let go his hold."



7



;3 '..

._ .-_ _- , _
-- ... --- I _- ---












THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.


Perhaps he will," said Dandelion, turning as
blue as a bluebell.
Horrible !" said Bindweed, shaking as if he were
going to have a fit.
He'd find me a bitter morsel, though," said
Dandelion, with grim pleasure.
I should think he would," said Bindweed; and
the idea revived and amused him a little.
All this time they were behind a fern, for they
had crawled there as soon as they had got their
breath; and as they could not see the Toad, they
hoped he could not see them.
He seems quiet enough now," said Dandelion;
" shall we take a peep at him again ?"



9








THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



III.
A RETREAT.

BINDWEED was certainly not so courageous as Dan-
delion; he had a much more wavering disposition.
When he had some one to support him he could
carry out his pranks, but if not, he generally failed.
Dandelion's curiosity got stronger and stronger
every minute,-the Toad was so very quiet; at
last he made a proposal.
Just climb that old fern, Bindweed, and I'll help
you. You see, if you peep through the leaves, you
can soon tell if the Toad is asleep; and if he is, I
think we might pelt him and run away before he
could get at us. I don't like leaving the wrinkled
old thing without paying him out,-do you ?"
"W\ell, I think it might be the wisest plan," said
Bindweed; but seeing Dandelion look at him with
contempt, he added, but I'll try, if you like:" so,
shutting his eyes, he began climbing the fern. He
looked such a funny little creature, creeping up so
quietly and steadily,-for Bindweed was one of the
best climbers in Elf-land, or with his eyes shut he



10








THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



III.
A RETREAT.

"The Toad's head was seen over the top of the stool;
down dropped the stone, and both the little Elves scurried off
as fast as their legs could carry them."



II



__












THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



could never have reached the top. Dandelion was
watching him anxiously from below; but his eyes
were dreadfully strained, for at the height to which
Bindweed had ascended, he looked to Dandelion
like a small ladybird perched on the top of the fern.
Is he asleep ? keep very quiet," Dandelion called
out, making a trumpet of a little bit of straw which
he found on the ground.
His voice seemed to Bindweed miles away, and
so startled him that he slipped quickly down.
Is he awake ?" said Dandelion, alarmed at this
rapid descent.
"I don't know; I only saw his back."
"You didn't look, I do believe!" said Dandelion,
scornfully.
Yes, I opened one eye, and peeped."
One eye !" said Dandelion, angrily. You're not
half an Elf," and he took up a little stone to throw
at him. But just then the Toad's head was seen
over the top of the stool; down dropped the stone,
and both the little Elves scurried off as fast as
their legs could carry them.



13








THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



IV.
A LOOK-OUT.

ON and on flew the little Elves, much to the sur-
prise and astonishment of Buttercup and Bluebell,
who were both busy on the top of a hill not far
distant.
"Ho, ho, ho!" laughed Buttercup, as he saw
Bindweed go head over heels; for a worm was just
coming out to refresh himself, and unfortunately got
in his way. The worm quickly retired, and Bindweed
picked himself up, and ran on after Dandelion as
fast as he could; but he had hurt his back so much
that he had to hold it as he ran. I do not know
when he would have overtaken him, but that Dan-
delion attempted to leap over a crack in the ground,
and as it was too wide he fell in, and soon found
himself at the bottom. If he had not been so fat he
would have been very much hurt; as it was, he only
felt uncomfortably shaken. Poor Bindweed coming
up, could not see him, and was so frightened that he
screamed louder than he had ever done before.
This brought Buttercup and Bluebell to the spot.
They had not seen what had happened, because



14










THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



IV.

A LOOK-OUT.

"'We'll creep through the grass and flowers softly, and
steal on the enemy from behind.'"



15











THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



they had gone on with their work; but now they
were horrified to see Dandelion looking like a speck
at the bottom of the precipice.
"We must make a ladder," said Buttercup, "and
Bindweed, who is a good climber, must go down and
fetch Dandelion up."
So a ladder was made of cobwebs strung together,
and then Bindweed descended and helped Dande-
lion to the top. He soon recovered his spirits, and
thanked his friends graciously for their trouble.
You've been up to mischief, I know," said Blue-
bell; I advise you to take to work."
Good advice is never to be despised," said Dan-
delion, gravely.
Until sunset," said Buttercup, for that was the
Elves' good-bye.
Until sunset," said Bindweed and Dandelion,
and they were left alone.
Those little Elves make me mope," said Dan-
delion; it's always work, work, work, with them.
However, they have their good points."
Yes," said Bindweed, doubtfully.
What do you say to another peep at the Toad,
eh ?"
I don't mind," said Bindweed, whose back was
better. We'll creep through the grass and flowers
softly, and steal on the enemy from behind."



