• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Drawing from Nature
 The Fishwoman
 Our Pic-Nic
 Teacher's Visit
 "Come Home, Father"
 The Triangle
 The Missionary Dog
 The Infant School
 Watering the Sheep in Palestin...
 Lucy Graham
 The Fireman
 Poor Doggie
 That Thief, "Pincher"
 "You Dirty Boy!"
 Playing in the Nursery
 The Spoiled Pinafore
 Bertie's Own Flowers
 "Come Home Early, Father"
 Learning to Sing
 "Shall I Eat It All Myself?"
 Saturday Afternoon
 The Pet Spaniels
 Planning to Do Good
 The Ferry Boy
 The Elephant
 Reading the Wall-Bills
 Who Broke It?
 A Merry Group
 The Zoological Gardens
 The Swans
 Highland Cattle
 Richard and His Friend "Nep"
 Oranges
 Mending His Coat
 The Organ-Boy
 Visiting the Poor
 The Steeple-Chase
 The Cut Finger
 The Peep-Show
 Quite Safe
 "Do They Fit?"
 Dozing in Church
 Waiting for the Milk
 Sunday Morning
 Tom's Balloon
 Back Matter
 Back Cover






Group Title: Our pet lambs picture-book
Title: Our pet lamb's picture book
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047781/00001
 Material Information
Title: Our pet lamb's picture book
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Gilbert, John, 1817-1897 ( Illustrator )
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
S. W. Partridge & Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
Publisher: Thomas Nelson and Sons
S.W. Partridge and Co.
Place of Publication: New York
London
Publication Date: c1879
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1879   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Some illustrations by John Gilbert and Harrison Weir.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00047781
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002235244
notis - ALH5687
oclc - 61514778

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Half Title
        Page ii
    Frontispiece
        Page iii
    Title Page
        Page iv
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Drawing from Nature
        Page 2
        Page 3
    The Fishwoman
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Our Pic-Nic
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Teacher's Visit
        Page 8
        Page 9
    "Come Home, Father"
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The Triangle
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The Missionary Dog
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The Infant School
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Watering the Sheep in Palestine
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Lucy Graham
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The Fireman
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Poor Doggie
        Page 24
        Page 25
    That Thief, "Pincher"
        Page 26
        Page 27
    "You Dirty Boy!"
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Playing in the Nursery
        Page 30
        Page 31
    The Spoiled Pinafore
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Bertie's Own Flowers
        Page 34
        Page 35
    "Come Home Early, Father"
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Learning to Sing
        Page 38
        Page 39
    "Shall I Eat It All Myself?"
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Saturday Afternoon
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The Pet Spaniels
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Planning to Do Good
        Page 46
        Page 47
    The Ferry Boy
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The Elephant
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Reading the Wall-Bills
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Who Broke It?
        Page 54
        Page 55
    A Merry Group
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The Zoological Gardens
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The Swans
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Highland Cattle
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Richard and His Friend "Nep"
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Oranges
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Mending His Coat
        Page 68
        Page 69
    The Organ-Boy
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Visiting the Poor
        Page 72
        Page 73
    The Steeple-Chase
        Page 74
        Page 75
    The Cut Finger
        Page 76
        Page 77
    The Peep-Show
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Quite Safe
        Page 80
        Page 81
    "Do They Fit?"
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Dozing in Church
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Waiting for the Milk
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Sunday Morning
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Tom's Balloon
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Back Matter
        Page 92
    Back Cover
        Cover 3
        Cover 4
Full Text




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OUR PET LAMB'S



PICTURE-BOOK.



NEW YORK:
THOMAS NELSON AND
.LONDON:
S. W. PARTRIDGE AND



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THE children are having rare fun
in the garden to-day, but as it is
very cold, and snow fell last night,
they have covered themselves with
their mother's cloak.



F A OV/








DRAWING



THIS is my young friend George,
making a sketch from nature.
He is fond of drawing, and his pencil
is seldom out of his hand. He began
by drawing a flower, or some simple
object. Even this he found hard at
first, and you may be sure his efforts
were awkward enough. But he per-
severed, and now he is improving
fast, and is able to sit out-of-doors
and draw a landscape pretty well.
His friends feel quite proud of
George, when they look at his 'nice
drawings. He has been reading
" The Lives of the Painters."



