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Title: Improving F.O.B market facilities for fresh vegetables in Broward and Palm Beach counties
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 Material Information
Title: Improving F.O.B market facilities for fresh vegetables in Broward and Palm Beach counties
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Mathis, Kary
Wall, Bryan
Publisher: Food and Resource Economics Dept., IFAS, University of Florida
Publication Date: 1979
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States -- Florida -- Broward County
North America -- United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Title page
    Table of Contents
        Page i
    List of Tables
        Page ii
    List of Figures
        Page iii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
Full Text


DOCUMENT


MARSTON SCllNi. LibKAj


Staff Report















FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL MARKET RESEARCH CENTER
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611



















IMPROVING F.O.B. MARKET FACILITIES FOR FRESH

VEGETABLES IN BROWARD AND PALM BEACH COUNTIES

By

Kary Mathis and Bryan Wall


Staff Report 5


January 1979


Staff Papers are circulated without formal
review by the Food and Resource Economics
Department. Content is the sole responsi-
bility of the author.




Food and Resource Economics Department
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611













TABLES OF CONTENTS


Page

LIST OF TABLES ii

LIST OF FIGURES iii

INTRODUCTION . . . . ... . . 1

OBJECTIVES . . . . . . 2

PROCEDURES . . . . .. . . 2

Vegetable Production Patterns ........ .. . .. 2

Transportation Factors ... .. . 9

Market Users' Evaluation . .... ............ 13

Facilities used and evaluations . .... .14
Distance traveled . ... ......... .15
Market location . .. . ... 18
Market charges and volume . . .... .18

APPENDIX ......... . . . 23












LIST OF TABLES


Table Page

1 Farm characteristics and land use for Broward and
Palm Beach Counties. 4

2 Average acreage harvested, six major vegetables,
Broward and Palm Beach Counties 5

3 Distances from Broward and Palm Beach County vegetable
production areas to present and alternate F.O.B. market
sites. 12

4 Estimated average unit miles of travel from vegetable
producing areas in Broward and Palm Beach Counties to
present and alternate F.O.B. market sites. 13

5 Length of time associated with Pompano market. 14

6 Facilities used at Pompano market. 15

7 Market user preferences for expanding and/or improving
facilities at the Pompano market. 17

8 Preferences for shipping point market location expressed
by Pompano market users. 17

9 Market user opinions on Pompano market charges. 18

10 Estimated volume of vegetables physically handled
through the Pompano market by respondents. 19

11 Volume of vegetables market users would physically handle
through an F.O.B. market if it were improved 21

12 Yearly harvested acres of six vegetables, Broward and Palm
Beach Counties, 1960-61 through 1976-77. 22












LIST OF FIGURES

Figure Page

1 Snap beans and cucumbers: harvested acres, Broward
and Palm Beach Counties, 1960-61 through 1976-77. 6

2 Eggplant and tomatoes: harvested acres, Broward and
Palm Beach Counties, 1960-61 through 1976-77. 7

3 Peppers and squash: harvested acres, Broward and
Palm Beach Counties, 1960-61 through 1976-77. 8

4 Vegetable production areas and F.O.B. market sites in
Broward and Palm Beach Counties. 11

5 Mileage currently traveled to Pompano market by
market users, and miles users are willing to travel. 16









IMPROVING F.O.B. MARKET FACILITIES FOR FRESH VEGETABLES IN
BROWARD AND PALM BEACH COUNTIES

Kary Mathis and Bryan Wall


INTRODUCTION

The Pompano State Farmer's Market at Pompano Beach has been a major

F.O.B. market for fresh vegetables from south Florida since its construction

in 1939. The market, handling 4 to 5 million packages annually, is used

in one way or another by most vegetable growers in Broward and Palm

Beach Counties, as well as by some producers in other counties. Over

100 buying brokers have offices at the market, as well as selling brokers,

transfer operators and truck brokers.

