• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 List of Illustrations
 My mother
 The dogs' dinner-party
 The white cat
 Little dog Trusty
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: My mother's picture book : containing, My mother, The dogs' dinner-party, The white cat, Little dog Trusty
Title: My mother's picture book
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00035187/00001
 Material Information
Title: My mother's picture book containing : My mother, The dogs' dinner-party, The white cat, Little dog Trusty
Alternate Title: My mother
Dogs' dinner party
White cat
Little dog Trusty
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication: London
New York
Publication Date: c1878
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1878   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1878   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with twenty-four pages of illustrations.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00035187
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224286
notis - ALG4547
oclc - 61460949

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page ii
    List of Illustrations
        Page iii
    My mother
        Page iv
        Page 1
        Plate
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 6
    The dogs' dinner-party
        Page i
        Page 1
        Plate
        Page 2
        Plate
        Page 3
        Plate
        Page 4
        Plate
        Page 5
        Plate
        Page 6
    The white cat
        Page i
        Page 1
        Plate
        Page 2
        Plate
        Page 3
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 4
        Plate
        Page 5
        Plate
        Page 6
    Little dog Trusty
        Page i
        Page 1
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 6
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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MY MOTHER'S



PICTURE BOOK.

CONTAINING

MY MO OTHER.
THE DOGS' DINNER-PARTY
THE WHITE CA T.
LITTLE DOG TRUSTY.


WITH
TWENTY-FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS.












LONDON:
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS,
THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE.
NEW YORK: 416 BROOME STREET.]





















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.





MY MOTHER:
"AND ON MY CHEEK SWEET KISSES PRESSED."
"WHO SAT AND WATCHED MY INFANT HEAD."
WHO RAN TO HELP ME WHEN I FELL."
"WHO TAUGHT MY INFANT LIPS TO PRAY."
"I HOPE I SHALL REWARD THY CARE."
"WHEN THOU ART FEEBLE, OLD, AND GRAY."

THE DOGS' DINNER PARTY:
MIR. BLENHEIM WRITING THE INVITATIONS.
PUG WAITING ON MR. FOX-HOUND.
THE DINNER-PARTY.
MR. BULL-DOG TURNED OUT OF THE KITCHEN.
How MR. BUIL-DOG WENT HOME.

THE WHITE CAT:
THE KING SENDS HIS THREE SONS TO SEEK ADVENTURES.
THE PRINCE GOES OUT HUNTING WITH THE WHITE CAT.
THE PRINCE SEATED WITH TIHE WHITE CAT.
THE THREE PRINCES SHOWING THEIR DOGS.
THE PIECES OF CAMBRIC.
THE PRINCE PRESENTS THE PRINCESS TO THE KING.

LITTLE DOG TRUSTY:
FRANK AND ROBERT WITH LITTLE DOG TRUSTY.
FRANK AND ROBERT UPSET THE MILK.
ROBERT TELLS A LIE.
FRANK TELLS THE TRUTH.
POBERT IS PUNISHED FOR TELLING A LIE.
FRANK IS PRAISED FOR SPEAKING THE TRUTH.






















MY MOTHER










MY MOTHER.




"W HO fed me from her gentle breast,
And hush'd me in her arms to rest,
And on my cheek sweet kisses prest?
My Mother.


When sleep forsook my open eye,
Who was it sung sweet hushaby,
And rock'd me that I should not cry ?
My Mother.






































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My Mother. 2





Who sat and watched my infant head,
When sleeping on my cradle bed,
And tears of sweet affection shed ?
My Mother.



When pain and sickness made me cry,
Who gazed upon my heavy eye,
And wept for fear that I should die?
My Mother.









3 lIy Moither.





Who dress'd my doll in clothes so gay,
And taught me pretty how to play,
And minded all I had to say?
My Mother.



Who ran to help me when I fell,
And would some pretty story tell,
Or kiss the place to make it well ?
My Mother.







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Who taught my infant lips to pray,
And love GOD'S holy book and day,
And walk in Wisdom's pleasant way?
My Mother.



And can I ever cease to be
Affectionate and kind to thee,
Who was so very kind to me,
My Mother?









5 My Mother.





Ah, no! the thought I cannot bear;
And if GOD please my life to spare,
I hope I shall reward thy care,
My Mother.