17



11








THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.






V.
REVENGE.

" I ro believe he 's asleep," said Dandelion; can't
you hear him snore ?"
"He does breathe loudly," said Bindweed; I
think he must be asleep."
It seems an opportunity for something, doesn't
it ?"
Yes; let us tie a string to one of his legs, and
then we can do what we like with him,"
"A capital idea Really, Bindweed, you 're getting
as sharp as a blade of grass. You bind the string,
and I will help pull."
Poor Toadie had been dreaming of rich ponds
and delicious muddy banks, where the rushes grow
and form a pleasant shade, where the soft rich earth
makes a cool retreat when the sun is too hot for the
toadstools; and then suddenly he felt a sharp pull,
and he wondered what could be the matter.
Pull pull away, you twisty young Elf!" said
Dandelion; "you've tied a knot to some purpose !
Pull !-pull away!"
Bindweed was delighted to get a word of praise;



18











THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



REVENGE.

"Poor Toadie had been dreaming of rich ponds and
delicious muddy banks; and then suddenly he felt a sharp pull,
and wondered what could be the matter."



'9













THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



and pulled with such vigour that poor Toadie was
soon on the ground, panting, hurt, and frightened.
"Ding, ding! ring, ring! ding, ding!" sounded
the bells far away.
There's Bluebell ringing the bells," said Dan-
delion, who was trying to get breath again; while
the poor Toad lay quietly panting, and wondering
what he should do.
Why, the bells seem to speak," said Bindweed,
listening attentively; "they say, 'Oh, let him go!
oh, let him go!' Do you hear? Perhaps we had
better let him go."
"Nonsense!" said Dandelion, contempuously;
"you can make bells say anything."



21









THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



VI.
A RIDE.

" Now we'll have some fun, and see how the Toad
will like it," said Dandelion. So, while Bindweed
was amusing himself with jumping over the string
and pulling the poor Toad's leg, Dandelion got on
his back, but he was more quickly off again.
I never touched such a slimy, cold creature!"
he said, ruefully; "what makes him so wet ?"
Toads are fond of water," said Bindweed; per-
haps he has not dried himself after his bath."
Perhaps not," said Dandelion, and he plucked
some daisies and rubbed the Toad's back; but when
he got on again, it was just as cold as ever.
Nothing will warm him but a good trot; so here
I go! Hold on to the string, Bindweed."
So, while Dandelion rode, Bindweed held the
string, and then Bindweed mounted, and Dandelion
took the string; and so they went on, till the un-
fortunate Toad thought they would kill him with
fatigue. He looked round to see if there were not
some little hole or muddy refuge, where he could
hide himself and get rid of his tormentors; but he



22











"TIIE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



VI.

A RIDE.



"'How cold he is Nothing will warm him but a good trot
so here I go! Hold on to the string.'"












THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



could see none. No, off he must go again; and
that cruel string hurt his leg so much, that he felt
quite sick and ill.
He doesn't go so fast as he did," said Dande-
lion; "what can we do with him ?"



25








THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



VII.
TWO UPON ONE.

" I'LL tell you what we'd better do," said Bindweed,
who found riding much pleasanter than holding the
string, we'll untie the string and get on his back
together; he seems a very quiet, harmless monster."
Yes, that will be fun! You untwist that knot
then, while I sit on his back lest he should move."
So they both got on the Toad's back, and off they
went faster than before,-so fast, indeed, that they
found it difficult to keep on such a slimy seat.
Ho, ho! I wish he'd stop," gasped Bindweed;
" I don't like this at all."
But Dandelion could not answer; he felt as if he
were running to seed. The Toad seemed to have
quite regained his spirits, and his trot, which had
never been too even, was now so awkward on the
muddy ground, that Dandelion and Bindweed had
the greatest difficulty in keeping on his slimy back.
Soon Dandelion saw something shining in the dis-
tance; a strange creeping feeling came over him;
he quickly found his voice, and asked, with quiver-
ing lips, Bindweed, what is that in the distance ?"



