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Group Title: Florida Medal of Honor recipiants sic
Title: Florida Medal of Honor recipiants
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047713/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida Medal of Honor recipiants
Series Title: Special archives publication
Physical Description: 62 leaves : ill., ports. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Military Affairs
Publisher: State Arsenal
Place of Publication: St. Augustine Fla
Publication Date: [198-]
 Subjects
Subject: Medal of Honor   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: At head of title: Florida Department of Military Affairs.
Funding: The Florida National Guard's Special Archives Publications was digitized, in part by volunteers, in honor of Floridians serving both Floridians in disaster response and recovery here at home and the nation oversees.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00047713
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida National Guard
Holding Location: Florida National Guard, St. Augustine Barracks
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the Florida National Guard. Digitized with permission.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000938534
oclc - 15319642
notis - AEP9778

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Full Text



Digitized with the permission of the
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS

FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD





SOURCE DOCUMENT ADVISORY

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Where possible images have been manipulated to
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such manipulation was not possible. Where
available, the originals photocopied for publication
have been digitized and have been added,
separately, to this collection.

Searchable text generated from the digital images,
subsequently, is also poor. The researcher is
advised not to rely solely upon text-search in this
collection.



RIGHTS & RESTRICTIONS

Items collected here were originally published by the
Florida National Guard, many as part of its SPECIAL
ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series. Contact the Florida
National Guard for additional information.

The Florida National Guard reserves all rights to
content originating with the Guard.



DIGITIZATION

Titles from the SPECIAL ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series
were digitized by the University of Florida in
recognition of those serving in Florida's National
Guard, many of whom have given their lives in
defense of the State and the Nation.






FLORIDA ~

DEPARTMENT OF

MILITARY AFFAIRS













10

FLOR IDA
MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENTS








STATE ARSENAL
ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA
















FLOR IDA
MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENTS







STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS
OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL




POST OFFICE BOX 1008
STATE ARSENAL, ST. AUGUSTINE
32085-1008





The special Archives Publication Series of the Historical
Services Division are produced as a service to Florida
communities, historians, and to any other individuals, historical
or geneological societies, and national or regional governmental
agencies which find the information contained herein of use or
value.

At present, only a very limited number of copies of these
publications are produced and are provided to certain state and
national historical record repositories at no charge. Any
remaining copies are provided to interested parties on a first
come, first served basis. It is hoped these publications will
soon be reproduced and made available to a wider public through
the efforts of the Florida National Guard Historical Foundation
Inc.

Information about the series is available from the Historical
Services Division, Department of Military Affairs, State Arsenal,
St. Augustine, Florida.


Robert Hawk
Director


































ig











N _mN t,



OT J







MEDAL OF HONOR



The Medal of Honor, often referred to as the Congressional
Medal of Honor, was established by the U.S. Congress in 1862. It
was during the second year of the American Civil War, and, as
Florida was a Confederate state, Florida men were ineligible for
the award. The first Medal of Honor accredited to the state was
earned by a Florida-born, Seminole-Negro Indian Scout for
services in the Indians Wars of the Southwest following the Civil
War. The most recent award was to a Floridian serving as a Naval
officer in Vietnam.

Between 1874 and 1975, a total of twenty-seven Medals of
Honor have been officially, or unofficially, accredited to the
State of Florida. Accreditation is normally assigned based on
the recipient's Home of Record. Sometimes this is his place of
birth. It can also be the place of residence for his next of
kin. Unofficial accreditation is generally based on some firm
connection the recipient had with the State; birth, schooling, or
residence of his next of kin when accreditation is assigned to
another state for official reasons.

Of the twenty-seven Florida Medals of Honor, only
twenty-four of them can be firmly associated with the State using
one or more of the criteria outlined above. Citations for the
three are included at the end of the accompanying list.

Information used in this booklet was obtained from many
sources including the;
Military Awards Branch of the U.S. Army
U.S. Marine Corps Historical Division
U.S. Navy Historical Division
National Archives and the Still Media Depository
Congressional Medal of Honor Society

Considerable information, not otherwise available, was
obtained from the Medal of Honor Historical Society of Mesa,
Arizona. It was their contribution which enabled us to produce a
booklet that was more than merely a list of citations. They were
able to "fill in the blanks" left by official sources.

In this booklet, Florida recipients of the Medal of Honor
are presented in alphabetical order. At the end of the section,
there is an alphabetical list which also includes the year and
war, if applicable, in which the Medal was earned.








INDEX; FLORIDA MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENTS



BENNETT, Emory L. ...............1951; Korean War
BOLTON, Cecil H. ............... 1944; World War II
BOWEN, Hammett L. Jr. ...........1968; Vietnam War
CARTER, Bruce Wayne ............ 1969; Vietnam War
CORRY, William Merrill Jr. .....1920
CUTINHA, Nicholas J. ............1968; Vietnam War
FEMOYER, Robert Edward .........1944; World War II
JENKINS, Robert H. Jr. ......... 1969; Vietnam War
LASSEN, Clyde Everett ..........1968; Vietnam War
LITEKY, Angelo J. ...............1967; Vietnam War
LOPEZ, Baldomero ............... 1950; Korean War
MCCAMPBELL, David .............. 1944; World War II
MCGUIRE, Thomas B. Jr. .........1944; World War II
MCTUREOUS, Robert Miller Jr. ...1945; World War II
MILLS, James H. ................ 1944; World War II
NININGER, Alexander Ramsey .....1942; World War II
NORRIS, Thomas Rolland .........1972; Vietnam War
ORMSBEE, Francis Edward Jr. ....1918
PAINE, Adam ..................... 1874; Indian Wars
PLESS, Stephen W. ...............1967; Vietnam War
SEAY, William W. ................1968; Vietnam War
SIMS, Clifford Chester .........1968; Vietnam War
SMEDLEY, Larry Eugene ..........1967; Vietnam War
VARNUM, Charles Albert .........1890; Indian Wars

BROWN, Bobbie E
FOLEY, Robert F.
YNTEMA, Gordon D.











































EMORY L. BENNETT

Private First Class, United States Army
Company B, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division

Near Sobangsan, Republic of Korea
24 June 1951

Entered military service, Cocoa, Florida August 1950

Officially accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 20 December 1929, New Smyrna, Florida
Killed in action, 24 June 1951
Buried in Pinecrest Cemetery, Cocoa, Florida

Emory Bennett was born and raised in Florida. He entered
military service in August of 1950 and arrived in Korea during
February of 1951.
















G.O NUMBER: 11, 1 February 1952


CITATION: Pfc. Bennett a member of Company B, distinguished
himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of
his life above and beyond the call of duty in action against an
armed enemy of the United Nations. At approximately 0200 hours, 2
enemy battalions swarmed up the ridge line in a ferocious banzai
charge in an attempt to dislodge Pfc. Bennett's company from its
defensive position. Meeting the challenge, the gallant defenders
delivered destructive retaliation, but the enemy pressed the
assault with fanatical determination and the integrity of the
perimeter was imperiled. Fully aware of the odds against him,
Pfc. Bennett unhesitatingly left his foxhole, moved through
withering fire, stood within full view of the enemy, and,
employing his automatic rifle, poured crippling fire into the
ranks of the onrushing assailants, inflicting numerous
casualties. Although wounded, Pfc. Bennett gallantly maintained
his 1-man defense and the attack was momentarily halted. During
this lull in battle, the company regrouped for counterattack, but
the numerically superior foe soon infiltrated the position. Upon
orders to move back, Pfc. Bennett voluntarily remained to provide
covering fire for the withdrawing elements, and, defying the
enemy, continued to sweep the charging foe with devastating fire
until mortally wounded. His willing self-sacrifice and intrepid
actions saved the position from being overrun and enabled the
company to effect an orderly withdrawal. Pfc. Bennett's
unflinching courage and consummate devotion to duty reflect
lasting glory on himself and the military service.

At the time of his death, Privat Bennett's next of kin included;
Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Bennett, 1224 King Street, Cocoa, Florida.

Private Bennett was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Occupation Medal, Japan
Korean Service Medal
UN Korean Service Medal
Combat Infantryman Badge


















^ ,& .) 4 .....: *(. ***





























CECIL H. BOLTON




Mark River, Hol land, 2 November 1944

Entered Military Service at Huntsville, Alabama

Officially accredited to the State of Alabama

Born: Crawfordsvil le, Florida
Died: 22 January 1965 San Antonio Texas





Burial: Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery, San Antonio, Texas

Although born in Florida, Cecil Bolton considered Madison County,
Al abama as home. Prior to entering mil itary service, he owned
the Maple Grove Night Club in that county.
Alhoghbon n loid, ecl oloncosierd adso Cuny
Alabma a hoe. P iorto e tering i I tar ser ice he wne
the apleGroe Niht Cub n th conty









G.O NUMBER: 74, 1 SEPTEMBER 1945

MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: As leader of the weapons platoon of Company E, 413th
Infantry, on the night of 2 November 1944, he fought gallantly in
a pitched battle which followed the crossing of the Mark River in
Holland. When 2 machineguns pinned down his company, he tried to
eliminate, with mortar fire, their grazing fire which was
inflicting serious casualties and preventing the company's
advance from an area rocked by artillery shelling. In the
moonlight it was impossible for him to locate accurately the
enemy's camouflaged positions; but he continued to direct fire
until wounded severely in the legs and rendered unconscious by a
German shell. When he recovered consciousness he instructed his
unit then crawled to the forward rifle platoon positions. Taking
a 2-man bazooka team on his voluntary mission, he advanced chest
deep in chiI I ing water along a canal toward one enemy machingun.
While the bazooka team covered him, he approached alone to
within 15 yards of the enemy emplacement in a house. He charged
the remaining distance and killed the 2 gunners with
hand-grenades. Returning to his men he led them through intense
fire over open ground to assault the second German machinegun. An
ememy sniper who tried to block the way was dispatched, and the
trio passed on. When discovered by the machinegun crew and
subjected to direct fire, Lt. Bolton killed one of the gunners
with carbine fire, and his 2 comrades shot the others. Continuing
to disregard his wounds, he led the bazooka team toward an 88mm.
artillery piece which was having telling effect on the American
ranks, and approached once more through icy canal water until he
could dimply make out the gun's silhouette. Under his fire
direction, the 2 soldiers knocked out the enemy weapon with
rockets. On the way back to his own Iines he was agin wounded. To
prevent his men from being longer subjected to deadly fire, he
refused aid and ordered them back to safety, painfully crawling
after them until he reached his lines, where he collapsed. Lt.
Bolton's heroic assaults in the face of vicious fire, his
inspiring leadership, and continued aggressiveness even though
suffering from serious wounds, contributed in large measure to
overcoming strong enemy resistance and made it possible for his
battalion to reach its objective.

Cecil Bolton remained in the Army after the war, attaining the
rank of Colonel, retiring from active service in 1964. There is
a display devoted to his life and mi itary career in the County
Courthouse in Huntsville, Alabama.


Cecil Bolton is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations for his service in World War II.