Recently, many market users have raised questions with the Florida

Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services concerning improvements

needed at the Pompano market. Some growers have suggested that the

present location in Broward County is no longer suitable and that the

market should be moved to Palm Beach County. Many brokers and marketing

personnel have suggested that the location is satisfactory but that

remodeling is necessary. Growers have also noted that improvements and

additions to market facilities, wherever located, are also needed.

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS)

requested that the Florida Agricultural Market Research Center (FAMRC)

conduct an economic study of the questions of needed improvements and


Kary Mathis is associate professor in food and resource economics
and director, Florida Agricultural Market Research Center. Bryan Wall
is assistant professor in food and resource economics and extension
economist in marketing.







alternative locations. The FAMRC is a unit of the Food and Resource

Economics Department of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences,

University of Florida. Objectives for the FAMRC portion of this study,

and procedures used in reaching objectives are specified below.

OBJECTIVES

1. Determine what improvements market users feel are needed in
state-owned marketing facilities in the Broward-Palm Beach County
area.

2. Analyze the economic feasibility of various improvements, including
alternative locations, identified under Objective 1.

PROCEDURES

Questionnaires were sent to market users to assist in identifying

market facility needs, and to give users the opportunity to register

their evaluations of current and needed facilities and alternative

locations. Information from mail questionnaires were summarized and

analyzed, to assist in identifying needed improvements. Relevant

published data on vegetable production and marketing,, including current

status, trends, and facility usage, were collected and analyzed, to

assist in identifying and analyzing facility needs and locations.

Vegetable Production Patterns

As population in the state grows and becomes more urban, it is to

be expected that the number of farms and the proportion of land in farms

will decrease and the average size of those farms still actively producing

will increase. This has been the case in Broward County but not in Palm

Beach County. Since the 1949-50 agricultural census, Broward County has

experienced most of the effects of urban population growth on agriculture

mentioned above. Commercial farm acreage declined from 133,982 acres to








49,920 acres by 1974, and the total number of commercial farms dropped

from 305 to 192 during the same period (Table 1). This translates into

an average farm size of 224 acres in 1974, a decrease of 54 percent from

the 1949-50 average farm size of 493 acres. The percentage of county

land in commercial farms decreased from 42.1 to 5.9 percent.

In contrast, Palm Beach County experienced growth in land in farms.

In spite of population increases, commercial farm acreage increased from

373,758 acres to 503,617 acres between 1949-50 and 1974. Farm numbers

followed the same trend as in Broward County, but farm size increased.

The number of commercial farms in Palm Beach County declined from 527 to

382 over the same period and the average commercial farm size grew from

709 acres to 1,318 acres. The proportion of county land in farms moved

from 31.6 percent to 40.0 percent during the same 24 year time span.

The Pompano State Farmers Market is a state-owned and operated

shipping point market presently located in Pompano Beach, Broward

County. During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1978, fresh vegetables

valued at more than $31 million moved through the market. Of this

dollar volume, fully 75 percent or over $23 million was accounted for by

five fresh vegetable crops: snap beans, $11.3 million; cucumbers, $1.4

million; eggplant, $2.5 million; Calwonder peppers, $9.4 million; and

zucchini squash, $1.4 million. The balance of the dollar volume was

accounted for by various vegetables such as okra, peas, tomatoes, and

selected varieties of beans, peppers, and squash.

Production patterns for the five major crops sold through the

Pompano facility show Broward County production increasing relative to

Palm Beach County for eggplant and tomatoes (Figures 1-3 and Table 2).

The three-year averages were used in Table 2 to reduce the impact of

yearly fluctuations.















Table l.--Farm characteristics and land use for Broward and Palm Beach Counties.