26










"THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



VII.



Two UPON ONE.

"' We'll untie the string, and get on his back together
he seems a very quiet, harmless monster.'"



27












THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



The lake !" whispered Bindweed, shuddering, as
a dreadful thought came into his head.
Do you think there is any danger of-of-the
Toad wanting a bath ?" said Dandelion.
I'm afraid there is," answered Bindweed; what
can we do ?"
But before Dandelion could answer-



29









TIE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



VIII.
A COLD BATH.

THEY were at the water's edge, and the Toad
stopped short. In a moment they were flying over
his head, with hair on end, and terror in their faces.
Down they splashed into the muddy pond, and
the water rushed into their mouths and ears and
eyes; they felt that they would soon be choked,
and never see the pretty Elf valley again.
Dandelion sank lower and lower, until he saw a
large ugly fish looking at him as if he thought he
would make a good meal. Dandelion did not wish
to make a dinner for any one, so he turned sharply
round, but the fish turned too! Then Dandelion
darted up, but he heard the fish's great jaws closing
behind him, and he felt as if he were already down
his throat, when he clutched hold of a water-lily, and
managed to climb upon it. To his surprise, he
found Bindweed on another leaf of the same lily.
"Ho, ho!" he called, but Bindweed gave no
answer, and Dandelion could not wonder, for he did
not know his own voice, so hollow and weak it



30










THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL,



VIlI.

A COLD BATH.

In a minute they were flying over the Toad's back,
with hair on end, and terror in their faces. Down they splashed
into the muddy pond."



31











THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOl.



sounded. But soon Bindweed raised his languid
eyes, and saw him. Listen," he said, pointing to a
group of Frogs not far distant, and Dandelion heard
a great noise. Croak, croak, croak! louder and
louder it grew; croak, croak, croak! it seemed as if
it would never end.
It was the Tale of the Toad," which the Frogs
were telling to each other; and then suddenly one
of the largest Frogs leaped upon the lily, and the
little Elves sank terrified into the muddy pond.



33



C









THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



IX.
A WARNING.

BuT as they rose near the shore, the Toad, in the
largeness of his heart, picked them out of the water,
and in a grand and superior manner dismissed them.
A very great Toad he looked, as, with his head
high in the air, he bid the miserable little Elves
farewell.
Dripping, cold, and weary, they hurried along
over the soft mud as fast as they could, but they
got on very slowly, until at last they reached the
border of their pretty dell; then they quickened
their pace a little, and lay down beneath some
violets to rest.
Buttercup and Bluebell were having a merry
game in the neighbourhood, for they had finished
their work, and were chasing one another among
the flowers, when they suddenly came upon the two
wet little Elves. They were quite astonished to
see what a plight they were in.
Dear me!" said Buttercup, stroking his chin, I
think I 'd better fetch some butter and honey, or



34










THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



IX.

A WARNING.

"A very great Toad he looked, as, with his head high in the
air, he bid the miserable little Elves farewell."



35












THE STORY OF A TOADSTOOL.



they will die of hunger." So away he skipped,
looking brighter than a sunbeam.
And Bluebell was not idle, for he quickly made
up some little garments of flower leaves, and then
set the bells to ring. Dandelion and Bindweed
awoke with the sweet sound, and, looking up, saw
two daisies full of butter and honey in Buttercup's
hands, while two pretty little coats were being
spread out by Bluebell.
I will leave you to decide who had had the most
fun that day.



37
















MOONBEAM AND THE BIRDIES.




i.
THE NEST.

MOONBEAM was a busy little Elf, very fond of being
useful, and always on the look-out for opportunities.
She was a white, lily-like little Elf, with a beautifully
soft satin lustre, and she darted about very swiftly
and silently.
One day she spied two pretty birds, Mimi and
Titi, very busy making their home, and as they were
both very young, and not used to such work, she
thought she would help them. No sooner said than
done. She tucked in the feathers and bits of straw
and grass so quickly, that the birdies at last got
quite out of breath, and said, Oh, dear Moonbeam,
we must rest a little while, and take a meal; we
have not had one small worm for a quarter of an
hour."
Then Moonbeam laughed a silvery laugh. Go
and get your dinners, then, my birdies, and I will



38











MOONBEAM AND THE BIRDIES.