When thou art feeble, old, and gray,
My healthy arm shall be thy stay,
And I will soothe thy pains away,
My Mother.








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And when I see thee hang thy head,
"Twill be my turn to watch thy bed,
And tears of sweet affection shed,
My Mother.



For GOD, who lives above the skies,
"Would look with vengeance in His eyes,
If I should ever dare despise
My Mother.























THE DOGS' DINNER-PARTY.









THE DOGS' DINNER-PARTY


MR. BLENHEIM was a very gentlemanly dog, and
Mrs. Blenheim was quite the lady; both were
well-bred, handsome, and fond of good com-
pany. They lived in a nice house, by Hyde
Park Corner. Now Mr. Blenheim was one day
in the library, dozing in his arm-chair after
dinner, when Mrs. B. thus addressed him:
Rouse up, Blenny dear, and tell me about
these notes of invitation for our dinner-party."
"I am rather sleepy," said he, "so you must
read the list over to me."
Mrs. B. read the names of Mr. Tan-Terrier,
Mr. Fox-Hound, Mr. Dane, Mr. Mastiff, Mr.
Beagle, Mr. Poodle, Mr. Barker-Mr. Bull-Dog



















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concluding the list. "Mr Bull-Dog!" cried Mrs.
B., looking vexed, why do you ask him ? no
one considers him respectable."
It will not do to leave him out, dear !" said
Mr. Blenheim, who then got up, and went lazily
to the desk to write the invitations.
Pug, the Page, went to Kennel Court, the
country box of Mr. Fox-Hound, and found that
sporting character near home, wiping his brow
after a good hunt. His manners were more
blunt than his teeth, and his loud voice could be
heard miles off. He was called a "jolly dog,"
and seldom dined alone. But his great delight
was the chase of a fox; he could then hardly
give tongue enough to express his joy. After
asking Pug after Mrs. Blenheim's health, he
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3 The Dogs' Dizner-Pariy.
Florio, the Courier, waited on Mr. Barker with
his note of invitation. Mr. Barker lived in a
snug little house, in a farmyard, where he had
the charge of watching over and protecting the
live stock. He at first feared he must decline
the invitation, but, on second thoughts, he re-
solved to venture; it was not a late dinner, and
he would manage to get away early. Unluckily,
his coat was rather the worse for wear, but he
could boast of a handsome collar at any rate,-
and so he accepted.
When Pug, the Page, reached the dwelling-
place of Mr. Bull-Dog, he found him lying close
to a bit of an old tub, in a dirty yard, smoking a
short pipe very coolly. Mr. Bull-Dog snarled a
little at being disturbed, and then read the note.
" Oh, you can say I'll be sure to come," said he,









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The Dogs' Diner-Parfy. 4
"I am always ready for a good feed. Now,
young one," said he to Pug, with a growl, "I
advise you to cut away as fast as you can !"
At last the day of the grand dinner-party
arrived, and the guests all assembled, in good
spirits, with keen appetites for the feast. Never
had so many sleek, well-dressed dogs met to-
gether before, and the variety of their coats and
countenances was very striking. All were, in
compliment to the gentle hostess, Mrs. Blen-
heim, on their best behaviour, and great was the
harmony that prevailed. Ample justice, too,
was done to the good things liberally provided
for their entertainment; and, strange to say for
so large a party and so mixed a company, no
excess was committed either in eating or drink-
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The Dogs' Dziner-Party 5

pliments were exchanged; toasts, praising every
guest in turn, were proposed and received with
cordiality; speeches were made, which were
applauded even when not called for or under-
stood; and for a long while it seemed that no
Lord Mayor's feast could have passed off more
brilliantly, or have given greater satisfaction.
Mr. Bull-Dog was, however, missing from
among the guests after a time; it seems that he
found the sports rather dull, and so had sneaked
off. Presently, a great uproar was heard; and it
was found that he had gone below, and had
eaten up all the servants' dinner; so they all
joined together to punish him, and, after some
trouble, contrived to kick him out of the house;
and very foolish he looked, in spite of his tipsy
swagger.





























































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As Mr. Bull-Dog had lost his pipe in the street,
he thought he would turn into a public-house to
get another: here he again misbehaved, and was
soon turned out; some mischievous boys then
got hold of him, tied an old tin saucepan to his
tail, and chased him through the streets. The
faster he ran, the more he bumped himself with
the saucepan; and the more he yelled with pain,
the more the boys pelted him with mud and
stones. At length he reached his dirty dwell-
ing, more dead than alive.
Poor Mrs. Blenheim! she was, indeed, much
to be pitied, to have her nice dinner-party dis-
turbed by so vulgar a creature. This shows
how careful we should always be in avoiding
low company.























THE WHITE CAT.










THE WHITE CAT.


THERE Was once a King, who was growing old;
and it was told to him that his three sons wished
to govern the kingdom. The old King did not
wish to give up his power just yet. He thought
the best way to prevent his sons from taking
his throne was to send them out to seek for
adventures. So he called them all around him,
and said: My sons, go away and travel for a
year; and he of you who brings me the most
beautiful little dog shall have the kingdom, and
be king after me." Then the three Princes
started on the journey; but it is of the youngest
of the three that I have now to tell. He tra-
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one evening at the door of a splendid castle;
but not a man or woman was to be seen.
A number of hands, with no bodies to them,
appeared. Two hands took off the Prince's
cloak; two others seated him in a chair; another
pair brought a brush, to brush his hair; and
several pairs waited on him at supper. Then
some more hands came and put him to bed,
in a fine chamber, where he slept all night;
but still no one appeared. Next morning the
hands brought him to a splendid hall, where
there sat a large White Cat, who made him sit
beside her, and appeared glad to see him.
Next day the Prince and the White Cat went
out hunting together. The Cat was mounted on
a fine spirited monkey, and seemed very fond of
the Prince; who, on his part, was delighted














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with her wit and cleverness. Instead of dogs,
cats hunted for them. These creatures ran with
great agility after rats and mice, and birds, catch-
ing and killing a great number of them; and
sometimes the White Cat's monkey would climb
a tree, with the White Cat on his back, after a
bird, a mouse, or a squirrel.
This pleasant life went on for a long time.
Every day the White Cat became more fond
of the Prince; while, on his part, the Prince
could not help loving the poor Cat, who was
so kind and attentive to him. At last the time
drew near when the Prince was to return home,
and he had not thought of looking for a little
dog. But the Cat gave him a casket, and told
him to open this before the King, and all would
be well. So the Prince journeyed home, taking














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The IVhite Cat. 4

with him an ugly mongrel cur. When his bro-
thers saw this, they laughed secretly to each
other, and thought themselves secure, so far as
their younger brother was concerned. They
had, with infinite pains, procured each of them
a very rare and beautiful little dog, and each
thought himself quite sure to get the prize.
When the day came on which the dogs were
to be shown, each of the two elder Princes
produced a beautiful little dog, on a silk velvet
cushion; no one could judge which was the
prettier. The youngest now opened his casket,
and found a walnut. He cracked this walnut;
and out of the walnut sprang a little tiny dog
of exquisite beauty. Still the old King would
not give up his kingdom. He told the young
Princes they must bring him home a piece of















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5 The WIVite Cat.
cambric, so fine that it could be threaded
through the eye of a needle. And so they went
away in search of such a piece of cambric.
Again the youngest Prince passed a year
with the White Cat, and again the Cat gave
him a walnut when the time came for him to
return home. The three Princes were sum-
moned before their "father, who produced a
needle. The first and second Princes brought
a piece of cambric, which would almost, but
not quite, go through the needle's eye. The
youngest Prince broke open his walnut shell.
He found inside it a nut shell, and then a cherry-
stone, and then a grain of wheat, and then a
grain of millet; and in this grain of millet a
piece of cambric 400 yards long, which passed
easily through the eye of the needle. But the








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The White Cat. 6

old King said, "He who brings the most beau-
tiful lady shall have the kingdom."
The Prince went back to the White Cat,
and told her what his father had said. She re-
plied, "Cut off my head and my tail." At last he
consented. Instantly the Cat was transformed
into a beautiful Princess; for she had been con-
demned by a wicked fairy to appear as a Cat,
till a young Prince should cut off her head and
tail. The Prince and Princess went to the old
King's court, and she was far more beautiful
than the ladies brought by the other two Princes
But she did not want the kingdom, for she owned
four already. One of these she gave to each of
the elder brothers, and over the other two she
ruled with the young Prince, who married her
and they lived happily together all their lives.






















LITTLE DOG TRUSTY.











THE LITTLE DOG TRUSTY.


F RANK and Robert were two little boys, about eight years
old. Whenever Frank did anything wrong, he always told
his father and mother of it; and when anybody asked him about
anything he had done or said, he always told the truth; so every-
body who knew him believed him. But nobody who knew his
brother Robert believed a word he said, because he used to tell
lies. Whenever he did anything wrong, he never told his father
and mother of it; but when asked about it, he denied it, and said
he had not done it.
The reason Robert told lies was, because he was afraid of
being punished for his faults if he confessed them. He was a
coward, and could not bear the least pain. Frank was a brave
boy, and could bear to be punished for little faults; his mother
never punished him so much for such little faults as she did
Robert for the lies which he told, and which she found out
afterwards.
One evening, these two little boys were playing together in a
room by themselves. Their mother was ironing in a room next to
them, and their father was out at work in the fields, so there was
nobody in the room with Robert and Frank; but there was a little
dog, Trusty, lying by the fireside. Trusty was a pretty, playful
little dog, and the children were very fond of him.




























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The Little Dog Trzusty. 2
Come," said Robert to Frank, "there is Trusty lying beside
the fire, asleep; let us go and arouse him, and he will play with us."
yes, do let us," said Frank. So they both ran together
towards the hearth, to waken the dog.
Now there was a basin of milk standing upon the hearth;
and the boys did not see where it stood, for it was behind them.
As they were both playing with the dog, they kicked it with their
feet, and threw it down; and the basin broke, and all the milk ran
out of it over the hearth, and about the floor. When the boys
saw what they had done, they were very sorry and frightened; and
did not know what to do. They stood for some time looking at the
broken basin and the milk, without speaking. Robert spoke first.
So we shall have no milk for supper to-night," said he; and
he sighed.
"No milk for supper why not ? said Frank; "is there no
more milk in the house ?"
Yes, but we shall have none of it; for do not you remember,
last Monday, when we threw down the milk, my mother said we
were very careless, and that the next time we did so we should
have no more; so we shall have no milk for supper to-night."
Well, then," said Frank, "we must do without it, that's all.
We will take more care another time; there's no great harm done.
Come, let us run and tell mother. You know she bade us always
tell her directly when we broke anything; so come," said he,
taking hold of his brother's hand.
I will come, just now," said Robert. Don't be in such a
hurry, Frank-can't you stay a minute?" So Frank stayed; and
then he said, Come now, Robert." But Robert answered,
" Stay a little longer; I dare not go yet. I am afraid."







3 The Little Dog Trusty.
Little boys, never be afraid to tell the truth. Never say,
"Stay a minute," and "Stay a little longerr" but run directly, and
tell what you have done wrong. The longer you stay, the more
afraid you will grow, till at last, perhaps, you will not dare to tell
the truth at all. Hear what happened to Robert.
The longer he stayed, the more unwilling he was to go and
tell his mother he had thrown the milk down; and at last he
pulled his hand away from his brother, and cried, I won't go at
all, Frank; can't you go by yourself ?"
Yes," said Frank, so I will; I am not afraid to go by my-
self; I only waited for you out of good-nature, because I thought
you would like to tell the truth, too."
Yes, so I will; I mean to tell the truth when I am asked;
but I do not choose to go now. Why need you go either ? Can't
you wait here? Surely mother can see the milk when she
comes in."
Frank said no more; and as his brother would not go, he
went without him. He opened the door of the next room, where
he thought his mother was ironing; but he saw she was out; and
he thought she had gone to fetch some more clothes to iron. They
were hanging on the bushes in the garden, and he thought his
mother had gone there; so he ran after her, to tell her what had
happened.
Now, whilst Frank was gone, Robert was left in the room by
himself; and all the while he was alone he was thinking of some
excuses to make to his mother; and he was sorry that Frank was
gone to tell her the truth. He said to himself, If Frank and I
both were to say that we did not throw down the basin, she would
believe us, and we should have milk for supper. I am sorry Frank























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The Little Dog Trusty. 4
would go to tell her about it." Just as he said this to himself, he
heard his mother coming down stairs. Oh, oh! said he, then
my mother has not been out in the garden, so Frank could not
have met her, and told her; now I may say what I please."
Then this naughty, cowardly boy, determined to tell his mother
a lie. She came into the room; but when she saw the broken
basin, and the milk spilled, she stopped short, and said, So, so.
What a piece of work is here! Who did this, Robert ?"
I don't know, mamma," said Robert, in a very low voice.
You don't know, Robert! Tell me the truth, and I shall
not be angry with you, child. You will only lose the milk at
supper; and as for the basin, I would rather you broke all the
basins I have than tell me one lie. So don't tell me a lie. I ask
you, Robert, did you break the basin ?"
"No, mamma, I did not," said Robert; and he coloured as
red as fire.
"Then where is Frank ? Did he do it ?"
No, mother, he did not," said Robert; for he was in hopes
that when Frank came in he should persuade him to say that he
did not do it.
How do you know," said his mother, that Frank did not
do it ? "
Because-because," said Robert, hesitating, as liars do, for
an excuse, "because I was in the room all the time, and I did not
see him do it."
Then how was the basin thrown down ? If you have been
in the room all the time, you can tell."
Then Robert, going on from one lie to another, answered, I
suppose the dog must have done it."







5 The Little Dog Trusty.
Did you see him do it?" said his mother.
Yes," said the wicked boy.
Trusty, Trusty," said his mother, turning round; and Trusty,
who was lying before the fire drying his legs, which were wet with
the milk, jumped up and came to her. Then she said, Fie! fie!
Trusty !" pointing to the milk,-" Get me a switch out of the
garden, Robert; Trusty must be beat for this."
Robert ran for the switch, and in the garden he met his
brother. He stopped him, and told him in a great hurry, all he
had said to his mother; and he begged of him not to tell the
truth, but to say the same as he had done.
No, I will not tell a lie," said Frank. "What! and is
Trusty to be beat! He did not throw down the milk, and he shall
not be beat for it. Let me go to mother."
They both ran towards the house. Robert got home first,
and he locked the house door, that Frank might not come in. He
gave the switch to his mother.
Poor Trusty! he looked up as the switch was lifted over his
head; but he could not speak to tell the truth. Just as the blow
was falling upon him, Frank's voice was heard at the window.
Stop, stop! dear mother, stop!" cried he, as loud as he
could; Trusty did not do it. Let me in; I and Robert did it;
but do not beat Robert."
Let us in, let us in," cried another voice, which Robert knew
to be his father's; I am just come from work, and here's the door
locked."
Robert turned as pale as ashes when he heard his father's
voice; for his father always whipped him when he told a lie. His
mother went to the door and unlocked it.











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The Little Dog Trusty. 6
What's all this ?" cried his father, as he came in; so his
mother told him all that had happened.
Where is the switch with which you were going to beat
Trusty ? said the father.
Then Robert, who saw by his father's looks that he was going
to beat him, fell upon his knees and cried for mercy, saying, For-
give me this time, and I will never tell a lie again."
But his father caught hold of him by the arm. I will whip
you now," said he, "and then, I hope, you will not." So Robert
was whipped, till he cried so loud with the pain that the whole
neighbourhood could hear him.
"There," said his father, when he had done, now go without
supper; you shall have no milk to-night, and you have been
whipped. See how liars are served!" Then turning to Frank,
" Come here, and shake hands with me, Frank; you will have no
milk for supper, but that does not signify; you have told the truth,
and have not been whipped, and everybody is pleased with you.
And now I will give you the little dog Trusty. You shall feed
him and take care of him, and he shall be your dog; you have
saved him a beating; and, I'll answer for it, you will be a good
master to him. Trusty, Trusty, come here."
Trusty came; then Frank's father took off Trusty's collar.
" To-morrow I'll go to the brazier's," added he, "and get a new
collar made for your dog. From this day forward he shall be called
after you, Frank! And, wife, whenever any of the neighbours'
children ask you why the dog Trusty is to be called Frank, tell
them this story of our two boys: let them know the difference be-
tween a liar and a boy of truth."





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