Year
1949-50 1959-60 1964 1969 1974
Commercial farm Palm Palm Palm Palm Palm
characteristics Broward Beach Broward Beach Broward Beach Broward Beach Broward Beach


Acres 133,982 373,758 74,707 365,864 81,657 425,350 57,331 509,979 49,920 503,617

Number 305 527 257 454 247 403 195 442 192 382

Average size 439.3 709.2 288.7 806.0 202.5 1,055.4 294.0 1,151.4 224.0 1,318.0

Percent of county land area
in farms 42.1 31.6 10.4 29.4 11.1 35.4 7.8 40.7 5.9 40.0

Acres irrigated 84,346 193,826 8,881 78,629 13,775 315,334 19,964 238,395 7,961 308,346


Source: Census of Agriculture, U.S. Bureau of the Census.









major vegetables, Broward and Palm Beach Counties.


1960-61 thru 1962-63 1967-68 thru 1969-70 1974-75 thru 1976-77
Crop Unit Broward Palm Beach Broward Palm Beach Broward Palm Beach



Snap beans Acres 5,833 19,708 8,860 17,777 4,766 17,796

Percent 23 77 33 67 21 79

Cucumbers Acres ---- 2,527 ---- 1,737 ----- 1,283

Percent ----- 100 ----- 100 ----- 100

Eggplant Acres 215 1,388 190 873 313 1,057

Percent 13 87 18 82 23 77

Green peppers Acres 408 4,345 173 3,470 120 2,367

Percent 9 91 5 95 5 95

Squash, zucchini Acres 677 2,357 547 1,113 270 1,317

Percent 22 78 33 67 17 83

Tomatoesa Acres -- --- 395 2,195 387 1,658

Percent -- ------ 15 85 20 80

aData available only for years 1968-69 and 1969-70.

Source: Florida Agricultural Statistics: Vegetable Summary, Florida Crop and Livestock Reporting
Service.


Table 2.--Average acreage harvested, six



















= Snap beans
---- = Cucumbers


Palm Beach


Acres

22,500 -


20,000 -


17,500


15,000 -


12,500


10,000


7,500


5,000


2,500


0


Palm Beach

.- J--


I I 1,1 I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I


60-61


65-66


70-71


75-76 76-77


Figure l.--Snap beans and cucumbers: harvested acres, Broward and
Palm Beach Counties, 1960-61 through 1976-77.


Broward



















Acres

2,500- --- Tomatoes
= Eggplant

2,250


2,000


1,750


1,500- \ /\
I \
\ I \ /
\I
1,250 \ /
\ / \ Palm Beach --

1,000 \
\ I \

750


500 -
Broward
250


0 I I I 1 I I I I I I I I
60-61 66-67 71-72 76-77


Figure 2.--Eggplant and tomatoes: harvested acres, Broward and Palm
Beach Counties, 1960-61 through 1976-77.





8








Acres

= Peppers
6,000- = Squash





5,000





4,000-





3,000





2,000 \
\ Palm Beach




1 ,000 -
\


Broward


60-61 66-67 71-72 76-77


Figure 3.--Peppers and squash: harvested acres, Broward and Palm Beach
Counties, 1961-61 through 1976-77.








By individual crops, the relative share of snap bean production for

Broward County has fallen from 23 to 21 percent; in eggplant, Broward

County now produces 23 percent, up from 13 percent; for green peppers,

Broward's share has fallen from 9 to 5 percent; for squash, Broward's

share has gone from 22 to 17 percent; and for tomatoes, Broward's market

share has increased from 15 to 20 percent for Broward County.

While this may appear contradictory to the census data presented

initially, it must be remembered that Palm Beach County encompasses the

muck producing areas south and southeast of Lake Okeechobee. This area

has experienced an increase in intensive agricultural production but the

majority of the crops grown in this area are not marketed through a

state owned facility similar to the Pompano market.

When one considers only those crops marketed through the Pompano

State Farmers Market, Broward County has about the same production share

today as it did in the early 1960's. This conclusion is somewhat clouded

by the fact that production of snap beans and zucchini squash has reached

a peak and then fallen over the 16 year span covered here. Whether this

trend will continue or whether it will again increase is a matter of

speculation. To offset this decline, however, is a steady increase in

eggplant acreage in Broward County from 13'to 18 to 23 percent of the

total planted acreage of the two county area and an increase in tomato

acreage. Palm Beach County has also experienced a decline in cucumber

acreage of approximately 49 percent during the same time span.

