• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Introduction
 Section I
 Section II
 Section III
 Section IV






Group Title: Reference/research proposed FNG armory names
Title: Referenceresearch proposed FNG armory names
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047655/00001
 Material Information
Title: Referenceresearch proposed FNG armory names
Series Title: Special archives publication
Alternate Title: Reference, research proposed Florida National Guard armory names
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Military Affairs
Florida -- National Guard
Publisher: St. Francis Barracks
Place of Publication: St. Augustine Fla
Publication Date: [1991?]
 Subjects
Subject: Militia -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Militia -- Registers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Department of Military Affairs.
General Note: Cover title.
Funding: The Florida National Guard's Special Archives Publications was digitized, in part by volunteers, in honor of Floridians serving both Floridians in disaster response and recovery here at home and the nation oversees.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00047655
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida National Guard
Holding Location: Florida National Guard, St. Augustine Barracks
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the Florida National Guard. Digitized with permission.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001638038
oclc - 23612092
notis - AHR2929

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Cover
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Introduction
        Unnumbered ( 4 )
    Section I
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Section II
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Section III
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Section IV
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
Full Text



Digitized with the permission of the
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS

FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD





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collection.



RIGHTS & RESTRICTIONS

Items collected here were originally published by the
Florida National Guard, many as part of its SPECIAL
ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series. Contact the Florida
National Guard for additional information.

The Florida National Guard reserves all rights to
content originating with the Guard.



DIGITIZATION

Titles from the SPECIAL ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series
were digitized by the University of Florida in
recognition of those serving in Florida's National
Guard, many of whom have given their lives in
defense of the State and the Nation.





Florida

Department of

Military Affairs









Special Archives
Publication Number

89
REFERENCE/ RESEARCH
PROPOSED FNG ARMORY
NAMES


State Arsenal
St. Francis
Barracks
St. Augustise,
Florida












STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS
OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL




POST OFFICE BOX 1008
STATE ARSENAL, ST. AUGUSTINE
32085-1008





The special Archives Publication Series of the Historical
Services Division are produced as a service to Florida
communities, historians, and to any other individuals, historical
or geneological societies, and national or regional governmental
agencies which find the information contained herein of use or
value.

At present, only a very limited number of copies of these
publications are produced and are provided to certain state and
national historical record repositories at no charge. Any
remaining copies are provided to interested parties on a first
come, first served basis. It is hoped these publications will
soon be reproduced and made available to a wider public through
the efforts of the Florida National Guard Historical Foundation
Inc.

Information about the series is available from the Historical
Services Division, Department of Military Affairs, State Arsenal,
St. Augustine, Florida.


Robert Hawk
Director










STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS
OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL




POST OFFICE BOX 1008
STATE ARSENAL, ST. AUGUSTINE
32085-1008


December 1987

Herein presented are the names of those individuals from
Florida's Militia/National Guard past considered suitable for the
honor of having a state armory or other military facility named
for them.

A wide and diverse selection of individuals are presented.
Section I contains an alphabetical listing with brief comments,
of the primary nominees. Section II provides expanded
biographical material and photographs, where immediately
available, on those individuals included in Section I.

Section III provides lists of Florida National Guardsmen who
died or were killed during either World War I or World War II.
All, or most, would be suitable nominees and it is probable one
or more of the individuals on those lists have an importance and
relevance to certain local Florida communities un-recorded in
headquarters files.

The final Section, IV, contains information on several Army and
Army Air Corps (Air Force) Florida recipients of the
Congressional Medal of Honor. While none were members of the
National Guard, they were Floridians and it is entirely
appropriate to honor them by applying their names to state
military facilities.

This is a preliminary report. More information is available on
most of the nominees and additional photographs can be obtained.
Once this draft is reviewed, with comments and recommendations
attached, a more complete report can be designed and produced.
Some personnel and financial support would be necessary if a more
elaborate and professional-appearing result is desired.


Bob Hawk




















SECT ION I







SECTION I


SUMMARY LIST; APPROPRIATE SUBJECTS FOR NAMING FLORIDA NATIONAL
GUARD ARMORIES AND RELATED FACILITIES.


This alphabetical listing provides only a brief notation of
information on each subject, primarily related to the historical
importance, geographical context or association, arm of service
if appropriate, and similar information. Summarized biographies
of each subject and photographs, where available, is provided in
Section II of this report.


AYERS, Preston

20th century; former commander of the 124th; joined the'Florida
State Troops in 1900. Combat service with Regular Army during
Philippine Insurrection, 1902-05. Mexican Border, World War I and
II and interim with FNG. Important service during Hurricanes of
1926 and 1928.
INFANTRY
CENTRAL FLORIDA


BLENDING, Albert H.

20th Century; World War I and II; Chief of the National Guard
Bureau; Commanded 2nd Florida, Mexican Border, combat World War I.
CO of 31st Division during interim. Extremely important Florida
Guardsman. Even though Camp Blanding is already named for him,
his name could be used for additional facilities.
INFANTRY
CENTRAL FLORIDA
NATIONAL IMPORTANCE


BROWNE, Thomas

Commanded British East Florida, later King's, Rangers during
Revolutionary War. Extremely competent and successful combat
leader. The greatest "Ranger" in Florida history. A natural for
a Special Forces facility.
SPECIAL FORCES


BUZZETT, Julian R.

20th Century; one of the FNG engineers mobilized in 1940. Rather
than serve on the Alcan Highway project, he volunteered for
combat and was killed on Omaha Beach, Normandy, France, D-Day,
the 6th of June 1944.
ENGINEERS
FLORIDA PANHANDLE








CALL, Richard Keith

Governor and active commander of Florida Militia during early
days of the Second Seminole War. The only, and last, Florida
governor to lead militia into battle since the Spanish
Occupation.
FLORIDA MILITIA
TERRITORIAL
NORTH CENTRAL OR STATEWIDE


COLLINS, Vivian B.

20th century; Adjutant General during Depression and in preparing
for World War II. Commanded State Guard during World War l.
Long-time Florida Guardsman from before World War I.
COAST ARTILLERY/AIR DEFENSE ARTILLERY
STATEWIDE


DICKISON, John J.

Civil War; led Florida troops in the successful defense of
central Florida 1863-65. An extremely competent and successful
combat leader in regual battles or guerrilla warfare.
CAVALRY/SPECIAL FORCES
MARION COUNTY


EVANS, Robert L.

World War II, 31st Division. Mobilized with the Medical
Detachment, 124th Infantry and went to war in the Southwest
Pacific with his original unit (a rarity). The 124th Medical
Detachment was phenomenally successful and one of the most
decorated units of the Pacific War including a Distinguished Unit
Citation. Evans received a posthumous Silver Star for Combat
service on Mindanao, P.I. in 1945.
MEDICAL UNIT
CENTRAL FLORIDA/STATEWIDE


FINEGAN, Joseph

Civil War. Commanded Florida Militia in East Florida most of the
war. Was the successful Commanding Officer of Confederate Troops
at the Battle of Olustee in 1864, the largest battle in Florida
during that war. Also commanded the Florida Brigade with the
Army of Northern Virginia, 1864-65 including the Battle of Cold
Harbor where the Florida Brigade was instrumental in saving Lee's
Army.
INFANTRY
STATEWIDE







FOSTER, J. Clifford R.

20th century; Twice Adjutant General of Florida. Veteran of 1st
Florida, Spanish American War. Created the Florida National
Guard and very important leader of the National Guard of the U.S.
at a time when national politics threatened to destroy the
National Guard. The FNG state campground (now Jax NAS) was once
named for him.
MAJOR FNG PERSONALITY
ST. AUGUSTINE/STATEWIDE


HAVILAND, William D.

20th Century; Bill Haviland was the first commander of the
Florida Air National Guard. He trained and led it into active
service during the Korean War. The Florida Air Guard was one of
the best in the nation by 1950 and Haviland was a major factor in
creating the Air Guard.
FLORIDA AIR NATIONAL GUARD
JACKSONVILLE/STATEWIDE


HENDRICKS, George W.

Checkered career in FNG 1921-1940; Coast Artillery. One of first
two recipients of the Florida Cross for heroism 1938. Also
received the Soldier's Medal for same action; an extremely rare
event in the 1930's and a well-earned award.
COAST ARTILLERY/AIR DEFENSE ARTILLERY


HERNANDEZ, Joseph

19th Century; Very important Florida Militia officer and
organizer during the Florida Territorial Period. Also led units
of the Florida Militia in Second Seminole War.
SPANISH HERITAGE
INFANTRY/MOUNTED INFANTRY
ST. AUGUSTINE/NORTHEAST FLORIDA/STATEWIDE


HOUSTOUN, Patrick

19th Century; Civil War Veteran including combat in Florida;
Artillery; Adjutant General, 1890's; importance in preparations
for Spanish American War, annual encampments and professional
army training and review for Florida State Troops.
ARTILLERY
TRAINING
TALLAHASSEE/STATEWIDE


HUTCHISON, Joseph C.

20th Century; World War I (Combat) and World War II; 31st







Division, Southwest Pacific, Assistant Division Commander;
multiple combat decorations.
ARTILLERY
HILLSBOROUGH/POLK COUNTY AREA


LANG, David

Civil War; Famous and combat-hardened commander of the 8th
Florida, later the Florida Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia.
Became an active and important Adjutant General of Florida in
later 19th centruy. Was responsible for successful
establishment of summer training encampments for State Troops
(and for formally making the Volunteer Troops the official State
Troops, today's National Guard).
INFANTRY
TRAINING
STATEWIDE/PANHANDLE


LORING, Will iam W.

19th Century; one of the most famous of all Florida soldiers
with service as a militiaman during the Second Seminole War.
Later service in Mexico and the Far West with the Regular Army,
Major General in Confederate service and as a Pasha of the
Egyptian Army.
INFANTRY
ST. AUGUSTINE/NORTHEAST FLORIDA/STATEWIDE


LOWRY, Sumter De Leon

20th century; World War I and II plus long peacetime service with
FNG. CO of Divisional Artillery, 31st Division, South Pacific,
World War II. One of the more important, and controversial,
leaders of the FNG.
ARTILLERY
HILLSBOROUGH/POLK COUNTY AREA
STATEWIDE
STATE ACTIVE DUTY SERVICE


LOVELL, Charles P.

Founder of the Leesburg Rifles in 1889. From August 1898,
Commanding Officer, 1st Florida, Spanish American War. Left
retirement for service with the Motor Transport Corps, U.S. Army
during World War I. Adjutant General of Florida 1921-23.
INFANTRY
MOTOR TRANSPORT
CENTRAL FLORIDA/STATEWIDE


MENENDEZ, Francisco







First Spanish Period; a long-time member of the Spanish Florida
Militia during the early 18th century. He commanded a company of
Black Militia and was a wealthy free black himself. Participated
in several skirmishes and battles against the English colonists
from the north.
INFANTRY/DEFENSIVE ARTILLERY
SPANISH HERITAGE
BLACK MILITIA HERITAGE
NORTHEAST FLORIDA/STATEWIDE


MONTIANO, Manuel de

18th Century Spanish Governor and Military/Militia Commander in
Chief of Florida during the 1740 English invasion. His
defensive/offensive strategy saved Florida from conquest and his
use of militia troops was very noteworthy and successful.
SPANISH HERITAGE
COMMAND LEVEL
INFANTRY/ARTILLERY
STATEWIDE/ST. AUGUSTINE


PERRY, Edward A.

Civil War; commanded 2nd Florida and the Florida Brigade, Army of
Northern Virginia 1862-1864. Became governor of Florida after
the war. Important innovations in state militia organizations
during his tenure as governor.
INFANTRY
PENSACOLA/WEST FLORIDA/STATEWIDE


SAFAY, Fred

20th century; former commander of the 124th Infantry.
Syrian-born, long service in FNG; World War I and II and interim.
INFANTRY
JACKSONVILLE/STATEWIDE


SPENGLER, Jacob H.

20th Century; Regular Army 1900 to 1920; Philippine Insurrection
and World War I. FNG 1921 to 1944. Former commander 106th
Quartermaster Regiment, 1940.
QUARTERMASTER UNIT
STATEWIDE


THIGPEN, William E.

Long service in FNG; World War I and II; Coast Artillery and one
of first two recipients of the Florida Cross for heroism 1938.
Also received the Soldier's Medal for same event.
COAST ARTILLERY/AIR DEFENSE ARTILLERY


































SECT ION I
- ---~ -.-- -




























PRESTON AYRES













PRESTON AYERS


Preston Ayers was born 29 October 1882 in Calcuitt, Georgia. He
was a resident of Florida and attended Florida Schools prior to
and after his first enlistment in the Florida State Troops in
1900. He served in the Regular Army in the Philippine Islands and
saw combat service during the Insurrection. He re-joined the
Florida National Guard after regular service and was mobilized
with the 2nd Florida on the Mexican Border and for World War I.

Ayers was an electrical/public utilities contractor and was
commander of the 124th at the time of his death just pri6r to
World War II. He was well travelled; having been around the
world three times prior to 1921. He had received the Florida
Service and Active State Duty Medals in addition to his federal
awards.






Commanding One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Infantry


Enlisted in Company "L", Second Regiment, Florida State Troops, May 20, 1900. Resigned and
enlisted in Company "E," Twenty-first United States Infantry, September 22, 1902. Served in Philip-
pine Insurrection. Participated in engagements with Pulajanes on Island of Samar. Honorably
discharged, September 25, 1905. Enlisted in Company "G," Second Regiment, Florida State Troops,
January 17, 1906. Promoted to Second Lieutenant, Company "C," April 12, 1906. Resigned and
accepted commission as First Lieutenant. June 27, 1916. Inducted into Federal service (Mexican
Border service), June 27, 1916. Promoted to Captain, commanding Company "C," March 28, 1917.
Returned from Federal service April 17, 1917. Inducted into Federal service (World War), August
5, 1917, with Second Florida Infantry, converted into 124th Infantry, Thirty-first Division, at Camp
Wheeler, Georgia. Served overseas. Returned and honorably discharged, May 25, 1919. Entered
reorganized Florida National Guard as Captain of Company "K," 124th Infantry, March 25, 1921.
Promoted to Major, June 29, 1925. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, July 10, 1929. Promoted to
Colonel, commanding 124th Infantry, July 14, 1934. Rendered valuable service in the 1926 and
1928 hurricane disasters on the lower East Coast.






























2e









gos




ALBER H. BANDIN













ALBERT HAZEN

LANDING



He was born in 1876, the year Custer made his last reer was over. He resumed his duties with Florida's
stand against the Sioux Indians and died the year after Guard and reestablished his civilian career. But his tal-
Americans landed on the moon. He was a private of ents as a military leader were not destined to remain un-
Florida State Troops, and a lieutenant general of the used long.
Florida National Guard. He served on the Mexican Blanding picked up the morning paper one day in
Border, and in France, and in Belgium. He was a farmer 1924, to discover he had been appointed the command-
and dealer in lumber products. He helped bring relief ing officer of the 31st Infantry Division (National Guard)
to Floridians suffering from the ravages of nature or of and was now a major general. He was to command this
disorderly citizens. He served the Guard as its National division until 1940.
Bureau Chief, and his state as a wartime coordinator of Commanding a division wasn't to be his only ser-
civil defense. He was active in civic affairs, and grew vice in the years between the two World Wars. In 1936,
prize-winning flowers. He was Albert Hazen Blanding, he was selected by President Roosevelt to be the chief of
Florida's most nationally prominent Guardsman. the National Guard Bureau. Between 1936 and 1940, he
Albert Blanding was born in Iowa on the 9th of was instrumental in obtaining the political and financial
November, 1876, and, when he was only two years old, support at the national level to obtain the equipment
his family moved to central Florida. In Florida he grew and training necessary to prepare the country's Na-
to young manhood, attending the East Florida Semi- tional Guard for the war many were certain was coming.
nary, today's University of Florida. In 1895, he enlisted Blanding commanded the 31st Division during the
as a private in the Gainesville Guards, Florida State Louisiana Army maneuvers of 1940, retiring from ac-
Troops. In 1899, his superior skills and abilities brought tive service immediately afterward. He had served his
him a promotion to Captain of Florida's 2nd Regiment, state and nation for more than 40 years, but he wasn't
with which he was destined to serve until 1917, finishing finished yet. With the onset of the Second World War,
as its commanding officer on the Mexican Border. Blanding quietly retired in Florida, assumed duties as
America went to war with Germany in 1917. In the coordinator of the action forces of the state's wartime
early months of conflict Albert Blanding was one of only civil defenses and as military advisor to the governor. He
eight National Guard officers elevated to the rank of was to hold these positions until war's end.
general by President Woodrow Wilson. At first assigned The last 25 years of Blanding's life were spent qui-
duties with the 31st Division, he was later detached to etly at his home in Bartow. He continued to be active in
serve in France and Belgium with French and American civic organizations and was willing to speak publicly on
formations. The final months of war found him in com- matters important to the Guard. But his primary occu-
mand of a brigade in the 27th Division. The 27th pation was tending his large flower garden. His wife was
fought with the British Army in France and Flanders. the creator of new varieties and he was the gardener,
Blanding was in command of the 53rd Infantry Brigade hard work to which he attributed his long and healthy
when the Allied Army, including the 27th Division, life. He died in 1970 at the age of 94.
broke the German Army's final defenses on the Western As one of the true founders of the Florida National
Front, the Hindenberg Line. In 1919, a battle-tested and Guard, it is appropriate that the Guard's state training
experienced Albert Blanding returned home to Florida. camp near Starke is named for Albert Hazen Blanding.
Blanding presumed his active national service ca- After all, he remains Florida's most famous Guardsman.

















