The telegraph boy

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Material Information

Title:
The telegraph boy
Series Title:
Tattered Tom series
Physical Description:
262 p., 3 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 20 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Alger, Horatio, 1832-1899
John C. Winston Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
John C. Winston Co.
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia ;
Chicago ;
Toronto
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Telegraph -- Employees -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Street life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1879   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
Canada -- Totonto

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Horatio Alger, Jr.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements precede text.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002394419
notis - ALZ9325
oclc - 61515157
System ID:
UF00047771:00001


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THE



TELEGRAPH BOY





BY
HORATIO ALGER, JR.,
AUTHOR OF "RAGGED DICK SERIES," LUCK AND PLUCK SERIES,
"BRAVE AND BOLD SERIES," ETC., ETC.














THE JOHN C. WINSTON CO.
PHILADELPHIA



TORONTO



CHICAGO








FAMOUS ALGER BOOKS.


RAGGED DICK SERIES. By HORATIO ALGER, JR. 6 vols. 12mo. Cloth.



RAGGED DICK.
FAME AND FORTUNE.
MARK THE MATCH BOY.

TATTERED TOM SERIES. ]
Cloth. FIRST SERIES.
TATTERED TOM.
PAUL THE PEDDLER.

TATTERED TOM SERIES. 4
JULIUS.
THE YOUNG OUTLAW,

CAMPAIGN SERIES. By Ho
FRANK'S CAMPAIGN.
PAUL PRESCOTT'S CHARGE.

LUCK AND PLUCK SERIES.
Cloth. FIRST SERIES.
LUCK AND PLUCK.
SINK OR SWIM.

LUCK AND PLUCK SERIES.
TRY AND TRUST.
BOUND TO RISE.

BRAVE AND BOLD SERIES.
Cloth.
BRAVE AND BOLD.
JACK'S WARD.

PACIFIC SERIES. By HORAT
THE YOUNG ADVENTURER.
THE YOUNG MINER.



ATLANTIC SERIES.



ROUGH AND READY.
BEN THE LUGGAGE BOY.
RUFUS AND ROSE.



By HORATIO ALGER, JR. 4 vols.



12mo.



PHIL THE FIDDLER.
SLOW AND SURE.



I vols. 12mo. Cloth. SECOND SERIES.
SAM'S CHANCE.
THE TELEGRAPH BOY.

RATIO ALGER, JR. 3 vols.
CHARLIE CODMAN'S CRUISE.


By HORATIO ALGER, JR. 4 vols. 12mo.

STRONG AND STEADY.
STRIVE AND SUCCEED.



4 vols. 12mo. Cloth.



SECOND SERIES.



RISEN FROM THE RANKS,
HERBERT CARTER'S LEGACY.

By HORATIO ALGER, JR. 4 vols. 12mo.

SHIFTING FOR HIMSELF.
WAIT AND HOPE.

rio ALGER, JR. 4 vols. 12m6.
THE YOUNG EXPLORERS.
BEN'S NUGGET.



By HORATIO ALGER, JR. 4 vols.



THE YOUNG CIRCUS RIDER.
Do AND DARE.



HECTOR'S INHERITANCE.
HELPING HIMSELF.



WAY TO SUCCESS SERIES.
Cloth.
BOB BURTON.
THE STORE BOY

NEW WORLD SERIES. By H
DIGGING FOR GOLD. FA(



By HORATIO ALGER, JR.



4 vols. 12mo.



LUKE WALTON.
STRUGGLING UPWARD.



[ORATIO ALGER, JR. 3 vols. 12mo. Cloth.



CING THE WORLD.



IN A NEW WORLD.



Other Volumes in Preparation.



COPYRIGHT BY A. K. LORING, 1879.


















THREE YOUNG FRIENDS,



LORIN AND



BEATRICE



AND



FLORINE ARNOLD,


EiTOs toqr

IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED.



BERNHEIMER,













PREFACE.


THE "Telegraph Boy" completes the series
of sketches of street-life in New York in-
augurated eleven years since by the publi-
cation of "Ragged Dick." The author has
reason to feel gratified by the warm recep-
tion accorded by the public to these pictures
of humble life in the great metropolis. He
is even more gratified by the assurance that
his labors have awakened a philanthropic in-
terest in the children whose struggles and
privations he has endeavored faithfully to de-
scribe. He feels it his duty to state that
there is no way in which these waifs can
more effectually be assisted than by contrib-
uting to the funds of "The Children's Aid
Society," whose wise and comprehensive plans
for the benefit of their young wards have
already been crowned with abundant success.






V11



PREFA4 C.



The class of boys described in the pres.
ent volume was called into existence only
a few years since, but they are already so
numerous that one can scarcely ride down
town by any conveyance without having one
for a fellow-passenger. Most of them reside
with their parents and have comfortable
homes, but a few, like the hero of this
story, are wholly dependent on their own
exertions for a livelihood. The variety of
errands on which they are employed, and
their curious experiences, are by no means
exaggerated in the present story. In its
preparation the author has been assisted by
an excellent sketch published perhaps a year
since in the "New York Tribune."
HORATIO ALGER, JR.



NEW YORK, Sept. 1, 1879.









THE TELEGRAPH BOY.

---VeCt--- *----

CHAPTER I.

A YOUNG CARPET-BAGGER.

TwNTY-FIVE cents to begin the world with I"
reflected Frank Kavanagh, drawing from his vest-
pocket two ten-cent pieces of currency and a
nickel. That isn't much, but it will have to
do."
The speaker, a boy of fifteen, was sitting on
a bench in City-Hall Park. IIe was apparently
about fifteen years old, with a face not hand-
some, but frank and good-humored, and an ex-
pression indicating an energetic and hopeful
temperament. A small bundle, rolled up in a
handkerchief, contained his surplus wardrobe. He
had that day arrived in New York by a boat
from Hartford, and meant to stay in the city if
he could make a living.






THE TELEGRAPH BOY. 15


FREE LUNCH."

"How much money have you got, Frank?"
inquired Montagu Percy.
"Twenty-five cents."
"Lunch at this establishment is free," said
Montagu; "but you are expected to order some
drink. What will you have?"
"I don't care for any drink except a glass of
water."
All right; I will order for you, as the rules of
the establishment require it; but I will drink your
glass myself. Eat whatever you like."
Frank took a sandwich from a plate on the counter
and ate it with relish, for he was hungry. Mean-
while his companion emptied the two glasses, and
ordered another.
Can you pay for these drinks?" asked the bar-
tender, suspiciously.
"Sir, I never order what I cannot pay for."
"'I don't know about that. You've been in here
and taken lunch more than once without drinking
anything."






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



Next to him sat a man of thirty-five, shabbily
dressed, who clearly was not a member of any
temperance society, if an inflamed countenance
and red nose may be trusted. Frank Kavanagh's
display of money attracted his attention, for,
small as was the boy's capital, it was greater
than his own.
"Been long in the city, Johnny?" he inquired
"I only arrived to-day," answered Frank. "My
name isn't Johnny, though."
"It's immaterial. Johnny is a generic term,"
said the stranger. "I suppose you have come
here to make your fortune."
"I shall be satisfied with a living to begin
with," said Frank.
"Where did you come from?"
"A few miles from Hartford."
"Got any relations there?"
"Yes, an uncle and aunt."
"I suppose you were sorry to leave them."
"Not much. Uncle is a pretty good man, but
he's fond of money, and aunt is about as mean
as they make 'em. They got tired of supporting



10






THEJ TELEGRAPH BOY.



"It may be so. I will make up for it now.
Another glass, please."
First pay for what you have already drunk."
"Frank, hand me your money," said Montagu.
Frank incautiously handed him his small stock of
money, which he saw instantly transferred to the
bar-tender.
"That is right, I believe," said Montagu Percy.
The bar-keeper nodded, and Percy, transferring his
attention to the free lunch, stowed away a large
amount.
Frank observed with some uneasiness the transfer
of his entire cash capital to the bar-tender; but
concluded that Mr. Percy would refund a part after
they went out. As they reached the street he
oroached the subject.
I didn't agree to pay for both dinners," he said,
uneasily.
"Of course not. It will be my treat next time.
That will be fair, won't it?"
"But I would rather you would give me back
a part of my money. I may not see you
again."



16





THE TELEGRAPH BOY. 11

me, and gave me money enough to get to New
York."
"I suppose you have some left," said the
stranger, persuasively.
"Twenty-five cents," answered Frank, laughing.
"That isn't a very big capital to start on, is it?"
"Is that all you've got?" asked the shabbily
dressed stranger, in a tone of disappointment.
"Every cent."
"I wish I had ten dollars to give you," sad
the stranger, thoughtfully.
"Thank you, sir; I wish you had," said Frank,
his eyes resting on the dilapidated attire of his
benevolent companion. Judging from that, he was
not surprised that ten dollars exceeded the chaii-
table fund of the philanthropist.
"My operations in Wall street have not been
fortunate of late," resumed the stranger; "and I
am in consequence hard up."
Do you do business in Wall street?" asked
Frank, rather surprised.
"Sometimes," was the reply. "I have lost
heavily of late in Erie and Pacific Mail, but it





TBR TELEGRAPH BOY. 17

I will be in the Park to-morrow at one
o'clock."
"Give me back ten cents, then," said Frank,
uneasily. That was all the money I had."
"I am really sorry, but I haven't a penny about
me. I'll make it right to-morrow. Good-day, my
young friend. Be virtuous and you will be happy."
Frank looked after the shabby figure ruefully. He
felt that he had been taken in and done for.
His small capital had vanished, and he was adrift
in the streets of a strange city without a poany.






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



is only temporary. I shall soon be on my feet
again."
"I hope so, sir," said Frank, politely.
"My career has been a chequered one," con
tinued the stranger. 4"I, too, as a mere boy,
came up from the country to make my fortune.
I embarked in trade, and was for a time success-
ful. I resigned to get time to write a play,--a
comedy in five acts."
Frank regarded his companion with heightened
respect. He was a boy of good education, and
the author of a play in his eyes was a man of
genius.
Was it played?" he inquired.
"No; Wallack said it had too many difficult
characters for his company, and the rest of the
managers kept putting me off, while they were
producing inferior plays. The American public
will never know what they have lost. But, enough
of this. Sometime I will read you the 'Mother-
in-law,' if you like. Have you had dinner?"
"No," answered Frank. "Do you know where
I can dine cheap?" he inquired.