Transportation Factors


Factors affecting transportation for harvested products handled in

the Pompano market were estimated, for distances between production areas

and market locations in each of the two counties. Major producing areas






for the six major vegetables (Table 2) in each county were identified

and distances from these areas calculated to the present market site

and to an alternative site in Palm Beach County. Five production areas

were identified in each county (Figure 4). The average distance from

each of the five areas in Broward County to the present market location

in Pompano Beach was 5.27 miles, while average distance to the Palm

Beach County location was 12.32 miles (Table 3). Total distance from

all five Broward County production areas was 26.34 miles to the present

market and 61.58 miles to the Palm Beach County alternate.

Thus, with 1,050,756 total units sold of the six major vegetables
1
from Broward County, average unit miles to the present site were

5,537,484 and to the Palm Beach County location, 12,945,313 (Table 4).

Unit miles from Palm Beach County production areas for the six vegetables1

were calculated the same way, giving 48,827,814 unit miles to the present

site and 31,588,169 to the Palm Beach County site. The unit miles

concept permits weighting the relative quantities between the two counties

in estimating relative costs.

The total distance from all 10 production areas in both counties is

greater to a Palm Beach County market site than to the present location,

91 miles compared with almost 72 miles (Table 3). However, because of

the larger volume in Palm Beach County, unit miles are about 18 percent

less to the Palm Beach site than to the present site in Pompano Beach

(Table 4).


Three-year average production, calculated from Florida Agricultural
Statistics: Vegetable Summary, Florida Crop and Livestock Reporting
Service.























































Figure 4. Vegetable production areas and F.O.B. market sites in
Broward and Palm Beach Counties.








Table 3.--Distances from Broward and Palm Beach County vegetable
production areas to present and alternate F.O.B. market
sites.



County and _Market site
production area Pompano market Palm Beach County


----------Miles------------


Broward


Area 1 A
B
C


Total


Average


Palm Beach
Area 1 A
B
C
2
3


Total


Total


Average


4.50
4.42
5.67
8.92
2.83

26.34
5.27


4.75
6.75
11.75
7.17
15.67

45.59
9.12

71.93


10.25
11.50
12.33
17.83
9.67

61.58
12.32


10.33
5.08
2.50
6.00
5.58

29.49
5.90

91.07


aSee Figure 4.

Possible alternate site located at northeast corner of inter-
section of Florida 7 and Florida 80.







Table 4.-- Estimated average unit miles of travel from vegetable
producing areas in Broward and Palm Beach Counties to
present and alternate F.O.B. market sites.



Average distance
Production Total to market sites Unit miles
area units sold Present Alternate Present Alternate

--------------------Miles ----------------- -----------

Broward 1,050,756 5.27 12.32 5,537,484 12,945,313

Palm Beach 5,353,927 9.12 5.90 48,827,814 31,588,160

Total 54,365,298 44,533,482



Actual dollar costs were not calculated, since costs per unit differ

among the vegetables and the volume of product of each type from each

production area is not known. Hauling costs per unit for the 1976-77

season for each product were2: beans 16.34; cucumbers 14.9t; eggplant

14.7; peppers 15.6; squash 17.6; and tomatoes 16.6.


Market Users' Evaluations


Questionnaires (see Appendix) were sent to 75 growers, 31 in Broward

county and 44 in Palm Beach County, and distributed to 144 market personnel

by the market manager. Lists of growers were provided by county extension

personnel in each of the two counties. Of the 75 growers, 17 or

23 percent returned completed questionnaires. Thirty-one percent, or 46



2D. L. Brooke, Costs and Retu':rns from Vegetables Crops in Florida,
Season 1976-77 with Comparisons, Ec. Inf. Rep. 85, Food and Resource
Economics Department, University of Florida, March 1978.







market personnel returned questionnaires. Twenty-two were selling

brokers, 23 buying brokers, six transfer operators, five truck brokers,

four owned packing houses, and one each listed the following: grower,

trucking company, vegetable research, and chain store buyer.