NO PHOTOGRAPH OR' ILLUSTRATION
OF THIS INDIVIDUAL
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
















THOMAS BROWNE












THOMAS BROWNE


The date and place of Thomas Browne's birth are unknown. At the
beginning of the American Revolutionary War, Browne was a
successful citizen of Augusta, Georgia. He was an outspoken
Loyalist, a position that got him tarred and feathered. The
people of Georgia were to regret that abuse.

After moving to British Florida, Browne was commissioned Colonel
of the East Florida Rangers, a militia unit of white, black and
indian Floridians. The Rangers quickly established themselves as
superior partisan soldiers; making successful raids intd Georgia
and helping defend Florida from Rebel incursions.

Later, the East Florida Rangers, then called the King's Rangers
(and even the Queen'sRangers), took part in the successful
British conquest and defense of eastern Georgia. After the War,
Browne went to the Bahamas, later the Windward Islands where he
died in the 1830's.

Browne earned a reputation for excessive firmness in dealings
with captured Rebels, a not unusual reputation for a
ranger-partisan fighter. He was a brave and extraordinarily
skilled leader of irregular troops of mixed ethnic backgrounds.


















NO PHOTOGRAPH OR ILLUSTRATION
OF THIS INDIVIDUAL
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
















JULIAN R. BUZZETT-












JULIAN REXALL BUZZETT


Julian Buzzett was born in Apalachicola, Florida 25 January 1912.
He was raised in that city and joined Company E, 106th Engineers,
Florida National Guard in 1931. He remained with that unit
through several enlistments and was mobilized with his unit 25
November 1940. He was the recipient of the Florida Service
Medal.

After OCS training, Buzzett was commissioned a 2nd lieutenant and
sent to Fort Carson, Colorado for further training as a combat
engineer. Assigned to the 49th Engineers, he was killed in
action on Omaha Beach, Normandy the 6th of June 1944; "D-Day."































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R CHARD KE TH CALL














RICHARD KEITH CALL


Richard Call was born in Virginia shortly after the American
Revolutionary War in which his father had been an aide to George
Washington. He was raised in Kentucky and Tennessee. As a
militia soldier, he participated in the Creek Indian Wars under
Andrew Jackson.

Jackson noted Call's skill and bravery and helped him obtain a
regular army commission. As an officer, Call participated in
Jackson's West Florida and New Orleans Campaigns of 1814-1815.
Later, in 1821, Call arranged for the transference of West
Florida to the United States, then resigned his commission and
remained to settle in Pensacola.

Call became a prominent Florida politician and entrepreneur. Of
interest is the fact he constructed the third railroad ever built
in America, the Tallahassee-St. Marks Railroad. As governor,
Call personally commanded Florida militia troops in the Second
Seminole War.

Call opposed secession but loyally offered his support once
Florida joined the Confederacy. He died during the war. He was
an excellent soldier and served both regular and militia units at
all levels, from private to commanding general.




















1. 4













































VIVIAN B. COLLINS


i








Vivian B. Collins
Born: 15 April 1883
Plant City, Florida
Entered Florida Service:
12 June 1908
Retired: 15 April 1947
Died: 22 August 1955
St. Augustine, Florida
Adjutant General:
21 June 1928 to
15 April 1947

Vivian Collins entered the Florida National Guard
in 1908 as a lieutenant in the coast artillery. He switched
to the infantry in 1913, serving with the 2nd Florida In-
fantry Regiment on active service along the Mexican
Border 1916-1917. After serving with American troops in
France during the First World War, he resumed his du-
ties with the- Florida National Guard. Collins was ap-
pointed state Adjutant General in 1928 following the
death of Adjutant General Foster.
As Adjutant General, Collins was responsible for
keeping the Florida Guard well trained and viable dur-
ing the hard early years of the Great Depression and for
preparing it for the coming war. During the Second
World War, General Collins remained in the State where
he formed, and led, the Florida State Guard. He retired
from active duty in 1947 after directing the reestablish-
ment of the regular Florida National Guard following
its five-year absence on national service.

General Collins received the following medals and
decorations:
Legion of Merit
World War I Victory Medal
American Defense Service Medal
American Theater Medal
World War II Victory Medal
Florida Cross
Florida Active State Service Medal
Florida Service Medal
Florida 15-Years Continuous Service Medal
(This was the 29th and last of these medals to be
awarded, 1926)


































.]. Dclisonfm a photograph, 1895.








JOHN J. DICKISON
.==. r'











JOHN~ ~ 4 J.DIKI O



















JOHN J. DICKISON


Florida coastal cities came to call Dickison "Dixie"; the
territory he controlled was known as "Dixieland."
With reason to fear and respect his skill, Union
commands, large and small, came to grief at the hands
of Dickison and his men. At Gainesville in 1864 and
near Cedar Key in 1865, large Union forces were
soundly trounced by vastly smaller Confederate forces
John Jackson Dickison was a different kind of man led by Dickison. Even Union gunboats were not im-
with a different background who fought a different kind mune. He ambushed the Columbine and killed or cap-
of war than did David Lang. Dickison came to Florida tured all the men aboard.
from Virginia via South Carolina. He became a planter But the war was lost; Dickison and his men surren-
near Orange Lake, in northern Marion County. He was dered and were paroled near Waldo in May of 1865.
modestly wealthy by the standards of the time, but This wasn't, however, the end of his Confederate career.
would lose it all in the war to come. Later that same month Dickison and several of his men
Dickison's first war service was with the Marion helped former U.S Senator, Vice President, and Con-
Light Artillery in northeast Florida during the early federate Secretary of War, John C. Breckinridge escape
months of the conflict. But he wanted to lead cavalry, to Cuba.
and in July of 1862, he was eventually given authority to Marginally involved in politics after the war,
raise a company. Mustered in as Company H, 2nd Flor- Dickison became Adjutant General during the first
ida Cavalry, its members were from almost every county post-Reconstruction government of Florida. With little
in the central and northern part of the state. They were support from the state and almost none from the cen-
destined, however, never to fight in any of the great or trial government, he managed to establish a functioning
famous battles of the war. Their entire war was fought state military organization, which his successor, David
within the boundaries of Florida. But fight they did; in Lang, with more support, would be able to turn into a
many small battles and skirmishes, nearly always against modern military force.
great odds, always victorious. Toward the end of the century Dickison wrote a
Throughout most of 1864, and until the surrender military history of the war in Florida. It is still consid-
in 1865, Dickison and his men controlled the central ered a valuable historical resource because many of the
part of the state. Every attempt to invade his territory or documents he used are no longer available. He probably
to try and capture him met with defeat and great losses helped write, or even ghost-wrote, the popular account
in Union men and equipment. Dickison's command of his wartime exploits, Dickison and His Men, ostensibly
rarely numbered more than three hundred men, and authored by his wife, Mary Elizabeth Dickison. He lived
then only when reinforced by local militia or detached to see the beginning of a new century and died in 1903
elements of other companies. Union commanders in at his home in Ocala.













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ROBERT LEE EVANS


Robert Evans was born in Bladenboro, North Carolina 16 February
1916. He was raised in Sanford, Florida and first joined the
Medical Detachment, 124th Infantry, Florida National Guard in
1934. He was mobilized with his unit 25 November 1940.

Evans remained with the 31st Division throughout his service.
When the 124th was re-constituted in New Guinea during 1944,
Evans was still serving with the Medical Detachment.

The 124th Medical Detachment was a very proficient and highly
decorated unit. They received a Distinguished Unit Citation for
their work during May 1944 on Mindanao, P.I. It was during the
first day covered by that citation, 6 May 1945, that Evans was
killed in action performing the deed that would earn him-a
posthumous Silver Star Medal.


MEDICAL DETACHMENT. 124TH INFANTRY
REGICMENT the medical personnel. though no; wounded. had bullet
SREGIM T holes in their clothing. On 7 May 1945, the 3rd Battal-
31st Infantry Division. General Orders Number 87 ion, 24:h Infantry Regiment. with the mission of svIz-
16 July 1945 ing an objective in rear of the enemy fortified position,
The Medical Detachment, 124th Infantry Regi- thereby cutting his communication to the rear, ad-
ment, is cited for outstanding performance of duty in danced around the flank of the 2nd Battalion in ai, en-
action on Mindanao, Philippine Islands, during the circling movement. In executing this mission the 3rd
period 6 May 1945 to 12 May 1945. On 6 May 1945. the Battalion crossed a flat open grassland between two
1st Battalion, 124th Infantry Regiment, advanced north areas of heavy woods. As the rear of the battalion,
along the Sayre Highway from Kibawe wi4h the mission where the Battalion Medical Section was marching,
of seizing the Maramag Air Strip and opening the high- crossed this open grassland, the enemy launched a fu-
way to this point. Tio miles south of their objective the rious banzai attack. In the fight that ensued a number
leading elements of the Battalion entered an exception- of casualties were incurred by our troops. Though the
ally dense tropical rain forest. Here they encountered terrain was open and in full view of the enemy, the per-
heavy. accurate, controlled fire from an estimated bat- sonnel of the 3rd Battalion Medical Section treated the
talion of the enemy occupying a long prepared, well wounded in spite of heavy machine gun, rifle, and mor-
camouflaged, defensive position organized in depth, tar fire. For several hours the Medical Section. along
The 1st Battalion launched a determined attack, as- with several riflemen, were cut off from the Battalion.
saulting the position several times but were unable to Nevertheless the medical personnel continued to search
dislodge the enemy from his fortifications. Casualties for, treat, and collect the casualties. When contact was
were heavy. After the successive assaults, a large num- reestablished the wounded were evacuated. The Medi-
ber of the wounded remained in advance of our lines. cal Section-then returned to make another reconnais-
All personnel of the Battalion Medical Section, as well sance of the open area for other wounded, though they
as personnel of the Regimental Medical Section volun- were still endangered by enemy fire. In so doing the
tarily went forward to augment the strength of the com- personnel of the Medical Section were the last to leave
pany aid men. For three hours, under heavy enemy fire, this scene of conflict. This act not only saved the lives of
the medical personnel found, treated, and evacuated several of the fifteen severely wounded men and ten to
"fifty casualties, many of which were 20 and 30 yards in fifteen slightly wounded but was also responsible for
front of our lines. In the performance of this duty three keeping several of the wounded from falling into the
medical technicians were killed, the Assistant Battalion hands of a fanatical enemy. The Battalion Surgeon, al-
Surgeon and one aid man severely wounded, and three though severely wounded in this action, would not per-
aid men slightly wounded. On 7 May 1945, the 2nd Bat- mit treatment of his wounds until the other casualties
talion, 124th Infantry Regiment, reinforced the 1st Bat- had been cared for and removed to safety. Two medical
talion with the mission of taking the fortified positions non-commissioned officers were killed, one by enemy
and of clearing the woods of the enemy. The 2nd Bat- bayonet wounds while he was attempting to reach a
talion advanced 200 yards through the underbrush wounded man. The resistance of the enemy in and
when it encountered the same fierce resistance that had about the woods was so well camouflaged, dug in. or-
faced the 1st Battalion the day before. The position was ganized and stubborn that the fighting of all three Bat-
assaulted but the advance was stopped. Again.numer- talions continued for a period of six days before our
ous casualties remained where they had fallen in front troops completely annihilated the enemy. During this
of the enemy positions. In order to care for and remove period of time the eritire Medical Detachment contin-
all the wounded in as short a period as possible, the en- ued to go forward to treat and remove casualties from
tire 2nd Battalion Medical Section came forward to as- areas in front of our lines or from areas commanded by
sist the company aid men. Throughout the day men of enemy sniper fire. The conspicuous gallantry and out-
the 2nd Battalion Medical Section made numerous trips standing performance of duty from 6 May 1945 to 12
20 and 30 yards in front of our lines in the face of heavy May 1945 by all personnel of the Medical Detachment,
enemy small arms and grenade fire to find, treat, and 124th Infantry Regiment, was an inspiration to the
evacuate approximately 40 severely wounded men. In troops advancing along the Sayre Highway, reflected
the performance of this duty the Section Leader was great credit upon themselves and the Medical Depart-
killed, two aid men were seriously wounded and three of ment, and upheld the highest traditions of the Service.










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JOSERHI FINEGA










JOSEPH FINEGAN


Current research into Finegan's life is very incomplete. He is
known to have been a long-time resident of Florida. He served in
the Florida Militia during the Second and Third Seminole Wars and
had a controversial reputation in his dealings with Indians and
other state residents.

When Florida seceeded from the Union in 1861, Finegan became
commander of Florida Militia in East Florida. He was to remain
commander of most of Florida until 1864. A skilled and thorough
commander, he spent the first years of the war training troops
and countering Federal moves into Florida. He was commander of
all Confederate troops in the small army which stopped the Union
invasion of north-central Florida during February 1864 at
Olustee.

Following his victoryat Olustee, Finegan, and three regiments of
Florida Troops, were called north for service with the Army of
Northern Virginia. Brigaded with the surviving Florida troops
which had served there since 1862, the new Florida Brigade was
called to action almost immediately at the Battle of Cold Harbor
where they saved General Lee's Army by launching a savage, and
successful, counter-attack against a Union breakthrough on Lee's
right flank.

It is known Finegan returned to Florida after the war but the
details of his subsequent career and life are not yet immediately
available.






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J.*C IF R R. FOSTER








Joseph Clifford Reed Foster

Born: 13 February 1873
Savannah, Georgia

Entered Florida Service:
8 October 1891

Adjutant General:
29 June 1901 to
10 January 1917
and
3 February 1923 to
18 June 1928
(Died in Office)




Without question, J. Clifford R. Foster was the most
important and influential Adjutant General in Florida's long
history. He entered the Florida State Troops as a private in
1891. Rising to Battalion Sergeant Major, he was commissioned
into the First Florida Regiment and served with it on active
federal service during the Spanish-American War. During the year
1901, he rose in rank from captain to Major General and Adjutant
General of Florida. He was 28 years old.

As Adjutant General, Foster inherited a nearly moribund state
military organization, poorly armed and equipped and virtually
without financial support. During the next 15 years, he created
the modern Florida National Guard. He was an important influence
at the national level in the National Guard Association of the
United States as its President and on its Executive Committee.
He was instrumental in helping defeat Regular Army plans to
destroy the National Guard on the eve of America's entry into the
First World War.

Foster was out of office between 1917 and 1923. When he
returned, he found an organization weakened by changes in
national laws and personnel difficulties consequent to the
aftermath of World War. He applied all of his unique talents and
energies toward the re-creation of a superior National Guard
organization which he had largely accomplished by the date of his
death in office during 1928.

General Foster received the following medals and decorations:

Spanish American War Service Medal
Florida 15 Year Continuous Service Medal
(He was awarded, and wore, several other unofficial society
medals; state and national medal's policies were not
well-established until after his death.)










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WitLL IAM D,- HAV LAND










WILLIAM DONALD HAVILAND

Haviland was a native of Janesville, Wisconsin, having been born
there 13 March 1916. He attended Kemper Military School and the
University of Illinois prior to being accepted as a Naval
Aviation Cadet in 1940. He was commissioned an Ensign in August
of 1941 and was immediately assigned duty with the anit-submarine
patrols in the North Atlantic which proceeded America's entry
into the war.

During World War II, Haviland served in Newfoundland, Iceland,
England, North Africa, and in the United States. He was released
a Lt. Commander, in 1945.

Receiving a commission in the Florida Air National Guard
following the War, he became the original commanding officer of
the 159th Fighter Squadron. His skill and leadership turned the
Florida Air Guard into one of the very best in the nation, a
reality recognized when the 159th was selected as one of the very
few Air Guard squadrons to be sent into combat during the Korean
War. Following a tour as Air Liaison Officer with the 43rd
Infantry Division, Haviland left active service and did not
return to Florida.

Haviland's impact on the original formation, training, and
spirit de corps of the Florida Air National Guard was of
fundamental and lasting importance.



















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GEORGEW. HENR I CK








GEORGE W. HENDRICKS



Sergeant Hendricks, born in Jacksonville, also joined the 265th
CAC, Florida National Guard in 1921. His was a more checkered
career, but he eventually rose to the rank of 1st Sergeant. He
was released from the Guard on the eve of war mobilization in
1940 due to the number of dependents he supported. There are no
records to indicate he saw any further military service in either
the State Guard or U.S. Army.

Sergeant Hendricks is known to have received the following medals
and decorations:

Soldier's Medal
Florida Cross
Florida Service Medal
Florida Active State Duty Medal



To First Sergeant George W. llendrick%, Battery "A". 265th
Coast Artillery, Florida National Guard:
George W. Hendricks, First Sergeant. Battery "A".
265th Coast Artillery, for exceptional bravery in the
rescue of three comrades from a burning motor truck
near Dania, Florida, July 23. 1938. With disregard
for his own personal safety, Sergeant Hcndricks entered
the blazing truck and removed to safety three comrades
of his battery who had been rendered helpless in a col-
lision of their vehicle with a civilian gasoline truck.






CITATIC,1 :-Oh 501.I?.h'S '.ODhAL





George W. iiendri'cks, tirst: sergeant, FBt'ery A, 265th
Coast Artillery (Harbor Defense) Flor da Nati:nal Guard. r
heroism displayed in the rescue of a number of enlisted men fror-
a burning motor truck at Dania, Florida, on July 23, 1938. "'hen
a government truck collided with a loaded civilian gasoline trurc
and was saturated with gasoline, it immediately burst into flames,
trapping inside the seven enlisted men who had been riding there-
in and who had been rendered unconscious by the impact of the
collision. On observing the plight of the helpless men in t-he
wrecked truck, First Sergeant Hierricks, with utter disregard of
his personal safety, promptly forced his way into the blazing
vehicle despite the imminent danger of being trapped therein
himself, and, with the assistance of a comrade, removed the
seven unoon&hious men to safety, thereby saving the lives of el i
but one, the driver, who died as a result of the collision. The
heroism displayed by First Sergeant Hendr' cks on this occasion
reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
































:tE DripEtAr IDo Com'sp rom ith Treriio-, nd B3ii drea t h









JOSEPH HERNANDEZ










JOSEPH MARINO HERNANDEZ


Jose or Joseph Hernandez was born and raised in St. Augustine.
His family were Minorcan and had come to Florida during the
British Period and remained when the Spanish returned. Educated
in Florida and Cuba, Hernandez established himself as a superior
agriculturalist and prominent local citizen during the Second
Spanish Period and as an American citizen after 1821. He was
Florida's first delegate to the US Congress and was active in the
Florida Territorial Legislature.