12






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



18



"Yes," answered the stranger. "Once I boarded
at the Astor House, but now I am forced, by dire
necessity, to frequent cheap restaurants. Follow
me."
What is your name, sir?" asked Frank, as
he rose from the bench.
"Montagu Percy," was the reply. Sorry I
haven't my card-case with me, or I would hand
you my address. I think you said your name
was not Johnny.
"My name is Frank Kavanagh."
"A very good name. 'What's in a name?'
as Shakespeare says."
As the oddly assorted pair crossed the street,
and walked down Nassau street, they attracted
the attention of some of the Arabs who were
lounging about Printing-House square.
"I say, country, is that your long-lost uncle?"
asked a boot-black.
No, it isn't," answered Frank, shortly.
Though he was willing to avail himself of Mr.
Percy's guidance, he was not ambitious of being
regarded as his nephew.






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



" Heed



not their



ribald



scoffs,"



said Montagu



Percy,
the idle



loftily.
wind,'



" Their



which I



words



regard



pass by



me like



not."



" Who



painted your nose, mister?"



boy, of course



addressing Frank's



asked another



companion.



" I will hand you over



to the next policeman,"



exclaimed



Percy,



angrily.



"Look out he don't haul you in, instead,"
retorted the boy.



Montagu



Percy



made



a motion to



pursue his



tormentors,



but desisted.



" They



are beneath contempt,"



he said.



"It is



ever the lot of genius to



and ignoble.



be railed at



They referred to my



by the ignorant
nose being red,



but mistook the cause.



- the result



It is a cutaneous eruption,



of erysipelas."



"Is it?" asked Frank, rather mystified.



"I am



not a drinking man--that



is, I indulge



myself but rarely.



But here we are."



So saying
basement, F



he plunged d<
rank following



own some steps



him.



into



Our hero found



himself in



a dirty apartment,



provided with



a bar,



over which was a placard, inscribed:-



14



a






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



CHAPTER



II.



DICK RAFFERTY.



" I'VE been



genuine



a fool,"



mortification, as



had permitted



himself



said Frank
he realized



to be duped.



to himself, ir
how easily he
" I ought to



have stayed in the country.



Even a small



sum of money imparts



to its



sessor
quite



a feeling
penniless



of independence,



feels helpless



but one who



is



and apprehensive.



Frank was



unable even to purchase an apple



the snuffy old
stand near by.



apple-woman



who presided



over the



" What



am I going



to do?"



he asked



himself,



soberly.



" What



has



become



of your uncle ?"



asked a



boot-black.



Looking



up, Frank



recognized



one of



those who



had saluted Percy and himself



on their way to the



restaurant.



pos-



from



18






THE TELEGRAPH BOY. 19

"IHe isn't my uncle," he replied, rather resent-
fully.
"You never saw him before, did you?" continued
the boy.
No, I didn't."
"That's what I thought."
There was something significant in the young
Arab's tone, which led Frank to inquire, "Do you
know him?"
"Yes, he's a dead-beat."
A what?"
A dead-beat. Don't you understand English?"
He told me that he did business on Wall street."
The boot-black shrieked with laughter.
He do business on Wall street!" he repeated.
" You're jolly green, you are!"
Frank was inclined to be angry, but he had the
good sense to see that his new friend was right. So
he said good-humoredly, I suppose I am. You
see I am not used to the city."
"It's just such fellows as you he gets hold of,"
continued the boot-black. "Didn't he make you
treat?"






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



" I may as well



confess



it,"



thought



Frank.



"' This boy may help me with advice."



"Yes," he said aloud.



" I hadn't but twenty-five



cents,



and he made



me spend it all.



I haven't



cent left."



"Whew!"



ejaculated



the other



boy.



" You're



beginning'



business on a small capital."



".That's



so,l



said Frank.



" Do you



know any



way I can earn money?"



Dick Rafferty
rough, and now



was a good-natured boy, although
that Frank had appealed to him for



advice he



felt willing



to help him, if



he could.



What can you do?" he asked, in a
tone. Have you ever worked?"



" Yes,"
" What



"I



horse



business-like



answered Frank.
can you do?"



can milk



cows,



hoe



corn and potatoes, ride



to plough, and-



" Hold



up!"



said Dick.



" All them



things



to do you no good in New York.



cows as



a regular



thing



People don't



here."



" Of course



"And



I



know



that."



there aint much room



corn



a



goin'
keep



aint



20



for planting'






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



and potatoes.



Maybe you



could



get



a job



over in



Jersey."



rather



stay



in New York.



I



can do



some-



thing



here."



" Can



you



black



boots,



or sell papers?"



"6I can



learn."



" You



need money



to



set



up



in either



of them



lines,"



said Dick



Rafferty.



"Would



twenty-five



cents



have



been



enough?"



asked



Frank.



" You



could



have



bought



some



evening



papers



with that."



"I wish somebody would



lend me some money,"



said Frank;

my papers.



"I'd
Iwas



pay



it back as soon as I'd



sold



a fool to let that fellow swindle



me."



" That's



thinking' of



so,l
that



assented



now.



Dick;



I'd lend



" but



it's no good



you the money my-



self, if



I



had it;



but I've run out my account at the



Bank,



and can't



spare



the



money



present."



" How



long



have



you



been



in business? "



asked



Frank.



21



"I'd



*



Park



just



at






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



" Ever since I was eight



years old;



and I'm going



on fifteen now."
"You went to work early."



I had to.



Father



and mother both



Yesd
and I



was left



to take



care of myself."



" You



took



care of yourself when you were only



eight years



old ? "



asked



Frank,



in surprise.



" Then



I ought



to make a living, for I am fifteen,



- a year older than you are now."
Oh, you'll get along when you get started," said



encouragingly.



"11 There's



lots of things



"Is there anything to do that



doesn't require any



capital ?"



inquired



Frank,



anxiously.



"Yes,
"' Will



you can smash baggage."



people pay for



that ? "



asked Frank,



a smile.



" Of



course



the ferries



they will.



and steamboat



You jest hang



landin's,



round



and when



a



comes



by



with



a valise or



carpet-bag,



jest offer to carry it,



that's



" Is that what you call



smashing



baggage ?"



22



died,



Dick,
do."



to



with



chap



all."



you







THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



23



"Of course. What did you think it was?"
Frank evaded answering, not caring to display
his country ignorance.
Do you think I can get a chance to do that?'
he asked.
You can try it and see."
"I came in by the Hartford boat myself,
to-day," said Frank. "If I'd thought of it, I
would have begun at once."
"Only you wouldn't have knowed the way any-
where, and if a gentleman asked you to carry his
valise to any hotel you'd have had to ask where
it was."
"So I should," Frank admitted.
"I'll show you round a little, if you want
me to," said Dick. "I shan't have anything to do
for an hour or two."
"I wish you would."
So the two boys walked about in the lower part
of the city, Dick pointing out hotels, public build-
ings, and prominent streets. Frank had a reten-
Uve memory, and stored away the information
carefully. Penniless as he was, he was excited






24



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



and exhilarated by the scene of activity in which
he was moving, and was glad he was going to live
in it, or to attempt doing so.
When I am used to it I shall like it much
better than the country," he said to Dick. "Don't
you ?"
"I don't know about that," was the reply.
Sometimes I think I'll go West ; a lot of boys
that I know have gone there."
Won't it take a good deal of money to go?"
asked Frank.
Oh, there's a society that pays boys' expenses,
and finds 'em nice homes with the farmers. Tom
Harrison, one of my friends, went out six weeks
ago, and he writes me that it's bully. He's gone
to some town in Kansas."
"That's a good way off."
"I wouldn't mind that. I'd like ridin' in the
cars."
"It would be something new to you; but I've
lived in the country all my life, I'd rather stay
here awhile."
"It's just the way a feller feels," said Dick





THE TELEGRAPH BOTY



philosophically.



"I've



bummed



around



so much



I'd like a good, stiddy home,
meals a day and a good bed
"Can't you get that here?"
"Not stiddy. Sometimes I
square meal a day."
Frank became thoughtful.
seemed more precarious and



with three square
to sleep on."
asked Frank.
don't get but one



Life in the
less desirable
t



city
than



he anticipated.
Well, I must go to work again," said Dick,
after a while.
Where are you going to sleep to-night?"
asked Frank.
"I don't know whether I'd better sleep at the
Astor House or Fifth avenue," said Dick.
Frank looked perplexed.
"You don't mean that, do you?" he asked.
"Of course I don't. You're too fresh. Don't
get mad," he continued good-naturedly, seeing the
flush on Frank's cheek. "You'll know as much
about the city as I do before long. I shall go
to the Newsboys' Lodgin' House, where I can
sleep for six cents."



25



0



I






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"I wish I had six cents," said



could



only get



can't think



work I'd



of anything



Frank.



soon earn it.



for



me to do,



" If
You
can



you ?"



Dick's



face lighted



" Yes," he



said,



" I can



get



you



a job, though



it aint a very good



one.



I wonder I



didn't think



of it before."



"( What



"It's to go
contributions."



is it?" asked



round



with



Frank,



a blind



anxiously.



man,



solicitin'



"You
"Yes;



mean



begging ?"



you lead



him into



stores



and counting'



rooms,



and he asks for money."



" I don't



" but
that's



like it much,"



I must do something.



said Frank,



After



all,



slowly,



it'll be he



begging, not I."



" I'll take



you right



round



where



he lives,"



said Dick.



"Maybe



he'll



go



out this evening .



His other



boy give



him the



slip,



and he hasn'



a new one yet."



26



I



up.



got





THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



CHAPTER III.

FRANK FINDS AN EMPLOYER.

A STONE'S throw from Centre street stands a tall
tenement-house, sheltering anywhere from forty to
fifty families in squalid wretchedness. The rent
which each family pays would procure a neat
house in a country town, with perhaps a little land
beside; but the city has a mysterious fascination
for the poorer classes, and year after year many
who might make the change herd together in con-
tracted and noisome quarters, when they might have
their share of light and space in country neighbor-
hoods.
It was in front of this tenement-house that Dick
halted, and plunged into a dark entrance, admon-
ishing Frank to follow. Up creaking and dilapi-
dated staircases to the fourth floor the boys went.
"Here we are," said Dick, panting a little from
the rapidity of his ascent, and began a vigorous
tattoo on a door to the left.






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"Is
Frank,
He



this where the blind gentleman 1
looking around him dubiously.
isn't much of a gentleman to I



.ives?" asked


look at," said



Dick, laughing. "Do you hear him?"
Frank heard a hoarse growl from the inside, which
might have been "Come in." At any rate, Dick
chose so to interpret it, and opened the door.
The boys found themselves in a scantily fur-
nished room, with a close, disagreeable smell per-
vading the atmosphere. In the corner was a low
bedstead, on which lay a tall man, with a long,



gray beard, and a disagreeable, almo
countenance. He turned his eyes, wh
to Frank's expectations, were wide ope
his visitors.
"What do you want?" he asked
"I was asleep, and you have waked
"Sorry to disturb you, Mr. Mills,
"but I come on business."
What business can you have wit
handed the blind man. "Who are y
I am Dick Rafferty. I black boots
replied Dick.



st repulsive,
ich, contrary
n, full upon


querulously.
me up."
" said Dick;



;h me ?" dle
ou ? "
in the Park,"



28






THE TELEGRAPfH BOY.



29



Well, I haven't got any money to pay for
blacking boots."
I didn't expect you had. I hear your boy has
left you."
Yes, the young rascal! He's given me the slip.
I expect he's robbed me too; but I can't tell, for
I'm blind."
Do you want a new boy ?"
Yes; but I can't pay much. I'm very poor.
I don't think the place will suit you."
Nor I either," said Dick, frankly. I'd rather
make a living outside. But I've got a boy with
me who has just come to the city, and is out of
business. I guess he'll engage with you."
What's his name? Let him speak for himself."
"My name is Frank Kavanagh," said our hero,
in a clear, distinct voice.
How old are you?"
Fifteen."
Do you know what your duties will be?"
Yes; Dick has told me."
"I told him you'd want him to go round on
a collecting tour with you every day," sail Dick.






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"That



isn't all.



You'll



have to buy



my gro-



series



and all



I need."



"I can do that,"



said Frank, cheerfully, reflecting



that this would



be much



more agreeable



accompanying



"Are



you



the old man



honest ?"



round



queried



the streets.



the blind



man,



sharply.



Frank



answered,



with



an indignant



never stole a cent in my life."



"I supposed



you'd



say that,"



retorted



the blind



man,
many



with



a sneer.



" They



all do;



but



a good



will steal for all that."



"If you're



afraid



I



will, you needn't



hire me,"



said Frank,



independently.



"Of course I needn't,"



said Mills, sharply;



am not



afraid.



If you



take any of



my money



I shall be sure to find



it out,



if I am blind."



"Don't



mind



him, Frank,"



said Dick,



in a low



voice.



"1 What's



that ?"



asked



the blind



man,



suspi-



ciously.



" What



are you two whispering



about ?"



" I told Frank



not to mind the way you spoke,"



said Dick.



80



than



flush,



" I



I



" but






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"Why not?"
"Because, if he's honest, it



don't matter."



ThI
'Now
I'll
felt tha
This
Yes
a week
come a:
An



at's so," said Mills, partially
what pay do you expect?"
leave that to you," said our
t he was not in a position to ma
answer seemed to please the bli
3, yes, that is right. I can tel:
what I can afford to pay you.
nd try how you suit me."
1 I to stay here?" asked Frank



satisfied.



hero, who
ke terms.
.nd man.
I better in
I'11 let you



S.



N *



"Yes; there's a bed in the other room. GIo in
and see it."
The boys entered an inner room, where there
was a heap of rags on the floor, and no other
article.
"There's your bed, Frank," said Dick, pointing
to the rags.
"Have I got to sleep there?" asked Frank, in a
tone of dissatisfaction.
"Oh, it'll be comfortable enough," said Dick,
whose street life had cured him of fastidiousness,
if he had ever been troubled by that feeling.



81



i Q






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



" If you'd slept on
as often as I have
"1 guess I can



wharves and in empty wagons
you wouldn't mind that."
stand it," said Frank, stifling



his dissatisfaction; "but I've always slept in a
bed."
Oh, you'll like it well enough," said Dick.
carelessly. "Well, I must leave you now, I've
got to earn my supper."
"Do you want me now, sir?" asked Frank, of
his new master.
"Yes; I want you to get me something to eat.
You can go with this boy, and he'll tell you
where to get it."
"What shall I boy, sir?"
"Buy a loaf of bread at the baker's, and a
bottle of ale."
"Yes, sir."
"You can pay for it, and I will pay you when
you get back."
"I have no money," said Frank, embarrassed.
"No money!" snarled the blind man.
"No, sir; I only brought twenty-five cents with

me, and that I have sentt"



-



32



II



h



I



--r ----






THE TELEGRAPH BOL



" Your

"Not



friend

much,"



will lend

answered



you some,



Dick,



then."



laughing.
n0 z



;' I'm



dead-broke.



Haven't



you got



any money,



Mills?"



" I have



" but

back."



a



this boy



little,"



grumbled



may take it,
to7



the blind



and



never



man;
come



"If you think so,"
4Vi



said Frank, proudly,



"you'd



better



engage
Z", z



some other



boy."



use; you're



all alike.



Wait a



minute,



and I'll give



you some money."
vd



He drew



from



his pocket



a roll of scrip,



handed



one to Frank.



" I don't



think



that will be enough,"



Frank.



" It's



only



five cents."



" Are



you



sure it isn't



a quarter?"



grumbled



Mills.

Yes, sir."



"1 What



do



"It's only



you say, you, Dick ?"



five cents,



sir."



"Is that twenty-five?"

"Yes, sir."



" Then



take



it, and mind



you don't



loiter."



38



Mr.



" No



and



said






4THE TELEGRAPH BO .



" Yes. sir."



"And



be



sure to bring



back the change."



" Of course I



will,"



said Frank



indignantly,



resenting
What



his employer's



do



you



think



suspicion.
of him,



Frank ? "



asked



Dick,



as they descended



" I don't



like him at



the stairs.
all, Dick,"



said Frank,



decidedly.



" I wish I could



get something



to do."



" You can,



after



a while.



capital
"So



you must take
I suppose; but



what you



can



I didn't come



"get now.
to the city



fr this.



like it



you



can leave



in



afew



days."



This Frank



fully resolved



to do at



the first



favorable opportunity.



Dick showed



articles
Frank,



he



him where



was commissioned



after obtaining



them,



he could



buy



to purchase;



the
and



went back to the



tenement-house.

Mills scrupulously



demanded



the change,



made Frank



else



As



you



have



no



"If



you



don't



and



34



it back into



put



his pocket.



Then he






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



35



pour out the ale into a glass. This he drank
with apparent zest, but offered none to Frank.
"Ale isn't good for boys," he said. "You can
cut the bread, and eat two slices. Don't cut then
too thick."
The blind man ate some of the bread himself,
and then requested Frank to help him on with
his coat and vest.
I haven't taken any money to-day," he said
"I must try to collect some, or I shall starve.
It's a sad thing to be blind," he continued, his
voice changing to a whine.
You don't look blind," said Frank, thought-
fully. "Your eyes are open."
"What if they are?" said Mills, testily. "I
cannot see. When I go out I close them, because
the light hurts them."
Led by Frank, the blind man descended the
stairs, and emerged into the street.






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



CHAPTER IV.

"PITY THE BLIND."



" WHERE



shall I



lead you?"



asked



Frank.



"To Broadway



" Yes,



first.



Do you know Broadway?"



sir."



"Be careful



when we cross the



street, or you



will have me run over."
"All right, sir."



one asks



you about me,



say I am



your uncle."
But you are not."



" What



fool?"



difference



does that make,



said the blind man, roughly.



you



" Are



ashamed to own me as your uncle?"



Frank
" No;"



felt obliged,



out of politeness,



to



but in his own mind he was not



say



quite



sure whether



he would



be willing



to acknowledge



any relationship



whom



to the disagreeable



he was leading.



36



" If



any



little
you



Sold



man






THE TELEGRAPH BOY. 37

They reached Broadway, and entered a store
devoted to gentlemen's furnishing goods.
Charity for a poor blind manI" whined Mills,
in the tone of a professional beggar.
"Look here, old fellow, you come in here too
often," said a young salesman. "I gave you
five cents yesterday."
"I didn't know it," said Mills. "I am a poor
blind man. All places are alike to me."
Then your boy should know better. Nothing
for you to-day."
Frank and his companion left the store.
In the next they were more fortunate. A
nickel was bestowed upon the blind mendicant.
How much is it?" asked Mills, when they
were on the sidewalk.
Five cents, sir."
"That's better than nothing, but we ought to
do better. It takes a good many five-cent pieces
to make a dollar. When you see a well-dressed
lady coming along, tell me."
Frank felt almost as much ashamed as if he
were himself begging, but he must do what was






THE TELEGRAPH BOT.



expected



of him.



Accordingly



notified



the blind



man that a lady



was close at



hand.



" Lead



me up to her,



and



say,



Can



you spare



something for my poor, blind uncle?"



Frank



complied



in part,



but



instead



of poor,



uncle "



he said "poor,



blind



man."



scowled,



as he



found



himself disobeyed.



"How long has he
sympathetically.



been blind?"



asked



the lady,



" For many years,"



whined



Mills.



"Is this your



boy ?"



" Yes,



ma'am;



he is my



young



nephew,



the country."



" You



are fortunate



in having him



to go about



with you."