One of the growers owned a packing house in addition to farming.

Nearly all respondents from both groups had been associated with the

Pompano market more than 15 years (Table 5).



Table 5.--Length of time associated with Pompano market.


Years Growers Market personnel


Number Percent Number Percent

1 0 0 0 0

2-5 2 12 0 0

6-10 1 6 1 2

11-15 1 6 5 11

Over 15 13 76 40 87

Total 17 100 46 100


Facilities Used and Evaluation


Nearly all growers used the handling platform, but very few of the

other facilities. Market personnel used all the facilities with 30 or

more using the platform, office space and restaurant (Table 6).








When asked what facilities they would like to see expanded and/or

improved, growers wanted both a longer and better platform, more cooler

space and road access to Atlantic Ave. (Table 7). One grower suggested

that a concrete floor was needed for the platform.

Table 6.--Facilities used at Pompano market.



Facility Growers Market personnel


Number Percent Number Percent

Handling platform 13 76 40 87

Cooler 1 6 15 33

Office space 0 0 30 65

Restaurant 2 12 32 70

Stalls 0 0 1 2




Market personnel stressed about the same needs for expanding, and

a sizeable number felt improvements were needed in the platform, paved

area, road access, general lavatories, security, the restaurant and

lighting. Only the platform received the notice of more than two growers

(Table 7).


Distance Traveled


The growers responding to the survey currently travel from five to

50 miles to the market, with an average of 20 miles. They would be

willing to drive from five to 100 miles to the market with the average

distance 24 miles (Figure 5).













Individual response by market usersa
Grow cers F Mlarket personnel
Now travel Will travel Now travel Will travel


Avg.
[o~

0


0
0

000

0
0


0000

0
00


0


0 0

0


0


0 0


Avg. o s o o e


0 0


0O


8888
0000


88 o o
88oo


0


0


0


0


00


80- 0





-100- 0




Figure 5.--Mileage currently traveled to Pompano market by market users, and
miles users are willing to travel.

a
Each symbol represents one market user.







Table 7.--Market user preferences for expanding and/or improving
facilities at the Pompano market.



Expanded Improved Both
Market Market Market
Facility Grower personnel Grower personnel Grower Personnel

-----------------Number--------------------
Platform 2 2 2 24 4 2
Cooler space 5 4 4 1 -
Paved area 3 1 17 1 6
Offices 1 3 1 9 2
Road access to Atlantic
Ave. 6 4 13 2 20
Truck scales 1 3 1 5 1 6
Lavatory facilities,
general use 1 2 12 1 20
Lavatory facilities,
truck operators 1 2 8 1 18
Security .2 2 1 14 1 18
Restaurant 2 2 14 1 12
Lighting 1 3 8
Others:
Parking, auto 2 -- -




Table 8.--Preferences for shipping point market location expressed by
Pompano market users.


Location Growers Market personnel


Number Percent Number Percent

Present 11 65 41 89

Other, Broward County 0 0 0 0

Palm Beach County 5 29 5 11

.No response 1 6 0 0

Total 17 100 46 100








Market Location

Market users were asked to express their preferences for market

location, if facilities were improved as they suggested. Eleven or 65

percent of the growers and 41 or 89 percent of the market personnel

preferred the present site, while five of each group preferred the market

to be located in Palm Beach County (Table 8).


Market Charges and Volume


Nearly all market users completing the questionnaires felt current

charges were about right (Table 9). Only two of each group thought

charges were too low, and seven market personnel thought charges were

too high.


Table 9.-- Market user opinions on Pompano market charges.