Hernandez served in the Florida Militia during the Spanish Period
and the succeeding American Territorial rule. He was the
Brigadier General commanding the East Florida Militia from the
late 1820's until the end of the Second Seminole War. He
personally took part and led troops in several campaigns against
the Indians and, under orders from General Jessup, organized the
capture of Osceola, the greatest Seminole Chief.

The last decade of his life was spent in retirement in Cuba
where he died in 1856. Hernandez was very influential and
important in the development of volunteer militia units in
American Florida. With experience, he knew the old reliance on
enrolled militia was wrong and it was largely due to his efforts
that East Florida was able to defend itself in the early,
chaotic, days of the Second Seminole War.


















NO PHOTOGRAPH OR ILLUSTRATION
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IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE















PATRICK HOUSTOUN













PATRICK HOUSTOUN


Houstoun was of a historically important family whose ancestors
had been among the first settlers of Georgia. Born 20 September
1837, he, and his family, moved to Leon County, Florida when he
was but two years old. There he was raised and received his
basic schooling. He attended either University of North Carolina
or Virginia. When the Civil War began, he joined Captain Dyke's
Company of Light Artillery. Transferred to Villepique (also known
as the Kilcrease Light) Artillery, he saw active servicein
Georgia and South Carolina during 1863-1864. The final year of
the war, he and his regiment were in Florida, taking part in
several skirmishes and the Battle of Natural Bridge.

Houstoun made a living in agriculture and civic service,
including politics. He became Adjutant General and Major General
of Florida State Troops in 1893. He was successful obtaining
training and other advantages for the troops and was able to
provide an entire regiment, as requested, for the Spanish
American War. He died in office, 6 May 1901.










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30SEPH C. HUCH SON










JOSEPH C. HUTCHINSON JR.


Joseph Hutchinson was born 17 September 1894 in Cross Hill, South
Carolina. He moved to Sanford, Florida in 1915 as a young school
teacher. He entered federal military service in the fall 1917
and received a commission in the field artillery the following
summer. He saw combat service with Battery C, 18th Field
Artillery, 1st Division.

Following World War I, Hutchison joined the Florida National
Guard, serving both with the artillery and infantry. He was
mobilized with the Florida Guard in November 1940 as 62nd Brigade
Commander, 31st Division. Later, he became Assistant Divisional
Commander and served with the division in the Southwest Pacific
and in the Philippines.

For his combat service with the 31st Division, Joseph Hutchison
was awarded the Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, and
Air Medal. After the war, he re-joined the Florida NAtional
Guard and was Assistant, later Commanding General, 48th Division.
He retired in 1952 and died in 1982.

Of note, Hutchison was the general commanding who formally
accepted the Japanese surrender of their 35th Army on the island
of Mindanao, Philippine Islands in September 1945.




































David Langfrom a paining of him as Adjuan Gener of Flrida, 1885.






DAV D LANG







DAVID LANG





David Lang was a Georgian, born, bred, and edu-
cated. He moved to Florida as a young man to pursue a
career in engineering and surveying. When the war
began he volunteered, serving as a private and then as a
sergeant in the 1st Florida Infantry. In 1862, upon re-
organization of the regiment, he returned to Florida to
raise a new company in the 8th Florida Infantry. The
8th Florida joined the 2nd and 5th Florida to form a
Florida Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia.
Between the summer of 1862 and the surrender at
Appomattox in the spring of 1865, there were no major
battles involving the Army of Northern Virginia that
did not include the Florida Brigade and David Lang.
Second Manassas, Antietam, Fredricksburg, Chancel-
lorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotslyvania, Cold
Harbor, and the battles for Petersburg: Lang was always
there.
Lang was badly wounded twice, at Antietam and in
the Wilderness. Then, due to the incapacitation of Gen-
eral Perry, the brigade commander, Lang commanded
the entire brigade at Gettysburg and Spotslyvania. He
commanded again during the retreat to Appomattox
when the new brigade commander, Joseph Finegan, was
transferred to other duties.
He gained considerable renown for his regiment's
defense of the river crossings at Fredricksburg and
gained immortality, at the age of 25, leading his brigade
into the Union lines during Pickett's Charge at
Gettysburg.
With the election of his old brigade commander,
E.A. Perry, as governor of Florida, Lang became Adju-
tant General. With modest help from the state, Lang
was able to establish regular summer training camps for
state troops, to obtain better arms and equipment and
to designate the volunteer militia units as the official
State Troops of Florida. Following his eight-year tenure
as Adjutant General, he became private-secretary to the
next two governors. He lived to see all Americans, North
and South, wearing the same uniform and fighting a
common enemy, the soldiers of the German Empire. He
died an old and still proud man in December of 1917.




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WILLIAM W. LORIjNG






WILLIAM WING LORING:

FLORIDA MILITIA TO

EGYPTIAN PASHA


In the square behind Government House in down- military district which included New Mexico when the
town St. Augustine stands a monument and obelisk in Confederacy was formed, Loring resigned his commis-
memory of a most unusual Floridian, William Wing sion and journeyed to Richmond where he was imme-
Loring. Boy soldier in the Florida Militia during the diately commissioned a brigadier general, C.S.A., and
Second Seminole War, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel in the sent to command troops in western Virginia.
war with Mexico, regimental commander in the Far During the following four years of bitter warfare,
West, Major General of the Confederacy, and Pasha of Loring served as a divisional and corps commander in
Egypt: Loring was all of these. many major battles and campaigns, east and west. He
Loring was born in Wilmington, North Carolina. and his division were at Vicksburg, in the Tennessee
His family moved to St. Augustine, Florida, when he was and North Georgia campaigns of 1863 and 1864, and
three years old. His phenomenal military career began with Hood in his disastrous winter campaign against
as a volunteer in the Florida Militia in 1832, when he was Nashville. Transferred to the east early in 1865, Loring
barely 14 years old. He saw considerable fighting in the and the remnants of his division surrendered to Gen-
early stages of the Second Seminole War where he eral William T. Sherman in North Carolina, shortly
earned the sobriquet "Boy Soldier" from the local press. after Lee's surrender to Grant in Virginia.
Promoted sergeant, later lieutenant of the militia, he For the next several years following the Civil War,
ended his participation in the war to do what young men Loring found himself making his living as an advisor on
are supposed to do at his age, go to school. After at- Southern investments for a group of New York bankers.
tending school in Virginia, he returned to Florida and He made a comfortable living but the work must not
served in the new state legislature following Florida's have pleased him because when he was offered profes-
admission to the Union as a state. sional military employment with the Egyptian Army in
Loring wasn't entirely. happy as a politician, and 1869, he accepted immediately.
when it was announced that the national government Hiring professional soldiers from other countries
was raising a regiment of mounted volunteers for ser- was not unusual in the 19th century. When former
vice in Oregon he volunteered and was appointed cap- Union General William Sherman was on a visit to Egypt,
tain of the new regiment. The outbreak of the war he was asked by the Khedive for a list of American of-
caused the regiment to be diverted to Mexico where it, ficers, Union and Confederate, with Civil War experi-
and Loring, served with distinction with General Scott's ence, who might be willing to accept service with the
expedition into the Valley of Mexico. Loring was brev- Egyptian Army. Loring's was one of the first names on
eted three times for bravery: at Cerro Gordo, Churu- the list and the very first to accept a position.
busco, and at the Belen Gate of Mexico City where he Loring served for ten years in Egypt. Initially con-
lost his left arm. He finished the war as colonel in com- cerned with training and coastal defenses, he took part
mand of the regiment. in one active, ill-considered campaign against Abyssinia,
In 1849, the Regiment of Mounted Rifles, with today's Ethiopia. Complications of the Egyptian com-
Loring in command, resumed its journey to Oregon. mand arrangements, realities that made his advice, in-
For the next twelve years Loring, and the regiment, saw fluence, and experience useless, ultimately led to defeat
duty in the American Far West: along the Oregon Trail, for the Egyptian Army. Disgusted, Loring soon re-
against the Mormons, and in many conflicts with the In- signed his commission and returned to the United
dians of Texas and New Mexico. In command of the States.



For the next few years, Loring wandered around used as an occasion for a combined encampment, and
the country, visiting friends and relatives and lecturing week-long meeting, of the Union and Confederate vet-
on his life as a pasha, or general, in the Egyptian Army. erans organizations of northeast Florida. Both groups,
He wrote and published a book, A Confederate Soldier in in conjunction with other local civic organizations,
Egypt, about his experiences. He began preparing his sponsored the erection of a memorial obelisk and mon-
notes for a projected autobiography. It was not to be ument, in Government House Square, inscribed with
written. William Wing Loring died suddenly, December the details of Loring's life and military service and em-
30, 1886, in New York City. blazoned with the flags of the United States, the Con-
Loring's reinterment and public funeral in St. federate States, and the Ottoman province of Egypt. It
Augustine during March of 1887 was one of the grand- is a fine memorial to the local militiaman who became a
est events in the city's history for that decade. It was pasha of Egypt.










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SUMPTER LOWRY













SUMMER deLEON

LOWRY: THE PERFECT

GUARDSMAN

What is a perfect National Guardsman? In the tra- with the extended Lowry-Avery-Parkhill clans of
edition of the Minuteman or Florida's own Spanish Florida and South Carolina.
Milicia, the perfect Guardsman must be a citizen en- Lowry was also a soldier of his state. He was called
gaged in the pursuits of a normal civilian life. He must out many times to help preserve civil order and assist
also be a soldier, trained, equipped and willing to de- those suffering from the effects of storms and floods. It
fend his nation from its enemies. He must be ready to was Lowry who, faced by a large and angry mob in 1917,
assist the people of his state recover from the ravages of lined up his few soldiers and told the crowd he'd shoot
nature or chaos of civil unrest. He should be active in anyone who crossed the line. A voice in the back.of the
community affairs and have strong commitments to crowd said he knew Lowry and guessed he'd do what he
family and friends. All of his decisions and actions must said. The crowd went home. It was Lowry, when another
be based on a profound understanding and acceptance riotous and violent crowd set up a machine gun to use
of the virtues, duty, honor, country. In short, he must be against the police and soldiers guarding a prisoner, re-
like Sumter Lowry, Florida's Perfect Guardsman. sponded by setting up a machine gun of his own. When
Sumter Lowry was a Floridian, born in St. Augus- the mob leaders directed fire at Lowry's men, he had
tine during a hurricane in 1893. The birth occurred in them fire back. The riot ended a short time later with
a civilian family house, but on property overlooking the Lowry's men in control.
Castillo San Marcos, then known as Fort Marion. This But a Guardsman does not only serve his private in-
juxtaposition of the civilian and military was to be a terests and those of his state. A Guardsman may be
major theme of Lowry's life for most of the following 90 called to serve his nation. Lowry was called to national
years, service on three occasions. He served with the 2nd Flor-
Lowry attended grammar and high school in ida on the Mexican Border in 1916-1917, and with the
Tampa. He received his college education at the Vir- 31st Division during the First World War. He was com-
ginia Military Institute. After graduation in 1914, he re- mander of the 56th Artillery Brigade, 31st Division,
turned to Tampa and formed Company H, 2nd Florida during the Second World War and served with them in
Infantry. During the next two years he also began his the New Guinea campaign against the Japanese. A
business career and his family. As a citizen-soldier, grateful government awarded him the Distinguished
Lowry needed a civilian profession. He became a busi- Service Medal for his service in the South Pacific.
nessman and was extremely successful. He owned sev- Following the Second World War, Sumter Lowry
eral industrial enterprises, was a land developer in commanded the 51st Division, National Guard. He re-
Florida and North Carolina, and he founded Liberty tired to civilian life in 1952, a Lieutenant General in the
Life Assurance Company, now known as Gulf Life. All Florida National Guard. For the next 30 years, until his
of his enterprises were successful and freed him from death at age 91 in 1985, he continued active in business,
financial concerns for most of his life. community affairs, and politics. He remained inter-
As a citizen of Florida and active member of his ested in the Florida Guard and established the Lowry
community, Lowry served on the boards of numerous Award, given annually to a Florida Guardsman who best
civic service organizations, supported a number of pri- demonstrates those virtues of patriotism, leadership
vate charities and contributed money, time, and equip- and service to community, state and nation both as a sol-
ment to many public organizations. He was a dedicated dier and as a civilian. In effect, it's an award for those
family man, and not just to his immediate family. He who most reflect the life and character of Florida's
was an enthusiastic supporter of all activities associated Perfect Guardsman, Sumter deLeon Lowry.

















NO PHOTOGRAPH OR ILLUSTRATION
OF THIS INDIVIDUAL
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
















CHARLES P. LOVELL











Charles Phillip Lovell
Born: 7 May 1869
Utica, Illinois
Died: 25 January 1923
Entered Florida Service:
July 1887
Adjutant General:
4 January 1921 to
25 January 1923

Charles Phillip Lovell's family moved to Florida
when he was a young boy. He attended the East Florida
Seminary, 1883 to 1887. At that time it was a military
school and, upon graduation, Lovell received a com-
mission as a 2nd lieutenant in the Florida State Troops.
Along with his brother, George, Lovell formed the Lees-
burg Rifles and by 1889 was its commanding officer.
In 1893, Lovell was promoted to major in the 2nd
Battalion, Florida State Troops. The 1890s were a very
active period for Florida's soldiers. There were annual
encampments, regular training, and some periods of



active state duty. When war with Spain was declared,
Lovell was appointed major and second in command of
the 1st Florida Volunteer Infantry Regiment. In August
of 1898, he became the regiment's commanding officer.
Lovell was promoted to Brigadier General of Flor-
ida State Troops in 1903 and retired in 1906. When war
was declared against Germany in 1917, Lovell left retire-
ment and accepted a captain's commission in the Ar-
my's Motor Transport Corps. Following more than a
year's active service, he retired once more to private life.
In 1921, Lovell was asked to give up his retirement
to become Florida's Adjutant General. His experience
and skill were desperately needed to rebuild an almost
nonexistent Florida National Guard. Traditionally, it has
always been difficult to reestablish state troops follow-
ing a long term of active national duty and, although he
died in office after only two years in office, Lovell
achieved remarkable increases in Guard strength and
proficiency. His successor, J.C.R. Foster, found a solid
foundation on which to build the new Florida Guard.
Lovell was eligible for the Spanish War Service
Medal and the First World War Victory Medal, no bar.
















NO PHOTOGRAPH OR ILLUSTRATION
OF THIS INDIVIDUAL
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
















FRANCISCO MENENDEZ












FRANCS SCO TTENENDEZ






FLORIDA'S BLACK

MILITIA





Blacks, free and slave, had been resident in Spanish paid for the rebuilding of two bastions in the city de-
East Florida since the first years of its settlement. While fense wall.
details are lacking, it is probable they served as individ- Black Floridians would serve prominently in the
ual members of the local militia during periods of ex- East Florida Rangers, Florida's British militia during
treme crisis, as during the Drake attack of 1585 and the the American Revolution and would, once more, have
Guale Indian Revolt of 1598-1599. However, it is not their own local militia company during the Second Pe-
until 1683 that documentary evidence identifies a spe- riod of Spanish Occupation in Florida, 1783-1821. Du: -
cific local militia unit as the company of pardesy morenos ing the early period of American occupation in Floridci.
(free men of color). 1821-1865. there would be no organized black Florida
It is fairly certain that the black militia company of militia; most blacks were slaves, and the less than 1000
Spanish Florida enjoyed virtually continuous existence free blacks in Florida were prohibited from bearing
from 1683 to 1763. Prior to 1720, it is probable that the arms. Between 1865 and 1901 there were black units of
black militia unit's officers and sergeants were white the enrolled state militia but they received no state sup-
Spaniards. After 1726, and through the period of the port and no encouragement to become active units.
English invasion of Florida in 1740, probably until the Until the mid-1960s, blacks were not allowed tojoin
British occupied Florida after 1763, the unit's officers the organized volunteer militia, later the Florida Na-
and sergeants were almost certainly black. The com- tional Guard. Since that time, black Floridians have
mander of the black militia company from 1726 until been encouraged to join and serve in the Guard an:i.
sometime after 1742 was a local "free man of color," now, many serve. Those black Floridians who ser':c
Francisco Menendez. He was its commander during the today honor a long and worthy tradition. They have
successful assault on English-held Fort Mose in 1740. served Florida for more than 400 years.
Menendez was also a man of property, having personally
















NO PHOTOGRAPH OR ILLUSTRATION
OF THIS INDIVIDUAL
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
















MANUEL DE MONTIANO












MANUEL DE MONTIANO


Research on the life and career of Florida's Spanish governor,
1737 to 1749 is not yet complete. He was most likely
Spanish-born and is known to have served with the Grenadier
Infantry of Aragon in the North African Wars against the Moors.
His subsequent career included both military and civil positions
in Spanish Central America prior to, and following, his term as
Governor of Florida.