NATURE,



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FISHWOMAN.



THE fishwoman is out early this
morning. Her husband is a
fisherman, and has been out all
night catching fish. She goes trip-
ping along, though she has a heavy
load. Her young boy is marching
before her, with his father's heavy
fishing-boots on his back. They are
quite a load for the little fellow, but
he marches along merrily with them.
It is hard work for both of them, for
they are out from morning till night,
and get little for it after all. But they
do not grumble, as many people do,
but make the best of it.



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OUR PIC-NIC.



pAPA had long promised us a treat,
and as he knew Beechwood was.
a very pretty spot, he went over on
horseback, and left mama and all of
us to meet him there in a waggonette.
There were about twelve of us alto-
gether, counting Bruno" as one.
When we arrived there, we spread a
large table-cloth on the grass under
the trees, and sat round it. Tom
carried the great pie, Charlie the
cake, Lucy the fruit, and Emma took
charge of the plates. Bruno seemed
to enjoy himself much, lying down
by Emma's bonnet and jacket.


























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TEACHER'S



ROBERT is fond of his Sunday-
school, and is seldom absent.
He is also very fond of his teacher.
About two months ago, he fell down
one day, and hurt his leg so sadly
that his parents had to send for the
doctor. There he lay for several
weeks, unable to get up. His greatest
grief, he said, was because he was
unable to go to his school and see
his teacher. So his kind teacher has
come to-day to see him, and is glad
to learn from the doctor that he will
probably be able to go to school
again next Sunday.



VISIT.






























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"COME HOME, FATHER."

JAMES BROWN is, I am sorry to
say, fond of drink, and spends
much of his time at the Red Lion."
He went there this evening as usual,
and his little Polly was sent there
just now by her mother to fetch him
home. Polly soon found him, and
has coaxed him to come home. As
it is raining fast he is carrying her
through the rain, for he loves his
little Polly. His sottish companions
inside are watching him, and laugh-
ing. I wish Brown would never go
inside the "Red Lion" again. It
would be better for him, every way.











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"BABY is highly amused just now,
for George is playing on his
triangle, and baby has not heard it
before. He is listening as if he
wondered where the sound came
from. His old horse is his favourite
toy, but he has left it to listen to this
wonderful triangle. George is very
fond of his little brother, and does
all he can to amuse him. He has
promised to put some wheels on that
horse of his, and to nail a new mane
on. The triangle belongs to their
father, who is one of the performers
in a military band.



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MISSIONARY



THIS is a picture of "Jowler," a
clever dog, who used to collect
subscriptions for missions in a little
village in Cheshire. At a missionary
meeting held there, it was stated that
he had collected more than thirty-
three shillings. I will tell you how
he went to work. He had a small
basket given him, which he carried
in his mouth, and every one in the
village knew his peculiar knock and
bark. As soon as the door was
opened, Jowler would bark, and there
he would remain till some money
was put in his basket.



DOG.



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THE INFANT



THE young Curate has come in this
morning to inspect the Infant
School. The little ones are glad to
see him; he is so kind to them, and
takes such an interest in them. They
get round him as soon as he comes
in, and try to attract his attention.
He has taken a chubby child on his
knee; and her elder sister has put
her hand on his, she seems so at
home with him. They would be
glad, I dare say, if he could stay with
them all the morning. But he has
some sick families to visit, so he
must go soon.



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WATERING THE SHEEP
IN PALESTINE.

IN the Holy Land water is scarcer
than it is in England. On this
account it is sometimes difficult to
get enough for the cattle. The sheep
know the voice of their own shepherd,
and follow him. When they go from
place to place he does not drive
them, but goes before them, so that
they do not know what it is to be
driven and worried. If you read the
lives of Jacob and David, you will
find sheep frequently mentioned;
and our Lord often spoke of them in
those wonderful parables of His.



































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LUCY GRAHAM.

THIS is my young friend Lucy
Graham. She lives in that house
behind, among the trees. Her parents
have a nice garden, with some very
fine flowers, and Lucy likes nothing
better than to spend an hour or two
in sowing seeds and training the
young flowers. They grow some
very fine lilies, and Lucy has just cut
one to ornament the table, as she has
invited her cousin Kate to tea with
her, and therefore wishes everything
to look bright and nice. The lily 'is
a graceful flower,- second to none,
except perhaps the rose.















































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FIREMAN.