Medal of Honor
Silver Star
Bronze Star
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantryman Badge




















































HAMMETT L. BOWEN JR

Staff Sergeant, United States Army
Company C, 2nd Battal ion, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry
Division

Binh Duong Province, Republic of Vietnam
27 June 1969

Entered military service at Jacksonville, Florida
6 February 1968

Officially accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 30 November 1947, LaGrange, Georgia
Killed in action: 27 June 1969
Burial: Restlawn Memorial Gardens, LaGrange, Georgia











Hammett Bowen was a graduate of Ocala High School, Ocala,
Florida. Prior to his entry into military service, he attended
Central Florida Junior College in that same city. He completed
basic training with Company B, 7th Battalion, 2nd Brigade, U.S.
Army Training Center, Infantry, Fort Benning, Georgia and
advanced training with Company D, 2nd Training Battalion, Army
Infantry Training Brigade, U.S. Army Training Center, Fort
McClellan, Alabama. From July 1968 to February 1969, Bowen was
assigned, consecutively, to the 74th Company, The Candidate
Brigade (Provisional), U.S. Army Infantry School, and the 45th
Company, 4th Student Battalion (Airborne), The Student Brigade,
both at Fort Benning, Georgia, and Company C, 1st Training
Battalion, Army Infantry Training Brigade, U.S. Army Training
Center, Fort McClellan, Alabama.

In March of 1969, now Sergeant Bowen joined Company C, 2nd
Battalion, (Airborne), 14th Infantry Regiment of the 25th
Infantry Division in Vietnam.



CITATION: S/Sgr. Bowen distinguished himslef while serving as a
platoon sergeant during combat operations in Binh Duong Province,
Republic of Vietnam. S/Sgt. Bowen's platoon was advancing on a
reconnaissance mission into enemy controlled terrain when it came
under the withering cross-fire of small arms and grenades from an
enemy ambush force. S/Sgt. Bowen placed heavy suppressive fire on
the enemy positions and ordered his men to fall back. As the
platoon was moving back, an enemy grenade was thrown amid S/Sgt.
Bowen and 3 of his men. Sensing the danger to his comrades,
S/Sgt. Bowen shouted a warning to his men and hurled himself on
the grenade, absorbing the explosion with his body while saving
the lives of his fellow soldiers. S/Sgt. Bowen's extraordinary
courage and concern for his men at the cost of his life server as
an inspiration to his comrades and are in the highest tradio'ions
of the military service of the U.S Army.
Sergeant Bowen's next of kin at the time of his death included
Mr. and Mrs. Hammett Bowen, parents, 846 N.E. 31st Street, Ocala,
Florida.

At the time of award, Hammett Bowen's medals and decorations
included;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
Vietnam Campaign Medal
Combat Infantryman Badge
















































BRUCE WAYNE CARTER

Private First Class, United States Marine Corps
Company H, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine
Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force

Near Vandergrift Combat Base, Quang Tri Province
Republic of Vietnam
7 August 1969

Entered naval service 12 August 1968 at Jacksonville, Florida
Officially accredited to the State of Florida

Born: Schenectady, New York, 7 May 1950
Killed in action: 7 August 1969
Burial: Vista Memorial Gardens, Hialeah, Florida


Bruce Carter attended elementary schools in Pasadena,
Texas, Gretna Park and Mimosa Park, Louisiana. Later, he
attended Filer, Hialea and Miami Springs Junior High Schools in
the Miami Florida area and West Jeferson High School in Wego,
Louisana before leaving school to enter the Marine Corps in June
of 1968.











Carter received basic training with the 3rd Recruit Training
Battalion at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South
Carolina and Individual Combat Training with the 1st Infantry
Training Battalion, Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, North
Carolina. Now a Private First Class, Carter was sent to the
Vietnamese Language School at Monterey, California from. January
to March 1969. In April, he was sent to Vietnam, becoming a
Radio Operator/Radio Man with Company H, 2nd Battalion, 3rd
Marines, 3rd Marine Division.


CITATION: For consicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of
his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as
grenadier with Company H in connection with combat operations
against the enemy. Pfc. Cater's unit was maneuvering against the
enemy during Operation Idaho Canyon and came under a heavy volume
of fire from a numerically superior hostile force. The lead
element soon became separated from the main body of the squad by
a brush fire. Pfc. Carter and his fellow marines were pinned down
by vicious crossfire when, with complete disregard for his
safety, he stood in full view of the North Vietnamese Army
soldiers to deliver a devastating volume of fire at their
positions. The accuracy and aggressiveness of his attack cause
several enemy casualties and forced the remainder of the soldiers
to retreat from the immediate area. Shouting directions to the
Marines around.him, Pfc. Carter then commenced to lead them from
the path of the rapidly approaching brush fire when he observed a
hostile grenade land between him and his companions. Fully aware
of the probable consequences of his action but determined to
protect the men following him, he unhesitatingly threw himself
over the grenade, absorbing the full effects of its detonation
with his body. Pfc. Carter's indomitable courage, inspiring
initiative, and selfless devotion to duty upheld the highest
traditions of the Marine Corps and the U.S Naval Service. He
gave his life in the service of his country.

Next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Krel step-father
and mother, 6625 38th Street Northwest, Miami Springs, Florida,
Gliford R. Carter, father, 1009 Bolo Court, Bridge City,
Louisana, Pamala Carter, sister, Hauma, Louisana, Cheryle Car,ter,
sister, Miami Springs, Florida

Private Carter was eligible for the following medals and decorations;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart
Combat Action Ribbon
National Defense Service Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
(one bronze star)
Vietnam Campaign Medal
(Vietnamese)

















































WILLIAM MERRILL CORRY JR.

Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy
Aide for Aviation, Staff, Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet

Near Hartford, Connecticut, 2 October 1920

Entered Naval Service at Annapolis, Maryland 1906

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: Quincy, Florida 5 October 1889
Died of Injuries: 7 October 1920
Burial: Eastern Cemetery, Quincy, Florida


William, "Bill" Corry was born and raised in Florida. Following
his graduation from high school, he attended the University of
Georgia, leaving that institution to accept an appointment to the
U.S. Naval Academy in 1906. He graduated with the Class of 1910
and served aboard the USS KANSAS from 1911 to 1915. He
considered leaving Naval Service in 1914 but applied for Naval
Aviator's training instead, becoming Naval Aviator Number 23 at
Pensacola, Florida 6 March 1916.










During the following year, Corry served as an aviator aboard the
USS NORTH CAROLINA and the USS SEATTLE. With America's entry
into the World War, Corry was sent to France. He was appointed
Commanding Officer of the U.S. Naval Air Station, LeCroisic,
France, the first American operational combat unit. In 1918, he
was assigned to command the Naval Air Station at Brest, France
and directed naval air patrols of that part of the Atlantic.

Following the Armistice, Commander Corry remained in Europe,
assigned to the US Aeronautical Inter-Allied Commission of
Control and with special duty with the air forces of Belgium and
France. In 1920, he returned to the United States and was
appointed Aviation Aide on the Staff of the Commander in Chief,
Atlantic Fleet. He held this position at the time of his death.


MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: For heroic service in attempting to rescue a brother
officer from a flame-enveloped airplane. On 2 October 1920, an
airplane in which Lt. Comdr. Corry was a passenger crashed and
burst into flames. H was thrown 30 feet clear of the plane and,
though injured, rushed back to the burning machine and endeavored
to release the pilot. In so doing he sustained serious burns,
from which he died 4 days later.

NAVY CROSS (World War I)

"...For distinguished and heroic service as a pilot making many
daring flights over enemy lines, for untiring and efficient
efforts toward the organization of the U.S. Naval Aviation

Foreign Service, and the building up of the Northern Bombing
Project."

There were three naval vessels named in honor of William Corry.
The first, USS CORRY (DD-334), was scrapped in 1930. The second,
USS CORRY (DD-463) was sunk by enemy action during the first days
of the Normandy invasion, 8 June 1944. The third, USS CORRY
(DD-817) was launched in 1945 and may still be serving with the
fleet. The Naval Air Station, Corry Field, Pensacola, Florida is
also named in his honor.

At the time of his death, Commander Corry's next of kin included
Arthur Corry, brother, 214 East King Street, Quincy, Florida anc
Mrs. Alice C. Wilhoit, sister, Pensacola, Florida.

Commander Corry was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Navy Cross
Victory Medal (World War I, bars unknown)
Legion of Honor, Chevalier
(France)














































H, "" *




















ing vctouer ana NovemDner- Member original group First" Yale Unit, trained



































AVIATORS OF THE REGULAR NAVY AND MARINE CORPS PENSACOLA 1914
Rear- Paunick (27) Spencer(20) Bartlett (21) Edwards (3001) field (28). Front, Saulley (14) Dellinger (8) Whiting (16) Mus-
Bronson (15) Corry (23) Nortleet (555) McDonnell (18) Sco- tin (11) Read (24) Johnson (25) Cunningham (5) Evans (20) *
Haas (assigned to aviation, but not Identified as a Naval Aviator).















































NICHOLAS J. CUTINHA

Specialist 4th Class, United States Army
Company C, 9th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division

Near Gia Dinh, Republic of Vietnam
2 March 1968

Entered service at Coral Gables, Florida 1 March 1967

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 13 January 1945, Fernandina Beach, Florida
Died of Wounds: 2 March. 1968
Burial: Fort Denaue Cemetery, Fort Denaue, Florida


Nicholas Cutinha was born and raised in Florida, graduating from
Yulee High School in Yulee, Florida. Following induction into
the mil itary service, he was sent to the U.S. Army Reception
Station and Training Center at Fort Benning, Georgia. He joined
the 3rd Training Brigade at Fort Polk, Louisiana in June of 1967
and was sent to Vietnam as a replacement in Company C, 4th
Battal ion, 9th Infantry, 25th Division in September 1967.















CITATION; Date of Issue; 7 April 1970: For conspicuous gallantry
and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and
beyond the call of duty. While serving as a machinegunner with
Company C, Sp4c Cutinha accompanied his unit on a combat mission
near Gia Dinh. Suddenly his company came under small arms,
automatic weapons, mortar and rocket propelled grenade fire from
a battalion size enemy unit. During the initial hostile attack,
communication with the battalion was lost and the company
commander and numerous members of the company became casualties.
When Sp4c Cutinha observed that his company was pinned down and
disorganized, he moved to the front with .complete disregard for
his safety, firing his machinegun at the charging enemy. As he
moved forward he drew fire on his own position and was seriously
wounded in the leg. As the hostile fire intensified and half of
the company was killed or wounded, Sp4c Cutinha assumed command
of all the survivors in his area and initiated a withdrawal while
providing covering fire for the evacuation of the wounded. He
killed several enemy soldiers but sustained another leg wound
when hi's machinegun was destroyed by incoming rounds. Undaunted,
he crawled through a hail of enemy fire to an operable machinegun
in order to continue the defense of his wounded comrades who were
being administered medical treatment. Sp4c Cutinha maintained his
position, refused assistance, and provided defensive fire for his
comrades until he fell mortally wounded. He was solely
responsible for killing 15 enemy soldiers while saving the lives
of at least 9 members of his own unit. Sp4c Cutinha's gallantry
and extraordinary heroism were in keeping with the highest
traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon
himself, his unit, and the U.S Army.


Next of kin at the time of the award included Joseph A. Cutinha,
father, Mrs. Pearl M. Donker, mother, Mrs. Hazel Marie Teston and
Mrs. Jewel Augusta Scott, sisters and Roy John Cutinha and John
Erick Cutinha, brothers.

