• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Abstract
 Acknowledgement
 Center information
 Summary
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 Main














Title: Opinions and attitudes of chain supermarket representatives toward goat meat
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047738/00001
 Material Information
Title: Opinions and attitudes of chain supermarket representatives toward goat meat
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Locascio, J. David
Degner, Robert L.
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Market Research Center, Food and Resource Economics Dept., IFAS, University of Florida
Publication Date: 1988
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00047738
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Title page
    Abstract
        Abstract
    Acknowledgement
        Page ii
    Center information
        Page i
    Summary
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
    List of Tables
        Page vi
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
Full Text
r&537Fr






Staff Report
















FLORIDA

AGRICULTURAL MARKET RESEARCH CENTER

FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611




/1 ( / I


OPINIONS AND ATTITUDES OF CHAIN
SUPERMARKET REPRESENTATIVES
TOWARD GOAT MEAT

By

J. David Locascio and Robert L. Degner


Staff Report 14


May 1988


Staff papers are circulated without formal review
by the Food and Resource Economics Department.
Content is the sole responsibility of the authors.





Food and Resource Economics Department
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611








ABSTRACT


The objective of this research was to determine the current market-
ing environment for goat meat in Florida sold through conventional,
commercial marketing channels for meat. Six of 17 retail food chains
surveyed presently sell goat meat in at least one of their stores.
However, goat meat was identified as being sold in only 28 of 168 stores
run by the six chains. The 28 individual stores selling goat meat sold
an average of 2,088 pounds per year.

Representatives of chain stores presently selling goat meat see
little future in expanding sales because goat meat, in general, appeals
only to a small ethnic segment of the population, predominantly Latins
and Haitians. Seven of nine representatives of chains not presently
selling goat meat indicated there was an insufficient ethnic trade to
support selling goat meat.

Low volumes, negative attitudes, and insufficient knowledge of both
retailers and consumers does not presently warrant intensified promotion
through chain stores. In conclusion, the foodservice industry may
provide the best potential for introducing goat meat to the most consu-
mers at an acceptable cost level.


Key Words: marketing, goat meat








ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


Our sincere appreciation is expressed to Dr. Robert Bradford, Direc-

tor of the Center for Cooperative Agricultural Program, Florida A & M

University (FAMU), to Dr. Claude McGowan, Extension Animal Science

Specialist, FAMU, and to their staffs for their interest in the agricul-

tural economy of north Florida. We are grateful for their financial

support. We are indebted to Dr. James R. Simpson, Extension Livestock

Specialist, Food and Resource Economics Department, University of

Florida, for his suggestions during the formative stages of the project

and for his review of the manuscript. Special thanks also go to Renelle

Ramirez for typing this manuscript.








THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL MARKET RESEARCH CENTER


The Florida Agricultural Market Research Center is a service of the

Food and Resource Economics Department. Its purpose is to provide

timely, applied research on current and emerging marketing problems

affecting Florida's agricultural and marine industries. A basic goal of

the Center is to provide organized groups with practical solutions to

their marketing problems. The Center seeks to provide marketing research

and related information to producer organizations, trade associations,

and governmental agencies concerned with improving and expanding markets

for Florida's agricultural and marine products.

Client organizations are required to pay direct costs associated

with their research projects. Such costs include labor for personnel and

telephone interviewing, mail surveys, travel, and computer analyses.

Professional time and support is provided at no charge by IFAS.

Professional agricultural economists with specialized training and

experience in marketing participate in every Center project. Cooperating

personnel from other IFAS units are also involved whenever specialized

technical assistance is needed.

For more information about the Center, contact:

Dr. Robert L. Degner, Director
Florida Agricultural Market Research Center
1083 McCarty Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
(904) 392-1845








SUMMARY


* The objective of this research was to determine the current marketing
environment for goat meat in Florida sold through conventional, commer-
cial marketing channels for meat.

