• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Introduction
 Florida state depositories
 Americal division
 26th infantry division "Yankee...
 27th infantry division "New...
 28th infantry division "Keysto...
 29th infantry division "Blue and...
 30th infantry division "Old...
 31st infantry division "Dixie"
 32nd infantry division "Red...
 33rd infantry division "Golden...
 34th infantry division "Red...
 35th infantry division "Santa...
 36th infantry division "Texans...
 37th infantry division "Buckey...
 38th infantry division "Cyclon...
 40th infantry division "Sunbur...
 41st infantry division "Jungle...
 42nd infantry division "Rainbo...
 43rd infantry division "Winged...
 44th infantry division "44th"
 45th infantry division "Thunde...
 Compilation of information and...






Title: Summary histories
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047651/00001
 Material Information
Title: Summary histories World War II National Guard Divisions
Series Title: Special archives publication
Physical Description: 1 v. (unnumbered) : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Picken, Jack L
Florida -- Dept. of Military Affairs
Publisher: State Arsenal, St. Francis Barracks
Place of Publication: St. Augustine Fla
Publication Date: [1992?]
 Subjects
Subject: World War, 1939-1945 -- Regimental histories -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: At head of title: Florida Department of Military Affairs.
General Note: "... was compiled by Jack L. Picken of Waterloo, Iowa"--Introduction.
General Note: Cover title.
Funding: The Florida National Guard's Special Archives Publications was digitized, in part by volunteers, in honor of Floridians serving both Floridians in disaster response and recovery here at home and the nation oversees.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00047651
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida National Guard
Holding Location: Florida National Guard, St. Augustine Barracks
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the Florida National Guard. Digitized with permission.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001753813
oclc - 26724758
notis - AJG6799

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Cover
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Introduction
        Unnumbered ( 4 )
    Florida state depositories
        Unnumbered ( 5 )
    Americal division
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    26th infantry division "Yankee"
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    27th infantry division "New York"
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    28th infantry division "Keystone"
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    29th infantry division "Blue and Gray"
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    30th infantry division "Old Hickory"
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    31st infantry division "Dixie"
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    32nd infantry division "Red Arrow"
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    33rd infantry division "Golden Cross"
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    34th infantry division "Red Bull"
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    35th infantry division "Santa Fe"
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
    36th infantry division "Texans"
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    37th infantry division "Buckeye"
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    38th infantry division "Cyclone"
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    40th infantry division "Sunburst"
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    41st infantry division "Jungleers"
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
    42nd infantry division "Rainbow"
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
    43rd infantry division "Winged Victory"
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    44th infantry division "44th"
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    45th infantry division "Thunderbird"
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
    Compilation of information and statistics relating to US army casualties during the Second World War
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
Full Text



Digitized with the permission of the
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS

FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD





SOURCE DOCUMENT ADVISORY

Digital images were created from printed source
documents that, in many cases, were photocopies of
original materials held elsewhere. The quality of
these copies was often poor. Digital images reflect
the poor quality of the source documents.

Where possible images have been manipulated to
make them as readable as possible. In many cases
such manipulation was not possible. Where
available, the originals photocopied for publication
have been digitized and have been added,
separately, to this collection.

Searchable text generated from the digital images,
subsequently, is also poor. The researcher is
advised not to rely solely upon text-search in this
collection.



RIGHTS & RESTRICTIONS

Items collected here were originally published by the
Florida National Guard, many as part of its SPECIAL
ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series. Contact the Florida
National Guard for additional information.

The Florida National Guard reserves all rights to
content originating with the Guard.



DIGITIZATION

Titles from the SPECIAL ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series
were digitized by the University of Florida in
recognition of those serving in Florida's National
Guard, many of whom have given their lives in
defense of the State and the Nation.








FLORIDA



DEPARTMENT OF



MILITARY AFFAIRS














Special Archives Publication
Number

134

SUMMARY HISTORIES:
WORLD WAR II
NATIONAL GUARD DIVISIONS

State Arsenal
St. Francis Barracks
St. Augustine, Florida









STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS
OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL




POST OFFICE BOX 1008
STATE ARSENAL, ST. AUGUSTINE
32085-1008






These Special Archives Publications are produced as a service to Florida communities,
historians and any other individuals, historical or geneaological societies and both national
and state governmental agencies which find the information contained therein of use or
value. They are automatically distributed to all official Florida State archival records
depositories.

At present, only a very limited number of copies of these publications are produced.
They are provided to certain state and national historical record depositories and other
public libraries and historical societies at no charge. Any copies remaining are given to
other interested parties on a first come, first served basis.

Information about the series is available from the Historical Services Division, Depart-
ment of Military Affairs, State Arsenal, PO Box 1008, St. Augustine, Florida 32085.



Robert Hawk
Director









INTRODUCTION


The information in all the Summary Unit Histories was compiled by Jack L. Picken of
Waterloo, Iowa. He is an amateur historian who has made the research and study of
American combat units in the wars of the twentieth century his life's work. These
summaries were sent to us as part of his contribution to the establishment of the Camp
Blanding Museum and Memorial Park of the Second World War.

Some of the material was extracted from the standard works on US units listed below.
But there is considerable information contained in these pages that is the result of dogged
research in original records, especially the detailed information concerning unit casualties
and decorations awarded. The statistics on day to day casualties Mr. Picken has
researched for most combat units is absolutely unique and available in this form in no other
source. (His statistics on casualties are more accurate than those available from normal
official sources!)

There are some gaps in the information available and some "fine tuning" yet to be
accomplished but eventually we hope to put this material on a computer and publish it in
a more complete and professional manner. Until then these photocopied compilations will
meet the immediate needs of all those interested in the incredible history of America's
soldiers, airmen and marines during the Second World War.



Robert Hawk
Department of Military
Affairs
St. Augustine, Florida
1991



RESOURCES

Army Almanac (1950)
Committee on Veterans Affairs; Medal of Honor Recipients 1863-1978
Fighting Divisions; Kahn, Ely J. and McLemore, Henry
Library, US Army Military History Institute, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania
University of Iowa; Army Divisional Combat Narratives, World War II (Archives)
Other public and private standard informational sources and institutions were con-
sulted as necessary











FLORIDA STATE DEPOSITORIES

State documents are distributed to the following depository libraries and are
available to Florida citizens for use either in the libraries or on interlibrary
loan, subject to each library's regulations. An asterisk (*) indicates libraries
that are obligated to give interlibrary loan service. Requests should be
directed to the nearest depository.

Bay Vista Campus Library (1982) *State Library of Florida (1968)
Documents Department Documents Section
Florida International University R. A. Gray Building
North Miami, Florida 33181 Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0250

Brevard County Library System (1968) Stetson University (1968)
308 Forrest Avenue Dupont-Ball Library
Cocoa, Florida 32922-7781 Deland, Florida 32720-3769

Broward County Division of Libraries (1968) Jacksonville University (1968)
100 South Andrews Avenue Carl S. Swisher Library
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301 University Blvd., North
Jacksonville, Florida 32211
*Central Florida Regional Lib. System (1972)
15 Southeast Osceola Avenue *Tampa-Hillsborough County (1968)
Ocala, Florida 32671 Public Library System
900 North Ashley Street
*Florida Atlantic University (1968) Tampa, Florida 33602
Library
P. O. Box 3092 *University of Central Florida (1968)
Boca Raton, Florida 33431 Library
Post Office Box 25000
*Florida International University (1971) Orlando, Florida 32816-0666
Documents Section
Tamiami Campus Library Tamiami Trail *University of Florida Library (1968)
Miami, Florida 33199 Documents Department
Gainesville, Florida 32611
*Florida State University Library (1968)
Documents Maps Division *University of Miami Library (1968)
Tallahassee, Florida 32306 Gov't Publications
P.O. Box 248214
*Jacksonville Public Libraries (1968) Coral Gables, Florida 33124
122 North Ocean Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32202-3374 *University of North Florida Library
Documents Division (1971)
Lee County Library System (1991) Post Office Box 17605
2025 Lee Street Jacksonville, Florida 32216
Ft. Myers, Florida 33901-3989
*University of South Florida (1968)
*Miami-Dade Public Library System (1968) Library Special Collections
101 West Flagler Street 4204 Fowler Avenue
Miami, Florida 33130-1523 Tampa, Florida 33620

Northwest Regional Library System (1968) University of West Florida (1968)
25 West Government Street Documents John Pace Library
Panama City, Florida 32402 Pensacola, Florida 32514- 5750

Orange County Library District (1968) Volusia County Library Center (1990)
101 East Central Boulevard City Island
Orlando, Florida 32801 Daytona Beach, Florida 32114

St. Petersburg Public Library (1969) West Palm Beach Public Library (1968)
3748 Ninth Avenue, North 100 Clematis
St. Petersburg, Florida 33713 West Palm Beach, Florida 33401



















AMERICAL DIVISION

Activated-27 May 1942 in New Caledonia
Returned To United States-21 November 1945
Inactivated-12 December 1945
Battle Credits, World War II: Guadalcanal Bougainville
Southern Philippines
Commanding Generals (During Combat, WW II):
Maj-Gen Alexander M. Patch May-December 1942
Brig-Gen Edmund B. Sebree January-May 1943
Maj-Gen John R. Hodge May 1943-April 1944
Maj-Gen Robert McClure April-October 1944
Maj-Gen William H. Arnold November 1944-Inactivation

Combat Chronicle: The Americal Division had no number during World War II.
But it didn't need one, asit became famous among the Americans, and only too
well-known to the Japanese.
In early-1942, the Japanese were on the rampage in the southwest Pacific,
and Task Force 6814 was rushed first to Australia, and then to New Caledonia,
where it conducted a defensive mission. There, it prepared for an offensive,
and was organized into a division. Its first commander, Major-General Alexan-
der Patch, would later command the U.S. 7th Army in Europe. The division's
name was derived from a combination of America and New Caledonia.
The 164th Infantry Regiment of the Americal was the first Army unit to re-
inforce the hard-pressed 1st Marine Division on Guadalcanal, arriving on 13
October 1942. It got there in time to see plenty of action, as Japanese war-
ships and planes continued to bombard the island, especially at night.
From 23-26 October 1942, the Japanese launched their heaviest land attacks
on Guadalcanal, but the 164th Infantry, with the marines, held their ground
and beat the Japs back in some of the most vicious and desperate fighting of
the war. The 164th and the marines then counterattacked, 5-11 November 1942,
and the 164th helped reduce Japanese strongpoints at Koli Point and Gavaga
Creek. In these actions the 164th had 26 men killed and 52 wounded. Japan-
ese losses were far greater.
Then, later on in November 1942, in between incessant rains, the 182nd Inf-
antry Regiment of the Americal arrived, as did a large part of the 2nd Marine
Division. From 18-23 November, a large force of Marine and Army units, in-
cluding the 182nd Infantry Regiment, crossed the Matanikau River to try to
advance toward Kokumbona and the Poha River. But the Japanese resisted so
fiercely and skilfully that the Americans were forced to halt and dig-in.
In early-December 1942, General Patch took command of all ground forces
on Guadalcanal, as the 132nd Infantry Regiment of the Americal arrived on the
embattled island, while the 1st Marine Division was evacuated for a well-









deserved rest and rehabilitation.
In January 1943, the 132nd Infantry Regiment, in conjunction with the rec-
ently arrived 25th Infantry Division, attacked Mt. Austen, and engaged in very
bitter fighting at the Gifu Strongpoint, 24 December 1942-9 January 1943, when
it was relieved in line by the 25th Infantry Division. Beginning on 16 January
1943, the 182nd Infantry participated in the advance along the east coast, and
on 1 February, the 132nd landed at Verahue, and reached the Tenaru Village by
9 February 1943. It was on this latter date that organized Japanese resistance
was declared ended on Guadalcanal. The Americal Division was the only Army
division to be awarded by the Navy with its Presidential Unit Citation. 365
men in the Americal made the supreme sacrifice on Guadalcanal.
The Americal next moved by echelon to the Fiji Islands, 1 March-10 April
1943.
In December 1943, the Americal joined in the fight for Bougainville. The
3rd Marine Division, which had initially invaded the island left, while the
37th Infantry Division, which had landed in mid-November 1943, stayed on. The
Americal stayed on Bougainville for nearly a year. It was early in the Ameri-
cal's stay on Bougainville, that it had a Medal of Honor winner, Staff Sergeant
Jesse R. Drowley, on 30 January 1944.
S/Sgt Drowley was a squad leader in a platoon whose mission was to remain
under cover while holding a perimeter defense and acting as a reserve.
When intense enemy fire prevented aid from reaching three seriously wounded
men from an assault company, he rushed forward to carry the wounded to cover.
Then Sgt Drowley discovered a pillbox which was inflicting heavy casualties
on the Americans. Signalling to the crew of a tank, he climbed to the turret,
grabbed a submachinegun, and directed the tank to within 20 feet of the pill-
box, where he received a severe bullet wound in the chest. Refusing medical
aid, he stayed on the tank, and was again wounded very seriously, losing his
left eye. Nevertheless, he remained along side the tank until the Jap pillbox
was completely demolished, and another directly behind it, also destroyed.
The sergeant's voluntary mission completed, he then returned alone for medical
treatment. He lived to receive his award.
In March 1944, the battle on Bougainville erupted with renewed fury. The
Japanese attacked through the jungle, trekking around from Buin. The hardest
blows fell upon the 37th Infantry Division, but the Americal also saw several
days of heavy combat. An enemy attack on 10 March 1944, took the south knob
of key Hill 260 from the 182nd Infantry Regiment, and it wasn't recovered un-
til the Japs abandoned it on 15 March.
In April 1944, the Americal went over to the offensive, pushing east of the
Mavavia River, and securing several hill masses, There was some heavy fighting
on 16 April, as the outpost line was extended beyond the Torokina River.
The Americal continued patrolling in the Torokina, Numa Numa, and Laruma sec-
tors until relieved by the Australian 3rd Division on 10 December 1944.
Then, on 8 January 1945, the Americal sailed for the Philippines, where it
began cleaning out pockets of remaining Japanese on Leyte and Samar. Elements
of the division also conducted a number of smaller operations in the Visayen
Islands, mopping-up Japanese on the relatively small islands of Biri, Capul,
Ticao, and Burias. Then the Americal opened its attack at Villaba, on Leyte,
and completed its encirclement of the Japanese in the northwest coastal region
of the island, and mopped-up until 10 March 1945.
On 26 March 1945, the Americal landed on Cebu, and soon found itself mixed
up in rough, difficult combat. After battling off of the beaches, the divis-
ion reached the city of Cebu. Then, as the soldiers pursued into the hills,
the Japs poured it on with everything they had, and blew-up an ammunition dump.
The explosions killed 20 Americans and wounded 30 more. The 182nd Infantry









Regiment fought for Go Chan Hill, 28-29 March 1945 (the latter date being the
division's bloodiest day in combat), and then battled to clear some other hills,
being heavily counterattacked on Bolo Ridge on 1 April. The 132nd Infantry
Regiment was counterattacked while approaching Hill 27 on 7 April 1945, but
took both Hills 20 and 26 by 10 April. The 3rd Battalion, 164th Infantry Reg-
iment landed on Bohol on 11 April 1945. There were only 330 Japanese on this
island, but there were some sharp actions before it was secured by 25 April.
Meanwhile, back on Cebu, there was bitter fighting. The Americal fought
the battle of Babay Ridge, 12-17 April 1945, and suffered heavy casualties.
Action on Cebu continued until the end of June 1945. The island cost the
lives of 410 men in the Americal.
The 164th Infantry landed on southern Negros, 26 April 1945, and fought for
the Palimpinon Heights until 28 May. Many Japanese were slain near Balasbalas,
7-12 June 1945.
Also, elements of the Americal landed on the north coast of Mindanao to act
as a rearguard for one of the 40th Infantry Division's regiments.
By 17 June 1945, the Americal was back on Cebu, where it flushed out remain-
ing Japanese stragglers, and trained for the proposed invasion of Japan.
On 10 September 1945, the Americal Division landed in Japan for occupation-
al duty in the Yokohama area. The men who had started out without a name and
ended up without a number had really done all right!

Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor--- Casualties: Total Battle Deaths-l,259
Distinguished Unit Citations--2 Killed In Action-- 1,075
Distinguished Service Crosses-45 Wounded 3,350
Silver Stars 565 Missing 16
Captured 1
Total Casualties----4,442

* One to the entire division--Guadalcanal

The Americal Division served in the Vietnam War.






1 WWII


AMERICAL DIVISION


OCTOBER 1942 NOVEMBER 1942 DECEMBER 1942 JANUARY 1943
15 Oct 1 3 Nov 1 1 Dec 1 1 Jan 111
18 Oct 111 5 Nov 111 2 Dec 11 2 Jan 111111111 9
20 Oct 11 6 Nov 1 7 Dec 1 3 Jan 1111111
25 Oct 11 7 Nov 11 8 Dec 1 4 Jan 1111
26 Oct 111111111 9 10 Nov 11 10 Dec 1 5 Jan 1111
27 Oct 1 11 Nov 1 19 Dec 11 6 Jan 1
14 Nov 1 20 Dec 111 7 Jan 1111111
15 Nov 1 21 Dec 111111 8 Jan 1111
17 Nov 1 23 Dec 1 9 Jan 1
19 Nov 11111 25 Dec 111111 10 Jan 1
20 Nov 11111111 8 26 Dec 11 12 Jan 1
21 Nov 11111111111111 14 27 Dec 11 14 Jan 11111111 8
22 Nov 11111111111111 14 28 Dec 111 22 Jan 1
23 Nov 1111111 29 Dec 111 30 Jan 1111
24 Nov 11 31 Jan 11
25 Nov 111
26 Nov 11111
28 Nov 111
29 Nov 11
30 Nov 1111
80





2 WWII


AMERICAL DIVISION


FEBRUARY 1943 JANUARY 1944 FEBRUARY 1944 MARCH 1944 APRIL 1944
1 Feb 1 3 Jan 1 6 Feb 1 2 Mar 1 1 Apr 1
4 Feb 111 8 Jan 1 13 Feb 1 4 Mar 1 2 Apr 11
5 Feb 1 12 Jan 11 22 Feb 1 5 Mar 1 4 Apr 11
7 Feb 11 18 Jan 1 28 Feb 1 7 Mar 1 5 Apr 1
12 Feb 1 19 Jan 1 4 8 Mar 11 7 Apr 11111
14 Feb 1 20 Jan 11 9 Mar 1 8 Apr 1
23 Jan 11 10 Mar 111111111111 12 14 Apr 1
S26 Jan 11111 11 Mar 1111111 16 Apr 111111111 9
30 Jan 11111111 8 12 Mar 1111111 17 Apr 1
23 13 Mar 11 21 Apr 1
14 Mar 1111 23 Apr 1
15 Mar 11 25 Apr 1
16 Mar 1
17 Mar 11
18 Mar 1
19 Mar 111
MAY 1944 JUNE 1944 JULY 1944 2 Mar 1111
2 May 11 5 June 1 8 July 111 23 Mar 11
2 7 June 1 24 Mar 1
9 June 1 25 Mar 1
26 Mar 11
29 Mar 11
30 Mar 11
AUGUST 1944 SEPTEMBER 1944 OCTOBER 1944 NOVEMBER 1944
8 Aug 1 24 Sept 1111 1 Oct 1 63 5 Nov 1
11 Aug 1 28 Sept 11 2 Oct 1 9 Nov 1
12 Aug 1 30 Sept 1 3 Oct 11 28 Nov 1
13 Aug 1 7 15 Oct 1 3
17 Aug 1 26 Oct 111
20 Aug 1 8
25 Aug 1
29 Aug 11
9






3 WWII


AMERICAL DIVISION


FEBRUARY 1945 MARCH 1945 APRIL 1945 MAY 1945
10 Feb 11 1 Mar 11111 1 Apr 111 1 May 1111
11 Feb 11 2 Mar 11 2 Apr 11111 2 May 1
12 Feb 1 3 Mar 1111 3 Apr 111111111 9 3 May 11
13 Feb 1 4 Mar 111 4 Apr 1111 4 May 111
14 Feb 11 5 Mar 11111 5 Apr 1111 5 May 1
15 Feb 1 6 Mar 11 6 Apr 1 6 May 11
16 Feb 1 7 Mar 1111 7 Apr 1111 7 May 1111
17 Feb 11 8 Mar 111 8 Apr 1 8 May 111
18 Feb 11 9 Mar 1 9 Apr 11111 9 May 111
20 Feb 1111111111 10 10 Mar 111 10 Apr 1111111 10 May 1
21 Feb 1111111111 10 11 Mar 11 11 Apr 1111 11 May 1
22 Feb 111 12 Mar 1 12 Apr 111111111 9 12 May 1
23 Feb 1 20 Mar 1 13 Apr 111111111 13 May 11111111 8
24 Feb 11 26 Mar 11111 14 Apr 11111111111111111 17 14 May 1
25 Feb 11111 27 Mar 11 approx. 15 Apr 11111111111 11 15 May 1111
26 Feb 11 28 Mar 11111111 8 40Xmen 16 Apr 111 18 May 1
27 Feb 11 29 Mar 11111111111111111111 20* 17 Apr 111 19 May 111
28 Feb 111111 30 Mar 111111111111111 15 18 Apr 11111 21 May 1
31 Mar 111111 19 Apr 1111 23 May 1
55 21 Apr 111 24 May 11
92 24 Apr 1 25 May 111
25 Apr 1 26 May 11
26 Apr 1111
27 Apr 11
28 Apr 1
29 Apr 111111111 9
128






4 WWII


AMERICAL DIVISION


JUNE 1945 JULY 1945 AUGUST 1945
4 June 1 7 July 1 3 Aug 1
6 June 1 1 25 Aug 1
8 June 11 2
9 June 11
10 June 11
12 June 1
18 June 1
21 June 1
11


















AMERICAL DIVISION'S
*bloodiest day 29 March 1945
bloodiest month April 1945
2nd bloodiest day 14 April 1945
3rd bloodiest day --30 March 1945
Total battle deaths 1,259
690 are listed=54.6% KIA-1,075























26TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Yankee"

Originally-New England National Guard
Activated (WW II)-16 January 1941
Returned To United States and Inactivated-December 1945
Battle Credits, World War II: Lorraine-Saar Ardennes Rhineland Central Europe
Days In Combat-210
Commanding General (During Combat, WW II):
Maj-Gen Willard S. Paul August 1943-June 1945

Combat Chronicle: The 26th Infantry Division had units like the 104th Infantry Regiment
which could trace their lineage clear back to even before the Revolutionary War.
In World War I, the 26th led all other Guard divisions in number of combat decorations,
and fought near Chateau-Thierry, being subjected to brutal gas attacks. The Yankee Divi-
sion subsequently fought at Verdun, and also took part in the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne
offensives. Altogether, it had 13,664 casualties. Coincidentally, its days in combat to-
talled 210-the same as in World War II.
Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the 26th was "raided" and many of its more
experienced men went into the famous Americal Division which fought on Guadalcanal, on
Bougainville, and in the Philippines.
The 26th rebuilt itself and eventually landed in Normandy, on 7 September 1944, but did
not enter combat until one month later on 7 October 1944. The bulk of the division relie-
ved the 4th Armored Division in western Lorraine, and maintained defensive positions.
Meanwhile, the 328th Infantry Regiment was temporarily attached to the 80th Infantry Div-
ision and saw action with this unit between 5-15 October. On 22 October 1944, a limited
attack was carried out in the Moncourt Woods by the other two regiments of the 26th, and
this assault resulted in considerable casualties.
Then, on 8 November 1944, General Patton launched an offensive in very inclement wea-
ther to surprise the Germans and, hopefully, drive into the Saar. The 26th attacked with
three regiments abreast and the Germans offered very determined resistance. The fighting
was bloody and difficult as the 26th crossed the Seille River, took ChAteau-Salins and
Moyenvic, and entered Koecking Ridge Forest. It was on the very first day of this 3rd
Army offensive that the 26th had a Medal of Honor winner, Technician 5th Grade Alfred L.
Wilson, Medical Detachment, near Bezange la Petite, France, 8 November 1944.
T/5 Grade Wilson administered aid to men from a company other than his own which was
under constant artillery fire. He then returned to his own company when a shellburst in-
jured a number of its men. While giving first aid, he was seriously wounded, but refused
to be evacuated. Inspite of great pain and loss of blood, he continued to give first aid
until too weak to stand. Crawling from one patient to another, he continued his work un-








til excessive loss of blood prevented him from moving. He then verbally directed unskill-
ed men in giving first aid. He eventually was unable to speak above a whisper, and then
lapsed into unconsciousness. The effects of his wound later caused his death.
By his distinguished devotion to duty and his own personal sacrifice, T/5 Grade Wilson
helped save the lives of at least ten wounded men.
The 26th kept on advancing against very strong German opposition, and suffering very
heavy losses. On 19 November 1944, the division was forced to a halt on the Dieuze-Bene-
stroff line. The Germans then began slowly withdrawing, and the 104th Infantry Regiment
took Marimont, while the 328th Infantry Regiment occupied Dieuze on 20 November, assisted
by the 4th Armored Division. The 26th advanced rapidly behind the retreating Germans,
button 21 November, part of the 104th Infantry was isolated at Albestroff. Flooding, mines,
and heavy enemy fire compounded the difficulty in enveloping this important crossroads
town. The 328th Infantry was sent into the attack to assist the 101st Infantry Regiment,
and Albestroff was taken on 23 November. However, skillful rearguard actions by the Ger-
mans kept the 328th Infantry out of Honskirch until 27 November 1944. The 101st Infantry
participated in the 4th Armored Division's advance east of the Sarre River. The 26th took
Sarre-Union in house-to-house fighting which lasted until 4 December 1944.
The 26th regrouped, after reaching the Maginot fortifications, 7 December 1944, and the
328th Infantry Regiment attacked Fort Wittring at dawn, 9 December, and Rederching fell to
104th Infantry Regiment the following day.
The 26th then crossed the Blies River into Germany, and was now in the Siegfried Line.
Then, on 13 December 1944, the 26th was relieved by the recently arrived 87th Infantry Div-
ision. Since the beginning of the 3rd Army offensive from Lorraine-into the Saar, the 26th
Infantry Division, among other losses, had, between 8 November-13 December 1944, 840 men
killed in action or died of wounds. It had been a bloody campaign.
The 26th returned to Metz for rest and rehabilitation, but this was interrupted a few
days later by the German counteroffensive in the Ardennes.
No outfit fought harder in the Battle of the Bulge than the Yankee Division. The 26th
was one of the first 3rd Army divisions to attack the Germans on their southern flank--
in appalling winter conditions. Struggling forward into Luxembourg, the 26th attacked at
Rambrouch and Grosbous on 22 December 1944. The Germans, camouflaged in white, raked the
Americans with murderous artillery, mortar, machinegun, and rifle fire. Beating back in-
tense German counterattacks, the 26th took Arsdorf on Christmas Day after sustaining heavy
casualties. Then the division attacked toward the Wiltz River, but was forced to withdraw
in the face of determined German resistance.
After regrouping, 5-8 January 1945, the 26th forced a small bridgehead near Oberwampach,
across the Wiltz, on 20 January 1945. The 26th continued its advance and took Grumelscheid
on the next day, and then crossed the Clerf River three days later. By this time, cases
of frostbite and trench foot were a real problem. The Battle of the Bulge was officially
declared over on 28 January 1945. The huge battle had cost the 26th 575 men killed in ac-
tion or died of wounds, many hundreds more wounded, and numerous men captured.
The 26th then shifted to the west bank of the Saar River, inside Germany, and maintain-
ed defensive positions north of Saarlautern, from 29 January-6 March 1945. No major batt-
les were fought by the division during this period.
And then, the 3rd Army offensive into the Palatinate region of western Germany opened
on 13 March 1945. The 104th Infantry seized the Prims River bridge at Huettersdorf, 17
March, while the 328th Infantry cleared Merzig and Haustadt. The 26th was the first 3rd
Army outfit to make contact with a 7th Army unit (6th Armored Division) advancing from the
south. In between was the German 1st Army, caught in a vise-like trap, and confused Ger-
mans were captured by the thousands.
The 26th crossed the Rhine at Oppenheim, 25-26 March 1945. Advancing northeast, Hanau
was taken in house-to-house combat by 28 March. The Yankees then pushed through Fulda, 1
April 1945, and helped reduce Meiningen on the 5th. Advancing deeper into central Germany,
in the wake of the llth Armored Division, the 26th moved through part of the Thuringen
Forest against inconsistent opposition, capturing numerous towns and villages.
Still under the 3rd Army, the 26th cut a swath southeastward, advancing in the corridor








between the Danube and the Czech border. The 26th closed to the Ilz River on 30 April
1945, and the 104th Infantry Regiment took positions beyond Hauzenberg, near the Austrian
border, without resistance. The 328th Infantry Regiment, meanwhile, established a bridge-
head across the Ilz, at Strasskirchen.
Continuing southeast into Austria, the 26th assisted the llth Armored Division in the
capture of the city of Linz. Die-hard Germans offered bitter resistance, even though the
war was almost over, but Linz fell on 4 May 1945.
The 26th then changed the direction of its attack to the northeast, and was moving
across the Vltava (Moldau) River in Czechoslovakia, when V-E Day finally arrived on 8 May
1945.
The Yankee Division had made heavy sacrifices in blood (as had so many other outfits)
in being one of the 3rd Army's most reliable and effective divisions. The 26th returned
home in December 1945.

Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor--- Casualties: Total Battle Deaths--2,136
Distinguished Unit Citations--1 Killed In Action---1,850
Distinguished Service Crosses--43 Wounded 7,886
Silver Stars 955 Missing 159
Captured 806
Total Casualties-- 10,701






1 WWII


26TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Yankee"


SEPTEMBER 1944 OCTOBER 1944 NOVEMBER 1944
19 Sept 1 7 Oct 1111 1 Nov 1
21 Sept 1 8 Oct 1111 2 Nov 1
25 Sept 11 9 Oct 1 3 Nov 1
4 11 Oct 111111111 9 4 Nov 1
12 Oct 11 5 Nov 1
13 Oct 1 7 Nov 11
14 Oct 1 8 Nov 11111111111111111 17
15 Oct 1 9 Nov 111111111111111111111111 24
16 Oct 1 10 Nov 1111111111111111111111 22
18 Oct 11 11 Nov 1111111111111111 16
19 Oct 1 12 Nov 11111111111111 14
20 Oct 1 13 Nov 111111111111111 15
21 Oct 1 14 Nov 1111
22 Oct 11111111111111111111 20 15 Nov 111111111111 12
23 Oct 11111111111111111111 20 16 Nov 11111111111111111111111111111111 32
24 Oct 1111 17 Nov 111111111111 12
25 Oct 11 18 Nov 1111111111111111 16
26 Oct 1111111 19 Nov 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111 40*
27 Oct 1111 20 Nov 111111111111 12 approx. 70 men
28 Oct 111 21 Nov 111111111111111111111111111111111 33
29 Oct 1111 22 Nov 111111111111111 15
30 Oct 11 23 Nov 11111111111111111111111111111111 32
31 Oct 11 24 Nov 1111111111111111111111111 25
25 Nov 111111111 9
97 26 Nov 11111111111111111111111111 26
27 Nov 11111111111111 14
28 Nov 1111111111111111111111111 25
29 Nov 1111111111111111 16
30 Nov 1111
442






2 WWII


26TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Yankee"


DECEMBER 1944 JANUARY 1945 FEBRUARY 1945
1 Dec 11111111 8 1 Jan 11 8 Feb 11
2 Dec 111111 2 Jan 11111111111111 14 10 Feb 1
3 Dec 1 3 Jan 1111111111 10 11 Feb 1
4 Dec 111111111 9 4 Jan 11111111111111 14 12 Feb 1
5 Dec 1 5 Jan 1111111111 10 13 Feb 111
6 Dec 111 6 Jan 111111111111111 15 14 Feb 111111
7 Dec 1111111111 10 7 Jan 11111111111 11 15 Feb 11
8 Dec 11111 8 Jan 1111111111 10 16 Feb 1
9 Dec 111111111 9 9 Jan 1111111111 10 17 Feb 11111111 8
10 Dec 1111 10 Jan 1111111111111111111 19 18 Feb 111
11 Dec 11 11 Jan 111111111111 12 19 Feb 1111
12 Dec 11111111 8 12 Jan 1111111111111111111111111 25 20 Feb 11
13 Dec 1111 13 Jan 111111 22 Feb 111111
15 Dec 1 14 Jan 11111111111111111111111 23 23 Feb 1
16 Dec 1 15 Jan 11 24 Feb 11
20 Dec 1 17 Jan 111 26 Feb 1
21 Dec 1 18 Jan 111 28 Feb 1
22 Dec 1111 19 Jan 11 45
23 Dec 1111111 20 Jan 111111
24 Dec 111111111111 12 21 Jan 11
25 Dec 11111111111111 14 24 Jan 1111
26 Dec 1111111111111111 16 25 Jan 11111111111111 14
27 Dec 1111 26 Jan 111
28 Dec 11111 27 Jan 111
29 Dec 1111111111 10 29 Jan 1
30 Dec 1111111111111111111111111 25 224
31 Dec 11111111111111111111111 23
194







3 WWII

26TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Yankee"

MARCH 1945 APRIL 1945 MAY 1945
1 Mar 1 1 Apr 111111 1 May 1
2 Mar 111 2 Apr 1 4 May 1
4 Mar 1 3 Apr 1 5 May 1
6 Mar 1 7 Apr 1 7 May 1
10 Mar 1 8 Apr 1 9 May 111111
11 Mar 1 10 Apr 11
12 Mar 11 11 Apr 1111 10
13 Mar 11111111111111111 17 17 Apr 1
14 Mar 111111111111 12 18 Apr 11
15 Mar 111111111111111111 18 25 Apr 1
16 Mar 11111111 8 30 Apr 11
17 Mar 11111 22
18 Mar 1111111
19 Mar 1111
21 Mar 11
27 Mar 111111111 9
28 Mar 1111
29 Mar 111111
102







26TH INFANTRY DIVISION'S
*bloodiest day ---19 November 1944
bloodiest month- November 1944
2nd bloodiest day --21 November 1944
3rd bloodiest day 16 and 23 November 1944
Total battle deaths 2,116
1,140 are listed=53.8% KIA-1,892


















27TH INFANTRY DIVISION "New York"

Originally-New York National Guard
Activated (WW 11)-15 October 1940
Returned To United States-15 December 1945
Inactivated-31 December 1945
Battle Credits, World War II: Makin Atoll Eniwetok Saipan Okinawa
Commanding Generals (During Combat, WW II):
Maj-Gen Ralph C. Smith November 1942-June 1944
Maj-Gen George W. Griner, Jr. June 1944-December 1945

Combat Chronicle: The 27th Infantry Division first saw action in World War I, in the Somme
Offensive of 1918, and also in western Belgium. The 27th had 1,442 men killed in action and
6,892 wounded in that war.
Before Pearl Harbor, the 27th was commonly known as the "Empire" or "New York" Division,
having been originally composed of National Guardsmen from "upstate" New York.
After patrolling the west coast of the United States for a few weeks after Pearl Harbor,
the 27th sailed for Hawaii, and manned defensive positions on Kauai, Maui, and Hawaii, while
also conducting training procedures.
In November 1943, the 27th earned its first battle star. While the 2nd Marine Division
stormed into the hell of Tarawa, the 27th's 165th Infantry Regiment and other elements went
ashore on Makin Atoll, on the main island of Butaritari, somewhat to the north. It was no-
where near as bad as Tarawa, but bad enough. After three days of fierce fighting, the 165th
radioed to the task force off shore, "Makin taken." It cost the life of the regimental com-
mander and 70 men. The Japanese garrison was wiped out.
After Makin, the 27th's 106th Infantry Regiment took the small island of Majuro without
opposition, and then went on to join the fighting in the Marshalls, in February 1944, seeing
action on Eniwetok. This island was invaded on 19 February 1944, and the 106th Infantry
suffered heavy losses on the first day of this assault. Eniwetok was secured after three
days of furious fighting which included a Japanese counterattack. The 106th Infantry lost
close to 100 men.
The 106th Infantry Regiment returned to Hawaii, to rejoin the rest of the 27th on 13
April 1944.
The 27th fought as an entire unit, for the first time, during the capture of Saipan, in
the Marianas, in June-July 1944. The 2nd and 4th Marine Divisions made the initial assault
landings on 15 June 1944. The 27th, first held in floating reserve, landed its 165th Infan-
try Regiment on the night of 16 June, to support the heavily engaged 4th Marine Division.
The 105th Infantry Regiment was landed the following day.
The 165th Infantry, supported by artillery and naval gunfire, cleared Aslito Airfield,
and its surrounding heights by 18 June 1944.
The 165th and 105th Infantry then advanced over rugged terrain and attacked Nafutan Point
on extreme southern Saipan. This area was cleared after about a week of hard fighting, and
the 106th Infantry landed on Saipan, on 20 June 1944.
The two marine divisions were having an equally tough time, and so the 27th was placed in








between the two marine divisions as they battled northward, on 23 June 1944.
The 27th had the roughest terrain to negotiate, and the Japanese were entrenched in caves
and concrete fortifications, and offered their usual fanatical resistance. The 106th Infan-
try Regiment assaulted Death Valley, while the 165th Infantry Regiment fought on Purple
Heart Ridge. The 106th Infantry began reducing Hell's Pocket, 28 June 1944, and had clear-
ed both Death Valley and Purple Heart Ridge by the 30th. Casualties were very heavy, as the
terrific battle continued unabated.
Attacking with all three regiments, the 27th gained positions commanding Tanapag Plain,
and on 4 July, the 106th Infantry reached the seaplane base at Flores Point. After taking
the town of Garapan, the 2nd Marine Division was pinched out of the attack, and the 27th
and the 4th Marine Division continued to battle north with the 27th on the left and the 4th
on the right.
And then, on the Tanapag Plain, in the pre-dawn hours of 7 July 1944, the Japanese laun-
ched a tremendous Banzai attack, with the heaviest blow falling against the 105th Infantry
Regiment, 27th Infantry Division. There were over 5,000 Japanese in on the overall assault.
Many of the Japs were armed only with clubs, swords, or bayonets, and many of them were
drunk. None seemed afraid to die.
In some of the most savage fighting of the entire war, the Japs came on wildly, scream-
ing obscenities, and were mowed down and blasted by the hundreds. Still, by their sheer
weight of numbers, size and momentum of their onslaught, and their utter disregard for loss-
es, the Japs reached the American lines, and there was wild, terrific hand-to-hand fighting.
It was in this extremely violent combat that the 27th produced one of its three Medal of
Honor winners of the war, Lieutenant-Colonel William J. O'Brien, 1st Battalion, 105th Inf-
antry Regiment. Lt-Colonel O'Brien had already distinguished himself by his valiant and
skillful leadership earlier in the battle on Saipan.
Then, on 7 July 1944, his and another battalion of the 105th Infantry were hit full force
by the above mentioned onslaught. With vicious, bloody hand-to-hand fighting going on every-
where, the American lines were pierced by sheer weight of numbers. With many casualties,
and ammunition running low, Lt-Col O'Brien refused to leave the front lines. Striding up
and down the lines, he fired at the enemy with a pistol in each hand, and his presence bol-
stered the morale of the men, encouraged them in their desperate fight, and sustained them
in their heroic stand.
Though seriously wounded, Lt-Col O'Brien refused to be evacuated and, after exhausting
his pistol ammunition, he manned a .50 caliber machinegun mounted on a jeep, and continued
firing. When last seen alive, he was standing upright and firing into the Jap hordes that
were enveloping him. Some time later, his body was found surrounded by dead Japanese. A
lasting inspiration to his entire battalion, even the whole 27th Division, Lt-Col O'Brien's
exceptional valor was in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. military.
With the greatest effort the 105th Infantry did everything it could to try to throw the
remaining Japanese back. But there were just too many of them and, in a mixed-up, wild
free-for-all, hundreds of the Japs broke through to attack a marine artillery unit to the
rear. The marines fought valiantly, but they, too, were unable to stop the frenzied enemy,
as some elements of the 105th were pulled off the island by water. The lunging Japanese
drive finally spent itself, and lost momentum at a U.S. command post, where cooks, clerks,
and staff officers stood their ground.
The terrible battlefield was littered with men from both sides--with the majority of
them being dead Japanese. Over 4,000 of them were counted on the battlefield. The 105th
Infantry Regiment lost way over 300 men. The entire 105th Infantry was awarded the Distin-
guished Unit Citation for this heroic action.
As a finale to the overall battle on Saipan, the 165th Infantry then cleared Hara-kiri
Gulch, suffering very heavy losses on 9 July 1944. Shortly after, the island was declared
secured, but the 27th remained throughout August 1944, cleaning out isolated pockets of
Japanese in the hills and cliffs of Saipan. Altogether, the 27th lost 1,053 men on terri-
ble Saipan!
The division then sailed to the New Hebrides for rest and rehabilitation.
On 25 March 1945, the 27th sailed from Espiritu Santo, and arrived on Okinawa, 9 April








1945, nine days after the initial assault landings by four other divisions, the 1st and
6th Marine and 7th and 96th Infantry.
On 10 April 1945, the 105th, Infantry Regiment assaulted Tsugen Shima, an island off of
Okinawa, and secured it in moderate to heavy combat by the next day. The 105th rejoined
the rest of the 27th back on Okinawa, on 13 April.
On 19 April 1945, the 27th participated in a general assault on the outer belt of the
Shuri Line defenses. The Japanese had been treated to a very heavy naval and air bombard-
ment, but this had little effect on their well-organized system of cave-tunnel defenses.
The 27th fought valiantly, but the 106th Infantry was stopped at the Urasoe-Mura Escarp-
ment. This area was secured only after the defeat of several Japanese counterattacks, and
a fierce battle which ended on 23 April.
Meanwhile, the 105th Infantry battled up Kakazu Ridge, in a costly attack which claimed
many men, as well as 22 tanks.
The 165th Infantry was committed on 20 April, and became involved in the battle for Item
Pocket, which lasted until 27 April 1945.
The 27th then made efforts to improve its positions, and, after a bitter struggle, took
Machinato Airfield, on 28 April. But the raging battle continued, and on 1 May 1945, the
27th was relieved by the 1st Marine Division.
After rest and rehabilitation, elements of the 27th landed on Tora Shima, another small
island near Okinawa, 12 May 1945. The landing was unopposed.
Isolated pockets of Japanese were causing sufficient trouble on northern Okinawa, that
the 27th was next committed there. In a battle that was literally fought in the clouds,
the division, after over a week of fighting, secured Onna Take Hill, on 2 June 1945. The
27th continued to mop-up on northern Okinawa, until 4 August 1945. The 27th lost 711 men
on Okinawa.
The 27th left Okinawa, 7 September 1945, and moved to Japan, pulling occupational duties
in the Niigata and Fukushima areas. The 27th left for home in December 1945.

Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor--3 Casualtiess Total Battle Deaths--1,977
Distinguished Unit Citations-2 Killed In Action---l,545
Distinguished Service Crosses-21 Wounded 5,485
Silver Stars 1132 Missing 'I0
Captured 1
Total Casualties--- 7,071
* One to the entire 105th Infantry Regiment---Saipan

Other 27th Infantry Division Medal of Honor winners in World War II: Killed in action *
Sgt Thomas A. Baker, 105th Inf Rgt, 19 June-7 July 1944, on Saipan
Pfc Alejandro R. Ruiz, 165th Inf Rgt, 28 April 1945, on Okinawa






1 WWII



27TH INFANTRY DIVISION "New York"


NOVEMBER 1943 FEBRUARY 1944 JUNE 1944
20 Nov 11111111111 11 19 Feb 11111111111111111111111111111 29 6 June 1
21 Nov 11111111111111 14 20 Feb 111111 7 June 1
23 Nov 1 21 Feb 111111 17 June 1111111
24 Nov 111 22 Feb 1 18 June 1111111
25 Nov 111 23 Feb 111 19 June 111
26 Feb 1 20 June 11
32 21 June 1111111
22 June 111111
23 June 111111111111 12
24 June 111111111111111 15
25 June 111111111111111111111111111111 34
26 June 11111111111111111 17
27 June 111111111111111 15
28 June 11111111111111111111111111111111111 35
29 June 11111111111111111111111 23
30 June 1111111111111111111111111 25
210






2


27TH INFANTRY DIVISION "New York"


JULY 1944 AUGUST 1944
1 July 11111111111111111111 20 1 Aug 111
2 July 111111111111 12 5 Aug 11
3 July 111111111 9 12 Aug 1
4 July 111111111 9 17 Aug 11
5 July 1111111111111 13 28 Aug 1
6 July 111111
7 July 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111iiiiiiiiii1 9
1111111111111111111111111111111111111111 130*approx. 240Xmen
8 July 11111111111111111111111111111111 32
9 July 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 75
10 July 111111111111111 15
11 July 11111
12 July 1111
13 July 1
14 July 1
16 July 11
17 July 1
18 July 1111
19 July 11
20 July 1
21 July 11
22 July 11
25 July 1
29 July 1
30 July 1
31 July 11
351







3 WWII

27TH INFANTRY DIVISION "New York"


APRIL 1945 MAY 1945 JUNE 1945
3 Apr 1 1 May 111111111111111111111111111 27 5 June 1
10 Apr 111 2 May 111111111111 12 8 June 11
11 Apr 1111111111 10 3 May 111 9 June 111
13 Apr 1 4 May 111111111111111111 18 11 June 11
15 Apr 1 5 May 11 12 June 11
16 Apr 1 6 May 11 13 June 1
17 Apr 11111 7 May 11 22 June 1
18 Apr 11 9 May 11 28 June 1
19 Apr 1111111111 10 10 May 11 13
20 Apr 11111111111 11 11 May 1111
21 Apr 111111111111111111111111111 27 13 May 11
22 Apr 1111111111111111111111 22 16 May 1 JULY 1945
23 Apr 11111111111111111111111 23 17 May 1 4 July 1
24 Apr 11111111111 11 19 May 1111 8 July 1
25 Apr 111111111111111111 18 20 May 1 16 July 1
26 Apr 111111111111111111111111111 27 21 May 111 31 July 11
27 Apr 1111111111111111111111111111 28 23 May 111
28 Apr 1111111111111111111111111111111111111 37 26 May 1 5
29 Apr 111111111111111111111 21 27 May 1
30 Apr 111111111111111111111111111111111111 38 29 May 1
297 30 May 11
94



27TH INFANTRY DIVISION'S
*bloodiest day 7 July 1944
bloodiest month July 1944
2nd bloodiest day -9 July 1944
3rd bloodiest day 30 April 1945
Total battle deaths 1,977
1,057 are listed=53.14% KIA-1,566

















28TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Keystone"

Pennsylvania

Activated (WW II)-17 February 1941

Returned To United States-2 August 1945

Inactivated-13 December 1945

Battle Credits, World War II: Normandy Northern France Siegfried Line
Ardennes Alsace Rhineland
Days In Combat-196

Commanding Generals (During Combat, WW II):
Maj-Gen Lloyd D. Brown January 1943-July 1944
Maj-Gen Norman D. Cota August 1944-Inactivation

Combat Chronicle: The 28th Infantry Division, nicknamed the "Bloody Buckets" by the Ger-
mans because of the shape and color of its shoulder patch and its furious assaults, took
part in some of the heaviest fighting in World War I. The 28th had 2,165 men killed in
action and another 11,974 more wounded in that conflict. The division is probably best
noted in World War I for its rescue of the famous "Lost Battalion" of the 77th Division
in the Meuse-Argonne forest.
In World War II, the 28th, after training in England and Wales, landed in Normandy on
22 July 1944. Entering the bitter hedgerow struggle, the 28th was placed in the line in
between two veterans of D-Day, the 4th and 29th Infantry Divisions. The 28th inched for-
ward against desperate opposition.
It was usually a standard German tactic to hit new divisions as they were committed, and
casualties were heavy. On 2 August, alone, the 28th sustained 750 casualties. The town of
Percy fell, and then the 110th Infantry Regiment hammered at Gathemo for 3 days before it
finally fell with the help of a task force from the 2nd Armored Division. Two days later,
on 12 August, Brigadier-General James E. Wharton was killed a few hours after assuming com-
mand of the division by a sniper's bullet as he visited the command post of the 112th Inf-
antry Regiment. He was replaced by Brigadier-General Norman "Dutch" Cota, who had heroic-
ally commanded the 29th Infantry Division on Omaha Beach.
Gradually, the American offensive in Normandy gained momentum, and the 28th captured
Sourdeval. After a few days rest, the Bucketeers raced to the Seine River, and helped cap-
ture Elbeuf on 25 August.
After parading down the Champs-Elysees in Paris, 29 August 1944, the proud division con-
tinued its sustained drive through northern France and Luxembourg to the Siegfried Line on
the German frontier.
At dawn on 14 September 1944, the 28th and five other 1st Army divisions launched an att-
ack against the Siegfried Line. But the Germans had had time to man this sector in strength,
murderous fire met the Americans, and the attack made little headway. It was during this
period that the 28th had a Medal of Honor winner, Technical Sergeant Francis J. Clark, Com-
pany K, 109th Infantry Regiment.
On 12 September 1944, Company K began fording the Our River near Kalborn, Luxembourg, to
take some high ground on the opposite bank, which was German soil. Covered by fog, one








platoon made the opposite shore, but when a second reached the far shore, the Germans
opened up with withering fire.
Sgt Clark led this platoon to safety and rescued a wounded soldier. Later, he att-
acked an enemy machinegun with grenades and killed two Germans. He roamed the line and
flanks, killing and wounding an undetermined number of the enemy, scattering German pat-
rols, and eventually forcing the withdrawal of an entire company of German soldiers.
On 17 September 1944, near Sevenig, Germany, Sgt Clark advanced alone against a mach-
inegun, killed the gunner, and forced his assistant to flee. The Germans counterattacked
and Company K suffered heavy casualties. Seeing that two platoons lacked leadership, he
took over command and moved among the men, giving them encouragement.
On the 18th, he was wounded, but refused to be evacuated, taking up a position in a
pillbox as night came. Emerging at daybreak, he killed a German setting up a machinegun
not more than five yards away. Locating another enemy emplacement, Sgt Clark moved up
unobserved and disposed of two Germans with rifle fire. Later that day, he volunteered
to take food and water to members of an isolated platoon.
Sgt Clark's actions of leadership and heroism were vital in defeating counterattacks
by formidable enemy forces, and put fighting heart into the hard-pressed men of Company K.
Fierce fighting continued at the Siegfried Line. On 19 September 1944, the 112th Inf-
antry Regiment, with the 5th Armored Division, defeated strong German counterattacks ag-
ainst the Wallendorf bridgehead. After more fighting, the 28th was given a rest, start-
on 9 October 1944. Then the Bucketeers were given new orders-to relieve the 9th Infan-
try Division, near Schmidt, in the HUrtgen Forest.
On 26 October 1944, the 28th slowly marched into the dark, damp, forbidding, evil for-
est. It was almost like right out of a German fairy tale--but filled with death. The
men of the 28th were met by the exhausted veterans of the 9th Division as they staggered
out of the forest with haunted looks, the faces of men who had seen much dying and misery.
It was foggy and the men's boots sank in the mud. It was cold. There were shellholes,
splintered trees, damaged vehicles, battered road signs, and destroyed bunkers. And, as
the men of the 28th soon learned to their horror, the Germans had planted thousands of
mines of all types.
On 2 November 1944, the 28th jumped-off into an attack toward the small town of Sch-
midt, deep in the forest. Although there was no air support, a heavy artillery bombard-
ment preceded the attack. At first, good progress was made in the center, and two vill-
ages were taken. Little did the 28th know that the crack 116th Panzer and 89th Infantry
Divisions, plus elements of two other German divisions were massing for a very heavy
assault.
On 4 November 1944, a tremendous artillery barrage fell upon the 28th, and then the
Germans surged forward with tanks and infantry. The 28th fought courageously, and over
the next several days violent fighting caused Vossenack and Schmidt to change hands sev-
eral times. But there were just too many Germans, and the 28th lacked enough tanks and
anti-tank weapons to cope with the huge German assault. The Germans eventually captured
Schmidt. Royal Tiger tanks thrust the ugly snouts of their guns right up to the windows
of some of the buildings which some of the GIs were holding. These men had no choice but
to either give up or be blown to bits.
In the overall battle the division was forced to pull back the 112th Infantry Regiment
on 14 November 1944 (a particularly bloody day), and on the 17th, the 110th Infantry Regi-
ment was also forced to withdraw. By 19 November 1944, it was all over, and the 28th had
lost at least 550 men.
This action of the 28th in the Hiirtgen Forest was as bitter as any of the war. The
division's attack had been smashed, and there were over 6,000 casualties: But it wasn't
the 28th's fault. It was a very good, veteran outfit, and its tactical planning had been
sound. SHAEF (Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force) had failed to appreciate
the strength of the Germans in this region, and should not have sent single divisions in-
to the forest, one at a time, to be severely mauled. Several other divisions would yet
fight in the green hell of the HUrtgenwald, but the 28th's experience was as bad as any.
Military experts would later consider the fighting in the Hirtgen Forest to be the worst







of any on the Western Front.
After this extremely bitter, costly experience, the 28th was sent to a supposedly
quiet sector of the front-the Ardennes. The Bucketeers did get a few weeks of relative
quiet, but then came the great German counteroffensive-the Battle of the Bulge, beginn-
ing on 16 December 1944.
The heaviest blow fell on the U.S. 8th Corps--and the strung-out 28th was smack in the
center of it. No less than 9 German divisions were concentrated opposite the 28th's ex-
tended sector in the northern portion of Luxembourg. The Allies had never expected the
Germans to launch a major attack in the rugged Ardennes, and in the middle of winter, and
the 28th was simply overwhelmed.
After the terrible experience in the Hrtgen Forest, it was one of the more unfortunate
events of the war that the 28th took the brunt of the German onslaught. Although, here
and there, some men broke and ran, as a whole, the 28th put up a magnificent fight, in-
flicted tremendous losses on the Germans, and seriously upset their timetable, allowing
the 101st Airborne Division and elements of the 9th and 10th Armored Divisions precious
time to establish a very formidable defense of the key town of Bastogne, a major German
objective. But the 28th, once again, suffered very heavy losses in men and equipment,
with 20 December 1944, being an especially costly day. The 28th was badly shattered as
remnants of the division fell back to the west. Between the HUrtgen Forest debacle and
the Ardennes, the 28th suffered over 12,000 casualties:
The 28th moved to a defensive position along the Meuse River, from Givet to Verdun,
where it was reconstituted with replacements.
Then, after a short rest, the 28th was moved by freight cars south into central Alsace,
to help eliminate the troublesome Colmar Pocket in late-January 1945. The 28th was one
of several American divisions sent into this region to help out the French 1st Army. It
was a very vicious and bloody battle fought in deep snow, densely wooded areas, and in
numerous small towns and villages.
On 1 February 1945, the 28th attacked and, in heavy combat, reached the sizeable town
of Colmar the next day, but tanks of the French 5th Armored Division swept past it to
enter the city first. After mopping-up in Colmar was finished by 3 February, the 28th
joined French armor blocking the Vosges in the region southwest of Colmar, along the Ill
and Fecht Rivers. The 28th passed through some French infantry and crossed the Rhine-
Rh6ne Canal on 6 February 1945.
The Colmar Pocket was finally erased by 12 February 1945. The 28th lost close to 170
men in this battle, and the entire 109th Infantry Regiment received the French Croix de
Guerre.
After this battle, the 28th was moved up far to the north in the right flank of the
U.S. 1st Army, west of the Rhine.
The 28th relieved the 2nd Infantry Division on 20 February 1945. It seized Schleiden,
4 March, and began advancing toward the Ahr River on 6 March 1945. The 110th Infantry
reached Zingsheim, and the 112th Infantry reached Goldbach on the first day of this offen-
sive. The 28th advanced to the Ahr River, at Blankenheim, 7 March, and assembled in the
Nieder Mendig sector for rehabilitation, and the holding of defensive positions along the
middle Rhine.
On 13 April 1945, the 28th assumed occupational duties in Jilich, Germany, and on 24
April 1945, relieved the 36th Infantry Division in the Palatinate area of western Germany.
The division then took over responsibility for the military government in Hessen and in
the Saar, as well as the Palatinate, as V-E Day finally came on 8 May 1945.
The 28th had taken the worst that the war could throw at it. The 28th was called upon
to participate in some of the most desperate fighting of the war, and never once did it
fail to add luster to its reputation as a first-class combat unit.
Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor--1 Casualties: Total Battle Deaths--2,873
Distinguished Unit Citations--1 Killed In Action- 2,316
Distinguished Service Crosses-29 Wounded -9,609
Silver Stars '135 Missing 884
Captured ----3,953
Total Casualties-----16,762
To the entire 112th Infantry Regiment--Battle of the Bulge