THIS is a fireman. He has to be
ready all the night long to start
off with his engine on the first alarm
of fire. In a few minutes the horses
are put to the fire engine, he and his
companions jump on the top, and
away they gallop to the fire. It is
dangerous work, for the floors of
warehouses and houses soon fall-in
when the fire is raging. The fireman
wears a helmet on his head to protect
himself from the flames. Often he
has to place an escape against the
Lhest windows of a tall house, and
ter rooms filled with smoke.



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POOR DOGGIE.



THE people in the cottage were
alarmed just now at hearing the
loud yelping of a dog, as though it
had been hurt. John went out to
see what was the matter, and found
their little dog Dash" lying by a
tree and yelping piteously. He took
it up in his arms, and is carrying it
in-doors. Dash does not seem to
be much injured, and I dare say a
little bathing of the paws in warm
water, and a few hours' rest, will
make the poor thing all right again.
He looks up in John's face as though
he was very grateful.












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THAT THIEF,



" pINCHER" was a fine, well-fed,
sleek dog, and was generally
very quiet. But Pincher had one
great fault, he was sly. One day his
mistress left Pincher in the parlour,
and on the table there was a plate of
cake. Now as soon as the door was
shut, and his mistress out of sight,
Pincher jumped on a chair by the
side of the table, and ate up all the
cake. As soon as he heard his mis-
tress coming he lay on the rug quietly,
just as if he had been asleep all the
while. Now this was very sly and
very wrong of Pincher.



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"YOU DIRTY BOY!"

IT is one of young Edwin's-faults
that he does not like to be washed.
This is very wrong, the more so
because Edwin likes to play about
out-of-doors, and in warm weather of
course he gets dusty and dirty Be-
sides, it is strange that any boy should
dislike a good wash, as it is so health-
ful and refreshing. Our Dash "
dearly loves to plunge into the canal,
and even our cat is continually clean-
ing herself with her paw. But Edwin's
mama will not let him escape, and
has made up her mind that he shall
have his face and hands well washed.

































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PLAYING IN THE NURSERY.



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wooden
brought
and are
castles.



is such a wet day, and they
not go for their usual walk,
nd Laura are having a game
sir little brother Tom in the
They have some nice
bricks which their papa
them home the other evening,
making trains, houses, and
They have just asked nurse



to go and fetch mama to see the
large house Tom has made; but he
must be careful not to shake it, or it
will fall down. Wooden bricks are
nice toys for children, as they cannot
well be destroyed.
















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PINAFORE.



IT is a good thing to be able to
write, and it is well to begin to
learn early. But it is not right for a
little boy to play with pens and ink,
and spoil his pinafore, as little William
has just done. While his mama's back
was turned, he got the inkstand and
a pen his brother had been using, and
sat down at the table, just as he had
seen his brother do. Of course he
soon managed to ink his fingers,
smear the ink on the best table-cloth,
and presently upset the ink over his
clean pinafore. Mama was very
angry when she came in.



SPOILED



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BERTIE'S OWN FLOWERS.

BERTIE lives in one of those snug
cottages, covered with ivy and
Virginia creeper, that you see behind
in the picture. The people are very
fond of their pretty cottages, and
they may well be so, for they look so
quiet and pleasant. On the grass in
front of them are some nice flowers
grouped together, and Bertie's parents
have given him one of these groups.
In hot weather you may see him
watering his flowers every evening,
and they do great credit to his care
and attention. I wish every boy had
a small garden of his own.









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"COME HOME EARLY,
FATHER."

I DO not think there is in all our
village a happier home than that
of John Green. His cottage is not
much to look at, for John does not
get high wages as a carpenter. But
John spends his wages well, and as
he is steady he is seldom out of work.
He does not spend his wages at the
public-house, but has a little account
of his own at the Post-Office Savings'
Bank. As soon as his work is done,
he is home again, and even the little
one crows and laughs as soon as she
sees him coming.










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LEARNING



THE children are having a singing
lesson this afternoon, which is



always a treat to them.



The teacher



is counting the time aloud, to keep



them all together.



Some of them are



beginning to sing very well.



At first



it was dull and tedious learning about
bars, and intervals, and rests, and
remembering the difference between



crotchets



and



quavers.