Nicholas Cutinha was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Bronze Star with V device
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
Vietnam Campaign Medal
(Vietnam)
Combat Infantryman Badge














































ROBERT EDWARD FEMOYER

2nd Lieutenant, United States Army Air Corps
711th Bomb-Squadron, 447th Bomb Group (Heavy)

Air Mission; Meresburg, Germany 2 November 1944

Entered Military Service at Jacksonville, Florida
11 November 1942

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 30 October 1921, Huntington, West Virginia
Died of wounds: 2 November 1944
Burial: Greenlawn Cemetery, Jacksonville, Florida


Robert Femoyer enlisted in the Enlisted Reserve Corps and was
called to active duty at Richmond, Virginia in February 1943. He
completed Basic Training at Training Center Number 4, Miami,
Florida. He received further training at the University of
Pittsburg and the Nashville Army Air Center in Tennessee.
Subsequent training in the pilot and later navigator programs, he
served at Maxwell Field, Montgomery, Alabama, Jackson, Mississippi
Selman Field, Louisiana and Fort Myers, Florida.

















Upon his graduation from the Navigator's School, he was
commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant and continued his operational
training at Army Air Corps bases in Lincoln, Nebraska and Souix
City, Iowa. He departed for overseas duty 2 September 1944 and,
upon arrival in England, was assigned to the 711th Bombardment
Squadron, 447th Bombardment Group and with them, entered combat
operations against strategic targets in Germany.


DATE OF ISSUE: 9 MAY 1945
G.O NUMBER: 35

MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk
of his life above and beyond the call of duty near Meresburg,
Germany-, on 2 November 1944. While on a mission, the bomber, of
which 2d Lt. Femoyer was the navigator, was struck by 3 enemy
anti-aircraft shells. The plane suffered serious damage and 2d
Lt. Femoyer was severely wounded in the side and back by shell
fragments which penetrated his body. In spite of extreme pain and
great loss of blood he refused an offered injection of morphine.
He was determined to keep his mental faculties clear in order
that he might direct his plane out of danger and so save his
comrades. Not being able to arise from the floor, he asked to be
propped up in order to enable him to see his charts and
instruments. He successfully directed the navigation of his lone
bomber for 2-1/2 hours so well it avoided enemy flak and returned
to the field without further damage.Only when the plane had
arrived in the safe area over the English Channel did he feel
that he had accomplished his objective; then, and only then, he
permitted an injection of a sedative. He died shortly after being
removed from the plane. The heroism and self-sacrifice of 2d Lt.
Femoyer are in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S Army.

Robert Femoyer is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations at the time of his death;

Medal of Honor
Air Medal
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal












A- .



































ROBERT H. JENKINS JR

Private First Class, United States Marine Corps
3rd Reconniassance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division (Reinforced)
Fleet Marine Force

Fire Support Base Argonne, near the Demilitarized
Zone, Republic of Vietnam, 5 March 1969

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida
Entered naval service at Jacksonville, Florida 2 February 1968.

Born: 1 June 1948, Interlachen, Florida
Died of Wounds: 5 March 1969
Burial: Sister Spring Cemetery, Interlachen, Florida


Robert Jenkins was born and grew up in the small Putnam
County town of Interlachen. He graduated from Palatka Central
Academy, at the time an all-black school, now integrated and
named Robert Jenkins Middle School. Family and friends described
him as a nice boy, and A-student with many friends and who worked
hard for his family. He was wel l-liked and looked forward to a
career in the Marine Corps. His last letter from Vietnam
remarked how he was counting the days until he could come home.
He had considerable talents as a mason and wood worker. He was
the only fatal war casualty from the township







Jenkins received his recurit training with the 2nd Recruit
Training Battalion, Recruit Training Regiment, Marine Corps
Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina. On the 1st of
April, 1968, he was promoted Private First Class. Following boot
camp, Jenkins received Individual Combat Training and Infantry
Special Training with the 2nd Infantry Training Battalion, 1st
Infantry Training Regiment and 1st Infantry Training Battalion,
all in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, completing the course in May
of 1968.

Arriving in Vietnam during July of 1968, Jenkins was assigned
to the Headquarters and Service Company, 3rd Reconniassance
Battalion and later, as Scout and Driver with Company C, 3rd
Reconniassance Battalion. During the fall and winter of
1968-1969, the Third Marine Division was deployed in the
northernmost province of Vietnam. Most of their activities,
aside from pacification programs, involved campaigns against
North Vietnamese military units in, or just south of, the
Demilitarized Zone. There were several limited Marine offensives
designed to pre-empt NVA offensives from the north, considerable
patrolling by Marine Reconniassance units and several defensive
battles for control of Marine fire-controll support bases on or
near the DMZ. It was during, such a base defense fight that
Private Jenkins lost his life.


MEDAL OF HONOR: Citation

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk
of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a
machinegunner with Company C, rd Reconnassaisance Battalion, in
connection with operations against enemy forces. Early int eh
morning Pfc Jenkins' reconnaissance team was occupying defensive
position at Fire Support Base Argonne south of the Demilitarized
zone. Suddenly, the marines were assaulted by a North Vietnamese
Army platoon employing mortars, automatic weapons and
handgrenades. Reacting instantly, Pfc Jenkins and another marine
quickly moved into a 2-man fighting emplacement, and as they
boldly delivered accurate machinegun fire against the enemy, a
North Vietnamese soldier threw a handgrenade into the friendly
emplacement. Fully realizing the inevitable results of his
actions, Pfc Jenkins quickly seized his comrade, and pushing the
man to the ground, he leaped on top of the marine to shield him
from the explosion. Absorbing the full impact of the detonation,
Pfc Jenkins was seriously wounded and subsequently succumbed to
his wounds. His courage, inspiring valor and selfless devotion'to
duty saved a fellow marine from serious injury or possible death
and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the U.S
Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

At the time of his death, Private Jenkins's Next of kin included;
Robert H. Jenkins, Sr., father P.O. Box 164, Mrs. Willie Mae
Jenkins, Mother, Ruby L., Roselind, Veronica Jenkins, sisters,
and James A. Jenkins, brother, all of P.O. Box 353, Interlachen,
Florida.

Robert Jenkins was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart
National Defense Service Medal
Vietnam Service Medal with two bronze stars
Medal
























































Lieutenant, United States Navy
Helicopter Squadron 7, Detachment 104, Embarked in U.S.S. Preble
(DLG-15)

Republic of Vietnam, 19 June 1968

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Entered Naval Service at Jacksonvi l le, Florida 14 September 1961

Born: Fort Myers, Florida 14 March 1942
CLYDE EVRT LSE

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Clyde Lassen was raised in Florida and graduated from Venice
Senior High School, Venice, Florida. After graduation he made
his living as a self-employed, licensed ceramic tile contractor.
After enlistment in the Navy, he completed Recruit Training at
the Naval Training Center, San Diego, California. He was
subsequently assigned duty at the Naval Air Station, Miramar,
California and in August of 1962, he took the navigation course
at the Naval Air Technical Training Center in Memphis, Tennessee.
Following graduation, Lassen was assigned to Training Squadron
TWO, Naval Air Station, Whiting Field, Milton, Florida.

While stationed at Miramar and at Whiting Field, Lassen attended
first San Diego City College and the Pensacola Junior College in
his off-duty hours. This collegiate preparation helped secure
him an appointment to the Naval Aviation Cadet Program at
Pensacola, Florida in May 1964.

Having completed flight training, Lassen was designated a Naval
Aviator and commissioned an Ensign in the U.S. Naval Reserve 12
October 1965. (He transferred to the U.S. Navy 20 February 1968).

As a new aviator-officer, Lassen was assigned to Helicopter
Combat Support Squadron ONE at the Naval Auxilary Air Station,
Ream Field, Imperial Beach, California in November 1965. In
February of the next year, he was transferred to Helicopter
Combat Support Sqadron ONE, Detachment ONE based at the Naval Air
Station in Atsugi, Japan. The squadron was re-designated
Helicopter Combat Support Squadron SEVEN and Lassen became the
Officer in Charge of his detachment at Cubi Point in the Repbulic
of the Phillipines. The Unit was then deployed aboard the USS
Oklahoma City, flagship of the Commander, SEVENTH fleet operating
off the coast of Vietnam for a full year.

Following his deployment aboard the flagship, Lassen was
re-assigend to Detachment ONE, now aboard the USS Mars. From this
ship, he flew replenishment missions to troops ashore and then he
was made Officer in Charge, first of Combat Rescue Detachment ONE
HUNDRED EIGHT and the Combat Rescue Detachment ONE HUNDRED FOUR.
It was for services while attached to the latter unit he was to
receive the Medal of Honor.


















MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the riskof
his life above and beyond the call of duty as pilot and aircraft
commander of a search and rescue helicopter, attached to
Helicopter Support Squadron 7, during operations against enemy
forces in North Vietnam. Launched shortly after midnight to
rescue 2 downed aviators, Lt. (then Lt. [jg]) Lassen skillfully
piloted his aircraft over unknown and hostile terrain to a
steep, tree-covered hill on which the survivors had been
located. Although enemy fire was being directed at the
helicopter, he initially landed in a clear area near the base of
the hill, but, due to the dense undergrowth, the survivors could
not reach the helicopter. With the aid of flare illumination, Lt.
Lassen successfully accomplished a hover between 2 trees at the
survivors' position. Illumination was abruptly lost as the last
flares were expended, and the helicopter collided with a tree,
commencing a sharp descent. Expertly righting his aircraft and
maneuvering clear, Lt. Lassen remained in the area, determined to
make another rescue attempt, and encouraged the downed aviators
while awaiting resumption of flare illumination. After another
unsuccessful, illuminated rescue attempt, and with his fuel
dangerously low and his aircraft significantly damaged, he
launched again and commenced another approach in the face of
continuing enemy opposition. When flare illumination was again
lost, Lt. Lassen, fully aware of the dangers in clearly revealing
his position to the enemy, turned on his landing lights and
completed the landing. On this attempt, the survivors were able
to make their way to the helicopter. En route to the coast he
encountered and successfully evaded hostile anti-aircraft fire
and, with fuel for only 5 minutes of flight remaining, landed
safely aboard U.S.S Jouett (DLG-29).

AIR MEDAL: CITATION

"For meritorious service while serving as Officer in Charge of
Helicopter Support Squadron SEVEN, Detachment ONE HUNDRED FOUR
from 17 May to 25 June 1968 during combat operations against the
enemy...While deployed aboard the USS REVES (DLG-24) ns USS
PREBLE (DLG 15), he made aerial identification of hostile surface
contacts and flew combat support missions while fulfilling his
mission as Combat Sea Air Rescue. He flew nijnety-one missions
in the combat zone, many under hazardous flying conditions and
occasionally receiving hostile fire. The degree of readiness he
instilled in his Detachment made possible the rescue of two
aviators from North Vietnam at night while receiving hostile
fire...


























Lieutenant Lassen received the Presidential Unit Citation for
services with the Delta River Patrol Group (Task Force 116.1)

In late 196r8, Lieutenant Lassen returned to duty in Japan,
assigned to Helicopter Support Squadron SEVEN. In February 1969,
he assumed duties associated with naval aviation officer
recruiting at the Naval Air Reserve Training Unit, Jacksonville,
Florida and in May 1969, joined Training Squadron ONE, Naval Air

Station, Saufley Field, Pensacola, Florida.

Next of Kin at time of award included; Linda Barbara Lassen,
wife and Arthur W. and Jacqueline V. Lassen, parents, P.O. Box
5028, Grove City, Englewood, Florida.

At the time of the award, Lieutenant Lassen was eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Medal of Honor
Bronze Star with Combat V Device
Air Medal
Presidential Unit Citation
Navy Good Conduct Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
Vietnam Campaign Medal
(Vietnam)










































ANGELO J. LITEKY

Chaplain (Captain) United States Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 199th Infantry Brigade

Near Phuoc-Lac, Bien Hoa Province, Republic of Vietnam
6 December 1967

Entered Service at Fort Hamilton, New York 5 July 1966

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 14 February 1931, Wahington, D.C.


Angelo Litkey was a graduate of Robert E. Lee High School in
Jacksonville, Florida. He attended both the University of
Florida, Gainesville, and Chipola Junior College, Marianna,
Florida prior to beginning his religious training. In pursuit of
his career in the church, he attended St. Joseph's Missionary
Seminary, Holy Trinity, Alabama, Father Judge Mission Seminary,
Brackney, Pennsylvania, and Holy Trinity Mision Seminary,
Winchester, Virginia. Upon entering military service, he
attended the U.S. Army Chaplain's School, Fort Hamilton, New
York, completing the course of study in September of 1966.
From September 1966 to March 1967, Chaplain Litkey was
assigned to the 1st training Brigade, U.S. Army Training Center,
Infantry, Fort Benning, Georgia. He next joined the Headquarters
and Headquarters Company of the 199th Infantry Brigade in the
Republic of Vietnam, serving in country from April 1967 to
October 1968.









CITATION: Chaplain (Captain) Angelo J. Liteky distinguished
himslef by exceptional heroism on 6 December 1967, while serving
with Company A, 4th Battalion, 12th Infantry, 199th Light
Infantry Brigade. He was participating ion a search and destroy
operation near Phuoc-Lac, Bien Hoa Province, Republic of Vietnam,
when Company A came under intense fire from, a battalion size
enemy force. Momentarily stunned from the immediate encounter
that ensued, the men hugged the ground for cover. Observing 2
wounded men, Chaplain Liteky moved to within 15 meters of an
enemy machinegun position to reach them, placing himself between
the enemy and the wounded men. When there was a brief respite in
the fighting, he managed to drag them to the relative safety of
the landing zone. Inspired by his courageous actions, the company
rallied and began placing a heavy volume of fire against the
enemy's positions. In a magnificent display of courage and
leadership, Chaplain Liteky began moving upright through the
enemy fire, administering last rites to the dying and evacuating
the wounded. Noticing another trapped and seriously wounded man,
Chaplain Liteky crawled to his aid. Realizing that the wounded
man was too heavy to carry, he rolled on his back, placed the man
on his chest and through sheer determination and fortitude
crawled back to the landing zone using his elbows and heels to
push himself along. Pausing for breath momentarily, he returned
to the action and came upon a man entangled in the dense, thorny
underbrush. Once more intense fire was directed at him, but
Chaplain Liteky stood his ground and calmly broke the vines and
carried the man to the landing zone for evacuation. On several
occasions when he landing zone was under small arms and rocket
fire, Chaplain Liteky stood up in the face of hostile fire and
personally directed the medevac helicopters into and out of the
area. Upon the unit's relief on the morning of 7 December 1967,
it was discovered that despite painful wounds in the neck and
foot, Chaplain Liteky had personally carried over 20 men to the
landing zone for evacuation during the savage fighting. Through
his indomitable inspiration and heroic actions, Chaplain Liteky
saved the Iives of a number of his comrades and enabled the
company to repulse the enemy. Chaplian Liteky's actions reflect
great credit upon himslef and were in keeping with the highest
traditions of the United States Army.

Next of Kin at the time of the award Mrs. Gertrude O. Litkey,
mother,1059 Talbot Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida. His father
was deceased.

Angelo Liteky left the priesthood in the 1970's and later became
an activist against American national policy towards Nicaraugua.
He returned his Medal of Honor to the government as a form of
protest and no longer considers himself a recipient.

As of the date of award, Chaplain Litkey's medals and decorations
included;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart
National Defense Service Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
Valorous Unit Award
Vietnam Campaign Medal































:,15 Ser *195












BALDOMERO LOPEZ


1st Lieutenant, United States Marine Corps
Company A, 1st Battal ion, 5th Marine Regimen23 August, 1st Marine Division

Inchon, Republic of Korea
15 September 1950

Entered Naval Service 8 July 1943

Official ly Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: in Tampa, Florida 23 August 1925
Killed in action: 15 September 1950
Burial: Centro Asturiano Memorial Park, Tampa, Florida


Baldomero Lopez was born and raised in Tampa, Florida. He
attended high school in that city and was considered a star
basketball player. But there was a war on and he enlisted in the
United States Navy in 1943. He was honorably discharged 11 June
1944 as he had been underage when first enlisted. His record was
good and he was accepted as a cadet at the U.S. Naval Academy,
graduating on 6 June 1947. He accepted a commission as a 2nd
Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps.







Following graduation from Officers School at Quantico, Virginia,
he served for a period as a platoon commander in the Platoon
Leaders Class Training Regiment. In 1948, Lieutenant Lopez was
sent to serve with the Marine Contingent in China, first as a
mortar section commander and later as a rifle platoon commander
at Tsingtao and Shanghai. Upon his return to the United States,
Lieutenant Lopez was assigned to duties at Camp Pendleton,
California.

When the war in Korea broke out, Lopez immediately volunteered
for service as an infantry officer. He entered active combat
duty with the 5th Marines during .the defensive battles against
hostile North Korean forces in the Pusan Perimeter. Following
the successful operations there, the regiment was pulled out to
participate in the landings at Inchon. Lieutenant Lopez was
killed during the first hours of the invasion.


MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk
of his life above and beyond the call of duty as a rifle platoon
commander of Company A, in action against enemy aggressor forces.
With his platoon Lt. Lopez was engaged in the reduction of
immediate enemy, beach defenses after landing with the assault
waves. Exposing himself to hostile fire, he moved forward
alongside a bunker and prepared to throw a handgrenade into the
next pillbox whose fire was pinning down that sector of the
beach. Taken under fire by an enemy automatic weapon and hit in
the right shoulder and chest as he lifted his arm to throw, he

fell backward and dropped the deadly missile. After a moment, he
turned and dragged his body forward in an effort to retrieve the
grenade and throw it. In critical condition from pain and loss of
blood, and unable to grasp the grenade firmly enough to hurl it,
he chose to sacrifice himself rather than endanger the lives of
his men and, with a sweeping motion of his wounded right arm,
cradled the grenade under him and absorbed the full impact of the
explosion. His exceptional courage, fortitude, and devotion to
duty reflect the highest credit upon 1st Lt. Lopez and the U.S
Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

Next of kin included Baldomero and Francis Lopez, parents, 2405
Twelfth Street, Tampa, Florida and Jose Lopez, brother, in Naval
Service.

Lieutenant Lopez was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart
Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon
American Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
China Service Medal
Occupation Medal (Japan)
National Defense Service Medal
Korean Service Medal
UN Service Medal
(bar Korea)


















**', i j .' ... ,., t .?, -








































DAVID McCAMPBELL

Commander, United States Navy
Commanding Air Group 15, U.S.S. Essex (CVA..)

First and Second Battles of the Phil I pine Sea,
19 June and 24 October 1944

Entered Naval Service, U.S. Naval Academy,
Annapol is, Maryland, 1929 (Class of 1933)

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: Bessemer, Alabama, 16 January 1910
~"7?-; T~~=n'.cT'r~ ~1r~r~- L *











Although born in Alabama, David McCampbell and his family moved
to West Palm Beach, Florida when he was a very young boy. In
that city he grew up and from there, he left to attend Staunton
Military Academy In Virginia, Georgia Tech University and the
U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland from which he graduated
in 1933. Due to governmental cut-backs, he was not called to
active duty until 1934. For the next three years he served
aboard the USS Portland. Next sent to Pensacola to train as a
Navy pilot, he graduated in 1938 and served aboard the USS Ranger
in Atlantic waters as a pilot and later, as a Landing Signal
Officer aboard the USS WASP.

During 1941, the WASP was engaged in Neutrality Patrols in the
Atlantic and, with America's entry into the war, the WASP
participated in the Malta Relief campaigns of the spring of 1942.
Returning to the United States, McCampbel I had shore duty in
Florida for a year before being promoted Commander of Air Group
15. After training, McCampbell and his Air Group were sent to
the South Pacific aboard the USS Hornet and then, in April 1944,
transferred to the USS ESSEX from whose decks the Group would
operate during the next twelve months through some of the
heaviest air combat of the Pacific war.

The Group entered combat with an attack on Marcus Island in May
1944 and were rarely out of combat for many months, participating
in several great naval battles, attacks on Japanese shipping and
shore installations and in support of American landings on
Saipan, Tinian, Guam, Peliliu, Leyte, and Iwo Jima. Their's was
the most successful and highest scoring Air Group in the Navy.


MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk
of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commander, Air
Group 15, during combat against enemy Japanese aerial forces in
the first and second battles of the Phillipine Sea. An inspiring
leader, fighting boldly in the face of terrific odds, Comdr.
McCampbel I led his fighter planes against a force of 80 Japanese
carrier-based aircraft bearing down on our fleet on 19 June 1944.
Striking fiercely in valiant defense of our surface force, he
personally destroyed 7 hostile planes during this single
engagement in which the outnumbering attack force was utterly
routed and virtually anihilated. During a major fleet engagement
with the enemy on 24 October, Comdr. McCampbel I, assisted by but
1 plane, intercepted and daringly attacked a formation of 60
hostile land-based craft approaching our forces. Fighting
desperately but with superb skill against such overwhelming
airpower, he shot down 9 Japanese planes and, completely
disorganizing the enemy group, forced the remainder to abandon
the attack before a single aircraft could reach the fleet. His
great personal valor and indomitable spirit of aggression under
extremely perilous combat conditions reflect the highest credit
upon Comdr. McCampbel I and the U.S. Naval Service.













NAVY CROSS

CITATION;
For distinguishing himself by extraordinary heroism and
skill in operations against the enemy in the vicinity of Luzon,
Phillipine Islands, while serving as Target Coordinator for the
combined aircraft of three Task Groups on 25 October 1944. His
coolness, quick thinking, superior judgment and outstanding
leadership resulted in the sinking of one medium aircraft
carrier, one light cruiser, two destroyers, and damaging of one
battleship. By his outstanding performance not only was the
maximum damage inflicted on the enemy but our own losses were
kept at a minimum.

SILVER STAR

CITATION;
"For distinguishing himself conspicuously by gallantry and
intrepidity in action while serving as a pilot of a carrier based
fighter plane in-an attack against the enemy in the Central
Phill-ipine Islands on 12 September 1944. When he so ably led the
attack group as to cause maximum damage and destruction to the
enemy and he did, personally, engage and destroy four enemy
airplanes in aerial combat and, in the face of anti-aircraft
fire, did strafe and cause serious damage to an enemy merchant
sh ip...

LEGION OF MERIT

"For exceptionally meritorious conduct...while attached to
the USS ESSEX, during action against enemy Japanese forces in the
Phillipine Islands from November 11 to 14, 1944... (He) directed
the operations of several attack groups during this period,
skillfully deploying the forces under his command to strike at
the enemy with devastating speed, power and precision in
perfectly coordinated raids which resulted in maximum damage
inflicted on hostile shipping and vital harbor facilities and in
the complete destruction of a large Japanese troop convoy...

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

"For distinguishing himself by heroism while participating
in an aerial flight...as Commander of an air group in operations
against the enemy. He led his group against the strong
fortifications on Marcus Island on 19 May 1944 and early in the
attack was hit by anti-aircraft fire which seriously damaged the
after fuselage and controls, and set fire to the auxilary
gasoline tank. Despite this heavy damage to his own plane, he
remained to direct operations of his group until all ammunition
was expended, then he led them back to their carrier..."













GOLD STAR, in lieu of second DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS:

...While participating in an aerial flight against enemy
forces on 13 June 1944. As commander of a carrier-based Air
Group, he led component parts of his group in an outstanding
attack against an enemy convoy in the vicinity of the Marianas
Islands...(resulting) in the destruction of upwards of fifty
thousand tons of enemy merchant shipping, at least one enemy
destroyer and three escort vessels, and damage to numerous
others...

GOLD STAR, in lieu of third DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS:

"For distinguishing himself by heroism and extraordinary
achievement while participating in an aerial flight as pilot of a
carrier-based fighter plane on 13 September 1944. When, as
leader of a fighter sweep assigned to a mission against the enemy
in the Central Phillipines, he did engage and destroy in aerial
combat three enemy planes and did, in the face of anti-aircraft
fire, destroy two more planes on the ground by strafing...

AIR MEDAL

"For distinguishing himself by meritorious achievement while
participating in an aerial flight as Air Group Commander during
carrier attacks against enemy aircraft and airfields on Luzon on
5 November 1944, when he successfully directed the attacking
forces and so skillfully deployed those at his command as to
destroy a large number of aircraft, both airborne and on the
ground, two airborne being credited to him personally; and to
cause substantial damage to aircraft installations..."

During his post-war career, David McCampbell had a wide variety
of assignments including service in Intelligence, as Aviation
Advisor to the Argentine Navy, staff duty with several commands,
sea duty aboard the USS SEVERN (AO-61) the USS FRANKLIN D.
ROOSEVELT and as Commanding Officer of the USS BON HOMME RICHARD.
He retired from active duty as a Captain, U.S. Navy on 1 July
1964.

David McCampbel I's next of kin include Sara-Jane McCampbel I,
wife, David Perry, John Calhoun, and Frances McCampbell,
children. Following retirement from the Navy, the McCampbell's
settled in Eustis, Florida.

At the end of the Second World War, Commander McCampbel I
was eligible for the following medals and decorations;









Medal of Honor
Silver Star
Legion of Merit with combat V
Distinguished Flying Cross with 2 clusters
Air Medal
Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon
American Defense Service Medal with Bronze A
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal one star
Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal seven stars
Victory Medal
Phillipine Liberation Ribbon two stars
Navy Expert Rifleman's Medal

For services in the post-war Navy, McCampbell received;

Joint Services Commendation Medal
National Defense Service Medal


































"






*-?;.. ^ ^ -
















































THOMAS B. McGUIRE JR.

Major, United States Army Air Corps
13th Air Force

Luzon, Phi II pine Islands, 25-26 December 1944

Entered Service at Sebring, Florida 1942

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: Ridgewood, New Jersey 1 August 1920
Killed in Action: 7 January 1945
Burial: Arlington National Cemetery

Thomas McGuire was born in New Jersey but moved to Florida when
he was a youg boy. He grew up in Sebring, graduating from
Sebring High School just before the onset of the Second World
War. He attended Georgia Tech University and took flying lessons
while a student. During 1941, he volunteered to take flying
training with the Royal Air Force but enlisted in the Army Air
Corps immediately after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.






McGuire eventually saw considerable combat service flying P-38
fighter aircraft in the New Guinea and Phillipines campaigns. He
became the second highest scoring fighter "Ace" of World War II
with 38 confirmed "kills". All of his combat was against the
Japanese. It was during the Pre-invasion and immediate
post-invasion operations connected with the American landings on
Luzon, Phillipine Islands that Major McGuire was killed on a
mission.

G.O NUMBER: 24, 7 MARCH 1946

MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: He fought with conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity
over Luzon, Phillipine Islands. Voluntarily, he led a squadron of
15 P-38's as top cover for heavy bombers striking Mabalacat
Airdrome, where his formation was attacked by 20 aggressive
Japanese fighters. In the ensuing action hhe repeatedly flew to
the aid of embattled comrades, driving off enemy assaults while
himself under attack and at time outnumbered 3 to 1, and even
after his guns jammed, continuing the fight by forcing a hostile
plane into his wingman's line of fire. Before he started back to
his base he had shot down 3 Zeros. The next day he again
volunteered to lead escort fighters on a mission to strongly
defended Clark Field. During the resultant engagement he again
exposed himself to attacks so that he might rescue a crippled
bomber. In rapid succession he shot down 1 aircraft, parried the
attack of 4 enemy fighters, 1 of which he shot down,
singlehandedly engaged 3 more Japanese, destroying 1, and then
shot down still another, his 38th victory in aerial combat. On
January 7 1945, while leading a voluntary fighter sweep over Los
Negros Island, he risked an extremely hazardous maneuver at low
altitude in an attempt to save a fellow flyer from attack,
crashed, and was reported missing in action. With gallant
initiative, deep and unselfish concern for the safety of others,
and heroic determination to destroy the enemy at all costs, Maj.
McGuire set an inspiring example in keeping with the highest
traditions of the military service.

At the time of his death, McGuire's next of kin included Marylin
McGuire, widow and it is believed his mother still lived in
Sebring, Florida. McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey is named
for Major McGuire.

Thomas McGuire is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations at the time of his death;

Medal of Honor
Distinguished Service Cross
Silver Star
(two oak leaf clusters)
Distinguished Flying Cross
(five oak leaf clusters)
Air Medal
(fourteen oak leaf clusters)
Purple Heart
(one oak leaf cluster)
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Phillipine Liberation Ribbon












































ROBERT MILLER McTUREOUS JR.

Private, United States Marine Corps
Company H, 3rd Battalion, 29th Marine Regiment,
6th Marine Division

Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 7 June 1945

Entered Naval Service from Florida 31 August 1944

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida
Born: Altoona, Florida 26 March 1924
Died of wounds: 11 June 1945
Burial: 2nd Marine Division Cemetery, Saipan


Robert McTureous was born and raised in Altoona, Florida. He
graduated from high school in Umatilla in 1941 and attended
Brewton-Park Institute at Mount Vernon, Georgia for a year. He
was a mathematics, was active in sports, played the trombone and
sang with the Glee Club and other groups. In 1942, he returned
to Florida, working as a night watchman and trying to get his 4-F
draft status changed. He required two operations to correct a
disability and worked as a rod-man on a survey crew for the
Florida Highway Department to earn the money necessary to pay for
the operations. In August 1944, his status was changed to 1-A
and he was inducted into the Marine Corps.




McTureous completed Basic Training at Parris Island, South
Carolina and, while there, achieved sharpshooter qualification
with both the M-1 and Browning Automatic Rifle. Foll wilhg
additional training at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, McTureous,
now assigned to the 46th Replacement Battalion, was sent overseas
in March 1945. The 46th staged through Hawaii and underwent
considerable combat training in Guam. Following the invasion of
Okinawa, his unit was sent there on the 15th of May as
replacements. Initially, the 46th served as an independent unit
but later, on 31 May, McTureous and others were individually
assigned to permanent combat units, in his case, Company H, 3rd
Battalion, 29th Marines. With them, he would see the combat that
would earn him the Medal of Honor and the wounds from which he
died.


MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk
of his life above and beyond the call of duty, while serving with
the 3rd Battalion, 29th Marines, 6th Marine Division, during
action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa .in the Ryukyu
Chain, 7 June 1945. Alert and ready for any hostile counteraction
following his company's seizure of an important hill objective,
Pvt. McTureous was quick to observe the plight of company
stretcher bearers who were suddenly assailed by slashing
machine-gun fire as they attempted to evacuate wounded at the
rear of the newly won position. Determined to prevent further
casualties, he quickly filled his jacket with handgrenades and
charged the enemy-occupied caves from which a concentrated
barrage was emanating. Cooly disregarding all personal danger as
he waged his furious 1-man assault, he smashed grenades into the
cave entrances, thereby diverting the heaviest fire from the
stretcher bearers to his own person and, resolutely returning to
his own lines under a blanketing hail of rifle and machine-gun
fire to replenish his supply of handgrenades, dauntlessly
continued his systematic reduction of Japanese strength until he
himself sustained serious wounds after silencing a large number
of hostile guns. Aware of his own critical condition and
unwilling to further endanger the lives of his comrades, he
stoically crawled a distance of 200 yards to a sheltered position
within friendly lines before calling for aid. By his fearless
initiative and bold tactics, Pvt. McTureous had succeeded in
neutralzing the enemy fire, killing 6 Japanese troops and
effectively disorganizing the remainder of the savagely defending
garrison. His outstanding valor and heroic spirit of
self-sacrifice during a critical stage of operations reflect the
highest credit upon himself and the U.S Naval Service.

McTureous was removed to the Hospital Ship USS Relief. In spite
of massive infusions of whole blood and the best efforts of the
Navy doctors, McTureous died of his wounds on the 11th of June.

Robert McTureous was the son of Bessie Palmer McTureous and
Robert Miller McTureous Sr., Postmaster of Altoona, Florida.

Private McTureous was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal




















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JAMES H. MILLS

Private, United States Army
Company F, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division

Near Cisterns Di Littoria, Italy
24 May 1944

Entered service at Fort Meade, Florida

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: Fort Meade, Florida
Died: 11 November 1973
Burial: Oak Hill Cemetery, Lakeland, Florida

James Mills was born and raised in the west-central Florida town
of Fort Meade. Following his entry into military service,
believed to have been in mid 1943, Mills was sent overseas as an
infantryman replacement and sent to the 3rd Division in the
Anzio, Italy beachead in late April 1944. The division had been
battle ing the Germans at Anzio for several months and were
preparing to launch the offensive which would result in the
successful breakout of Alt ed Forces. The day Mi Is earned the
Medal of Honor was his first day in combat and first with the
15th Infantry Regiment. The 24th of May was the day Al ied forces
finally succeeded in breaking out of the Anzio Beachead and began
the advance to liberate Rome.

















G.O NUMBER: 87, 14 NOVEMBER 1944

MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk
of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Pvt. Mi lls,
undergoing his baptism of fire, preceded his platoon down a draw
to reach a position from which an attack could be launched
against a heavily fortified strongpoint. After advancing about
300 yards, Pvt. Mills was fired on by a machinegun only 5 yards
distant. He killed the gunner with 1 shot and forced the
surrender of the assistant gunner. Continuing his advance, he saw
a German soldier in a camouflaged position behind a large bush
pulling the pin of a potato-masher grenade. Covering the German
with his rifle, Pvt. Mills forced him to drop the grenade and
captured him. When another enemy soldier attempted to throw a
handgrenade into the draw, Pvt. Mills killed him with 1 shot.
Brought under fire by a machinegun, 2 machinepistols and 3 rifles
at a range of only 50 feet, he charged headlong into the furious
chain of automatic fire shooting his M1 from the hip. The enemy
was completely demoralized by Pvt. Mills' daring charge, and when
he reached a point within 10 feet of their position, all 6
surrendered. As he neared the end of the draw, Pvt. Mi I s was
brought under fire by a machinegunner 20 yards distant. Despite
the fact that he had absolutely no cover, Pvt. Mills killed the
gunner with 1 shot. Two enemy soldiers near the machinegunner
fired wildly at Pvt. Mills and then fled. Pvt. Mills fired twice,
killing 1 of the enemy. Continuing on to the position, he
captured a fourth soldier. When it became apparent that an
assault on the strongpoint would in all probability cause heavy
casualties on the platoon, Pvt. Mills volunteered to cover the
advance down a shallow ditch to point within 50 yards of the
objective. Standing on the bank in full view of the enemy less
than 100 yards away, he shouted and fired his rifle directly into
the position. His ruse worked exactly as planned. The enemy
centered its fire directly on Pvt. Mills. Tracers passed within
inches of his body, rifle and machinegun fire ricocheted off the
rocks at his feet. Yet he stood there firing until his rifle was
empty. Intent on covering the movement of his platoon, Pvt. Mills
jumped into the draw, reloaded his weapon, climbed out again, and
continued to lay down a base of fire. Repeating this action 4
times, he enabled his platoon to reach the designated spot
undiscovered, from which position it assaulted and overwhelmed
the enemy, capturing 22 Germans and taking the objective without
casualties.

























After the war, James mills became a Contact Representative for
the Veterans Administration in Jacksonville,Florida and retired
to Melrose, Florida in 1966. In the early morning hours of 8
November 1973, Mills and a friend were picked up by three men in
a car who then robbed and beat them savagely. James Milles died
at the Veterans Hospital in Gainesville, Florida of the wounds
received in the robbery.

Next of kin at the time of his death included; Mrs.Lesslie
Mi I Is""mother, Bradley, Florida, James Thomas and Thomas Eugene
Mills, sons of Bartow and Jacksonville, Florida respectively,
Toya Lee Mills, daughter of Jacksonville and one brother and two
sisters.

Private Mill's medals and decorations included;

Medal of Honor
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantryman Badge







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Burial: No remains recovered; memor ized













Alexander, "Sandy" in inger was born in Georgia and moved to Fort
Lauderdale as a very young boy. He came from a long ine of






famEiey members with micl itary experience. At a young age, he
determined to attend the U.S. Mi itary Academy at West Point.
K.iled in'. a ci: 2a r 1942







































Following schooling in Florida and after graduating from a Fort
Lauderdale high school in 1937, he was given a congressional
appointment to the Academy. While there, he excelled in track
and was prominent in debate and lecture series.
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Once graduated in 1941 and following training at Fort Benning,
Georgia, Nininger was sent to Fort Wi liam McKinley, Phillipine
Islands and assigned to Company A, 57th Phil I ipine Scouts in
November 1941. His introduction to combat didn't have long to
wait as the Japanese invaded the Phil ipines the next month. The
initial battles for the Abucay Line on Baatan were crucial to the
American campaign plan and they almost failed. It was noted by
several that Nininger's intelligence gathering scouting following
a Japanese breakthrough, coupled with his extremely aggressive
personal and largely un-supported counter-attack against the
initial Japanese penetrating force led to a larger and completely
successful American attack later which restored the essential
defensive positions at Abucay. Had they not been re-established,
it is believed the American-Phillipino ability to defend Baatan
would have been substantially reduced.

G.O. No, 9, 5 February 1942

MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and
beyond the call of -duty in action with the enemy near Abucay,
Bataan, Phi I ipine Islands, on 12 January 1942. This officer,
though assigned to another company not then engaged in combat,
voluntarily attached himself to Company K, same regiment, while
that unit was being attacked by an enemy force superior in
firepower. Enemey snipers in trees and foxholes had stopped a
counterattack to regain part of the position. In hand-to-hand
fighting which followed, 2d Lt. Nininger repeatedly forced his
way to and into the hostile position. Though exposed to heavy
enemy fire, he continued to attack with rifle and handgrenades
and succeeded in destroying several enemy groups in foxholes and
enemy snipers. Although wounded 3 times, he continued his attacks
until he was killed after pushing alone far within the enemy
position. When his body was found after recapture of the
position, 1 enemy officer and 2 enemy soldiers lay dead around
him.

At the time of his death Alex Nininger's next of kin included his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander R. Nininger, Sr. of Fort
Lauderdale, Florida.

Lieutenant Nininger was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart, two clusters
American Defense Service Medal
Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Phillipine Defense Ribbon
(Phil I pines)





















































THOMAS ROLLAND NORRIS

Lieutenant, United States Navy
SEAL Advisor, Strategic Technical Directorate Assistance Team,
Headquarters, U.S. Military Assistance Command

Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam
10-13 April 1972

Entered Naval Service At Silver Spring, Maryland
27 September 1967

Accredited to the State of Florida (birth) and
Maryland (parents home)

Born: 14 January 1944 in Jacksonville, Florida








MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: Lt. Norris completed an unprecedented ground rescue of
2 downed pilots deep within heavily controlled enemy territory in
Quang Tri Province. Lt. Norris, on the night of 10 April 1972,
led a 5-man patrol through 2,000 meters of heavily controlled
enemy territory, located 1 of the downed pilots at daybreak, and
returned to the Forward Operating Base (FOB). On 11 April 1972,
after a devastating mortar and rocket attack on the small FOB,
Lt. Norris led a 3-man team on 2 unsuccessful rescue attempts for
the second pilot. On the afternoon of the 12th, a forward air
controller located the pilot and notified Lt. Norris. Dressed in
fishermen disguises and using a sampan, Lt. Norris and 1
Vietnamese traveled throughout that night and found the injured
pilot at dawn. Covering the pilot with bamboo and vegetation,
they began the return journey, successfully evading a North
Vietnamese patrol. Aproaching the FOB, they came under heavy
machinegun fire. Lt. Norris called in an air strike which
provided suppression fire and a smokescreen, allowing the rescue
party to reach the FOB. By his outstanding display of decisive
leadership undaunted courage, and selfless dedication in the
face of extreme danger, Lt. Norris enhanced the finest traditions
of the U.S Naval Service.

At th'e' time he received the award his next of kin were his
parents resident in Silver Springs, Maryland. Norris was
medically discharged from the Naval Service in 1976 and became an
agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Lieutenant Norris was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Silver Star
Bronze Star with combat V device
(One Cluster)
Joint Services Commendation Medal
Army Commendation Medal with combat V device
Purple Heart
Combat Action Ribbon
Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon
Navy Unit Commendation Ribbon
Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation Ribbon
National Defense Service Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
Navy Expert Pistol Medal
Navy Expert Rifle Medal
Gallantry Cross with star
(Vietnam)
....... (Military merit
(Vietnam)
....... cross of honor?
(Vietnam)
Gallantry Cross Unit Citation with palm
(Vietnam)
Civil Actions Unit Citation
(Vietnam)
Vietnam Campaign Medal
(Vietnam)
SEAL Badge










ADAM PAINE

Private, Seminole Negro Indian Scouts
4th U.S. Cavalry

Staked Plains, Texas, 20 September 1874

Officially accredited to the State of Florida

Died: 1 January 1877, Brackettville, Texas
Burial: Seminole-Negro Cemetery, Brackettville, Texas


Very little is known of Adam Paine's life. He was prooabiy
a member of a group of Seminole Indian-Negro mixed bloods who
were forced to leave Florida during the Second Seminole War
(1835-1822) or the Third Seminole War (1856-1858) and who
initially settled in northern Mexico. Most of this group later
moved to frontier Texas and many later joined the U.S. Cavalry as
Scouts.. The members of the Indian Scouts from this group gained
considerable fame for their abilities and bravery during- the
indian Wars of the Southwest following the Civil War.

DATE OF ISSUE: 13 OCTOBER 1875

CITATION: For gallantry in action.

Ranald MacKenzie, commanding officer of the 4th Cavalry curing
operations against Incians in Texas and the Rio Grande area
during the middle 1870's, was quite famous and it is an episode
in his ife on which the John Wayne movie, Rio Grande, was based.
it was during a campaign against Commanche Indians in rne Staked
Plains of Texas that Paine earned his medal.

-he Letter of Recommencation read in part;

31 August 1875

.. (!) honor to designate the men of the 4th Cavalry who
particularly distinguished themselves during my late campaign
against hostile Indians, with the particular act of gal antrv of
each and to whom Medals of Honor were suggested to be awarced. as
foi lows:
(There follow seven names anc acts, the eighth and ias: oe.nc ..
"Seminole Negro Adam Paine for Gallantry on September 20:n (1874)
when attacked by a hugely superior party of Indians. This man is
a scout of great courage.

Very Respectively,
Your Obedient Servant
R.S. MacKenzie
Colonel, 4th Cavalry
Commanding

Adam Paine was discharged from the military on 19 February 1875
having completed his enlisted contract. He was shot and killed








FRANCIS EDWARD ORMSBEE JR.

Chief Machinist Mate, United States Navy

Pensacola, Florida, 25 September 1918

Entered naval service, 18 May 1917, Providence, Rhode Island

Officially accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 30 April 1892 at Providence, Rhode Island
Died: 24 October 1936
Burial: St. Francis Cemetery, Pawtucket, Rhode Island

Francis Ormsbee was born and raised in Rhode Island and
entered the naval service during the early weeks of America's
involvement in the First World War. He received recruit training
at the Naval Training Station, Newport, Rhode Island. Later
transferred to the Naval Station in Pensacola, Florida for duties
involving flying.

DATE OF ISSUE: 15 January 1919
G.O. NUMBER: 436, 1918

CITATION: For extraordinary heroism while attached to the Naval
Air Station, Pensacola, Florida, on 25 September 1918. While
flying with Ensign J. A. Jova, Ormsbee saw a plane go into a
tailspin and crash about three-quarters of a mile to the right.
Having landed nearby, Ormsbee lost no time in going overboard and
made for the wreck, which was all under water except the 2 wing
tips. He succeeded in partially extricating the gunner so that
his head was out of water, and held him in this position until
the speedboat arrived. Ormsbee then made a number of desperate
attempts to rescue the pilot, diving into the midst of the
tangled wreckage although cut about the hands, but was too late
to save his life.

In August of 1919, Ormsbee re-enlisted for two years and
remained at the Seaplane School at Pensacola. It appears he
remained at Pensacola until his assignment to Observation Plane
Squadron Three aboard the U.S.S. RALEIGH in June 1924. He
re-enlisted in April 1925 and was returned to Pensacola in June
1926, now re-designated Chief Aviation Machinist Mate. In 1928
and 29, he served with V.S. Squadron Five with the U.S.S
Cincinnati. Ormsbee was Honorably Discharged from Active duty 8
February 1929 and from the Naval Reserves 8 February 1933. He
died in 1936.

Chief Ormsbee was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Navy Good Conduct Medal
Victory Medal, World War I








ADAM PAINE

Private, Seminole Negro Indian Scouts
4th U.S. Cavalry

Staked Plains, Texas, 20 September 1874

Officially accredited to the State of Florida

Died: 1 January 1877, Brackettville, Texas
Burial: Seminole-Negro Cemetery, Brackettville, Texas


Very little is known of Adam Paine's life. He was probably
a member of a group of Seminole Indian-Negro mixed bloods who
were forced to leave Florida during the Second Seminole War
(1835-1842) or the Third Seminole War (1856-1858) and who
initially settled in northern Mexico. Most of this group later
moved to frontier Texas and many later joined the U.S. Cavalry as
Scouts. The members of the Indian Scouts from this group gained
considerable fame for their abilities and bravery during the
Indian Wars of the Southwest following the Civil War.

DATE OF ISSUE: 13 OCTOBER 1875

CITATION: For gallantry in action.

Ranald MacKenzie, commanding officer of the 4th Cavalry during
operations against Indians in Texas and the Rio Grande area
during the middle 1870's, was quite famous and it is an episode
in his life on which the John Wayne movie, Rio Grande, was based.
It was during a campaign against Commanche Indians in the Staked
Plains of Texas that Paine earned his medal.

The Letter of Recommendation read in part;

31 August 1875

...(I) honor to designate the men of the 4th Cavalry who
particularly distinguished themselves during my late campaign
against hostile Indians, with the particular act of gallantry of
each and to whom Medals of Honor were suggested to be awarded, as
follows:
(There follow seven names and acts, the eighth and last being'...)
"Seminole Negro Adam Paine for Gallantry on September 20th (1874)
when attacked by a hugely superior party of Indians. This man is
a scout of great courage.

Very Respectively,
Your Obedient Servant
R.S. MacKenzie
Colonel, 4th Cavalry
Commanding

Adam Paine was discharged from the military on 19 February 1875
having completed his enlisted contract. He was shot and killed
at a New Years dance in Brackettville, Texas by a Deputy Sheriff.
Paine was a fugitive at the time, being wanted in connection with
the murder of a Black soldier.
























































WILLIAM W. SEAY

Sergeant, United States Army
62nd Transportation Company (Medium Truck), 7th Transportation
Battalion, 48th Transportation Group

Near Ap Nhi, Republic of Vietnam
25 August 1968

Entered military service at Montgomery, Alabama, 18 January 1967

Officially accredited to the State of Alabama

Born: 24 October 1948, Brewton, Alabama
Died of Wounds, 25 August 1968
Burial: Weaver Cemetery, Brewton, Alabama












WiI I iam Seay graduated from Escambia High School in
Pensacola, Florida. Prior to his entry into military service in
January 1967, he worked with the Job Corps in San Marcos, Texas.
He received his basic training with Company D, 10th Battalion,
3rd Brigade at Fort Benning, Georgia and attended the Leadership
Preparation Course in Fort Polk, Louisiana. In April 1967, he
was assigned to Company C, 3rd Battalion, 4th Training Brigade at
Fort Polk before being sent to Company B, 5th Supply and
Transportation Battalion, 5th Infantry Division in Fort Carson,
Colorado. He went to Vietnam with the 87th Transoortation Company
(Light Truck) but was re-asigned to the 62nd Transportation
Company the month after his arrival in country.

DATE OF ISSUE: 7 APRIL 1970

CITATION: Sergeant William W. Seay distinguished himself on 25
August 1968 while serving as a driver with the 62d Transportaion
Company (Medium Truck), 7th Transportation Battalion,
48th Transportation Group on a resupply mission near Ap Nhi,
Republic of Vietnam. The convoy with which he was travelling,
carrying critically needed ammunition and supplies from Long Binh
to Tay Ninh, was ambushed by a reinforced battalion of the North
Vietnamese Army. As the main elements of the convoy entered the
ambush killing zone, they were struck by intense rocket,
machinegun and automatic weapons fire from the well-concealed and
entrenched enemy force. When his convoy was forced to stop, Sgt.
Seay immediately dismounted and took a defensive position behind
the wheels of a vehicle loaded with high-explosive ammunition. As
the violent North Vietnamese assault approached within ten meters
of the road, Sgt. Seay opened fire, killing two of the enemy. He
then spotted a sniper in a tree approximately seventy-five meters
to his front and killed him. When an enemy grenade was thrown
under an ammunition trailer ner his position, without regard for
his own safety he left his protective cover, exposing himself to
intense enemy fire, picked up the grenade and threw it back to
the North Vietnamese position, killing four more of the enemy and
saving the lives of the men around him. Another enemy grenade
landed approximately three meters from Sgt. Seay's position.
Again Sgt. Seay left his covered position and threw the armed
grenade back upon the assaulting enemy. After returning to h'is
position he was painfully wounded in the right wrist; however,
Sgt. Seay continued to give encouragement and direction to his
fellow soldiers. After moving to the relative cover of a shallow
ditch, he detected three enemy soldiers who had penetrated the
position and were preparing to fire on his comrades. Although
weak from loss of blood and with his right hand immobilized, Sgt.
Seay stood up and fired his rifle with his left hand, killing all
three and saving the lives of the other men in his location. As a
result of his heroic action, Sgt. Seay was mortally wounded by a
sniper's bullet. Sgt. Seay, by his conspicuous gallantry and
intrepidity in action at the cost of his own life, has reflected
great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.































Next of kin included; father, Mrs. Pauline W.Rebich, mother, 42
Blount Ave, Pensacola, Florida, William C. Seay, father Mrs.
Sarahlynn Wellman, sister, Geroge T. Rebich, half-brother.


Sergeant Seay was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
(with four bronze stars)
Vietnam Campaign Medal





















































CLIFFORD CHESTER SIMS

Staff Sergeant, United States Army
Company D, 2nd Battal ion (Airborne), 501st Infantry Regiment',
101st Airborne Division

Near Hue, Republ ic of Vietnam
21 February 1968

Entered military service, Jacksonville, Florida 13 October 1961

Officially accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 18 June 1942, Port St. Joe, Florida
Killed in action, 21 February 1968
Burial: Barrancas National Cemetery, Pensacola, Florida











Clifford Sims was born and raised in Port St. Joe, Florida,
graduating from Washington High School in that Panhandle city.
Following enlsitment in the Army, he trained with Company B, 11th
Battalion, 3rd Training Regiment, U.S. Army Training Center,
Infantry, Fort Jackson, South Carolina. In early 1962, he
transferred to the 42nd Company, 4th Battalion, Student Brigade,
Fort Benning, Georgia. From April 1962 until May 1964, Sims was
assigned to the Special Forces Training Group (Provisional),
82nd Administration Company and 1st Battle Group, 187th Infantry,
82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

In May 1964, Sims transferred to Company A, 2nd Battalion,
508th Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg,
North Carolina and continued to serve with that unit following
his re-enlistment in the Army in October 1964. Re-assigned to
Company B, Sims saw service in the Dominican Republic from May to
September 1966, returning with his unit to Fort Bragg. In
October 1967, Sergeant Sims transferred to Company D, 2nd
Battalion, 501st Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division and
went with them to Vietnam in December 1967.

2 December 1969

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at
the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. S/Sgt.
Sims distinguished himself while serving as a squad leader with
Company D. Company D was assaulting a heavily fortified enemy
position concealed within a densely wooded area when it
encountered strong enemy defensive fire. Once within the
woodline, S/Sgt. Sims led his squad in a furious attack against
the enemy force which had pinned down the 1st Platoon and
threatened to overrun it. His skillful leadership provided the
platoon with freedom of movement and enabled it to regain the
initiative. S/Sgt. Sims wa then ordered to move his squad to a
position where he could provide covering fire for the company
command group and to link up with the 3d Platoon, which was under
heavy enemy pressure. After moving no more than 30 meters S/Sgt.
Sims noticed that a brick structure in which ammunition was
stocked was on fire. Realizing the danger, S/Sgt. Sims took
immediate action to move his squad from this position. Though in
the process of leaving the area 2 members of his squad were
injured by the subsequent explosion of the ammunition, S/Sgt.
Sims' prompt actions undoubtedly prevented more serious
casualties from occurring. While continuing through the dense
woods amidst heavy enemy fire, S/Sgt. Sims and his squad were
approaching a bunker when they heard the unmistakable noise of a
boobytrapbeing triggered immediately to their front. S/Sgt. Sims
warned his comrades of the danger and unhesitatingly hurled
himself upon the device as it exploded, taking full impact of the
blast. In so protecting his fellow soldiers, he willingly
sacrificed his life. S/Sgt. Sims' extraordinary herosim at the
costf his life is in keeping with the highest traditions of the
military service and reflects great credit upon himself and the
U.S Army.



























At the time of his death his next of kin included Mary Sims,
widow, Gina Rene Sims, Daughter, both at 1839 Seabrook,
Fayettevi le, North Carolina, James Sims, father; 188 Avenue F,
Port St. Joe, Florida and Irene Sims, mother, 3065 Lakeview
Avenue, St. Petersburg, Florida

Clifford Sims was eligible for the following medals and
decorations:

Medal of Honor
Silver Star
Bronze Star
Purple Heart
National Defense Service Medal
Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
Cross Gallantry with palm
(Vietnam)
Military Merit Medal
(Vietnam)
Vietnam Campaign Medal
(Vietnam)
Combat Infantry Badge
Parachutist Badge


















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LARRY EUGENE SMEDLEY

Corporal, United States Marine Corps
Company D, 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine


Near Phoc Ninh, Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam
20-21 December 1967

Entered Naval service 7 April 1966 at Orlando, Florida

Officially accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 4 March 1949, Front Royal, Virginia
Died of Wounds, 21 December 1967
Burial:Arlington National Cemetery
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Larry Smedley attended grammar schools in Berryvi le and Boyce
Virginia, Augusta, Georgia and Union Park, Florida. He left
Howard Junior High School, Union Park, Florida in 1964 -and
enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1966. Smedley received recruit
training with the 1st Recruit Training Battalion, Marine Corps
Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina and Individual
Combat Training with the 2nd Infantry Training Battalion, 1st
Infantry Training-Regiment, Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune,
North Carolina. Between July 1966 and May 1967, first as Private
First Class and then as Lance Corporal, Smedley as a rifleman
with Company D, 1st Battal ion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division,
Fleet Marine Force and later as a Fire Team Leader with Company
C, at Camp Lejeune. In July 1967, Corporal Smedley was sent to
Vietnam, joining Company D, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines as a
Rifleman and Squad Radio man.

MEDAL OF HONOR

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk
of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a
squad leader with Company D, in connection with operations
against the enemy. On the evenings of 20-21 December 1967, cpl.
Smedley led his 6-man squad to an ambush site at the mouth of
Happy Valley, near Phouc Ninh (2) in Quang Nam Province. Later
that night an estimated Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army
regulars, carrying 122mm rocket launchers and mortars, were
observed moving toward Hill 41. Realizing that this was a
significant enemy move to launch an attack on the vital Danang
complex, Cpl. Smedley immediately took sound and courageous
action to stop the enemy threat. After he radioed for a reaction
force, he skillfully maneuvered his men to more advantageous
position and led an attack on the numerically superior enemy
force. A heavy volume of fire from an enemy nmachinegun
positioned on the left flank of the squad inflicted several
casualties on Cpl. Smedley's unit. Simultaneously, an enemy rifle
grenade exploded nearby, wounding him in the right foot and
knocking him to the ground. Cpl. Smedley disregarded this serious
injury and valiantly struggled to his feet, shouting words of
encouragement to his men. He fearlessly led a charge against an
enemy machinegun emplacement, firing his rifle and throwing
grenades, until he was struck by enemy fire and knocked to the
ground. Gravely wounded and weak from loss of blood, he rose and
commenced a 1-man assault against the enemy position. Although
his aggressive and singlehanded attack resulted in the
destruction of the machinegun, he was struck in the chest by
enemy fire and fell mortally wounded. Cpl. Smedley's inspiring
and courageous actions, bold initiative, and selfless devotion to
duty in the face of certain death were in keeping with the
highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the U.S Naval Service.
He gallantly gave his life for his country.

Next of kin included; Russell E. Smedley, father, 1213 Lincoln
Avenue, Albany, Georgia, Mrs. Mary E. Willis, mother, P.O. Box
11033, Orlando, Florida, Mrs. Vicki Whipple, sister, 1890
Ontario Street, Honeye Falls, New York

Corporal Smedley was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart
Presidential Unit Citation
National Defense Service Medal
Vietnam Service Medal with bronze star
Vietnam Campaign Medal


















































Captain, United States Army
Company B, 7th Cavalry Regiment

White Clay Creek, South Dakota, 30 December 1890

Entered Mil itary service, Pensacola, Florida 1 September 1868
CHARLES ALBERT VARNUM










Officially Accredited to the State of Florida
Born: Troy, New York, 21 June 1849
Died: San Francisco, California 26 February 1936
Burial; National Cemetery, Presidio, San Francisco, California

Charles Varnum's family were descended from some of the original
settlers of Massachusetts Bay Colony. Although born in New York,
his family returned to Massachussets almost immediately after his
birth. There he would grow up and complete his basic schooling.
His father, following service in the Union Army, was assigned to
reconstruction work in the area of Pensacola, Florida towards the
end of the war and his wife and children, including Charles,
joined him there in 1866. The young Charles decided on a
mil itary career and, with his father appointed Adjutant General
of Florida, he was able to secure an appointment to the U.S.
Mil itary Academy at West Point in 1867.










His years at the Point were un-remarkable save for the near
record he established for garnering demerits and walking
punishment tours. However, his strong background in mathematics
and excellence as a cavalryman, helped him graduate high in his
Class of 1872. Following graduation and a brief stay in Alabama,
Varnum joined the 7th Cavalry in Kentucky, commanded by Lt.
Colonel George A. Custer.

The next decade would be a very busy one for Varnum, and
hazardous. He would participate in all the scouting and combat
missions of the 7th Cavalry into Indian lands in Montana, Wyoming
and the Dakotas. He was with Reno's Company at the Little Big
Horn ("Custer's Last Stand") in 1876 and, when he died in 1936,
was the last surviving officer who served in that action.

Varnum remained on frontier service for the remainder of the
19th century, serving in a variety of posts. He was a troop
commander at the Battles of Wounded Knee and White Clay Creek
or Drexel Mission, in 1890 where he received the Medal of Honor.

MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: While executing an order to withdraw, seeing that a
continuance of the movement would expose another troop of his
regiment to being cut off and surrounded, he disregarded orders
to retire, placed himself in front of his men, led a charge upon
the advancing Indians, regained a commanding position that had
just been vacated, and thus insured a safe withdrawal of both
detachments without further loss.
After the Ghost Dance War, Varnum continued to serve at posts in
the West. Even when assigned as Professor of Military Science,
it was at the University of Wyoming. In command of a volunteer
infantry regiment, he served with the Cuban Occupation forces in
1899. Later, now with the 4th Cavalry, Varnum saw service in the
Phillipines 1905-1907. He retired in 1907 but almost immediately
requested further active duty. He was assigned to serve with the
National Guard of Idaho and later, as Professor of Military
Science at the University of Maine. Apparently, he was extremely
good at organizing recruiting stations and performed those duties
in Oregon and Missouri until 1918. Finally, in 1919, 70 years
old and with 51 years active duty behind him, Charles Varnum
retired, for good.

At the time of his death, his next of kin included Mary Alice
Varnum, widow, George and John Varnum, sons.

Charles Varnum was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Silver Star
Indian Wars Campaign Medal
Spanish War Service Medal
Cuban Occupation Medal
Phillipine Insurrection Medal
Victory Medal (World War I)








(Some official records indicate Brown to have been born in
Florida. Other records indicate he was "from" Georgia, whether
born or born and raised is not precisely known.)

BOBBIE E. BROWN

Captain, U.S. Army
Company C, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division
Place and date: Crucifix Hill, Aachen, Germany, 8 October 1944
Entered Military Service in Columbus, Georgia
Officially accredited to the State of Georgia
Born: Crestview, Florida
Died: 8 November 1971

G.O NUMBER: 74, 1 SEPTEMBER 1945

CITATION: He commanded Company C, 18th Infantry Regiment, on 8
October 1944, when it, with the Ranger Platoon of the 1st
Battalion, attacked Crucifix Hill, a key point in the enemy's
defense of Aachen, Germany. As the leading rifle platoon
assaulted the first of many pillboxes studding the rising ground,
heavy fire from the flanking emplacement raked it. An intense
artillery barrage fell on the American troops which had been
pinned down in an exposed position. Seeing that the pilboxes must
be neutralized to prevent the slaughter of his men, Capt. Brown
obtained a pole charge and started alone toward the first
pillbox, about 100 yards away. Hugging the ground while enemy
bullets whipped around him, he crawled and then ran toward the
aperture oof the fortification, rammed his explosive inside and
jumped back as the pillbox and its occupants were blown up. He
rejoiuned the assault platoon, secured another pole charge, and
led the way toward the next pillbox under continuous artillery,
mortar, automatic, and small arms fire. He again ran forward and
placed the charge in the enemy fortification, knocking it out. He
then found that fire from a third pillbox was pinning down his
company; so he returned to his men, secured another charge, and
began to creep and crawl toward the enemy emplacement. With
heroic bravery he disregarded opposing fire and worked ahead in
the face of bullets streaming from the pillbox. Finally reaching
his objective, he stood up and inserted his explosive, silencing
the enemy. He was wounded by a mortar shell but refused medical
attention and, despite heavy hostile fire, moved swiftky among
his troops exhorting and instructing them in subduing powerful
opposition. Later, realizing the need for information of enemy
activity beyond the hill, Capt. Brown went out alone to
reconnoiter. He observed possible routes of enemy approach and
several times deliberately drew enemy fire to locate gun
emplacements. Twice more, on this self-imposed mission, he was
wounded; but he succeeded in ion securing information which led
to the destruction of several enemy guns and enabled his company
to throw back two powerful counterattacks with heavy losses. Only
when Company C's position was completely secure did he permit
treatment of his three wounds. By his indomitable courage,
fearless leadership, and outstanding skill as a soldier, Capt.
Brown contributed in great measure to the taking of Crucifix
Hill, a vital link in the American line encircling Aachen.







(Robert Foley was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, Class
of 1963. It is believed his parents were resident in Florida at
the time he received his Medal of Honor)



NAME: ROBERT F. FOLEY
RANK & ORGANIZATION: CAPTAIN, UNITED STATES ARMY, COMPANY A, 2D
BATTALION, 27TH INFANTRY, 25TH INFANTRY DIVISION
PLACE & DATE: NEAR QUANG DAU TIENG, REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM, 5
NOVEMBER 1966
ENTERED SERVICE: NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS
BORN: MAY 30 1941, NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk
of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Capt. Foley's
company was ordered to extricate another company of the
Battalion. Moving through the dense jungle to aid the besieged
unit, Company A encountered a strong enemy force occupying well
concealed, defensive positions, and the company's leading element
quickly sustained several casualties. Capt. Foley immediately ran
forward to the scene of most intense action to direct the
company's efforts. Deploying 1 platoon on the flank, he led the
other 2 platoons in an attack on the enemy in the face of intense
fire. In this action both radio operators accompanying him were
wounded. At grave risk to himself he defied the enemy's murderous
fire, and helped the wounded operators to a position where they
could receive medical care. As he moved forward again one of his
machinegun crews was wounded. Seizing the weapon, he charged
forward firing the machinegun, shouting oeders and rallying his
men, thus maintaining the momentum of the attack. Under
increasingly heavy enemy fire he ordered his assistant to take
cover and, alone, Capt. Foley continued to advance firing the
machinegun until the wounded had been evacuated and the attack in
this area could be resumed. When movement on the other flank was
halted by the enemy's fanatical defense, Capt. Foley moved to
personally direct this critical phase of the battle. Leading the
renewed effort he was blown off his feet and wounded by an enemy
grenade. Despite his painful wounds he refused medical aid and
persevered in the forefront of the attack on the enemy redoubt.
He led the assault on several enemy gun emplacements and,
singlehandedly, destroyed three such positions. His outstanding
personal leadership, under intense enemy fire during the fierce
battle was instrumental in the ultimate success of the operation.
Capt. Foley's magnificent courage, selfless concern for his men
and professional skill reflect the utmost credit upon himself and
the United States Army.








(It is believed either Yntema's children or his parents were
resident in Florida at the time he earned the Medal of Honor.)

NAME: GORDON D. YNTEMA
RANK & ORGANIZATION: SERGEANT, U.S ARMY
PLACE & DATE: NEAR THONG BINH, REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM,
16-18 JANUARY 1968
ENTERED SERVICE: 10 JULY 1963
BORN: 26 JUNE 1945, BETHESDA, MARYLAND

CITATION: Sergeant Gordon D. Yntema, United States Army,
distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity on
16-18 January 1968, while assigned to Detachment A-431, Company
D, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, in
the Republic of Vietnam. As part of a larger force of civilian
irregulars from Camp Cai Cai, he accompanied two platoons to a
blocking position east of the village of Thong Binh, where they
became heavily engaged in a small arms firefight with the Viet
Cong. Assuming control of the force when the Vietnamese commander
was seriously wounded, he advanced his troops to within 50 meters
of the enemy bunkers. After a fierce thirty minute firefight, the
enemy forced Sgt. Yntema to withdraw his men to a trench in order
to afford them protection and still perform their assigned
blocking mission. Under cover of machinegun fire, approximately
one company of Viet Cong maneuverd into a position which pinned
down the friendly platoons from three sides. A dwindling
ammunition supply, coupled with a Viet Cong mortar barrage which
inflicted heavy losses on the exposed friendly troops, caused
many of the irregulars to withdraw. Seriously wounded and ordered
to withdraw himself, Sgt. Yntema refused to leave his fallen
comrades. Under withering small arms and machinegun fire, he
carried the wounded Vietnamese commander and a mortally wounded
American Special Forces advisor to a small gully 50 meters away
in order to shield them from enemy fire. Sgt. Yntema then
continued to repulse the attacking Viet Cong attempting to
overrun his position until, out of ammunition and surrounded, he
was offered the opportunity to surrender. Refusing, Sgt. Yntema
stood his ground, using his rifle as a club to fight the
approximately fifteen Viet Cong attempting his capture. His
resistance was so fierce that the Viet Cong were forced to shoot
in order to overcome him. Sgt. Yntema's personal bravery in the
face of insurmountable odds and supreme self-sacrifice were in
keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and
reflect the utmost credit upon himself, the 1st Special Forces
and the United States Army.




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