Group Title: West Indies in 1837 being the journal of a visit to Antigua, Montserrat, Dominica, St. Lucia, Barbadoes, and Jamaica undertaken for the purpose of ascertaining the actual condition of the Negro population of those islands
Title: The West Indies in 1837 being the journal of a visit to Antigua, Montserrat, Dominica, St. Lucia, Barbadoes, and Jamaica undertaken for the purpose of ascertaining the actual condition of the Negro population of those islands
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00044199/00001
 Material Information
Title: The West Indies in 1837 being the journal of a visit to Antigua, Montserrat, Dominica, St. Lucia, Barbadoes, and Jamaica undertaken for the purpose of ascertaining the actual condition of the Negro population of those islands
Physical Description: xi, 380, xciv p. : ; 22cm.
Language: English
Creator: Sturge, Joseph, 1793-1859
Harvey, Thomas, 1812-1814
Publisher: Hamilton, Adams, and co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1938
 Subjects
Subject: Blacks -- West Indies   ( lcsh )
West Indies, British   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: By Joseph Sturge and Thomas Harvey.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00044199
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000140250
oclc - 26639324
notis - AAQ6382

Full Text






T H E


WEST INDIES
IN

1837;

BEING THE


JOURNAL OF A VISIT TO ANTIGUA,


MONTSERRAT, DOMINICA,


ST. LUCIA, BARBADOS, AND JAMAICA;

UNDERTAKEN FOR

TI'EI PURPOSE OF ASCERITA[NlNG I'HE ACTUAL CONDITION OF THE
NEGRO POPULATION OF THOSE ISLANDS.




BY

JOSEPH FURGE AND THOMAS HARVEY.





LONDON:
HAMILTON, .\i.\ ,1 & CO. PATERNOSTER ROW.
PRINTED BY B. HUDSON, BIRIIINGHAM.
MDCC(XXXVI 1.














CG ONT E N T S.


CHAP. I.
PAGBi
BARBADOS ........... ... ... .. ....... 1
CHAP. II.
VOYAGE TO ANTIGUA ............................ 9
CHAP. III.
ANTIGUA ...................................... 18
CHAP. IV.
RESULTS OF EMANCIPATION IN ANTIGUA ............ 69
CHAP. V.
M ONTSERRAT.................................... 80
CHAP. VI.
D OMINICA ...................................... 90
CHAP. VII.
M ARTINIqUE ...... .................. ......... 108
CHAP. VIII.
ST. LUCIA .......... ............................. 119
CHAP. IX.
BARBADOS....................................... 128
CHAP. X.
RARBADOS,-GENERAL REMARKS .................. 150
CHAP. XI.
JAMAICA .................. ...................... 156
CHAP. XII.
JAMAICA-JOURNAL OF WILLIAM LLOYD AND THOMAS
HARVEY. .................. ................ 287
CHAP. XIII.
RESULTS OF THE APPRENTICESHIP IN JAMAICA ....... 344
CHAP. XIV.
CoNCLuSION ........ ........................... 373











Viii. PREFACE.

hope, that a blessing may accompany it; and, that it may
promote, in however small a degree, the glory of God, and
the happiness of that injured, oppressed, and still enslaved
portion of their fellow men and fellow subjects, who have
been the objects of their labors, anxieties, and prayers.
llth MONTH, 30th, (NOV.) 1837.


We embarked at Falmouth, on board the Skylark
Packet, commanded by Lieutenant C. P. LADD, R. N., on
the 17th of 10th Month (October) 1836 ; and after a plea-
sant voyage, came in sight of land on the 12th of llth Month
(November.) Land was announced from the mast-head
about eight o'clock a. m., and in three or four hours the
dark outline of the eastern shore of Barbados was visible
from the deck. We cast anchor in Carlisle Bay before mid-
night. On the following morning most of the passengers
were on deck at sunrise ; some ready to greet the familiar
appearance of a well known shore, and others to receive the
novel impressions of a tropical clime and country. The
view of the town and Bay is very beautiful. Bridgetown ex-
tends almost from point to point, along two or three miles
of a curved shore. The white houses are interspersed with
cocoa-nut and palmetto trees. After leaving the vessel, we
realized in our first brief hour on land, our earliest and pro-
bably our deepest impressions of the characteristic features
of the country. The vegetation is wholly different from
that of Europe. The larger trees are chiefly palms, and the
smaller beautiful flowering shrubs. Many of the fences are
composed of a gigantic species of cactus, the prickly pear.
It seemed extraordinary to see the sickly exotics of an Eng-
lish conservatory, growing in such luxuriant vigour. Our
feelings also were deeply interested in finding ourselves in
the midst of a dark population. There were all shades of
color, from fair mulatto to black. We could not avoid being
struck with the beautiful and intelligent countenances and
European foreheads of many of the colored children.





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