1 WWII


28TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Keystone"


JULY 1944 AUGUST 1944 SEPTEMBER 1944
26 July 1 1 Aug 111111111111111111111111111111 30 1 Sept 1
28 July 1 2 Aug 111111111111111111111111111111 30 2 Sept 11
30 July 111 3 Aug 111111111111111111111111111 27 4 Sept 1
31 July 1111111 4 Aug 111111111111111111111111111111111 33 6 Sept 1
1111111 14 5 Aug 111111111111 12 7 Sept 1
1 6 Aug 111111111111111111111111111 27 8 Sept 1
S7 Aug 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 45 9 Sept 11
8 Aug 11111111111111111111111 23 10 Sept 1111
9 Aug 111111111111111111111111111111111 33 11 Sept 11
10 Aug 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 47 13 Sept 111111111111111 15
11 Aug 1111111111111111111111 22 14 Sept 11111111111111 14
12 Aug 11111111111111111111111111111111 32 15 Sept 1111111111111111111111 22
13 Aug 111111111111111111 18 16 Sept 1111111111111 13
14 Aug 111111 17 Sept 11111111111111111111111 23
15 Aug 11111 18 Sept 11111111111111111 17
16 Aug 1 19 Sept 1111111111111111 16
18 Aug 1 20 Sept 111111111 9
19 Aug 11 21 Sept 1111
21 Aug 11 22 Sept 1111111111 10
22 Aug 11111 23 Sept 111
23 Aug 1 24 Sept 1
25 Aug 111 26 Sept 11
26 Aug 111 27 Sept 11
30 Aug 1 28 Sept 1
31 Aug 1 29 Sept 1111111111111 13
410 30 Sept 111111
186






2 WWII


28TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Keystone"


OCTOBER 1944 NOVEMBER 1944
1 Oct 1111 2 Nov 111111111111111111111111111111 30
2 Oct 111 3 Nov 11111111111111111111 20
3 Oct 1111111 4 Nov 111111111111111111111111 24
4 Oct 111 5 Nov 11111111111111111111111 23
5 Oct 11111 6 Nov 1111111111111111111111111111111111111 37
7 Oct 11 7 Nov 1111111111111 13
8 Oct 11 8 Nov 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 80
9 Oct 1 9 Nov 11111111111111111111111111 26
13 Oct 1 10 Nov 1111111111 10
14 Oct 1 11 Nov 111111
20 Oct 1 12 Nov 11111
26 Oct 1 13 Nov 11111111111111 14
28 Oct 1 14 Nov 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 45
29 Oct 111111 15 Nov 1111
31 Oct 1 16 Nov 11
17 Nov 1111111111 10
39 18 Nov 11111111 8
19 Nov 111111
20 Nov 1
364







3 WWII

28TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Keystone"


DECEMBER 1944
2 Dec 1
4 Dec 1
6 Dec 1
10 Dec 1
15 Dec 1
16 Dec 11111111111111111111111111111111111 35
17 Dec 1111111111111111111111 22
18 Dec 11111111111111111111111111111111111111 38
19 Dec 11111
20 Dec 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 90*
21 Dec 111111111111111 15 approx. 160*rmen
22 Dec 11111
23 Dec 11111
24 Dec 11
26 Dec 11
27 Dec 1
29 Dec 111111
30 Dec 1111
31 Dec 1
236






4 WWII

28TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Keystone"


JANUARY 1945 FEBRUARY 1945 MARCH 1945 APRIL 1945
1 Jan 1 1 Feb 111111111 9 3 Mar 1 5 Apr 1111
2 Jan 11 2 Feb 111111111111111 15 4 Mar 111 11 Apr 1
3 Jan 1 3 Feb 1111111111 10 5 Mar 1111111 14 Apr 1
6 Jan 111 4 Feb 111 6 Mar 1 17 Apr 1
7 Jan 11111111111 11 5 Feb 111111 8 Mar 11
8 Jan 1 6 Feb 111111 21 Mar 11
10 Jan 1 7 Feb 11 16
14 Jan 1 8 Feb 1
15 Jan 1 9 Feb 1
22 Jan 1 10 Feb 1
23 Jan 111111111111 12 15 Feb 1
24 Jan 1 16 Feb 1
27 Jan 11 21 Feb 1
28 Jan 1 22 Feb 1
29 Jan 1111111111 10 23 Feb 1
30 Jan 1111 26 Feb 111
31 Jan 1111111111 10 27 Feb 1
63 63







28TH INFANTRY DIVISION
*bloodiest day 20 December 1944
bloodiest month August 1944
2nd bloodiest day 8 November 1944
3rd bloodiest day 10 August 1944
Total battle deaths 2,700 (approximately)
1,398 are listed=51.7% KIA-2,300 (approximately)



















29TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Blue and Gray"

Originally--Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, District of Columbia National Guard

Activated (WW II)-3 February 1941

Returned To United States-4 January 1946

Inactivated-17 January 1946

Battle Credits, World War II: Normandy Brittany Siegfried Line Rhineland
North-Central Germany
Days In Combat--242

Commanding General (During Combat, WW II):
Maj-Gen Charles H. Gerhardt July 1943-Inactivation

Combat Chronicle: The 29th Infantry Division has, as its shoulder patch, blue and gray
colors combined in a monad, the Korean symbol for eternal life. The Blue and Gray Division,
so named because it had men about equally divided from northern and southern states in the
First World War, had a prominent part in that conflict. It sustained over 6,000 casualties
in the Meuse-Argonne.
In World War II, the 29th more than lived up to that record, by suffering over 20,000
casualties
From October 1942-early-June 1944, the 29th conducted intensive training in Scotland
and England. Although untried in combat, but well-trained, the 29th was picked to help
spearhead the D-Day invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944. Along with the great 1st Infantry
Division, it landed on Omaha Beach--and into a hellish storm of artillery, mortar, machine-
gun, and small-arms fire from the high ground somewhat inland above the vulnerable beachhead.
Some of the men were hit while still in the water. Others, wounded, swam weakly until
their feet touched bottom and then dragged themselves on to the sands. Men who had reached
the beach unhurt found their position on the wide exposed sands more dangerous, and some ran
back into the water up to their necks for concealment and cover from the enemy fire. Others
stayed on the beach, burrowing holes into the shingle and sand until the rising tide engulf-
ed them. Ten minutes after the landing ramps dropped, Company A, 116th Infantry Regiment
was without any officers.
Meanwhile, Companies E, F, and G fared a good deal better. This was greatly due to a
grass fire along several hundred yards of bluff above the beach set off by naval rockets,
and which greatly inhibited German observation of the beachhead. Still, the ordeal was any-
thing but easy, and the only real solution was to move inland off the beaches, since the Ger-
mans had every foot of it zeroed in.
It was touch and go for awhile, but a highly 'instruental force was the 29th's acting com-
mander, Major-General Norman "Dutch" Cota. Cajoling, cursing, encouraging, and rallying his
men, he gradually got enough of them together to get off the beaches, which spelled the diff-
erence between victory and defeat. Gradually, the 29th pushed inland, and there were many
individual acts of heroism. One such case was that of Technical Sergeant Frank D. Peregory,








Company K, 116th Infantry Regiment.
Leading elements of the 3rd Battalion, 116th Infantry were advancing near Grandcanpe.
Suddenly, they were halted by decimating machine-gun fire from firmly entrenched German
forces on the high ground overlooking the town. After numerous attempts to neutralize the
German position by supporting artillery and tank fire had proved ineffective, T/Sgt Pereg-
cry, on his own initiative, advanced up the hill under withering fire, and worked his way
to the crest where he discovered an entrenchment leading to the main enemy fortifications
200 yards away. Without hesitating, he leaped into the trench and moved toward the emplace-
ment. Encountering a squad of enemy riflemen, he attacked them with hand grenades and bay-
onet, killed 8 and forced 3 more to surrender.
Continuing along the trench, he singlehandedly forced the surrender of 32 more riflemen,
captured the machine-gunners, and opened the way for his unit to advance and secure its ob-
jective.
Sgt Peregory was later killed in a subsequent action, and was posthumously awarded the
Medal of Honor.
No American division in the terrific fighting in Normandy had it tougher than the Fight-
ing 29th, and no division suffered greater casualties, which skyrocketed at an alarming rate.
After capturing Isigny, with the aid of naval gunfire, the 29th cut across the Elle Riv-
er and inched slowly and painfully toward St. Lo, fighting bitterly in the hedgerows of
Normandy.
These hedgerows had been planted centuries earlier by the Norman farmers to help as pro-
tection from the harsh wind and rains blowing inland from the English Channel. The hedge-
rows were an extremely dense, fence-like growth of vegetation growing at intervals across
generally more open terrain, sometimes as little as 30 or 40 yards apart. They consisted
of vines, trees, thick brush, bushes, and other bramble, usually 8 to 10 feet thick, and up
to 15 feet high. Sometimes, a line of this growth would be on top of several feet of solid,
built-up earth. Also, these hedgerows might be on either side of a sunken-in road.
Against such terrain, the 29th and other 1st Army divisions inched painfully forward.
Obviously, such countryside offered a distinct advantage to the defender, and often, a small
group of Germans, well dug-in and concealed, could hold off a much larger force of Americ-
ans for a lengthy period of time. Air support was of limited value, since the opposing
sides were often too close to each other, and so the risk of hitting our own troops. Often,
the GIs couldn't see beyond the next hedgerow.
The 29th, slowly inching forward against very tough opposition, bore the brunt of the
heaviest fighting for the key town of St. L6. In two days, the 29th sustained 1,000 casual-
ties, and the 35th Infantry Division almost as many. It was some of the most bitter, frust-
rating, and costly fighting that American troops have ever experienced. One hill on the
way to St. L8 was very appropriately dubbed "Purple Heart Hill." In and around St. L6 were
two elite German divisions, the 3rd Parachute and 352nd Infantry, the latter of which had
opposed the landings at Omaha Beach.
Major Tom Howie, who had distinguished himself for gallantry in the fierce attack on
this important town, was killed just outside of it. He had wanted to lead his men into
St. L, and they saw that his wish came true. When St. Lo finally fell on 18 July 1944,
the 29th's victorious columns included a lone ambulance--containing the flag-draped body
of the Major of St. L6.
After St. L6, the 29th joined in the battle for Vire. The Germans resisted tenaciously,
but the town fell on 7 August.
Altogether, in Normandy the 29th lost some 2,500 men, had another 8,000 wounded, and al-
most 200 missing in action'
After all this, turning 200 miles into the western tip of Brittany, the 29th, along with
the 2nd and 8th Infantry Divisions, the 2nd and 5th Ranger Battalions, and French Forces of
the Interior, attacked the fortified port city of Brest. It was during this fighting that
the 29th had another Medal of Honor winner, Staff Sergeant Sherwood Hallman, 175th Infantry
Regiment, at Brest, 13 September 1944.
Realizing that an important German position must be neutralized without delay, Sgt Hall-
man ordered his squad to cover his movements by fire while he advanced alone to a point
from which he could make an assault.
Without hesitating the sergeant leaped over a hedgerow into a sunken road, the central








point of the German defenses which was known to contain a machine-gun position and at least
30 riflemen.
Firing his carbine and hurling grenades, Sgt Hallman, unassisted, killed or wounded 4
Germans, then ordered the remainder to surrender. Immediately, 12 Germans gave up, and the
position was shortly secured by the remainder of his company.
Seeing the surrender of this position, about 75 of the enemy in the vicinity surrendered,
yielding a defensive organization which his entire battalion had been unable to take.
This single act of heroism resulted in the immediate advance of the entire battalion a-
bout 2,000 yards to a position from which Fort Keranroux was taken.
Very unfortunately, Sgt Hallman's award was posthumous, for he died of wounds the follow-
ing day.
In another bitter, lengthy, tedious, and costly battle Brest finally fell after 39 days
of furious fighting against first-rate German troops, including the 2nd Parachute Division.
Over 35,000 Germans were taken prisoner, but it cost the Americans and French 10,000 casua-
lties. The 29th had 624 men killed in action.
After a rest in the fields of Brittany, the 29th was entrained clear across northern
France, through Belgium, and then attacked through the extreme southeast corner of Holland.
The division took the cities of Maastricht and Kerkrade, before hitting the Siegfried Line.
On 29 September 1944, the 29th went into position in the Siegfried Line, relieving the
mighty 2nd Armored Division between Gangelt and Teveren. The 29th, after battling in the
enclosed hedgerow terrain for so long, soon felt the sharp consciousness of exposure to the
enemy in the flat terrain of the Rhineland. The region was broken only by draws and patch-
es of woods. And, for the first time, the 29th was in the enemy's homeland. At places
like Schierwaldenrath, Breberen, and Hatterath Woods the Blue and Gray saw some bitter com-
bat against crack German troops.
Then, there was the so-called furious battle for the Aachen Gap in which the 29th fought
in conjunction with such famous units as the 1st and 30th Infantry Divisions, and in which
the Germans mounted repeated vicious counterattacks. The city of Aachen was taken by the
1st Infantry Division on 21 October 1944.
On 30 October, the 29th was relieved by the newly arrived 102nd Infantry Division, and
prepared for the assault to the Roer River.
The U.S. 9th Army assault to the Roer, mid-November-into December 1944, was some of the
most bitter fighting on the Western Front. Setterich, Siersdorf, Durboslar---all towns on
the way to the Roer that had to be assaulted in furious combat that meant heavy losses for
the 29th as well as for the Germans. So bitterly did the Germans hang on to Durboslar,
that they had to be blasted out by air strikes. In Putzdorf, though, the Germans had an
active concentration of tanks and struck out with them right and left in attempting to re-
take Aldenhoven and Niedermerz. Artillery was called upon to break up these attacks. Al-
though Aldenhoven was secured, the enemy clung to Niedermerz throughout 20 November. Art-
illery concentrations were required that night, and house clearing by the infantry the next
day, before the Germans gave in. Around 300 POWs were taken, almost all of them from cellars
Almost every day there was at least one large enemy counterattack. On the night of 25-
26 November, the Germans bombed Bourheim in a prelude to their last fierce attack in that
area.
Meanwhile, tw: miles further north, another battle raged at Koslar. 22 November was a
day of slow, hard fighting in rain and mud. That night a German counterattack was broken up.
Next, came Kirchberg. There seemed no end to it for the tired, dirty, battered men of
the 29th. But, with the capture of this town, the last sizeable enemy force was finally
driven across the Roer.
From 1 October-31 December 1944, the 29th lost over 700 men-killed in action and died
of wounds.
From 8 December 1944-23 February 1945, the valiant 29th was one of the 9th Army divis-
ions which helped hold the line at the Roer River, while the Battle of the Bulge raged fur-
ther to the south.
Finally, the attack across the Roer jumped-off on 23 February 1945. Against heavy res-
istance the assault carried the 29th through Jilich, Broich, and Immerath, and then into
the textile manufacturing city of M6nchen-Gladbach by 1 March. Up to this time, this was
the largest German city taken by the Western Allies, with a population of 200,000 people.








During March 1945, the 29th rested and rehabilitated.
In early-April, the 116th Infantry Regiment, which had been cited on Omaha Beach, was
attached to the 75th Infantry Division to help clear up the northern side of the Ruhr Pock-
et. The rest of the 29th advanced across north-central Germany toward the Elbe River.
On 21 April, some resistance was met at Grabau, but this was quickly overcome.
The Germans had brought down some of their divisions from Norw-uy in a futile attempt to
bolster their defenses in these closing days of the Third Reich. One of these divisions,
the 160th Infantry, offered some spirited, though short-lived resistance near Dannenberg,
as the 29th approached the Elbe. However, by the end of the day, the 24th, over 1,600 pris-
oners had been taken.
The toughest opposition during this advance came from scattered anti-personnel and anti-
tank minefields, and from mines laid in the roads.
By 24 April, the 115th and 116th Infantry Regiments had reached the Elbe, with the 84th
Infantry Division to the south, and the British 5th Infantry Division on the north.
In the meantime, the 175th Infantry Regiment had been detached to help clear out a stub-
born group of Germans in the Klotze Forest.
During the month of April 1945, the 29th had 55 men killed in action, 140 wounded, and
2 men missing.
After V-E Day, 8 May 1945, the Blue and Gray Division was assigned military government
duty in the Bremen area of northwest Germany, along the coast.
The 29th returned to the United States in January 1946, and was demobilized. Only 2
other U.S. Army divisions, the 3rd and 4th Infantry, had lost more men than the 29th, a
really great division. What a sacrifice it had made'

Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor--2 Casualties: Total Battle Deaths--4,824
Distinguished Unit Citations---' Killed In Action- 3,887
Distinguished Service Crosses-44 Wounded -15,541
Silver Stars 854 Missing --347
Captured -85
Total Casualties-- 20,620
* One each to the 115th and ll6th Infantry Regiments--D-Day, Normandy






1 WWII


29TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Blue and Gray"


JUNE 1944
6 June 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111
11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
7 June 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 50 220*approx. 420 men
8 June 41111111111111111l11111111111111i i1111 40
9 June 11111111111111111111 22
10 June 1111111111111111111111 22
11 June 1111111111 10
12 June 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 44
13 June 1111111111111111111111111111111111 34
14 June 111111
15 June 11
16 June 1111111111111111111111111111111111111 40
17 June 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 49
18 June 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 80
19 June 1111111111111111111111111 25
20 June 111111
21 June 1111111
22 June 1111111111111 13
23 June 1111
24 June 1111111111 10
25 June 11111111111111111 17
26 June 111111111111111 16
27 June 111
28 June 11
29 June 111111111 9
30 June 11111111111 11
74~2






2 WWII


29TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Blue and Gray"

JULY 1914 AUGUST 1944
1 July 11111111111111111111 20 1 Aug 1111111111111111111111111111111111111 37
2 July 11111111111 11 2 Aug 111111111111111111111111111 27
3 July 1111111 3 Aug 1111111111111111 16
4 July 1111 4 Aug 111111111111111111111 21
5 July 1 5 Aug 1111111111111111 16
6 July 11111111 8 6 Aug 1111111111111111 16
8 July 11111 7 Aug 11111111111111111111111111111111111 35
9 July 111 8 Aug 11113111111111111111111111111111111 37
10 July 1 9 Aug 1111111111111111111111 22
11 July 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 56 10 Aug 111111111111111111111 21
12 July 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 11 55 11 Aug 11111111111111111 17
13 July 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 53 12 Aug 1111111111111111111111111111 28
14 July 11111111 8 13 Aug 111
15 July 11111111111111111111111111111111111111 38 14 Aug 111111111111 12
16 July 111111111111111111111111111111111111 36 15 Aug 111
17 July 111111111111111i11111111111111111 111 42 16 Aug 11
18 July 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111 43 17 Aug 1
19 July 11111111111111111111 20 24 Aug 1
20 July 111111 25 Aug 11111111111111111111111111111 29
21 July 11 26 Aug 111111111111111111111111 25
23 July 1 27 Aug 111111111111111111111111111111111111 36
24 July 1 28 Aug 1111111111111111111111 22
26 July 11 29 Aug 111111111111111111 18
27 July 111 30 Aug 1111111111111111111111 22
28 July 1111 31 Aug 111111111111111 15
29 July 1111111111111111 16 482
30 July 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
111111111111111111111111 85
31 July 1111111111111111111111111111111111111 37
568






3 WWii


29TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Blue and Gray"

SEPTEMBER 1944 OCTOBER 1944 NOVEMBER 1944
1 Sept 11111111111111111 18 1 Oct 1 1 Nov 1
2 Sept 11111111111 11 2 Oct 111 2 Nov 1
3 Sept 1111111111111111111 19 3 Oct 1 6 Nov 1
4 Sept 1111 4 Oct 1111111111111 13 7 Nov 1
5 Sept 111111 5 Oct 1111111 9 Nov 1
6 Sept 111 6 Oct 111111 13 Nov 11
7 Sept 1111111 7 Oct 1111111111 10 16 Nov 1111111111111111 16
8 Sept 111111111 9 8 Oct 1 17 Nov 111111111111111111111111 24
9 Sept 11111111111111111 17 9 Oct 11 18 Nov 111111111111111111111111111111111 33
10 Sept 11111 10 Oct 11111 19 Nov 1111111111111 13
11 Sept 1111 11 Oct 11 20 Nov 1111111111111111111111111111111111111 37
12 Sept 111111111111111111111111111111 30 13 Oct 111111111111 12 21 Nov 11111111111111111111 20
13 Sept 111111111111111111111111111111 30 14 Oct 11111 22 Nov 111111111111111111111 21
14 Sept 11111111111111111111111 24 15 Oct 1111 23 Nov 11111111111 11
15 Sept 1111111 16 Oct 1111 24 Nov 1111111111111111 16
16 Sept 1111111111111 13 17 Oct 111 25 Nov 1111111111 10
17 Sept 11111111111111111111111 23 18 Oct 1111 26 Nov 111111111111111 15
18 Sept 11 19 Oct 11 27 Nov 111111111 9
19 Sept 11111 20 Oct 1 28 Nov 1
20 Sept 1111 21 Oct 1111
21 Sept 1 22 Oct 1
22 23 Oct 11
24 Oct 1
25 Oct 1
29 Oct 1111111111 10
30 Oct 11
107






4 WWII


29TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Blue and Gray"

DECEMBER 1944 JANUARY 1945 FEBRUARY 1945 MARCH 1945
1 Dec 111 1 Jan 1 21 Feb 111 1 Mar 11
3 Dec 111111111111111 15 4 Jan 1 22 Feb 11111 2 Mar 1
4 Dec 111 9 Jan 11 23 Feb 111111111111111111111111111111111 33 3 Mar 1
5 Dec 11 13 Jan 1 24 Feb 11111111111 11 4 Mar 1
6 Dec 11 22 Jan 1 25 Feb 111111111111111 15 11 Mar 1
8 Dec 1111111111111111 16 25 Jan 1 26 Feb 11 20 Mar 1
9 Dec 111111 27 Jan 1 27 Feb 11 24 Mar 1
10 Dec 1 28 Jan 1 28 Feb 1111111 8
14 Dec 11
16 Dec 1 9 7
27 Dec 1
29 Dec 1
30 Dec 1
54
















5 WWl

29TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Blue and Gray"


APRIL 1945 MAY 1945
4 Apr 1111 28 May 1
5 Apr 111 1
6 Apr 1
21 Apr 111111
22 Apr 111
23 Apr 11
24 Apr 1111111111 10
30 Apr 11
31














29TH INFANTRY DIVISION'S
*bloodiest day 6 June 1944
bloodiest month June 1944
2nd bloodiest day 30 July 1944
3rd 18 June 1944
4th -11 July 1944
5th 12 July 1944
Total battle deaths 1-,736
2,555 are listed=53.9% KIA-3,870
















30TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Old Hickory"

Originally-Tennessee, North and South Carolina National Guard

Activated (WW II)-16 September 1940

Returned To United States-19 August 1945

Inactivated-25 November 1945

Battle Credits, World War II: Normandy Northern France-Belgium Siegfried Line
Ardennes Rhineland North-Central Germany
Days In Combat-282

Commanding General (During Combat, WW II):
Maj-Gen Leland S. Hobbs September 1942-September 1945