* Data from the 1980 Census of the Population were used to identify three
metropolitan areas where large concentrations of ethnic populations are
located. The three areas were identified as Miami (Dade County), Fort
Lauderdale (Broward County) and Tampa (Hillsborough County). Previous
research indicated that these areas were likely candidates for rela-
tively high goat meat consumption and were selected because of this
characteristic. Chain stores operating in the study areas were identi-
fied through use of the 1986 Directory of Supermarkets, Grocery and
Convenience Stores.

* Meat buyers and executives of 17 retail food chains doing business in
the study area were interviewed. These 17 chain stores consist of
approximately 622 individual stores located throughout Florida.

* Six of the 17 retail food chains surveyed presently sell goat meat in
at least one of their stores. These six chains are made up of approxi-
mately 168 stores. However, goat meat was identified as being sold in
only 28 of these 168 stores. The average number of stores per chain
for goat meat sellers was six versus 53 for non-sellers. Chains
selling goat meat tended to cater to specific groups of ethnic con-
sumers.

STotal annual volume, sold by the six chains, was approximately 58,450
pounds. The 28 individual stores selling goat meat sold an average of
2,088 pounds per year or 40 pounds per week. Two chains sold 84
percent of the total survey volume.

SNinety-nine percent of the survey volume was purchased in frozen
product form. Five of the six chains purchase whole carcasses. The
sixth chain store (largest of the six) purchased whole carcasses plus
"anything they can get." Most of the meat was resold in primal-like
chunks containing no specific body part. About 12 percent was diced
and some whole carcasses were sold.

SWholesale purchase price (per pound, whole carcasses) ranged from $1.10
to $1.20 and averaged $1.16. The retail price ranged from $1.50 to
$1.69 and averaged $1.58. Overall mark-up on purchase price averaged
26 percent.

SNo major marketing problems were identified by representatives of chain
stores selling goat meat, although two chain store representatives
mentioned lack of demand as a problem, and supply was mentioned once.







* Representatives of chain stores presently selling goat meat see little
future in expanding sales because goat meat, in general, appeals only
to a small ethnic segment of the population, predominantly Latins and
Haitians. Nearly half of the representatives of chains not selling
goat meat were outwardly negative towards the idea of selling goat
meat. Seven of nine representatives indicated there was an insuffi-
cient ethnic trade to support selling goat meat. Two of the negative
responses were by executives representing chain stores with a combined
Florida market share of 50 percent.

* In general, non-sellers and sellers alike exhibited a lack of knowledge
concerning goat meat. Most sellers did not know how customers reacted
to the quality and product form of the meat they sold, nor how the
product was prepared. Non-sellers did not know what product form was
preferred by goat meat customers, how goat meat ranked in quality, how
the product was prepared, or how it tasted. Most non-sellers stated
there was a lack of public knowledge concerning goat meat, and indi-
cated there was a need for consumer education. Nearly all non-sellers
felt that finding a dependable supply of goat meat would be difficult,
and over half felt that their customers would react negatively towards
having goat meat in the displays.

* Low volumes, discouraging attitudes, and insufficient knowledge of both
retailers and consumers does not warrant intensified promotion through
chain stores. In conclusion, the foodservice industry may provide the
best potential for introducing goat meat to the most consumers at an
acceptable cost level.








TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS . . . . . ii

SUMMARY . . . . . . . iii

LIST OF TABLES . . . . ... . .... vi

INTRODUCTION . . . . ... . . 1

OBJECTIVES . . . . ... . . 1

PROCEDURES . . . . ... . . 2

FINDINGS . . . . .... . . 4

Chain Stores Selling Goat Meat . . .. . 4

Incidence of Goat Meat Sales . . . .. 4

Product Form . . . . ... . 4

Retail Volume . . . . .. 5

Purchase and Selling Prices . . . 5

Seasonality . . . . ... . 6

Marketing Problems . . . .... ... 6

Promotion and Customer Comments . . . 7

Clientele and Future Sales . . . . 7

General Attitudes . . . .... .. 7

Chain Stores Not Selling Goat Meat . . . 9

Initial Attitude . . . . ... .. 9

Product Form . . . . ... .10

General Attitudes . . . .... ... 10

CONCLUSIONS . . . . ... . . 11

LITERATURE CITED . . . . ... ....... 14








LIST OF TABLES


Table Page

1 Florida standard metropolitan areas with highest concentra-
tions of selected ethnic populations . . . 3

2 Retailers' selling and purchase prices . . ... 6

3 General attitudes of sellers towards goat meat related
statements . . . . . ....... 8

4 General attitudes of non-sellers towards goat meat related
statements . . . . .. . .. 11








OPINIONS AND ATTITUDES OF CHAIN SUPERMARKET
REPRESENTATIVES TOWARD GOAT MEAT

by

J. David Locascio and Robert L. Degner


INTRODUCTION


American consumers are among the best fed in the world, and animal

protein is a major constituent in their diets. Americans' diets are

diverse, and many species of animals are consumed, although beef, pork

and poultry are the most important. Goat meat is consumed widely in many

countries of the world, particularly in developing countries; however,

consumption of goat meat is limited in the United States. Recently,

there has been an increased interest in goat production, particularly in

north Florida, as an alternative agricultural enterprise for small farms.

While milk production is important to Florida's emerging goat industry,

increased goat meat consumption can improve the economic viability of

goat production.


OBJECTIVES


For the last several years, faculty at the University of Florida

have cooperated with Florida A & M University in assessing the marketing

environment for goat meat in Florida. In 1986, livestock auction

managers were interviewed to identify buyers of live goats and to

determine typical marketing channels for these animals in Florida. As a

result of this preliminary work, additional research was conducted in

late 1986 and early 1987. The basic objective of the more recent

research was to determine the current marketing environment for goat meat

in Florida sold through conventional, commercial marketing channels for








meat. The results are published in two reports, one focusing on whole-

sale distribution channels and the other on supermarket distribution

(Degner and Locascio).

Specific objectives of the retail study were to: (1) determine the

present levels of goat meat being marketed through retail food chains,

(2) determine chain store representatives' attitudes towards handling

goat meat, (3) evaluate the potential for selling more goat meat through

chain stores, and (4) identify marketing problems and constraints on

market expansion.


PROCEDURES


Data from the 1980 Census of the Population were used to identify

three metropolitan areas where large concentrations of ethnic populations

are located. The three areas were identified as Miami (Dade County),

Fort Lauderdale (Broward County) and Tampa (Hillsborough County) (Table

1). These three markets total over 3.2 million people, of which 1.3

million were comprised of ethnic groups hypothesized to be likely

consumers of goat meat. These ethnic groups included Spanish, American

blacks, Greeks, Italians and Portuguese, with fifty-three percent of the

ethnic residents being of Spanish descent. Chain stores operating in the

study areas were identified through use of the 1986 Directory of Super-

markets, Grocery and Convenience Stores. Due to the geographically

dispersed nature of many chain stores, attitudes towards and knowledge

concerning goat meat were revealed for several chain stores doing

business throughout Florida, as well as for the immediate study area.

Meat buyers and executives of 17 retail food chains doing business in the












Table 1.--Florida standard metropolitan areas with highest concentrations of selected ethnic
populations.


Standard Metropolitan Areas

Ft. Lauderdale/ West Palm Beach/
Ethnic Group Miami Tampaa Hollywood Jacksonville Orlando Boca Raton

(--------------------------------P-- ersons---------------------------------)

Spanish Origin 580,994 64,199 40,315 13,366 25,972 28,505

Black 269,670 84,834 111,258 156,575 90,595 76,264

Greek 4,685 1,248 3,960 1,201 910 1,603

Italian 34,742 18,849 73,092 8,327 14,919 23,405

Portuguese 1,795 670 1,536 458 645 687

Total 891,886 169,800 230,161 179,927 133,041 130,464

aThe Tampa metropolitan area includes only Hillsborough County.

Source: 1980 Census of Population.








study area were interviewed. These 17 chain stores consist of approxi-

mately 622 individual stores located throughout Florida.


FINDINGS


Chain Stores Selling Goat Meat


Incidence of Goat Meat Sales


Of the 17 retail food chains surveyed, six presently sell goat meat

in at least one of their stores. These six chains are made up of

approximately 168 stores. However, goat meat was identified as being

sold in only 28 or 17 percent of these 168 stores. Overall, goat meat

was sold in approximately five percent of the 622 total stores repre-

sented in the survey.