Opinion Grower Market personnel

Number Percent Number Percent

Too low 2 12 2 4

Too high 0 0 7 15

About right 11 65 33 72

No response 4 24 4 9


Total 17 100 46 100



Market users were asked to indicate the products they handle and

then to note what percentage of their total volume of each product was

physically handled through the Pompano market. Eleven of the 17 growers







and 12 of the 46 market personnel completed this section of the

questionnaire.

The growers responding reported largest volumes of snap beans, bell

peppers and eggplant handled through the market, of the 15 products listed.


TablelO.--Estimated volume of vegetables physically handled through the
Pompano market by respondents.



Volume
Product Growers Market personnel


Packages

Beans
bush 752,500 919,941
pole ----- 7,438

Squash
acorn ------- 55,750
butternut ------- 8,243
yellow 14,328 144,775
zucchini 13,015 478,750

Peppers
bell 391,125 720,643
Cuban 2,275 127,563
hot 46,156 16,713
jalape o 4,813 5,688

Tomatoes
cherry ------- 5,250
other 51,000 4,875

Eggplant 138,813 51,375

Cucumbers 54,688 51,500

Corn ------- 500




Market personnel reported large volumes of snap beans, yellow and zucchini

squash and bell and Cuban peppers (TablelO).







Grower responses were about the same as the relative share of total

volume moving through the market reported by FDACS. Even though only 12

market personnel reported physical volume, the distribution among products

is representative of the total volume handled.

Those receiving questionnaires were also asked to indicate the

volume of each product they would physically handle through an F.O.B. market

if improvements they had preferred were made. Growers reported that they

would move larger volumes of all products except cucumbers through the

market if it were improved, compared with volumes they reported now

handling through physical facilities at the market (Tablell). Market

personnel said they would move larger volumes than currently of acorn

and butternut squash and eggplant.

These volume figures can be used only as indications of market

users' attitudes. The eleven growers completing the volume portions

of the questionnaire would appear willing to unload more of the products

listed at an F.O.B. market than they now do. The twelve market personnel

would apparently move less of most of the products, in several cases

far less, than are now physically handled through market facilities.

However, neither of these conclusions should be regarded as any-

thing more than indications of possible volumes. The relatively small

numbers of each group of market users responding to the survey, and the

relatively small number of market personnel completing the volume sections

prevents any stronger statement. Also, volumes of a given product

reported by each group cannot be added, since one or more brokers will

handle each grower's product.








Table ll--Volume of vegetables market users would physically handle
through an F.O.B. market if it were improved.



Product Growers Market personnel


Packages

Beans
bush 1,110,000 401,000
pole -------- 1,000

Squash
acorn -------- 101,000
butternut --------- 11,000
yellow 21,500 112,000
zucchini 31,000 451,000

Peppers
bell 775,000 301,020
Cuban 20,000 101,000
hot 46,750 6,000
jalapeno --------- 1,000

Tomatoes
cherry -------- 1,000
other 1,000,000 1,000

Eggplant 200,000 310,000

Cucumbers 20,000 -------







Table 12--


Yearly harvested acres of six vegetables, Broward and Palm Beach Counties, 1960-61
through 1976-77.


Snapbeans Cucumbers Eggplant Peppers Squash Tomatoes
Crop a a
year B. P.B. B. P.B. B. P.B. B. P.B. B. P.B. B. P.B.

--------------------------------------Acr-------------------------------------

1960-61 5800 18425 --- 3000 150 1515 375 5350 850 2075
1961-62 6100 19200 --- 2310 120 1300 250 3450 575 2275
1962-63 5750 21500 --- 2270 375 1350 600 4235 605 2720
1963-64 7150 16800 --- 2110 350 1070 530 5550 570 2480
1964-65 8500 17200 --- 2010 260 1510 670 6310 530 2600
1965-66 7300 17020 --- 1040 190 1300 400 6500 510 2020
1966-67 9600 17800 --- 1030 220 1250 290 6240 510 1410 --
1967-68 9980 19550 --- 2100 160 1090 150 5320 560 1570 --
1968-69 8600 18600 --- 1310 210 730 200 4820 540 920 395 2580
1969-70 8000 15180 --- 1800 200 800 170 3030 540 850 --- 1810
1970-71 7350 14250 --- 2120 170 900 70 4270 500 1200 580 1780
1971-72 8950 15850 --- 1550 190 850 110 3110 370 1250 570 2510
1972-73 8520 16970 --- 1020 240 900 100 2370 290 1420 570 2400
1973-74 6900 19340 --- 1070 260 820 100 2200 240 1350 635 1410
1974-75 5300 19290 --- 1150 280 1170 110 2450 250 1250 415 1285
1975-76 5000 19100 --- 1350 360 1150 150 2100 260 1300 360 2020
1976-77 4000 15000 --- 1350 300 850 100 2550 300 1400 385 1670