" Yes,



ma'am; I don't



know what



I should



without him."



" Here



is something



for



you, my good man,"



said the lady, and passed on.



" Thank you, ma'am.



May Heaven bless you! "



" How



much



is it ?" he asked



quickly,



the lady was out of hearing.



38



he



very



soon



blind



Mills



from



do



when






THE TELE GRAPH B Y.



39



Two cents," answered Frank, suppressing with
difficulty an inclination to laugh.
"The mean jade! I should like to wring her
neck!" muttered Mills. "I thought it was a
quarter, at least."
In the next store they did not meet a cordial
reception.
Clear out, you old humbug!" shouted the
proprietor, who was in ill-humor. You ought
to be put in the penitentiary for begging about
the streets."
I pray to God that you may become blind
yourself," said Mills, passionately.
Out of my store, or I'll have you arrested,
both of you!" said the angry tradesman. "Here,
you boy, don't you bring that old fraud in
this store again, if you know what's best for your-
self."
There was nothing to do but to comply with
this peremptory order.
"He's a beast!" snarled Mills;" I'd like to
put his eyes out myself."
You haven't got a very amiable temper,"






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



thought Frank. "I w
but even if I were, I -
Two young girls, pas
man. They were sofl
inquire how long he ha
Before you were b
Mills, sighing.
I have an aunt w
the girls; "but she is
I am very poor,"
not money enough to
be turned out into the
How sad! said



couldn't like to be blind;
would try to be pleasanter."
ssing by, noticed the blind
t-hearted, and stopped to
d been blind.
orn, my pretty maid," said



vho is blind,"



said one



of



not poor, like you."
whined Mills; I have
pay my rent, and I may
street."
the young girl, in a tone



of deep sympathy. I have not much money,
but I will give you all I have."
May God bless you, and spare your eyes!"
said Mills, as he closed his hand upon the
money.
How much is it?" he asked as before, when
they had passed on.
Twenty-five cents," said Frank.
"That is better," said Mills, in a tone of
satisfaction.



40



I






THE TELEGRAPh BOY. 41

For some time afterwards all applications were
refused ; in some cases, roughly.
"Why don't you work?" asked one man, bluntly.
"What can I do?" asked Mills.
"That's your lookout. Some blind men work.
I suppose you would rather get your living by
begging."
"I would work my fingers to the bone if I
could only see," whined Mills.
So you say; but I don't believe it. At any
rate, that boy of yours can see. Why don't you
set him to work?"
He has to take care of me."
"I would work if I could get anything to do,"
said Frank.
As he spoke, he felt his hand pressed forcibly
by his companion, who did not relish his answer.
"I cannot spare him," he whined. "He has
to do everything for me."
When they were again in the street, Mills de-
manded, roughly, What did you mean by saying
that ?"
What, sir?"






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"That you wanted



" Because it is



to go to work."



true."



You are
said Mills.
"I would



at work;



rather



work



you



in



are working



a store,



for me,"



or an office,



or sell



papers."



", That



wouldn't



do



me any good.



Don't



speak



in that



way again."



The two were out about s
very tiresome Frank found it.



a couple
Then



of hours,



and



Mills indicated



a desire



to



go home,



and they



went back to the



in the old tenement-house.



"Mills threw



self down on the



bed in



the



corner,



and heaved



sigh of relief.



" Now, boy, count the



money we have



collected,"



he said.



" There's



ninety-three



cents,"



Frank



announced.



"If I had known



it was so near a dollar



would have



stayed a little



longer.



Now, get me my



pipe."



" Where is it,



"In the cupboard.



light



Fill it with tobacco, and



it."



42



room



him-



a



we



sir ? "






THE TELEGRAPH BOY. 43

"Are you not afraid of setting the bedding on
fire, sir?"
Mind your own business. If I choose to set
it on fire, I will," snarled Mills.
Very well, sir; I thought I'd mention it."
"You have mentioned it, and you needn't do it
again."
What a sweet temper you've got I" thought
Frank.
He sat down on a broken chair, and, having
nothing else to do, watched his employer. "He
looks very much as if he could see," thought
Frank; for Mills now had his eyes wide open.
What are you staring at me for, boy?" de-
manded his employer, rather unexpectedly.
"What makes you think I am staring at you,
sir?" was Frank's natural question. "I thought
you couldn't see."
No more I can, but I can tell when one is
staring at me. It makes me creep all over."
"Then I'll look somewhere else."
Would you like to do some work, as you said? "
Yes, sir."






44



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"Then take twenty-five cents, and buy some
evening papers and sell them; but mind you
bring the money to me."
"Yes, sir," said Frank, with alacrity.
Anything he thought would be better than sit-
ting in that dull room with so disagreeable a
companion.
"Mind you don't run off with the money,"
said the blind man, sharply. "If you do I'll
have you put in the Tombs."
"I don't mean to run away with the money,"
retorted Frank, indignantly.
"And when you've sold the papers, come home."
"Yes, sir."
With a feeling of relief, Frank descended the
stairs and directed his steps to the Park, meaning
to ask Dick Rafferty's advice about the proper way
to start in business as a newsboy.





THE TELE GRAPH BOY.



CHAPTER



V.



FRANK



THROWS UP HIS SITUATION.



FRANK



found



his friend



on



Park



Row,



made



known



his errand.



"So old Mills



wants



you



to sell papers for



his benefit, does



he? "



" Yes,



but I'd rather



do it than



to stay with



him.



" How
" That
"You'd



much



has he agreed



isn't settled



better



bring



to



pay you?"



yet."



him to the point,



or he



won't



pay you anything



except



board



and lodg-



ing,



and mighty



"I won't
said Frank.



mean both



say anything



" What



of them



about



papers shall



will be."



it the first day,"



I



buy ? "



" It's



rather



late.



You'd



better



try



for Tele-



grams."



Frank



did so, and succeeded



in selling



dozen,



yielding



a profit



of six cents.



45



and



half



a



It



was






46



THE TELEGRAPH OY.



not a brilliant beginning, but he was late in the
field, and most had purchased their evening
papers. His papers sold, Frank went home and
announced the result.
"Umph!" muttered the blind man. Give me
the money."
Here it is, sir."
Have you given me all?" sharply demanded
Mills.
Of course I have," said Frank, indignantly.
"Don't you be impudent, or I will give you
a flogging," said the blind man, roughly.
"I am not used to be talked to in that way,"
said Frank, independently.
"You've always had your own way, I suppose,"
snarled Mills.
No, I haven't; but I have been treated
kindly."
You are only a boy, and I won't allow you
to talk back to me. Do you hear?"
Yes."
Then take care to remember."
You've got a sweet disposition," thought






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



47



Frank. I won't stay with you any longer than
I am obliged to."
Several days passed without bringing any in-



cidents worth recording. Fro
walk with the blind man,
morning, sometimes in the
walks were very distasteful to
panion of a beggar, he felt
were begging. He liked better
in selling papers, though he
himself. In fact, his wages v
Thus far his fare had consist
with an occasional bun. He
vigorous boy, and he felt the
some other hearty food, and ve
as much to his employer.
"So you want meat, do you
Yes, sir; I haven't tasted



Perhaps
Delmonico's
Frank was
known name
him, and he



Ink took a daily
sometimes in the
afternoon. These
him. The com-
as if he himself
the time he spent
reaped no benefit
vere poor enough,
ted of dry bread
was a healthy,



need



of meat, or



ntured to intimate


?" snarled Mills.
anv for a week."'



you'd like to take your meals at
? sneered the blind man.
i so new to the city that this well-
0 did not convey any special idea to
answered Yes."



%.f %-



v






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



" That's



what I



thought!"



exclaimed



Mills,



angrily.
home."



" No,



" You want to eat me



I don't ;



out of



I only want enough



house



and



food to



up my



strength."



"I Well,



you are



getting



it. I give



you



all I



can afford."



k was inclined 1
that what he ate



over six or



earned
sale of



about



a



eight cents



for him twenty



papers,
dollar



besides



daily



to doubt



this.



did not cost his



a day,



He esti-
employer



and he generally



to thirty cents



helping



from those



on the



him to collect



who pitied



blindness.



He mentioned



his grievance



to his friend,



Rafferty.



you what to do,"



said Dick.



"I wish you



would."



Keep
papers,



some of
and buy



the money you



a square



make



meal at



by



selling



an eating'



house."



" I don't



like to do that;



it wouldn't



honest."



48



keep



Fran
mated



his



" I'll



tell



Dick



Sbe






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



49



Why wouldn't it?"
"I am carrying on the business for Mr. Mills.
He supplies the capital."
"Then you'd better carry it on for yourself."
"I wish I could."
"Why don't you?"
"I haven't any money."
"Has he paid you any wages?"
No."
"Then make him."
Frank thought this a good suggestion. He
had been with Mills a week, and it seemed fair
enough that he should receive some pay besides
a wretched bed and a little dry bread. Accord-
ingly, returning to the room, he broached the
subject.
What do you want wages for ?" demanded Mills,
displeased.
"I think I earn them," said Frank, boldly.
You get board and lodging. You are better off
than a good many boys."
"I shall want some clothes, some time," said



Frank.



p A










50



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



Perhaps you'd like to have me pay you a dollar
a day," said Mills.
I know you can't afford to pay me that. I will
be satisfied if you will pay me ten cents a day."
replied Frank.
Frank reflected that, though this was a very small
sum, in ten days it would give him a dollar, and
then he would feel justified in setting up a business
on his own account, as a newsboy. HIe anxiously
awaited an answer.
"1I will think of it," said the blind man eva-
sively, and Frank did not venture to say more.
The next day, when Mills, led by Frank, was on
his round, the two entered a cigar-store. Frank was
much surprised when the cigar-vender handed him a
fifty-cent currency note. He thought there was some
mistake.
"Thank you, sir," he said; "but did you mean
to give me fifty cents?"
"Yes," said the cigar-vender, laughing; "but I
wouldn't have done it, if it had been good."
"Isn't it good?"
"No, it's a counterfeit, and a pretty bad one. I