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teacher persevered



with them



now they can read the music
easily. They are going to h



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concert some evening soon, and are
just now practising the music.



TO SING.













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"SHALL I EAT IT ALL
MYSELF ?"

MARY White was sent one day by
her mother to Farmer Brown's
with a message, and as he had a
very large orchard, and the apples
were just ripe, the kind farmer gave
her a large one. Mary had not
carried it far before she began to
debate with herself whether she
should eat it or not. It looked so
tempting that she made up her mind
she could not carry it all the way
home, and so must eat it at once.
But at last she decided she would
take it home, and give her sister half.










































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AFTERNOON.



AS



week,



it is a half-holiday to-day,



lessons are all finished



and



for the



Ellen and her little friends



arranged to



go for a walk as far as



the wood, and gather some



flowers.



One of them



has



a little



sick brother at home, who is very



fond of flowers.



So her young com-



panions are helping her to gather as
many as they can, to make a large
nosegay for him. How pleased poor
Frank will be when he sees them on



the table by the side of his bed !



A



sick-room should never be without
some bright cheerful flowers.



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SATURDAY




















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THE PET



THE young lady seems to be enjoy-
ing herself there, reading her
letter. And her three pet spaniels
around her seem also quite at their
ease. I dare say they have a pleasant
time of it, for they look as if they were
pampered and fondled in a very
special manner. How keen and in-
telligent are the eyes of the two little
spaniels looking out of the picture!
They seem very happy, as indeed
they ought to be. How many dogs
there are that do not know what care
and kindness are, that have scarcely
a home at all!



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PLANNING TO DO GOOD.


EVERY poor person in the village
loves Richard. One afternoon he
was just stepping out of his father's
door, with a new shilling in his
pocket, which his aunt had given
him, when he saw widow Smith's
eldest daughter nursing the baby,
which was asleep in her arms.
Though the wind was cold, the poor
baby was scarcely covered with an
old thin shawl, and its feet were
almost blue with cold. Richard said
not a word, but in ten minutes he
had spent his new shilling in a warm
pair of socks for the baby.







































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FERRY



ALL the people in the village know
Tom, the ferry boy, and speak
well of him too. Tom is honest, and
would not take what does not belong
to him. Tom tells the truth, and
does not swear, nor use bad words.
He does not quarrel, and is liked by
every one as a civil and obliging lad.
His boat is not a very new one, cer-
tainly, but it is safe, and good enough,
as it only has to go across the stream.
Sometimes Tom takes his little dog
in the boat with him, and he seems,
by his barking and frisking about, to
think it a high treat.



BOY.



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ELEPHANT.



THE elephant is a great creature,
and one of the most sagacious of
animals. In India they are much
used, and when quite tame are very
valuable. A large erection is made
for the purpose, and fastened on its
back. In this persons can sit very
comfortably. The driver sits in front
of this, and guides the animal along.
The trappings that hang there about
the elephant are very gaudy, and
sometimes very costly. The children
at the Zoological Gardens are fond
of a ride on the elephant; indeed, it
is one of the chief attractions.



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READING THE WALL-BILLS.

WJHITE, the carpenter, is a good
man, and tries to do all the
good he can in the village. And
great need there is that some one
should try, for many of the labouring
men spend their evenings at the
public-house, instead of at home with
their wives and children. White has
hung up some Wall-bills, with pic-
tures on them, in his workshop; and
it is surprising how interested the
village folks have been in them.
Mary Brown is so fond of looking at
them that she comes nearly every
day to read them.

















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BROKE



THE two children seem in great
trouble, and no wonder, for there
lies that beautiful jug on the ground,
broken in pieces. I wonder who
broke it, and what they will say
when their mother questions them
about it. I hope they will tell the
truth, and not try to put the blame
on each other. Whatever may have
been done, it is always better to tell
the truth, for we cannot deceive God,
who hears all we say. Perhaps they
were both to blame, but I think their
mother should not have let them have
such a fine jug merely to get water in.



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A MERRY



GROUP.



THIS is a merry group-grand-
mama, grandpapa, mama, the ser-
vant, and boys and girls more than I
can count. They have just left the
station, and are out for a day's holiday
at the sea-side. Grandpapa seems
strong enough for the occasion; but
grandmama looks as if all this pulling,
and coaxing, and leading, would soon
be too much for her. She will, how-
ever, I dare say, make the best of it,
and will do all she can to contribute
to the pleasure of her dear ones. I
hope it will be fine, and then I am
sure they will enjoy themselves.































































































































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THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS.

THIS is the Zoological Gardens in
the Regent's Park, one of the
favourite sights of London. Mr.
Jones having just arrived, with his
son and young daughter, from the
country, has brought them to see this
famous collection of animals. Ellen
has long wished to see a living lion,
and her wish is now gratified. The
lion seems sleepy just now, and is
lying in the corner of the cage; and
the lioness is walking about. Ellen
looks rather alarmed, and is holding
her father's hand. But she need not
fear, for the iron bars are very strong.

































































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THE SWANS.



SWANS are most graceful creatures,
and seem as though they were
made to float along on a smooth lake.
They are, however, ill-tempered, al-
though they look so calm, and they
will sometimes beat one another.
Though they are so graceful in the
water, they are very awkward when
they walk about upon the banks.
Their thin short legs do not seem
strong enough to support them on
land, and so they waddle along in a
strange way. The nest they make
among the reeds by the side of the
water is very beautiful indeed.










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HIGHLAND



THIS is a beautiful picture of cattle,
as we often see them in summer
in the Highlands of Scotland. How
pleased and contented the noble
animals look, as they lie on the hill-
side among the bright pink heather!
They seem half asleep in the noon-
tide sun, and the birds are so little
afraid of them that they hop about in
their very shadows. God has given
animals to man to serve and obey
him, but we are not to torture or
ill-use them. I have often thought
it would be more humane if cattle
were killed in the country.



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RICHARD AND HIS FRIEND
NEP."

THESE are two fast friends,
Richard and his dog Neptune."
I will tell you how this friendship
began. About a year ago Richard
was bathing, one afternoon, in a wide
stream, with some companions. He
was at some distance from them, and
alone, and the water was deep, and
he was not able to swim. Richard
struggled to get to where it was shal-
low, but in vain, and his companions
were far off. Just as he was sinking,
Nep jumped in, and brought him safe
to the bank.




































































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ORANGES.


THE children are very fond of
oranges, and the old woman has
some fine ones on her stall. They
are considering whether they shall
have the larger ones, or the smaller
ones. James thinks it better to buy
the smaller ones, because you get
more for your money; but Alice
fears they are not so ripe, and there-
fore she prefers the larger ones. I
suppose they will settle this grave
question in a few minutes, and trot
away with their purchase. Of course
the old woman will be equally
pleased whichever way they decide.














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HIS COAT.



IT is not a bad thing, let me tell
you, for a boy to learn how to
use a needle and thread. William's
mother taught him how to use them
when he was a little boy, and now he
can mend a hole in his coat almost
as well as a tailor. One morning a
friend called on him in his garret to
take him out for a walk, and found
him sitting cross-legged on the floor,
mending his coat. He was not at all
ashamed to be found thus, as he
could not well afford to pay a tailor
for mending it. A tailor would per-
haps have charged him a shilling.



MENDING















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THE ORGAN-BOY.

THE children are fond of a merry
tune, so they have given the
organ-boy a penny to play. The
babies stare at the organ, as though
they thought it a very funny box to
make such a noise. One little child,
with a doll in her arms, is giving a
piece of bread to the monkey, but he
looks as if he suspected it was a trick.
The boy has a cloth over his organ,
to protect it when it rains. I do not
like to see monkeys led about in this
way. I think it is cruel, and must
cause them much suffering, especially
if they have a cruel master.



















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VISITING THE POOR.

THERE are many persons who
have so little thought for their poor
neighbours that they seem scarcely to
be aware how they live, or what they
need. This is not right. Even if we
have nothing to give them, we can
speak kindly to them, and show by
our manner that we take an interest
in them. Mrs. Price is a kind lady,
who often calls on the poor around
her, and this morning she has brought
her little son and daughter with her.
The poor woman is very glad to see
a kind face at her door, for she is in
trouble and distress.





























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STEEPLE-CHASE.



THIS is a steeple-chase, which is a
chase across hedges, ditches,
palings, or anything that may be in
the way. The horses are often urged
on such occasions to clear obstacles
that are beyond their power. Thus
sad and sometimes fatal accidents
happen to both horses and riders.
Many a fine horse has been ruined
for life; and many a rider killed on
the spot, or terribly injured. The
horse is a noble and willing animal,
and will attempt almost anything to
please its master. Steeple-chasing is
a cruel and unnatural pastime.



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THE CUT FINGER.

POOR little Robert! There he
sits in the window-seat this fine
morning by the side of his grand-
mother, and cannot play with his
young companions. He looks very
sad, but he should have minded what
his good grandmother told him. He
has cut his finger very badly, though
he had often been told not to play
with sharp knives. I hope it will be
a lesson to him, for boys, and girls
too, should not be wilful, but should
learn to attend to what is said to
them. He must have patience, and
perhaps it will be better to-morrow.






































































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THE PEEP-SHOW.

THIS is a showman. A smart
fellow he is, with that peacock's
feather in his hat. And he has so
much to say about his wonderful
show that the girls and boys rush out
with their pennies as soon as they
hear his voice. The girls there say
the scenes are very good, and that it
is worth the penny. The little boy
behind is very anxious to be lifted up
to see what is to be seen. Tom
Wright is feeling in his pocket for a
penny, but he has so many things
there that it is not easy to get to the
bottom of it.

















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QUITE SAFE.

M RS. Stanley, a young widow, was
staying for a week at the sea-
side. One fine morning her little
girl Susie asked her to let her go on
to the beach with their dog Bruno,"
and she would be back soon. An
hour or two passed, however, and
Mrs. Stanley became anxious and
alarmed, and went down to the beach
to see what had become of her.
There, behind a large boat, she soon
found her little Susie, sitting on the
sands. Her pail and spade were lying
by her side, and the faithful Bruno
with his head on her lap.


























































































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yOUNG Edgar wears out his boots
very fast, as he has some distance
to go to school. His father finds it
no small expense to find shoes and
boots for his three children, but of
course they cannot walk about with
bare feet. As his old ones were
worn out, the shoemaker has just
sent home a new pair of boots for
Edgar, and he is trying them on.
His mother thinks they may be
rather small, but that is a good fault,
as the leather will stretch a little
presently. As winter is coming, his
new boots will keep his feet dry.



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IN CHURCH.



THIS is Master Fred, as he was
seen gaping and dozing at church
the other Sunday afternoon. He did
not think any one observed him, but
a clever friend of mine made a sketch
of him, with his prayer-book on the
seat, and his hat on the floor. Of
course he did not know what the
sermon was about. I told him he
ought to keep awake at church, as
we should go there to worship God,
and not to sleep. Poor Fred was
quite ashamed, but he promised he
would not do so again, and said it
was a very hot afternoon.



DOZING










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FOR THE MILK.



THERE was, belonging to a person
at Bolton, a dog that was very
useful. When milk was wanted, a
can, with the money inside, was
given to the dog, who trotted off to
the dairy with the can in his mouth.
He always went straight to the place.
If he found the gate shut, he would
knock with his paw, or lay down
the can, and bark till it was opened.
The milkman knew his four-legged
customer well. When the milk was
put in the can, the dog would hurry
back, but carry it so steadily that he
seldom spilt any.



WAITING


















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SUNDAY MORNING.


GEORGE likes to go to church
on a Sunday morning. As he
is only a poor apprentice, and his
trousers are very patched, and his
coat worn, he sits in the free seats.
But this he does not mind, and as he
generally sits near the stove it is very
comfortable in cold weather. His
mother cannot afford to buy him a
prayer-book, as she is only a poor
widow. But he is saving up his
money to buy one, and has nearly got
enough. George is very careful how
he spends his little earnings. This
is more important than high wages.











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TOM'S BALLOON.



WTJHAT a clever boy Tom is He
seems to have a talent for mak-
ing toys. His uncle gave him half-a-
crown the other day, and Tom bought
a pocket-knife, and got a block of
wood, and cut out such a nice little
yacht. And then he asked his
mother to give him some pieces of
linen for the sails, and at last he
floated it in the large pond at the
bottom of the field, and the wind
blew it along. You should have seen
how pleased Tom was. His mama
has just bought him one of the
*coloured parlour balloons.































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HERE is baby all astray in the
garden. His sister should watch
him better. But she sat down to
look at a book for a few minutes,
thinking he was close to her. I dare
say she is not far off.






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