It is for his role as the brilliant, and successful, commander of
Spanish Florida troops during the English invasion of 1740 that
he is best remembered. His masterstroke during that campaign,
the Garrison-Militia strike against Fort Mose which was largely
responsible for the ultimate British defeat, rightly belongs in
the military annals of Florida history. In several campaigns,
Montiano demonstrated-superior skill as a military leader of both
regular soldiers and provincial militia.
























...r "a "" '~9
,:' .-' '
W. ,















~~.RE SAFAY -- -- -31=~ ~i















FRED ABRAHAM SAFAY


Fred Safay was born in Syria on the 10th of February 1893. He
was raised and always made his home in Jacksonville, Florida.
His first military service was with the band, 1st Florida in
1916. Mobilized for World War I, Safay left the 31st Division to
accept a commission in the 121st Infantry Regiment. He saw
combat service in France with the 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st
Division.

Safay re-joined the Florida National Guard after the war, serving
throughout the 1920's and 1930's, becoming regimental commander
of the 124th following the death of Preston Ayers in 1940.
Mobilized with the Florida guard in November 1940, he rose to
brigade commander and, taking a reduction in rank, tried to
obtain a combat assignment. However, he was released from
federal service in 1944 and retired in 1946. He died in 1952.































JACOB H. SPENGLER
















JACOB H. SPENGLER


Jacob Spengler was a native of Archbold, Ohio, having been born
there 16 June 1881. Spengler first entered military service in
the Third US Cavalry, April 1900. Later, he transferred to the
Second Cavalry and with the two regiments, served most of the
years between 1900 and 1917 in the Philippine Islands. He saw
considerable combat service during several insurrections in the
i stands.

Spengler became a Quartermaster Sergeant on the eve of America's
entry into World War I and served overseas during 1918-1919,
rising to' the rank of Major in the Quartermaster's Corps. After
the war and following a stint of duty in Washington, DC, Spengler
retired from the Regular Army and, in 1921, accepted a commission
as State Quartermaster in the Florida National Guard.

Spengler was the Commander of the 106th Quartermaster Regiment
when it was mobilized for service during World War II. He
retired from active duty in June 1945. Among his awards were a
Certificate of Merit from General Pershing for services in World
War I and a rare Purple Heart for Meritorious Services during and
immediately after that war.




Enlisted Troop C, Third Cavalry, April 30, 1900. Honorably gium, Italy, and Germany, 1918-1919. Assistant to Military At-
discharged, April 29, 1903. Served in Philippine insurrection, July tachee, Rome, Italy, 1919. Received citation for meritorious serv-
14, 1900, to June 22, 1902. Re-enlisted in Troop A, Second Cavalry, ices Commander in Chief, A. E. F., 1919. Duty with National
July 7, 1903. Discharged July 6, 1906. Served in Philippine Islands Museum, Washington, D. C., 1920. Honorably discharged as Major,
February 18, 1904, to January 5, 1906. Appointed Squadron Ser- Quartermaster Corps, October 20, 1920. Re-enlisted Senior Grade
geant Major, First Squadron, Second Cavalry, December 23, 1906. Quartermaster Sergeant, October 30, 1920. Retired from active
Discharged and re-enlisted July 7, 1909, in the Second Cavalry. service, May 15, 1921. Promoted to Major, Retired List Regular
Served in the Ute Indian disturbance, South Dakota, 1907. Ap- Army, by act of Congress, May 7, 1932. Appointed Captain of
pointed Post Quartermaster Sergeant, November, 1911. Discharged Infantry, Florida National Guard, September 14, 1921.. Designated
and re-enlisted, July 7, 1912. Served in the Philippine Islands U. S. P. & D. O., October 6, 1921. Appointed State Quarter-
from January 3, 1910, to May 15, 1915. Participated in skirmishes master, Florida, September 14, 1921.
with hostile Moros in Jolo in 1911. Discharged and re-enlisted, Promoted to Major, Quartermaster Corps, Florida National
July 7, 1915. Appointed Senior Grade Quartermaster Sergeant, Guard, October 31, 1921. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, Quar-
Quartermaster Corps, March 23, 1917. Instructor in Quartermaster termaster Corps, Florida National Guard, June 13, 1924. Appointed
Corps School, Philadelphia, Pa., 1917. Division Quartermaster, Thirty-first Division (Dixie Division), June 5,
Appointed Captain, Quartermaster Corps, August 6, 1917. Des- 1924. Relieved U. S. P. & D. O., February 12, 1938. Relieved
ignated as an Executive Officer, Camp Johnston, Florida, October, State Quartermaster, November I, 1938. Awarded Purple Heart
1917. Relieved, 1918. Administrative Division, Office of the Quar- for meritorious services with A. E. F. Diploma Command and Gen-
termaster General, 1918. Promoted to Major in Quartermaster eral Staff, Extension Course, 1938. Certificate of Proficiency,
Corps, July 6, 1918. Served with A. E. F. in England, France, Bel- Fourth Corps Area Command Staff School, 1939.

[8]






























WILL I AM E TH I GPEN









WILLIAM E. THIGPEN


Captain Thigpen was born in North Carolina. He served with the
61st Artillery, Regular Army in France during World War I. He
joined the 265th CAC, Florida National Guard in 1921 and
eventually rose to the rank of captain. Mobilized with the 265th
in January 1941, he later served with the Air Corps Ferrying
Command and the Air Defense Artillery wntil returned to state
service in 1944. He became inactive in 1949 and retired in 1953.

Captain Thigpen is known to have been awarded the following
medals and decorations:

Soldiers Medal
World War I Victory Medal
American Defense Medal
American Campaign Medal
World War II Victory Medal
Florida Cross
Florida Service Medal.
Florida Active State Duty Medal


1T Captain William E. Thigpen. Battery "A". 265th Coast
Artillery; Florida National Guard:
William E. Thigpen, Captain, 265th Coast Artillery,
for exceptional bravery in the rescue of a detachment
of soldiers of hi, battery from a burning motor Iruck
near Dania, Florida, July 23, 1933. At great hazard.
and with disregard for his own personal safety,
Captain Thigpen entered the blazing truck and assisted
in the removal of helplessly injured personnel to safety.






CITATION FOR SOLDIER'S 1EDAL




William E. Thigpen, captain, Coast Artillery Corps,
National Guard of the United States, For heroism displayed
in the rescue of a number of eiilisted men from a burning
motor truck at Dania, Florida, on July 23, 1938. TWhen a
government truck collided with a loaded Tiilian gasoline
truck and was saturated with gasoline, it immediately burst
into flames, trapping inside the seven enlisted men who had
been riding therein and who had been rendered unconscious by
the impact of the collision. On observing the plight of the
helpless men in the wrecked truck, Captain Thigpen, with
utter disregard of his personal safety, promptly forced his
way into the blazing vehicle despite the imminent, danger of
being trapped therein himself, and, with the assistance of
a comrade, removed the seven unconscious men to safety,
thereby saving the lives of all but one, the driver, who died
as a result of the collision. The herbiit displayed by
Captain Thigpen on this occasion reflects great credit upon
himself and the military service.



















SECTION III






S-FATAL CASUALTIES: FIRST WORLD WAR

S;: W A DECKER, Peter J., Private, Hillsborough
S FATA ASUALTIES Florida Service: 1st Company CAC
War Service: 50th Company CAC
FIRST W ORLD W AR Death/Date/Loc: 16 October 1918; Overseas
SInfantry War Service: Company B, 116th Machine
S19 1 97 Gun Battalion
11: Death/Date/Loc: 23 February 1918/United States,
DILLON, George, Corporal, Monroe : i.
Men of the Florida National Guard who died, died of woundsor C M
en of the Florida Naona Guard who ded, ded of wounds Florida Service: Company I, 2nd Florida Infantry
or were killed in action while on active service during the First War Service: Company I, 124th Infantry
World War, 1917-1918, are included in this list. Death/Date/Loc: 3 December 1917; United States
: DENMARK, Gordon H., Corporal, Columbia
SCAMPBELL, Frank A., Private, Seminole Florida Service: Company A, 1st Separate Battalion
Florida Service: Company C, 2nd Florida Infantry, Florida Infantry
Company C, 124th Infantry Regiment War Service: Company A, 106th Engineers
War Service: Company M, 166th Infantry Regiment 'Death/Date/LLc: 6 October 1918; Overseas
Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 19 July 1918 EDWARDS, Albert A., Private, Gadsden
CARAWAY, Frank A., Sergeant, Jackson Florida Service: Company B, 1st Florida Infantry,
Florida Service: Company G, 1st Infantry Company E, 124th Infantry Regiment
War Service: Company F, 56th Brigade War Service: Company A, 102nd Infantry Regiment,
Death/Date/Loc: 15 October 1917; United States 26th Division
CARTMEL, Arthur R., Jr., Private, Duval Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 25 October 1918
Florida Service: Company A, 1st Separate Battalion, ELMORE, Allie J., Private, Bay
Florida Infantry Florida Service: Company M, 1st Florida Infantry
War Service: Company A, 1st Separate Battalion, War Service: Company F, 106th Engineers
Florida Infantry Death/Date/Loc: 25 December 1917; United States
Death/Date/Loc: 12 June 1917; United States ELMORE, Cassie, Private, Jackson
CLAYTON, Henry P., Corporal, Hillsborough Florida Service: Company M, 1st Florida Infantry
Florida Service: 1st Company CAC War Service: Battery F, 116th Field Artillery
War Service: 3rd Company CAC Death/Date/Loc: 17 November 1917; United States
Death/Date/Loc: 14 October 1918; United States FERRAND, William, Private First Class, Polk
CLAYTON, John W., Private, Marion Florida Service: Company D, 2nd Florida Infantry,
Florida Service: Company A, 2nd Florida Infantry Company C, 124th Infantry Regiment
War Service: Company A, 124th Infantry War Service: Company D, 168th Infantry Regiment,
Death/Date/Loc: 29 January 1918; United States 42nd Infantry Division
COLEMAN, Coke P., Private, Hillsborough Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 30 July 1918
Florida Service: Company I, CAC FOY, Rol, Private, Suwanee
War Service: Company I, 124th Infantry Florida Service: 1st Florida Infantry
Death/Date/Loc: 29 January 1918; United States War Service: Company B, 106th Engineers
COLLIER, Leslie E, Private, Highlands Death/Date/Loc: 2 February 1918; United States
Florida Service: Company B, 2nd Florida Infantry, FROST, George W., Private First Class, Manatee
Company B, 124th Infantry Regiment Florida Service: Company E, 2nd Florida Infantry
War Service: Company B, 38th Infantry Regiment, War Service: 124th Infantry
2nd Infantry Division Death/Date/Loc: 26 January 1918; United States
Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 8 August 1918; France GERRELL, Irs O., Private, Leon
COOPER, Ralph E., Private First Class, Lake Florida Service: Company B, 1st Florida Infantry
Florida Service: Company C, 2nd Infantry War Service: Company A, 106th Engineers
War Service: Company C, 124th Infantry Death/Date/Loc: 14 December 1917; United States
Death/Date/Loc: 7 March 1918; United States GONZALES, Marcelo, Private First Class, Hillsborough
COWART, Walter N., Private, Manatee Florida Service: Company H, 2nd Florida Infantry,
Florida Service: Company I, 1st Separate Battalion Company H, 124th Infantry Regiment
Florida Infantry War Service: Company C, 26th Infantry Regiment,
War Service: Company F, 56th Brigade 1st Infantry
Death/Date/Loc: 5 November 1917; United States Division Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 6 October
CULBRETH, EricJ., Private, Hillsborough 1918; France
Florida Service: Company H, 2nd Florida Infantry, GRACE, Henry G., Corporal, Bay
Company H, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company M, 1st Florida Infantry
War Service: Combat: Company A, 9th Infantry, I -War Service: Company F, 106th Engineers... ...
2nd Florida Infantry Death/Date/Loc: 15 November 1918; France
Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 20 July 1918; France

*271







APPENDIX 4

GARCIA, John M., Corporal, Hillsborough INGRAM, JOHN W., Private First Class, Gadsden
Florida Service: Company H, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company B, 1st Florida Infantry
War Service: Company H, 1st Pioneer Infantry War Service: Company B, 106th Engineers
Death/Date/Loc: 21 May 1919; France Death/Date/Loc: 24 May 1919; France
GONIE, Charlie A., Private, Hillsborough JOHNS, Harold R, Private First Class, Martin
Florida Service: Company G, 2nd Infantry Florida Service: Company L, 2nd Florida Infantry,
War Service: Company G, 124th Infantry Company L, 124th Infantry Regiment
Death/Date/Loc: 13 March 1918; United States War Service: Company E, 103rd Engineers
GRIER, Thomas W., Private, Calhoun Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 30 September
Florida Service: Company G, 1st Florida Infantry 1918; FRANCE
War Service: Company C, 117th Machine Gun Battalion JOHNSON, Albin M., Private First Class, Putnam
Death/Date/Loc: 4 December 1917; United States Florida Service: 4th Company, 1st Training Battalion
HALLEY, Charles L., Private, Pinellas War Service: Company D, 130th Machine Gun Battalior
Florida Service: Company C, 2nd Florida Infantiy Death/Date/Loc: 14 December 1918; France
War Service: Company C, 106th Engineers JOHNSON, Rendell, Private, Dade
Death/Date/Loc: 28 May 1918; United States Florida Service: Company M, 2nd Florida Infantry
HEISLER, Ralph E., Private, Pinellas War Service: Company M, 124th Infantry Regiment
Florida Service: Machine Gun Company, 2nd Florida Death/Date/Loc: 12 October 1918; United States
Infantry, Machine Gun Company, 124th JOHNSON, William H., Private, Dade
Infantry Regiment Florida Service: Company M, 2nd Florida Infantry
War Service: Machine Gun Company, 165th Infantry War Service: Company M, 124th Infantry
Regiment, 42nd Infantry Division Death/Date/Loc: 25 January 1918; France
Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 28 July 1918; France KELLY, DaveJ., Private, Santa Rosa
HERNANDEZ, Theo H., Corporal, Duval Florida Service: Company K, 1st Florida Infantry
Florida Service: Machine Gun Company, War Service: Company E, 106th Engineers
1st Florida Infantry Death/Date/Loc: 16 December 1917; United States
War Service: Company B, 116th Machine Gun Battalion KNIGHT, Carl V., Private, Duval
Death/Date/Loc: 23 February 1918/United States Florida Service: Company, 1st Separate Battalion,
HERRING, Jody L., Private, Hardee Florida Infantry
Florida Service: Company F, 2nd Florida Infantry, War Service: Headquarters Troop 31st Division
Company F, 124th Infantry Regiment Death/Date/Loc: 18 October 1918; France
War Service: Company A, 102nd Infantry Regiment, KNIGHT, Percy, Private, Duval
26th Infantry Division Florida Service: Company F, 1st Separate Battalion
Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 26 September 1918 War Service: Company D, 106th Engineers
HILL, Thomas L., Private, Pinellas Death/Date/Loc: 1 December 1917; United States
Florida Service: Company A, 2nd Florida Infantry LAWTON, Carl V., Private, Pinellas
War Service: Company A, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company H, 2nd Florida Infantry
Death/Date/Loc: 30 August 1918; France War Service: Company H, 124th Infantry
HINES, Joseph S., Private, Suwanee Death/Date/Loc: 22 November 1917; United States
Florida Service: Company E, 1st Florida Infantry LEITNER, James F, Sergeant, Marion
War Service: Company B, 106th Engineers Florida Service: Company A, 2nd Florida Infantry
Death/Date/Loc: 16January 1918; United States War Service: Company F, 106th Engineers
HIRES, Ezekiel, Private, Calhoun Death/Date/Loc: 24 November 1917; United States
Florida Service: Company H, 1st Battalion Infantry LEMIEUX, Lewis T., Private, Bay
War Service: Company D, 106th Engineers Florida Service: Company M, 1st Florida Infantry
Death/Date/Loc: 18 November 1917; United States War Service: 6th Company M, M Regiment, U. S.
HODGES, Henry M, Private, Madison Air Service -
Florida Service: Company E, 1st Florida Infantry Death/Date/Loc: 15 September 1918; France
War Service: Company E, 106th Engineers LUMSDEN, William M., Sergeant, Duval
Death/Date/Loc:: 6 January 1918; United States Florida Service: Company A, Ist Separate Battalion
HUDSON, James M., Private, Desoto War Service: Company F, 106th Engineers
Florida Service: Company K, 2nd Florida Infantry Death/Date/Loc: 22 April 1918; United States
War Service: Company K, 124th Infantry LYLES, Robert C., Private, Hillsborough
Death/Date/Loc: 31 December 1917; United States Florida Service: Company G, 2nd Florida Infantry
HUTCHINSON, Neil F., Private First Class, Leon War Service: Company C, 124th Infantry
Florida Service: Company A, 1st Florida Infantry Death/Date/Loc: 2.0January 1918; United States
Headquarters, 124th Infantry Regiment
War Service: Company F, 167th Infantry Regiment,
42nd Infantry Division
Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 28July 1918