Source: Florida Agricultural Statistics: Vegetable Summary,Florida Crop and Livestock Reporting
Service.
aB.---Broward County


P.B.--Palm Beach County


























Appendix




FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE
SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES ANO CONSERVATION


AGRICULTURAt. EXPERIMENT STATIONS
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


neptv To: University of Florida
1091 McCarty Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611


TO ALL USERS OF THE POMPANO STATE FARMERS MARKET:


Are Pompano market facilities adequate? Is the Farmers Market in the best
location for you? The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services has asked us to determine how users evaluate the suitability and
location of market facilities.

Your opinions are important to us. Please complete the part of the form
that pertains to you and return it to us today -- it will only take a few
minutes. Your answers will help show how market facilities can be improved.
We are not promoting any side of present discussions, but are ,nly asking
for your views and opinions.

Your prompt attention is appreciated.


Sincerely,



Bryan Wall, Extension Economist
Vegetable Marketing


Kary Mathis, Director
Florida Agricultural Market
Research Center


1. What is your commercial interest in the Pompano Market? Please check
all that apply.


Vegetable grower
Selling broker
Buying broker
Truck broker
Transfer operator


SPackinghouse owner
- Other please list


2. How many years have you been associated with the Pompano market?


Ten fifteen
More than fifteen


(Over)



The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research,
educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS, UNIVERSITY OF


One
Two-five
Five-ten








3. What facilities do you presently use at the market?


Handling platform
Cooler
Office space
Restaurant


4. Of the following, which would you like to see


Expanded


Other please list


expanded and/or


Improved


Platform
Cooler space
Paved area
Offices
Road access to Atlantic Ave.
Truck scales
Lavatory facilities, general use
Lavatory facilities, truck
operators
Security
Restaurant
Lighting
Others please list:


5. How far do you presently travel to the market?

6. How far would you be willing to travel to conti
the market? Miles


Miles


nue to do business with


7. If the market were improved to your preference, where would you prefer
it to be located?

Present site, Pompano Beach
Another site, Broward County
Palm Beach County

8. Do you consider the user charges for present market facilities (check one):


Too low


Too high


About right


9. If you were given the opportunity to correct, expand, improve, or recondition
any aspect of the market, what items would you consider to be most important?


improved?


Both








10. Please check the products you produce or handle in Part I, and indicate
the total quantity of each handled during the 1977-78 season.

Of the quantity you indicate in Part II, what percentage is physically
handled through the Pompano market?


Product



*Beans

bush
pole


PART I
Units


0-10


10-25


PART II
Percentage

25-50


50-75 75-over


Squash


acorn
butternut
yellow
zucchini


Peppers

bell
Cuban
hot
jalapenos


Tomatoes


cherry
other


Others (please list)


(Over)






-4-


11. If the market were improved and located to your preference, as you noted
earlier, how much produce would you physically handle through the State Farmer's
Market?


Units


Beans


bush
pole


Product


Peppers


Units


bell
Cuban
hot
jalapenos


Tomatoes


acorn
butternut
white
yellow
zucchini


Other (please list)


cherry
other


12. Please note any comments or suggestions you may have in the space below.


lease return in the enclosed envelope. No postage necessary. Thank you
or your help.


Product


Squash




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