• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 The Old Woman and Her Pig
 Old Mother Hubbard
 The House That Jack Built
 The Courtship and Marriage of Cock...
 The Death and Burial of Poor Cock...
 Jack the Giant-Killer
 Little Red Riding-Hood
 Tom Thumb
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Old stories for young folks ...
Title: Old stories for young folks
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047782/00001
 Material Information
Title: Old stories for young folks
Uniform Title: Little Red Riding Hood
The History of Tom Thumb
Alternate Title: The Old woman and her pig
Old Mother Hubbard
The Courtship and marriage of Cock Robin and Jenny Wren
The House that Jack built
Death and burial of poor Cock Robin
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Brothers
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1879
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Picture books for children   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1879   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1879   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1879   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with 72 illustrations printed in colors.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00047782
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002235106
notis - ALH5548
oclc - 61514764

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    The Old Woman and Her Pig
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Old Mother Hubbard
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 1page 14
    The House That Jack Built
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The Courtship and Marriage of Cock Robin and Jenny Wren
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The Death and Burial of Poor Cock Robin
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Jack the Giant-Killer
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Little Red Riding-Hood
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Tom Thumb
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Back Cover
        Cover 3
        Cover 4
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text










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YOUNGFOLKS








































The Baldwin Library
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OLD STORIES
FO 0


Y UN ( FOLKS,
COMPRISING
The Old IWomian and Her Pig.
Old Mother Hubbard.
The IHouse utha Jack Built.
The Cour/tsjl and A[irridage of Cock
Robinz and h'zenny iwrn.
Death and Buridal of Poor Cock Robizn.
Jack the Gianti-Killer.
Little Red RXidb'i-lfood.
The History of Toni Thumb.
WITH 72 ILLUSTRATIONS, PRINTED IN COLORS,


McLOUGIILIN BROTIIERS, NEW YORK.







THE OLD WOMAN
AND

HER PIG.


AN old woman was sweeping her house, and she found
a silver sixpence. What," said she, shall I do with
this little sixpence? I will go to market, and buy a pig."
She went to market and bought a nice little pig, and, as
she was coming home, she came to a stile; the piggy,
however, was obstinate, and would not go over the stile.
The old Dame saw a little dog.
So she said to the dog-
Good dog, bite pig;
Piggy won't go over the stile ;
And I shan't get home to-night."
But the dog would not.
She went a little further, and she met a stick.
So she said-
Good stick, beat dog;
Dog won't bite pig ;
Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."
But the stick would not.



































T I













THE OLD WOMAN BUYING HER PIG AT MARKET.





THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.












K-.






PIGGY TURNS OBSTINATE.

She went a little further, and she met a fire.
So she said-
Fire, fire, burn stick ;
Stick won't beat dog ;
Dog won't bite pig,
Piggy won't get over the stile ;
And I shan't get home to-night."
But the fire would not.
She went a little further, and she met some water.






THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.

So she said-
Water, water, quench fire;
Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog;
Dog won't bite pig;
Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."
But the water would not.
She went a little further, and she met an ox.
So she said-
Ox, ox, drink water ;
Water won't quench fire;
Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog;
Dog won't bite pig ;
Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."
But the ox would not.
She went a little further, and she met a butcher.
So she said-
Butcher, butcher, kill ox;
Ox won't drink water ;
Water won't quench fire;
Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog ;






TIHE OLD WOMAN AND HER FIG.





















F FRE URN STICK.
,. F

.,i























"L'IiE, F nuE, BURN STICK."





THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.





































"BUTCHER, BUTCHER, KILL Ox."






THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.

Dog won't bite pig;
Piggy won't get over the stile :
And I shan't get home to-night."
But the butcher would not.
She went a little further, and she met a rope.
So she said-
Rope, rope, hang butcher;
Butcher won't kill ox
Ox won't drink water ;
Water won't quench fire ;
Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog ;
Dog won't bite pig ;
Piggy won't get over the stile ;
And I shan't get home to-night."
But the rope would not.
She went a little further, and she met a rat.
So she said-
Rat, rat, gnaw rope ;
Rope won't hang butcher ;
Butcher won't kill ox ;
Ox won't drink water ;
"Water won't quench fire
Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog ;






THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.





































" RAT. RAT, GNAW ROPE.
" RAT, RAT, (5AW ROPE."






TIlE OLD WOMAN ANT) HER PIG,











"I. CER




ii:
























"LCOW, CowT, G~IVE ME A SAhUCERn OF M\ILK."






THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.

Dog won't bite pig ;
Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."
But the rat would not.
She went a little further, and she met a cat.
So she said-
Cat, cat, kill rat ;
Rat won't gnaw rope;
Rope won't hang butcher;
Butcher won't kill ox ;
Ox won't drink water ;
Water won't quench fire;
Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog ;
Dog won't bite pig ;
Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."
But the cat said to her, If you will go to yonder
cow, and fetch me a saucer of milk, I will kill the rat."
So away went the old women to the cow, and said-
Cow, cow, give me a saucer of milk;
Cat won't kill rat ;
Rat won't gnaw rope;
Rope won't hang butcher,
Butcher won't kill ox ;






THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.

Ox won't drink water ;
Water won't quench fire ;
Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog;
Dog won't bite pig ;
Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."
But the cow said to her, If you will go to yonder
haymakers, and fetch me a wisp of hay, I'll give you
the milk."
So away the old woman went to the haymakers, and
said-
Haymakers, give me a wisp of hay ;
Cow won't give me milk ;
Cat won't kill rat ;
Rat won't gnaw rope;
Rope won't hang butcher;
Butcher won't kill ox ;
Ox won't drink water ;
Water won't quench fire;
Fire won't burn stick;
Stick won't beat dog ;
Dog won't bite pig ;
Piggy won't get over the stile;
And I shan't get home to-night."
But the haymakers said to her, If you will go to







THE OLD WOMAN AND IER PIGo






































" IIAYMAKEiS, GIVE ME A WVISP OF HAY.'






THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.


































"T1E C








" THE CAT BEGAN TO KILL TIIE RAT."






TTIE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.

yonder stream, and fetch us a bucket of water, we'll give
you the hay."
"So away the old woman went, but when she got to
the stream, she found the bucket was full of holes. So
she covered the bottom with pebbles, and then filled the
bucket with water, and away she went back with it to
the haymakers ; and they gave her a wisp of hay.
As soon as the cow had eaten the hay, she gave the
old woman the milk ; and away she went with it in a
saucer to the cat.
As soon as the cat had lapped up the milk-
The cat began to kill the rat;
The rat began to gnaw the rope;
The rope began to hang the butcher;
The butcher began to kill the ox;
The ox began to drink the water ;
The water began to quench the fire;
The fire began to burn the stick;
The stick began to beat the dog;
The dog began to bite the pig ;
The little pig in a fright jumped over the stile;
And so the old woman got home that night.










OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.






OLD Mother Hubbard
Went to the cupboard
To get her poor Dog a bone;
But when she came there
The cupboard was bare,
And so the poor Dog had none.









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OLD M EIA W TT C
'K'.r























OLD) OTHER hIUBBARD -WEZNT TO TIE CUP'BOARD.





OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.













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OLD MOTHER IUBBARD.




She went to the baker's
To buy him some bread,
But when she came back
She thought he was dead.




She went to the joiner's,
To buy him a coffin,
But when she came back
The sly dog was laughing.





OLD MOTHER I1UBBARD.




She took a clean dish,
To get him some tripe,
But when she came back
He was smoking his pipe.




She went to the ale-house,
To get him some beer,
But when she came back
The dog sat in a chair.








OLD MOTHER IIUBBARD.


















LA.-
I ~i~II














~$~slCB~ j~ss~q~~g -~ -~--~-~-






OLD MOTHER HIUBBARD.









Ylr N' iit \%ll e mill rl I ,




ll I,, 1,u l l :1 I t hat ;,
lt wIihtrn lhe came. Lack

HE v.i. I-EIDJINt THi E ..





OLD MOTHER IIUBBARD.





AM


















s ie- w s p l in ti 1 il'-u.
l -( sh C:i. :l I
-He was playing a flute.
He wmas playing flute.







OLD MOTHER IUBBARD.





OLD MOTHER IUBBARD.




She went to the tailor's,
To buy him a coat,
But when she came back
He was riding a goat.




She went to the cobbler's,
To buy him some shoes.
But when she came back
He was reading the news





OLD MOTHER IIUBBARD.





She went to the sempstress,
To buy him some linen,
But when she came back
The dog was spinning.




She went to the hosier's,
To buy him some hose,
But when she came back
He was dresl'd in his clothes.





OLD MOTHER IIUBBARD.

S' i r ~ -


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=i-!,_-l L r r --



























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OLD MOTHER IIUBBARD.


The Dame nmile a curtsey,
The Dog made a bow;
The Dame said "Your servant,"
The Dog said "Bow wow!"

This wonderful Dog
Was Dame Hubbard's delight;
He could sing, lie could dance,
IIe could read, le could write.

She gave him rich dainlties
Whenever he fed,
And erected a monument
When he was dead.

















































THIS IS THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.





























__1 IS^ i'hL LA'I MHATl X IR L
' H1111 I. iHIL 1'A1 IL' A11.LD IIL AlL T.

















'li-is 1i s -L '.I i 'iH.\l IiLED tE IlIT





THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.


This is the MALT
That lay in the house
That Jack built.


This is the RAT,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house
That Jack built.


This is the CAT,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house
That Jack built.





THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.

This is the DoG,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house
That Jack built.



This is the Cow,
With the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house
That Jack built.

























iHI-S HE 1 1 H 1: 1 I 'I .H 1i .






THIS IS THE COW WITH THE CRUMPLED HORN














THIS IS THE COW WITH THE CRUMPLED HORN.





THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.



















This is the MAIDEX all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn.
That toss'd the dog, that worried the cat,
That killed the rat, that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.






THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.


















This is the MIA
All tattered and torn,
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow
With the crumpled horn,






THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.



That tossed the dog,

That wolried the cat,

That kilFd the rat,

That ate the nmalt,

That lay in the house that Jack built




"V*
rht '1

.

.. .... '





THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.



This is the PRIEST
All shaven and shorn,
That married the man
All tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow
With the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.





THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.



This is the COCK
That crowd in the morn,
That waked the priest
All shaven and shorn,
That married the man
All tatter'd and torn,
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn,
That mnilk'd the cow

With the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,






THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.





















That ate the malt,

That lay in the house

That Jack built.







THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.












































THIS IS THE FARMER WHO SOW'D THE CORN.





THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.

This is the FARMER
Who sow'd the corn,
That kept the cock
That crowd in the morn,
That waked the priest
All shaven and shorn,
That married the man
All tattered and torn,
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow
With the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt,
That lay in the house that Jack built.






THE
COURTSHIP AND MARRIAGE
OF
COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.

IT was on a merry time,
When Jenny Wren was young,
So neatly as she danced,
And so sweetly as she sung,-
Robin Redbreast lost his heart:
He was a gallant bird;
He doff'd his hat to Jenny,
And thus to her he said:
"My dearest Jenny Wren,
If you will but be mine,
You shall dine on cherry pie,
And drink nice currant wine.
"I'll dress you like a Goldfinch,
Or like a Peacock gay;
So if you'll have me, Jenny,
Let us appoint the day."



















































oTENNY PL{T~qtI I) B'EIIIN) TIER FAN.






THE COURTSHIP AND MARRIAGE OF




















ROBIN'S COURTSHIP.

Jenny blush'd behind her fan,
And thus declared her mind:
" Then let it be to-morrow, Bob,
I take your offer kind;






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.

"Cherry-pie is very good,
So is currant wine,
But I'll wear my russet gown,
And never dress too fine."
Robin rose up early,
Before the break of day;
He flew to Jenny Wren's house,
To sing a roundelay.
He met the Cock and Hen,
And bade the Cock declare,
This was his wedding day,
With Jenny Wren the fair.
The Cock then blew his horn,
To let the neighbors know
This was Robin's wedding day,
And they might see the show.
And first came Parson Rook,
With his spectacles and band;
And one of Mother Hubbard's books
He held within his hand.






THE COURTSHIP AND MARRIAGE OF

Then followed him the Lark,
For he could sweetly sing,
And he was to be the clerk
At Cock Robin's wedding.
He sung of Robin's love
For little Jenny Wren;
And when he came unto the end,
Then he began again.
The Goldfinch came on next,
To give away the bride;
The Linnet, being bridesmaid,
Walk'd by Jenny's side;
And as she was a-walking,
Said, "Upon my word,
I think that your Cock Robin
Is a very pretty bird."
The Blackbird and the Thrush,
And charming Nightingale,
Whose soft "jug" sweetly echoes
Through every grove and dale;






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.



















PARSON ROOK.