THE TELEGRAPH BOY. 51

might pass it, but it would cost me too much time
and trouble."
Frank was confounded. He mechanically handed
the money to Mills, but did not again thank the
giver. When they returned to the tenement-house,
Mills requested Frank to go to the baker's for a loaf
of bread.
"Yes, sir."
"Here is the money."
But that is the counterfeit note," said Frank,
scrutinizing the bill given him.
What if it is?" demanded Mills, sharply.
"It won't pass."
"Yes, it will, if you are sharp."
"Do you want me to pass counterfeit money, Mr.
Mills ?"
Yes, I do; I took it, and I mean to get rid
of it."
"But you didn't give anything for it."
That's neither here nor there. Take it, and offer
it to the baker. If he won't take it, go to another
baker with it."
I would rii ^ ii Fnk, rrml V






52



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"Rather not!" exclaimed Mills, angrily. "Do
you pretend to dictate to me?"
No, I don't, but I don't mean to pass any coun
terfeit money for you or any other man," said Frank,
with spirit.
Mills half rose, with a threatening gesture, but
thought better of it.
"You're a fool," said he. "I suppose you are
afraid of being arrested; but you have only to say
that I gave it to you, and that I am blind, and
couldn't tell it from good money."
But you know that it is bad money, Mr. Mills."
What if I do? No one can prove it. Take the
money, and come back as quick as you can."
"You must excuse me," said Frank, quietly, but
firmly.
"Do you refuse to do as I bid you?" de-
manded Mills, furiously.
"I refuse to pass counterfeit money."
Then, by Heaven, I'll flog you "
Mills rose and advanced directly towards Frank,
with his eyes wide open. Fortunately our hero was
near the door, and, quickly opening it, darted from






THE TELEGRAPH BOY. 53

the room, pursued by Mills, his face flaming with
wrath. It flashed upon Frank that no blind man
could have done this. He decided that the man
was a humbug, and could see a little, at all events.
His blindness was no doubt assumed to enable
him to appeal more effectively to the sympathizing
public. This revelation disgusted Frank. He could
not respect a man who lived by fraud. Counterfeit
or no counterfeit, he decided to withdraw at once
and forever from the service of Mr. Mills.
His employer gave up the pursuit before he
reached the street. Frank found himself on the
sidewalk, free and emancipated, no richer than when
he entered the service of the blind man, except in
experience.
"I haven't got a cent," he said to himself, but
I'll get along somehow."





54



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



CHAPTER VI.

FRANK GETS A JOB.

THOUGH Frank was penniless he was not cast
down. He was tolerably familiar with the lower
part of the city, and had greater reliance on him-
self than he had a week ago. If he had only had
capital to the extent of fifty cents he would have
felt quite at ease, for this would have set him
up as a newsboy.
"I wonder if I could borrow fifty cents of Dick
Rafferty," considered Frank. "I'll try, at any rate."
He ran across Dick in City-Hall Park. That
young gentleman was engaged in pitching pennies
with a brother professional.
I say, Dick, I want to speak to you a
minute," said Frank.
"All right! Go aheadI"
Ive lost my place."
Dick whistled.






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



Got sacked, have you?" he asked.
"Yes; but I might have stayed."
"Why didn't you?"
Mills wanted me to pass a count,
and I wouldn't."
Was it a bad-looking one?"
Yes."
"Then you're right. You might
nabbed."
That wasn't the reason I refused.
been sure there'd have been no trouble
have done it."
Why not?" asked Dick, who did
stand our hero's scruples.
Because it's wrong."
Dick shrugged his shoulders.
"I guess you belong to the church,
No, I don't; what makes you their
"Oh, 'cause you're so mighty par



erfeit



have



note,





got



If I had
I wouldn't



not under-





" he said.
ik so?"
'ticular. I



wouldn't mind passing it if I was sure I wouldn't
be cotched."
"I think it's almost as bad as stealing to buy
bread, or anything else, and give what isn't worth



55






56



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



anything for it. You might as well give a piece
of newspaper."
Though Frank was unquestionably right he
did not succeed in making a convert of Dick Raf-
ferty. Dick was a pretty good boy, considering
the sort of training he had had; but passing bad
money did not seem to him objectionable, unless
" a fellow was cotched," as he expressed it.
"Well, what are you going to do now? asked
Dick, after a pause.
"I guess I can get a living by selling papers."
You can get as good a livin' as old Mills gave
you. You'll get a better bed at the lodgin'-house
than that heap of rags you laid on up there."



But 1
haven't f
me fifty
"4 Fifty
take me
built or
but now



there's one
any money
cents ? "
cents!" re
for ? If I
Astor I m
I can't."



trouble,"
to start



:peate
Swas
eight



continued
on. Can



d Dick. "
connected
set you up



Frank, I
you lend



Whal
with
in



t do you
Vander-
business,



Twenty-five
Look here,



cents will do," said Frank.
Frank," said Dick, plunging



his






"THE TELEGRAPH BOY. 57

hands into his pocket, and drawing therefrom
three pennies and a nickel, "do you see them?"
Yes."
"Well, it's all the money I've got."
"I am afraid you have been extravagant, Dick,"
said Frank, in disappointment.
Last night I went to Tony Pastor's, and when
I got through I went into a saloon and got an ice-
cream and a cigar. You couldn't expect a feller
to be very rich after that. I say, I'll lend you
five cents if you want it."
No, thank you, Dick. I'll wait till you are
richer."
"I tell you what, Frank, I'll save up my
money, and by day after to-morrow I guess I
can set you up."
"Thank you, Dick. If I don't have the money
by that time myself I'll accept your offer."
There was no other boy with whom Frank felt
sufficiently well acquainLed to request a loan, and
he walked away, feeling rather disappointed. It
was certainly provoking to think that nothing but
the lack oi a small sum stood between him and






58



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



remunerative employment. Once started he deter-
mined not to spend quite all his earnings, but to
improve upon his friend Dick's practice, and, if
possible, get a little ahead.
When guiding the blind man he often walked
up Broadway, and mechanically he took the same
direction, walking slowly along, occasionally stop-
ping to look in at a shop-window.
As he was sauntering along he found himself
behind two gentlemen, one an old man, who
wore gold spectacles; the other, a stout, pleasant-
looking man, of middle age. Frank would not
have noticed them particularly but for a sudden
start and exclamation from the elder of the two
gentlemen.
"I declare, Thompson," he said, "I've left
my umbrella down-town."
"Where do you think you left it?"
"In Peckham's office; that is, I think I left
it there."
Oh, well, he'll save it for you."
"I don't know about that. Some visitor may
carry it away."







THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



Never
enough to



mind,
afford



Mr.
a new



It isn't the value
said his friend, in so
brella was brought me
John, who died. It is a
regard and value it. I
hundred dollars, nay, fi-
"If you value it s(
turn round and go back
Frank had listened
an idea struck him.
respectfully, "Let me



Bowen.
one."



You



the article,
Emotion.
from Paris



are



rich



Thompson,"
" That um-

by my son



as a souvenir of him th
I would not lose it f(
re hundred."
o much, sir, suppose
for it."
to this conversation,
Pressing forward, he
go for it, sir. I will



at
)r



I
a



we


and
said
get



it, and bring it to your house."
The two gentlemen fixed their eyes upon the
bright, eager face of the petitioner.
"Who are you, my boy?" asked Mr. Thompson.
I am a poor boy, in want of work," an-

swered our hero promptly.
"What is your name?"
"1 Frank Kavanagh."



Where do you
I am trying to



live? "
live in the city, sir."



59



((6
"41






60



THE TELEGRAPh BOY.



What have you been doing ?"
Leading a blind man, sir."
Not a very pleasant employment, I should
judge," said Thompson, shrugging his shoulders.
" Well, have you lost that job?"
Yes, sir."
So the blind man turned you off, did he?"
Yes, sir."
Your services were unsatisfactory, I suppose?"
"He wanted me to pass counterfeit money for
him, and I refused."
"If that is true, it is to your credit."
It is true, sir," said Frank, quietly.
Come, Mr. Bowen, what do you say,--shall
we accept this boy's services? It will save you
time and trouble."
If I were sure he could be trusted," said
Bowen, hesitating. He might pawn the umbrella.
It is a valuable one."
"I hope, sir, you won't think so badly of me
as that," said Frank, with feeling. If I were
willing to steal anything, it would not be a gift
from your dead son."






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



61



"I'll trust you, my boy," said the old gen-
tleman quickly. "Your tone convinces me that
you may be relied upon."
"Thank you, sir."
The old gentleman drew a card from his
pocket, containing his name and address, and on
the reverse side wrote the name of the friend at
whose office he felt sure the umbrella had been
left, with a brief note directing that it be handed
to the bearer.
"All right, sir."
Stop a moment, my boy. Have you got
money to ride ?"
No, sir."
Here, take this, and go down at once in the
next stage. The sooner you get there the better."
Frank followed directions. He stopped the next
stage, and got on board. As he passed the City-
Hall Park, Dick Rafferty espied him. Frank
nodded to him.
How did he get money enough to ride in a
"bus?" Dick asked himself in much wonderment.
"4' A few minutes ago he wanted to borrow some






62



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



money of me, and now he's spending ten cents
for a ride. Maybe he's found a pocket-book."
Frank kept on his way, and got out at Wall
street. He found Mr. Peckham's office, and on
presenting the card, much to his delight, the
umbrella was handed him.
"Mr. Bowen was afraid to trust me with it
over night," said Mr. Peckham, with a smile.
He thought some visitor might carry it off,"
said Frank.
Not unlikely. Umbrellas are considered
common property."
Frank hailed another stage, and started on his
way up-town. There was no elevated railway
then, and this was the readiest conveyance, as
Mr. Bowen lived on Madison avenue.





68



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.






CHAPTER VII.

AN INVITATION TO DINNER.



"MR. BOWEN must be a rich man," though
Frank, as he paused on the steps of a fine brown
stone mansion, corresponding to the number or
his card.
He rang the bell, and asked, "Is Mr. Bower
at home ?"
Yes, but he is in his chamber. I don't think
he will see you."
"I think he will," said Frank, who thought
the servant was taking too much upon herself,
" as I come by his appointment."
"I suppose you can come into the hall," said
the servant, reluctantly. Is your business im
portant ? "
"You may tell him that the boy he sent for
his umbrella has brought it. He was afraid he
had lost it."



t


1






TBE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"He sets great



the girl,



in



store by



a different



tone.



that umbrella,"



" I'11



go



said



and tell



him."



Mr. Bowen came downstairs



almost



immediately



There was a look of extreme



gratification



face.



my soul,



how quick



you



were !"



exclaimed.



" Why,



I've only



been home



a few



minutes.



Did



you



find the umbrella



at Mr. Peck-



ham's



office ? "



" Yes,



sir ;



it had been found, and



taken



of."



" Did



Peckham say



anything ?"



"He said you were



probably



afraid



to trust it



with him
said it."



" Peckham



over night,



but he smiled



will have his joke,



when



he



but he is an ex-



cellent
you."



man.



My boy, I



am much



indebted



"I



was very glad



to do the errand,



Frank.



" I think



you



said



you were



poor,"



said the



man, thoughtfully.



64



" Bless



upon



his



he



care



to



sir,"



said



old






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



Yes, sir. When
In the world."
"Haven't you any



I met you I hadn't a cent



way to



make



a



living ?"



Yes, sir. I could sell papers if I had enough

money to set me up in business."
"Does it require a large capital?"
"Oh, no, sir," said Frank, smiling, unless you
consider fifty cents a large sum."
"Fifty cents!" repeated the old gentleman, in
surprise. You don't mean to say that this small
sum would set you up in business?"
Yes, sir; I could buy a small stock of papers,
and buy more with what I received for them."

"To be sure. I didn't think of that."



Mr. Bowen w
had an ample in



Tas not a
come, and



man of business. He
his tastes were literary



and artistic. HE

men, and more
"Well, my bo
much do I owe

"I leave that

right will satisfy
Let me see



e knew more of books than of

of his study than of the world.
y," he said after a pause, "how

you for doing this errand?"

to you, sir. Whatever you think



h

dI



me."

, you wan1



t



fifty



cents



to buy



65



-I -



I






66



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



papers, and you will require something to pay
for your bed."
"Fifty cents in all will be enough, sir."
"I think I had better give you a dollar," said
the old gentleman, opening his pocket-book.
Frank's eyes sparkled. A dollar would do him
a great deal of good; with a dollar he would
feel quite independent.
"Thank you, sir," he said. It is more than
I earned, but it will be very acceptable."
He put on his hat, and was about to leave
the house, when Mr. Bowen suddenly said, Oh,
I think you'd better stay to dinner. It will be
onthe table directly. Myy niece is away, and if
you don't stay I shall be alone."
Frank did not know what to say. He was
rather abashed by' the invitation, but, as the old
gentleman was to be alone, it did not seem so
formidable.
I am afraid I don't look fit," he said.
"You can go upstairs and wash your face and
hands. You'll find a clothes-brush there also.
I'll ring for Susan to show you the way."






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



67



He rang the bell, and the girl who had ad.
emitted Frank made her appearance.
"Susan," said her master, "you may show
this young gentlemen into the back chamber on the
third floor, and see that he is supplied with towels
and all he needs. And you may lay an extra
plate; he will dine with me."
Susan stared first at Mr. Bowen, and then at
Frank, but did not venture to make any re-
mark.
"This way, young man," she said, and ascended
the front stairs, Frank following her closely.
She led the way into a handsomely furnished
chamber, ejaculating, Well, I never!"
"I hope you'll find things to your satisfaction,
sir," she said, dryly. "If we'd known you were
coming, we'd have made particular preparations for
you.1
"Oh, I think this will do," said Frank, smiling
for he thought it a good joke.
"I am glad you think it'll do," continued Susan.
" Things mayn't be as nice as you're accustomed
to at home."



I






68



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"Not qaite," said Frank, good-humoredly; "but
I shan't complain."
"That's very kind and considerate of you, I'm
sure," said Susan, tossing her head. "Well, I
never did!"
Nor I either, Susan," said Frank, laughing.
" I am a poor boy, and I am not used to this
way of living; so if you'll be kind enough to
give me any hints, so I may behave properly at
the table, I'll be very much obliged to you."
This frank acknowledgment quite appeased Susan,
and she readily complied with our hero's request.
"But I must be going downstairs, or dinner will



be late," she said, hurl
down when you hear th(
Frank had been well
in the city, and he was
ness was one of the first
leman. He therefore scru
till they fairly shone, and
great care.. Even then
rather shabby, and there



elbow



of his coat; but,



"iedly.
3 bell



"" You
ring."



can come



brought up, though not
aware that perfect neat-
characteristics of a gen-
ibbed his face and nands
brushed his clothes with
they certainly did look
was a small hole in the
on the whole, he looked






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



quite pf
room.
Take
Frank

used to
Take
Bowen, i
Frank
and more



issable



when



he. entered



the



dining-



that seat, my boy," said his host.
sat down and tried to look as if he was
it.



this soup to
n a dignified
started and s

that it was



Mr. Kavana,
tone.
miled slightly

an excellent



said Mr.



,feeling more

joke.



-' I wonder what Dick Rafferty would say if he

could see me now," passed through his mind.
He acquitted himself very creditably, however,
and certainly displayed an excellent appetite, much
to the satisfaction of his hospitable host.
After dinner was over, Mr. Bowen detained him
and began to talk of his dead son, telling anec-
dotes of his boyhood, to which Frank listened with
respectful attention, for the father's devotion was
touching.
"I think my boy looked a little like you,"
3aid the old gentleman. "What do you think,
Susan ? "
Not a mite, sir," answered Susan, promptly.



69



a



1



Thh






70



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



When he was a boy, I mean."
"I didn't know him when he was a boy, Mr
Bowen."
No, to be sure not."
But Mr. John was dark-complected, and this
boy is light, and Mr. John's hair was black, and
his is brown."
I suppose I am mistaken," sighed the old
man; "but there was something in the boy's face
that reminded me of John."
"A little more, and he'll want to adopt him,"
thought Susan. That wouldn't do nohow, though
he does really seem like a decent sort of a
boy."
At eight o'clock Frank rose, and wished Mr.
Bowen good-night.
Come and see me again, my boy," said the
old gentleman, kindly. "You have been a good
deal of company for me to-night."
"I am glad of it, sir."
"I think you might find something better to do
than selling papers."
"I wish I could, sir."






7.



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



Come and dine wit
and I may have some
"Thank you, sir."
Feeling in his pocket
safe, Frank set out to
to the lodging-house,
astonished that young
adventures.
"It takes you to g4
"I wonder I don't get
avenue."
"I give it up," saic



again this day week,
to tell you."



to see that his dollar was
walk down-town, repairing
where he met Dick, and
man by the recital of his



et round, Frank," he said.
invited to dine on Madison



i Frank.






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



CHAPTER VIII.

A NEWSBOY'S EXPERIENCES.



FRANK
found a



slept
much



that night at the
better bed than



lodging-house,
he had been



vided with by his 1
bright and early the i
a stock of morning i
in selling during the
thirty cents. It was
isfied. At any rate ]
off than when in the
course he had to ecoi



ate employer. He was up
iext morning, and purchased
papers. These he succeeded
forenoon, netting a profit of
not much, but he was sat-
he was a good deal better
employ of Mr. Mills. Of
nomize strictly, but the ex-



cellent arrangements of the lodging-house helped
him to do this. Twelve cents provided him with
lodging and breakfast. At noon, in company
with his friend Dick, he went to a cheap restau-
rant, then to be found in Ann street, near Park
row, and for fifteen cents enjoyed a dinner of two
courses. The first consisted of a plate of beef,



72



and
pro-



I






THE TELEGRAPH BOY. 73

with a potato and a wedge of bread, costing ten
cents, and the second, a piece of apple-pie.
That's a good square meal," said Dick, in a
tone of satisfaction. "I oughter get one every
day, but sometimes I don't have the money."
"I should think you could raise fifteen cents
a day for that purpose, Dick."
"Well, so I could; but then you see I save
my money sometimes to go to the Old Bowery,
or Tony Pastor's, in the evening. "
I would like to go, too, but I wouldn't give
up my dinner. A boy that's growing needs enough
to eat."
I guess you're right," said Dick. We'll go
to dinner together every day, if you say so."
"All right, Dick; I should like your company."
About two o'clock in the afternoon, as Frank
was resting on a bench in the City-Hall Park, a
girl of ten approached him. Frank recognized her
as an inmate of the tenement-house where Mills,
his late employer, lived.
"Do you want to see me?" asked Frank, ob-
serving that she was looking towards him.






74



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"You're the boy that went round with the
blind man, aint you?" she asked.
I Yes."
"He wants you to come back."
Frank was rather surprised, but concluded that
Mills had difficulty in obtaining a boy to succeed
him. This was not very remarkable, considering
the niggardly pay attached to the office.
"Did he send you to find me?" asked our
hero.
"Yes; he says you needn't pass that money if
you'll come back."
"Tell him that I don't want to come back,"
said Frank, promptly. "I can do better working
for myself."
"He wants to know what you are doing," con-
tinued the girl.
"Does he? You can tell him that I am a
newsboy."
"He says if you don't come back he'll have
you arrested for stealing money from him. You
mustn't be mad with me. That's what he told
me to say."






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"I don't



blame



you,"



said Frank,



hotly; "but



you can tell



him that he



is



a liar."



"Oh,



beat



I



wouldn't



dare to tell



him that;



he would



me."



"How



can he do that,



when



he can't



see where



are ? "



"I don't



to where



know



you



how it
are just



is,



but he can go



right



as well as if he could



see."



" So he



can.



He's



His eyes may not be



that.



a humbug



very good,



He pretends



and



but he



to be blind



a fraud.
can see
so as to



make



money."



" That's



what mother



and I



think,"



said the



" So you



won't



come



back ?"



"Not



much.



He



can hire



some



other



boy, and



starve



him.



" Aint



He won't



you



afraid



get me."
he'll have



you



arrested



stealing ?"



asked



the girl.



"If he tries that I'll



expose



him for wanting



me to



pass



a counterfeit



note.



never



cent from him."



" He'll



be awful mad,"



said the little



75



you



up



for all



girl.



for



took



girl






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



Let him. If he had treated me
would have stayed with him. Now I'm
him."
Mills was indeed furious when, by
had drawn from his young messenger
Aaa said. He was sorry to lose him,



most truthful
employed, an



d



and
he



4/



decently I
glad I left


degrees, he
what Frank
for he was



satisfactory guide
now regretted that



he
he



had
had



driven him away by his unreasonable exactions.
He considered whether it would be worth while
to have Frank arrested on a false charge of theft,
but was restrained by the fear that he would him-
self be implicated in passing counterfeit money,
that is, in intention. He succeeded in engaging
another boy, who really stole from him, and
finally secured a girl, for whose services, how-
ever, he was obliged to pay her mother twenty



every time she



went out with him.



Mean



and miserly as he was, he agreed
reluctance, and only as a measure of
As he became more accustomed to
pation Frank succeeded better. He
considerable energy, and was on the



to this with
necessity.
his new occu-
was a boy of
alert for cus-



76



tnje
evei



cents



I





THE TELEGRAPH BOY. 77

towers. It was not long before his earnings
exceeded those of Dick Rafferty, who was inclined
to take things easily.
One evening Dick was lamenting that he could not
go to the Old Bowery.
There's a bully play, Frank," he said. There's
a lot of fighting' in it."
What is it called, Dick?"
"' The Scalpers of the Plains.' There's five men
murdered in the first act. Oh, it's elegant!"
Why don't you go, then, Dick?"
Cause I'm dead-broke busted. That's why.
I paint had much luck this week, and it took all my
money to pay for my lodgin's and grub."

"Do you want very much to go to the theatre,
Dick ? "
Of course I do; but it aint no use. My credit
aint good, and I haint no money in the bank."
How much does it cost?"
Fifteen cents, in the top gallery."
"Can you see there?"
"Yes, it's rather high up; but a feller with good
eyes can see all he wants to there."






THE TELEGRAPH BOT.



" I'll tell you what



I'll do, Dick.



You have been



a good



friend



to me, and
i



I'll take



you at my



expense."



" You will?



To-night?"



" l Yes."
" You're



a regular



trump.



We'll



have



a staving



Sometime,



when I'm flush,



I'll return



compliment.



So the two boys went.



They were at



the doors,



early, and



secured



a front



seat in the gallery.



performance was well adapted



a boy,



uproarious



to please the taste of



and they enjoyed it exceedingly.



Dick



was



in his applause whenever a man was



killed.



"c Seems to me
said his friend.



you like to see men killed, Dick,"



"( Yes,



it's kinder



exciting. "



"I don't



like that part



so well



as some others,'



said Frank.



" It's



greatly
Frank



a stavin'
delighted.
assented.



play,



aint it ?" asked



Dick,



"1 I'll tell you what, Frank,"



said Dick;



" I'd like



78



time.



the



The






THE TELEGRAPH BOY. 79

to be a hunter and roam round the plains, killing'
bears and Injuns."
Suppose they should kill you? That wouldn't
suit you so well, would it?"
"No, I guess not. But I'd like to be a hunter,
wouldn't you?"
No, I would rather live in New York. I would
like to make a journey to the West if I had money
enough; but I would leave the hunting to other
men."
Dick, however, did not agree with his more sen-
sible companion. Many boys like him are charmed
with the idea of a wild life in the forest, and some
have been foolish enough to leave good homes, and,
providing themselves with what they considered
necessary, have set out on a journey in quest of the
romantic adventures which in stories had fired their
imaginations. If their wishes could be realized
it would not be long before the romance would
fade out, and they would long for the good homes,
which they had never before fully appreciated.
When the week was over, Frank found that he
had lived within his means, as he had resolved to






80



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



do; but he had not done much more. He began
with a dollar which he had received from Mr. Bowen,
and now he had a dollar and a quarter. There was
a gain of twenty-five cents. There would have
been a little more if he had not gone to the theatre
with Dick; but this he did not regret. He felt that
he needed some amusement, and he wished to show
his gratitude to his friend for various kind services.
The time had come to accept Mr. Bowen's second
dinner invitation. As Frank looked at his shabby
clothes he wished there were a good pretext for
declining, but he reflected that this would not be
polite, and that the old gentleman would make
allowances for his wardrobe. He brushed up his
clothes as well as he could, and obtained a boss
shine" from Dick. Then he started for the house on
Miadison avenue.
"I'll lend you my clo'es if you want 'em," said
Dick.
There are too many spots of blacking on
them, Dick. As I'm a newsboy, it wouldn't
look appropriate. I shall have to make mine
answer."






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



shine



up



the blackin'



spots



if you want me



" Never



mind,



Dick.



I'll wait till next



time for



your suit."



" I'll



81



to."






THE TELEGRAPH BOT.



CHAPTER



IX.



VICTOR DUPONT.



As Frank



was walking



on



Madison



avenue, a



little
met
Victo
at th



before
a boy
)r Dup(
ie hotel



had lived un
proud of hi
heavily upon
was glad to
Frank and h
and had be(



reaching the house of Mr. Bowen he
of his own age, whom he recognized.
ont had spent the previous summer
in the country village where Frank
til he came to the city. Victor was
s social position, but time hung so
Shis hands in the country that he
keep company with the village boys.
.e had frequently gone fishing together,
en associated in other amusements, so



that they were for the time
memories of home and past
upon our hero as he met I
flushed with pleasure.
Why, Victor," he said,
his hand, how glad I am to



1



quite intimate. The
pleasures thronged
Victor, and his face


eagerly, extending
see you I"



82






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



Frank forgot
not necessarily



that
lead



intimacy in
to intimacy



the
in



country
the city,



he was considerably surprised when Victor, no
appearing to notice his offered hand, said coldly
" I don't think I remember you."
Don't remember me!" exclaimed Frank,
amazed. "Why, I am Frank Kavanagh! Don't
you remember how much we were together last
summer, and what good times we had fishing
and swimming together?"
Yes, I believe I do remember you now,"
drawled Victor, still not offering his hand, or
expressing any pleasure at the meeting. When
did you come to the city?"
"I have been here two or three weeks," replied
Frank.
"Oh, indeed! Are you going to remain?"
"Yes, if I can earn a living."
Victor scanned Frank's clothes with a critical,
and evidently rather contemptuous, glance.
"What are you doing?" he asked. Are you
in a store ?"
No; I am selling papers."



83



does
and






THE TELEGRAPH



"A newsboy!"



said Victor,



BOY.

with



a curve



the lip.



answered



Frank,



his pleasure



chilled



by



Victor's manner.



"Are



you doing



well ?"



asked



Victor,



from curiosity tha
"I am making



in interest.
my expenses."



" How



do



you happen



to be in this neighbor-



hood?



I



"Yes,



suppose
but I a



you sell papers



,m invited



down-town."



to dinner."



" Not here on the



answered



avenue!"



Frank,



ejaculated



enjoying



Victor.



the other's



surprise.
Where?"



Frank



mentioned



the number.



" Why,



that is next to



my



house.



Mr. Bowen



lives there."
Yes."



" Perhaps



you



know



some



of the servants,"



suggested



Victor.



" I know



Victor's



one,"



thoughts;



said Frank
" but my



:, smiling,
invitation



for he read



comes



from



Mr. Bowen."



84



of



quite



more



" Yes,"



" Yes,"






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



" Did



you



ever dine there



before ? "



asked



tor, puzzled.



" Yes,



last week."



"sh You
should



1 must
hardly



excuse



think



my mentioning



you



would



it,



but I



like to sit down



a gentleman's



table



in that shabby



suit."



answered



Frank;



" but



better."



" Then



you ought



to decline



the invitation."



" I would,



but for appearing



" It seems very strange that



impolite."
Mr. Bowen



should



invite



a newsboy



to dinner."



" Perhaps



if you'd



mention



what



you



think



said Frank, somewhat



nettled,



"he would



call the invitation."



" Oh,



it's nothing



to me,"



said Victor;



" but



thought I'd mention



than



you



it,



as I



know more of etiquette



do."



You
a slight



are very



tinge



of



considerate,"



sarcasm



said Frank,



in his tone.



this time he had



reached



the house



of Mr.



Bowen,



and the two boys



Frank could



not help



parted.
thinking



a little



about



85



Vic-



at



I



have



no



it,"



of



re-



I



By



with



"< I don't,"






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



Victor
at it,



had said. His
seemed shabbier



suit,
than



as he
ever.



looked
Again



it occurred to him that perhaps Mr. Bowen had
forgotten the invitation, and this would make it
very awkward for him. As he waited for the
door to open he decided that, if it should appear
that he was not expected, he would give some
excuse, and go away.
Susan opened the door.
Mr. Bowen invited me to come here to



dinner to-night,"
"Yes, you are
to his relief. "
in."



began Frank, rather nervously.
expected," said Susan, very much
Wipe your feet, and come right



Frank obeyed.
You are to go upstairs
dinner," said Susan, and she
same chamber into which
ushered the week before.
There won't be much get
Frank. "However, I can stf
the bell ring."
As he entered the room



and get ready for
led the way to the
our hero had been



ting ready,"
ay there till



thought
I hear



he saw a suit of



86



what
down






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



clothes and some underclothing lying on t
bed.
"They are for you," said Susan, laconically.
"For me!" exclaimed Frank, in surprise.
Yes, put them on, and when you come dov



;he



to dinner
Is it
overwhelm
could see
Well,
it's likely
long, for



Mr. Bowen will see how they fit."
a present from him?" asked Frank,
ed with surprise and gratitude, for he
that the clothes were very handsome.
they aint from me," said Susan, "so
they come from him. Don't be too
Mr. Bowen doesn't like to have any



one late to dinner."
Susan had been in the service of her present
mistress fifteen years, and was a privileged char-
acter. She liked to have her own way; but had
sterling qualities, being neat, faithful, and indus-
trious.
"I wonder whether I am awake or dreaming,"
thought Frank, when he was left alone. I
shouldn't like to wake up and find it was all a
dream."
He began at once to change his shabby clothes