The six chains identified as selling goat meat tended to be smaller

chains catering to specific groups of ethnic consumers. The average

number of stores per chain selling goat meat was six versus 53 for non-

sellers. Although it is located outside the immediate study area, Belle

Glade was mentioned by two chains with stores in this area. They cater

to the large agricultural migrant labor force, which is at its peak from

November through February.


Product Form


All goat meat was purchased from wholesale distributors located in

Florida. Practically all of the survey volume was purchased in frozen

product form. Five of the six chains purchase whole carcasses. The

sixth chain store (largest of the six) purchased whole carcasses plus

"anything they can get." When asked what characteristics would be








important to know before purchasing goat meat, two chain representatives

said USDA inspection, and two offered no suggestions.

Most of the meat was resold in primal-like chunks containing no

specific body part. About 12 percent was diced and some whole carcasses

were sold. None of the chains handled goat heads. Two chain store

representatives said their customers would take any product form they

could get, another said customers preferred rear legs, and one did not

know.


Retail Volume


Total annual volume sold by the six chains was approximately 58,450

pounds, an average of 9,741 pounds per year per chain for the six chains

selling goat meat. The 28 individual stores selling goat meat sold an

average of 2,088 pounds per year or about 40 pounds per week. However,

weekly sales were extremely variable, ranging from three to 525 pounds.

The two chain stores selling the most goat meat represented 21 (75

percent) of the 28 stores selling goat meat. These two chains sold 84

percent of the total survey volume. They averaged close to 25,000 pounds

per chain, but only 2,360 pounds per store annually.


Purchase and Selling Prices


Wholesale purchase prices (per pound, whole carcass) ranged from

$1.10 to $1.20 and averaged $1.16 (Table 2). Retail prices ranged from

$1.50 to $1.69 and averaged $1.58. Average purchase and sale prices

weighted by volume were $1.19 and $1.46, respectively. One chain offers

specials from time to time for $1.20 per pound. Mark-up averaged 26








percent (22.5 percent weighted by volume) of the wholesale price and

ranged from 20 to 30 percent.


Table 2.--Retailers' purchase and selling prices.


Purchase Price Sale Price Mark-upa

(------Dollars per Pound------) (Percent)

Simple Average 1.16 1.58 26

Weighted Average 1.19 1.46 22.5

Range 1.10-1.20 1.50-1.69 20-30

percent mark-up is based on purchase price.


Seasonality


Three of the four low-volume chains indicated that there is sea-

sonality of demand. Christmas was mentioned twice, Easter once and the

crop/migrant season once as peak demand periods. Representatives of the

smallest volume chain (156 pounds per year) and the two largest volume

chains felt there was no seasonality of demand.


Marketing Problems


Half of the six chain store representatives selling goat meat said

they encountered no marketing problems. Two mentioned lack of demand as

a problem. Only one, the largest goat meat volume chain representative,

mentioned supply as a problem. Indications are that one chain store

purchased Australian mutton and sold it as goat meat at a relatively low

price. This practice, coupled with the lack of obvious differences

between mutton and goat carcasses, could be a problem to wholesale buyers

and consumers alike.








Promotion and Customer Comments


Goat meat was promoted to a significant degree by only one chain

store. This particular chain (second largest survey volume), ran

specials at a reduced price and mailed fliers to its customers. Another

chain periodically included goat meat advertisements in weekly fliers.

Three of the chain stores relied totally on window and/or shelf signs,

and one chain used no promotion at all.

Chain store representatives were asked about customers' comments

towards the overall quality of their goat meat. Only one representative

said customers' comments were favorable. Another felt customers were

indifferent towards the chain's goat meat, and three did not know.


Clientele and Future Sales


Latins were mentioned four times as being a specific ethnic group

which purchases goat meat. Two of these four felt that older Latins

constituted a major market segment. Haitians were mentioned twice, and

older Italians once.