The Sparrow and Tom-Tit,
And many more, were there;
All came to see the wedding
Of Jemmy Wren, the fair.






THE COURTSHIP AND MARRIAGE OF




















GOING TO THE WEDDING.

The Bullfinch walked by Robin,
And thus to him did say,
"Pray mnark, friend Robin Redbreast,
That Goldfinch dress'd so gay;






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.

"What though her gay apparel
Becomes her very well,
Yet Jenny's modest dress and look
Must bear away the bell."
Then came the bride and bridegroom;
Quite plainly was she dress'd,
And blush'd so much, her cheeks were
As red as Robin's breast.
But Robin cheer'd her up;
"My pretty Jen," said he,
"We 're going to be married,
And happy we shall be."
"Oh, then," says Parson Rook,
"Who gives this maid away?"
"I do," says the Goldfinch,
"And her fortune I will pay:
"Here's a bag of grain of many sorts,
And other things beside:
Now happy be the bridegroom,
And happy be the bride!"






THE COURTSHIP AND MARRIAGE OF

"And will you have her, Robin,
To be your wedded wife ?"
"Yes, I will," says Robin,
"And love her all my life!"
"And you will have him, Jenny,
Your husband now to be?"
"Yes, I will," says Jenny,
"And love him heartily!"
Then on her finger fair
Cock Robin put the ring;
"You're married now," says Parson Rook,
While the Lark aloud did sing:
"Happy be the bridegroom,
And happy be the bride!
And may not man, nor bird, nor beast,
This happy pair divide!"
The birds were ask'd to dine-
Not Jenny's friends alone,
But every pretty songster
That had Cock Robin known.






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.




















THE WEDDING.

They had a cherry pie,
Besides some currant wine,
And every guest brought something,
That sumptuous they might dine.






THE COURTSHIP AND MARRIAGE OF



















THE CONCERT.

Now they all it. or stood,
To eat and to drink;
And every one said what
lie happened to think.






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN

They each took a bumper,
And drank to the pair,
Cock Robin the Bridegroom,
And Jenny the fair.
The dinner things removed,
They all began to sing;
And soon they made the place
Near a mile around to ring.
The concert it was fine,
And every bird tried
Who best should sing for Robin,
And Jenny Wren the bride.
When in came the Cuckoo,
And made a great rout;
He caught hold of Jenny,
And pulled her about.
Cock Robin was angry,
And so was the Sparrow,
Who fetch'd in a hurry
His bow and his arrow.






THE COURTSHIP AND MARRIAGE OF



















THE DEATH OF COCK ROBIN.


His aim then he took,
But he took it not right;
His skill wva.s not good,
Or he shot in a fright;






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.








j- ii










Alas poor Cock Robin!

For the Cuckoo he miss'd,
But Cock Robin he killed !-
And all the birds mourn'd
That his blood was so spill'd.







THE

DEATH AND BURIAL
OF
POOR COCK ROBIN

WHO killed COCK ROBIN ?
I, said the Sparrow,
With my bow and arrow,
I killed Cock Robin.
This is the SPARROW,
With his bow and arrow.

Who saw him die?
I, said the Fly,
With my little eye,
I saw him die.
This is the little FLY,
Who saw Cock Robin die.





























WHO KILLED .'i k ROBIN ? I, SAID THE SPARROW.




















WHO SAW HIM DIE ? I, SAID THE FLY
































WHO CAUGHT HIS BLOOD ? I, SAID THE FITSH.


















WHO'LL MAKE HIS -II:1;.UD? I, SAID THE BEETLE.






THE DEATH AND BURIAL OF


Who caught his blood ?
I, said the Fish,
With my little dish,
I caught his blood.

This is the FIsn,
That held the dish.




Who'll make his shroud ?
I, said the Beetle,
With my thread and needle,
I'll make his shroud.

This is the BEETLE,
With his thread and needle.







POOR COCK ROBIN.


Who'll dig his grave ?
I, said the Owl,
With my spade and show'l,
I'll dig his grave.

This is the OwL,
With his spade and show'].




Who'll be the Parson ?
I, said the Rook,
With my little book,
I'll be the Parson.

This is the ROOK,
Reading his book.
























\ Tvii'A. l' I'i' "i -\' \vF 1 -AIl' JiLE "\\L.






















",E I .r I i' TH ,' : I' lK






THE DEATH AND BURIAL OF
















Who'll carry him to the grave ?
I, said the Kite,
If it's not in the night,
I'll carry him to the grave.
This is the KITE,
In the air in full flight.






POOR COCK ROBIN.






.-










Who'll be the Clerk ?
I, said the Lark,
If it's not in the clrk,
I'll be the Clerk.

This is the LARK,
Saying Amen," like a clerk.



























xI, ,|.T. i'. Yr TIl TLINKI ? I, SAID THE LINNET.





















WHO'LL BE CHIEF MOI';NL,1 I, SAID THE DOVE,







THE DEATH AND BURIAL OF


Who'll carry the link ?
I, said the Linnet,
I'll fetch it in a minute,
I'll carry the link.

This is the LINNET,
And a link with fire in it




Who'll be chief mourner ?
I, said the Dove,
For I mourn for my love,
I'll be chief mourner.

This is the DOVE,
Who Cock Robin did love.






















Who'll sing a psalm ?
I, said the Thrush,
As she sat in a bush,
I'll sing a psalm.
This is the TIHRUH,
Singing psalms from a bush.








THE DEATH AND BURIAL OF







.






POOR COCK ROBIN.


Who'll toll the bell?
I, said the Bull,
Because I can pull;
So, Cock Robin, farewell.

This is the BULL,
Who the Bell-rope did pull.




All the birds of the air
Fell a-sighing and sobbin'
When they heard the bell toll
For poor Cock Robin.











JACK THE GIANT-KILLER.