PFA/>



I.

THE NEST.

"Moonbeam tucked in the feathers and bits of straw and grass so
quickly, that the birdies at last got quite out of breath."



39



I












MOONBEAM AND THE BIRDIES.



gather some sweet-scented leaves to make pillows
for the babies. Fly, fly away !" she said, as she saw
they did not feel quite comfortable to leave her
working while they fed.
But soon Mimi flew back with the tiniest grub
you ever saw, and offered it, with three pretty curt-
seys, to Moonbeam; but Moonbeam shook her head,
and with three little bows declined the food, saying
she only lived on the gold-dust of flowers, and drank
sweet drops of dew.
Then little Mimi flew away, feeling glad that
Moonbeam was too busy to see how many worms
she required for her dinner.
When she and her husband Titi had finished,
they flew back to the nest, looking very happy and
comfortable; but Moonbeam was gone, having left
the little home quite ready for the baby eggs, and
smelling sweetly of violet leaves.



41









MOONBEAM AND THE BIRDIES.



II.
MINDING THE BABIES.

FOR some time Titi and Mimi saw nothing of Moon-
beam, and they often wished they had not stayed so
long at their dinner the day she had helped them
build their nest.
Perhaps she was offended at being left so long,"
said Mimi; I know it's trying for me when you
take a long time at your meals."
Indeed," said Titi, I never stand long at din-
ner; I bring you and the babies worms and grubs
between every mouthful ;" and Titi was so offended
that he flew to a neighboring tree, and would not
sing.
Mimi was feeling very sorry that she had spoken
her mind, when she felt a tiny touch, and saw
Moonbeam sitting on the edge of the nest.
Oh, Moonbeam!" she chirped, I'm so glad to
see you." And Titi, who was sulking still, heard
the chirping, and wondering what could make Mimi
happy when he was put out, flew down to see. He
was quite as glad to see Moonbeam as Mimi had



42










MOONBEAM AND THE BIRDIES.



II.



MINDING THE BABIES.

"Moonbeam was sitting in the nest, with one of the babies
on her lap, and the others all gaping round."



43












MOONBEAM AND THE BIRDIES.



been, and he immediately set up such a song that
Moonbeam and Mimi listened in raptures, and then
congratulated him heartily on his splendid execution
and power of voice.
Titi smoothed his feathers with a very satisfied
air, and then they all played with the babies. Moon-
beam promised to come every day, to see how they
were getting on.
A few days afterwards Titi, returning early in the
morning from a long search after food, found Moon-
beam sitting on the nest, with one of the babies on
her lap, and the others all gaping round.
I'm minding the babies while mamma has gone
to take a fly," said Moonbeam in her silver voice;
" and now you bring the breakfast as fast as you
can.



45









MOONBEAM AND THE BIRDIES.



11I.
LEARNING TO FLY.

THE little baby birdies got on so fast and grew so
fat, that they were the wonder of all the neighbour-
ing nests for trees round.
While the babies far and near were crying and
squealing all day long, the Titi family were quiet
and happy, each having a grub in its mouth; for
of course, as Moonbeam helped so much with the
nursing, papa and mamma had more time to get
food; and how could the babies cry when they
were always eating or sleeping ?
At last there was a grand consultation between
the parents and Moonbeam, for they considered the
time had arrived when the children ought to be
taught to fly.
Let me teach them," said Moonbeam, "and they
will soon fly like Elves."
So Titi and Mimi hovered near while Moonbeam
gave her first flying lesson. Oh, what fun it was!
First one got on her back, then another, and they
even quarrelled for the first turn; but Moonbeam



46









MOONBEAM AND THE BIRDIES.



III.

LEARNING TO FLY.

" Let me teach them," said Moonbeam,' and they will soon fly like
Elves.' So first one got on her back, and then another."