87



wn






88



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



for the new ones. He found that the articles
provided were a complete outfit, including shirt,
collar, cuffs, stockings; in fact, everything that
was needful. The coat, pants, and vest were a
neat gray, and proved to be an excellent fit. In
the bosom of the shirt were neat studs, and the
cuffs were supplied with sleeve-buttons to corre-
spond. When Frank stood before the glass, com-
pletely attired, he hardly knew himself. He was
as well dressed as his aristocratic acquaintance,
Victor Dupont, and looked more like a city boy
than a boy bred in the country.
"I never looked so well in my life," thought
our young hero, complacently. "How kind Mr.
Bowen is!"
Frank did not know it; but he was indebted
for this gift to Susan's suggestion. When her
master told her in the morning that Frank was
coming to dinner, she said, "It's a pity the boy
hadn't some better clothes."
"I didn't notice his clothes," said Mr. Bowen.
"' Are they shabby?"
"Yes; and they are almost worn out. They






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



don't look fit for
your table."
"Bless my soul!
think he needs som(
"I Ie needs them
"I will call at B
made; but I don't
He's about two



one who is going



to sit at



I never thought of that. You
e new clothes."
badly."
aldwin's, and order some ready-
know his size."
inches shorter than you, Mr.



Bowen. Tell 'em that, and they will know. He
ought to have shirts and stockings, too."
"So he shall," said the old man, quite inter-
ested. "He shall have a full rig-out from top to
toe. Where shall I go for the shirts and things?"
Susan had a nephew about Frank's age, and she
was prepared to give the necessary information.
The old gentleman, who had no business to attend
to, was delighted to have something to fill up



his time.



He went



out directly



after



breakfast,



or as soon as he had read the morning paper,
and made choice of the articles already described,
giving strict injunctions that they should be sent
home immediately.
This was the way Frank got his new outfit.



89






90 THE TELEGRAPH BOY.

When our hero came downstairs Mr. Bowen was
waiting eagerly to see the transformation. The
result delighted him.
Why, I shouldn't have known you!" he ex-
claimed, lifting both hands. "I had no idea new
clothes would change you so much."
"I don't know how to thank you, sir," said
Frank, gratefully.
I never should have thought of it if it hadn't
been for Susan."
"Then I thank you, Susan," said Frank, offer-
ing his hand to the girl, as she entered the room.
Susan was pleased. She liked to be appreci-
ated; and she noted with satisfaction the great
improvement in Frank's appearance.
"You are quite welcome," she said; "but it
was master's money that paid for the clothes."
It was your kindness that made him think
of it," said Frank.
From that moment Susan became Frank's fast
friend. We generally like those whom we have
benefited, if our services are suitably acknowl.
edged.





TrBS TELEGRAPH BOY.



CHAPTER



91



X.



A NEW PROSPECT.



WELL, Frank, and how is your business?"
asked the old gentleman, when they were sitting
at the dinner-table.
"Pretty good, sir."
Are you making your expenses?"
"Yes, sir; just about."
"That is well. Mind you never run into debt.
That is a bad plan."
I shan't have to now, sir. If I had had to
buy clothes for myself, I might have had to."
"Do you find the shirts and stockings fit
you ?"
6 6 iat 'h-vr ai-ra4- iMevbf-,.
TO ?)
C VnL r tr iCt ltth n tC



D a l; y JaLL UO
I bought half a dozen of
you the bundle when you
they had not been right, 1
exchanged."



each. Susan will
are ready to go.
they could have



give
If
been






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



" Thank



you,



sir. I shall



feel rich w ith



clothes."



" Where



do you



sleep, Frank ?"



"At the Newsboy's Lodging-House."



"Is there any



place there



where



you can keep



clothes ? "



"Yes,
"That



sir.
is



Each



boy



has



a good plan.



a locker



It would



to himself."



be better



if



had a room to



yourself."



" I can't afford



it yet, sir.



The lodging-house



costs
and I



me only



forty-two cents



could not get a room for



a week



for



a bed,



that."



"Bless my soul



think



I



could



That is



save money



very cheap.



by



giving



Really,
up my



house,



and going



there



to sleep."



" I don't



think



you



would



like it, sir,"



Frank,



smiling.



" Probably



not.



mention a plan I



Now, Frank,



have for



you.



I



am going



You don't



to be



a newsboy



all your life."



"" No,



sir;



I think I should



get



tired of it by



the time I



"My friend



was fifty."



Thompson, the gentleman who was



92



many



so



your



you



I



said



to



want






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



93



walking with me when we first saw you, is an
officer of the American District Telegraph Com-
pany. They employ a large number of boys at
their various offices to run errands; and, in fact,
to do anything that is required of them. Probably
you have seen some of the boys going about the
city."
** V Ct dic c;lv C11 t inr aT h1-3.1r ur tm- s" lC*^. u



Precisely.
situation of th
Very muc
"Would yo
boy ?"



ll ey al ve a u i UUIInormLU.
How would you like to get a
at kind ?"
"h, sir," said Frank, promptly.
u like it better than being a news-



Yes, sir."
"My friend Thompson, to whom I spoke on
the subject, says he will take you on in a few
weeks, provided you will qualify yourself for the
post."
I will do that, sir, if you will tell me how."
You must be well acquainted with the city
in all its parts, know the locations of different
hotels, prominent buildings, have a fair educa-
tion, and be willing to make yourself generally






94



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



useful. You will have to satisfy the superinten-
dent that you are fitted for the position."
"I think my education will be sufficient," said
Frank, for I always went to school till just be-
fore I came to the city. I know something
about the lower part of the city, but I will go
about every day during the hours when I am
not selling papers till I am familiar with all
parts of it."
Do so, and when there is a vacancy I will
let you know."
"How much pay shall I get, sir, if they ac-
cept me?"
About three dollars a week at first, and more
when you get familiar with your duties. No
doubt money will also be given you by some
who employ you, though you will not be allowed
to ask for any fees. Very likely you will get
nearly as much in this way as from your salary."
Frank's face expressed satisfaction.
"' That will be bully," he said.
I beg pardon," said the old gentleman, po-
litely. "What did you remark?"





THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"' That will be excellent," said Frank, blushing.
"I thought you spoke of a bully."
"It was a word I learned from Dick Raf-
ferty," said Frank, feeling rather embarrassed.
"And who is Dick Rafferty?"
"One of my friends at the Lodging-House."
"Unless his education is better than yours I
would not advise you to learn any of his words."
"I beg your pardon, sir."
"You must excuse my offering you advice. It
is the privilege of the old to advise the young."
I shall always be glad to follow your advice,
Mr. Bowen," said Frank.
Good boy, good boy," said the old gentle-
man, approvingly. I wish all boys were like
you. Some think they know more than their
grandfathers. There's one of that kind who lives
next door."
"His name is Victor Dupont, isn't it, sir?"
Mr. Bowen looked surprised. "How is it that
you know his name?" he asked.
"We were together a good deal last summer.
His family boarded at the hotel in the country






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



village



where



I used to live.



He and I went



bathing and



" Indeed!



fishing
Have



together."



you



seen him since



to the city ?"



"I met



him



as



I



was on my way



here this



afternoon."



"Did
"Yes,



he speak



sir ;



to you?"



though



at first he



pretended



didn't



remember



"Just



like him.



He is



a very



proud



ceited



boy.



Did you



tell him



you were coming



to dine with me ?"



"Yes,



sir.



IHe seemed



very much



surprised,



had just



he was



boy



told him I was a newsboy.



surprised



to dine with



that
you.



you



should



invite



He said
a news-



"I1 would



much



rather



have you



dine with me



than him.



What



more



did he say ? "



" He said he shouldn't



think



I



would



out to



dinner



with such



a shabby



suit."



"We



have removed



that objection,"



Bowen,



smiling.



" Yes,



sir,"



said Frank;



" I think



Victor will



96



you



came



me."



he



and



con-



I



as



go



like



to



said



Mr.






THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



me more



respectfully now when



he meets



"The respect of such a boy
importance. He judges only by t
At an early hour Frank took
rising to call again before long.

"4 Where can I send to you if
for a telegraph boy?" asked Mr.
"1 A letter to me addressed to
O'Connor at the lodging-house
said Frank.
"Write it down for me," said
II X r -*-10 1 f -' I1 0 -A



is
;he
his



of very little
outside."
leave, prom



you are wanted
Bowen.
the care of Mr.
will reach me,"



the old
* *1



gentle-
"-t



man. "ou will final writing materials on yonder
desk."
When Frank made his appearance at the lodg-
ing-house in his new suit, with two bundles, one
containing his old clothes, and the other his
extra supply of underclothing, his arrival made
quite a sensation.
"1 Have you come into a fortune? asked one



boy.
Did you
tery?" asked



draw a
another.



prize in



the Havana



treat
me."



97



lot.






98



THE TELEGRAPH BOY.



"Have you been playing policy?" asked a
third.
"You're all wrong," said Dick Rafferty.
"Frank's been adopted by a rich man upon
Madison avenue. Aint that so, Frank?"
Something like it," said Frank. There's a
gentleman up there who has been very kind to
me."
If he wants to adopt another chap, spake a
good word for me," said Patsy Reagan.
Whisht, Patsy, he don't want no Irish bog-
trotter," said Phil Donovan.
You're Irish yourself, Phil, now, and you
can't deny it."
What if I am? I aint no bog-trotter-- I'm



the son of an Irish count.
looks that I belong to the g
"Then the gintry must
freckles, Phil. There aint no
Tell us all about it,
" Shure I'm your best friend,
tion my name to the would gi



any more good clothes to



You can see by my
intry."
have red hair and
chance for you."
Frank," said Dick.
and you might men-
intleman if he's got



give away.