I DARE say you have heard of King Arthur, or, as some call him,
Prince Arthur, and his wife Genevra, who reigned in Britain many
hundred years ago-being long before the time of the good King
Alfred. I am going to tell you a wonderful and remarkable story,
not about King Arthur, but about a marvellous -person who lived
in his time, and who did some very brave actions. His name was
Jack.
This Jack was the son of a poor farmer who lived in Cornwall, near
the Land's-end. Jack was always a bold, fearless boy. He, feared
neither heat nor cold, could climb a steep mountain, or plunge into a
deep stream; and he delighted to hear his father's stories about the
brave Knights of the Round Table, and of all their valiant deeds.
From constantly hearing of such things, Jack got to take a great
interest in all that related to combats, victories, and battles. And the
more he heard, the more anxious did he feel to find some enemy
against whom he could fight; for he never doubted that his skill and
courage would give him the victory in every encounter.
Now there were several great giants in England and Wales at the
time of which I write ; and against these giants Jack resolved to try
his strength and skill. He could scarcely have chosen more fitting
enemies; for the giants were hated and feared by everybody, with
good reason. If there was one giant, whose absence all Jack's neigh-
bors particularly desired, and whom they were especially sorry to see
when he called in upon them, that giant was the one named Cormoran
(also called Cormorant from his great and voracious appetite.)
This cruel monster lived on St. Michael's Mount, a high hill that
rises out of the sea near the coast of Cornwall. He was eighteen feet
high and nine feet round. He had a very ugly face, and a hugh
mouth with pointed teeth like those of a saw.
He used to come out of the cave in which he dwelt on the very top
of the mountain, and walk through the sea when the tide was low,
right into Cornwall; and the people who lived there used to take care





















I





















CORMIORAN IN THE PIT.
that he did not find them at home when he called. However, he did
not have his walk for nothing, for he carried off their cattle a dozen
at a time, slinging them on a pole across his shoulder, as a man might
sling a dozen rabbits.
When he got tired of eating beef, he would vary his diet by coming
and stealing three or four dozen sheep and hogs, that he might have










TT,


11



























BLUNDERBORE AND FRIEND HANGING.
a dish of pork and mutton ; and these animals he would string round
his waist and carry off-the sheep bleating and the pigs squealing-
to the great annoyance of the owners, who watched him at a distance
and did not dare to interfere. For the giant had a big club which he
used as a walking-stick, and it had spikes at one end. And he had
been heard to say-that all those whom he did not knock down dead







4 JACK THE GIANT -KILLER.

with the thick end of his club, he would spit, like so many larks, on
the spike at the other end ; so the people were very shy of coming
within reach of either end of the giant's club.
But there was one youngster who declared he would serve out
Master Cormoran in one way or another ; and this youngster was our
friend Jack. This is the way he made good his promise :
'*One winter's evening, when it was already growing dark, he swam
from the Cornish coast to St. Michael's Mount, pushing before him a
kind of raft on which were a pickaxe, a shovel, and a dark lantern.
It was quite dark by the time he got to the mount; but in the
giant's cave there was a light, and Jack could see Cormoran, who had
just finished his supper, picking his teeth with a fence-rail. All night
long Jack worked busily and silently by the light of his dark lantern,
digging a deep pit before the giant's dwelling. By the time the
morning dawned, he had made a great hole, many feet deep, and
very broad. He covered this pit-hole with sticks and straw, and
strewed earth and sand hghtly over the top, so that it looked just like
solid ground. Then he stepped back a few paces, took a trumpet that
hung at the gate, and blew a loud blast as a challenge to the giant to
come out ard fight him. Cormoran woke up from his sleep with a
start ; he was in a great rage, sure, when he saw What a little fellow
was standing outside defying him. You saucy villain he roared
out; wait a moment, and I'll broil you for my breakfast "
With this agreeable speech he turned back into the cave to get the
neat walking-stick I have told you of; and having armed himself
with this weapon, he came rushing out, intending to give Jack a
taste-first of the thick end, and then of the spike at the other end.
But the pit was in his way. The giant came tramping over it with
his great heavy feet, and-" crack I "-in he went, right up to his
neckl and stood there, roaring with rage, with only his great head
above the surface of the ground.
Aha, Master Cormoran," cried Jack, "what say you now-will
nothing serve you for your breakfast this cold morning but broiling
poor me? "
The giant was more enraged than ever; and he made such a mightty
effort to get out of the pit, that the stones and rubish came rolling
down into the hole. Jack saw there was no time to be lost. He
raised his pick-axe, struck Cormoran one blow on the head with it,
and the cruel giant dropped down dead in a moment.
Jack returned in triumph to Cornwall; and when the people heard







JACK THE GIANT-KILLER. 5


of their enemy's death, they were very joyful; and the justices and
great squires of Cornwall declared, that from henceforth, the valiant
youth should be called JACK THE GIANT-KILLER ; and as a further
reward they presented him with a handsome sword, and a belt, on
which stood in letters of gold, the words :
THIS IS THE VALIANT CORNISH MAN
"WHO SLEW THE GIANT CORMORAN!
This was all very well; but one piece of work often brings on
another. Jack soon found that his title of "Giant-Killer" brought
some danger along with it, as well as a good deal of praise and
honor; and a very few weeks after Cormoran's death he found he
would have to sustain new combats.

























JACK AND THE PIIISONER.







6 JACK THE GIANT-KILLER.


Above all, there was a great ugly giant, who lived among the
mountains of Wales. This giant had been a friend of Cormoran's,
and had often been invited by that personage to dine with him off
an ox or half-a-dozen sheep. When he heard of Cormoran's death he
was very angry, and vowed vengeance against Jack.
Now it happened that Jack took a journey into Wales ; and one
(ay, as he was traveling through a wood, he sat down beside a foun-
tain to rest. The day was hot ; and Jack, overcome by fatigue,
quickly fell asleep beside the fountain. As he lay there, who should
come by but old Blunderbore, (this was the giant's name). The
giant saw by the inscription on Jack's belt who and what he was.
"Aha,'" he chuckled, "have I caught you, my valiant Cornish man?
Now you shall pay for your tricks," and he hoisted Jack up on his
shoulder and began to stride towards his castle as fast as he could.
The jolting walk of the giant soon woke Jack out of his sleep, and lie
was very much alarmed when he found himself in Blunderbore's
clutches.
Blunderbore seemed to enjoy Jack's fright very much ; and told him
with a hideous grin that his favorite food was a man's heart eaten
with salt and pepper; and showed pretty plainly that he intended
heartily to enjoy Jack's heart within a very short time. Blunderbore
said he did not care to eat such a nice meal as the Giant-Killer would
be, all by himself. He had one or two giant friends who used to
come to supper with him. One of these old Blunderbore invited to
spend the day with him that he might brag of having captured the
famous hero, who slew their lamented friend Cormoran.
Jack paced to and fro in the room in which he was confined for
some time in great perplexity, and at last ran to the window to see
if he could leap out. It was too high for him to think of such a
thing ; and-oh, horror!-there were the two giants coming along
arm-in-arm.
Jack cast a glance around the room, in- a far-off corner of which
he espied two stout cords. To seize them, make a running noose
in the end of each, and twist them firmly together, was the work
of a moment ; and just as the giants were entering the gate of the
castle, he cleverly dropped a noose over the head of each. The
other end was passed over a beam of the ceiling, and Jack pulled
and hauled with all his might; in short, he pulled with such a will
that the giants were very soon black in the face. When Jack
found the giants were half strangled by the cords, he got out of the







JACK THE GIANT--KILLER. 7

window, and sliding down the rope, drew his sword and killed them
both.
Jack lost no time in getting the giant's key and setting all the
captives free; and he gave them the castle and all it contained as
a reward for their sufferings; and bidding them a polite good-bye,
pursued his journey.
He walked on sturdily till the night came, by which time he had
reached a large and handsome house, which looked very inviting
to a weary traveler, who had walked many miles, after killing two
giants.' He knocked at the door to ask admittance for the night,
and was rather startled when the door was answered by a large
giant. This monster was indeed a formidable fellow. He was as
tall as C ,rmoran, and a foot or two broader round the waist, and had
two he:Lds. He was very civil, however. He made our hero a bow,
and invited him into his house, gave him a good supper, and sent
hi;z to bed. Bat Jack did not entirely trust his host. He thought
hei had seen him shaking his fist at him slily once or twice during
supper time; so, instead of going to sleep he listened. Presently
he heard the giant marching about in the room, singing a duet for
two voices all by himself-the treble with one mouth, and the bass
with the other. This was the song he sang :-
T I ..... you lodge with me this night,
Yo, shall not see the morning light;
My club shall dash your brains out-quite !"

"Indeed," thought Jack, when he heard this amiable ditty. Are
these the tricks y'ou play upon travelers, Mr. Giant. But I hope I
shall prove a match for you yet." So he began groping about the
room to tind something to laty in the bed instead of himself, against
the time when the giant should bring the club. H-' found a great
log of wood in the fire place ; and this he put into the bed and
covered it well up, while he himself lay concealed in a corner of the
room.
In the middle of the night he heard the two-headed giant come
creeping softly into the room. He sidled up to the bed, and-
" Whack!-whack!-whack!"-down came his cruel club upon the
log of wood, just where Jack's head would have been but for his
clever trick. The giant, thinking he had killed his guest, retired.
We may fancy how surprised he was when Jack came next morning
to thank him for his night's lodging.






























I








THE WELSH GIANT.

The giant rubbed his eyes and pulled his hair to make sure that he
was awake ; but Jack stood looking on as cool as a cucumber.
"Why? ho-ow-w-w did you sle-e-e-ep?" stammered the giant at
last. Was there nothing to dist-u-r-r-b you in the night? "
"Oh, I slept exceedingly well," replied Jack. "I believe a rat






















W.q








ifrn'












THE THEEE-HEADED GIANT.
came and flapped me with his tail three or four times ; but he soon
went away again."
The giant was so surprised that he sat down on a bench, and
scratched his heads for three minutes, trying to make it out. Then
he rose slowly, and went away to prepare breakfast. Jack now
thought he would play the giant another trick; and he managed it







10 JACK THE GIANT-KILLEI,


in this way. He got a great leather bag and fastened it to his body,
just under a loose kind of blouse he wore, for he thought he would
make the giant believe he had an immense appetite. Presently the
giant came in with two great bowls of hasty pudding, and began
feeding each of his mouths by turns. Jack took the other bowl and
pretended to eat the pudding it contained ; but instead of swallowing
it, he kept stowing it in the great leather bag. The giant stared
harder than ever, and appeared to seriously doubt the evidence of
his own eyes. He was wondering to behold such a little chap as
Jack eat such a breakfast. "Now," said Jack, when breakfast was
over, I can show you a trick. I can cut off my head, arms, or legs,
and put them on again, just as I choose ; and do a number of strange
and wonderful things besides. Look here, I will show you an
instance." So saying he took up a knife and ripped up the leather
bag, and all the hasty pudding came tumbling out on the floor, to the
great surprise of the giant. "Ods! splutter hur nails!" cried the
giant, "hur can do that hurself." So, determined not to be outdone
by such a little chap as Jack, he seized his knife! plunged it into the
place where Hms hasty pudding was!! AND DROPPED DOWN DEAD ON THE
FLOOR !!
After this great achievement Jack had a better title than ever to
the name of the "Giant Killer." He continued his journey, and a
few days afterwards we find him traveling in very grand company
indeed. The only son of King Arthur had traveled into Wales, on
an errand somewhat similar to Jack's. He wanted to deliver a
beautiful lady from the hands of a wicked magician, who was keeping
her in captivity. One day the prince fell in with a sturdy traveler,
and found by the belt the stranger wore, who he was ; for Jack's fame
had by this time traveled as far even as King Arthur's court. The
prince therefore gladly joined company with Jack, who offered his
services, which were, of course, accepted.
A mile or two further on they came to a large castle inhabited by a
wonderful giant indeed; a greater personage than even the gentleman
who "spluttered his nails;" for this giant had three heads, and could
fight five hundred men (at least said he could.) The prince felt rather
awkward about asking such a personage to entertain him; but Jack
undertook to manage all -that. He went on alone, and knocked
loudly at the castle gate. "Who's there ? roared the giant. "Only
your poor cousin Jack," answered the intruder. The giant, like most
great men, had a good many poor relations, and Jack knew this very







JACK THE GIANT-KILLER. 11

well. "What news, cousin Jack?" asked the giant. Bad news!
B id news !-dear uncle," replied Jack. Pooh !-bah !-nonsense,"
cried the giant; "what can be bad news for a person like me, who
has three heads and can fight five hundred men?" Oh, my poor
dear uncle!" replied the cunning Jack, the king's son is coming, with
two thousand men, to kill you and destroy your castle!" All the
giant's three faces turned pale at once ; and he said, in a trembling
voice, This is bad news, indeed, cousin Jack ; but I'll hide in the
cellar and you shall lock me in, and keep the key till the prince has
gone."
Jack laughed in his sleeve as he turned the key of the cellar
upon the giant; and then he fetched the prince and they feasted
and enjoyed themselves, whilst the poor master of the house sat
in the cellar shivering and shaking with fear. Next morning Jack
helped the prince to a good quantity of the giant's treasure, and
sent him forward on his journey. He then let out his uncle," who
looked about him in rather a bewildered way, and seemed to think
that the two thousand men had not done much damage to his
castle after all, and that the prince's retinue had very small appe-
tites. Jack was asked what reward he would have, and answered-
"Good uncle, all I want is the old coat and cap, and the rusty
sword and the worn slippers which are at your bed's head." You
shall have them," said the giant. "They will be very useful to
you. The coat will make you invisible ; the cap will reveal to you
hidden things ; the sword will cut through anything and everything ;
and the slippers will give you swiftness; take them, and welcome,
my valiant cousin, Jack."
Jack and the prince soon found out the wicked magician, and in
due course killed him, and liberated the lady. The prince married
her the next day. The happy pair then proceeded to King Arthur's
court, and so pleased was that monarch with what they 'had done,
that Jack was made one of the Knights of the Round Table.
But Jack could not be idle. He wanted to be employed on active
service, and begged the king to send him forth against all the remain-
ing Welsh giants.
He soon had an opportunity to display his prowess ; for on the third
day of his journey, as he was passing through a thick wood, he heard
the most doleful groans and shrieks. Presently he saw a great giant
dragging along a handsome knight and a beautiful lady by the hair
of their heads in a very brutal manner. Jack at once put on his























rr











A.





rv







JACK THE GIANT-KILLE1R. 13

invisible coat, and taking his sword of sharpness, stuck the giant
right through the leg, so that the great monster came tumbling down
with a crash. A second blow of the sword cut off the giant's head.
The knight and his lady thanked their deliverer, you may be sure;
but Jack would not accept an earnest invitation they gave him to go
to their castle and live with them, for he wanted to see the giant's
den. They told him the giant had a brother fiercer than himself,
who dwelt there ; but Jack was not to be deterred.
Sure enough, at the mouth of the cavern sat the giant on a block
of timber, with a club by his side. Here is the other," cried Jack,
and he hit the giant a blow with his sword. The ,giant could see
no one, but began to lay about him with his club; Jack, however,
slipped behind him, jumped on the log of timber, cut off the giant's
head, and sent it to King Arthur with that of the giant's brother;
and the two heads just made a good wagon load.
Now, at length, Jack felt entitled to go and see the knight and his
lady-and I can tell you there were rare doings at the castle on his
arrival. The knight and all his guests drank to the health of the
Giant-Killer ; and he gave Jack a handsome ring with a picture on
it of the giant dragging along the once unhappy couple.
They were in the height of their mirth when a messenger arrived
to tell them that Thundel, a fierce giant and a near relation of the
twg giants, was coming, burning with rage, to avenge his kinsmen's
death. All was hurry and fright ; but Jack bade them be quiet-he
would soon settle Master Thundel, he said. Then he sent some men
to cut off the drawbridge, just leaving a slight piece on each side.
The giant soon came running up, swinging his club, and though he
could not see Jack, for our hero, knowing the importance of keeping
out of sight on such occasions, had taken the precaution to put on
his coat of darkness, yet hi, propensity for human flesh had rendered
his sense of smelling so acute, that he knew some one was at hand,
and thus declared his intentions.

Fee!-fie !-foh !-fum.
I smell the blood of an Englishman.
Be he alive-or be he dead-
I'll grind his bones to make my bread!"

"First, catch me," said Jack, and he flung off his coat of darkness
and put on his shoes of swiftness, and began to run, the giant rush-
ing after him in a great rage. Jack led him round the moat, and






11 JACK THE GIANT-K1LLEI.


then suddenly ran across the draw-bridge ; but the giant, who fol-
lowed him very closely, no sooner came to the middle where the
bridge had been cut, than it snapped with his weight at once, and
down he went-splash !-into the moat, which was full of water and
of great depth. The giant struggled fiercely to release himself from
the unexpected and uncomfortable position in which he was placed ;
but Jack, who had looked forward to this moment with the greatest
anxiety, was quite prepared to counteract all his efforts. A strong
rope, with a running noose at the end, had been kept in readiness,
and was cleverly thrown over the giant's head by Master Jack, who
had found such a weapon very useful on a former occasion, and had
since taken great pains to make himself perfect in its use. By this
means he was drawn to the castle side of the moat, where, half-
drowned and half-strangled, he lay at the mercy of the Giant-Killer,
who completed his task by cutting off the giant's head to the evident
pleasure of all the inhabitants of the castle and the surrounding
country. As Jack was naturally desirous that the king should be
made aware of the good service he was doing the state, the giant's
head was sent to King Arthur, who perceived at once the family
likeness which it bore to those already in his possession ; and a letter
of thanks was sent to Jack by the king himself.
After spending a short time very pleasantly with the knight and
his lady, Jack again set out in search of adventures. And it was not
long before he met with a good one. At the foot of a high moun-
tain he lodged, one night, with a good old hermit. This hermit was
very glad to see Jack when he heard that his visitor was the far-
famed Giant-Killer ; he said, "I am rejoiced to see you, for you can do
good service here. Know that at the top of this mountain stands an
enchanted castle, the dwelling of the giant Galligantus. This wicked
monster, by the aid of a magician as bad as himself, is now detaining
a number of knights and ladies in captivity; and to do so the more
surely, the magician has changed them into beasts. Amongst the rest
there is a duke's daughter who was carried off as she was walking in
her father's garden, and borne away to this castle in a chariot drawn
by two fiery dragons. They have changed her into a deer. With
your coat of darkness you might manage to pass by the fiery griffins
which keep guard at the gate, without being seen; and your sword
of sharpness would do the rest.
Jack wanted to hear no more. He promised to do his very best,
and the nexr morning early he set off, dressed in his invisible coat,



















"- -'x-



















JACK CATCHING THE GIANT THUNDEL.

to climb the mountain. And it was well he had put his garment on;
for long before he got to the castle he could see the old magician,
who was of a very suspicious nature, looking out of the second floor
window. He had an owl on his shoulder, which looked very much
like himself ; and he had a long wand in his hand; and stood poking
his red uose out of the window in a most inquisitive manner.
At the castle gate sat the two griffins, likewise on the look-out







1G JACK TIE GIANT-KILLEtR.


but thanks to his coat Jack passed between them unharmed. At the
gate hung a large trumpet, and below it was written, as a notice to
travelers
Whoever can this trumpet blow,
Shall cause the giant's overthrow.'
You may fancy what a blast Jack blew ; but you can hardly fancy
the crash with which the gates flew open ; and the bewildered look
of the giant and magician, as they stood biting their nails with
vexation and fear. The captives were liberated, and the giant and
magician killed in a most satisfactory way ; and Jack set out for
King Arthur's court with the fair duke's daughter, whom he soon
made his wife, and I am told they lived long and happily.
Now I only hope that all little boys and girls who read this his-
tory, will attack the gigantic sums, verbs, and lessons they may have
to do as valiantly, and conquer them as completely, as the giants
were overthrown by JACK THE GIANT-KILLER.