47












MOONBEAM AND THE BIRDIES.



soon hushed that, and said she would take them all
at once if she could, but as she was not big enough,
they must patiently wait their turn.
Can you believe it-they all learned to fly in two
days ? Such a thing had never been heard of
before; and you should have seen the hundreds of
birds who collected to see Moonbeam fly with her
nurslings.
Time went on, and the little birds were fast grow-
ing up. Moonbeam did not come to see them so
often now, so they consulted together to try and
find out where she lived. The next time she came
to the nest they all kept very close to her, and when
she said Goodbye," they flew high up in the air,
and kept their sharp eyes on their Fairy friend, and
saw her enter a large white water-lily, and presently
fall asleep.
In the morning Moonbeam awoke with a start,
she heard such sweet sounds; and there were all
her nurslings holding a morning concert in her
honour!



49



1)
















OLD PRICKLES.



I.
GOING HOME TO SUPPER.

THERE lived in Fairyland an old Hedgehog, called
Prickles, and a very clever animal he was. When
he was hungry, or when he thought it would be
wise to lay in a little store of food, he proceeded to
an orchard some little way from his home, where he
was sure to find plenty of apples on the ground.
Then he pushed two or three of them together, and
curling himself up into a ball, rolled over them, and
as his prickles stuck into them, he was able to carry
them off comfortably to his home. You never saw
a Hedgehog do that, but then you have not been
in Fairyland.
One afternoon Prickles had loaded himself with
"a couple of apples, and was carrying them home in
"a very contented state of mind, when he met Gobble
the Elf,
"Ha!" said Gobble, looking greedily at the



50











OLD PRICKLES.



I.

GOING HOME TO SUPPER.

"Prickles had loaded himself with a couple of apples, and was
carrying them home, when he met Gobble the Elf."



51











OLD PRICKLES.



apples-" Ha !" and he put his finger in his mouth
as if it were a piece of apple, but it did not satisfy
him.
Old Prickles felt alarmed; he thought that Ha !"
sounded queer, and he did not know what to make
of it.
Hm!" said Gobble.
Old Prickles liked that no better, and he began
to feel very uncomfortable; but when Gobble said
"Ho!" he thought he would try to pass quietly
behind him.
















1



53








OLD PRICKLES.



IT,
A ROBBERY.

BUT Gobble skipped behind poor old Prickles, and
began robbing him of his supper.
It was now old Prickles' turn to exclaim, which
he did by giving a shrill and distressed squeak.
It was of no use, however; Gobble got both the
apples, and then, thinking he would have some fun
before he eat them, he began to play at ball with
them.
Old Prickles had never had such mischief prac-
tised on him before, and at first he felt quite
bewildered. It made him giddy to see Gobble
tossing up the apples. What a shame to use good
food in that way!" he thought, and his heart swelled
with indignation.
But presently Gobble rolled an apple up to him,
and he thought, "Ah! he's not so greedy, after
all; he will give me half."
So old Prickles opened his mouth wide for a
good bite, when Gobble snatched the apple away,



54











OLD PRICKLES.



g---g -- ,'



II.



A ROBBERY.

"Gobble skipped behind poor old Prickles, and began
robbing him of his supper."



55












OLD PRICKLES.



and poor Prickles' mouth closed with such force
that every tooth in his head ached.
"Ho, ho!" laughed Gobble, "didn't you enjoy
it ?" and then he danced round poor old Prickles,
first putting one apple to his nose and then the
other, until he felt sick with longing for a piece.



57








OLD PRICKLES.



III.
SUPPERLESS.

POOR old Prickles looked miserable. His face said
as plainly as words, How can you treat me in this
cruel way ?"
But Gobble only made a face, and said, "You
won't have either of these beautiful apples, you
touchy old thing, because I want them both my-
self."
Old Prickles, however, did not mean to give them
up so easily, so he began running round and round
Gobble, trying each time to bite a piece out of one
of the apples.
Gobble at first thought this great fun; but after
a little while he began to get giddy, so he ran away,
rolling first one apple and then the other in front
of him.
But old Prickles rushed forward, and would have
got hold of one, only he went so quickly that he
tumbled on his head just as he was going to
snatch it.
Ho, ho!" laughed Gobble, "you did not quite



58













OLD PRICKLES.



III.

SUPPERLESS.

" Poor old Prickles looked miserable. His face said plainly, 'How
can you treat me in this cruel way?'"



59
















OLD PRICKLES.



manage to get it that time, Mr. Prickles! Now,
try again ;" then Gobble held an apple high in the
air, and old Prickles looked at it in despair.
Now, you shall see them both quite close, with
their pretty red sides near your mouth," But
Prickles came too close, and Gobble started back
in a hurry.