When asked what potential they saw for selling increased quantities

of goat meat in the future, five of the six chain store representatives

were pessimistic. One responded positively but indicated it depended on

the market area because he felt that goat meat was mainly consumed by

Haitians. Three said there was minimal growth potential because appeal

is limited to ethnic groups.


General Attitudes


Chain store representatives were read a series of statements and

asked to agree or disagree with each one (Table 3). Of the four sellers









who cooperated, three felt that they did not carry goat meat for novelty

sake, and one felt they did. Three felt goat meat was not more profit-

able than other meat items, and one did not know. Three representatives

felt that finding a dependable supply was easy, while one did not. Two

felt goat meat was delicious, one did not, and the fourth had no idea how

goat meat tasted. Three felt the quality of goat meat was high, and one

did not know. All four responding representatives felt that overall

customer reaction to having goat meat in the displays was positive.

Also, they all felt that goat meat went well with the other meat items

they sold and that selling goat meat increased their total sales.


Table 3.--General attitudes of sellers towards goat meat related state-
ments.


Response

Statement Positive Negative Do Not Know

It is a Novelty Item 1 3 0

More Profitable than Other Meats 0 3 1

Good Customer Reactions 4 0 0

Dependable Supply 3 1 0

High Quality Meat 3 0 1

Goes Well in Meat Department 4 0 0

Would Increase Total Sales 4 0 0

It's Delicious 2 1 1

aAfter each statement, respondents were asked to strongly agree,
slightly agree, slightly disagree or strongly disagree. Respondents
strongly or slightly agreeing were reported as positive responses.
Respondents strongly or slightly disagreeing were reported as negative
responses.








Chain Stores Not Selling Goat Meat


The attitudes of representatives of chain stores not selling goat

meat are important for understanding why goat meat is not sold more

widely and for determining what barriers exist towards future market

expansion. Nine of the eleven representatives of chain stores not

selling goat meat answered questions and offered opinions concerning goat

meat and discussed the possibility of selling it in the future.


Initial Attitude


Four of nine representatives had a negative first reaction towards

the thought of selling goat meat in their stores. Three others were

neutral, and two were positive. Two of the negative responses were by

executives representing chain stores, with a combined Florida market

share of approximately 50 percent. One of the neutral respondents

represented a chain which sold goat meat in Texas. However, he felt that

there was an insufficient market in south Florida to sell goat meat in

his stores. Of the two with positive first reactions, one had previously

suggested carrying goat meat but was overruled by the company's presi-

dent. The other was willing to try goat meat only during the

crop/migrant season. All seven representatives who were negative or

neutral towards carrying goat meat indicated that there were insufficient

ethnic populations in the areas where their stores were located to

support selling goat meat, or that they did not cater to those particular

ethnic groups purchasing goat meat. None of the nine chain store

representatives had ever been presented with sales promotion or plans

received any sales materials related to selling goat meat.








Product Form


Most chain store representatives hypothetically preferred to be able

to purchase goat meat already cut up. Three requested that the meat be

fresh, and two requested frozen. The most common pre-purchase condition

was USDA inspection. When asked what forms they thought customers would

like, six of the nine had no specific ideas.


General Attitudes


Chain store representatives were read a series of statements and

asked to agree or disagree with each one (Table 4). Eight of the nine

representatives agreed they would not carry goat meat for novelty's sake.

Five felt that goat meat would not be more profitable than other meats,

two thought it would, and two did not know. Five felt that their present

customers would react negatively to having goat meat in the displays,

three felt customer reactions would be positive, and one could not

predict how customers would react. Eight felt that finding a dependable

supply would be difficult. Only one felt it would not be a problem.

Five of the representatives did not have any knowledge regarding the

quality of goat meat, three felt it was low quality, and one felt it was

good quality. Five felt goat would go well with other meat products,

while four did not. Four felt goat meat would increase total store

revenues, while five did not. Five non-sellers did not know how goat

meat tasted, two said it was good, and two did not like it.








Table 4.--General attitudes of non-sellers towards goat meat related
statements.