JACK THE GIANT-KILLER.

A LAD who fought with giants ? I know one mighty giant,
Yes,-and who killed them too- The cause of much distress;
He must have been a hero- Whene'er you meet him, fight him,
Gallant, brave, and true. His name is IDLENESS.

"But that's all past and over"- Another just as hurtful,
Perhaps my readers say- Comes stalking by his side,
"I'd like to meet a giant, Step out and fight him boldly,
And fight with him to-day. His name is SURLY PRIDE.

But I can never see them- And there are many others-
Their day is gone and fled; One whom they FALSEHOOD call,
Not one is left to fight with, Child, see thou fight him boldly,
The giants must be dead r" For he's the worst of all.

My little valiant readers, These giants, like old Thundel,
If you would giants kill, Go stalking through the town-
Just listen, I will tell you If ever they attack you,
Where you may find them still. Out clubs, and knock them down!







LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD.


ONCE upon a time, in a pretty village, stood a neat little cottage,
covered with roses and honeysuckles, and shaded by large trees.
In this cottage lived a good woman, who had a very pretty daugh-
ter-a sweet, dear little girl, with bright eyes and long hair, falling in
golden curls all over her neck and shoulders. Her cheeks were as
rosy as two ripe peaches, and her laugh was the merriest you would
hear on a Summer's day; and what was better than all this was,
that that little girl was a kind, good child, with a gentle heart and
obliging manners. She had a pleasant smile and cheerful word for
all, and would do anything to give pleasure to others.
So it is no wonder she became the greatest favorite with all the
villagers. Every one who knew her liked her; and when she called
to see any poor or sick neighbor, her presence was like a ray of sun-
shine to them, so pleased were they to see her.
Now, although she was greatly liked by all the villagers, far and
near, none loved her so dearly as her mother and grandmother. This
little girl's grandmother, to show how much she appreciated her
goodness, made her a beautiful riding-hood of scarlet cloth, such ;as
ladies wore in those days when they went out riding.
The little girl looked quite charming in this riding-hood, and she
found it so handy and convenient she seldom went abroad without it;
hail, rain, or shine she would wear it-in fact, it was her favorite
article of dress. She wore it so frequently, and looked so nice in it,
that when she was seen coming along the village, the neighbors would
say: "Here comes Little Red-Riding Hood," till at last she was
known by that name and no other ; indeed, I have never been able to
learn her other name.





















W4 .. .. .






















L E N
cI -- ---

ir i
:!.
































LITTLE~ RED RLIDING IlOOLi.
























i /







THE PRESENT.

Now, the good old grandmother had been very sick for a long time,
and, although not so bad as she had been, she was not yet sufficiently
well to leave her cottage. So the mother, who had been making some
cheese-cakes and churning some butter that morning, said to her
daughter: You may go, my child, to your grandmother's, and take
her some of these nice cakes and a pot of fresh butter for her break-
fast."
Little Red Riding-Hood was highly delighted at the thought of-a
run to her grandmother's such a fine morning, so she went and
brought a little basket for the cakes and butter; and you may be sure
she did not forget to put on the little scarlet hood which became her







4 LITTLE RED RIDING-IIOOD.


so well. She was very soon ready, and the cakes and butter were
put into the basket and covered with a clean cloth.
Now, it. was not very far from Little Red Riding-Hood's home to
the cottage in which her grandmother lived, so her mother thought
little of sending her alone. Still, on parting with her, she told her
not to stop too long on the way. She also charged her with many
kind messages for the good old grandmother.
Little Red Riding-Hood promised not to forget, and giving her two
kisses, and saying "Good-bye," tripped off as gay and light-hearted
as any of the little birds that were singing on the boughs of the trees.
Now, there were some woodmen at work in the forest cutting down
trees for firewood, and singing as they dealt their strokes with willing
hands and heavy axes. There was also something there that threat-
ened danger to the little girl, namely: a great hungry wolf.
This cruel animal had paid a-visit to a sheep-fold, thinking he could
steal a lamb for dinner, but was disappointed, for the watch-dog had
caught him and beaten him soundly.
The wolf knew Little Red Riding-Hood very well, and had often
watched and plotted to carry her off, that he might devour her. He
was desperately hungry this morning, and out of temper, for he felt
very sore from his recent beating; but the sight of the little girl made
him grin with delight.
Now, the wolf would like to have made one spring at Red Riding-
Hood, and have eaten her up at once ; but he was too cunning for
that, for the woodmen were near, and he was afraid they would see
him, which would never do. So he resolved to make her acquaintance,
and pretend to be her friend.
One of the woodmen saw both the wolf and Little Red Riding-
Hood, and, suspecting Master Grizzly was bent upon some mischief,
kept a watch on him without seeming to do so.







LITTLE RED RIDING-IIOOD. 5


Master Wolf walked dantily up to Little Red Riding-Hood, wag-
ging his tail, and tried his best to appear as amiable as possible, and
succeeded very well; only his green eyes had a treacherous look, and
glared in a hungry, uncomfortable manner. When he smiled he
showed a double row of sharp white teeth. But she felt not the
slightest fear of him. The wolf made a graceful bow and said:
"Good-morning, Little Red Riding-Hood."
Good-morning, Master Wolf," replied Little Red Riding-Hood.
And, pray, where are you going so early, my darling ?" continued
the wolf.
"I am going to my grandmother's," answered the child.
Your grandmother ? how is the dear old lady ?" asked the wolf,
pretending to take the greatest interest in her welfare.
She has been very sick, and is not yet well," said Little Red
Riding-Hood. I am taking her some cakes and a pot of nice fresh
butter."
Dear me! I am sorry to hear my respected friend, your grand-
mother, is out of health. I will call upon her ; she will be glad to
see me, I have no doubt. Allow me to carry your basket, my dear ;
I fear you are tired." At the same time giving a sly, hungry sniff,
and almost thrusting his nose into the basket.
Little Red Riding-Hood thought this was rather rude of him, after
his polite offer, but only said: "Oh! no, I thank you; I am not a bit
tired."
"Well," said the wolf, "give my love to your grandmother, and
say I will call and see her. Now, suppose I take this path to the
right, and you follow that one, and we'll see which of us gets there
first."
Now, this cunning old wolf knew very well he would get to the old
dame's cottage first. He had chosen the shortest way, you may be

































THE PARTING.

sure ; and not only that, but as soon as the child was out of sight he
set off galloping as hard as he could go.
Little Red Riding-Hood had no cause to hurry, it being yet early;
she loitered along the pleasant forest path, to gather the pretty wild
flowers that grew by the wayside, to make a nosegay. "Grand-
mamma likes flowers," she said to herself, "and she will be pleased
if I bring her a handsome nosegay; and a few wood-strawberries to
eat with her cakes will, perhaps, please her, too."
The pace at which the wolf ran soon brought him to the grand-
mother's cottage.











r





















-6-N
















THE WOLF MEETING LITTLE RED EIDI-HOOU.