Combat Chronicle: The 30th Infantry Division, in World War II, arrived in England on
22 February 1944, and trained until the first part of June.
The 30th entered the fighting in Normandy on 15 June 1944, D-plus 9, and met difficult
opposition as soon as the leading squads had crept past the line of the railroad leading
east from Carentan. Among the 30th's first opponents in the bloody fighting in the hedge-
rows were elements of the 275th and 352nd Infantry and 17th SS Panzer Grenadier Divisions.
When the men were halted by the inevitable burp of a machine-pistol or chatter of a mach-
ine-gun from the next hedgerow, German mortar shells seemed to arrive with deadly prompt-
ness. The best bet was to keep trying to advance, a point which battalion commanders drum-
med into their men on which success depended. Enemy counterattacks coming when men were
tired and their ranks depleted, were often more dangerous than when the Americans launched
their attacks.
The last half of June 1944 was plenty bloody enough for the 30th in the hedgerows of
Normandy, but July was the most costly month of the division's entire fighting in Europe.
Old Hickory fought some of the best divisions in the entire German Army. Divisions such
as the crack Panzerlehr which made an attack on 13 July, and which for a week the 30th
made slow intermittent progress against. In the first seven days of the Vire River area
attack, 7-13 July, the 30th lost 3,200 officers and men in dead, wounded, and missing:
Then there was the 14th Parachute Regiment of the German 5th Parachute Division. On 16
July, the strapping German paratroopers appeared in savage counterattacks, supported by
tanks and backed up by exceptionally heavy artillery fire. The 120th Infantry Regiment
massacred about a company of them in the open as they crossed its field of fire. There
was the elite 2nd Panzer Division which, lavishly equipped with tanks and many other types
of weapons and vehicles, was just as formidable of an opponent as either the German para-
troopers or the SS troops. Against all these formations the 30th more than held its own,
taking a heavy toll of the enemy in return for its own high casualties.
In mid-July 1944, although the 30th didn't actually enter the key town of St. L8, the
division played a vital role in the overall battle, with the town falling to the 29th Inf-
antry Division and the 113th Cavalry Group on 18 July.
Then, after an Allied high-level saturation bombing behind the German lines in which
some of the bombs accidentally fell in the 30th's zone and killed 64 men, an American
breakthrough was achieved beginning on 25 July 1944, and the 30th helped spearhead it. The
attack slowly gained in momentum and a number of German divisions were very badly mauled








in the most bitter combat. However, the 3 weeks of fighting between the assault across
the Vire and the capture of Tessy had provided a sustained nightmare of losses. There
were many cases where, three days after a replacement had reported to the rear echelon,
he would be stricken off the division roster---evacuated by the clearing station or dead.
Advancing to the vicinity of Mortain, the 30th relieved the equally great 1st Infantry
Division on 6 August. The 30th shortly found itself in a very fight for its survival.
On the very next day, the Germans struck with an unusually strong counterblow with 4
of their very best divisions--the 1st and 2nd SS Panzer and the 2nd and 116th Panzer.
The object of this attack was to cut through to Avranches on the coast and trap a large
part of General Patton's 3rd Army which had already begun moving into Brittany and fanning
out to the Loire River.
On the northern side of the attack the 116th Panzer was contained by the 4th Infantry
Division. The three other German divisions did well, at first. Numerous U.S. forward
positions were overrun and a battalion headquarters was surrounded. The 2nd Panzer raced
to Juvigny, but then came under very heavy artillery fire. The 1st SS Panzer was in the
center of the attack. At the southern end, the 2nd SS Panzer "Das Reich" swept through
Mortain and pushed toward St. Hilaire, but was thwarted by the heroic resistance of the
30th Infantry Division. The brunt of the onslaught fell upon the 1st Battalion, 117th
Infantry Regiment. It threw every man into the line, stemmed the attack, and was later
cited. One group of men on a high hill were cut-off for 5 days but refused all demands
to surrender. The 35th Infantry Division and combat commands of the 2nd and 3rd Armored
Divisions were moved into the battle to help out the hard-pressed 30th, and after a week
of violent fighting, the Germans gave up the idea and began to withdraw. They never
threatened to touch the sea again. The 30th lost some 1,800 men killed, wounded, captured,
and missing. The Germans lost over 100 tanks. Their infantry losses were unknown, but
they were, no doubt, in accordance with their high losses in tanks and other equipment.
The Old Hickory Division didn't rest long. It took Reuilly, crossed the Seine, and
drove on through Peronne, Cambrai, Valenciennes, and Tournai, the region of so much heavy
fighting in World War I. In September, the 30th continued on eastward through Belgium,
and into the Dutch panhandle of extreme southeastern Holland. There had been localized
opposition, but at best by disorganized groups of Germans lost in the shuffle. It was a
time of rapid motorized pursuit. However, in southeast Holland, there was some fierce
action around Valkenburg.
As the 30th reached the Siegfried Line in extreme western Germany, resistance stiffened
a great deal. In fact, the Germans soon contested every yard of ground.
The assault to crash the Siegfried Line began, for the 30th, on 2 October 1944. The
30th, in the bitterest type of combat against the 3rd Panzer Grenadier and elements of the
116th Panzer Divisions, broke through at Palemberg and Rimburg and, by 16 October, had made
contact with the 1st Infantry Division and helped encircle the city of Aachen. Fighting
alongside the 30th in this vicious battle was the valiant Norwegian-American 99th Infantry
Battalion. One of the hottest spots in this area was the town of Wurselen where the Ger-
mans conducted a series of savage counterattacks. Their artillery was also 'uncanny.
It was in this drawn-out battle for Wurselen that the 30th had one of its 6 Medal of Honor
winners of the war, Staff Sergeant Freeman V. Horner, Company K, lth Infantry Regiment,
16 November 1944.
S/Sgt Horner and other members of his company were attacking Wurselen against stubborn
resistance, when machine-gun fire from houses on the edge of the town pinned them in flat,
open terrain 100 yards from their objective. As they lay in the field, enemy artillery
observers directed fire upon them, causing serious casualties.
Realizing that the machine-guns must be eliminated in order to permit the company to ad-
vance from its precarious position, Sgt Horner voluntarily stood up with his submachine-gun
and rushed into the teeth of concentrated fire, burdened by a heavy load of ammunition and
hand grenades. Just as he reached a position of seeming safety, he was fired on by a mach-
ine-gun which had remained silent up to that time. He cooly wheeled in his fully exposed
position while bullets barely missed him and killed two enemy gunners with a single, devas-
tating burst. He turned to face the fire of the other 2 machine-guns and, dodging fire as
he ran, charged the two positions 50 yards away. Demoralized by their inability to hit the
intrepid infantryman, the enemy abandoned their guns and took cover in the cellar of the







house they occupied. Sgt Homer busted into the building, hurled 2 grenades down the
cellar stairs, and called out for the Germans to surrender. Four men gave themselves up.
By his extraordinary courage, Sgt Horner eliminated 3 enemy machine-gun positions, kill-
ed or captured 7 Germans, and cleared the path for his company's successful assault on
Wurselen.
After a rest period, the Old Hickory took part in the U.S. 9th Army's assault to the
Roer River. It advanced to the Inde River at Altdorf, 28 November 1944, and, fighting on
the flat Cologne Plain, did very well and reached the Roer at a total cost of around 225 men
killed and 1,058 wounded. However, units on either side of the 30th, notably thie29th Inf-
antry and 2nd Armored Divisions, sustained very heavy losses in this battle. After the push
to the Roer, the 30th received another rest period. But not for long.
On 17 December 1944, Old Hickory raced to the south into eastern Belgium to help stop
the onrushing Germans. The Battle of the Bulge was on in full fury.
There then followed one of the proudest chapters in the 30th Infantry Division's history;
the defeat of the Ist SS "Leibstandarte" Panzer Division, "Hitler's Own." This elite and
ruthlessly fanatical outfit had managed to thread its way through weak spots in the American
lines and for one week was on the rampage--until stopped by the 30th in some of the most
bitter fighting of the war at a town called Stavelot. Inspite of the intense cold, the
young, fanatical SS troopers waded across the icy Ambleve River in an attempt to get at the
GIs. They never made it, and were slaughtered in their efforts, although one comparatively
small group did manage to establish a small bridgehead on the Americans' side of the river.
The Germans quickly began an attack from out of this foothold, but the Americans rallied and
drove them back. One courageous and rather amazing action was that of Staff Sergeant Paul
L. Bolden, Company I, 120th Infantry Regiment, 23 December 1944.
When his company was pinned down by heavy automatic and rifle fire from a house 200 yards
ahead, he voluntarily attacked it. Sgt Bolden and another soldier moved forward into a hail
of bullets to eliminate this German strongpoint. Crawling forward, the pair finally reach-
ed the house. Sgt Bolden was under a window, and his comrade across the street where he
could deliver covering fire.
In rapid succession, Sgt Bolden hurled a fragmentation grenade and a white phosphorus
grenade into the building. Then, fully realizing he faced tremendous odds, he rushed to
the door, threw it open, and fired into 35 SS troopers who were trying to reorganize them-
selves after the havoc wrought by the grenades. Twenty Germans were killed by his sub-mach-
ine-gun before he was struck in the shoulder, chest, and stomach by part of a burst which
killed the other soldier across the street.
Sgt Bolden withdrew from the house, waiting for the surviving Germans to come out and
surrender. When none appeared, he summoned his ebbing strength and, overcoming extreme
pain, boldly walked back into the house, firing as he went. He had killed the remaining
15 enemy soldiers, when his ammunition ran out: Sgt Bolden survived his wounds to later
receive the Medal of Honor.
The 30th took care of its share of the German counteroffensive so effectively that the
Germans, convinced that no ordinary infantry division could treat them that way, began call-
ing it "Roosevelt's SS troops."
Confident of victory, the SS fanatics had driven themselves almost as ruthlessly as they
had treated the civilians and prisoners whose mutilated bodies lay stiff in the snow near
Malmedy. Among other losses, the 1st SS lost 92 tanks and had 2,500 men killed.
The 30th then participated in the 1st Army counteroffensive. A particular tough action
in this phase of the battle was at Thirimont, 13-16 January 1945, against the formidable 3rd
Parachute Division. By 26 January, the 30th had reached a point two miles south of St. Vith,
before being moved back to an assembly area near Lierneux.
The last great battle of the winter campaign, the assault across the Roer, finally began
during the pre-dawn hours of 23 February 1945. It was long overdue. For almost 3 months
American sentries had glared across the river from their outposts on the west bank.
At 2:45 A.M. on the 23rd, the artillery commenced pounding the Germans in a terrific 45
minute barrage. The 30th then crossed the Roer, some men on a foot-bridge built by the eng-
ineers and some in assault boats. So heavy had been the artillery fire and so rapid the ad-
vance of the U.S. infantry, that most of the Germans on the opposite side of the Roer had
to be dragged from their cellars. The German 363rd Infantry Division was soon finished as








an effective fighting force, but some trouble was provided by the 9th Panzer Division.
By 6 March 1945, surrounded at last by friendly troops, Old Hickory moved on back to the
area where the Belgian-Dutch-German borders meet for rest and rehabilitation. The 30th
had been picked to help spearhead the 9th Army's assault crossing of the Rhine River.
The assault commenced on the night of 24 March 1945. The 30th and 79th Infantry Divis-
ions led the way for the 9th Army, the 30th crossing at Biderich. Opposition, initially,
was sporadic since the Germans were caught by surprise. But on 27 March, the 30th ran in-
to some fierce resistance put up by the 116th Panzer Division between Dorsten and Haltern.
Bypassing along the northern edge of the Ruhr, the 30th continued on eastward into the
province of Westphalia, mopping-up pockets of German resistance. Fierce opposition was
met in and around the storybook town of Hamelin in early-April, and the ancient, medieval
town was blasted by artillery fire.
The 30th then proceeded on eastward, capturing the sizeable town of Hildesheim, 11 Ap-
ril, and the next day reached the city of Braunschweig (Brunswick) where it ran into mod-
erate resistance of no lengthy duration.
The advance continued toward Tangerminde, on the Elbe, which the 5th Armored Division
had already reached. The 30th then turned sharply south through Wolmirstedt, and, with
the aid of the mighty 2nd Armored Division, cleared the city of Magdeburg in 24 hours.
During the 3 weeks between the fall of Magdeburg and V-E Day, 8 May 1945, the 30th cap-
tured 7,468 prisoners---as many as it had taken in its first 3 months of combat in 1944.
The Russians had been contacted at Grinewald, and after a short occupational period,
the 30th then began leaving for home, arriving on 19 August 1945.
The 30th Infantry Division in World War II had an unusually high esprit de corps, and
was one of the finest American divisions of the war.

Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor--6 Casualties: Total Battle Deaths-3,547
Distinguished Unit Citations--8 Killed In Action-- 3,003
Distinguished Service Crosses-50 Wounded ----13,376
Silver Stars --. 1,773 Missing 903
Captured 1,164
Total Casualties--18,446
Other 30th Infantry Division Medal of Honor winners in World War II: Killed in action *
1st Lt Raymond 0. Beaudoin, 119th Inf Rgt, 6 April 1945, Hamelin, Germany
Sgt Francis S. Currey, 120th Inf Rgt, 21 December 1944, Malmedy, Belgium
Pvt Harold G. Kiner, 117th Inf Rgt, 2 October 1944, near Palemberg, Germany
S/Sgt Jack J. Pendleton, 120th Inf Rgt, 12 October 1944, Bardenberg, Germany





1 WWII

30TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Old Hickory"

JUNE 1944 JULY 1944
15 June 111111111111111111111111111 27 2 July 11
16 June 11 4 July 111
17 June 11 6 July 1
18 June 11111 7 July 1111111111111111111111111 25
19 June 111 8 July 1111111111111111111111 22
20 June 1111 9 July 1111111111111111111111111111111111111 37
21 June 1 10 July 1111111111111111111111111 25
22 June 111 11 July 11111111111111111111111111111111111111 38
23 June 1 12 July 1111111111111111111111111111111111111 37
24 June 1 13 July 1111111111111111111111111111111 31
25 June 1 14 July ll1111111111111 1111111 23
26 June 1 15 July 11111111111111111111111 23
27 June 1 16 July 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 43
29 June 1 17 July 111111111111111111111111 24
18 July 111111111111111111 18
53 19 July 1111111111111 13
20 July 1111111
21 July 11111111 8
22 July 1111111
23 July 111
24 July 111111111111111 15
25 July llllllll1111111111111111111111111111111111111111 48
26 July l1111111111111111111111111111111111111111 41
27 July 11111111111111ll 11111111111111111 33
28 July 1l1111111111111111111111 26
29 July l111111111111111111 23
30 July 111111111111111111111111111 27
31 July 11111111l11111111111111111111111 36
639





2 WW11


30TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Old Hickory"


AUGUST 1944 SEPTEMBER 1944
1 Aug 1111111111111111111111 22 1 Sept 1111
2 Aug 111111111 9 2 Sept 1
3 Aug 1111111 5 Sept 1
4 Aug 111111 10 Sept 11
5 Aug 11111 12 Sept 1111
6 Aug 1111111111 10 13 Sept 111111
7 Aug 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 60* 14 Sept 111
8 Aug 11111111111111111111111111111111111 35 approx. 15 Sept 11
9 Aug 111111111111111111111111 24 110men 16 Sept 111111
10 Aug 11111111111111111111111111 26 17 Sept 11
11 Aug 111111111111111111 18 18 Sept 11111
12 Aug 1111111111111 13 19 Sept 1111111111 10
13 Aug 111111111 9 20 Sept 111111
14 Aug 1111111 24 Sept 1
15 Aug 1111 27 Sept 1
16 Aug 1111111 30 Sept 1
17 Aug 111
18 Aug 11111111 8 55
19 Aug 1
21 Aug 1111111
22 Aug 111111111 9
23 Aug 11111111 8
24 Aug 1
25 Aug 1
27 Aug 111111111111 12
28 Aug 1111111111111111111111 22
29 Aug 111111111111111111111 21
30 Aug 1
31 Aug 1111
360






3 wwII

30TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Old Hickory"


OCTOBER 1944 NOVEMBER 1944
2 Oct 111111111111111111111 21 3 Nov 1
3 Oct 1111111111111111 16 4 Nov 1
4 Oct 1111111111111111111111111 25 5 Nov 1
5 Oct 111111111 9 7 Nov 1
6 Oct 1111111111111 13 8 Nov 11
7 Oct 111 9 Nov 1
8 Oct 111111111111111111111 21 11 Nov 1111
9 Oct 111111111 9 12 Nov 11
10 Oct 1111111 16 Nov 111111111111111 15
11 Oct 11111111 8 17 Nov 1111111111 10
12 Oct 1111111111111 13 18 Nov 11111
13 Oct 11 19 Nov 111111111 9
14 Oct 1111 20 Nov 1111111
15 Oct 111 21 Nov 1111111
16 Oct 1111111111111111111 19 22 Nov 11111111111 11
17 Oct 11111111 8 23 Nov 111111111111 12
18 Oct 1111111 24 Nov 11111111 8
19 Oct 111 25 Nov 1
20 Oct 11111 26 Nov 11111
21 Oct 11 27 Nov 1111111111111 13
22 Oct 11 28 Nov 1111111
23 Oct 1 30 Nov 1
24 Oct 11 124
26 Oct 1
27 Oct 1
28 Oct 111
29 Oct 1111
31 Oct 11
214





4 WWII


30TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Old Hickory"


DECEMBER 1944 JANUARY 1945
1 Dec 1 2 Jan 1
2 Dec 1 3 Jan 1
5 Dec 1 7 Jan 1
9 Dec 11 11 Jan 1
14 Dec 1 12 Jan 1
17 Dec 1 13 Jan 111111111111111111111111111111111111 36
18 Dec 1 14 Jan 1111111111111111111111111 25
19 Dec 111111111111111 15 15 Jan 1111111111111111111111111111 28
20 Dec 11111 16 Jan 11111111111111111 17
21 Dec 111111111111111111111111111 27 17 Jan 111
22 Dec 111111 18 Jan 11
23 Dec 1111 19 Jan 1111111111 10
24 Dec 11111111 8 20 Jan 111111
25 Dec 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 50 21 Jan 111111111 9
26 Dec 11 22 Jan 1
28 Dec 1 23 Jan 1111
29 Dec 11 24 Jan 1
30 Dec 1 26 Jan 1
31 Dec 11 28 Jan 11
131 150





5 WWII

30TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Old Hickory"


FEBRUARY 1945 MARCH 1945 APRIL 1945 MAY 1945
8 Feb 1 1 Mar 111 2 Apr 1111 3 May 1
10 Feb 1 2 Mar 1 3 Apr 11111111111 11
14 Feb 1 9 Mar 1 4 Apr 11
19 Feb 1111 10 Mar 1 6 Apr 1111
22 Feb 1 13 Mar 1 8 Apr 11
23 Feb 111111111111111111111111 24 15 Mar 1 11 Apr 1
24 Feb 1111111111111 13 18 Mar 1 12 Apr 11111
25 Feb 111111111111 12 23 Mar 11 13 Apr 1111
26 Feb 111 24 Mar 111111111111111111 18 14 Apr 111111
27 Feb 11111111111111111111 20 25 Mar 11111111111111 16 15 Apr 11
28 Feb 11 26 Mar 111111111111111111 18 17 Apr 11111
82 27 Mar 1111 18 Apr 1111
28 Mar 111 19 Apr 1
29 Mar 1 29 Apr 1
31 Mar 1
72







30TH INFANTRY DIVISION'S
-tbloodiest day 7 August 1944
bloodiest month July 1944
2nd bloodiest day 25 December 1944
3rd 25 July 1944
4th 16 July 1944
5th 26 July 1944
Total battle deaths 3,525
1,933 are listed=54.8? KIA-2,992




















31ST INFANTRY DIVISION "Dixie"

Originally-Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi National Guard
Activated (WW II)-25 November 1940
Returned To United States-12 December 1945
Inactivated-21 December 1945
Battle Credits, World War II: Northern New Guinea Morotai Mindanao
Commanding Generals (During Combat, WW II):
Maj-Gen John C. Persons November 1940-September 1944
Maj-Gen Clarence A. Martin September 1944-Inactivation

Combat Chronicle: The 31st Infantry Division, as is obviously indicated, consisted
of a great many men from the deep south, but long before the war was over it also
had many men in its ranks from northern states. Differences about the Civil War and
sometimes resulting fist-fights were long resolved and forgotten by the time the div-
ision got ready to go overseas. The 31st, after rigorous training at various camps
in the United States, including Camp Blanding, Florida, left the Hampton Roads, Vir-
ginia, port of embarkation on 12 March 1944.
The 31st arrived in Oro Bay, New Guinea, on 24 April 1944, and engaged in amphib-
ious training prior to entering combat.
The 31st's 124th Infantry Regiment caught a heavy assignment for its first action.
It was sent into the operation around Aitape, northern New Guinea, and had a major
part in breaking the back of the bypassed Japanese 18th Army, as it attempted to bat-
tle its way across the Driniumor River. 31 July 1944, was the 31st's bloodiest day
in this fighting, and losses were fairly heavy. Fighting continued on into early-
August, with the 124th accounting for some 3,000 Japanese.
Meanwhile, the 155th and 167th Infantry Regiments took part in the Wakde-Sarmi
operation, further west on the northern New Guinea coast, relieving the 6th Infantry
Division. Action was much lighter, but still, the two regiments accounted for more
than 1,000 Japanese while on the Maffin Bay perimeter, which guarded a 5th Air Force
airstrip.
On 15 September 1944, the 31st landed on the island of Morotai, while the 1st Mar-
ine and 81st Infantry Divisions assaulted the Palau Islands, further to the north.
Despite a treacherous landing beach, in which even bulldozers sank in the muck, the
Dixies quickly secured a beachhead against light resistance, and seized Pitoe Airdrome.
This action cut-off 20,000 Japanese troops on the larger island of Halmahera, just to
the south.
For seven months the 31st maintained a perimeter defense for the 13th Air Force.
Companies lived in outposts for weeks at a time, supplied by barge and plane. Men
spent their nights on guard in pillboxes, and patrols probed continuously into the
mountainous jungle for any Japanese driven into the interior of the island. In seven
months on Morotai, the 31st killed several thousand Japanese. During the occupation







of Morotai, elements of the division seized Mapia and the Asia Islands to find that
the Japanese had already evacuated from these places.
Then, on 22 April 1945, the 31st, in conjunction with the 24th Infantry Division,
landed on the southern side of the large island of Mindanao, in the southern Philipp-
ines. Moving up along the Sayre Highway and along the Kibawe-Talomo Trail, the 31st
fought the Japanese in head-high cogon grass and in deep rain forests, through knee-
deep mud and torrential rains. The Japanese withdrew into the interior and, as the
24th Division headed east toward the city of Davao, the 31st advanced northward, deep-
er into the wild region of central Mindanao. The Japanese resisted stubbornly, but
were defeated in a firefight at Misinsman on 1 May.
The 31st's bloodiest battle came when it met the Japs below the Maramag Airstrip.
Here, the fanatical enemy had dug-in beneath great tree roots. On 6-7 May 1945, two
battalion-sized attacks by the Americans were repulsed with heavy casualties. In
fact, 6 May 1945, was the 31st's bloodiest day in combat of the war. However, after
a few days, the Americans, supported by strong artillery fire, overran the enemy pos-
itions, and by 12 May, the Japanese had been routed from Colgan Woods. An enemy coun-
terattack was defeated, and the 155th Infantry Regiment then took over the point of
march. The 155th surprised a large group of Japanese sunning themselves along a stream.
In a quick attack the regiment wiped out all 96 of them while losing just one man.
The advance along the Talomo Trail was checked on 16 May 1945, but then continued
by the 167th Infantry Regiment.
The 31st continued on northward against deteriorating resistance by the Japanese
30th Division. The 155th Infantry took the Japanese supply base at Malaybalay, 21
May, and Kalasungay the next day. On 23 May 1945, the 31st contacted the 108th Infan-
try Regiment, 40th Infantry Division which had landed on the northern coast of Mindan-
ao and advanced southward. The 31st then continued in dangerous mopping-up operations.
The division got its one Medal of Honor winner of the war, Corporal Harry R. Harr,
Company D, 124th Infantry Regiment, near Maglamin, Mindanao, 5 June 1945.
When an enemy grenade landed in the midst of a group of men, including himself, he
realized that under the circumstances he couldn't safely throw the unexploded missile.
Corporal Harr covered the grenade with his body, smothering the blast, and heroically
saving the lives of several of his fellow-soldiers at the cost of his own.
The 31st was commended by Lt General Robert L. Eichelberger, commanding the U.S.
8th Army, for its performance on Mindanao.
With the aid of large Filipino guerrilla units, the 31st continued mopping-up oper-
ations in the Agusan River sector along both the Kibawe-Talomo Trail and the Sayre High-
way, from Malaybalay to Valencia, until the end of the war on 14 August 1945. Follow-
ing the Japanese surrender, the 31st concentrated on accepting their capitulation on
Mindanao. The 31st returned home in December 1945.

Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor--1 Casualties: Total Battle Deaths--418
Distinguished Unit Citations-- 3 Killed In Action--- 342
Distinguished Service Crosses--7 Wounded -1,392
Silver Stars 178 Missing- 0
Captured 1
Total Casualties---1,733








31ST INFANTRY DIVISION "Dixie"

JULY 1944 AUGUST 1944 SEPTEMBER 1944 OCTOBER 1944
13 July 11 3 Aug 1111 6 Sept 1 7 Oct 1
14 July 111 4 Aug 1 16 Sept 11 8 Oct 1
15 July 11 5 Aug 11111 17 Sept 1 17 Oct 1
16 July 111 6 Aug 11 18 Sept 1 18 Oct 1
17 July 1 7 Aug 1 22 Sept 111 25 Oct 1
19 July 11 8 Aug 11111 23 Sept 1
20 July 11 11 Aug 1 5
21 July 111 13 Aug 1
22 July 11111 18 Aug 11
29 July 1111 29 Aug 1111
31 July 111111111 9 26
36




NOVEMBER 1944 DECEMBER 1944 JANUARY 1945 APRIL 1945
14 Nov 1 1 Dec 1 6 Jan 11 26 Apr 111111111 9
16 Nov 1111111 4 Dec 1 17 Jan 1 27 Apr 1
17 Nov 1 10 Dec 1 18 Jan 1
S14 Dec 1 27 Jan 11
15 Dec 1 6
18 Dec 1
26 Dec 1
7






2 WWII

31ST INFANTRY DIVISION "Dixie"

MAY 1945 JUNE 1945 JULY 1945 AUGUST 1945
1 May 1 1 June 1 22 July 1 3 Aug 1
6 May 111111111111111111111111111111 30- 2 June 11111 1 9 Aug 1
7 May 1111 approx. 3 June 1 11 Aug 1
8 May 1 60Xmen 4 June 1 16 Aug 1
9 May 1 5 June 111111 4
10 May 1 6 June 1
11 May 11111 7 June 1
15 May 11 8 June 1
17 May 1 9 June 1
20 May 11 12 June 1
21 May 11 13 June 1
22 May 1 16 June 11
23 May 1 17 June 11
25 May 1 18 June 1
27 May 11 19 June 11
29 May 1 20 June 1
30 May 11 22 June 111111
25 June 11
58 26 June 11
27 June 11
28 June 111
43




31ST INFANTRY DIVISION'S
*bloodiest day 6 May 1945
bloodiest month M-ay 1945
2nd bloodiest day 31 July 1944 and 26 April 1945
3rd bloodiest day 16 November 1944
Total battle deaths 418
214 are listed=51.1l KIA-342




















32ND INFANTRY DIVISION "Red Arrow"

Originally-Michigan-Wisconsin National Guard
Activated (WW II)-15 October 1940
Inactivated-28 February 1946 in Japan
Battle Credits, World War II: Papua Northern New Guinea Leyte Luzon
Commanding Generals (During Combat, WW II):
Maj-Gen Edwin F. Harding March 1942-January 1943
Maj-Gen William H. Gill February 1943-Inactivation