6r









OLD PRICKLES.



IV.
A FALL.

DOWN went Gobble with a great bump, and the
apples slipped out of his hands. Then, before he
had time to get up, he felt pricks on his toes, and
then on his knees, chest, and neck. What could
it mean ? He tried to push old Prickles off, but
he only hurt his hands dreadfully.
Oh, oh !" he called, but no one answered. Ho,
ho!" he screamed, but no one seemed to hear.
Suddenly he found that he was not only being
pricked, but that he was also being carried on the
pricks high up in the air.
To think of having such a ride, and being taken
off without his leave or consent!
Pray, Mr. Prickles, put down your pricks,"' said
Gobble, in as gentle a voice as he could assume;
" I would gladly attend you on foot, but to be stuck
through with bristles will not make me an agreeable
companion, and I shall be obliged to scream the
whole way."
But this grand speech had no effect on Prickles,


62









OLD PRICKLES.



IV.

A FALL.



Gobble with a great bump, and the apples slipped
out of his hands."



63



" Down went












OLD PRICKLES.



for he did not quite understand the Elf language;
he only knew that he had succeeded in making his
enemy very uncomfortable, and that he had won
his supper back again, and I think he felt that he
had fought well and cleverly, but he could not have
said this to save his life.



65



E









OLD PRICKLES.



V.

A RIDE.

FOR a little while Gobble lay quite still, and did not
attempt to move. But the pain of the pricks got
worse and worse, so he looked up to see if there
were not some kind Elf who would help him in his
sore distress.
He could see no one; and he was turning his
head to look on the other side, when he saw six
pretty little Beetles, which he had stuck on thorns,
all lying dead on the grass.
"Oh dear! oh dear !" he thought, if I had only
known what it felt like to be pricked, I should not
have treated those Beetles in that way, and thought
it such fun to see them wriggle about."
Then, to his delight, he heard the joyful singing
of two little Elves, and he knew their voices quite
well; they were Humming-bird and Harebell, out
for some fun.
Gobble raised his head as far as he could, and
cried, Ho, ho, there! brave little Elves, please
help me, your friend, you know! Ho, ho!"



66











OLD PRICKLES.



V.

A RIDE.



" For a little while Gobble lay still, and did not attempt to move;
but the pain of the pricks got worse and worse."





67



IMF-- C7












OLD PRICKLES.



But they were so happy singing away that they
did not hear; and old Prickles soon left them far
behind.
How can people sing, I wonder ?" thought
Gobble; "if I am ever king of the Elves, I shall
forbid singing for ever."
And then poor Gobble began screaming again,
and it was not nearly so pretty to hear as the
singing; so the birds flew away frightened, and
there was no creature near to hear the sad, sad
cries.



69









OLD PRICKLES.



VI.
THE LAST OF GOBBLE.

PRESENTLY old Prickles began making a low grunt-
ing sound, and if you could have seen his face you
would have thought that he was getting towards
the end of his journey, for he looked so eager and
bright. Gobble seemed to think the same, for he
began trying to get off the Hedgehog's back, but
he soon found that his efforts were quite useless.
The pricks held him fast, and it was quite impos-
sible to release himself. He could even feel one
of the apples, and yet he could not have taken
hold of it if he had been starving. He was so
dreadfully frightened, however, that he determined
to do something; and as he had heard that animals
were soothed and pleased with gentle tones, he put
on the sweetest voice he could, and said-
Dear old Prickles, do take a little rest, and let
me go; you cannot eat me-at least I hope not," he
thought-" and though your back is very handsome,
it is not a pleasant couch. Oh! do take a short
nap, my friend."



70













OLD PRICKLES.



-. --~- s

s- -~ -- -:- ~--~



VI.

THE LAST OF GOBBLE.



"When they came to the bottom of the hill, old Prickles had reached

his hole-and Gobble was never heard of again."



71



----clC7



I












OLD PRICKLES.



But old Prickles trudged on his way, and took
no notice of Gobble's most earnest tones; and as he
soon began ascending a little hill, poor Gobble could
s e the pretty Elf-land spread out before him, and
all the mischief he had done there came into his
mind-for, truth to tell, he had done little else all
his life, and now-
Yes,-now, alas! they were descending the little
hill, and old Prickles started forward with such
grunts of triumph that Gobble lost all hope; and
well he might, for when they came to the bottom,
old Prickles had reached his hole-and Gobble was
never heard of again!



73
















BLOB, THE SPIDER.



I.
ROSYWING.

ROSYWING was considered a beauty by all the other
Elves who were not jealous of her. She certainly
was lovely, and her complexion was the most deli-
cate pink, just the colour of a blush rose.
Few Elves had such a lovely home as Rosywing,
for she lived in the heart of a sweet-scented pink
rose, and here she delighted to have all her friends
to see her; and as she was kind to all creeping and
flying creatures, they were always glad to come
about her.
Every morning she had a bath in the dew, which
hung in beautiful bright- drops on the leaves of her
house, and was sweeter and fresher than any rose-
water. Then when the sun was overhead she could
hide herself from his heat down in the cool hollow
of her rose; and there, on little delicate stalks, grew
the rich golden powder which was her food.



74











BLOB, THE SPIDER.



1 .--





I.

ROSYWING.

"She lived in a sweet-scented pink rose; and as she was
kind to all creeping and flying creatures, they were always glad to
come about her."



75











BLOB, THE SPIDER,



But in the soft cool evenings she used to come
out and enjoy the sweet air, and then she might
have been seen sitting on her rose, with all her
friends round her. Sometimes a great Peacock
butterfly would come and put his head under her
arm, and a splendid Swallowtail would alight on the
other side, and lay his head upon her lap. The
bees would bring her honey, and the little rose-
beetles would come to be patted; and she would
stroke the wings of the moths so gently that not a
speck of their delicate brown dust was rubbed off.



77








BLOB, THE SPIDER.



II.
A CARRIAGE-AND-FOUR.

ONE day Rosywing was feeling rather dull, for it
had been a very wet day, and she was quite tired
of sitting in the smallest and closest parlour of the
rose, where she could not get much air.
What was her delight, then, when the sun came
out, and she heard a noise which told her some of
her friends were outside the rose. She quickly came
out, and what were her surprise and delight when a
yellow butterfly and a brown moth conducted her
to the most lovely carriage-and-four that ever was
seen.
It was a present from her friends,-a flying car,
made of a sweet-pea blossom, supported by a bal-
loon of thistle-down, and drawn by four humming-
bird hawk-moths.
She was quickly placed in this delightful carriage,
and away she went at a tremendous pace, over flower
tops and grass plots, corn fields and hedges, and
even over a brook, which was called by the Fairies
the Ocean.



78









BLOB, THE SPIDER.



I- .pi ~ A h..
-' .~ .'%I .5f:4'6hikdl i ,



II.



A CARRIAGE-AND-FOUR.

"A flying car, made of a sweet-pea blossom, supported by a
balloon of thistle-down, and drawn by four moths."



79











BLOB, THE SPIDER.



Every day Rosywing went out driving, sometimes
one way and sometimes another, but always going
at a tremendous pace; for you know love flies fast,
and the hawk-moths loved Rosywing more than I
can tell you, and they are the fastest flyers of all the
moths. Nothing could keep up with them, not even
the bees or the flies.



81 F








BLOB, THE SPIDER.



III.
AN ENEMY.

THERE was not a happier Fairy to be found than
Rosywing, and none had friends more devoted and
true.
But, alas! an enemy had already entered the
peaceful valley, and who could tell what ravages he
might make among Rosywing's dear friends ?
Old Blob, the great Spider, had arrived, and was
beginning to spin his web, while several beetles and
butterflies gathered round to see what was going on.
One little white Butterfly got so frightened that she
was taken with a trembling fit, and was obliged to
be carried away by her friends. They were all in
such alarm about her that they left off watching
Blob, and took her to the good little Fairy Rosy-
wing, to ask what they could do. But Rosywing
was out, so they laid the poor white Butterfly in the
largest parlour of the rose, and gradually brought
her round with rose-water and soothing words.
The poor little Butterfly went to sleep at last, but
still she kept saying, "Oh, those dreadful eyes!"










BLOB, THE SPIDER.



III.



AN ENEMY.



"Blob was beginning to spin his web, while several beetles and
butterflies gathered round to see what was going on."



83












BLOB, THE SPIDER.



even in her sleep. This so kept up the alarm of
her friends that they would not leave her, although
some of them had a very strong desire to see those
dreadful eyes again.
But, fortunately for themselves, their love was
stronger than their curiosity, or even on that first
day Blob might have done some dreadful mischief.



85









BLOB, THE SPIDER.



A WARNING.

AT last Rosywing arrived; but there was such a
buzz of wings and tongues, that it was some time
before she could get the rights of the story her
friends had to tell.
When she did understand it, she looked very
serious. But, first of all," she said, I must go
and get some dandelion-water for poor little Tiny-
wing, or she may have a nervous fluttering; but all
of you remain here, and do not, on any account, go
near that dreadful monster, Blob."
At these words the friends trembled in every
wing, and most of them crept into the various par-
lours of the rose, so that when Rosywing returned
she found her house quite full.
With care and skill Tinywing was quite well in
the morning; and then Rosywing told the oldest
and most experienced of her friends that she wished
them to go and summon all her flying and creeping
friends to meet her in half an hour, and not to go
near Blob's web until she had spoken to them.











BLOB, THE SPIDER.



pi-



IV.



A WARNING.

"Putting up her hand gently, she warned them
that if they even touched Blob's web, they would find themselves
caught and held fast."



87











BLOB, THE SPIDER.



89



So there was soon quite a gathering of every kind
of insect that could pretend to fly or creep; and when
Rosywing arrived there was a flutter of expectation,
and a general buzz, buzz, so that for a minute she
could not be heard.
But then, putting up her hand gently, she warned
them that if they even touched Blob's web they
would find themselves caught and held fast, and
then the great Spider would seize them, and bind
them wing and foot till they could not stir; and
then he would suck the life out of them. So she
begged them to be prudent, and not to venture
near.
At which all the assembly rose, and thanked Rosy-
wing for her kindness, and even did her the honour
of taking her advice.









BLOB, THE SPIDER.







V.
CAUGHT ASLEEP.

Now old Blob was a very clever fellow, and when
day after day passed, and not one little creature
came to be caught in his net, he felt quite sure that
some one had been telling the truth about him, and
finding out that it was Rosywing, he determined
to be revenged. But this was not easy, for every-
body loved and protected her.
Little did Rosywing suspect how old Blob fol-
lowed her about, often taking most troublesome
journeys, in hopes of catching her asleep.
For a long time he was unsuccessful, but at last
he found her lying in a cool mossy hollow, in the
trunk of a great tree, with a lazy lackey Moth keep-
ing guard while she slept. He soon strangled the
unfortunate Moth, and then swiftly and silently he
began spinning his dreadful web round and round
her, until poor little Rosywing was a fast prisoner.
There she lay calmly sleeping, little thinking she
had fallen herself in the claws of Blob. Gradually
the sad news got about, and her friends came, one



90









BLOB, THE SPIDER.



z 410- O ,




-1A1



V.



CAUGHT ASLEEP.

"He soon strangled the unfortunate Moth,
and then swiftly and silently he began spinning his dreadful web
round and round her."



91












BLOB, THE SPIDER.



by one, to see her; but they dared not come near
Blob, and did not know what to do.
The only way in which they could relieve their
feelings was in abusing the poor strangled little
Moth, who had been too sleepy to give warning.








BLOB, THE SPIDER.



V\ I.
PERKS, THE WOODPECKER.

PRESENTLY Rosywing awoke, and looked at Blob.
She did not say a word, for she knew that was
useless, but she began singing a pretty little song.
"Yes, sing away," thought Blob, "sing away; you
won't break my web, if you sing till you're tired ?"
And Rosywing seemed to know what his thoughts
were from his great, great wicked eyes; but she
began another song, and then another.
She had not finished the third song, when Perks,
the Woodpecker, hearing her voice, put his head
into the hollow. One snap of his beak was enough;
he swallowed Blob at a mouthful, tore his web to
pieces, and set Rosywing free.
There was a great feast that night at the rose;
the bees brought honey enough for all, the air was
sweet and warm, the moon shone brightly. Every
parlour was full; and Rosywing would never have
known how many friends she had, if it had not
been for old Blob.



94











BLOB, THE SPIDER.



VI.

PERKS, THE WOODPECKER.



" One snap of his beak was enough; he swallowed Blob at a mouthful,
tore his web to pieces, and set Rosywing free."



95



i

















































































/
_ I/







- ----________----- ----- _______ .f.



; ---------- ---
II



":


I





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