FATAL CASUALTIES: FIRST WORLD WAR

LYNCH, William Hasley, Private First Class, Alachua MORRIS, John M., Private First Class, Jackson
Florida Service: Machine Gun Co, 2nd Florida Infantry, Florida Service: Company D, 106th Engineers :
Machine Gun Co, 124th Infantry Regiment War Service: Development Battalion,
War Service: Machine Gun Co, 167th Infantry, 31st Infantry Division
42nd Infantry Division Death/Date/Loc: 19 March 1919; United States
Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 15 October 1918 NEEL, Henry, Private, Jackson
MADDEN, Arthur, Private, Hardee Florida Service: Company, 1st Florida Infantry
Florida Service: Company K, 2nd Florida Infantry War Service: Battery F, 117th Field Artillery .
War Service: Company K, 124th Infantry Death/Date/Loc: 12 Novemeber 1917; United States
Death/Date/Loc: 14 November 1918; United States NETTLES, William F., Private, Columbia
MATHEWS, Bacile M., Private, Lafayette Florida Service: Company C, 1st Florida Infantry
Florida Service: 1st Florida Infantry War Service: 33rd Company, 9th Training Battalion;
War Service: Battery B, 117th Field Artillery 56th Depot Brigade
Death/Date/Loc: 17 November 1917; United States Death/Date/Loc: 12 May 1918; United States
MCCRANIE, John W., Private, Liberty NETTLES, William F., Corporal, Citrus '
Florida Service: Company L, 1st Florida Infantry Florida Service: Company A,.2nd Florida Infantry
War Service: Company E, 106th Engineers War Service: 106th Engineers
Death/Date/Loc: 6 May 1918; United States Death/Date/Loc: 9 December 1917; United States
MCLAULIN, Robert M. NEWMAN, Sam, Private, Polk
Florida Service: Medical Department, Florida Service: Company D, 2nd Florida Infantry
2nd Florida Infantry War Service: Company D, 124th Infantry
War Service: Sanitary Detachment, 124th Infantry Death/Date/Loc: 5 December 1917; United States
Death/Date/Loc: 20 April 1918; United States ORTON, Raymond A., Corporal, Lake
MCLEOD, Norman, Private, Hillsborough Florida Service: Company C, 2nd Florida Infantry
Florida Service: Company E, 2nd Florida Infantry, War Service: Company C; 124th Infantry
Company E, 124th Infantry Regiment Death/Date/Loc: 2 January 1918; United States
War Service: Company B, 163rd Infantry Regiment PARKER, Lewis H., Private, DeSoto
41 Infantry Division Florida Service: Company K, 2nd Florida Infantry,
Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 18 July 1918 Company K, 124th Infantry Regiment
MCLOUGHLIN, Patrick W., Private First Class, War Service: Company C, 103rd Supply Training
Hillsborough Death/Date/Loc: 10 November 1918; France
Florida Service: Company G, 2nd Florida Infantry PEACOCK, Niven L., Private, Dixie
War Service: Company G, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Supply Company, 2nd Florida Infantry
Death/Date/Loc: 19 December 1917; United States War Service: Supply Company, 124th Infantry
MERCER, Burrell E., Private, Liberty Death/Date/Loc: 29 January 1918; United States
Florida Service: Company H, 1st Florida Infantry PENT, Norman, Private, Monroe
War Service: Battery C, 117th Field Artillery Florida Service: Company I, 2nd Florida Infantry
Death/Date/Loc: 9 January 1918; United States War Service: Company I, 124th, Infantry, Company M,
MINTON, Erving, Private, Braford 1st Pioneer Infantry
Florida Service: Company D, 1st Separate Battalion, Death/Date/Loc: 8 November 1918; France
Florida Infantry PITTS, John H., Private, Calhoun
War Service: Company B, 106th Engineers Florida Service: Company H, 1st Supply Battalion
DeathiDate/Loc: 15 January 1918; United States War Service: Battery D, 146th Field Artillery
MITCHELL, George, Private, Suwanee Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 5 October 1918
Florida Service: Company E, 1st Florida Infantry POPE, Ike, Private First Class, Orange
War Service: Company F, 106th Engineers Florida Service: Company C, 2nd Florida Infantry
Death/Date/Loc: 27 December 1917; United States War Service: Company C, 124th Infantry, 31st Division
MONTGOMERY, Cecil E., Private First Class, Hillsborough Headquarters, 1st Pioneer Infantry
Florida Service: Company K, 2nd Florida Infantry, Death/Date/Loc: 11 April 1919; United States
Company K, 124th Infantry Regiment PRIDGEON, Willis W, Private First Class, Leon
War Service: Company A, 9th Infantry Regiment, Florida Service: 2nd Company, 1st Training Battalion,
2nd Infantry Division 56th Depot Brigade FNG
Death/Date/Loc: Died of wounds; 14 September War Service: Company A, 106th Engineers
1918, France ..... .......- Death/Date/Loc: 10July 1919; France
MORRIS, Alav H., Private, Gadsden PUMAREGA, Louis, Private First Class, Hillsborough
Florida Service: Company B, 1st Florida Infantry Florida Service: Company G, 2nd Florida Infantry,
War Service: 106th Engineers Company G, 124th Infantry
Death/Date/Loc: 22 November 1917; United States War Service: 101st Infantry Regiment, 26th Infantry
Division
Death/Date/Loc: 6 April 1919; France









APPENDIX 4

PUMPHREY, James W., Private, Jackson STONEBRAKER, Jacob F., Jr., Corporal DeSoto
Florida Service: Headquarters, 117th Machine Gun Florida Service: Company K, 2nd Florida Infantry
Battalion War Service: Company K, 124th Infantry
War Service: Quartermaster Corps, Auxiliary Remount Death/Date/Loc: 17 April 1918; United States
Detachment Number 311 31st Division STRINGFELLOW, Joseph H., Sergeant, Hillsborough
Death/Date/Loc: 21 April 1918; United States Florida Service: 1st Company CAC
RAULERSON, Porter, Private First Class, Palm Beach War Service: Battalion B, 36th Artillery CAC
Florida Service: Company L, 2nd Florida Infantry, : Death/Date/Loc: 14 December 1918; United States
Company L, 124th Infantry Regiment SULLIVAN, Homer D., Private, Brevard
War Service: Company D, 23rd Infantry Regiment, Florida Service: Company K, 124th Infantry
2nd Infantry Division War Service:
Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 18 July 1918 Death/Date/Loc: 16 February 1918; United States
REDD, Ralph, Private, Santa Rdsa THOMAS, Archie T., Palm Beach
Florida Service: Company K, 1st Florida Infantry Florida Service: 1st Company CAC
War Service: Company F, 106th Engineers War Service: Headquarters Detach nent 1st Heavy
Death/Date/Loc: 13 November 1917; United States Artillery Brigade
ROBERTS, Chester W., Private, Columbia Death/Date/Loc: 20 February 1919; France
Florida Service: Company C, 1st Florida Infantry TOMLINSON, Cecil, Private, Suwanee
War Service: Quartermaster Auxiliary Remount Florida Service: Company E, 1st Florida Infantry
Detachment Number 311 War Service:
Death/Date/Loc: 18 April 1918; United States Death/Date/Loc: 3 September 1917; United States
ROBERTS, Claude J., Private, Franklin THOMPSON, Clifford H., Private First Class, Duval
Florida Service: Company L, Ist Florida Infantry Florida Service: Company D, 1st Florida Infantry
War Service: Company D, 106th Engineers War Service: Headquarters Company, 116th Machine
Death/Date/Loc: 17 April 1918; United States Gun Battery
SANDLIN, Houston, Corporal, Columbia Death/Date/Loc: 18 October 1918; France
Florida Service: Company C, 1st Florida Infantry TUTEN, Hal M., Jr., Private, Hamilton
War Service: Company A, 106th Engineers Florida Service: Company C, 1st Florida Infantry
Death/Date/Loc: 30 November 1917; United States War Service: Company A, 116th Machine Gun Battery
SAND, Howard J., Private, Monroe Death/Date/Loc: 2 June 1918; United States
Florida Service: Company I, 2nd Florida Infantry, VINSON, William G., Private, Marion
Company I, 124th Infantry Regiment Florida Service: Company A, 2nd Florida Infantry
War Service: Supply Company, 101st Infantry Regiment, War Service: Company A, 124th Infantry
26th Infantry Division Death/Date/Loc: 15 January 1918; United States
Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 19 July 1918 WATKINS, James E., Private, DeSoto
SIMMONS, William C., Private, Orange Florida Service: Company K, 2nd Florida Infantry,
Florida Service: Supply Company, 2nd Florida Infantry, Company K, 124th Infantry Regiment
Supply Company, 124th Infantry Regiment War Service: Company B, 9th Infantry Regiment,
War Service: Company F, 7th Engineers 2nd Infantry Division
Death/Date/Loc: Died of wounds; 15 October 1918 Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 18 July 1918
SINGLETON, Sam, Private, Duval WATSON, Elmer T., Private, Hernando
Florida Service: Company D, 1st Separate Battalion Florida Service: Company F, 2nd Florida Infantry,
Florida Infantry Company F, 124th Infantry Regiment
War Service: Company D, 106th Engineers War Service: Company M, 125th Infantry Regiment,
Death/Date/Loc: 26 September 1918; United States 32nd Infantry Division
SMEDLEY, FRANK C., Private, Marion Death/Date/Loc: Killed in action; 11 October 1918;
Florida Service: Company A, 2nd Florida Infantry France
War Service: Company A, 124th Infantry WEATHERSBEE, Preston H., Private, Marion
Death/Date/Loc: 3 December 1917; United States Florida Service: Company A, 2nd Florida Infantry
STARLING, Marion W., Private, Manatee War Service: Company A, 124th Infantry
Florida Service: Company E, 2nd Florida Infantry Death/Date/Loc: 1 June 1918; United States
War Service: 40th Company, 10th Rec Battalion, WHITLOCK, Fred, Private, Duval
157th Brigade Florida Service: Company F, 1st Seperate Battalion
Death/Date/Loc: 31 January 1919; France Florida Infantry
STEWART, Velpo M., Private, Pinellas War Service:
Florida Service: Company D, 2nd FL Infantry, Death/Date/Loc: 8 May 1917; United States
Company D, 124th Infantry Regiment WIGGINS, George C., Private First Class, Santa Rosa
War Service: Company B, 104th Infantry Regiment, Florida Service: Company K, 1st Florida Infantry
26th Infantry Division War Service: Battery C, 116th Field Artillery
Death/Date/Loc: Died of wounds; 22 July 1918 Death/Date/Loc: 30 December 1917; United States








FATAL CASUALTIES: FIRST WORLD WAR

WILLIAMS, Ernest C., Corporal, Duval WILSON, Henry S., Martin
Florida Service: Company F, 1st Seperate Battalion Florida Service: Company L, 2nd Florida Infantry
War Service: Headquarters Company, War Service: Company L, 124th Infantry
117th Field Artillery Death/Date/Loc: 26 November 1917; United States
Death/Date/Loc: 21 January 1918; United States WOFFORD, Howard M., Private, Orange
WILLIS, Charles C., Private, DeSoto Florida Service: Company C, 2nd Florida Infantry
Florida Service: Company K, 2nd Florida Infantry War Service: Company C, 124th Infantry
War Service: Company K, 124th Infantry Death/Date/Loc: 2 January 1918; United States
Death/Date/Loc: 8 December YON, Joseph J., Private, Calhoun
WILSON, George, Private, Hillsborough Florida Service: Company H, 1st Separate Battalion
Florida Service: 3rd Company CAC Florida Infantry
War Service: 7th Company CAC War Service: Company A, 117th Machine Gun Battalion
Death/Date/Loc: 25 April 1918; United States Death/Date/Loc: 14 April 1918; United States








APPENDIX 4

fBBERC;FIELD, Henry, Major, Durval
FATAL CASUALT ES Florida Service: 265th Coast Artillery
Died non-battle; date and place unknown
SECOND WORLD WAR BLACK, Clifford R., Private, Hillsborough
Florida Service: Battery D, 116th Field Artillery
ERWA E1940 945 Combat Service: 466th Parachute Infantry Field
E A 1940-1E945 Artillery
Battalion, 17th Airborne Division
This list includes all those men on active duty with the battalion, 1th irorne i
Florida National Guard when their units were mobilized for KODENHAMER, Ralph B., Tech 5, Duval
federal service, 25 November 1940 and 6 January 1941, and B Ralph ec Du al
Florida Service: Company C, 124th Infantry
who are known to have subsequently died, were killed in ac- Servic: ,
-. Combat Service: lth Infantry, 3rd Division
tion, or died of wounds during the official war era. Not in- D ied of wounds; 26 Ma y 1944, 3Nettuno, Ita
Died of wounds; 26 May 1944, Nettuno, Italy
cluded are the fatal casualties from among the hundreds of B Riad E, P Pam ea
rBOW, Richard E., PFC, Palm Beach
former Florida Guardsmen who left the Guard prior to those Florida Service: Comay C, 1h ar
dates and were later drafted or who enlisted in the Armed Flora Service: C th Infantry, 4th D
-Combat Service: 12th Infantry, 4th D.ivision
Forces of the United States for service during the Second BRADSHAW, Marion M., PFC, Jefferson
BRADSHAW, Marion M., PFC, Jefferson -
World War.
Florida Service: Company M,- 124th Infantry
ACOSTA, Jefferson B., Tech 5, Duval Combat Service: 3rd Division
SKilled in action: 24 Mav 1944, Cisterna, Italy
Florida Service: Company G, 124th Infantry BROKMEER, Henry C., Sergeant, Seminole
Died non-battle; date and place unknown BROKMEYER, Henry C., Sergeant, Seminole
Florida Service: Company D, 124th Infantry
ADAMS, Horace H., Sergeant, St. Johns Servic: 124th Infantry
-War Service: 124th Infantry
Florida Service: Service Company, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 9 th Infantry, 30th Diviion Died non-battle; 15 June 1943, Fort Benning, Georgia
Combat Service: 119th Infantry, 30th Division
BROWNING, John P., Sergeant, St. Johns
Killed in action; 20 July 1944, Hebecrevow, France BROWNING, John Sergeant, St. Johns
ALBERT, Sam M., Sergeant, Dual Florida Service: Service Company, 124th Infantry
Fl a Serce: C pany G, 1h Ifantry Combat Service: 117th Infantry, 30th Division
Florida Service: Company G, 124th Infantry Killed in action; 2 October 1944, Holland
Combat Service: 120th Infantry, 30th Division
BUTLER, Buford A., Manatee
Killed in action; 21 June 1944, Normandy, France BUTLER, Buford A., Manatee
ALLI Alt 0, S M e Florida Service: Company L, 124th Infantry
ALLIGOOD, Albert O., Sergeant, Manatee Otb 94
o. Died non-battle; 28 October 1941
Florida Service: Company I, 124th Infantry Died non-battle; 28 October 1941
Combat Service: 119th Infantry, 30th D n BUZZETT, Julian R., 1st Lieutenant, Franklin
Combat Service: 119th Infantry, 30th Division F C E
Florida Service: Company E, 106th Engineers
Killed in action; 24 July 1944, St. Lo, France FComba Service: Co237 E 10 engineer B lion
ANDERSON, William H., Lieutenant, Leon th Engineer Btt
Florida Service: Company M, 124th Infantry 49h E r men
Died non-battle; date and place unknown Killed in action; 6 June 1944, Normandy, France
Died non-battle; date and place unknown -.., .,,.,.. J '
ARGO, Jasper H., Private, Dade CA William T, Tech 5, Lee
Florida Service: Company A 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company E, 106th Medical Regiment
Florida Service: Company A, 124th Infantry
Killed in action; date and place unknown Killed in action; 6 February 1945, place unknown
Killed in action; date and place unknown
CANNON, Alvin B., PFC, Manatee
AYERS, Lloyd W., Sergeant, Dade CANNON, Alvin B., PFC, Manatee
Florida Service: Company B, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company L, 124th Infantry
Florida Service: Company B, 124th Infantry
Killed in action; date and place unknown War Service: 124th Infantry, 31st Division
Killed in action; date and place unknown
BACKUS, William E., Sergeant, Polk Died non-battle; 9 April 1943, Fort Benning, Georgia
CARTER, Walton L., Sergeant, Duval
Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry CARTER, Walton L., Sergeant, Duval
Florida Service: Company C, 124th Infantry
Died non-battle; date and place unknown
Died non-battle; date and place unknown FlCombat Service: 120th Infantry, 30th Division
BAUGHMAN, William F., Sergeant, Hillsborough Combat Service: 120th Infantry, 30th Division
BAU.GAN Wli E, Serea, lsbo h- Killed in action; 17 June 1944, St. Lo, France
Florida Service: Medical Detachment, 116th Field i in actra
Artillery CARVER, Burnice, Sergearit, Suwannee
SrFlorida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 171st Field Artillery Battalion Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry
Died of w ; 22 N r 13, Combat Service: 16th Infantry, 1st Division
Died of wounds; 22 November 1943, Italy
BELL, James Irwin, PFC, LaFayette Killed in action; 14 September 1944, Belgium
BELL, James Irwin, PFC, LaFayette CHAPMAN, A E. S Dade
Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry CHAPMAN, Arthur E., Sergeant, Dade
omat Service: 7 th Infantry, 3d Diviion Florida Service: Company B, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 7th Infantry, 3rd Division
D ied of wounds; 25.March..94,. A io, taly Combat Service: 368th Bomb Squadron, 306th Bomb
Died of wounds; 25.Marxh,1944,. Anzio, Italy Gr--- -"..- -
BENSEL, Robert Frederick, PFC, Palm Beach Group
Florida Service: Company C, 1th Ifantry Killed in action; 14 October 1942, northern France
Florida Service: Company C, 124th Infantry
Died non-battle; date and place unknown










FATAL CASUALTIES: SECOND WORLD WAR

CHESSER, Evan Hughes, Captain, Duval DEAN, Harold M., PFC, Gadsden
Florida Service: Headquarters Battery, 265th Coast Florida Service: Company M, 124th Infantry
Artillery Combat Service: 7th Infantry, 3rd Division
Combat Service: 63rd Bomb Squadron Killed in action; 30 September 1944, Italy
Killed; 9 January 1945, plane crash, Southwest Pacific DENT, Ira E., 2nd Lieutenant, Duval
CHILDRESS, Robert L., Tech 5, Polk Florida Service: Company G, 124th Infantry
Florida Service: Headquarters Battery, 2nd Battalion, Combat Service: 383rd Infantry, 96th Division
116th Field Artillery Killed in action; 22 May 1945, Tobaru, Okinawa
Combat Service: 603rd Tank Destroyer Battalion, DERINGER, Don F., PFC, Dade
6th Armored Division Florida Service: Company B, 124th Infantry
Died of wounds; 17 April 1945, Germany Died of Wounds; date and place unknown
CHRISTOPHER, James H., Private, St. Johns DUKE, George R., Corporal, Hillsborough
Florida Service: Service Company, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Battery C, 116th Field Artillery
Combat Service: 306th Infantry, 77th Division Combat Service: 757th Tank Battalion
Killed in action; 21 December 1944, Philippine Islands Killed in action; 24 May 1944, Italy
COLLINS, Ernest W., Sergeant, Suwannee EBBETS, John Augustus, 2nd Lieutenant, Duval
Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company B, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 119th Infantry, 30th Division Combat Service: 19th Infantry, 24th Division
Killed in action; 12 July 1944, St. Lo, France Killed in action; 11 May 1945, Philippine Islands
COLLINS, Hugh L., Sergeant, Orange ELLIOT, John C., Sergeant, Palm Beach
Florida Service: Headquarters Detachment, Florida Service: Company C, 124th Infantry
1st Battalion 124th Infantry Combat Service: 360th Bomb Squadron, 303rd
Combat Service: 124th Infantry, 31st Division Bomb Group
Killed in action; 26 April 1945, Mindanao, Philippine Killed in action; 21 January 1945, Freudenstadt,
Islands Germany
COOMBS, James P., Lt. Colonel, Franklin ELLZEY, George B., Corporal, Columbia
Florida Service: Headquarters, 106th Engineers Florida Service: Company H, 124th Infantry
Died non-battle; 5 June 1943 Killed in action; date and place unknown
COX, Richard, Private, Hillsborough EMPHREM, Victor L., Sergeant, Duval
Florida Service: Headquarters Battery, 116th Field Artillery Florida Service: Anti-tank Company, 124th Infantry
Died non-battle; 13 June 1943 Combat Service: 119th Infantry, 30th Division
CRAWFORD, Rosco N., Sergeant, Santa Rosa Died of wounds; 11 August 1944, France
Florida Service: Company G, 124th Infantry EVANS; Robert L., Sergeant, Seminole
Combat Service: 19th Infantry, 24th Division Florida Service: Medical Detachment, 124th Infantry
Died of Wounds; 4 June 1945, Phillipine Islands Combat Service: Medical Detachment, 124th Infantry,
CRAWFORD, W. H., Private, Escambia 31st Division
Florida Service: Company K, 124th Infantry Killed in action; 6 May 1945, Mindanao, Philippine
Combat Service: 7th Infantry, 3rd Division Islands
Killed in action; 1 October 1944, France FERNANDEZ, Henry B. Jr., Tech 4, Hillsborough
CROFT, Earl B., Tech 4, Hillsborough Florida Service: Battery C, 116th Field Artillery
Florida Service: Battery C, 116th Field Artillery Combat Service: 466th Parachute Field Artillery,
Combat Service: 757th Tank Battalion 17th Airborne Division
Killed in action; 22 April 1945, Decima, Italy FLAKE,J. C., PFC, Orange
CURRAN, George D., Private, Duval Florida Service: Company K, 124th Infantry
Florida Service: Battery A, 265th Coast Artillery Combat Service: 8th Infantry, 4th Division
Combat Service: 19th Air Bombardment Squadron, Killed in action; 2 August 1944, Normandy, France
(Medium) FORRESTER, Copeland A., Sergeant, Hillsborough
Killed in action, 15 February 1942, Southwest Pacific; Florida Service: Battery D, 116th Field Artillery
Philippine Islands. Died non-battle; date and place unknown
DAVIS, Marquis E., PFC, Hillsborough FOX, Raymond F, Sergeant, Nassau
Florida Service: Battery B, 116th Field Artillery Florida Service: Company D, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 504th Parachute Infantry, 82nd Combat Service: 860th Bomb Squadron, 493rd
Airborne-Division. --.. Bomb Group .........
Killed in action/declared dead; 11 July 1944 Killed in action; 19 September 1944, Hilbersheim,
DAVIS, Robert C., Lt. Colonel Germany
Florida Service: 124th Infantry FUQUAY, Cecil O., 2nd Lieutenant, Palm Beach
Died non-battle; 1 April 1941 Florida Service: Company C, 124th Infantry
Killed in action; date and place unknown




.>" -- ", .,- -







APPENDIX 4

GAINES, William J., Captain. Duval INESON, William L. Jr., Sergeant, Pinellas
Florida Service: Company C, 106th Quartermaster Florida Service: Headquarters Battery, 116th Field
Died of wounds; 21 August 1944, France (Wounded Artillery
16 August) Died non-battle; date and place unknown
GOFF, Curtis A. Jr., PFC, Duval JENKINS, Samuel T., Corporal, Jefferson
Florida Service: Company G, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company M, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 8th Infantry, 4th Division Combat Service: 117th Infantry, 30th Division
Killed in action; 25 June 1944, France Killed in action; 27 February 1945, Hambach Forest,
GOLDEN, William C., 1st Lieutenant, St. Johns Germany
Florida Service: Headquarters Battalion, 265th Coast JOHNSON, Andrew L. Jr., PFC, Duval
Artillery Florida Service: Company F, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 20th Bomb Squadron, 2nd Bomb War Service: Same
Group Died non-battle; 4 April 1941; Camp Blanding, Florida
Killed in action; 10 January 1944, Bulgaria JOHNSON, Robert Nesbutt, Captain, Orange
HALL, Russell E., Ist Lieutenant, St. Johns Florida Service: Company K, 124th Infantry
Florida Service: Service Company, 124th Infantry Combat Service: 504th Parachute Infantry, 82nd
Combat Service: 506th Parachute Infantry, 101st Airborne Division
Airborne Division Killed in action; 16 December 1943, Mt. Sammuero,
Killed in action; 23 September 1944, Veghel, Holland Italy
HARPER, William M., Sergeant, Suwannee JONES, Joseph A., 1st Lieutenant, Duval
Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Headquarters Battery, 265th Coast
Combat Service: 309th Infantry, 78th Division Artillery
Killed in Action; 15 April 1945, Kilinghausen, Germany Combat Service: 450th Bomb Squadron, 322nd Bomb
HARRIS, Gillis R. Private Polk Group
Florida Service: Battery F, 116th Field Artillery Killed in action; 17 May 1943, Bergen, Holland
Combat Service: 456th Parachute Infantry, 82nd KALEEL, Sam A., Private, Duval
Airborne Division Florida Service: Battery B, 265th Coast Artillery
Killed in action; 15 October 1944, Nimegen, Holland Died non-battle; date and place unknown
HEAD, Frank E., PFC, Hillsborough KAUFMAN, Herbert C., Captain, Leon
Florida Service: Medical Detachmnent, 116th Field Florida Service: Company M, 124th Infantry
Artillery Combat Service: 504th Parachute Infantry, 82nd
Combat Service: 503rd Parachute Infantry, Airborne Division
llth Airborne Division Killed in action; 9 July 1943, Sicily
Killed in action; 15 February 1945, Philippine Islands KELLER, John J., Captain, Dade
HERRING, Francis M., Sergeant, St. Johns Florida Service: Company A, 124th Infantry
Florida Service: Service Company, 124th Infantry Combat Service: 507th Parachute Infantry, 82nd
Combat Service: 7th Infantry, 3rd Division Airborne Division
Killed in action; 24 November 1944, Saales, France Killed in action; 6 June 1944, Normandy, France
HOGAN, James C., PFC, Seminole KEMP, Thomas E., Sergeant, Palm Beach
Florida Service: Company D, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company C,-124th Infantry
Combat Service: 180th Infantry, 45th Division Combat Service: 31st Division
Killed in action; 16 August 1944, Ste Maxime, France Killed in action; 3 August 1944, New Guinea
HOWARD, Green V., Sergeant, Suwannee KNIGHT, Carlton D., Tech 5, Suwanee
Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 119th Infantry, 30th Division Combat Service: 60th Infantry, 9th Division
Killed in action; 8 July 1944, St. Lo, France Killed in action; 11 October 1944, Zweifel, Germany
HOWE, John S., Corporal,-Duval LANDEN, Nathaniel, 2nd Lieutenant, Suwanee
Florida Service: Company G, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry
Combat Servie: 30th Division Combat Service: 435th Fighter Squadron, 475th Fighter
Killed in action; 12 July 1944, St. Lo, France Group
HUGHES, John William, PFC, Dade Killed in action; 19 September 1944, Manado, Celebes
Florida Service: Battery F, 265th Coast Artillery Islands
Combat Service: 168th Infantry, 34th Division LAWHORN, Cecil B., PFC, Dade
Died of wounds; 7 January 1944, San Vittore, Italy Florida Service: Company A, 124th Infantry
HYSLER, Daniel Franklin Jr., Corporal, Duval .. Combat Service: .502nd Parachute Infantry, 101st
Florida Service: Battery A, 265th Coast Artillery Airborne Division
Combat Service: U.S. Marine Corps Killed in action; 19 September 1944, Best, Holland
Killed in action; 6 January 1945, aboard the U.S.S.
New Mexico, Luzon, Philippine Islands





.. ." .. -.






FATAL CASUALTIES: SECOND WORLD WAR

LENNON, Rufus H., Private, Manatee NELSON, LaudiesJ.Jr., Corporal, Hillsborough
Florida Service: Company L, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Battery B, 116th Field Artillery
Combat Service: 180th Infantry, 45th Division Combat Service: 712th Tank Destroyer Battalion
Killed in action; 21 September 1944, Epinal, France Died of wounds; 19 September 1944, Germany
LUTZ, Herman P., Major, Duval NETTLES, George M., Sergeant, St. Johns
Florida Service: Headquarters Company, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Service Company, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 148th Infantry, 37th Division Combat Service: 119th Infantry, 30th Division
Killed in action; 19 June 1945, Luzon, Philippines Killed in action; 3 September 1944, France
MARTIN, Clifford E., Private, Dade NEWSOME, Witmer W., PFC, Seminole
Florida Service: Company B, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company H, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 503rd Parachute Infantry, llth Combat Service: 12th Infantry, 4th Division
Airborne Division Killed in action; 13 June 1944, Normandy, France
Killed in action; 17 September 1943, Southwest Pacific NICHOLSON, Jack M, 1st Lieutenant, Collier
MATHEWS, Arthur F., Corporal, Polk Florida Service: Headquarters Company, 124th Infantry
Florida Service: Headquarters Battery, 2nd Battalion, Combat Service: 9th Infantry, 2nd Division
116th Field Artillery Killed in action; 29 August 1944, Brest, France
Combat Service: 508th Parachute Regimental Combat NORRIS, Willard P.,-PFC, Columbia
Team Florida Service: Company H, 124th infantry
Killed in action; 12 June 1944, Normandy, France Combat Service: 179th Infantry, 45th Division
MCGAHEE, Hunton, 2nd Lieutenant, Duval Killed in action; 3 June 1944, Cecchina, Italy
Florida Service: Company F, 124th Infantry NORSWORTHY, Arthur G., Private, Duval
Combat Service: 12th Infantry, 4th Division Florida Service: Company H, 124th Infantry
Killed in action; 5 July 1944, Normandy, France Died; 21 December 1940, Starke, Florida
MACMILLAN, James K., Sergeant, Manatee OGDEN, Ernest E., PFC, Monroe
Florida Service: Company I, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Battery E, 265th Coast Artillery
War Service: 300th Infantry, 94th Division Combat Service: 505th Parachute Infantry, 82nd
Died; 17 June 1943, Fort Benning, Georgia Airborne Division
MCNAMARA, George P., Palm Beach Killed in action; 30 April 1945, Wentischtum, Germany
Florida Service: Company C, 124th Infantry O'QUINN, Milton F, PFC, Duval
Combat Service: 117th Infantry, 30th Division Florida Service: Battery A, 265th Coast Artillery
Killed in action; 9 July 1944, St. Lo, France Combat Service: 504th Parachute Infantry, 82nd
MCRORY, George Whitfield, Lt. Colonel, Jackson Airborne Division
Florida Service: Headquarters, 31st Division Killed in action; 10 February 1944, Nettuno, Italy
Combat Service: Unit unknown; European Theater OUIMETTE, Edward J., Sergeant, Hillsborough
Died of disability incurred in service; 19 January 1946 Florida Service: Battery E, 116th Field Artillery
MERRILL, William K., Captain, Dade Combat Service: 31st Division
Florida Service: Company A, 124th Infantry Died of Wounds; 10 August 1944, Aitape, New Guinea
Combat Service: 108th Infantry, 27th Division PALMES, Jere F., Captain, St. Johns
Killed in action; 27 March 1945, Philippine Islands Florida Service: Service Company, 124th Infantry
MICHELSON, David Anthony, 1st Lieutenant, Volusia Combat Service: 222th Infantry, 42nd Division
Florida Service: Battery D, 265th Coast Artillery Killed in action; 25 April 1945, Donauworth, Germany
Combat Service: 850th Bomb Squadron, 801st Bomb PARKER, Billy D., Private, Dade
Group Florida Service: Company B, 124th Infantry
Killed in action; 18 July 1944, Marigny, France Combat Service: 325th Glider Infantry Regiment, 82nd
MILTON, Johnnie J., Sergeant, Columbia Airborne Division
Florida Service: Company H, 124th Infantry Killed in action; 7 June 1944, Normandy, France.
Combat Service: 117th Infantry, 30th Division PARRA, Roy P., Sergeant, Hillsborough
Killed in action; 13 July 1944, St. Lo, France Florida Service: Battery A, 116th Field Artillery
MINX, Earl O.Jr., Private, Palm Beach Combat Service: 702nd Tank Destroyer Battalion
Florida Service: Company C, 124th Infantry Killed in action; 21 November 1944, Uebach, Germany
Combat Service: 124th Infantry, 31st Division PERSONS, Hubert W., PFC, Orange
Killed in action; 22 July 1944, New Guinea Florida Service: Company K, 124th Infantry
MOORE, William G., Sergeant, Palm Beach Combat Service: 167th Infantry, 31st Division
Florida Service: Company C, 124th Infantry Killed in action; 15 May 1945, Mindanao, Philippines
Died non-battle; date and place unknown PETERSON, Noel B., PFC, Suwanee
.-MULLANEY, Harrell Lee, Sergeant, Polk. .. .... Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infanry... ...
Florida Service: Battery F, 116th Field Artillery Combat Service: 8th Infantry, 4th Division
Combat Service: 376th Parachute Artillery, 82nd Killed in action; 10 June 1944, Normandy, France
Airborne Division
Died of wounds; 15 February 1944, Nettuno, Italy








APPENDIX 4

PHILLIPS, Roscoe D., Private. Dade SHARPE, Robert, Private, Polk
Florida Service: Company B, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Battery F, 116th Field Artillery
Died non-battle; date and place unknown Died non-battle; date and place unknown
PIERCE, Shelton Houston, ist Lieutenant, Duval SIMMONS, Bill, Private, Hamilton
Florida Service: Company G, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company H, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 585th Bomb Squadron, 394th Bomb Combat Service: 4th Division
Group Killed in action; 8 July 1944, Normandy, France
Killed; 12 July 1943, air crash SIMMONS, James S., PFC, Marion
POWERS. Joseph E., Sergeant, Lee Florida Service: Company K, 124th Infantry
Company E, 106th Medical Regiment Combat Service: 313th Infantry, 79th Division
Died non-battle; date and place unknown Killed in action; 6 july 1944, France
PREESCHL, Donald Richard, Sergeant, Dade SIRES, Charles R., PFC, Manatee
Florida Service: Company A, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company I, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 134th Infantry, 35th Division- Combat Service: 179th Infantry, 45th Division
Killed in action; 10 November 1944, Fresnes en Killed in action; 28 May 1944, Parano, Italy
Saulnois, France SKINNER, Steve Earl, Sergeant, Suwanqe
PREVATT, John P., PFC, Suwanee Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry
Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry Combat Service: Unit unknown
Combat Service: 314th Infantry, 79th Division Killed in action; 29 November 1944, Germany
Killed in action; 19 November 1944, Barbas, France SMITH, Boyd A., Private, Pinellas
PURDY, Clayton D., Private, Columbia Florida Service: Headquarters Battery,
Florida Service: Company H, 124th Infantry 116th Field Artillery
Combat Service: 22nd Infantry, 4th Division Died non-battle; date and place unknown
Died of Wounds: 11 June 1944, Normandy, France SMITH, John Wesley, Sergeant, Bay
RABB, Gerald E., Sergeant, Dade Florida Service: Company D, 106th Engineers
Florida' Service: Battery F, 265th Coast Artillery Combat Service: 428th Bomb Squadron,
Killed in action; date and place unknown 310th Bomb Group
ROBERTS, Charles E., Tech 5, Monroe Killed in action; 24 December 1944, Sileareccio, Italy
Florida Service: Battery E, 265th Coast Artillery SMITH, Rupert, Major, Desoto
Died non-battle; date and place unknown Florida Service: State Staff
RODRIQUEZ, William David, Private, Hillsborough Died non-battle; 29 August 1944
Florida Service: Battery A, 116th Field Artillery SMITH, William H., Captain, Duval
Killed in action; date and place unknown Florida Service: Company F, 124th Infantry
ROGERS, John W. Jr., PFC, Suwanee Combat Service: 255th Infantry, 63rd Division
Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry Killed in action; 3 January 1945, Achen, France
Combat Service: 155th Infantry, 31st Division SPIVEY, Jasper C., Tech 5, Seminole
Died of Wounds; 30 August 1944, Maffin Bay, Florida Service: Medical Detachment, 124th Infantry
New Guinea Combat Service: 120th Infantry, 30th Division
RUDD, James D., PFC, Seminole Killed in action;25 July 1944, St. Lo, France
Florida Service: Company D, 124th Infantry STEELE, James E., Sergeant, Manatee
Killed in action; date and place unknown Florida Service: Company I, 124th Infantry
RUSSELL, James Joseph, Sergeant, Franklin Combat Service: 61st Armoured Infantry Battalion
Florida Service: Company E, 106th Engineers Killed in action; 5 December 1944, Reimbach, Germany
Died non-battle; date and place unknown STEGALL, Kemp E., PFC, Orange
RYAN; John F., Sergeant, Escambia Florida Service: Company K, 124th Infantry
Florida Service: Battery C, 265th Coast Artillery Combat Service: 157th Infantry, 45th Division
Combat Service: 20th Bomb Squadron, Killed in action; 25 March 1944, Italy
2nd Bomb Group STEPHENS, Bernard F, Aviation Cadet, Dade
Killed in action; 25 February 1944,Moosdorf, Austria Florida Service: Company I, 124th Infantry
SCOTT, Eldred F., Private, Manatee Died non-battle; date and place unknown
Florida Service: Company I, 124th Infantry STEVENS, Edwin C., Sergeant, Palm Beach
Combat Service: 179th Infantry, 45th Division Florida Service: Company C, 124th Infantry
Killed in action; 14 January 1945, Mutterheuse, France Combat Service: 119th Infantry, 30th Division
SELLERS, Luther L., PFC, Duval Died of Wounds; 1 August 1944, St. Lo, France
Florida Service: Company G, 124th Infantry STRAUBEL, Eric Roy, Private, Orange
Combat Service: 301st Infantry, 94th Division Florida Service: Battery A, 265th Coast Artillery
Killed in action; 27 February 1945, Freudenberg, Died non-battle; date and place unknown
Germany






'~ .9 -. K..;,rS







FATAL CASUALTIES: SECOND WORLD WAR

STRUTH, Elmo R., Captain, Bradford WALTHALL, Randall, Sergeant, Seminole
Florida Service: Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, Florida Service: Headquarters Detachment,
124th Infantry 1st Battalion, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 19th Infantry, 24th Division Combat Service: 30th Infantry, 3rd Division
Died of wounds; 1 June 1945, Mindanao, Killed in action; 24 April 1944, Parano, Italy
Philippine Islands WARDEN, Alexander, Flight Officer, Duval
SUHRBIER, Leo K., PFC, Dade Date, place and nature of death unknown
Florida Service: Company B, 124th Infantry WARREN, William E., Leon
Combat Service: 124th Infantry, 31st Division Florida Service: Company M, 124th Infantry
Killed in action; 3 August 1944, Aitape, New Guinea Date, place and nature of death unknown
TAPLEY, Arthur L. Jr., PFC, Suwanee WEAVER, William D., Private, Suwanee
Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company E, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 15th Infantry, 3rd Division Combat Service: 119th Infantry, 30th Division
Killed in action; 24 March 1944, Isola della, Italy Killed in action; 12 July 1944, St. Lo, France
TAYLOR, John S., PFC, Hardee WEINTRAUB, Bernard, Sergeant, Hillsborough
Florida Service: Company L, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Medical Detachment,
Combat Service: 157th Infantry, 45th Division 116th Field Artillery
Killed in action; 14 February 1945, Conya, Italy Combat Service: 125th Evacuation Hospital
THOMAS, Paul F., Corporal, Hillsborough Died; 21 December 1944, England
Florida Service: Battery C, 116th Field Artillery WILLIAMS, Earl D., Sergeant, Manatee
Combat Service: 757th Tank Battalion Florida Service: Company L, 124th Infantry
Died of wounds; 23 May 1944, Ausonia, Italy Killed in action; date and place unknown
TILLIS, Wiley W., PFC, Bradford WILLIAMS, Earnest W. Jr., Private, Palm Beach
Florida Service: Company D, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Company C, 124th Infantry
Combat Service: 30th Infantry, 3rd Division Combat Service: 117th Infantry, 30th Division
Killed in action; 10 March 1944, Parano, Italy Killed in action; 16 July 1944, St. Lo, France
TURNER, Emil, Corporal, Manatee WILLIAMS, Oscar M., 2nd Lieutenant, Polk
Florida Service: Company I, 124th Infantry Florida Service: Battery D, 116th Field Artillery
Combat Service: 155th Infantry, 31st Division Combat Service: 403rd Bomb Squadron, 43rd Bomb Group
Killed in action; 16 November 1944, Mapia, New Guinea Killed in action; 25 October 1943, Rabaul, New Britain
VARGAS, Lionel G., Tech 5, Orange WINGERT, Walter H., 1st Lieutenant, Manatee
Florida Service: Battery E, 265th Coast Artillery Florida Service: Company I, 124th Infantry
Died non-battle; date and place unknown Combat Service: 10th Photo Recon Group
WAAS, Jack M., 1st Lieutenant Killed in action; 18 July 1944, Torigny-Gires, France
Florida Service: Headquarters Company, 124th Infantry WOOD, Joseph E., 2nd Lieutenant, Dade
Combat Service: 121st Infantry, 8th Division Florida Service: Company A, 124th Infantry
Killed in action; 17 September 1944, Brest, France Combat Service: 351st Fighter Squadron,
WALLACE, Walter M., PFC, Hillsborough 353rd Fighter Group
Florida Service: Battery C, 116th Field Artillery Killed in action; 22 February 1944; off coast of Holland
Combat Service: 504th Parachute Infantry, 82nd WOODS, George H., Private, Duval
Airborne Division Florida Service: Anti-Tank Company, 124th Infantry
Killed in action; 5 February 1944, Nettuno, Italy Combat Service: 301st Infantry, 94th Division
WALTER, Harry G., Sergeant, Dade Killed in action; 3 May 1945, Serrig, Germany
Florida Service: Company A, 124th Infantry Available records one member of the Florida State Guard to
Combat Service: 119th Infantry, 30th Division have been accidently killed at Alachua Air Base, Gainesville,
Killed in action; 27 November 1944, Germany 27 October 1943.
GOURLEY, Clark, 2nd Lieutenant, Alachua





















SECTION IV























NO PHOTOGRAPH AVAILABLE


















EMORY L. BENNETT

Private First Class, United States Army
Company B, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division

Near Sobangsan, Republic of Korea
24 June 1951

Entered mil i.tary service, Cocoa, Florida August 1950

Officially accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 20 December 1929, New Smyrna, Florida
Killed in action, 24 June 1951
Buried in Pinecrest Cemetery, Cocoa, Florida

Emory Bennett was born and raised in Florida. He entered
military service in August of 1950 and arrived in Korea during
February of 1951.















G.O NUMBER: 11, 1 February 1952


CITATION: Pfc. Bennett a member of Company B, distinguished
himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of
his life above and beyond the call of duty in action against an
armed enemy of the United Nations. At approximately 0200 hours, 2
enemy battalions swarmed up the ridge line in a ferocious banzai
charge in an attempt to dislodge Pfc. Bennett's company from its
defensive position. Meeting the challenge, the gallant defenders
delivered destructive retaliation, but the enemy pressed-the
assault with fanatical determination and the integrity of the
perimeter was imperiled. Fully aware of the odds against him,
Pfc. Bennett unhesitatingly left his foxhole, moved through
withering fire, stood within full view of the enemy, and,
employing his automatic rifle, poured crippling fire into the
ranks of the onrushing assailants, inflicting numerous
casualties. Although wounded, Pfc. Bennett gallantly maintained
his 1-man defense and the attack was momentarily halted. During
this lull in battle, the company regrouped for counterattack, but
the numerically superior foe soon infiltrated the position. Upon
orders to move back, Pfc. Bennett voluntarily remained to provide
covering fire for the withdrawing elements, and, defying the
enemy, continued to sweep the charging foe with devastating fire
until mortally wounded. His willing self-sacrifice and intrepid
actions saved the position from being overrun and enabled the
company to effect an orderly withdrawal. Pfc. Bennett's
unflinching courage and consummate devotion to duty reflect
lasting glory on himself and the military service.

At the time of his death, Privat Bennett's next of kin included;
Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Bennett, 1224 King Street, Cocoa, Florida.

Private Bennett was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Occupation Medal, Japan
Korean Service Medal
UN Korean Service Medal
Combat Infantryman Badge













F:" -



































HAMMETT L. BOWEN JR

Staff Sergeant, United States Army
Company C, 2nd Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry
Division

Binh Duong Province, Republic of Vietnam
27 June 1969

Entered military service at Jacksonville, Florida
6 February 1968

Officially accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 30 November 1947, LaGrange, Georgia
Killed in action: 27 June 1969
Burial: Restlawn Memorial Gardens, LaGrange, Georgia












Hammett Bowen was a graduate of Ocala High School, Ocala,
FJorida. .... Pr.'.ior-.to, his entcy-.i-Mto-m-i tary-sevce,-he-a-tended-- --
Central Florida Junior College in that same city. He completed
basic training with Company B, 7th Battalion, 2nd Brigade, U.S.
Army Training Center, Infantry, Fort Benning, Georgia and
advanced training with Company D, 2nd Training Battalion, Army
Infantry Training Brigade, U.S. Army Training Center, Fort
McClellan, Alabama. From July 1968 to February 1969, Bowen was
assigned, consecutively, to the 74th Company, The Candidate
Brigade (Provisional), U.S. Army Infantry School, and the 45th
Company, 4th Student Battalion (Airborne), The Student Brigade,
both at Fort Benning, Georgia, and Company C, 1st Training
Battalion, Army Infantry Training Brigade, U.S. Army Training
Center, Fort McClellan, Alabama.

In March of 1969, now Sergeant Bowen joined Company C, 2nd
Battalion, (Airborne), 14th Infantry Regiment of the 25th
Infantry Division in Vietnam.



CITATION: S/Sgr. Bowen distinguished himslef while serving as a
platoon sergeant during combat operations in Binh Duong Province,
Republic of Vietnam. S/Sgt. Bowen's platoon was advancing on a
reconnaissance mission into enemy controlled terrain when it came
under the withering cross-fire of small arms and grenades from an
enemy ambush force. S/Sgt. Bowen placed heavy suppressive fire on
the enemy positions and ordered his men to fall back. As the
platoon was moving back, an enemy grenade was thrown amid S/Sgt.
Bowen and 3 of his men. Sensing the danger to his comrades,
S/Sgt. Bowen shouted a warning to his men and hurled himself on
the grenade, absorbing the explosion with his body while saving
the lives of his fellow soldiers. S/Sgt. Bowen's extraordinary
courage and concern for his men at the cost of his life served as
an inspiration to his comrades and are in the highest traditions
of the military service of the U.S Army.
Sergeant Bowen's next of kin at the time of his death included
Mr. and Mrs. Hammett Bowen, parents, 846 N.E. 31st Street, Ocala,
Florida.

At the time of award, Harrmmett Bowen's medals and decorations
included;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
Vietnam Campaign Medal
Combat Infantryman Badge





jn~. .-r -~ 2-~:. icLi













































NICHOLAS J. CUTINHA

Specialist 4th Class, United States Army
Company C, 9th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
Near *Gia Dinh, Republic of Vietnam
S 2 March 1968

Entered service at Coral Gables, Florida 1 March 1967

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 13 January 1945, Fernandina Beach, Florida
Died of Wounds: 2 March. 1968
Burial: Fort Denaue Cemetery, Fort Denaue, Florida


Nicholas Cutinha was born and raised in Florida, graduating from
Yulee High School in Yulee, Florida. Following induction into
the military service, he was sent to the U.S. Army Reception
Station and Training Center at Fort Senning, Georgia. He joined
the 3rd Training Brigade at Fort Polk, Louisiana in June of 1967
and was sent to Vietnam as a replacement in Company C, 4th
Battalion, 9th Infantry, 25th Division in September 1967.


S' :; ---. .-.- ,-..... ... ..--












CITATION: Date of IssueL; .Apr._.- 170 -For-con-sp-ircutTr gT"a fi
h"a~ "intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and
beyond the call of duty. While serving as a machinegunner with
Company C, Sp4c Cutinha accompanied his unit on a combat mission
near Gia Dinh. Suddenly his company came under small arms,
automatic weapons, mortar and rocket propelled grenade fire from
a battalion size enemy unit. During the initial hostile attack,
communication with the battalion was lost and the company
commander and numerous members of the company became casualties.
When Sp4c Cutinha observed that his company was pinned down and
disorganized, he moved to the front with complete disregard for
his safety, firing his machinegun at the charging enemy. As he
moved forward he drew fire on his own position and was seriously
wounded in the leg. As the hostile fire intensified and half of
the company was killed or wounded, Sp4c Cutinha assumed command
of all the survivors in his area and initiated a withdrawal while
providing covering fire for the evacuation of the wounded. He
killed several enemy soldiers but sustained another leg wound
when his machinegun was destroyed by incoming rounds. Undaunted,
he crawled through a hail of enemy fire to an operable machinegun
in order to continue the defense of his wounded comrades who were
being administered medical treatment. Sp4c Cutinha maintained his
position, refused assistance, and provided defensive fire for his
comrades until he fell mortally wounded. He was solely
responsible for killing 15 enemy soldiers while saving the lives
of at least 9 members of his own unit. Sp4c Cutinha's gallantry
and extraordinary heroism were in keeping with the highest
traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon
himself, his unit, and the U.S Army.


Next of kin at the time of the award included Joseph A. Cutinha,
father, Mrs. Pearl M. Donker, mother, Mrs. Hazel Marie Teston and
Mrs. Jewel Augusta Scott, sisters and Roy John Cutinha and John
Erick Cutinha, brothers.

Nicholas Cutinha'was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Bronze Star with V device
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
National Defense Service Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
Vietnam Campaign Medal
(Vietnam)
Combat Infantryman Badge














































ROBERT EDWARD FEMOYER

2nd Lieutenant, United States Army Air Corps
711th Bomb-Squadron, 447th Bomb Group (Heavy)

Air Mission; Meresburg, Germany 2 November 1944

Entered Military Service at Jacksonville, Florida
11 November 1942

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 30 October 1921, Huntington, West Virginia
Died of wounds: 2 November 1944
Burial: Greenlawn Cemetery, Jacksonville, Florida


Robert Femoyer enlisted in the Enlisted Reserve Corps and was
called to active duty at Richmond, Virginia in February 1943. He
completed Basic Training at Training Center Number 4, Miami,
Florida. He received further training at the University of
Pittsburg and the Nashville Army Air Center in Tennessee.
Subsequent training in the pilot and later navigator programs, he
served at Maxwell Field, Montgomery, Alabama, Jackson, Mississippi
Selman Field, Louisiana and Fort Myers, Florida.















Upon his graduation from the Navigator's School, he was
commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant and continued his operational
training at Army Air Corps bases in Lincoln, Nebraska and Souix
City, Iowa. He departed for overseas duty 2 September 1944 and,
upon arrival in England, was assigned to the 711th Bombardment
Squadron, 447th Bombardment Group and with them, entered combat
operations against strategic targets in Germany.


DATE OF ISSUE: 9 MAY 1945
G.O NUMBER: 35

MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk
of his life above and beyond the call of duty near Meresburg,
Germany, on 2 November 1944. While on a mission, the bomber, of
which 2d Lt. Femoyer was the navigator, was struck by. 3 enemy
anti-aircraft shells. The plane suffered serious damage and 2d
Lt; Femoyer was severely wounded in the side and back by shell
fragments which penetrated his body. In spite of extreme pain and
great loss of blood he refused an offered injection of morphine.
He was determined to keep his mental faculties clear in order
that he might direct his plane out of danger and so save his
comrades. Not being able to arise from the floor, he asked to be
propped up in order to enable him to see his charts and
instruments. He successfully directed the navigation of his lone
bomber for 2-1/2 hours so well it avoided enemy flak and returned
to the field without further damage.Only when the plane had
arrived in the safe area over the English Channel did he feel
that he had accomplished his objective; then, and only then, he
permitted an injection of a sedative. He died shortly after being
removed from the plane. The heroism and self-sacrifice of 2d Lt.
Femoyer are in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S Army.

Robert Femoyer is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations at the time of his death;

Medal of Honor
Air Medal
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal















































THOMAS B. McGUIRE JR.

Major, United States Army Air Corps
13th Air Force

Luzon, Phillipine Islands, 25-26 December 1944

Entered Service at Sebring, Florida 1942

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: Ridgewood, New Jersey 1 August 1920
Killed in Action: 7 January 1945
Burial: Arlington National Cemetery

Thomas McGuire was born in New Jersey but moved to Florida when
he was a youg boy. He grew up in Sebring, graduating from
Sebring High School just before the onset of the Second World
War. He attended Georgia Tech University and took flying lessons
white a student. During 1941, he volunteered to take flying
training with the Royal Air Force but enlisted in the Army Air
Corps immediately after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.







McGuire eventually saw considerable combat service flying P-38
fighter aircraft in the New Guinea and Phillipines campaigns. He
became the second highest scoring fighter "Ace" of World War I1
with 38 confirmed "kills". All of his combat was against the
Japanese. It was during the Pre-invasion and immediate
post-invasion operations connected with the American landings on
Luzon, Phillipine- Islands that Major McGuire was killed on a
mission.

G.O NUMBER: 24, 7 MARCH 1946

MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: He fought with conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity
over Luzon, Phillipine Islands. Voluntarily, he led a squadron of
15 P-38's as top cover for heavy bombers striking Mabalacat
Airdrome, where his formation was attacked by 20 aggressive
Japanese fighters. In the ensuing action hhe repeatedly flew to
the aid of embattled comrades, driving off enemy assaults while
himself under attack and at time outnumbered 3 to 1, and even
after his guns jammed, continuing the fight by forcing a hostile
plane into his wingman's line of fire. Before he started back to
his base he had shot down 3 Zeros. The next day he again
volunteered to lead escort fighters on a mission to strongly
defended Clark Field. During the resultant engagement he again
exposed himself to attacks so that he might rescue a crippled
bomber. In rapid succession he shot down 1 aircraft, parried the
attack of 4 enemy fighters, 1 of which he shot down,
singlehandedly engaged 3 more Japanese, destroying 1, and then
shot down still another, his 38th victory in aerial combat. On
January 7 1945, while leading a voluntary fighter sweep over Los
Negros Island, he risked an extremely hazardous maneuver at low
altitude in an attempt to save a fellow flyer from attack,
crashed, and was reported missing in action. With gallant
initiative, deep and unselfish concern for the safety of others,
and heroic determination to destroy the enemy at all costs, Maj
McGuire set an inspiring example in keeping with the highest
traditions of the military service.

At the time of his death, McGuire's next of kin included Marylin
McGuire, widow and it is believed his mother still lived in
Sebring, Florida... McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey is named
for Major McGuire.

Thomas McGuire is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations at the time of his death;

Medal of Honor
Distinguished Service Cross
Silver Star
(two oak leaf clusters)
Distinguished Flying Cross
(five oak leaf clusters)
Air Medal
(fourteen oak leaf clusters)
Purple Heart
(one oak leaf cluster)
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
... Victory Medal






*5W 4


































JAMES H. MILLS

Private, United States Army
Company F, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division

Near Cisterna Di Littoria, Italy
24 May 1944

Entered service at Fort Meade, Florida

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: Fort Meade, Florida
Died: 11 November 1973
Burial: Oak Hill Cemetery, Lakeland, Florida

James Mills was born and raised in the west-central Florida town
of Fort Meade. Following his entry into military service,
believed to have been in mid 1943, Mills was sent overseas as an
infantryman replacement and sent to the 3rd Division in the
Anzio, Italy beachead in late April 1944. The division had been
battling the Germans at Anzio for several months and were
preparing to launch the offensive which would result in the
successful breakout of Allied Forces. The day Mills earned the
Medal of Honor was his first day in combat and first with the
15th Infantry Regiment. The 24th of May was the day Allied forces
finally succeeded in breaking out of the Anzio Beachead and began
the advance to liberate Rome.

















G.O NUMBER: 87, 14 NOVEMBER 1944

MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk
of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Pvt. Mills,
undergoing his baptism of fire, preceded his platoon down a draw
to reach a position from which an attack could be launched
against a heavily fortified strongpoint. After advancing about
300 yards, Pvt. Mills was fired on by a machinegun only 5 yards
distant. He killed the gunner with 1 shot and forced the
surrender of the assistant gunner. Continuing his advance, he saw
a German soldier in a camouflaged position behind a large bush
pulling the pin of a potato-masher grenade. Covering the German
with his rifle, Pvt. Mills forced him to drop the grenade and
captured him. When another enemy soldier attempted to throw a
handgrenade into the draw, Pvt. Mills killed him with 1 shot.
Brought under fire by a machinegun, 2 machinepistols and 3 rifles
at a range of only 50 feet, he charged headlong into the furious
chain of automatic fire shooting his M1 from the hip. The enemy
was completely demoralized by Pvt. Mills' daring charge, and when
he reached a point within 10 feet of their position, all 6
surrendered. As he neared the end of the draw, Pvt. Mills was
brought under fire by a machinegunner 20 yards distant. Despite
the fact that he had absolutely no cover, Pvt. Mills killed the
gunner with 1 shot. Two enemy soldiers near the machinegunner
fired wildly at Pvt. Mills and then fled. Pvt. Mills fired twice,
killing 1 of the enemy. Continuing on to the position, he
captured a fourth soldier. When it became apparent that an
assault on the strongpoint would in all probability cause heavy
casualties on the platoon, Pvt. Mills volunteered to cover the
advance down a shallow ditch to point within 50 yards of the
objective. Standing on the bank in full view of the enemy less
than 100 yards away, he shouted and fired his rifle directly into
the position. His ruse worked exactly as planned. The enemy
centered its fire directly on Pvt. Mills. Tracers passed within
inches of his body, rifle and machinegun fire ricocheted off the
rocks at his feet. Yet he stood there firing until his rifle was
empty. Intent on covering the movement of his platoon, Pvt. Mills
jumped into the draw, reloaded his weapon, climbed out again, and
continued to lay down a base of fire. Repeating this action 4
times, he enabled his platoon to reach the designated spot
undiscovered, from which position it assaulted and overwhelmed
the enemy, capturing 22 Germans and taking the objective without
casualties.

























After the war, James mills became a Contact Representative for
the Veterans Administration in Jacksonville,Florida and retired
to Melrose, Florida in 1966. In the early morning hours of 8
November 1973, Mills and a friend were picked up by three men in
a car who then robbed and beat them savagely. James Milles died
at the Veterans Hospital in Gainesville, Florida of the wounds
received in the robbery.

Next of kin at the time of his death included; Mrs.Lesslie
Mills, mother, Bradley, Florida, James Thomas and Thomas Eugene
Mills, sons of Bartow and Jacksonville, Florida respectively,
Toya Lee Mills, daughter of Jacksonville and one brother and two
sisters.

Private Mill's medals and decorations included;

Medal of Honor
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantryman Badge
































-Or-













ALEXANDER RAMSEY NININGER JR.

1st Lieutenant, United States Army
Company A. 57th Infantry, Phi Iipine Scouts

Near Abucay, Bataan, Phillipine Islands
12 January 1942

Entered Military Service at Fort Lauderdale, Florida 1 July 1937

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida

Born: Gainesville, Georgia 30 October 1918
Killed in action: 12 January 1942
Burial: No remains recovered; memorialized


Alexander, "Sandy" Nininger was born in Georgia and moved to Fort
Lauderdale as a very young boy. He came from a long l ine of
family members with military experience. At a young age, he
determined to attend the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.
Following schooling in Florida and after graduating from a Fort
Lauderdale high school in 1937, he was given a congressional
appointment to the Academy. While there, he excelled in track
and was prominent in debate and lecture series.
ComanyA, 7thInfntr, Pil ipneScout
Near Abucay Bataan Phi II ipne land
12 January 19
Center Miltary ervic at Frt Laderdae, Flrid uy13
Offiial y Acredtedto te Stte f Flrid
Bor; Ginesvil~le, Georgia 3 October 191
Kil~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ a~b le nato"12Jnay1
Bu al:Norman rcvee; eora ie

Alexander,~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~.~ "Sny iigrwsbr n eri n oe oFr
Lauderdale"''~~'L;~f~~ asaveyyun oy ecaefrmaloglieo
famiy meber wit miitar exeriece.At ayoug ag, h
determined~~~~~2 to atendthe .S.MltayAaem tWstPi












Once graduated in 1941 and following training at Fort Benning,
Georgia, Nin singer was sent to Fort Wili am McKinley, Phillipine
Islands and assigned to Company" A, 57-TPh'i'l I ip inie Scouts- i ri ----
November 1941. His introduction to combat didn't have long to
wait as the Japanese invaded the Phillipines the next month. The
initial battles for the Abucay Line on Baatan were crucial to the
American campaign plan and they almost failed. It was noted by
several that Nininger's intelligence gathering scouting following
a Japanese breakthrough, coupled with his extremely aggressive
personal and largely un-supported counter-attack against the
initial Japanese penetrating force led to a larger and completely
successful American attack later which restored the essential
defensive positions at Abucay. Had they not been re-established,
it is believed the American-Phillipino ability to defend Baatan
would have been substantially reduced.

G.O. No, 9, 5 February 1942

MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and
beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy near Abucay,
Bataan, Phillipine Islands, on 12 January 1942. This officer,
though assigned to another company not then engaged in combat,
voluntarily attached himself to Company K, same regiment, while
that unit was being attacked by an enemy force superior in
firepower. Enemey snipers in trees and foxholes had stopped a
counterattack to regain part of the position. In hand-to-hand
fighting which followed, 2d Lt. Nininger repeatedly forced his
way to and into the hostile position. Though exposed to heavy
enemy fire, he continued to attack with rifle and handgrenades
and succeeded in destroying several enemy groups in foxholes and
enemy snipers. Although wounded 3 times, he continued his attacks
until he was killed after pushing alone far within the enemy
position. When his body was found after recapture of the
position, 1 enemy officer and 2 enemy soldiers lay dead around
him.

At the time of his death Alex Nininger's next of kin included his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander R. Nininger, Sr. of Fort
Lauderdale, Florida.

Lieutenant Nininger was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Purple Heart, two clusters
American Defense Service Medal
Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Phillipine Defense Ribbon
(Phillipines)







ADAM PAINE

Private, Seminole Negro Indian Scouts
Ath U.S. Cavalry

Staked Plains, Texas,- 20 September-- 1874 ------- -

Officially accredited to the State of Florida

Died: 1 January 1877," Brackettville, Texas
Burial: Seminole-Negro Cemetery, Brackettville, Texas


Very little is known of Adam Paine's life. He was probably
a member of a group of Seminole Indian-Negro mixed bloods who
were forced to leave Florida during the Second Seminole War
(1835-1842) or the Third Seminole War (1856-1858) and who
initially settled in northern Mexico. Most of this group'later
moved to frontier Texas and many later joined the U.S. Cavalry as
Scouts. The members of the Indian Scouts from this group gained
considerable fame for their abilities and bravery during the
Indian Wars of the Southwest following the Civil War.

DATE OF ISSUE: 13 OCTOBER 1875

CITATION: For gallantry in action.

Ranald MacKenzie, commanding officer of the 4th Cavalry during
operations against Indians in Texas and the Rio Grande area
during the middle 1870's, was quite famous and it is an episode
in his I ife on which the John Wayne movie, Rio Grande, was based.
It was during a campaign against Commanche Indians in the Staked
Plains of Texas that Paine earned his medal.

The Letter of Recommendation read in part;

31 August 1875

.(I) honor to designate the men of the 4th Cavalry who
particularly distinguished themselves during my late campaign
against hostile indians, with the particular act of gallantry of
each and to whom'Medals of Honor were suggested to be awarded, as
follows:
(There follow seven names and acts, the eighth and last being...)
"Seminole Negro Adam Paine for Gallantry on September 20th (1874)
when attacked by a hugely superior party of Indians. This. man is
a scout of great courage.

Very Respectively,
Your Obedient Servant
R.S. MacKenzie
Colonel, 4th Cavalry
Command ng

Adam Paine was discharged from the military on 19 February 1875
having completed his enlisted contract. He was shot and killed
at a New Years dance in Brackettville, Texas by a Deputy Sheriff.
Paine was a fugitive at the time, being wanted in connection with
the murder of a Black soldier.



















































CLIFFORD CHESTER SIMS

Staff Sergeant, United States Army
Company D, 2nd Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry Regiment,
101st Airborne Division

Near Hue, Republic of Vietnam
21 February 1968

Entered military service, Jacksonville, Florida 13 October 1961

Officially accredited to the State of Florida

Born: 18 June 1942, Port St. Joe, Florida
Killed in action, 21 February 1968
Burial: Barrancas National Cemetery, Pensacola, Florida












Clifford Sims was born and raised in Port St. Joe, Florida,
-gradUating from Washington High School- in -tha-t-Panhand-Le city.
Following enlsitment in the Army, he trained with Company B, 11th
Battalion, 3rd Training Regiment, U.S. Army Training Center,
Infantry, Fort Jackson, South Carolina. In early 1962, he
transferred to the 42nd Company, 4th Battalion, Student Brigade,
Fort Banning, Georgia. From April 1962 until May 1964, Sims was
assigned to the Special Forces Training Group (Provisional),
82nd Administration Company and 1st Battle Group, 187th Infantry,
82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

In May 1964, Sims transferred to Company A, 2nd Battalion,
508th Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg,
North Carolina and continued to serve with that unit following
his re-enlistment in the Army in October 1964. Re-assigned to
Company B, Sims saw service in the Dominican Republic from May to
September 1966, returning with his unit to Fort Bragg. In
October 1967, Sergeant Sims transferred to Company D, 2nd
Battalion, 501st Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division and
went with them to Vietnam in December 1967.

2 December 1969

CITATION: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at
the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. S/Sgt.
Sims distinguished himself while serving as a squad leader with
Company D. Company D was assaulting a heavily fortified enemy
position concealed within a densely wooded area when it
encountered strong enemy defensive fire. Once within the
woodline, S/Sgt. Sims led his squad in a furious attack against
the enemy force which had pinned down the 1st Platoon and
threatened to overrun it. His skillful leadership provided the
platoon with freedom of movement and enabled it to regain the
initiative. S/Sgt. Sims wa then ordered to move his squad to a
position where he could provide covering fire for the company
command group and to link up with the 3d Platoon, which was under
heavy enemy pressure. After moving no more than 30 meters S/Sgt.
Sims noticed that a brick structure in which ammunition was
stocked was on fire. Realizing the danger, S/Sgt. Sims took
immediate action to move his squad from this position. Though in
the process of leaving the area 2 members of his squad were
injured by the subsequent explosion of the ammunition, S/Sgt.
Sims' prompt actions undoubtedly prevented more serious
casualties from occurring. While continuing through the dense
woods amidst heavy enemy fire, S/Sgt. Sims and his squad were
approaching a bunker when they heard the unmistakable noise of a
boobytrapbeing triggered immediately to their front. S/Sgt. Sims
warned his comrades of the danger and unhesitatingly hurled
himself upon the device as it exploded, taking full impact of the
blast. In so protecting his fellow soldiers, he willingly
sacrificed his life. S/Sgt. Sims' extraordinary herosim at the
costf his life is in keeping with the highest traditions of the
military service and reflects great credit upon himself and the
U.S Army.



























At the time of his death his next of kin included Mary Sims,
widow, Gina Rene Sims, Daughter, both at 1839 Seabrook,
Fayetteville, North Carolina, James Sims, father,188 Avenue F,
Port St. Joe, Florida and Irene Sims, mother, 3065 Lakeview
Avenue, St. Petersburg, Florida

Clifford Sims was'eligible for the following medals and
decorations:

Medal of Honor
Silver Star
Bronze Star
Purple Heart
National Defense Service Medal
Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
Cross Gallantry with palm
(Vietnam)
Military Merit Medal
(Vietnam)
Vietnam Campaign Medal
(Vietnam)
Combat Infantry Badge
SParachutist Badge















































CHARLES ALBERT VARNUM

Captain, United States Army
Company B, 7th Cavalry Regiment

White Clay Creek, South Dakota, 30 December 1890

Entered Military service, Pensacola, Florida 1 September 1868

Officially Accredited to the State of Florida
Born: Troy, New York, 21 June 1849
Died: San Francisco, California 26 February 1936
Bur.ial; National Cemetery, Presidio, San Francisco, California

Charles Varnum's family were descended from some of the original
settlers of Massachusetts Bay Colony. Although born in New York,
his family returned to Massachussets almost immediately after his
birth. There he would grow up and complete his basic schooling.
His father, following service in the Union Army, was assigned to
reconstruction work in the area of Pensacola, Florida towards the
end of the war and his wife and children, including Charles,
joined him there in 1866. The young Charles decided on a
military career and, with his father appointed Adjutant General
of Florida, he was able to secure an appointment to the U.S.
.- .P -










His years at the Point were un-remarkable save for the near
record he established for garnering demerits and walking
pun ishment tours. However, his strong background in mathematics
and excellence as a cavalryman, helped him graduate high in his
Class of 1872. Following graduation and a brief stay in Alabama,
Varnum joined the 7th Cavalry in Kentucky, commanded by Lt.
Colonel George A. Custer.

The next decade would be a very busy one for Varnum, and
hazardous. He would participate in all the scouting and combat
missions of the 7th Cavalry into Indian lands in Montana, Wyoming
and the Dakotas. He was with Reno's Company at the Little Big
Horn ("Custer's Last Stand") in 1876 and, when he died in 1936,
was the last surviving officer who served in that action.

Varnum remained on frontier service for the remainder of the
19th century, serving in a variety of posts. He was a troop
corrnander at the Battles of Wounded Knee and White Clay Creek
or Drexel Mission, in 1890 where he received the Medal of Honor.

MEDAL OF HONOR

CITATION: While executing an order to withdraw, seeing that a
continuance of the movement would expose another troop of his
regiment to being cut off and surrounded, he disregarded orders
to retire, placed himself in front of his men, led a charge upon
the advancing Indians, regained a commanding position that had
just been vacated, and thus insured a safe withdrawal of both
detachments without further loss.
After the Ghost Dance War, Varnum continued to serve at posts in
the West. Even when assigned as Professor of Military Science,
it was at the University of Wyoming. In command of a volunteer
infantry regiment, he served with the Cuban Occupation forces in
1899. Later, now with the 4th Cavalry, Varnum saw service in the
Phil lipines 1905-1907. He retired in 1907 but almost immediately
requested further active duty. He was assigned to serve with the
National Guard of Idaho and later, as Professor of Military
Science at the University of Maine. Apparently, he was extremely
good at organizing recruiting stations and performed those duties
in Oregon and Missouri until 1918. Finally, in 1919, 70 years
old and with 51 years active duty behind him, Charles Varnum
retired, for good.

At the time of his death, his next of kin included Mary Alice
Varnum, widow, George and John Varnum, sons.

Charles Varnum was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Medal of Honor
Silver Star
Indian Wars Campaign Medal
Spanish War Service Medal
Cuban Occupation Medal
Phillipine Insurrection Medal
Victory Medal (World War I)




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