Combat Chronicle: The 32nd Infantry Division, the "Red Arrow", earned another nickname in
World War I. It was given to the division by the French--"Les Terribles", when the 32nd
won 4 battle stars, and was the first American division to crack the Hindenburg Line. The
32nd had 2,250 men killed in action, and 11,011 more wounded in that war.
In World War II, the 32nd left the San Francisco port of embarkation on 22 April 1942.
Landing in Adelaide, South Australia, it trained there, and then moved to a camp just out-
side of Brisbane, Queensland.
Most of the 32nd was rushed to southeast New Guinea (Papua), by air in mid-September
1942, when Japanese forces attempted to complete the crossing of the Owen Stanley Mountains,
and threatened the vital Allied base at Port Moresby. At this time, fighting was also rag-
ing on Guadalcanal, as the Japanese tried simultaneously to take both the Solomon Islands
and New Guinea, in preparation for an assault on Australia.
Fighting along the Goldie River, to protect the Australians' right flank, the 32nd for-
ced the Japanese back along the Kokoda Trail, and helped stop the enemy threat to Port More-
sby. The rest of the 32nd was joined on 15 November 1942, by the 2nd Battalion, 126th Inf-
antry Regiment, which had trekked over the mountain range in 49 agonizing days.
Few ordeals in the war can compare with what the 32nd went through to capture the Japan-
ese stronghold at Buna, on the southeast coast of New Guinea. Buna was a miserable plant-
ation area surrounded by stinking swamps, swollen rivers, and the jungle. In it the Japan-
ese had built-up a series of interlocking defense positions, mostly bunkers, and they res-
isted with the utmost tenacity. New to combat, the 32nd had not only to fight the swamps,
jungle, diseases, and the Japanese, but its own inexperience, as well. Large-scale maneuv-
ers were impossible--positions of the opposing sides were often less than 50 yards apart,
and snipers were everywhere. Men fought knee-deep in swamp water, and worse, the Americans
and Australians lacked equipment, enough weapons and ammunition, and enough food. C-rations
were luxuries to be dreamt about. Worst of all, however, was the climate.
In this hot and humid jungle, flooded by torrential rains, every kind of fever and dis-
ease flourished. There was malaria, dengue fever, and tropical dysentary. Men's bodies
were covered by tropical ulcers. The dead decomposed quickly and added to the stench of the
swamps, and the Japanese carried gas masks against the intolerable odor. Entire American
companies were fever-ridden.
The battle for the Buna beachhead had commenced on 19 November 1942. In heavy fighting








the Duropa Plantation was assaulted on 26 November 1942.
The bitter fighting continued unabated throughout December 1942, with 5 December 1942,
being one of the 32nd's bloodiest days of the war. The 127th Infantry Regiment moved up to
Dobodura, and seized evacuated Buna Village, 14 December 1942, after heavy fighting in the
plantation and Simemi Creek bunker area.
The battle for Buna Mission began on 24 December 1942. After very difficult and stren-
uous combat, elements of the 32nd were eventually able to break through on a narrow front
to the sea. Figuring prominently in this success was a German-born Sergeant Hermann Bott-
cher, who, by his outstanding bravery, leadership, skill as a soldier, and repeated volun-
teering for hazardous assignments, helped make this event possible. He was later killed on
Leyte. Sergeant Bottcher left behind a lot of good friends.
Also, figuring greatly in this success to split the Japanese beachhead was Sergeant Ken-
neth E. Gruennert, Company L, 127th Infantry Regiment, 24 December 1942.
On this day Sgt Gruennert was second in command of a platoon with the mission of driving
through the Japanese lines to the beach 600 yards ahead, when within 150 yards of the ob-
jective, the platoon encountered two enemy pillboxes. Sgt Gruennert advanced alone against
the first one, and put it out of action with grenades and rifle fire, killing 3 Japanese.
Seriously wounded in the shoulder, he bandaged his wound under cover of the pillbox, refus-
ing to withdraw to the aid station and leave his men.
With great daring, and under extremely heavy fire, he then attacked the second pillbox.
As he neared it he threw grenades which forced the enemy out where they were easy targets
for his platoon. But before his men could reach him, he was killed by a Jap sniper.
Sgt Gruennert's inspiring valor cleared the way for his platoon which was the first to
attain the beach in this successful effort to split the enemy positions. His actions were
in the highest traditions of the U.S. military. Sgt Gruennert was posthumously awarded the
Medal of Honor.
This action had a great deal to do with breaking the backbone of the Japanese defenses
at Buna. One enemy bunker was destroyed, and then another, as the Japanese were compressed
into an ever smaller area. The 32nd finally took Buna Mission on 2 January 1943, and, with
the fall of Sanananda on 22 January 1943, the campaign was officially over.
Like Guadalcanal, this early campaign in Papua, New Guinea, proved that the Japanese
could be soundly beaten in jungle warfare and, as well, removed the threat of a Japanese
invasion of Australia. The 32nd lost 530 men in the Papuan campaign.
The 32nd then returned to Australia for badly needed rest and rehabilitation.
Nearly a year later, on 2 January 1944, the 126th Infantry Regiment of the 32nd went
back into action at Saidor, on the eastern coast of New Guinea. The 126th was joined by the
128th Infantry Regiment on 19 January 1944. This move was to block Japanese troops who were
retreating further north away from Australian forces, and these two regiments inflicted sev-
ere losses upon them. A junction was made with the Australians on 10 February 1944, and
this operation was completed by mid-April 1944.
By 4 May 1944, a large part of the 32nd had landed on the northern New Guinea coast, at
Aitape. Slight initial enemy resistance in this region eventually gave way to sustained
Japanese action along the Driniumor River. On 5 June 1944, the 127th Infantry Regiment took
the ridge north of Afua.
The 32nd attacked to drive the Japanese back across the Drindarai, and especially heavy
fighting occurred on 11, 22, and 29 July 1944. Until mid-August 1944, fighting continued
by the 32nd and several other U.S. outfits. These were the 112th Cavalry Regiment and large
contingents of the 31st and 43rd Infantry Divisions. The Japanese 18th Army tried desper-
ately to get past Aitape (moving west), and to attack the Allied base at Hollandia. The
Japs never made it, and had over 9,000 men killed in their efforts. In this operation the
32nd had way over 200 men killed in action.
Elements of the 32nd then reinforced the Wakde-Sarmi area of northern New Guinea, furth-
er west of Aitape, 15 August 1944, and the 126th Infantry was detached to reinforce the
31st Infantry Division on Morotai, 16 September 1944. The rest of the 32nd left Aitape,
for Hollandia, and got ready for the Philippines.
The 32nd entered the battle for Leyte, on 14 November 1944, relieving the exhausted 24th








Infantry Division. Going into action along the Pinamopoan-Ormoc Road, the 32nd took Limon,
and smashed the Yamashita Line in bitter hand-to-hand combat. The battle was fought in
precipitous hills with deep mud and torrential downpours, and with tangled forests overhead.
The 32nd battled on Corkscrew and Breakneck Ridges, and it was a lot of bloody fighting.
In fact, 22 November 1944, was the 32nd's most costly day of the entire war.
Heavy fighting raged through the remainder of November 1944, and the division fought fur-
iously for Kilay Ridge, from 29 November-5 December 1944.
The bitter fighting on Leyte continued, and 11 December 1944, was another very costly day.
On the night of 13-14 December, the 32nd was counterattacked along Highway 2, but the Japs
were beaten back.
The Red Arrow linked-up with elements of the 1st Cavalry Division at Lonoy, on 22 Decem-
ber 1944, and this marked the collapse of Japanese resistance in the upper Ormoc Valley.
In 37 days of combat on Leyte, the 32nd had gained just 62 miles. But, in this slow ad-
vance, the division had succeeded in turning the Japanese left flank, and slew 6,700 of them.
In return, 450 men in the 32nd made the supreme sacrifice on Leyte.
Withdrawn from the battle on 4 January 1945, the 32nd rested for just three weeks, and
then moved on to Luzon, for more murderous fighting, landing at Lingayen Gulf, on 27 January
1945.
Pushing northward into the Caraballo Mountains, between the 33rd and 25th Infantry Divis-
ions, the 32nd saw bitter combat along the treacherous Villa Verde Trail, where every other
Japanese soldier seemed to be armed with a machinegun.
February 1945, wasn't too bad for the 32nd, but as March came around the fighting was
bloody, difficult, and drawn-out. It was during this exhausting combat that the 32nd had
several more Medal of Honor winners, one of whom was Pfc Thomas E. Atkins, Company A, 127th
Infantry Regiment, along the Villa Verde Trail, 10 March 1945.
With two companions, he occupied a position on a ridge outside the perimeter defense. At
about 3 A.M., two companies of Japanese attacked with rifles, machineguns, grenades, TNT
charges, and land mines, severely wounding Pfc Atkins, and killing his two comrades. Des-
pite the intense enemy fire, and pain from a deep wound, he held his ground and returned
heavy fire. After the attack was repulsed, he remained in his precarious position to repel
any subsequent assaults instead of returning to the American lines for medical treatment.
The Japanese made repeated fierce attacks, but for 4 hours Pfc Atkins determinedly rem-
ained in his foxhole, bearing the brunt of each assault, and maintaining steady and accur-
ate fire until each charge was hurled back.
By 7 A.M., numerous enemy dead lay in front of his position. He had fired over 400
rounds, all that he and his two dead companions possessed, and had used 3 rifles until each
one had jammed too badly for further operation.
During a lull, he withdrew to secure a rifle and more ammunition, and was persuaded to
remain for medical treatment. While waiting, he saw a Jap within the perimeter and, seiz-
ing a nearby rifle, shot him. A few minutes later, while lying on a litter, he discovered
an enemy group moving up behind his platoon's lines. Despite his severe wound, he sat up,
delivered heavy and accurate rifle fire against the group, and forced them to withdraw.
Pfc Atkins' superb bravery and his determination to hold his post against the main force
of repeated enemy attacks, even though painfully wounded, were major factors in enabling his
fellow soldiers to maintain their lines against a numerically superior enemy. And he lived
to receive his award.
During the rest of March 1945, the 32nd fought rugged battles at Salacsac Pass, and along
the Arboredo and Ambayang Valleys. Hill 159 was taken, 6 April 1945, despite torrential
downpours. The Japanese often had to be buried in their underground foxholes and in caves.
April 1945, was a very costly month for the 32nd. Salacsac Pass finally fell, 10 April,
and clearing operations commenced along the Villa Verde Trail. But there was no let-up to
the bitter, drawn-out fighting in the 32nd's sector of the front. And the division became
increasingly depleted through shortage of adequate replacements for its losses. The 128th
Infantry was, for awhile, down to an effective total strength of some 1,500 men, less than
half of its authorized strength. And the other two infantry regiments weren't in much bet-
ter shape.








The key town of Imugan was finally taken after lengthy and costly fighting, on 28 May
1945. Contact was then made with the 25th Infantry Division near Santa Fe, and this sec-
ured vital Balete Pass, the gateway to the Cagayen River Valley.
In this lengthy, bitter campaign on Luzon, the 32nd helped destroy the rest of the Jap-
anese 2nd Tank Division, and killed some 6,000 Japanese. The 32nd lost 820 men.
The 32nd rested and rehabilitated from 4 June-8 July 1945. Some active elements of the
division mopped-up in the Bauang-Naguilan-Caba-Aringay area.
After this, the 32nd advanced from Anabat, to reduce Japanese defenses in the mountains
of northern Luzon. The Agno River Valley was secured, and Highway 11 was opened in the
Baguio area, as a supply route.
Operations ceased on 14 August 1945, with the Japanese surrender, and the 32nd shipped
out for Japan, for occupational duties, on 20 October 1945. By then, 30 per cent of its
personnel had been overseas for more than 3 years--and the 32nd had piled up more combat
time than any other U.S. division in any theater of World War II--654 days!

Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor--11 Casualties: Total Battle Deaths-2,524
Distinguished Unit Citations-- 14 Killed In Action- 2,108
Distinguished Service Crosses--37 Wounded 6,627
Silver Stars 657 Missing -27
Captured 1
Total Casualties--8,763

* One to the entire 32nd Infantry Division--Papua, New Guinea

Other 32nd Infantry Division Medal of Honor winners in World War II: Killed in action *
1st Sgt Elmer J. Burr, 127th Inf Rgt, 24 December 1942, Buna, Papua, New Guinea
S/Sgt Gerald L. Endl, 128th Inf Rgt, 11 July 1944, near Anamo, northern New Guinea
Pfc David M. Gonzales, 127th Inf Rgt, 25 April 1945, Villa Verde Trail, Luzon
Sgt Leroy Johnson, 126th Inf Rgt, 15 December 1944, near Limon, Leyte
Pvt Donald R. Lobaugh, 127th Inf Rgt, 22 July 1944, near Afua, northern New Guinea
Pfc William A. McWhorter, 126th Inf Rgt, 5 December 1944, on Leyte
Pfc William R. Shockley, 128th Inf Rgt, 31 March 1945, Villa Verde Trail, Luzon
S/Sgt Ysmael R. Villegas, 127th Inf Rgt, 20 March 1945, Villa Verde Trail, Luzon
Pfc Dirk J. Vlug, 126th Inf Rgt, 15 December 1944, near Limon, Leyte






1 WWII


32ND INFANTRY DIVISION "Red Arrow"

OCTOBER 1942 DECEMBER 1942 JANUARY 1943
29 Oct 111 1 Dec 11111111111111 14 1 Jan 111111111111111111 18
3 2 Dec 11111111111111111 17 2 Jan 1111
3 Dec 11111 3 Jan 1
4 Dec 1111111 4 Jan 11111111 8
NOVEMBER 1942 5 Dec 11111111111111111111111111111 29 5 Jan 1
5 Nv 6 Dec 11111 6 Jan 1
5 Nov 11 7 Dec 11111 7 Jan 11
10 Nov 1 8 Dec 1111111 8 Jan 11
1 Nov 9 Dec 1111 9 Jan 1
17 Nov 1 10 Dec 111 10 Jan 1
18 Nov 1 11 Dec 111111 12 Jan 11
19 Nov 111 12 Dec 1 14 Jan 111
20 Nov 11
20 Nov 11 4 Dec 111 15 Jan 1
21 Nov 1111111111111 13
21 Nov 11111 15 Dec 11111 19 Jan 11
22 Nov 111111 16 Dec 111111 20 Jan 1111
23 Nov 111111 17 Dec 111 21 Jan 1
24 Nov 11 18 Dec 1111 22 Jan 1
26 Nov 11111111111111 14 Dec 1111 28 Jan 1
19 Dec 11111 28 Jan 1
27 Nov 1111111
28 Nov 111 20 Dec 1111111111111 13 30 Jan 1
28 Nov 111 2 D
29 Nov 1111 21 Dec 155
22 Dec 1
30 Nov 11111111111 11 24 Dec 111111 8
81 25 Dec 11111111111 11 NOVEMBER 1943
26 Dec 1111111 1 Nov 1
27 Dec 111111 26 Nov 1
28 Dec 111
29 Dec 1111111111111 13 2
30 Dec 1
31 Dec 1111111111111111 16
210




2 WWII



32ND INFANTRY DIVISION "Red Arrow"

JANUARY 1944 MAY 1944 JULY 1944 NOVEMBER 1944
3 Jan 1 3 May 11 1 July 1 7 Nov 1
4 Jan 1 8 May 1 5 July 1 15 Nov 1
7 Jan 1 9 May 1 9 July 1 16 Nov 11111
11 Jan 1 10 May 1 10 July 111111 17 Nov 1111
14 Jan 1 13 May 1 11 July 1111111111111111111111i 23 18 Nov 111111
18 Jan 1 14 May 1 12 July 11 19 Nov 111111111111111111 18
25 Jan 1 19 May 1 13 July 111 20 Nov 11111111111111 14
28 Jan 111111 31 May 111 19 July 11 21 Nov 111111
29 Jan 1 120 July 1 22 Nov 111111111111111111111111111111 30*
14 22 July l1111111 8 23 Nov 1111 approx.
14 24 July 111 24 Nov 1111111111111 13 60tmen
JUNE 1944 25 July 1111 25 Nov 111111111111 12
FEBRUARY 1944 26 July 11111 26 Nov 111
2 June 11 27 July 11 27 Nov 1111111111 10
2 Feb 11 3 June 1 28 July 1 28 Nov 111111111 9
5 Feb 1 4 June 11111111 8 29 July 11111111111111 14 29 Nov 111111111 9
17 Feb 1 5 June 1 31 July 11 30 Nov 111111
18 Feb 1 7 June 1111
19 Feb 11 8 June 1 79 151
20 Feb 1 16 June 1
21 Feb 11 17 June 11 AUGUST 1944
22 Feb 11 21 June 1
23 Feb 1 21 2 Aug 11
24 Feb 1 4 Aug 1
146 Aug 11

5
APRIL 1944
SAp 1 SEPTEMBER 1944
7 Apr 1
19 Apr 1 26 Sept 11
2 2






3 WWII

32ND INFANTRY DIVISION "Red Arrow"


DECEMBER 1944 FEBRUARY 1945 MARCH 1945 APRIL 1945
1 Dec 1111111111111111111111 22 5 Feb 1 1 Mar 1 1 Apr 111
2 Dec 111111111111 12 7 Feb 1 2 Mar 11111 3 Apr 1111
3 Dec 11111 9 Feb 1 3 Mar 11 4 Apr 1
4 Dec 1111 14 Feb 1111 5 Mar 11111111 8 6 Apr 11
5 Dec 111111i 8 21 Feb 1 8 Mar 11111 7 Apr 111111
6 Dec 111111 22 Feb 11111 9 Mar 111 8 Apr 11111111111111 14
7 Dec 11 23 Feb 11 10 Mar 111111 9 Apr 1111
8 Dec 11111 25 Feb 1 11 Mar 11 10 Apr 111111
9 Dec 111111 26 Feb 1 13 Mar 11111 11 Apr 11111111111111111111 20
10 Dec 11111 27 Feb 11 14 Mar 11 12 Apr 11111
11 Dec 1111111111111111 16 19 15 Mar 11111 13 Apr 1111111
12 Dec 11111 16 Mar 11 14 Apr 11111111 8
13 Dec 111111111 9 17 Mar 111111 15 Apr 111
14 Dec 111111111 9 18 Mar 11 16 Apr 11111
15 Dec 11i 19 Mar 1 17 Apr 1111111
16 Dec 1 20 Mar 1111111111 11 18 Apr 111111
17 Dec 1 21 Mar 1111111 19 Apr 1111
18 Dec 1111111111 10 22 Mar 1111 20 Apr 11
19 Dec 11 23 Mar 11111111111 11 21 Apr 111111111111111 15
20 Dec 111111111 9 24 Mar 11111 22 Apr 111
21 Dec 111 25 Mar 1 23 Apr 1111111
22 Dec 1 27 Mar 11111111111111111 17 24 Apr 111111111111 12
24 Dec 1 28 Mar 1111 25 Apr 11i
25 Dec 11 29 Mar 111111111 9 26 Apr 11111111111111111 17
30 Dec 1 30 Mar 111111 27 Apr 11
31 Dec 1111 31 Mar 11111111 9 28 Apr 1111
152 139 29 Apr 1
30 Apr 111111111111111111 18
189






4 WWII

32ND INFANTRY DIVISION "Red Arrow"


MAY 1945 JUNE 1945 JULY 1945 AUGUST 1945
1 May 111111 1 June 1111 6 July 1 4 Aug 1
2 May 1 2 June 1 13 July 1 15 Aug 11
3 May 11111 3 June 1 21 July 1
4 May 111111 7 June 1 25 July 1111
5 May 1111 15 June 11 27 July 111
7 May 111111 18 June 11 28 July 1
8 May 11111111111111 14 11 29 July 11
9 May 111111 31 July 11
10 May 11111 15
11 May 1111111111111 13
12 May 11111111 8
13 May 1111
14 May 111
16 May 11
17 May 11111
18 May 1
19 May 111
20 May 11
21 May 1
22 May 111
23 May 11111
24 May 11
25 May 111
26 May 1
27 May 1111
28 May 1
29 May 11
30 May 111
31 May 1
120
32ND INFANTRY DIVISION'S
* bloodiest day 22 November 1944
bloodiest month December 1942
2nd bloodiest day 5 December 1942
3rd bloodiest day 11 July 1944
Total battle deaths 2,524
1,298 are listed=55.7% KIA-2,108


















33RD INFANTRY DIVISION "Golden Cross"

Illinois National Guard
Activated (WW II)-5 March 1941
Inactivated-3 February 1946 in Japan
Battle Credits, World War II: Northern New Guinea Morotai Luzon
Commanding General (During Combat, WW II):
Maj-Gen Percy W. Clarkson October 1943-November 1945

Combat Chronicle: The 33rd Infantry Division, also known as the "Illinois" or
"Prairie" Division, participated in the Somme Offensive of 1918, and in the
Meuse-Argonne operation in World War I. The division trained at Camp Forrest,
Tennessee, took part in the Louisiana maneuvers, was transferred to Ft. Lewis,
Washington, in September 1942, and left the San Francisco port of embarkation
on 7 July 1943.
The 33rd arrived in Hawaii, 12 July 1943, and, while guarding installations,
received training in jungle warfare. On 11 May 1944, it arrived in New Guinea.
The 123rd Infantry Regiment took part in the Wakde-Sarmi operation in northern
New Guinea, arriving at Maffin Bay on 1 September 1944. It provided a perimeter
defense by aggressive patrolling for Wakde Airdrome and the Toem-Sarmi area.
This regiment was relieved on 26 January 1945.
Although the 31st Infantry Division had invaded the island of Morotai, near
Halmahera, on 15 September 1944, large numbers of Japanese were still hiding
out in the hills. And so, in mid-December 1944, the 33rd began sailing for Mor-
otai. As long as Morotai remained secured, 20,000 Japanese would be cut-off on
Halmahera. Defensive perimeters were established, and the 33rd reduced Japanese
forces at the headwaters of the Pilowo River. Along with the 31st Division, the
33rd gradually ferreted the Japs out of the mountains in small groups, maintain-
ing aggressive patrol activities.
The next, and by far, the toughest operation for the 33rd was on Luzon. The
division landed at Lingayen Gulf on 10 February 1945, a month after the initial
assault landing, and relieved the exhausted 43rd Infantry Division in the Damor-
tis-Rosario-Pozorrubio area, 13-15 February 1945.
Attacking northward, the 33rd sustained heavy casualties, 19-20 February 1945,
as it opened its drive into the Caraballo Mountains toward the objective of Bag-
uio, the summer capital of the Philippines, and, also, the headquarters of Gener-
al Yamashita. Working with the 32nd and 37th Infantry Divisions, the 33rd was in
for a number of bitter battles with the desperate Japs.
The 33rd seized Questionmark and Benchmark Hills after heavy fighting by 22
February, and after battling entrenched Japanese in the hills. Two companies of
the division were temporarily isolated, and suffered a great deal from thirst be-
fore eventually being rescued.
The 130th Infantry Regiment took Aringay and a bridge nearby, 7 March 1945,
without opposition, and went on to capture Mt. Magabang the following day. The
136th Infantry, meanwhile, maintained pressure on the Japanese as it advanced








along Kennon Road, while the 123rd Infantry patrolled northeast of Pugo. A
division task force composed of a battalion of the 130th Infantry linked-up
with Filipino guerrilla forces from northern Luzon in the vicinity of San
Fernando, 21 March 1945, but the Japanese had already withdrawn.
Not long after, the 123rd Infantry Regiment took Mt. Calugong, 8 April
1945, and pushed beyond Galiano. The 130th Infantry captured Asin, 12 April,
in a surprise night attack, but further advances were stopped by a Japanese
tunnel complex nearby. This tunnel complex was then given the treatment by
the division artillery. The 33rd then renewed its attack on 21 April, and
reduced the tunnels one after the other in close combat. Meanwhile, other
elements of the division arrived in Tuba on 25 April 1945. On this same day
the 130th Infantry Regiment, trucked into positions, began the assault on the
hills surrounding Baguio, and took Mt. Mirador. Baguio finally fell after
fierce and heavy fighting, under the concerted attack of the 33rd and 37th
Infantry Divisions on 27 April 1945. Manuel Roxas, later president of the
Philippines, was liberated with the fall of Baguio, as well as several thous-
and other people, many of them escaping through the 33rd's lines.
The 33rd was then given the mission of clearing northward from Baguio to
break up remaining enemy pockets of resistance. With the capture of the San
Nicholas-Tebbo-Itogon Route by 12 May 1945, organized opposition in the 33rd's
region of operations collapsed. It was in this action that the 33rd had one
of its 3 Medal of Honor winners of the war, Private (later Sergeant) John R.
McKinney, Company A, 123rd Infantry Regiment, 11 May 1945.
Pvt McKinney was helping to defend an outpost, when just before daybreak,
around 100 Japanese stealthily attacked the perimeter defense, concentrating
on his position. Pvt McKinney, having just completed a long tour of duty at
his machinegun, was resting a few feet away, when a Japanese soldier dealt
him a glancing blow on the head with a saber. Although dazed by the blow, he
bludgeoned his attacker, and then shot another Jap who was charging him.
Meanwhile, one of his comrades at his gun was wounded, and another man at
the position carried him to safety.
Alone, Pvt McKinney, in hand-to-hand combat, killed 10 Japanese. In the
melee, however, his machinegun was rendered inoperative. Armed only with a
rifle and some hand grenades, he then stopped a furious assault by the Jap-
anese who remained, and then clubbed them to death with his rifle. When help
arrived, he had thwarted this attack, and was in complete control of the area.
38 dead Japanese lay sprawled around his position.
Pvt McKinney's extraordinary courage and fighting skill had singlehandedly
stopped cold a Japanese attack and saved his company from possible annihilat-
ion. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military.
The 33rd advanced on Highway 11, occupied Tabio and Ambuclac on 13 June,
and secured this area after the fall of Bokod on 17 June 1945. Daklan Airstrip
was captured on 22 June.
The 33rd was relieved by the 32nd Infantry Division on 30 June 1945, and
moved to Bauang for rehabilitation. The division was engaged in amphibious
training in the Philippines when the war ended on 14 August 1945. The 33rd
landed on the main Japanese island of Honshu, 25 September 1945, and performed
occupational duties until inactivated there on 3 February 1946.

Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor--3 Casualties: Total Battle Deaths-524
Distinguished Unit Citations-- 6 Killed In Action-- 396
Distinguished Service Crosses-31 Wounded 2,024
Silver Stars '170 Missing 5
Captured 1
Total Casualties--2,426
Other 33rd Infantry Division Medal of Honor winners in World War II: KIA *
Pfc Dexter J. Kerstetter, 130th Inf Rgt, 13 April 1945, near Galiano, Luzon
S/Sgt Howard E. Woodford, 130th Inf Rgt, 6 June 1945, near Tabio, Luzon






1 WWII


33RD INFANTRY DIVISION "Golden Cross"


SEPTEMBER 1944 JANUARY 1945 FEBRUARY 1945 MARCH 1945
26 Sept 111 1 Jan 1 6 Feb 1 1 Mar 11
3 2 Jan 1 15 Feb 1 2 Mar 11111
3 Jan 1 16 Feb 11111 4 Mar 11111
4 Jan 111111 17 Feb 1 5 Mar 111111
OCTOBER 1944 6 Jan 11 18 Feb 1 6 Mar 11
7 Jan 1 19 Feb 11111111111111111 17* 7 Mar 11
SOct 11 8 Jan 1 20 Feb 1111111111111 13 approx. 8 Mar 1
9 Jan 1 21 Feb 1 35*men 9 Mar 1
5 11 Jan 1 22 Feb 11 10 Mar 1
14 Jan 1 23 Feb 1 11 Mar 1
DECEMBER 1944 19 Jan 1 24 Feb 11 14 Mar 11111
DECEMBER 1944
25 Feb 11111 19 Mar 1
3 Dec 1 17 26 Feb 1 21 Mar 11
9 Dec 1 27 Feb 1111 22 Mar 1
26 Dec 11 28 Feb 1 24 Mar 1
27 Dec 1 56 26 Mar 11111
29 Dec 1 27 Mar 111
31 Dec 1 29 Mar 111111
30 Mar 1
7 31 Mar 1
52






2 WWII


33RD INFANTRY DIVISION "Golden Cross"


APRIL 1945 MAY 1945 JUNE 1945
1 Apr 11 2 May 1 1 June 1
2 Apr 11 3 May 1 6 June 1111
3 Apr 1 5 May 1 7 June 1
4 Apr 11 6 May 111111 8 June 1
7 Apr 11 10 May 1 12 June 111
10 Apr 1 11 May 111 13 June 1
11 Apr 1111111111111 13 12 May 1111111 15 June 1
12 Apr 111111 13 May 11 16 June 1
14 Apr 111 21 May 1 24 June 11
15 Apr 111 31 May 11 15
16 Apr 1111111111 10 25
18 Apr 11
19 Apr 11111
21 Apr 11
22 Apr 111111
23 Apr 11
24 Apr 111111
25 Apr 1111
26 Apr 11111
28 Apr 1
29 Apr 1111
30 Apr 11
84



33RD INFANTRY DIVISION'S
Bloodiest day 19 February 1945
bloodiest month April 1945
2nd bloodiest day 20 February and 11 April 1945
3rd bloodiest day 16 April 1945
Total battle deaths- 509
264 are listed=51.8% KIA-388

















34TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Red Bull"

Originally-Iowa, Minnesota, Dakotas National Guard
Activated (WW II)--10 February 1941
Returned To United States and Inactivated-3 November 1945
Battle Credits, World War II: Algeria Tunisia Southern Italy Cassino
Days In Combat-512 Anzio Rome-Arno Northern Apennines Po Valley
Days In Combat--512
Commanding Generals (During Combat, WW II)s
Maj-Gen Charles W. Ryder May 1942--July 1944
Maj-Gen Charles L. Bolte July 1944-Inactivation

Combat Chronicle: The 34th Infantry Division was the first division to be shipped overseas
after Pearl Harbor, embarking in January 1942, and sailing to Northern Ireland, where it
trained for the invasion of North Africa.
The 34th has a shoulder patch of which the background is an "olla", a Mexican water bot-
tle, inspired by the desert country of the Southwest, where it trained during World War I.
Part of the 34th saw its first action when the 168th Infantry Regiment landed west of
Algiers, during the Allied invasion of North Africa, on 8 November 1942. The 168th sustain-
ed fairly heavy losses against the French on the first day of the attack, until the latter
agreed to a cease-fire on the llth.
The rest of the 34th landed in North Africa on 3 January 1943.
After Algeria, the 34th trained some more for the campaign in Tunisia. Part of it was
hit hard by the German attack through Kasserine Pass in mid-February 1943, and the 168th
Infantry Regiment became isolated on Djebel Lessouda, and was forced to infiltrate out at
night. The Germans were eventually forced back after hard fighting.
The 34th had another rough time at Fondouk, late-March-early April 1943, while attempt-
ing to support a local British attack. The division came under very heavy artillery fire,
and its part in the attack bogged down with considerable losses.
However, in the famous Battle of Hill 609, the Red Bull more than repaid the enemy for
its previous setbacks. After the 135th Infantry Regiment took Hill 490, 28 April 1943, and
held it against a counterattack, the 34th assaulted Hill 609. The Germans on this large,
rocky, fortified hill included some of the best troops in their entire army, including the
tough Barenthin Regiment and much of the Hermann GSring Division. Many of these troops
thought that the hill could never be taken. But the 34th, supported by tanks of the 1st
Armored Division, battled up the slopes against withering enemy fire. By tenacity, courage,
and perseverance, the Americans finally won out, and this key bastion in the German defen-
ses fell on 1 May 1943.
The capture of Hill 609 paved the way for the advance on Mateur, Bizerte, and smaller
towns. The 34th drove through Chouigui Pass to Tebourba, and then Ferryville. The German-
Italian Army in Tunisia called it quits on 13 May 1943. Total casualties in the campaign,
for the 34th, came to 4,254 men, including approximately 380 men killed.
The 34th rested during the Sicilian campaign. Then it trained for the Salerno landing,
although only the 151st Field Artillery Battalion was in on the initial assault landing.
The rest of the 34th landed in southern Italy on 25 September 1943.
During the 20 long months of fighting in Italy that followed, the 34th fired a total of







1,125,639 artillery shells, a record for any division artillery in the war.
In southern Italy, contacting the Germans at the Calore River, 28 September 1943, the
34th advanced northward to take Caiazzo against stubborn resistance by the 3rd Panzer Gren-
adier Division. The 34th fought through strong opposition and heavy rains to cross the
Volturno River on 13 October 1943. Fighting against local counterattacks and obstinate
German rearguard actions, the Red Bull slowly continued further north into almost trackless
mountain areas. The 133rd Infantry Regiment crossed the winding Volturno a second time on
18 October, and the 168th Infantry Regiment entered evacuated Dragoni the next day. On 20
October 1943, the 34th began the push on Capriati al Volturno, and made its third crossing
of the Volturno near Roccaravindo on 3 November.
Along with the 3rd and 45th Infantry Divisions, plus some British outfits, the 34th be-
gan a bloody 10-day Battle for the Winter Line on 4 November 1943. Despite valiant efforts
on the part of the American and British units involved, the Germans were just too well dug-
in with some of their best units, and, for the most part, this assault failed. However,
the 168th Infantry Regiment stormed Monte Pantano and, in bloody hand-to-band fighting, de-
feated German attempts to take it back. On 9 December 1943, the 34th was pulled out of the
line for rest and rehabilitation.
On 30 December 1943, the 34th returned to attack the extremely strong Gustav Line, and
relieved the 36th Infantry Division in line. On 5 January 1944, the 135th Infantry Regim-
ent began the battle for San Vittore, while the 168th Infantry moved to outflank La Chiala,
and the 133rd Infantry Regiment (attached to the 1st Special Service Force) attacked Monte
Maio. 7 January 1944, was one of the 34th's bloodiest days in combat of the entire war.
The 168th Infantry cleared the heights overlooking the Rapido River, 13 January, and the
135th Infantry finally won Monte Trocchio on the 15th.
Then, in late-January 1944, the 34th attacked into the extremely strong defenses of the
Cassino area, which was part of the German Gustav Line. Attached to the 34th, at this time,
was the 142nd Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division, and the Japanese-American 100th
Infantry Battalion.
Before it could cross the Rapido, the Red Bull was forced to go through a marshy area
heavily laden with mines. Nevertheless, by continual probing, the 34th succeeded in gett-
ing across the narrow, but swift-flowing Rapido, and making a small, but important breach
in the German line. The 168th Infantry Regiment attacked through this bridgehead and took
Hills 56 and 213 after hard fighting which included the repulse of a strong German counter-
attack on 30 January 1944.
After several days of grueling and continuous fighting, the 34th, in a gradual flanking
maneuver, had captured several hills north of Monte Cassino, on top of which was the mona-
stery. As the intensive battle continued the 133rd Infantry Regiment attempted to capture
a highly fortified hill which blocked the entrance to Cassinoe It was in this action that
the 34th had one of its 9 Medal of Honor winners of the war in an extremely daring and val-
iant action by Pfc Leo J. Powers, on 3 February 1944.
By singlehandedly destroying 3 enemy pillboxes with grenades in the face of furious fire,
he worked his way over the entire company front against tremendous odds and, almost alone,
broke the backbone of this heavily defended and strategic German position. Pfc Powers' he-
roic action enabled the entire 133rd Infantry Regiment to advance into Cassino town.
Once inside the town, the 133rd had to fight one of the most furious actions of the war.
It was violent building-to-building combat, and the Germans launched numerous counterattacks.
The following day the 133rd Infantry attempted to clear the barracks north of Cassino, but,
despite tank reinforcement, was repulsed with heavy casualties.
Meanwhile, the 135th Infantry Regiment managed to get a shock force right up to the walls
of the monastery, but these valiant men were forced back. The 168th Infantry Regiment att-
acked from just to the north of Monte Cassino, and the 135th Infantry captured the key Hill
593. At times, the opposing sides were close enough to throw rocks at each other, and hand
grenades were often the decisive weapon. But all attempts to capture Monte Cassino and the
towering monastery failed, although on 5 February 1944, large elements of the 34th were a
mere 3 miles from the Via Casilina, a main highway leading to Rome. Three miles----the
distance between Heaven and hell...
During the course of the fighting, the Austrian 44th Infantry Division was shattered as
an effective fighting force. But the Germans moved other first-class troops into the area,







including the 90th Panzer Grenadier and vaunted 1st Parachute Divisions. The German 1st
Parachute Division "Green Devils" was probably the finest unit in the entire German Army.
On 8 February 1944, the 34th made one final all-out attack in alternate rain and snow,
but by 13 February, the division was totally exhausted, and its positions in the mountains
were taken over by the 4th Indian Division. Some of the 34th's companies were down to ith
of their original strength, while some of the surviving men had to be carried out of their
positions on stretchers, since they were too numb and stiff to walk, due to the exposure
from the cold in the mountains, lack of sleep, and the constant fighting. Since the start
of this 1st Battle of Cassino, the 34th had lost over 600 men killed in action or died of
wounds, many more wounded, and a number of men missing or captured.
The 34th Infantry Division's performance and its attached units at Cassino ranks among
the top feats of arms of the war. (Subsequent assaults on Cassino by the 4th Indian and
2nd New Zealand Divisions also failed. The area wasn't cleared until mid-May 1944, in a
massive assault by five Allied divisions). The 34th and its attached units had almost
made it alone.
After rest and rehabilitation, the 34th landed in the Anzio beachhead on 25 March 1944.
It maintained defensive positions until the offensive began, 23 May 1944, to break out of
the beachhead area. This involved more very furious and heavy fighting. The 133rd Infan-
try Regiment led the division attack toward Monte Arrestino. After the junction of U.S.
forces outside the beachhead on 25 May 1944, the 34th followed up the 1st Armored Division,
and saw heavy fighting at Lanuvio. On 29 May 1944, the 34th had another Medal of Honor win-
ner in a very valiant action, Captain William W. Galt, 168th Infantry Regiment.
Captain Galt was battalion S-3. Following two unsuccessful attacks by his battalion in
a critical period of action, on his own accord, he went forward to ascertain just how ser-
ious the situation was. He volunteered to personally lead the next attack himself.
The captain jumped up upon the lone remaining tank destroyer. As it moved forward, foll-
owed by a company of riflemen, he manned the .30 caliber machinegun on the turret. He loc-
ated and directed fire on an enemy 77mm antitank gun and destroyed it.
Nearing the German positions, Captain Gait stood fully exposed in the turret, ceaseless-
ly firing his machinegun and tossing grenades into the zigzag series of trenches, despite
a hail of enemy fire. As the tank destroyer advanced, the captain so maneuvered it so that
40 of the enemy were trapped in one trench. When they refused to surrender, he pressed the
trigger of the machinegun and dispatched every one of them. A few minutes later, an 88mma
shell struck the tank destroyer, mortally wounding him as he fell across his gun.
Captain Galt had given great impetus to this attack, and was a source of inspiration.
His courage and leadership exemplify the highest traditions of the U.S. armed forces.
In heavy fighting, the 34th pushed past Rome, to Civitavecchia, and then further north
up the western coast of Italy. The division overran Tarquinia, on Highway 1, on 9 June
1944, and then took over the advance from the 36th Infantry Division on 26 June 1944.
Against fierce resistance by the 16th SS Panzer Grenadier Division, the 133rd Infantry
Regiment took Cecina, 30 June-2 July 1944, the 135th Infantry won the battle for Rosignano,
3-7 July, and the 168th Infantry took Castellina on 6 July. After a short respite, the 34th
moved on to capture Leghorn (Livorno) on 19 July 1944, and, soon after, reached the Arno.
During August 1944, the 34th rested and rehabilitated.
Then, on 10 September 1944, the 34th, along with other 5th Army outfits, began the ass-
ault on the German Gothic Line. In brilliant fighting against much of the German 4th Para-
chute Division, the 34th captured Monte Frassino, 15 September 1944. The 133rd Infantry
Regiment of the division fought for Torricella Hill, 13-21 September, and then went on to
take Montepiano by the 23rd. This area was all in the region of Futa Pass. Then, after a
hard battle, Monte Bastione fell to the 135th Infantry on 28 September 1944.
Continuing further north in the mountains, along with other 5th Army outfits, against
very tough resistance, the 34th was eventually stalemated at the battle of Monte Belmonte,
16-23 October 1944. This action saw the employment of searchlights and "artificial moon-
light" (searchlights reflecting off of the low clouds in the sky at night).
By the end of October 1944, the entire U.S. 5th Army, as well as the British 8th Army,
was completely exhausted from the incessant fighting in the mountains amid the unusually
foul weather. The two Allies were unable to break out of the mountains and into the Po
Valley before winter set-in. Besides the weather and rugged terrain, the Germans still had







some of their best formations on the Italian Front. Among them were the 1st and 4th Para-
chute, 26th Panzer, 29th and 90th Panzer Grenadier, 8th Mountain, and quite a few first-
rate infantry divisions.
The 34th dug-in south of the city of Bologna for the long winter. Except for 5 February
1945, no heavy fighting occurred for the 34th all through that long winter of 1944-45. For
the most part, action consisted of relatively small, but still highly dangerous patrol act-
ivities. For over 5 months the 34th and other Allied outfits waited and shivered in the
mountains, and prepared for the long-awaited offensive in the coming spring.
Finally, on 14 April 1945, the 5th Army opened its all-out offensive to smash the Ger-
mans in northern Italy. The offensive against Bologna was initiated on 15 April, by the
Polish Corps, part of the U.S. 91st Infantry Division, and the 34th. 18 April 1945, was
the 34th's most costly day of this entire offensive, as the division fought past furiously
contested Gorgognano Ridge, the Sevizzano Heights, and Drei Mori Hill to help seize Bologna
with the 133rd Infantry Regiment on 21 April 1945.
On 23 April, the 34th screened Highway 9, taking Reggio, and relieving the 1st Armored
Division. After a sharp, but short fight, south of Piacenza, the 34th raced westward, cap-
turing Cremona and Milan.
The final campaign in Italy contained a couple of ironies for the 34th. At Bologna had
been the elite German 1st Parachute Division, which had handed the Allies repeated setbacks
at Cassino. The 34th, and especially the Polish Corps, had the satisfaction of eliminating
on the battlefield this tough, 61ite enemy formation. And, in northwest Italy, the German
75th Corps surrendered to the 34th--which included the German 34th Infantry Division, vet-
eran of the Russian Front. At the time of the German surrender in Italy, on 2 May 1945,
the 34th had reached the Ticino River, northwest of Milan.
Besides all the fighting in North Africa, no outfit fought longer or harder up the long
boot of Italy than the Fighting 34th Infantry Division, which piled-up more combat time
than any other American division in the Mediterranean-European Theater of Operations.

Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor--9 Casualties: Total Battle Deaths--3,708
Distinguished Unit Citations-- 3 Killed In Action---- 3,145
Distinguished Service Crosses--6 Wounded 12,545
Silver Stars 1,153 Missing -622
Captured 1,368
Total Casualties-- 17,680

Other 34th Infantry Division Medal of Honor winners in World War II: Killed in action *
Pvt Robert D. Booker, 9 April 1943, near Fondouk, Tunisia
2nd Lt Ernest H. Dervishian, 23 May 1944, near Cisterna, Italy
S/Sgt George J. Hall, 135th Inf Rgt, 23 May 1944, Anzio Beachhead, Italy
1st Lt Beryl R. Newman, 133rd Inf Rgt, 26 May 1944, near Cisterna, Italy
2nd Lt Paul F. Riordan, 133rd Inf Rgt, 3-8 February 1944, Cassino, Italy
Pvt Furman L. Smith, 135th Inf Rgt, 31 May 1944, near Lanuvio, Italy
2nd Lt Thomas W. Wigle, 135th Inf Rgt, 14 September 1944, Monte Frassino, Italy





1 WWII

34TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Red Bull"


NOVEMBER 1942 FEBRUARY 1943 MARCH 1943 APRIL 1943
8 Nov 111111111111111 15 1 Feb 1 10 Mar 11 1 Apr 1111111111 10
10 Nov 1 2 Feb 1111 15 Mar 1 2 Apr 1
14 Nov 1 8 Feb 1 16 Mar 1 3 Apr 111
22 Nov 111 12 Feb 1 20 Mar 1 4 Apr 1
20 16 Feb 11 21 Mar 1 7 Apr 1
17 Feb 11 24 Mar 1 8 Apr 111111111111111111111111111 27
19 Feb 1 27 Mar 11111 9 Apr 111111111111111111111111111 28
DECEMBER 1942 20 Feb 111111 28 Mar 11111 10 Apr 111111
6 Dec 1 22 Feb 11111 29 Mar 11111111111 11 11 Apr 1
25 Feb 1 30 Mar 11111111111111 14 12 Apr 1
7 Dec 1 28 Feb 1 31 Mar 1111111111 10 20 Apr 1
2 25 52 26 Apr 1
27 Apr 1111
28 Apr 11111111111 11
JANUARY 193 29 Apr 111111
18 Jan 1 30 Apr 11111
31 Jan 111111111111 12 17
13
MAY 1943
2 May 1
3 May 1
5 May 111
6 May 11111
7 May 11111111111111 14
9 May 1
25





2 WWII


34TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Red Bull"


OCTOBER 1943 NOVEMBER 1943 DECEMBER 1943
1 Oct 1 1 Nov 111111 1 Dec 11111111111111111 17
2 Oct 111111111 9 2 Nov 1 2 Dec 111111111111111 15
6 Oct 1 3 Nov 11 3 Dec 111111111 9
7 Oct 1 4 Nov 111111111111111111111 21 4 Dec 11111111 8
10 Oct 1 5 Nov 11111111111 11 5 Dec 1111111
13 Oct 111111111111111111 18 6 Nov 11111111111111 14 6 Dec 1111111
14 Oct 1 7 Nov 111111111 9 7 Dec 1111
15 Oct 11 8 Nov 111111111111 12 8 Dec 1
16 Oct 1 9 Nov 111 9 Dec 11111
18 Oct 11 10 Nov 11 10 Dec 1111
21 Oct 111111111111111111 18 13 Nov 11 12 Dec 1
22 Oct 1111 15 Nov 1 17 Dec 1
23 Oct 111 19 Nov 1 19 Dec 1
24 Oct 1 22 Nov 11 25 Dec 1
25 Oct 1 23 Nov 11 26 Dec 1
26 Oct 111111 24 Nov 11111
27 Oct 111111 28 Nov 1
28 Oct 1 29 Nov 111111
29 Oct 1111 30 Nov 1111111
30 Oct 1 108
31 Oct 111
85






3 WWII

34TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Red Bull"


JANUARY 1944 FEBRUARY 1944 MARCH 1944
3 Jan 1111111111 10 1 Feb 1111111111 10 8 Mar 1
4 Jan 11 2 Feb 11111111111111111111111111111 29 18 Mar 1
5 Jan 11111111111 11 3 Feb 11111111111111 18 25 Mar 111111
6 Jan 1111111111111 13 4 Feb 111111111111111111 18 26 Mar 1
7 Jan 11111111111111111111111111111111111 35* 5 Feb 11111111111111 14 29 Mar 1111
8 Jan 111 approx. 6 Feb 11111111111111 14 30 Mar 11
9 Jan 1111111 65*men 7 Feb 111111111111111 15 31 Mar 1
10 Jan 1111111 8 Feb 111111111111111 16
11 Jan 1111111111111 13 9 Feb 1111111111111111111111111111 28
12 Jan 11111111111 11 10 Feb 1111111111 10
13 Jan 1111111111 10 11 Feb 111111111111 12
14 Jan 11111 12 Feb 11111111111 11
15 Jan 1 13 Feb 111111
16 Jan 111 14 Feb 11111111111 11
17 Jan 111111 15 Feb 111111111 9
18 Jan 11 17 Feb 11111
19 Jan 1 18 Feb 1111111
22 Jan 1 21 Feb 11
23 Jan 1 23 Feb 1
24 Jan 1111 24 Feb 1
25 Jan 1111111111 10
26 Jan 11111111111111111111111111111111 32 237
27 Jan 11111111111 11
28 Jan 111111111111111111111 21
29 Jan 11
30 Jan 11111111 8
31 Jan 11111
235






4 WWII

34TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Red Bull"


APRIL 1944 MAY 1944 JUNE 1944
1 Apr 111 3 May 11111 1 June lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 35*
2 Apr 1 5 May 1 2 June 11111111111111111 17
3 Apr 111111111 9 6 May 1 3 June 1111111111 10
4 Apr 1 8 May 1 4 June 11111
6 Apr 11111 9 May 11 5 June 11111
7 Apr 1 10 May 1 6 June 11
9 Apr 111 11 May 1 7 June 1
10 Apr 1 12 May 11 8 June 1111
11 Apr 11 16 May 1 9 June 1
12 Apr 111111 17 May 111 10 June 11
14 Apr 11 18 May 1 11 June 1
15 Apr 1 20 May 11111 13 June 1
17 Apr 1111 21 May 1111111 15 June 1
18 Apr 1111 22 May 11 20 June 1
20 Apr 111 23 May 1111111111111 13 21 June 1
21 Apr 1 24 May 11111111111 11 22 June 1
22 Apr 11 25 May 1111111 26 June 11111111 8
24 Apr 1 26 May 1111111111 10 27 June 1111111
25 Apr 1 27 May 1111111111111111 16 28 June 111
26 Apr 11 28 May 1111111111111 13 30 June 111111111111111 15
27 Apr 1 29 May 11111111111111111111l1111111111111i 35* 121
28 Apr 1 30 May 111111111 9
29 Apr 11111 31 May 11111111111111111111 20
30 Apr 11 167
62






5 WWII

34TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Red Bull"


JULY 1944 SEPTEMBER 1944 OCTOBER 1944
1 July 11111111111111111111111111111111111 35* 8 Sept 111 1 Oct 111111
2 July 11111 11 Sept 1111 2 Oct 11111111111 11
3 July 111111 12 Sept 11111 3 Oct 11
4 July 1111111111 10 13 Sept 111111111111 12 4 Oct 111111111 9
5 July 11111111 8 14 Sept 111111111111111111111 21 5 Oct 111111
6 July 11111 15 Sept 1111111111111111111 19 6 Oct 111
7 July 111111111 9 16 Sept 11111111111111111 17 7 Oct 11111
8 July 1111111111111 13 17 Sept 11111111 8 8 Oct 1111
9 July 1111111 18 Sept 11111111111111 14 9 Oct 1
10 July 111111 19 Sept 11111111111111 14 10 Oct 111
11 July 111 20 Sept 111 12 Oct 1
12 July 11111111 8 21 Sept 111111 13 Oct 111111
13 July 1111 22 Sept 1 14 Oct 111111111111111111111 21
14 July 111 23 Sept 111111111 9 15 Oct 111111
15 July 1111111 25 Sept 1 16 Oct 1111111
16 July 1111111 26 Sept 11111 17 Oct 11111111111111111 17
17 July 111111111111111111111111 24 27 Sept 11 18 Oct 111111
18 July 1 28 Sept 111 19 Oct 111
20 July 1 29 Sept 11 20 Oct 1
21 July 111 30 Sept 11111 21 Oct 111
22 July 11 154 22 Oct 111111111 9
23 July 1111111111111 13 23 Oct 111111
25 July 1 24 Oct 1111111111111111 16
27 July 111 25 Oct 1
27 Oct 1
14 28 Oct 111
29 Oct 1111111111 10
30 Oct 11
31 Oct 11
171






6 WWII

34TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Red Bull"


NOVEMBER 1944 DECEMBER 1944 JANUARY 1945 MARCH 1945 APRIL 1945
1 Nov 111111 1 Dec 1 3 Jan 1 2 Mar 1 8 Apr 1
2 Nov 1111 3 Dec 1 12 Jan 1 5 Mar 1 9 Apr 1
3 Nov 1 8 Dec 1 17 Jan 11 7 Mar 11 12 Apr 1
4 Nov 1 9 Dec 1 22 Jan 1 9 Mar 1 15 Apr 11
6 Nov 11 10 Dec 11111 23 Jan 1 11 Mar 1 16 Apr 11
11 Nov 111 11 Dec 1 26 Jan 1 17 Mar 1 17 Apr 111
12 Nov 11 13 Dec 1 29 Jan 1 19 Mar 1 18 Apr 1111111111111111111111 22
14 Nov 1 14 Dec 1 8 22 Mar 11 19 Apr 1111
15 Nov 111 18 Dec 1 25 Mar 1 20 Apr 11111
16 Nov 1 19 Dec 1 23 Apr 1
19 Nov 1 22 Dec 11 FEBRUARY 1945 24 Apr 11111
21 Nov 111111 26 Dec 111 F 25 Apr 1
22 Nov 11111111 8 30 Dec 1 5 Feb 11111 1 17 26 Apr 111111
5 Feb 11111111111111111 17 28 Apr 1
23 Nov 1 28 Apr 1
26 Nov 1
28 Nov 1 21 Feb 11 55
28 Nov 1
29 Nov 1 21
43 MAY 1945
24 May 1
1




34TH INFANTRY DIVISION'S
*bloodiest days 7 January 1944; 29 May 1944; 1 June 1944; 1 July 1944
bloodiest month February 1944
5th bloodiest day ---26 January 1944
6th 2 February 1944
7th -9 April 1943; 9 February 1944
Total battle deaths -3,708
2,025 are listed=54.6% KIA-3,145









Awks




35TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Santa Fe"

Originally-Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska National Guard
Activated (WW II)-23 December 1940
Returned To United States-10 September 1945
Inactivated-7 December 1945
Battle Credits, World War II: Normandy North-Central France
Lorraine-Saar Ardennes Alsace
Days In Combat-264 Rhineland North-Central Germany
Commanding General (During Combat, WW II):
Maj-Gen Paul W. Baade January 1943-Inactivation
Combat Chronicle: The 35th Infantry Division had an inconspicuous captain of
artillery in World War I, Harry S. Truman. 27 years later, while on his way
to the Potsdam Conference, he got to inspect some 1,600 men from the soldiers
wearing the same Santa Fe cross on their shoulders. He was well-guarded. The
men of the 35th wore 5 major battle stars, and could tell of fighting under 4
different American armies to help crush Nazi tyranny. The 35th fought under
the 1st, 3rd, 7th, and 9th Armies, in that order.
The 35th's shoulder patch originated during the Indian Wars. The white
cross on a blue field is to honor the men who blazed the old Santa Fe Trail.
In.World War I, the 35th saw heavy fighting in the Meuse-Argonne.
The 35th arrived in England on 25 May 1944, and received further training.
The 35th entered combat in Normandy on 10 July 1944. In the hot, jungle-
like quiet of that night, the Santa Fe Division moved silently along dusty
roads to form a battle line running southeast from the Vire River, above La
Meauffe to La Nicollerie.
Just before dawn on 11 July 1944, more than 200 division and supporting
corps artillery pounded German positions in a thundering barrage. Then, at
0600, the infantry charged through the hedgerow country with grenades, bayon-
ets, and point-blank fire. In La Meauffe, every building was a converted
pillbox. U.S. artillery levelled these strongpoints with deadly accurate
barrages, and the infantry drove the Germans from the town. Between 15-17
July 1944, the 35th beat back 12 German counterattacks at Emilie, before
battling into rubble-strewn St. L8, on 18 July. In one 2-day period, the
35th sustained almost 1,000 casualties.
After mopping-up in the St. L6 area, the division blasted its way onward
to Vire, and then, further south, helped repulse a very strong German count-
erthrust in the vicinity of Mortain, in one of the most vicious battles in
France, and suffered heavy casualties. Altogether, the fighting in Normandy
cost the 35th some 825 men.
Spearheaded by the 4th Armored Division, the 35th advanced across north-
central France and captured Orleans in a day and night of hard fighting by
18 August 1944. The division continued its drive across France, taking Mon-
targis, 23 August, and after crossing the Seine and then Meuse Rivers, forced
the Moselle at Crevechamps, on 11 September. The city of Nancy was liberated
on 15 September 1944.