Response

Statement Positive Negative Do Not Know

It is a Novelty Item 1 8 0

More Profitable than Other Meats 2 5 2

Good Customer Reactions 3 5 1

Dependable Supply 1 8 0

High Quality Meat 1 3 5

Goes Well in Meat Department 5 4 0

Would Increase Total Sales 4 5 0

It's Delicious 2 2 5

aAfter each statement, respondents were asked to strongly agree,
slightly agree, slightly disagree or strongly disagree. Respondents
strongly or slightly agreeing were reported as positive responses.
Respondents strongly or slightly disagreeing were reported as negative
responses.


CONCLUSIONS


Presently, the volume of goat meat being sold through Florida chain

supermarkets is low. Of the 17 retail food chains represented in the

survey, only six were selling goat meat. Of the 168 stores represented

by these six chains, only 28 actually sold goat meat. These 28 stores

sold an average of less than 2,100 pounds per store per year. Goat meat

was promoted to a significant degree by only one chain store.

The chain stores selling goat meat were the smaller chains, averag-

ing six stores per chain versus 53 for non-selling chain stores. These

chains also catered to specific ethnic segments of the general popula-

tion. Nearly all goat meat was purchased frozen and mostly in whole








carcass form. Most of the meat was resold in primal-like chunks contain-

ing no specific body parts. Wholesale purchase price averaged $1.16 per

pound, and retail sale price averaged $1.58. The overall mark-up on

purchase price averaged 26 percent. Weighted by volume, the wholesale

purchase price averaged $1.19, the retail sale price averaged $1.46, and

the mark-up averaged 22.5 percent. No major marketing problems were

identified by representatives of chain stores selling goat meat, although

two chain store representatives mentioned lack of demand as a problem,

and supply was mentioned once.

Representatives of chain stores presently selling goat meat see

little future in expanding sales because goat meat, in general, appeals

only to a small ethnic segment of the population, predominantly Latins

and Haitians. Nearly half of the representatives of chains not selling

goat meat were outwardly negative towards the idea. Seven of nine

representatives indicated there was an insufficient ethnic trade to

support selling goat meat. Only one of nine non-selling chain store

representatives was enthusiastic about selling goat meat, but only

during the crop/migrant season.

In general, non-sellers and sellers alike exhibited a lack of

knowledge concerning goat meat. Most sellers did not know how customers

reacted to the quality and product form of the meat they sold, nor how

the product was prepared. Non-sellers did not know what product form was

preferred by goat meat customers, how goat meat ranked in quality, how

the product was prepared, or how it tasted. Most non-sellers stated

there was a lack of public knowledge concerning goat meat and indicated

there was a need for consumer education. Nearly all non-sellers felt

finding a dependable supply of goat meat would be difficult, and over








half felt their customers would react negatively towards having goat meat

in the displays.

The present volume sold through retail food outlets is small, and

chain store representatives' attitudes towards selling more goat meat, or

selling goat meat at all, is not encouraging. Chain store representa-

tives' marketing knowledge of goat meat, as well as the retail consumers'

knowledge of taste and preparation, is insufficient to warrant intensi-

fied promotion through chain stores.

In conclusion, the foodservice industry may provide the best

potential for introducing goat meat to the most consumers at an accept-

able cost level. The foodservice trade will require education as to the

merits of goat meat. Pre-cooked and properly packaged products must be

developed for the foodservice trade and eventually for the retail

consumer. Because the typical American consumer is unfamiliar with the

product, foodservice outlets, particularly restaurants, have an oppor-

tunity to prepare the product correctly and offer a tasty alternative to

conventional meat products to mainstream American consumers.





14


LITERATURE CITED


Bureau of Census. General Social and Economic Characteristics: Florida
1980 Census of Population. United States Department of Commerce.
July 1983.

Chain Store Guide. 1986 Directory of Supermarket, Grocery and Con-
venience Store Chains. Business Guides, Inc. New York, NY. 1985.

Degner, Robert L. and J. David Locascio. Distribution of Goat Meat in
Selected Metropolitan Florida Markets. Industry Report 88-3.
Florida Agricultural Market Research Center, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Gainesville, FL. May
1988.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs