• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Pretty pictures
 Pictures & Rhymes
 Pictures & Stories of dogs
 Back Cover






Group Title: Pictures and rhymes for young minds : containing, Pretty pictures, Favorite tales, Pictures & rhymes, Pictures & stories of dogs
Title: Pictures and rhymes for young minds
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00035186/00001
 Material Information
Title: Pictures and rhymes for young minds containing, Pretty pictures, Favorite tales, Pictures & rhymes, Pictures & stories of dogs
Alternate Title: Pictures & rhymes for young minds
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Maclure and MacDonald Lithographers ( Publisher )
Groombridge and Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: Maclure & Macdonald
Groombridge & Sons
Place of Publication: Glasgow ;
London
London
Publication Date: [1878?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1878   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: Scotland -- Glasgow
England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with twenty-four pages of illustrations.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00035186
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224557
notis - ALG4823
oclc - 61460951

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
        Page ii
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page iii
    Pretty pictures
        Page 1
        This robin redbreast
            Page 2
        Little Lucy so good
            Page 3
            Page 4
        Miss Betsy Macduff
            Page 5
            Page 6
        This proved quite a cure
            Page 7
            Page 8
        Sweet mistress Bo Peep
            Page 9
            Page 10
        See, this is Miss Bell
            Page 11
            Page 12
    Pictures & Rhymes
        Page 13
        Punch and little Katie
            Page 14
            Page 15
        Little Flora
            Page 16
            Page 17
        Launching the ship
            Page 18
            Page 19
        In the woods
            Page 20
            Page 21
        Playing at soldiers
            Page 22
            Page 23
        Lily, Jane, and Pussy
            Page 24
            Page 25
    Pictures & Stories of dogs
        Page 26
        St. Bernard's dog
            Page 27
            Page 28
        The scotch terrier
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
        The dandie dinmont
            Page 33
            Page 34
        The Newfoundland dog
            Page 35
            Page 36
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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PICTURES AND RHYMES



FOR YOUNG MINDS



CONTAINING
PRETTY PICTURES. FAVOURITE TALES.
PICTURES & RHYMES. PICTURES & STORIES OF DOGS.


WITH
TWENTY-FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS.












MACLURE & MACDONALD,
CHROMO-LITHOGRAPHERS AND ORNAMENTAL PRINTERS TO THE QUEEN,
GLASGOW AND LONDON.
GROOMBRIDGE & SONS, LONDON.














PRETTY PICTURES

















THIS ROBIN REDBREAST
HAD BEEN MARY'S GUEST
WHILE THE COLD WINTER MONTHS THEY DID LINGER;
BUT NOW, WITH A SIGH,
THEY ARE SAYING GOOD-BYE,
AND IT FLUTTERS WHILE PERCHED ON HER FINGER,


FOR IT NOW WANTS AWAY
TO THE GREEN WOODS SO GAY,
TO ITS NEST WHERE THE BROOM BLOSSOMS YELLOW;
MARY KISSED IT AND SIGHED.
CHIRRUP CHEEP, IT REPLIED,
IN A VOICE WHICH WITH GRIEF WAS QUITE MELLOW.




















LITTLE LUCY SO GOOD,
AND HER BROTHER, TOM HOOD,
BEING BOTH OF SUCH GOOD-NATURED HABITS,
HAVE A HOME, I DECLARE,
NEATHH THE NURSERY STAIR,
FOR THE CURE OF INCURABLE RABBITS.


LITTLE LUCY CAN TELL
WHEN THE PATIENTS GET WELL,
AND ALSO WHEN OTHERS GROW ILL;
AND TOM FROM THE YARD,
WITH SUCH TENDER REGARD,
NEW PATIENTS BRINGS UP IN A TOWEL.
























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MISS BETSY MACDUFF
AT HER SWEETHEART TOOK HUFF,
AND SHE SAID THAT HIS CONDUCT WAS CRUEL;
SO SHE GOT INTO BED,
WITH A SHAWL ROUND HER HEAD,
AND, WITH SPITE, DRANK FIVE BASINS OF GRUEL.


THEN, JACK FEELING HURT,
CALLED BETSY A FLIRT,
AND SAID THAT HIS HEART SHE WOULD HARDEN;
BUT HE MET ROSA DOVE,
AND WITH HER HE MADE LOVE
WHILE EATING RED GRAPES IN THE GARDEN.

















THIS PROVED QUITE A CURE,
AND MISS BETSY FELT SURE
IT WAS NO USE TO LIE IN BED LONGER;
PUTTING ON HER GRAND AIRS,
SHE CAME SAILING DOWN STAIRS,
AND TOLD JACK SHE WAS FEELING MUCH STRONGER.


BUT JACK SMILED WITH DISDAIN,
WHICH GAVE BETSY MUCH PAIN,
AND SHE WEPT, SAYING, "FAREWELL, WE MUST SEVER."
SO JACK SOFTENED AT THIS
AND GAVE BETSY A KISS,
AND NOW THEY'RE AS GREAT FRIENDS AS EVER.













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SWEET MISTRESS BO PEEP,
WHO ONCE LOST HER SHEEP,
WAS THIS MAIDEN'S AUNT; AND HER UNCLE
WAS SIR LANCELOT FITZ-MAULES,
OF THE THREE GOLDEN BALLS,
WHOSE NOSE WORE A MAGIC CARBUNCLE.

AND FAIRIES IN DOZENS
WERE HER COUNTRY COUSINS,
WHO HAD RICHES FAR MORE THAN MAN GATHERS;
AND LITTLE JACK HORNER,
WHO SAT IN THE CORNER,
WAS THE GREATEST OF ALL HER GRAND-FATHERS.
















SEE, THIS IS MISS BELL,
WHO AT PRESENT DOTH DWELL
IN THE TREES AWAY DOWN BY THE RIVER;
WHILE HER FRIENDS ARE AT PLAY,
SHE SITS DRAWING ALL DAY
FROM THE TOYS THAT HER GRAND-MAMA GAVE HER.


BUT SAD TO RELATE,
HER YOUNG SISTER KATE
ONE DAY WITH A PIN CAME BEHIND HER,
AND WITH SAVAGE JOY
SHE RIPP'D OPEN THE TOY,
BUT THE SAW-DUST DID VERY NEAR BLIND HER.













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PUNCH AND LITTLE KATIE.

HERE LITTLE KATIE, FAIR AND YOUNG,
IS USING BOTH HER HANDS AND TONGUE,
WHILE PUNCH RECLINING ON THE DRUM,
WAITS TO WELCOME ALL WHO COME.


NOW, MR. PUNCH, IT'S HARDLY FAIR,
THAT YOU SHOULD SIT SO CALMLY THERE,
WHILE DOLLY WALKS SO FAR BELOW;
COME, MR. PUNCH, DOWN YOU MUST GO.


BUT PUNCH HAD NEVER HEARD A WORD,
OR ELSE HE THOUGHT IT QUITE ABSURD;
BUT STILL REMAINED WITH OUTSTRETCHED HANDS,
WHILE STILL ENTREATING, KATIE STANDS.












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LITTLE FLORA.

LISTEN, SISTER, WHILE I TELL
OF MANY THINGS WE BOTH LOVE WELL;
WE'LL FIND THEM ALL IN THE GARDEN FAIR,
YES, ALL IS BRIGHT AND LOVELY THERE.


ROSES, AND LILIES, AND FLOWERS SO SWEET,
ARE WAITING THERE OUR PRESENCE TO GREET,
WITH DEWY PETALS AND PERFUME RARE,
OH, HOW I LONG TO BE WITH THEM THERE.


THEN COME, DEAR FLORA, DO NOT STAY,
WE'RE FREE TO SPEND THE LIVELONG DAY,
'MID BUDS, AND BLOOM, AND HUMMING BEES,
AND PRETTY SONG-BIRDS IN THE TREES.















LAUNCHING THE SHIP.

NOW WILLIE WITH GLEE TO THE BROOK HAS GONE,
AND LAUNCHES HIS SHIP WHILE NELLIE LOOKS ON;
AH, WILLIE, TAKE CARE, 'TIS A TINY WEE CRAFT,
A VESSEL INDEED OF A VERY LIGHT DRAUGHT.


THE SAILS ARE SPREAD, AND SHE WOOS THE BREEZE,
WHILE WILLIE HANGS OE'R HER ON BENDED KNEES
LIKE A QUEENLY SWAN AWAY SHE SAILS;
HURRAH, CRIES WILLIE, FOR FAVOURING GALES.


AND SO AT LAST SHE HAS REACHED THE SHORE,
NEATHH A SLOPING BANK WITH WILLOWS HUNG O'ER;
WHERE SHE FRIGHTENED THE MINNOWS THAT LAY IN THE SUN;
HURRAH, CRIES WILLIE, HER VOYAGE IS DONE.
















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IN THE WOODS.

BRAVE HARRY AND ANNE TO THE WOODS ARE GONE
TO PLAY IN THE GLADES SO SUNNY AND GREEN,
AND HAVE LIGHTED DOWN BY A MOSSY STONE
O'ERGROWN WITH FERNS, A FAIRY SCENE.


CLOSE DOWN AT THEIR FEET A STREAMLET FLOWS,
IN THE BOUGHS ABOVE THEM THE SONG-BIRDS SING,
AND ANNE SINGS TOO, WHILE HER SWEET FACE GLOWS,
AS ALL AROUND THEM THE ECHOES RING.


AND HARRY HAS GATHERED SOME BRANCHING FERNS,
AND NOW HE SITS BY HIS SISTER'S SIDE,
WHILE SHE WEAVES AN IVY-WREATH AND LEARNS
OF HER BROTHER'S EXPLOITS WITH GLOWING PRIDE.


SO HAPPY THEY ARE IN THEIR INNOCENT PLAY,
THAT THEY NEVER ONCE THINK OF THE PASSING HOURS,
AND ONLY HASTE TO THEIR HOME AWAY,
WHEN THE WOODS GROW DARK AND THE EVENING LOWERS.















PLAYING AT SOLDIERS.

HERE CAPTAIN TOM WITH HIS AWKWARD SQUAD,
ARE MARCHING SO MERRILY, FEARLESS, AND GLAD;
NOW, SHOULDER ARMS! ADVANCE! STRAIGHT ON,
KEEP TIME DOG JACKY YOU'LL GET A BONE.


ON WE MARCH TO MEET THE FOE,
LEFT FOOT FOREMOST, OFF WE GO;
ATTENTION, MARY, DON'T SLOPE YOUR GUN,
KEEP IT ERECT, YOU'LL SPOIL THE FUN.


NOW AFTER DRILL WE'LL HAVE SOME LUNCH,
AND JACK, WHILE YOUR BONE YOU MUNCH,
REMEMBER ALL YOU'VE LEARNT TO-DAY,
AND THEN WE'LL TRY SOME OTHER PLAY.







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LILY, JANE, AND PUSSY.

LILY AND JANE HAD TO BREAKFAST GONE,
AND LEFT POOR PUSSY ALL ALONE;
BUT BACK AGAIN THEY SOON APPEAR,
COME! PUSSY, DEAR, WE'VE BROUGHT GOOD CHEER.


NOW SIP AWAY, FOR LILY AND T
"MUST LEAVE YOU SOON, YOU KNOW NOT WHY;
TO SCHOOL WE GO, WE LIKE IT WELL,
BUT CATS DON'T READ, NOR WRITE, NOR SPELL.


NOW IF YOU WAIT TILL SCHOOL IS DONE,
WE'LL HAVE AGAIN SOME GLORIOUS FUN;
AND BRING WITH US A BALL SO NICE,
'TIS BETTER FAR THAN CREAM OR MICE.








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PICTURES & STORIES OF DOGS








ST, BERNARD'S DOG,

T HESE splendid Dogs are among the largest of the canine
race, being equal in size to a large mastiff. The good
work which is done by these Dogs is so well known that it is
only necessary to give a passing reference. Bred among the
coldest regions of the Alps, and accustomed from its birth to the
deep snows which everlastingly cover the mountain-top, the
St. Bernard's Dog is a most useful animal in discovering any
unfortunate traveller who has been overtaken by a sudden storm
and lost the path, or who has fallen upon the cold ground, worn
out by fatigue and hardship, and fallen into the death-sleep which
is the result of severe cold.
Whenever a snow-storm occurs, the monks belonging to the
monastery of St. Bernard send forth their Dogs on their errand
of mercy. Taught by the wonderful instinct with which they are
endowed, they traverse the dangerous paths, and seldom fail to
discover the frozen sufferer, even though he be buried under a
deep snow-drift. When the Dog has made such a discovery, it
gives notice by its deep and powerful bay of the perilous state of
the sufferer, and endeavours to clear away the snow that covers
the lifeless form.
The monks, hearing the voice of the Dog, immediately set
off to the aid of the perishing traveller, and in many cases have
thus preserved lives that must have perished without their timely
assistance. In order to afford every possible help to the sufferer,
a small flask of spirits is generally tied to the Dog's neck.
WOOD)'S Natural History.











































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THE SCOTCH TERRIER,

'T HE Scotch Terrier is a rough-haired, quaint-looking
animal, always ready for work or play, and always pleased
to be at the service of its master. Sir Walter Scott tells an
anecdote of one of these Dogs, called Dandie," which knew on
most occasions what was said in his presence. His master
returning home one night rather late, found all the family in
bed, and not being able to find the bootjack in its usual place,
said to his Dog, "' Dandie,' I cannot find my bootjack; search
for it." The Dog scratched at the room door, which his master
opened, proceeded to a distant part of the house, and soon
returned, carrying in his mouth the bootjack, which his master
had left that morning under a sofa." WOOD'S Natural History.











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THE DANDIE DINMONT,

"T H E peculiar breed of Scotch terriers which is called the
Dandie Dinmont, after the character of that name in Sir
Walter Scott's "Guy Mannering," is remarkable for exhibiting great
sagacity. One of these shaggy-haired pets, named "Fido," the pro-
perty of a well-known clergyman in Yorkshire, was in the habit of
waking his master every morning at seven o'clock. A little before
that time he always became extremely restless, and, as the hour ap-
proached, would come out of his kennel and sit down facing the
church, and patiently listen until the last stroke had chimed from the
steeple, when away he would scamper to his master's bedroom door
and give seven distinct sharp barks. If this did not arouse his
master he would commence crying until some response assured him
he had succeeded in his object.




























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THE NEWFOUNDLAND DOG,
"T HE large and handsome animal which is called from its
S native country the Newfoundland Dog, belongs to the
group of Spaniels, all of which appear possessed of con-
siderable mental powers, and to be capable of instruction to a
degree rarely seen in animals.
In this country the Newfoundland Dog is made the friend
and companion of man. Many a time has it more than repaid
its master for his friendship by rescuing him from mortal peril.
Not only have solitary lives been saved by this Dog, but a
whole ship's crew have been delivered from certain destruction
by the mingled sagacity and courage of a Newfoundland Dog,
who took in his mouth a rope and carried it from the ship to the
shore.
Even for their own amusement these Dogs may be seen
disporting themselves in the sea, swimming boldly from the land
in pursuit of some real or imaginary object, in spite of "rollers"
and "breakers" that would baffle the attempts of any but an
accomplished swimmer.
Should a Newfoundland Dog be blessed with a master as
amphibious as itself, its happiness is very great, and it may be
seen splashing and snapping in luxuriant sport, ever keeping
close to its beloved master, and challenging him to fresh efforts.
It is very seldom that a good Newfoundland Dog allows its
master to outdo it in aquatic gambols." wooDn' Natural History.










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