Then he knocked at the door, giving two little taps, as Little Red
Riding-Hood might have done.
"Who's there ?" cried the old dame






8 LITTLE BED RIDING-HOOD.


'Tis I," said the wolf, imitating Little Red Riding -Hood's
voice.
The grandmother, as she sat up in bed knitting, thought her
grandchild must have a bad cold to speak in such a gruff way. Never
suspecting for a moment any one else was there, she said: "Pull
the bobbin and the latch will fly up, and come in."
So the wolf took the bobbin in his teeth, gave it a jerk, then, put-
ting his shoulder to the door, pushed it open and went in-very much
to the old dame's astonishment and alarm, for she knew him to be
a cruel, dishonest fellow; and as she was certain he had some evil
design in coming there, she was on her guard against him.
"Good-morning, Madam," said the wolf, trying to be agreeable, but
looking as if he meant to eat her up.
"Good-morning to you, Sir," replied the dame, as she moved to
the other side of the bed.
"Your grandchild told me this morning you had been unwell, so I
thought I would call to see how you were."
The grandame saw the wolf looked fierce and hungry, so she
instantly got off the bed, away from the wolf, and moved toward the
door of a closet or small room, saying: "Pray, excuse me a minute,
Sir; I am not dressed to receive company.
Don't mind me, I beg," said the wolf, with a horrid grin, looking
savagely hungry, and made a spring across the bed, and seized the
wrapper she had on with his teeth. But fright made the old dame
active, and, as quiick as thought, she slipped off her loose wrapper
which the wolf had hold of, and darted into the closet and bolted
the door before he could recover himself; then fell down in a faint-
ing fit through fright.
The wolf grinned horribly with rage and disappointment, saying to
himself: Well, never mind, she is safe enough; Little Red Riding-







LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD. 9


Hood will soon be here; I'll have her for breakfast, and finish the
old woman for dinner."
With these savage thoughts, the wolf put on the dame's wrapper
and night-cap, and got into bed, pulling the clothes well up to hide
his hairy face. Presently he heard Little Red Riding-Hood coming
to the door ; then came tap tap tap I
"Who's there?" cried the wolf, this time trying to imitate the
grandmother's voice.
Little Red Riding-Hood thought, what a bad cold grandmother
has got to make her speak so hoarse ;" but suspecting nothing
wrong, she replied, "Your grandchild, with some nice cakes, and a
pot of fresh butter."
"Pull the bobbin, my dear," said the wolf, "and the latch will fly
up."
Little Red Riding-Hood did as she was told, and walked into the
room, all fresh and rosy with her walk, her basket on one arm, and
the wild flowers on the other. She was greatly surprised when she
saw how strange the old lady looked as she lay tucked up in bed.
Whatever can have made grandmother's eyes so green?" thought
she, as she employed herself in arranging the flowers she had brought
with her on the mantle-piece; and, as she was a tasty little thing,
she soon made the place look quite fresh and neat. When she had
finished, she turned her bright face to granny with a look of triumph,
and bade her see how pretty she had made her room.
Now, the pretended grandmother appeared to be very ill indeed,
and said in a feeble voice, "Oh! my dear grandchild, will you not
come into bed with your poor old granny; I am too ill to get up
and talk to you?"
Little,Red Riding-Hood obeyed without hesitation, and so tired
was she with her long walk, that in a moment she had fallen asleep.


































GATHERING FLOWERS.

Now, the wolf was so sure of his prey, that he felt quite pleased
with himself at the success of his plans. He could not help admiring
the beautiful little girl as she lay there sleeping, and thought what a
nice breakfast he would have presently.
But, like many wicked people, he deceived himself, as we shall
presently see.
"You remember the wood-cutters who saw the wolf with Little Red
Riding-Hood when they met in the forest. Well, they suspected the
wolf had some evil design that made him so very civil. So they
thought it prudent to see that Little Red Riding-Hood came to no





































THE WOLF TAPPING AT THE DOOR.

harm, and hastened to the cottage to see that all was right. But
what was their surprise, on looking through the window, to see Little
Red Riding-Hood in bed, and the wolf standing over her. There
she lay, with her rosy cheeks and pretty mouth, and close to her the
great hairy face of the wolf, with green eyes and long teeth. While
they were looking at them with astonishment, Little Red Riding-
Hood awoke, and began to tell her grandmother (as she supposed)







12 LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD.


all that had occurred since she left home, and how she had met the
wolf.
And, oh! grandmamma, he was so polite, and offered to carry my
basket for me."
"Did he, indeed, my dear," said the wolf, and laughed.
"Yes ; and he asked me where I was going. I told him you were
sick, and I was coming to see you, and bring you the cakes and
butter. He was sorry to hear you were sick, and he said he would
call and see you; and I rather expected to find him here. Do you
think I shall see him before I leave, grandma ?"
"I should not wonder if you did," replied the wolf, and gave her
a loving hug.
"Grandmamma," cried the child, in the greatest surprise, "what
great strong arms you have got."
"The better to embrace you with, my dear child," said the wolf.
"But, grandma, what long, stiff ears you have got."
"The better to hear what you say, my darling," said the wolf, and
his eyes glared greener than ever.
What large green eyes you have got, grandma," said Little Red
Riding-Hood, so frightened she knew not what to say.
The better to see you with, my child," chuckled the wolf, showing
his ugly teeth.
Little Red Riding-Hood now sat up in bed, in the greatest terror.
"Grandmamma! what a large mouth, and, ho! what big teeth you
have got."
"Ah! ah! ah! The better to tear you to pieces, and eat you with,"
said the wolf-throwing off his disguise, giving a hungry growl, and
opening his mouth to bite her throat-when whack! came a spear
on his head, then two or three stabs, which knocked him off the bed,
howling frightfully.





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