Then, in mid-September 1944, the 35th, under the U.S. 3rd Army, saw a
great deal of more tough fighting. In the thick Champenoux Forest, south of
the Nancy-Saarbriicken Highway were stubborn German concentrations which had
to be erased. The Germans, holding ideal defensive positions, repulsed a
first attack. Two days later, the GIs rode on tanks to the edge of the woods,
and then annihilated the defenders in bloody hand-to-hand combat.
The town of Gremercy and the ChAteau-Salins Forest was another German
stronghold. The Germans commenced violent counterattacks against the 35th
with their 559th Volksgrenadier Division beginning on 26 September, and for 3
days the fighting see-sawed viciously before the Germans were finally forced
back with the aid of the 6th Armored Division.
As the autumn wore on and the weather deteriorated, the Santa Fe Division
fought through northern Lorraine and toward the Saar, along with other 3rd
Army outfits. Between Morhange and Sarreguemines, the Germans resisted with
the utmost skill and determination, and it was very rough going. It was dur-
ing this fighting that the 35th had a Medal of Honor winner, Staff Sergeant
Junior J. Spurrier, Company G, 134th Infantry Regiment, at Achain, France, on
13 November 1944.
At 2, in the afternoon, Company G attacked the village of Achain. S/Sgt
Spurrier, armed with an automatic rifle, passed around the village and advan-
ced alone. Attacking from the west, he immediately killed three Germans.
From this time until dark, the sergeant, using his rifle, a pistol, grenades,
and a rocket launcher, continued his solitary attack against the enemy in the
face of heavy small-arms and automatic weapons fire. As a result of his cou-
rageous actions, he killed an officer and 24 enlisted men and captured two
officers and two enlisted men. Sgt Spurrier survived the war.
The advance to the Saar continued, but the 137th Infantry Regiment was hit
by a German counterattack which forced it out of Hilsprich, 23 November. How-
ever, the 134th Infantry Regiment took the town with tanks and massive artill-
ery fire the next day.
The 35th pushed into Sarreguemines, 6 December 1944, and, as it fought for
this town, the 134th and 320th Infantry Regiments assaulted across the Saar
River the following day. This bridgehead was defended against strong enemy
attacks, with liberal air and artillery support. Sarreguemines was reduced
after house-to-house combat by 11 December 1944.
The 35th then attacked across the Blies River on 12 December, where it was
subjected to fierce German counterattacks at Habkirchen, which was eventually
secured on 15 December 1944. The 137th Infantry was then forced out of Brei-
terwald on the same day, and on 20-21 December 1944, the 35th was relieved by
the 44th and 87th Infantry Divisions after almost 162 days of continual com-
bat. The division then moved back to Metz for rehabilitation.
By this time, the Germans had already begun their furious onslaught in the
Ardennes. The Battle of the Bulge was on in full fury. The 35th was one of
the 3rd Army divisions picked to attack northward into the southern side of
the German penetration. The weather was bitter cold with some snowstorms
and heavy drifting--the worst winter in Europe in half-a-century.
Under these appalling conditions, the 35th crossed the Sure River, 27 Dec-
ember 1944, and held its own against elements of 4 different German divisions
including the bulk of the double-tough, elite 1st SS Panzer Division "Leib-
standarte" and part of the equally tough 5th Parachute Division. In the face
of these odds, the fighting was unmatched in ferocity, and the 35th was tem-
porarily stalemated. Heroically, the 35th fought tenaciously and it finally
paid off. The Germans were forced back in extremely hard fighting, and the
vulnerable right flank of the Bastogne Highway was secured. Few American
troops have ever been called upon to fight in more trying conditions. In-
spite of it all, the 35th took Villers-la-Bonne-Eau, 10 January 1945, after








a 13-day battle. The 35th then advanced to Oubourcy and took it in house-to-house
combat on 15 January 1945. The town of Lutrebois then fell after a bitter 5-day
battle. On 18 January, the 35th was relieved, and returned to Metz to resume its
interrupted rest. But not for long.
The 35th was soon sent to the U.S. 7th Army area in Alsace to help stabilize
the front there. The division occupied the Foret Dominiale (forest), and exten-
sive patrol activity was conducted.
After only around one week in Alsace, the 35th, in still cold weather, was rush-
ed almost 300 miles to the north into southern Holland. It relieved the British
52nd Infantry Division., and held defensive positions along the Roer River from 6-
22 February 1945.
Then, as part of an all-out U.S. 9th Army offensive, the 35th, beginning on 25
February 1945, attacked across the Roer at Linnich. The division advanced rapidly
against moderate resistance in its zone of attack. On 6 March 1945, the 35th rea-
ched the Rhine, mopped-up Rheinberg, and then advanced through heavy opposition to
the Wesel River, where Ft. Blucher was seized on 11 March. The 35th was then sent
back to the rear for rest and rehabilitation.
The 35th crossed the Rhine, east of Rheinberg, on 26-27 March 1945. The divis-
ion was then engaged at Kirchhellen until the end of the month. The 134th Infantry
Regiment reached the Zweig Canal at Meckinghoven on 2 April, and then joined the
rest of the 35th defending the Rhein-Herne Canal sector.
After regrouping, the Santa Fe attacked across the canal to positions beyond the
city of Gelsenkirchen, 9 April, and then closed up to the Ruhr River, west of Witt-
en by 11 April 1945.
The 35th then advanced across north-central Germany, bypassing the city of Braun-
schweig (Brunswick). Resistance was sporadic in its zone of attack, and the divis-
ion reached the wide Elbe River on 14 April 1945. The 35th then mopped-up in the
vicinity of Angern and Kolbitz until 26 April, and then shifted to Hannover for
occupational duty and mopping-up actions. Later, the 35th joined the recently for-
med 15th Army.
The 35th returned home in September 1945, and was inactivated that following
December.

Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor--1 Casualties: Total Battle Deaths-2,997
Distinguished Unit Citations-- 6 Killed In Action--2,485
Distinguished Service Crosses-44 Wounded --11,526
Silver Stars ...688 Missing 340
Captured -- 1,471
Total Casualties--15,822

* One to the entire 134th Infantry Regiment--Battle of the Bulge






1 WWII

35TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Santa Fe"


JULY 1944 AUGUST 1944
11 July 1111111111111111 16 1 Aug 11111111111111111111111 23
12 July 11111111111111 14 2 Aug 11111111111111111111 20
13 July 1111111111111 13 3 Aug 111111111 9
14 July 111111111111111111 18 4 Aug 11111111111111 14
15 July 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 55* 5 Aug 1111
16 July 111111111111111111111111 24 approx. 6 Aug 1
17 July 11111111111111111111111111111111111 35 lO0men 7 Aug 111111
18 July 1111111111111111111 19 8 Aug 1111111
19 July 1111111111 10 9 Aug 111111111111 12
20 July 111111 10 Aug 1111111111111 13
21 July 1111 11 Aug 1111111111111 13
22 July 1111 12 Aug 111111111111111 17
23 July 1111111 13 Aug 1111111111111111 16
24 July 1111 14 Aug 11111
25 July 111111111 9 15 Aug 1
26 July 11111111 8 16 Aug 111
27 July 1111111 17 Aug 11111111 8
28 July 111111111111111111 18 18 Aug 111
29 July 1111111 19 Aug 1
30 July 11111111111111111111111 25 20 Aug 1
31 July 11111111 8 22 Aug 11
311 24 Aug 1
25 Aug 1
27 Aug 11
183





2 WWII


35TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Santa Fe"


SEPTEMBER 1944 OCTOBER 1944 NOVEMBER 1944
3 Sept 1 1 Oct 111111111111111 15 1 Nov 1
10 Sept 11 2 Oct 111111111111111 15 4 Nov 1
11 Sept 11111111111 11 3 Oct 11 5 Nov 1
12 Sept 11111111111111111111 20 4 Oct 1 7 Nov 1
13 Sept 111111111111111 15 5 Oct 1 8 Nov 111111111111111111 18
14 Sept 1111111111 10 6 Oct 1 9 Nov 1111111111 10
15 Sept 11111111111 11 7 Oct 1 10 Nov 1111111111111111111111111 25
16 Sept 111111 8 Oct 111 11 Nov 111111111111111111 18
17 Sept 1111111111111 13 9 Oct 1 12 Nov 111111
18 Sept 1111 10 Oct 1111111111111111111111111 25 13 Nov 11111111111111111111 20
19 Sept 11111 11 Oct 1111111 14 Nov 11111111111111111 17
20 Sept 1111111111111111111 19 12 Oct 11111 15 Nov 111111111111111111 18
21 Sept 11111111111111 14 17 Oct 1 16 Nov 1111111111 10
22 Sept 111111 18 Oct 1 17 Nov 1111111111 10
23 Sept 111111111111111111111 21 20 Oct 11 18 Nov 111111
24 Sept 11111 31 Oct 1 19 Nov 111111111 9
25 Sept 11111111 8 20 Nov 1111111
26 Sept 111111111111 12 21 Nov 1111
27 Sept 11111111 8 22 Nov 11111111111111 14
28 Sept 1111111111111111 16 23 Nov 1111111111 10
29 Sept 1111111111 10 24 Nov 11111111 8
30 Sept 111111111111111111 18 25 Nov 1111
26 Nov 11111111 8
235 27 Nov 11
28 Nov 1
29 Nov 1
30 Nov 11
232





3 WWII


35TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Santa Fe"


DECEMBER 1944 JANUARY 1945 FEBRUARY 1945
2 Dec 11 1 Jan 1111111111111111111111111111 28 1 Feb 1
3 Dec 1 2 Jan 11111111111111 14 4 Feb 1
4 Dec 11 3 Jan 11111 5 Feb 1
5 Dec 1111 4 Jan 11111111111111 14 7 Feb 11
6 Dec 11111111 8 5 Jan 111111111111111 15 12 Feb 1
8 Dec 11111111111 11 6 Jan 111111111111 12 13 Feb 1
9 Dec 11111111111111111111 20 7 Jan 1111111111111111111111111 25 16 Feb 1
10 Dec 1 8 Jan 111111 17 Feb 11
11 Dec 1111 9 Jan 111111 23 Feb 111
12 Dec 111111111 9 10 Jan 111111111111111111 18 24 Feb 1
13 Dec 11111111 8 11 Jan 1111111111111 13 26 Feb 1111111111 10
14 Dec 11111 12 Jan 1111111111111 13 27 Feb 111111
15 Dec 1111111111 10 13 Jan 1111111111111111 16 28 Feb 1
16 Dec 11111111111 11 14 Jan 11111111111111 14 31
17 Dec 111111111111 12 15 Jan 11
18 Dec 111 16 Jan 111
19 Dec 11 17 Jan 1111111111 10
20 Dec 111111111111 12 18 Jan 111
21 Dec 1 19 Jan 111
22 Dec 1 21 Jan 1
23 Dec 111 23 Jan 1
28 Dec 1 24 Jan 11
29 Dec 111 25 Jan 111111111 9
30 Dec 111 26 Jan 1
31 Dec 111 28 Jan 11
140 236





4 WWII


35TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Santa Fe"


MARCH 1945 APRIL 1945 JUNE 1945
2 Mar 1 1 Apr 1 18 June 1
3 Mar 1 2 Apr 1 1
4 Mar 111 4 Apr 11
5 Mar 1111 7 Apr 1
6 Mar 1 8 Apr 11
7 Mar 11 10 Apr 1
8 Mar 11111111111111111 17 11 Apr 111
9 Mar 11111 12 Apr 11
26 Mar 111111111 9 13 Apr 11
27 Mar 11 16 Apr 1111111
28 Mar 111111111111111 15 17 Apr 1111111
29 Mar 11 22 Apr 1
30 Mar 11111111 8 23 Apr 1
31 Mar 1 28 Apr 1
71 32









35TH INFANTRY DIVISION'S
bloodiest day -15 July 1944
bloodiest month July 1944
2nd bloodiest day -17 July 1944
3rd 1 January 1945
4th 30 July, 10 October, and 10 November 1944; 7 January 1945
5th 16 July 1944
Total battle deaths -2,936
1,554 are listed=52.9% KIA-2,476






** -sr "


















36TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Texans"

Originally-Texas Rational Guard

Activated (W II)-25 November 1940

Returned To United Statea-15 December 1945

Inactivated-15 December 1945

Battle Credits, World War II: Salerno Beachhead Southern Italy Anzio Bome--rno
Southern France Yosges Mountains Alsace
Siegfried Line Rhineland Central Europe
Days In Combat--400

Commniding Generals (During Combat, W II):
Maj-Gen Fred L. Walker September 1941-June 1944
Maj-Gen John E. Dahlquist July 1944-November 1945

Combat Chronicle: The 36th Infantry Division first saw action during World War I, in the
Meuse-Argonne crmp.ign.
In. World War II, it was the first U.S. division to land on continental Europe.
The 36th Division landed in Xorth Africa, 13 April 1943, and trained at Arsew and Rabat.
Then, on 9 September 1943, it landed at Paestum on the Gulf of Salerno. The 36th's bp-
tism of fire was a bloody one. The crack 16th Panzer Division, veteran of the Russian Front,
was waiting slightly inland from the beachhead, and commenoed strong counterattacks, as lat-
er did the 29th Panter Grenadier Division. Meanwhile, two British divisions, British oomm-
andoe, and a U.S. ranger battalion had landed to the left (west) of the 36th, and the next
day, the U.S. 45th Infantry Division landed. Other formidable German units began attacks
on the entire beachhead, and for several days the issue was critical, but tenacious Allied
resistance, and fire from an artillery battalion of the U.S. 34th Division and accurate off-
shore naval gunfire helped save the situation. The Allies grimly hung on and slowly began
forcing their way inland, the 36th securing the area from Agropoli to Altavilla. It was in
the battle for Altavilla that the 36th produced one of the most famous heroes of the war,
Corporal Charles E. "Comando" Kelly, Company L, 143rd Infantry Regiment, 13 September 1943.
Corporal Kelly voluntarily joined a patrol and located and neutralized enemy gun posit-
ions. Again voluntarily, he made his way under intense fire to a hill a mile away, report-
ing on his return that it was held by the Germans. Joining another patrol, he helped put 2
machine-guns out of action. He then found an anaunition dump under fire, and joined in its
defense. Corporal Kelly protected his position from the upper floor of a farmhouse all that
night, and was under constant attack from the enemy in other buildings, in ditches and gull-
iea, and from nearby heights.
That following morning the Germans readied for an all-out assault. Corporal Kelly fired
with his rifle, a bazooka, then with a BAR--and then, as the Germans surged forward, with
60 an mortar shells. He did this by pulling out the safety pin which neutralizes the prop-
elling charge and the cap which sets off the charge. Then he gently tapped the shell on a
window ledge and listened anxiously. He heard the sound of the second pin inside falling,








and knew he had a live bomb in his hands. The Germans were about to rush the house any sec-
ond. He threw the shell as one would throw a football, hard as be could, and there was a
heavy explosion. When the smoke cleared away, a ditch was filled with sprawled Germans. He
threw numerous mortar shells at the enemy in this manner, inflicting heavy casualties, and
then, he and some other men in the building made their escape during that night. Corporal
Kelly survived the war to later receive the Medal of Honor--one of 14 awarded to men of the
36th Infantry Division.
After the Salerno beachhead was secured by 17 September 1943, the 36th was given a rest,
returning to the front on 15 November, and relieving the 3rd Infantry Division.
In early-December 1943, the 5th Army began "Operation Raincoat", aptly named since, dur-
ing this period, "sunny Italy" was not so sunny. The weather was unusually bleak and rainy,
and the nights were bitter cold. This operation was aimed at breaking the German Winter Line,
just south of Cassino. In some of the most rugged fighting of the war, the 36th fought such
memorable battles as Monte Lungo, Monte Sammucro, a particularly tough battle, Monte Trocch-
io, and the bitter 10-day battle for San Pietro.
Before San Pietro could be taken, the Germans had to be forced off of these heights in
very strenuous fighting. Often, supplies had to be brought up by pack-mule, and the Germans
had all the advantages of the defender. It was a rifleman's war under grueling hardships,
and it was during this time that famed war correspondent Ernie Pyle hooked up with the 36th.
He soon wrote one of the most moving stories to come out of the war about a beloved company
commander who was killed in action, Captain Henry T. Waskow. This article later was the
principal theme for "GI Joe", the movie about Ernie's war experiences.
It wasn't until Christmas Eve, 1943, when a final desperate attack was made by weary el-
ements of the 141st Infantry Regiment, that the key hill mass of Sammucro was seized, fin-
ally forcing the Germans out of San Pietro after their position had become untenable. John
Huston made a 30-minute film of part of the Battle of San Pietro, which has come to be con-
sidered, by many, the best film to come out of the war.
Then, in January 1944, in conjunction with the 34th Infantry Division's assault on Cassino,
two regiments of the 36th were assigned the extremely difficult task of assaulting across
the narrow, but swift-flowing Rapido River. Crack German grenadiers raked them with mortar,
machine-gun, and rifle fire and the attack failed. But the Texans had fought courageously
against overwhelming odds. Meanwhile, the 142nd Infantry Regiment was helping the 34th Div-
ision's valiant, but abortive attempt to take Cassino.
Following the savage battle at the Rapido, the 36th was given 7 weeks of rest, and then
re-entered the fighting. It joined the forces at the Anzio beachhead, 25 May 1944, and help-
ed in the breakout from the beachhead in very heavy fighting. In fact, it was such tough
going for the Americans and British in trying to break the seemingly iron ring of German de-
fenses south of Rome, that they again were almost stalemated. But then, in a brilliant man-
euver, the 36th succeeded in locating a small gap in the German lines, exploited this advan-
tage in some skillful night maneuvering, and captured the key town of Velletri. This paved
the way for the fall of Rome, which the Allies finally entered on 4 June 1944--two days be-
fore the invasion of Normandy. If Generals Alexander and Clark received the key to "the
eternal city", it was the 36th which turned that key and handed it to them.
The men of the 36th hoped for some well-deserved time in Rome, but they never got it. In-
stead, they were ordered to continue on north along the western coast. Sharp, but fairly
short, resistance was met in the hills around Magliano. The division then advanced as far
north as Piombino, 26 June, before being pulled back to Paestux for rest and recuperation.
The Texans made their second amphibious assault landing of the war, this time in south-
ern France on 15 August 1944. They met the stiffest opposition of any of the assault for-
ces, but it was not of lengthy duration, and most objectives were quickly obtained. Advan-
cing up the Rhbne River Valley, Montilimar fell on 28 August, after a raging battle, and a
large part of the German 19th Army was badly shot-up as it retreated to the north. Mean-
while, the 143rd Infantry Regiment had captured the city of Grenoble, toward the Swiss fron-
tier.
Along with the 3rd and 45th Infantry Divisions and French units, the 36th then continued
north. It fought through Luxeuil, the W I base of the famous Lafayette Esoadrille, and
then to the Moselle River at Remiremont, at the base of the high Vosges. Here, the Germans








put up bitter resistance.
The Moselle was one of the Germans' heaviest fixed lines of defense, but the Texans
outwitted the defenders. Led by the 70-year old mayor of Raon-aux-Bois, who knew the riv-
er well, the 141st Infantry, wading waist-deep, sneaked across a little-known ford during
the night and established a bridgehead. Recovering from their surprise, the Germans turn-
ed murderous fire on the battalions, but the Americans drove on into the forests that cov-
er the slopes of the Vosges. The famous Japanese American 442nd Infantry Regiment, which
was attached to the 36th at this time, distinguished itself with a gallant attack which
took Bruyeres, and also fought through to a battalion of the 36th which had become surr-
ounded, and saved its men from probable annihilation. Mines, artillery, and snipers made
the battle in the forests a nightmare.
In a grinding offensive, the 36th crossed the Meurthe River, fought through the burning
town of Corcieur, breached the 2,900-foot high Ste. Marie Pass, and entered the flat Alsat-
ian Plain.
On 6 December 1944, in and around Selestat, the Germans began a series of strong and
skillful attacks, the object of which was nothing less than to destroy the 36th Division.
The Germans used first-rate troops in these vicious attacks, including SS elements. In
some of the division's most desperate fighting of the war, all of these enemy assaults were
hurled back with very heavy losses to the Germans, and one battalion of the 36th was award-
ed the Distinguished Unit Citation. Shortly after, the 36th was pulled out of the line af-
ter 122 consecutive days of combat. But not for very long.
On 1 January 1945, the Germans opened a furious offensive in northern Alsace with some
14 divisions, right at the heighth of the Battle of the Bulge, raging to the northwest.
The 36th was rushed northward to help stop the Germans who were attacking with great elan.
By 3 January, the entire division had taken up defensive positions in the area about Mont-
bronn, 10 miles southwest of Bitche. In very hard fighting the Germans dented the line be-
tween Lemberg and Gbtzenbruck, but this loss was restored before dark of the same day. Af-
ter 6 January, enemy attacks in the 36th's sector were contained, and then gradually died
down, as the Germans became discouraged at what little success they had had in this area.
However, over in the extreme right flank of the U.S. 7th Army sector, it was another
story. In the area between Gambsheim and Drusenheim, the Germans had managed to force a
dangerous bridgehead over the Rhine with two crack divisions, the elite 10th SS Panzer Div-
ision and the 553rd Volksgrenadier. A furious battle soon developed. The U.S. 12th Arm-
ored Division, attempting to eliminate this bridgehead, 16-18 January, was thrown back with
considerable losses. The U.S. 79th Infantry Division was also having a rough time of it
northeast of Haguenau in beating back repeated enemy assaults. To bolster and save this
critical situation, the 36th was ordered from Montbronn, save for the 141st Infantry which
remained in that area and was attached to the 100th Infantry Division.
The weather was still bitter cold as the 143rd Infantry moved in to support the 12th Ar-
aored on 19 January. The furious fighting continued, but a big turning point in the battle
was when Lt. Colonel Marion P. Bowden led his battalion in a determined counterattack that
killed 83 men and captured 176 more from the 10th SS Panzer, some of Germany's best troops.
After this, the enemy pressure in this area gradually sputtered out, as the snow fell to
a heavy 12-inch covering. Artificial moonlight at night (searchlights reflecting off of
the low ceiling, overcast sky) detected the slightest enemy movements. By the end of Jan-
uary, the entire German offensive had come to a halt.
In early-February 1945, the 36th fought back to regain lost ground and smashed into Ober-
hoffen and Herrlisheim, both of which the Germans bitterly contested. In fact, they resist-
ed fanatically, and it was bitter house-to-house combat. Opening American attacks on Herr-
lisheim were thrown back, but the Germans were eventually forced to evacuate the town. In
Oberhoffen it was a violent struggle almost 2 weeks long in which the 36th had two more Med-
al of Honor winners, 2nd Lt Edward Dahlgren and Sgt Emile Deleau,Jr. of the 142nd Infantry
Regiment.
SgtDeleau won his award posthumously. He was in Company A, and led his squad in a night
attack on Oberhoffen on 1 February 1945. After clearing one building, he moved his men to-
ward a second house from which came heavy machine-gun fire. He courageously ran forward,
firing his submachinegun as he went, until close enough to hurl a grenade through a window,








killing 3 Germans and wrecking their gun. His progress was then stopped by heavy rifle
and machine-gun fire from another house. Sgt Deleau dashed through the door, his gun
blazing, and captured 10 Germans. His squad then took up a position for the night and
waited for daylight to resume the attack.
At dawn on 2 February, Sgt Deleau pressed forward with his unit and killed 2 snipers,
when more machine-gun fire barred the way. Despite this fire, he raced across an open
area and killed the 2-man crew of this gun with a grenade. Working to the front of a
building, he located another machine-gun. Finding it impossible to toss a grenade at it
from his protected position, he fearlessly moved away from the building and was about to
hurl a grenade when he was instantly killed by a burst from the gun he sought to knock out.
With magnificent courage and daring aggressiveness, Sgt Deleau cleared four well-defend-
ed houses of the enemy, and, at the sacrifice of his own life, aided his entire battalion
to reach its objective with minimum casualties.
Then, after a rest period, as part of an all-out 7th Army offensive to smash the Sieg-
fried Line, beginning 15 March 1945, the 36th slashed forward in yet more furious fighting,
hitting the fortifications at Wissembourg. On the 36th's left flank was the U.S. 103rd Inf-
antry Division, and on the right, next to the Rhine, was the 3rd Algerian Division of the
French 1st Army. It took several days of heavy fighting against German artillery, rocket,
mortar, machine-gun, and rifle fire before the 36th smashed through and into the Palatinate.
After helping to mop-up the enemy in this region, the 36th got a well-deserved and lengthy
rest.
Toward the end of the war in Europe, the 36th was moved deep into Bavaria where it rel-
ieved the 63rd Infantry Division at Landsberg on 29 April 1945. Continuing the advance on
eastward below the Alps, the 36th captured Field Marshal von Rundstedt at Bad Tolz, 1 May,
and then, at Rosenheim, captured the number two ranked Nazi, portly Hermann G'ring.
Elements of the division then turned south into Austria--some men noted in mock alarm--
back toward Italy. Kitzbuhel and other smaller villages and towns were taken, and then the
Germans finally surrendered on 8 May 1945.
The 36th was one of the great-fighting American divisions of World War II, having seen
more than its share of the war. The 36th returned home in December 1945, although many of
its men had rotated back to the United States much earlier.

Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor---14 Casualties: Total Battle Deaths-3,890
Distinguished Unit Citations---12 Killed In Action-- 3,318
Distinguished Service Crosses--80 Wounded ---14,190
Silver Stars 2,354 Missing---- 494
Captured ---2,650
Total Casualties--20,652
* One to the entire 142nd Infantry Regiment---Siegfried Line (Alsace-Germany)

Other 36th Infantry Division Medal of Honor winners in World War II: Killed in action *

T/5 Grade Bernard P. Bell, 142nd Inf Rgt, 18 Dec 1944, near Mittelwihr, Alsace, France
1st Lt Arnold L. Bjorklund, 142nd Inf Rgt, 13 September 1943, Salerno beachhead, Italy
T/5 Grade Charles H. Coolidge, 141st Inf Rgt, 24-27 Oct 1944, east of Belmont-sur-Buttant,
France
T/5 Grade Morris E. Crain, 141st Inf Rgt, 13 March 1945, Haguenau, Alsace, France
Pvt William J. Crawford, 142nd Inf Rgt, 13 September 1943, Salerno beachhead, Italy
Sgt Edward C. Dahlgren, 142nd Inf Rgt, 11 February 1945, Oberhoffen, Alsace, France
2nd Lt Stephen R. Gregg, 143rd Inf Rgt, 27 August 1944, near Montelimar, France
Pfc Silvestre S. Herrera, 142nd Inf Rgt, 15 March 1945, near Mertzwiller, Alsace, France
Sgt James M. Logan, 141st Inf Rgt, 9 September 1943, near Salerno, Italy
S/Sgt Thomas E. McCall, 143rd Inf Rgt, 22 January 1944, near San Angelo, Italy
Sgt Ellis R. Weicht, 142nd Inf Rgt, 3 December 1944, St. Hippolyte, Alsace, France
S/Sgt Homer L. Wise, 142nd Inf Rgt, 14 June 1944, Magliano, Italy





1 WWII

36TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Texans"

SEPTEMBER 1943 NOVEMBER 1943 DECEMBER 1943
9 Sept 111111111111111111111111111111 16 Nov 1 2 Dec 1
111111111111111111111111111111 60* 17 Nov 1111 3 Dec 111111111 9
10 Sept 11 approx. 19 Nov 1111111111111111 16 4 Dec 111
11 Sept 11111 110Xmen 21 Nov 1111111 5 Dec 111
12 Sept 11 22 Nov 1111 6 Dec 1
13 Sept 11111111111111111111 20 23 Nov 111111 7 Dec 1111
14 Sept 11111111111 11 24 Nov 11 8 Dec 11111111111 11
15 Sept 111111 25 Nov 11111111 8 9 Dec 111111111111111111111111111111 30
16 Sept 1111111 26 Nov 11 10 Dec 111111111 9
17 Sept 11 27 Nov 11 11 Dec 1
18 Sept 1 28 Nov 1 12 Dec 11
19 Sept 1111 29 Nov 11 13 Dec 1111
20 Sept 11 30 Nov 11 14 Dec 111111111 9
23 Sept 1111111111111 13 15 Dec 11111111111111111 17
24 Sept 11111111 8 16 Dec 111111111111111 15
30 Sept 1 17 Dec 1111
18 Dec 111111
19 Dec 111111
20 Dec 1111111111 10
OCTOBER 1943 21 Dec 11111111 8
22 Dec 1
3 Oct 111 23 Dec 11
4 Oct 1111111 24 Dec 111
6 Oct 1 26 Dec 1
11 27 Dec 11
28 Dec 1
29 Dec 1
31 Dec 1
165






2 WWII

36TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Texans"


JANUARY 1944 FEBRUARY 1944
1 Jan 11 1 Feb 1111111
4 Jan 1 2 Feb 1111111
7 Jan 1 3 Feb 1111111
9 Jan 1 4 Feb 11111111111111111 17
15 Jan 111 5 Feb 111111111111111 15
16 Jan 111111 6 Feb 111
17 Jan 1 7 Feb 111111111 9
18 Jan 1111111 8 Feb 111111
19 Jan 1 9 Feb 11111111 8
20 Jan 11111 10 Feb 11
21 Jan 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 57 11 Feb 111111111111111111111 21
22 Jan 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 60* 12 Feb 1111111111111111111111111111111 31
23 Jan 11111111111111111111111111111111111 35 approx. 13 Feb 11111111 8
24 Jan 111111111 9 11Omen 14 Feb 1111
25 Jan 111111111 9 15 Feb 1
26 Jan 1111 16 Feb 1111
27 Jan 1111111 17 Feb 1111111
28 Jan 11 18 Feb 11111
29 Jan 11 19 Feb 11111
30 Jan 1111 20 Feb 1111
31 Jan 1111111111 10 21 Feb 11
24 Feb 1111111
22 25 Feb 111
26 Feb 11
27 Feb 11
187






3 WWII


36TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Texans"


MARCH 1944 JUNE 1944 AUGUST 1944
1 Mar 1 1 June 111111111111111111111111 24 15 Aug 111111111111111 15
3 Mar 1 2 June 11111111111111111111 20 16 Aug 1111111111111111111111111 25
5 Mar 1 3 June 1111111111111111111 19 17 Aug 1111111
11 Mar 1 4 June 1111111111 10 18 Aug 1
18 Mar 1 5 June 1111111 19 Aug 1111111
6 June 1 20 Aug 1111
5 9 June 111 22 Aug 1
11 June 111111111111111111 18 23 Aug 111111
MAY 1944 12 June 111111111 9 24 Aug 1111111
13 June 1111111111 10 25 Aug 1111111111111 13
25 May 11 14 June 111111111111111111111 21 26 Aug 11111111111111 14
26 May 1 15 June 111 27 Aug 111111111111111111 18
27 May 1 16 June 1 28 Aug 1111111111111111 16
28 May 111111111111111 15 17 June 11111111111111 14 29 Aug 1111111111 10
29 May 1111111111111 13 18 June 111111 30 Aug 1111111111111 13
30 May 11111111111 11
19 June 1111 31 Aug 1
31 May 1111111111 10 20 June 1
20 June 158
53 21 June 111
22 June 1111111
23 June 11111
24 June 11
190





4 WWII


36TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Texans"

SEPTEMBER 1944 OCTOBER 1944 NOVEMBER 1944 DECEMBER 1944
1 Sept 1 1 Oct 1111 1 Nov 111 1 Dec 111111
7 Sept 1 2 Oct 11111111 8 2 Nov 11111 2 Dec 11111111 8
8 Sept 1 3 Oct 11111111 8 3 Nov 1 3 Dec 11111
9 Sept 111111 4 Oct 1111111111 10 4 Nov 1 4 Dec 111
10 Sept 1 5 Oct 111111111111 12 5 Nov 11111 5 Dec 111
11 Sept 11 6 Oct 11111111111 11 6 Nov 1 6 Dec 111111
12 Sept 111111111 9 7 Oct 111111111 9 7 Nov 1111 7 Dec 111111
13 Sept 11111 8 Oct 111111111111 12 9 Nov 1111111 8 Dec 1111
14 Sept 1111111 9 Oct 11 10 Nov 11111111 8 9 Dec 1111111111111 13
15 Sept 111 10 Oct 11 11 Nov 111 10 Dec 11
16 Sept 111 11 Oct 111 14 Nov 11 11 Dec 111111111 9
17 Sept 111 12 Oct 111 15 Nov 111 12 Dec 1111111
18 Sept 1 13 Oct 11111 17 Nov 1 13 Dec 11111111111 11
19 Sept 1111 14 Oct 11 20 Nov 1 14 Dec 1111111111111111 16
20 Sept 1 15 Oct 1111 21 Nov 1 15 Dec 1111111111 10
21 Sept 111111111111111111111111111 27 16 Oct 111111 22 Nov 111111111 9 16 Dec 1111111111 10
22 Sept 1111111111111111111111 22 17 Oct 1111111111 10 23 Nov 1111111111111 13 17 Dec 111111111 9
23 Sept 11 18 Oct 111 24 Nov 1 18 Dec 11111
24 Sept 1 19 Oct 111 25 Nov 111 19 Dec 111
25 Sept 11111111111111111111 20 20 Oct 111111 26 Nov 111111 20 Dec 11
26 Sept 111 21 Oct 111 27 Nov 11111 27 Dec 1
27 Sept 111111111 9 22 Oct 11 28 Nov 111111111111 12 29 Dec 11
28 Sept 1111111111111111 16 23 Oct 11 29 Nov 11111 141
29 Sept 11111111111111111111 20 24 Oct 11111 30 Nov 1111111111 10
30 Sept 111111111111111 15 25 Oct 1111111 110
13 26 Oct 11111111 8
183 27 Oct 111111
29 Oct 1111
30 Oct 1111
31 Oct 11111111 8
172






5 wwII


36TH INFANTRY DIVISION. "Texans"


JANUARY 1945 FEBRUARY 1945 MARCH 1945
2 Jan 1111 1 Feb 1111111 2 Mar 11
3 Jan 111 2 Feb 1111 5 Mar 1
4 Jan 111 3 Feb 11111111111111111111 20 7 Mar 1
6 Jan 1 4 Feb 11111111 8 13 Mar 111l
7 Jan 1 5 Feb 1 15 Mar 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 42
8 Jan 111 6 Feb 1 16 Mar 111111111111111111 18
9 Jan 1 8 Feb 11 17 Mar 111111111 9
14 Jan 11 9 Feb 1 18 Mar 11111111 8
17 Jan 1 10 Feb 1111111111111 13 19 Mar 1111111111111111 16
18 Jan 11 11 Feb 1111111 20 Mar 1111111111111 13
19 Jan 1 12 Feb 11111 21 Mar 11111111111111111111 20
20 Jan 11 15 Feb 111 22 Mar 111111111111 12
21 Jan 1111111111111111 16 21 Feb 1 23 Mar 1111
22 Jan 111111111 9 23 Feb 1 24 Mar 111
23 Jan 1111 25 Feb 1 26 Mar 1
24 Jan 1 26 Feb 1 28 Mar 11
25 Jan 1 27 Feb 1 29 Mar 1
29 Jan 1 78 157
31 Jan 11111111 8
64






6 WWII

36TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Texans"


APRIL 1945 MAY 1945 JULY 1945
1 Apr 1 1 May 1 20 July 1
2 Apr 1 2 May 111
13 Apr 111 4 May 1
18 Apr 11111 29 May 1
30 Apr 11 6
12
















36TH INFANTRY DIVISION'S
*bloodiest day 9 September 1943 or 22 January 1944
bloodiest month January 1944
3rd bloodiest day 21 January 1944
4th 15 March 1945
5th 23 January 1944
6th 12 February 1944
7th 9 December 1943
Total battle deaths 3,890
2,121 are listed=54.$1 KIA--3,318



















37TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Buckeye"

Originally-Ohio National Guard
Activated (WW II)-15 October 1940
Returned To United States-November 1945
Inactivated-18 December 1945
Battle Credits, World War II: New Georgia Bougainville Luzon
Commanding General (During Combat, WW II):
Maj-Gen Robert S. Beightler Commanded the division throughout
the entire war
Combat Chronicle: The 37th Infantry Division was originally activated in August 1917,
and saw action in the Meuse-Argonne and in western Belgium, during World War I.
The 37th was reactivated in October 1940, and, after intensive training, arrived in
the Fiji Islands, in June 1942, against a possible Japanese invasion. There, the 37th
continued its training. After Guadalcanal had been secured, the division moved to that
island in April 1943, and got ready to invade New Georgia, in the central Solomons.
First elements of the 37th landed on New Georgia, in conjunction with Marine Raider
battalions, on 5 July 1943. The rest of the division landed on 20 July 1943, and assist-
ed the 43rd Infantry Division in capturing Munda Airfield, in one of the hardest, most
difficult operations of the war in the Pacific. New Georgia was rain, mud, swamps, Eng-
lish speaking Japanese-and furious fighting.
On 20 July 1943, the 145th Infantry Regiment relieved the exhausted 169th Infantry
Regiment, 43rd Infantry Division. On this same day the 148th Infantry Regiment broke
through some enemy positions, and a road through the jungle between Laiana and the Munda
Track was completed, allowing the Americans to receive more supplies.
By 22 July 1943, total U.S. land forces on New Georgia, Rendova, and smaller islands
amounted to 32,000 Army troops and 1,700 Marine personnel.
On 25 July 1943, the 37th and 43rd Divisions opened a massive assault on Munda. But
the going was still very tough, as the Japanese continued their tenacious opposition.
First attacks on a ridge mass by the 37th were repulsed with heavy casualties, and there
was also severe fighting on Horseshoe Hill. It was on 31 July 1943, that the 37th had
one of its 7 Medal of Honor winners of the war, Private Rodger W. Young, of the 148th
Infantry Regiment.
A song was later written titled, "The Ballad of Rodger Young". Bespectacled and mild-
mannered, some thought he was too frail for combat, although he was well-liked by his
fellow soldiers. Rodger showed his mettle on 31 July 1943.
Operating in dense jungle, his platoon was suddenly pinned down by intense machinegun
fire. Although the other men had trouble locating the weapon, Pvt Young was sure he saw
it, and immediately began crawling toward the machinegun. Although hit twice, he contin-
ued his heroic advance, answering with rifle fire. When close enough, he began throwing
grenades, and though this time he was hit mortally, he had succeeded in drawing the enemy
fire on to himself. In so doing, he permitted his platoon to withdraw to a comparatively
safe area, while inflicting several casualties on the enemy. Pvt Young's sacrifice was








an inspiration to the men of his entire company.
Munda Airfield was finally taken on 5 August 1943, and mopping-up procedures then
began on the entire island. The 37th returned to Guadalcanal for rest and recuperation.
The 37th will probably always be best remembered for its slaughter of the Japanese on
Bougainville, in the northern Solomons. The Buckeyes began relieving the 3rd Marine Div-
ision there in mid-November 1943. They took over the perimeter defense of the area, and
constructed roads and bridges, and engaged in extensive patrol activity.
Then, some three months later in March 1944, some 16,000 Japanese who had been waiting
for the Americans to strike at Buin, on the other side of the island, trekked through the
jungle and struck in full fury, making 8 major attacks. (The Americal Division was also
on Bougainville at this time). The enemy assault consisted mainly of the infamous 6th
Division, perpetrators of the rape of Nanking.
The main Japanese assaults on the 37th consisted of 4 major attacks. These included
the 8 March 1944 attack on Hill 700, the "Hill of Heroes", where the battle raged in an
area no more than 100 yards long and 50 yards wide, and where a salient driven into the
lines of the 145th Infantry Regiment wasn't reduced until 13 March 1944; a main attack
on 11 March 1944, toward Piva Airfield which hit the 129th Infantry Regiment; and a 23
March 1944 general attack which penetrated the 37th's lines before it was defeated.
In April 1944, patrols cleared the Laruma River Valley of major enemy units. The
37th then remained on Bougainville, and trained for the invasion of Luzon.
On 9 January 1945, the 37th, along with the 6th, 40th, and 43rd Infantry Divisions,
came ashore at Lingayen Gulf, on Luzon, in the Philippines. The 37th helped spearhead
the drive toward Manila. Meeting slight resistance at first, the 37th met heavy opposit-
ion at Clark Field and Fort Stotsenburg, reaching Manila on 4 February 1945.
Manila was the only large city battle of the Pacific War, and the 37th bore the brunt
of the fighting. In terms of duration, ferocity, and casualties, it paralleled or sur-
passed many of the city battles in Europe. The Americans soon realized that they couldn't
hope to save a large part of the city from being wrecked, while at the same time root-out
the Japanese. And so, they reluctantly lifted restrictions on their artillery. Wherever
possible, though, they avoided the more valuable buildings including churches, hospitals,
and administrative structures, but the Japs made this hard to do because of their fanatic-
al resistance. Every building was a fortress, almost every street corner a machinegun
nest. Thousands of mines had been planted by the Japanese, and there were numerous booby-
traps. And the Japanese had 16,000 men inside the city. The 37th had more than one Medal
of Honor winner in Manila, one of whom was Pfc Joseph J. Cicchetti, Company A, 148th Inf-
antry Regiment, 9 February 1945.
He was with troops assaulting the first important line of enemy defenses. The Japanese
had converted the partially destroyed Manila Gas Works and adjacent buildings into a for-
midable system of mutual supporting strongpoints from which they concentrated machinegun,
mortar, and heavy artillery fire on the Americans. Casualties rapidly mounted, and the
medical aid men, finding it increasingly difficult to evacuate the wounded, called for
volunteer litter bearers.
Pfc Cicchetti immediately responded, organized a litter team, and skilfully led it for
more than 4 hours in rescuing 14 wounded men, constantly passing back and forth over a
400-yard route which was the impact area for a tremendous volume of the most intense enemy
fire. On one return trip the path was blocked by machinegun fire, but Pfc Cicchetti delib-
erately exposed himself to draw the automatic fire which he neutralized with his own rifle,
while ordering the rest of the team to rush past to safety with the wounded.
While gallantly continuing his work, he noticed a group of wounded and helpless soldiers
some distance away and ran to their rescue, although the enemy fire had increased in ren-
ewed intensity. As he approached the casualties, he was struck in the head by a shell
fragment. With complete disregard for this gaping wound, he continued to his comrades,
and lifted one and carried him on his shoulders 50 yards to safety. He then collapsed
and died.
By his skilled leadership, indomitable will, and dauntless courage, Pfc Cicchetti saved
the lives of many of his fellow soldiers at the cost of his own. His actions upheld the
highest traditions of the U.S. military.









Furious building-to-building fighting continued. On 23 February 1945, an assault was
begun on Intramuros after heavy artillery preparation. The 145th Infantry stormed the
Quezon and Parian Gates, while the 129th Infantry crossed the Pasig River in assault
boats and attacked the Mint Building. Meanwhile, the 148th Infantry cleared the Legis-
lative Building. The fighting was furious and the heat was stifling, but by 3 March 1945,
Manila was finally cleared. The city was left in ruins, and thousands of Filipino civil-
ians who had been caught up in the battle were slaughtered by the Japs, as they, themselves
were being annihilated.
After garrison duty in Manila, 5-26 March 1945, and then a well-earned rest, the 37th
was shifted north into the Caraballo Mountains. Meanwhile, the 145th Infantry Regiment
was temporarily detached to help out other units in the fighting in the hills northeast
of Manila.
While this took place, in the more northern part of Luzon, more hard and heavy fighting
occurred. Late in April 1945, the 37th, in conjunction with the 33rd Infantry Division,
slugged forward and took the mile-high city of Baguio. Baguio was the summer capital of
the Philippines, and had also been the headquarters of General Yamashita. Next, the 148th
Infantry Regiment helped out the 25th Infantry Division in the rugged, bloody fighting
through Balete Pass.
After resting during most of May, the 37th advanced into the Cagayen River Valley in
June 1945, after a sharp fight at Oriung Pass. Advancing northward in the valley the 37th
took Ilagan against deteriorating resistance, and eventually made contact north of Tugueg-
arao with elements of the 511th Parachute Regiment, llth Airborne Division, which had drop-
ped near Aparri.
The 37th then struck eastward into the wild Sierra Madre Mountains of northeastern Luzon,
where the division eliminated about 1,000 of the enemy before V-J Day, 14 August 1945. The
37th lost some 50 men killed in action in this last operation.
Few outfits in the Pacific had seen more of the enemy, or slain more of them than the
Buckeye Division. The 37th then helped process prisoners of war, until it returned home
in November 1945.

Honors: Congressional Medals of Honor-- Casualties: Total Battle Deaths-1,456
Distinguished Unit Citations--9 Killed In Action---1,112
Distinguished Service Crosses-116 Wounded 5,261
Silver Stars 1,008 Missing 4
Captured-- 1
* One to the entire 148th Infantry Regiment--Luzon Total Casualties--6,378

Other 37th Infantry Division Medal of Honor winners in World War II: Killed in action *
Pfc Anthony L. Krotiak, 148th Inf Rgt, 8 May 1945, Balete Pass, Luzon
Pfc Frank J. Petrarca, 145th Inf Rgt, 27 July 1943, Horseshoe Hill, New Georgia
Pfc John N. Reese, Jr., 148th Inf Rgt, 9 February 1945, Manila, Luzon
Pvt Cleto Rodriguez, 148th Inf Rgt, 9 February 1945, Manila, Luzon
2nd Lt Robert M. Viale, 148th Inf Rgt, 5 February 1945, Manila, Luzon






1 WWII


37TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Buckeye"

JULY 1943 AUGUST 1943 MARCH 1944 APRIL 1944
10 July 1 1 Aug 1111111111111 13 9 Mar 1111111111 10 11 Apr 1
11 July 111111 2 Aug 11111 10 Mar 11111
15 July 1 3 Aug 1 11 Mar 1111111111111111 16
17 July 1 4 Aug 11111111111111 14 12 Mar 111111111111111 15
18 July 1111 5 Aug 1 13 Mar 1 MAY 1944
19 July 1111 7 Aug 1 14 Mar 11111
20 July 1111 21 Aug 1 15 Mar 111111111 9 19 May 1
21 July 11111 16 Mar 11 23 May 1
22 July 11111111 8 318 Mar 11111 24 May 1
23 July 11 19 Mar 1 ay
24 July 1 NOVEMBER 1943 20 Mar 1111 4
25 July 11111 8 Nov 1 22 Mar 1
26 July 111 12 Nov 23 Mar JULY 1944
27 July 11111111i 9 24 Mar 11111111111111111 17
28 July 111111111111 12 2 25 Mar 11 28 July 1
29 July 111111111 9 26 Mar 111111
Jlyllllllllllllll 17 27 Mar 1
30 July 11111111111111111 17 DECEMBER 1943 27 Mar 1
31 July 11lll1111ll111 14 30 Mar 1
10 Dec 1
106 23 Dec 1
29 Dec 1
3






2 WWII


37TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Buckeye"


JANUARY 1945 FEBRUARY 1945 MARCH 1945 APRIL 1945
12 Jan 11 1 Feb 11111111 8 1 Mar 1 5 Apr 11
18 Jan 1 2 Feb 111111111 9 2 Mar 1 8 Apr 111
22 Jan 11 4 Feb 1 4 Mar 11 9 Apr 11
27 Jan 1111 5 Feb 111 5 Mar 11 10 Apr 1
28 Jan 111 6 Feb 1111 9 Mar 1 11 Apr 11
29 Jan 111111111 9 7 Feb 111111 11 Mar 1 12 Apr 11111
30 Jan 1111111111 10 8 Feb 111111111111111 15 14 Mar 1 13 Apr 1
31 Jan 11111111111 11 9 Feb 11111111111111111111111111111111 33* 26 Mar 1 14 Apr 111111
42 10 Feb 111111111111111111111111 24 approx. 28 Mar 1 16 Apr 1
11 Feb 111111111111111111 18 60Mmen 17 Apr 11111111 8
12 Feb 11111111 8 18 Apr 111
13 Feb 111111 19 Apr 111111
14 Feb 1111111111111111111111 22 20 Apr 111111
15 Feb 11111 21 Apr 1111111
16 Feb 111111 22 Apr 11111111 8
17 Feb 111 23 Apr 1111111111 10
18 Feb 111111 24 Apr 111111111111111 15
19 Feb 1111111111 10 25 Apr 11111111111111111111 20
20 Feb 11111111 8 26 Apr 11
21 Feb 1111 27 Apr 11
22 Feb 111111111111 12 28 Apr 111
23 Feb 11 30 Apr 1111111111 10
24 Feb 1111 1
25 Feb 11
26 Feb 1
27 Feb 1
221






3 WWII


37TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Buckeye"


MAY 1945 JUNE 1945 JULY 1945 AUGUST 1945
1 May 1 1 June 11 2 July 1 1 Aug 11
2 May 1 2 June 1111 3 July 11 5 Aug 1111
3 May 11 3 June 11 7 July 1 6 Aug 11111
5 May 111 6 June 111 8 July 1 9 Aug 1
7 May 1111 7 June 11 13 July 1 12
8 May 1111111111 10 10 June 1111111 19 July 1111
10 May 11 11 June 1111 20 July 1
12 May 1111 13 June 11 22 July 1
14 May 111 15 June 11 23 July 1
16 May 11 17 June 1 31 July 1
21 May 1 18 June 1 14
22 May 1 19 June 11
31 May 11 20 June 1111
21 June 1
6 22 June 111
24 June 111
26 June 11
45








37TH INFANTRY DIVISION'S
*bloodiest day 9 February 1945
bloodiest month February 1945
2nd bloodiest day 10 February 1945
3rd bloodiest day --14 February 1945
Total battle deaths 1,456
759 are listed=52.1% KIA-1,112


















38TH INFANTRY DIVISION "Cyclone"

Originally-Indiana, Kentucky, West Virginia National Guard
Activated (WW II)-17 January 1941
Returned To United States-30 October 1945
Inactivated-lO November 1945
Battle Credits, World War II: Leyte Bataan Peninsula Luzon
Commanding Generals (During Combat, WW II):
Maj-Gen Henry L. Jones April 1942-February 1945
Maj-Gen William C. Chase February-July 1945
Maj-Gen Frederick A. Irving August 1945--Inactivation

Combat Chronicle: The 38th Infantry Division got its nickname, the "Cyclone Division",
when it was stationed at Camp Shelby, Mississippi. The tent-city in which it was bivouacked
was levelled by tremendous winds. Someone dubbed the 38th the Cyclones, and the name stuck.
After extensive training in the United States, the 38th left the San Francisco port of
embarkation on 3 January 1944.
The 38th arrived in Hawaii, on 17 January 1944, and took over the defense of Oahu. After
this, the division sailed to New Guinea, where part of it trained in the Oro Bay area from
July-November 1944.
In early-December 1944, the 38th shipped out for Leyte, in the Philippines, while heavy
fighting was still raging on that island.
On the evening of 5 December 1944, some 350 Japanese paratroopers dropped on the Buri and
San Pablo airstrips, in central Leyte, attempting to recapture them. While some elements of
the llth Airborne and 96th Infantry Divisions were already in this area, the tough Jap para-
troopers caused sufficient havoc, that the 38th's 149th Infantry Regiment was sent into the
battle to help out. The first night of this battle, 5 December 1944, turned out to be the
38th's bloodiest day in combat of the war, as the Japanese paratroopers resisted fanatically.
The Japs were very hard to flush out of the jungle surrounding the airstrips, and for the
next three days the paratroopers of the llth Airborne had a go at it. The 149th Infantry
finally finished up the tough battle by 10 December 1944, with the Japanese paratroopers
being annihilated. The 149th defended the airstrips until relieved on 4 January 1945.
A battalion of the 152nd Infantry Regiment was moved to Agojo Point, on Samar, while the
151st Infantry Regiment performed security operations in the Culaisan Point-Barugo area, on
Leyte, while under the control of the 24th Infantry Division. The 38th lost approximately
100 men on Leyte.
The 38th's next battle began when it landed on the southwestern coast of Luzon, north of
Subic Bay, on 29 January 1945, reinforced by the 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Div-
ision. This landing cut-in behind a large force of Japanese troops who were fighting large
elements of the U.S. 6th Army in the central Luzon plains, further north. At first, every-
thing went pretty well according to plan. Moving rapidly inland against scattered resist-
ance, the 38th captured Olongapo, and an airstrip at San Marcelino.
But then, advancing further east across the top of the Bataan Peninsula, the 38th ran in-
to a hornet's nest of some 3,000 Japanese, well dug-in at a place called Zig Zag Pass. This








pass twists and turns through some of the most mountainous and densest jungle terrain any-
where in the world. The Japanese used all their resources in an effort to hold this pass.
Mountain guns blasted the winding road to the pass. Mines made every step a dangerous one.
Machineguns swept every twist and turn, and from caves and heavily fortified pillboxes the
Japs poured continual artillery and mortar fire. In one instance, an entire battalion was
getting ready to set up a perimeter defense for the night on some high ground when, sudden-
ly, a group of Japs began firing from in the midst of them. They had been hiding in camou-
flaged foxholes and trenches, and casualties were heavy on both sides. Such was the nature
of the fighting. The Japanese had a number of tanks in the pass area, too.
The battle was furious, particularly on 8 February 1945. But the 38th was not to be den-
ied victory. The enemy was given a heavy artillery bombardment, the 34th Infantry Regiment
was brought forward, and progress improved. Nevertheless, it took 16 days of very rugged
combat to break through the pass. The 38th, employing all three regiments in this pass,
plus the 34th Infantry Regiment, altogether, lost 375 men.
Next, the 38th completed the reconquest of Bataan. The 151st Infantry Regiment made an
amphibious attack at Mariveles, catching the Japs off-guard, and defeating a major Japanese
counterattack on the night of 15 February 1945.
The 38th pushed down the east coast road to Pilar, and across the peninsula to Bagac,
securing most of the Bataan Peninsula by 21 February 1945.
A battalion of the 151st Infantry was detached to relieve the 503rd Parachute Regiment
on Corregidor, on 24 February 1945. "The Rock" was secured by 28 February.
The 38th then moved to Fort Stotsenburg, 10 March 1945, and relieved the 43rd Infantry
Division there. It then pushed west to destroy entrenched Japanese between the fort and
Mount Pinatubo.
Meanwhile, battalion-sized landings were conducted by the 151st Infantry on Caballo Is-
land and Fort Drum, on 27 March 1945, and on Carabao, 16 April.
Fierce fighting continued for the 149th Infantry in the wild Zambales Mountains of south-
western Luzon. It was during this fighting that the 38th had a Medal of Honor winner, Pfc
William H. Thomas, Company B, 149th Infantry Regiment, 22 April 1945.
Pfc Thomas was a member of the leading squad of Company B, which was attacking along a
narrow, wooded ridge. The Japanese, strongly entrenched in camouflaged emplacements on the
hill beyond, directed heavy fire and hurled explosive charges on the attacking GIs. Pfc
Thomas, an automatic rifleman, was struck by one of these charges, which blew off both of
his legs below the knees. He refused medical aid and evacuation, and continued to fire at
the enemy until his weapon was put out of action by an enemy bullet. Still refusing treat-
ment, he threw his last two grenades. He killed 3 Japanese after suffering the wounds from
which he died later that day.
The effective fire of Pfc Thomas prevented the repulse of his platoon, and assured the
capture of this enemy position. His magnificent courage was an everlasting inspiration to
his fellow soldiers.
The 38th moved as a unit to the Sierra Madre Mountains, northeast of Manila, to relieve
the exhausted 6th Infantry Division on 30 April 1945. This battle is officially called the
Battle of East-Central Luzon. Initially, the Japanese had 15,000 troops in this region.
With the 43rd Infantry Division capturing Ipo Dam on 17 May 1945, the 38th, meanwhile, fou-
ght a series of furious battles to capture Wawa Dam, the other of the two dams which was
vital to Manila's water supply.
This region was almost impassable terrain, and the Japanese had a well-developed and in-
terlocking series of caves, tunnels, pillboxes, and artillery emplacements.
After an intensive artillery bombardment, the 152nd Infantry Regiment attacked Woodpecker
Ridge, on 2 May 1945, but its advance was suspended until 4 May, when it attacked again, and
again was brought to a halt.
In the meantime, the 145th Infantry Regiment of the 37th Infantry Division, which was att-
ached to the 38th in this battle, attacked the Shimbu Line, 4 May 1945, as the 38th approach-
ed Wawa Dam. After heavy fighting the 145th gained the top of Sugar Loaf Hill, 6 May 1945.
The following day the 152nd Infantry reattacked Woodpecker Ridge, while the 145th Infantry
finally took Mount Binicayan, 9 May, after several assaults.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs