Tales for the little ones

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Material Information

Title:
Tales for the little ones
Physical Description:
86, 2, 8 p. : ill., music ; 18 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
John
Wentworth, Frederick ( Engraver )
Houghton, Arthur Boyd, 1836-1875 ( Illustrator )
Cassell, Petter & Galpin ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Cassell, Petter & Galpin
Place of Publication:
London ;
Paris ;
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1877   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1877   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1877   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1877
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
France -- Paris
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Uncle John.
General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Contains prose, verse and songs.
General Note:
Some illustrations engraved by F. Wentworth and some drawn by A. Houghton.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002239110
notis - ALH9635
oclc - 61442437
System ID:
UF00035192:00001

Full Text



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FOR THE


LIfT LE ONES.





BY
UNCLE JOHN.





EIGHTIETH THOUSAND.






CAPPE,LL, PETTER & QALPIN:
LONDON, PARIS & NEW YORK.






2 "TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

SIR GIRAFFE DE GIRAFFE.
SIR GIRAFFE DE GIRAFFE is a very fine
gentleman, so tall and graceful, with
such thin straight legs, and such a little
head on such a long neck. Did you
ever see Sir Giraffe as he walks about
in his town house at the Zoological
Gardens ? When he is at home, in
the far-off countries, Sir Giraffe walks
about among the palm trees, and is so
tall that he can crop off the topmost
branches as he walks. But Sir Giraffe
is a great coward, and will run away
from a very much smaller personage
than himself. He is, however, an
elegant fellow, and it is quite a treat to
see him walk gracefully about, nodding
his little head, as if he were always
saying-" How do y do ? I hope you
are very well." Sir Giraffe has a very
pretty coat, so beautifully spotted all
over. Would you like a ride on him ?





























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SIR GIRAFFE DE GIRAFFE.






4 TALES FOR, THE LITTLE ONES.

BROTHER AND SISTER.
GEORGE and LETTY GREEN are sitting
on the hill-side, talking. What do you
think they are talking about ? They
live in that little house you see peep-
ing through the trees, and father and
mother are very poor: so poor that
George and Letty koth know they
often find it difficult to get food and
clothing for them. So George is telling
Letty of a plan he has got for saving,
out of the money he gets for watching
Farmer Giles's sheep, enough to buy
mother a new gown, as a birth-day
present, and Letty is to make it all by
herself, without letting mother know
about it till they give it to her, with
their best love. Their mother will be
greatly pleased at receiving such a useful
present; but she will be pleased most
of all because the gift shows how her
children love her.

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Vuron
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BROTHER AND SISTER.






6 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE MARTYR.
IN those cruel days when people burnt
one another alive because they could
not agree to serve God in the same
manner, Mark Steadfast was put in
prison, and, though he was a very old
man, they kept him. there for many long
weeks, trying to make him give up read-
ing his Bible. But Mark was a good
old man, and would not listen to them,
and he was very much comforted during
his trials by the loving attentions of his
daughter Ruth, who came every day to
the prison to see her father, and try to
cheer him up. When at last the cruel
men came and took old Mark and
bound him to a stake, and then burned
him alive, Mark died without a mur-
mur, praying God to forgive his ene-
mies. Ruth wept bitterly, but kind
friends took care of her, and loved her
as their own daughter.































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THE MARTYR.






8 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE AVALANCHE.
RIGHT away among the snow-covered
mountains there stand very pretty little
chalets. Sometimes a strange rumbling
is heard, and women grow white as the
snow itself, and catch up their babies,
while men hurriedly collect their cattle,
and rouse their neighbours with the cry,
"Pierre! Jean! run, the avalanche is
coming!" And then there is a scamper
for bare life. Fathers, mothers, children,
and the frightened cattle go tearing down
towards the valleys, fortunate, indeed, if
they escape bruised and broken limbs,
or even death itself; for great broken
masses of snow and ice come rolling
down, crushing and breaking everything
in their way, snapping the strong green
firs as though they were bits of fire-
wood, and leaving the pretty chalets
mere heaps of rubbish, burying them
altogether, crushing all before them.






















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"THE AV'AL "CE






zo TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

JINNEY IN THE DITCH.
OF all the obstinate donkeys that ever
I met with, Jinney was the worst. She
would go exactly where she was not
wanted. If any little girls got on her
back, she walked up to the roughest
hedge she knew of, and she seemed to
know exactly where to find the thorniest
ones, and then rubbed and rubbed their
legs against them until they were glad
enough to get off again. If a boy got
on her back, why she quietly shook him
off, tumbling him over her head in a
manner wonderful to see. If that did
not do, she would quietly roll over on
her back, and kick her legs about in
such a frantic way, so that even the
most daring urchin in the village gave it
up as a bad job, and Jinney was let
alone, to draw her master's little cart to
market twice a week, and to eat all the
rest of the time.


















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JINNEY IN THE DITCH.







12 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

ON THE ICE.
NOT in England here, you know,
But away far over the sea,
'Mid ice, and snow, and cold
Three busy folks I can see.

There's Rollo, a fisherman pocr,
'Tis said he is eighty years old,
And Tym, and Joan, and Gog,
All standing out in the cold.

Tym, with his short nose so red,
And Joan muffled up in fur,
And Gog with his ears thrown back,
A sharp little bandy-legged cur.
Old Rollo, who's fishing for dinner,
Drops in a line with a hook,
"You fish, who have hid all the winter,
Come up-at the daylight look."
They come, with a splash and a splutter,
Tym gets a cold dab in the face,
While Gog runs away with a bark and
a growl,
In a hurry to leave the place.
When Rollo his basket has filled,
Away they go over the ice-
He trots away to the market,
And they scamper home like mice.



















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14 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.


THE PLAYMATES.
Spiritoso. Music by T. CRAMPTON.

VICE

and I. Full of fun and fro-lic Is oursweetpet Rose,
2. Rose is queen, and Pussy Is chief waiting-maid;






When thegambos o ver, Rose be-gins to tire; "
PIANO. '- 0,, 1'1


I PIN


And her elf- like movements Puz- zle all she knows;
SSure-ly such at ten-tion Ne'er to queen was paid.







Puss and Rose are playmates, Both so full of glee;
When the gambol's o ver, Rose be-gins to tire;




g T s a| t t c Iy


'Tis a treat to watch them Play-ing mer ri ly.
Off to sleep with Pus sy, Nestling by the fire.












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16 .TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE VAIN LITTLE GIRL.
FANNY is a bonnie girl,
But, oh! she's very vain;
And to peep into the looking-glass
She'll turn and turn again.
One day she drest her in her best,
Blue hat and frock of pink;
Then quietly she stole away
Down to the brooklet's brink.
Here, standing tiptoe on a-stone,
And holding by a tree,
She peeped into the streamlet,
Her pretty self to see;
When all at once the stone upset,
And Fan got such a souse;
She crawled back home, wet through
and through,
Just like a half-drowned mouse.













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THE VAIN LITTLE GIRL-
BID*






18 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE LITTLE CRIPPLE.
IARRY SMEDLEY had always been a
cripple. Poor little man, his seemed a
very hard life, having to sit there in the
arbour all alone, whilst his brothers and
sisters were out playing and romping.
But Harry was not unhappy, only
sometimes he would get rather sad, and
sit thinking for hours 'why he should
be a- cripple, unable to do more than
paddle about on crutches, whilst every
other little boy whom he knew was
strong and hearty, and able to enjoy the
health with which God had blessed
him. Harry's mother had, however,
early taught her boy that it sometimes
pleases God to keep some little boys
weak and feeble in body, that they may
become better in mind and heart,
and teach lessons of patience and faith
to others. And Harry had learnt to
be patient, thankful, and happy.


































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rHE LITTLE CRIPPLE






2o TALES FOR TiE LITTLE ONES.

LITTLE BUNNY.
LITTLE BUNNY lived in a very little hole,
in a very large park, and was as happy
as a king all the day long. Bunny had
a beautiful black, furry coat, though all
his brothers 'and sisters were brown;
and he was a very sly young rabbit, as
full of fun and frolic as a kitten, and
as wild and restless as the birds. The
little hole in which Bunny lived opened
into a long passage, out of which a
great many holes were made by Bunny's
sisters, and brothers, for there was quite
a large family of them altogether. One
day there was such a bustle in the place.
Some cruel men had brought, a little
animal called a ferret, and let it into the
passage, and a great many of Bunny's
sisters were killed by it before they
could get away. But little Bunny,
perhaps because of his black coat, was
not seen, and so got out of harm's way.




























































kL~I'ITE BNY









22 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES


THE GARDENER'S SONG.

Slowly. Music by T. CRAMPTON.

VOICE

ed x. Come, walk a-round my gar-den beds, Come, watch my bloom-ing
enO a. Pass not the buds un h.ed- ed by, To gaze up on the

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flowers Turn to the sun their sleep y heads, Or bend be-fore soft show'rs.
rose; Morn-ing will all these buds un-fold Theirgor-geous tints dis close.








They o pen with the morn-ing bright, They close at set of day, They
So do not waste thy plea-sant hours, That pass so quick-ly by, But








fl the air with fra -- grance light, Then soft ly die a - way.
S jin me in my gar - den bow'rs While sum-mer's sun is high.
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THE GARDENER'S SONG.






24 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE HUNTERS.
THESE are Lord Foxglove's hunters;
and very fine horses Roland and Bessie
are. In their own nice large stable,
with a crib full of corn to eat, and clean,
fresh straw to lie down upon, they look
very quiet. When Jerry, the groom,
comes to rub them down, they stand as
still as a post; for Jerry is a favourite
with them, and they like to hear his
" Swish, swish, swish," as he brushes
over their glossy backs and side. But
if you want to see Roland and Bessie at
their best, you should see them in the
field, when the dogs have scent of a fox.
They are all on fire then, and fly ovei
hedge, ditch, and dyke more like birds
than horses. When they go out to
grass, they always keep quite close
together, and wherever Roland goes
Bessie goes too, for they are very fond
of each other.































































THE HUNTERS.






26 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE RESTING-PLACE.
IN those wide, wild deserts where for
miles and miles there is nothing but
sand to be seen, there are little green
spots to be found, like this one, in which
a few tall trees, and sometimes a ruined
building, may be seen. You may be
sure the poor traveller is very glad to
find such a place to rest in after a
weary walk or ride all day under the
hot, burning rays of the sun, which is
very fierce and strong in those places.
The people you see in the picture seem
quite to enjoy the cool shade and soft
grass, do they not? Even the poor
horse will be glad of a rest after the
hot, burning sand he has been walking
on all day. Sometimes the wind blows
the sand into a cloud, and then it gets
into the eyes of the poor travellers,
making them quite blind. Here they
can rest and refresh themselves.






























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TH RESTING-PLA CF.---






&8 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE GENEROUS BOY.
FELIX HOLT, when he first went
to school, felt very lonely. Very soon,
however, he made friends amongst his
schoolfellows, and being a cheerful little
fellow, became a great favourite. When
he had been there about three months,
it was his birthday; and, greatly to his
delight, his kind parents sent him a
hamper full of presents. There was a
pie big enough for a dozen boys, and
more than a dozen helped to eat it;
for Felix shared all the good things
amongst his friends, which you may be
sure made him very popular. What a
treat they all had as long as the apples,
and plums, and tarts, and sweets, and
cake lasted! No boy in the school was
more liked than he was; and kindness
begot kindness; for all the boys, in
their turn, shared their good things with
Felix.







































THE GENEROUS BOY.
















THE GENEROUS BOY.






30 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE OWL AND T4 -:
MAGPIE.
ONCE upon a time a great grey Owl
had built her nest in a tower, covered
over with ivy and moss, and a Magpie
had also made her home close by.
Now the Magpie was very fond of
talking, and would never leave off if he
could only get any one to listen to him.
But the Owl was a very wise old bird,
and did not care for such a chatterbox as
the Magpie was. So when the Magpie
came and teased her by his noise, and
waked her out of her sleep, for the Owl
slept all day, she gave the Magpie a
good scolding, and told him to work
more and talk less, for little folks, she
said, should be seen and not heard. But
the Magpie was a silly little bird, and
chattered so much that at last the Owl
turned her back upon him, and refused
to speak another word.
















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THE O A'L AND THE MAGPIE.






32 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

"CAUGHT !"
WHAT a pleasant thing it is to stay at
the sea-side, to watch the dashing of
the waves upon the beach, and to
see the boats, and the fishermen and
the fish wives! So thought Tommy
Watson as he stood on the shore at
Herne Bay. The tide was just coming
in, and Tommy had been tempted to
step from one stone to another, till he
had got a long way from the shore. He
had not noticed how far he had wan-
dered till, suddenly looking round, he
found that the tide had got between
him and the land. He climbed upon
a rock and shouted, but no one heard
him. Presently he grew rather fright-
ened, and waved his hat to a boatman,
who saved him. You may be sure that
Tom was very glad to be taken back;
and he was very careful to keep nearer
shore for the future.




































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"CAUGHT 1





34 TALES FO1i0 IHE LITTLE ONES.
THE ANACONDA AND THE
WILD DEER.
POOR Wild Deer! He came down to
the water to have a nice cool drink, and
perhaps a quiet bath before he went to
bed, for he had been running about all
day. He had hardly got into the water
before he heard a loud hiss, and he
knew what it was, so he tried to jump
out and run away. But the cruel Serpent
was too quick for him, and, darting
down from the tall tree overhead, it
wrapped itself round and round the
poor stag, and bit him in the neck.
The poor beast tried hard to break
loose; but the Serpent made his bones
crack, he squeezed him so tightly; and
very soon the poor thing was dead. The
Serpent is a pretty-looking thing, with
beautiful rings all round its body; but,
like many things that look pretty, it is
very cruel, and bites very hard.




































































THE ANACONDA AND THE WILD DEER.





36 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE OLD CASTLE.
WHAT a strongly-built place it looks,
does it not? This is as they used to
build the castles in the old time. With
such tiny windows, only just big enough
for them to shoot their arrows through,
and only one big door, which was kept
locked, and bolted, and barred every
night. In the olden times, you know,
might was too often considered right,
and strong castles were thought neces-
sary by the nobles, some of whom were
very tyrannical, and escaped punish-
ment by shutting themselves up in their
castles. There was generally a dungeon
in these old castles, in which people
were cruelly confined, and sometimes
put to death. You might read, in the
History of England, many stories of
these old castles, and you would after-
wards feel glad to live in an age when
the rich and poor live happily together.








































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THE OLD CASTLE.






38 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

SUSAN GRAY.
Livdy. Music by T. CRAMPTON.
VOICE
I-,
and I. Su-san Gray, one fine bright day, Had rambled down the
n '2. Then Su-san stood and cried a loud, As if her heart would
PIANO. -J




street; Watching a Punch and Ju-dy show That she had chanc'd to meet.
"break; Her ve ry doll seem'd wretched too, But then it could not speak.






She wandered on from place to plae, For-get-ting to turn back, Till,
When Su-san did not go backhome They sent the Bell-man round; He
11 ,d t r- -tn t tr Till,




when quite tired, she looked for home, But found she'd lost her track.
rang lhi bell and spoke so loud That Su-san soonwasfound.

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SUSAN GRAY.





40 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE CASSOWARY.
THIS is a very big bird, almost as tall
as a man, with a tuft on its head like a
soldier's cap, and a long, white neck
like a crane. You should see it run;
it can beat the swiftest horses some-
times, and is so strong it can kill a dog
by a stroke of its foot. It is not a very
good-natured bird, and is very angry
if any one goes near to it with anything
red. What a lot of bread, and apples,
and carrots it can eat! It gobbles
them up without crushing them-swal-
lows them whole. If you go to see the
one at the Zoological Gardens, you
should be careful not to go too near,
lest you get a stroke from its strong,
sharp claws. Though the Cassowary
can run very fast when free, and at
home in the desert, it cannot fly,
because its wings are so short, and its
body is so heavy.





























































THE CASSOWARY.





42 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.
GATHERING APPLES.
IN our 'old garden at home we have
such a fine apple-tree, almost as big as
the house! The apples hang on it so
thickly, they push one another off, and
dr ,p down on the ground. Polly picks
them up in her pinny; but Master
Harry, not content with this, must
needs get a kitchen-chair, to mount into
the tree, after the fine ripe red ones
hanging there. I am sorry to say that
Harry, instead of being kind to his sister,
is a selfish little fellow, and lies on his
back in the tree, eating all the nice ones
he finds, although Polly holds out her
little hand, asking him to throw her one
down. If Master Harry does not take
care, he will be slipping off, and hurt
himself. What a pity Harry is so selfish!
Polly and he might be as happy as the
day is long, if it were not for these
naughty tempers.
















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G E APPLES.









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GATHERING APPLES.





44 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

ROVER.
ROVER is on duty, taking care of the
hares and birds his master has shot
"They have had a good day's sport, for
Rover is a capital dog for stirring up
the game, and his master is a good
hand at shooting them when Rover
holds up his foot and points them out.
But Rover knows when he is out with
a good sportsman, for having gone out
one day with a gentleman on a visit to
his master, but who did not know how
to shoot, Rover was so vexed at the
gentleman for missing the birds and the
hares he pointed at, that he turned
round and trotted quietly home, leaving
the gentleman to make his way back
by himself. Now that was very rude
of Rover, -was it not ? But then, you
know, he was only a dog, and so we
must not be hard upon him; besides,
he did not always act so rudely.





















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ROVE





46 :TALES W'OR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE SQUIRRELS.
THIS is Master Bushy and his sister.
They are brown squirrels, and live in
this tree, where they have built them-
selves quite a large nest, as you see.
Oh, what fun they have in fine weather,
running and leaping from branch to
branch, hunting for nuts, and cracking
them in their tiny teeth! Do you see
their fine bushy tails, almost as big as
themselves ? It is very pleasant for them
now, and they are very busy getting
nuts whilst they can; for if they do not
gather a great many now, during the
summer, they will have nothing to eat
when winter comes, and the trees are
all covered with snow. So Master and
Miss Bushy have no time to be idle,
but should be up and doing early and
late, or they will have soon to go
without supper, and that would not be
at all nice, would it ?

































































THE SQUIRR~IELS.





48 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.
THE PAINTER'S SON.
THIs is little Alick Gray, the painter's
son, and this is how he looked when his
papa painted his portrait. Alick was a
merry little man, and liked romping
about and playing at ball better than
sitting still, but he was a good boy, and
when his dear papa told him he wanted
to make a picture of him, he sat quite
still, without the least grumbling. His
papa painted him just as you see him,
in his nice new dress, with the fine frill
all round the neck, and his rough short
hair and bonny eyes. So many people
praised papa's picture, but no one knows
it is little Alick, except you and I;
so you must be sure and not let out the
secret, or people will be over-praising
Alick's portrait, and that, I fear, will
make Alick a vain little boy, which
would be a- great pity, for he is a very
modest little fellow now.





























THE PAINTERS SON.




















THE PAINTER'S SON.


T>* *





50 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.
NURSE THOMPSON.
How eagerly little Florence Seagrave
listens to old Nurse Thompson, as she
talks to her so gravely and sadly in the
shady wood. Florence thinks she
would never tire of listening; for nurse
is telling the little girl about her dear
mamma, who died when she was quite
a baby, and who had loved her so
tenderly, and sorrowed so much to
leave her, and who had begged nurse
to tell her to be good, and gentle, and
obedient. Florence has often felt sad
when she has seen her schoolfellows
run and throw themselves in their
mothers' arms, and she is determined
she will try to be in everything what
she knows her dear mamma would
have wished. It is well for her that
she has such a kind nurse to take
care of her, and talk to her of her
mother; for nurse loves her dearly.













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NURSE THOMIPSON.





<2 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.
PAPA AT HOME.
PAPA sits in front of the fire, with little
May upon his knee, and Rosie on the
footstool by his side. Little May has
got hold of one of the buttons of papa's
vest, and is begging him to tell them a
pretty little story, which papa seems
very much tempted to do, for he loves
his little girls very much. Mamma has
gone out shopping, and so papa and
his daughters are all alone. Don't they
look happy and comfortable together,
with the bright light from the fire
shining on their pretty young faces, and
papa looking as proud as a king, and
ready to tell them all sorts of nice
stories about Aladdin and his wonderful
lamp, and Jack and his Beanstalk, and
Old Mother Hubbard, or pretty Cin-
derella with her little glass slipper.
Don't you wish you were there, to hear
the pretty tales yourself ?









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AP AT HOME.





54 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE BULLFINCHES.
WHAT a pleasant family the Bullfinches
were. They had a large room all to
themselves, full of all kinds of plants
and ferns; and every morning their
kind little mistress gave them nice fresh
bread and clean water, which they
enjoyed very much you may be sure.
It was quite a treat to see them having
their baths; they splashed about in
the water, and sent it flying all over
each other; but that they did not
seem to mind at all, and only got cross
when sometimes a little Bullfinch tried
to drive another one away from the
bread-tray before he had quite finished
his breakfast or dinner. Some of them
used to draw up the water in a little
bucket, when they wanted to drink, by
walking up a little wheel their kind
master had made for them. Was not
that clever ?

























-'I














































THE BULLFINCHES.






56 TALES FOR lIHE LITTLE ONES.


THE LITTLE RIFLEMEN.
Allegretto martial. Music by T. CRAMPTON.

VOICE
4 .
and I. Six lit tie Ri flemen Come marching by in pairs, With a
S 2. Two lit tie ti ny boys With whistle and with drum, Playing

PIANO.





cap tain and a cor- por al, Who give themselves fine airs;
such a shrill and noi sy march, You wish they'd ne ver come;






,-,, I - -d -* I I% f
S Each with a wood en gun Rest ing on his nul der,
Neigh ours all stare a bout, Hens in ter ror fly them,

II I T r.ir : / -r




Full- grown Brit ish troops Could scarce ly have look'd bol der.
Such brave Ri fle men To see go march-ing by them.




















-c-















K' v








H I SM








THE RIFLEMEN'S MARCH.





58 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

LILLIE DALE.
BABY'S room at Allington was a fine old
room for children, and very much did
Lillie Dale enjoy it. There were pic-
tures all round the walls, and very
pretty pictures too. There was little-
Red Riding-hood going to her grand-
mamma's, with the curly little dog at
her side, and a pretty coloured picture
of the "Babes in the Wood" lying
fast asleep as the Robin covered them
over with leaves, and many more besides.
And there was a large old sofa to romp
upon, and beautiful flowers to take care
of and water out of little watering-pots,
just like the gardener's big one. There
were dolls and toys too; and, oh! such
very pretty picture-books, which Lillie
used to enjoy very much as she sat on
the floor with one on her lap, to read
over for perhaps the hundredth time an
old and favourite story.





























































LILLIE DALE.





6o TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE VISIT.
How sorry Jessie Green is to leave
the pleasant farmhouse where she has
spent such a pleasant fortnight. She
has been with the milkmaid when she
milked the cows early in the morning,
and drank the milk warm, and sweet,
and fresh; and listened to the humming
of the bee as he wandered from flower
to flower; and watched the soaring
lark as he mounted higher and higher,
singing his joyful song, and followed the
little downy chickens as they took a
walk across the farmyard with the proud
mother hen; and even been allowed to
search the warm nest for the white eggs
which lay so cosily hidden in the straw.
Now she must go back to school. Her
kind friends are waving farewells to her,
and they have not forgotten to give her
a beautiful nosegay to remind her of her
pleasant visit.





























































SHE VISIT.





62 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.
THE IDLE CARPENTER.
THERE was, in the little town of Soy-
land, a carpenter, called Caleb Jones,
who might have been very comfortable
if he had only been steady and careful.
But Caleb was a very idle, drunken
man, and very often was much behind
with his work. The time soon came
when friends began to look shyly upon
him, and left off giving him work to do;
so that he became very poor, and had to
sell his chairs and tables to buy more
beer, which had now become quite his
master. He became so very miserable
at last, that, sitting on his bed one day,
he looked back with sorrow on his past
bad life, and then prayed to God to
make him a better man in future. You
will be glad to hear that Caleb Jones
became as steady and respectable a man
as could be found in all the town of
Soyland.














~~n1K 'K ~K' -
N K -;



I































THE IDLE CARPENTER.






64 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE SELFISH BOY.
CHARLEY JENKINS was a selfish little
boy, and was not at all liked by his
schoolfellows. He used to keep all the
good things he got entirely to himself,
and would go and sit in one corner of
the playground, and eat his buns and
tarts all alone. This caused the boys
to shun him, and bye-and-bye he had
scarcely any one to play with. One
day the master gave the boys a holiday,
and took them out for a day's trip
into the country. They went to a
very pretty place called Ripponden,
where the old folks used to say a great
giant called Rippon had once lived.
Every one brought something, which
he added to the general stock, making
a famous dinner, which all enjoyed
except Charley Jenkins, who sat in one
nook by himself, greedily eating his
meal all alone.














*- 0
-' h W























THE SELFISH BOY
.r















.!!I 'I-




THE SELIS BOY





(o ZALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE WANDERER.
How sad it is for this poor lad! he
has no kind father or mother to care
for him, and he is left without a friend
in the world. He wanders about from
place to place with the monkey, his
only companion, living on the halfpence
that are thrown to him by pitying
strangers. Aleck and Rose felt so sorry
for him as he passed the field where
they were playing and eating-their rosy-
cheeked apples, that Aleck offered him
some of his, but he was frightened,
for he snatched it as if he were very
hungry. Aleck says he shall ask his
father, who is a large farmer, and em-
ploys a good many labourers, to give
him some work in the fields, and let
him sleep in an outhouse; and if he
does so, as I think it very likely he
will, the poor boy will not need to
wander any more.


















N





































-.ANs
MIE 5ADRR





68 A LES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

MEANWOOD FIELDS.
OH, the merry, merry days the little
folks spent in Meanwood Fields! Jane,
the nurse, with baby in her arms, kept
watch over the others, to see they did
not get into trouble. Their favourite
spot was the corner, where the old
wooden stile and the little bridge over
the bubbling brook made quite a pretty
picture. Here it was that the flowers
grew thickest, especially the forget-me-
nots and blue bells. Mary would carry
her basket home quite full of ferns and
flowers, and no one was so pleased as
Johnny Tannett to help her to gather
them. His bright young face never
looked brighter than when Mary thanked
him for bringing her a fine large bunch
to her basket. Little Magsy did not do,
much towards making the collection, I
am afraid; she was too fond of making
daisy chains and wreaths for her hat.
































































MEANWOOD FIELDS.






70 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

WAITING FOR FATHER.
HER little basket in her hand,
A weary time does Annie stand,
Looking across the waste moor-land,
Waiting for father.
The sun-set dazzles her blue eyes,
Painting the scene with crimson dyes,
Showing the path thro' which there lies
The road for father.
But Annie, now in anxious plight,
Gets fearful of the coming night,
Wishing that she could hear the light
Footstep of her father,-
Longing that he may soon. be here,
His little Annie's heart to cheer,
Then hey for home to mother dear,
With precious father!





















p R_



4;;

MR--















N ---~-



















WAITING FOR FATHER.






72 4ALES FOR THE LITTLE ONVES.

THE ELEPHANT.
THE Elephant is a native of India, and
is sometimes used instead of the horse
for ploughing, as you see here. Some
elephants are very clever, and do very
funny things. Like the one, for instance,
.that used to put its trunk in at the win-
dow of a shoemaker whose shop it had
to pass every day, for a piece of bread
or a nut, till one day the shoemaker,
being very busy, gave the trunk a tap
with his hammer instead. The Ele-
phant passed on, but soon came back,
and putting in its trunk again, threw a
large quantity of dirty water full upon
the poor man's face. It is very wrong
to tease dumb animals, for, as a rule,
they are easy to manage if treated kindly.
Sometimes the Elephant goes out hunt-
ing, and carries a large castle on his
back, out of which the hunters can shoot
the wild beasts in safety.


















/4


TH- LEPHANT .
-----













THE ELEPHANT.





74 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

OLD JOE AND AUNT
JUDY.
MR. and MRS. SIMPSON lived in Jamaica,
and had two black servants, Old Joe
and Aunt Judy. Old Joe used to take
care of the horses, drive the carriage,
and wait at the table; and Aunt Judy
attended to baby. When Old Joe took
the little girls, Edith, and Mary, and
Jessie, out for a ride, he was very care-
ful of them, and always walked close
behind them, to see they did not fall
off. But sometimes Edith, who was
the eldest, would give her pony a
switch with her whip, and, in spite of
Old Joe, she would go galloping off all
by herself, for she was a very good
rider, having been taught by her papa
when quite a little girl. That is her
papa reading the newspaper and smok-
ing his cigar, whilst mamma sits sewing,
and Aunt Judy feeds the baby.


















"L




OLD O U
7Y





N NM`




OLD JOE AND AUNT JUDY.





16 TALES FOR TIE LITTLE ONES.
POLLY AND HER DOG.
POLLY had a little dog, called Prince,
and very fond she was of him. He was
a black dog, with very short ears, but a
big bushy tail. And he was so good
and quiet that he would come and take
his food out of Polly's hand, and never
snap at her. When his mistress took
him near the large pond, she used to
throw little sticks into the water, and
Prince would jump in after them, and
swim back to land with them in his
mouth. And every night when Polly
went to bed she used. to take up Prince
in her arms, and he would lie all night
at the foot of Polly's crib, and take care
that no one came near his little mistress
till she awoke in the morning. He was
a capital house-dog too, and would bark
at night at the slightest noise, and so
frighten the robbers away, or rouse the
whole house.




















-* 'I








V



r 4

















POLLY AND HER DOG.





78 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.
THE TEMPTATION.
LITTLE MATTY stands at the window,
peeping in at the basket of fine ripe
fruit the gardener has just plucked.
Matty knows she must not touch it,
because Mamma has told her not to do
so; but she stands looking at it till her
little mouth quite waters for it,, and her
eyes say, Shouldn't I like some!" She
puts her little hand nearer and nearer,
and is just going to take one, when she
remembers what Mamma said about
God seeing everywhere, and so Matty
drags herself away, and runs quite to
the other end of the garden, lest she
should be tempted again to steal. The
only safe way to keep out of tempta-
tion is to do as Matty did; for if little
boys and girls once allow themselves
to be tempted, they are almost sure
to do wrong and to repent of it after-
wards.
































41.'

SOL















THiEMTTIN





o8 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

THE MOUNTAIN MAID.
THE bright morning sun does not rise
much earlier than Ruth, the pretty
daughter of the mountain farmer. As
soon as ever it is light enough to see,
she is up and at work, singing merrily as
she does her work. Her first duty is to
feed the goats; and there she goes up
the rocks, carrying a basket of food and
a pail of water, with her little pet Nanny
dancing by her side. Ruth is quite as
well known by the goats as she is by
her school-fellows; and as soon as
breakfast-time comes, you may see the
goats come leaping down the rocks to
meet her. They are not a bit afraid of
her,, and follow her all day long, for
Ruth is very kind and gentle with
them, and always gives them nice food
to eat and water to drink, and makes
sure that all the young ones get safely
housed in the cold weather.













































































-ARR
THE MOUNTAIN MAID.
Mi,





82 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

BUNNY'S SONG.
OVER the heath,
By bush and by furrow,
We scamper, then hide
In our snugly-hid burrow;
We leap o'er the rocks;
We hide and we seek;
Now down in our holes,
Now on the cliff's peak.
Oh! a merry life we lead,
For no care for aught have we;
And we roll and tumble all the day,
As happy as can be.
The sweet leaves we eat,
As we bask in the sun;
Or we coil ourselves up
From morning till noon.
We chase the wild birds
As they skim on the grass,
And nibble the tips
Of the flowers as we pass.



























































-=-






- - -













RABBITS.





84 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

JENNY ASHLEY.
IN a neat little cottage, down by the
side of the river, Jenny Ashley lived
all by herself. Jenny was a busy young
woman, and kept her little home always
very tidy and clean. The garden in
front of the house was a pretty patch
of flowers, and the walls of the cottage
were covered with creeping plants,
which made it look like a garden all
over. Jenny was very kind-hearted, and
always willing to do any one a good
turn if she could. She never sent a
beggar away from her door without
giving him something, and often had a
little basin of milk for a poor weary
traveller, like the one you see in the
picture. And very grateful for Jenny's
kindness is the poor little girl who has
been walking along the dusty road with
her father's dinner, which is in the little
basket at her feet.


















"N


















































JEN -E





JENNY ASHLEY.





86 TALES FOR THE LITTLE ONES.

SKATING.
OH, how delightful it is in the sharp,
cold weather to go to the pond, which
is thickly frozen over, and have an hour's
good skating! How warm and merry
the people look who have been there
some time, and how gracefully many of
them glide over the glassy surface, cut-
ting all sorts of pretty figures with their
sharp skates, especially that young lady,
who does it so well that I think she
must have learnt when she was a little
girl, for we always do a thing more
easily that we learn when we are young.
Come, let us join them, and see if we
cannot skim along as they do. It is
much better to begin right away on both
feet; you will learn much more quickly
than if you try one foot first. Very likely
you will have a fall or two, but you must
make up your mind to that, as you are
sure to get two or three hard knocks.






































-- J- -9-----
WS



























SKATING.






CASSELL'S

CHILDREN'S TREASURIES
A SERIES OF
PICTURE BOOKS FOR CHILDREN,
UNIFORM IN SIZE AND PRICE,
Eack containing 39 Full-page Pictures and accompanying
Stories, Poetry, and Music.
Square Crown 8vo, bound in cloth, price Is. each.

TIE BOOKS COMPRISE-

The Children's Joy.

Pretty Pictures and Pleasant Stories.

Our Picture Book.

Tales for the Little Ones.

My Sunday Book of Pictures.

Sunday Garland of Pictures and Stories.

Sunday Readings for Little Folks.

CASSELL, BETTER, & GALPIN, LONDON, PARIS, AND NEW YORK.
276





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The Little Folks' Picture Gallery.
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Being True Stories of Clever Creatures, Tame and Wild. By
the Author of Poems Written for a Child." Cloth gilt, 5s.
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Making numerous Articles for Use and Ornament, with
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2 Selections from Cassell Petter &, Galzin's Publications.

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4 Selections from Casscll Petter &1 Galin's Publications.

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6 Selections from Cassell Petter &, Galfin's Publications.


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Selections from Cassell Petter &' Galpin's Publications. 7


STORY BOOKS FOR CHILDREN, SUITABLE FOR
REWARDS AND PRIZES.


Shilling Story Books. The following Books are Illustrated, and each contains
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Little Content. HOWITT.
Little Lizzie. By MARY GILLIES. Jonas on a Farm.
Luke Barnicott. By WILLIAM Little Pickles. By JEANIE HERING.
HOWITT. Life and Adventures of a Little
My First Cruise. By W. H. G. Bird. By J. WATTS.
KINGSTON. aggles, Baggles, and the
Charlie's Lessons aboutAnimals. Emperor. By C. MATtAUX.
The Boat Club. Patsy's First Glimpse of Heaven.

The following Books (price Is. eac1) each contain FOUR COLOURED PLATES :-
Little Blackcap. Ashfield Farm; or, Ellen and
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The Broken Promise. By the Granamamma's Spectacles. By
Hon. Mrs. GREENE. the Author of "A Trap to Catch a
Little Red Shoes. Sunbeam."
The Holidays at Llandudno. Hid in a Cave.
The Hop Garden. Little Fables for Little Folks.
Algy's Lesson. By S. E. DE MORGAN. Flora Selwyn: A Story for Girls.

Eighteenpenny Story Books. With FOUR COLOURED PICTURES in each.
Dr. Savory's Tongs. The Boy who Wondered.
New Stories and Old Legends. The Story of Arthur Hunter
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Owen Carstone: A Story of School The Story of the Hamiltons.
Life. The Hill-side Farm.

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Threads of Knowledge. By ANNIE Autobiography of a Lump of
CAREY. Coal, &o. By ANNIE CAREY.
Labour Stands on Golden Feet. Second Edition.
Translated by J. YEATS. The Fishing Girl. By BJORNSTJERNE
Stories of the Olden Time. BJOENSON.
Love and Life in Norway. By One Trip More, and other Stories.
BJORNSTJERNE BJORNSON. By the Author of Mary Powell."

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8 Selections from Cassell Petter & Galpin's Publications.



"LITTLE FOLKS:

THE ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE FOR CHILDREN.

Published in Weekly Numbers, Id.; Monthly Parts, Od.; and
Half-Yearly Volumes, at 8s. 6d.
LITTLE FOLKS is one of the very LITTLE FOLKS has out-distanced
best Magazines for young children. We most all competitors, and keeps the position so well
cordially recommend it as a Magazine which won with a boldness and firmness defying
should find a place in every nursery."- competition. Its tales are the best we have
Graphic. ever seen for children."-Derby Mercury.
"LITTLE IFOLKS is as hig in "LITTLE FOLKS is decidedly the
m IT it L O is a high most attractive of the children's magazines."-
merit as it is wide in scope."-Daily Tele- .ewcastl Chronicle.
Tgra ."' LITTLE FOLKS is a joy in the
LITTLE FOLKS aims not only at household."-Bolton Yournal.
informing the young, but also at inducing "LITTLE FOLKS is the most delight-
them to become contributors."- Daily fulofchildren'smagazines."-Hereford7ournal.
IVews" LITTLE FOLKS is by far the best
LITTLE FOLKS is charming alike children's serial we have ever met with."-
in its engravings and stories."-Standard. Birmingham Mail.
*** VOLUMES I. and II. of the New and Enlarged Series of "LITTLE
FOLKS" are now ready, each containing nearly 500 PICTURES
and 430 Pages, crown 4to, price 3s. 6d. each, coloured boards; or 5s.,
cloth gilt, gilt edges.


(S* To be obtained of all Booksellers, or post free from the Publishers:-
Cassell's Complete Catalogue, containing a List of several hundred
Works, including :-
Bibles and Religious Literature. History.
Children's Books. Miscellaneous.
Dictionaries. Natural History.
Educational Works. Poetry.
Fine Art Volumes. Serial Publications.
Hand-books and Guides. i Travel and Adventure.

Cassell's Educational Catalogue, containing a Description of their
numerous Educational Work-. .':, s..t .i;.' "culars of CASSELL PETTER
& GALPIN'S Mathematical I..s;r.*, J.*;': i',r-Colours, Drawing AModels,
Drawing Pencils, &c.

Cassell Petter & Galpin: London, Paris & New York.






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