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Title: A day in the woods
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00035184/00001
 Material Information
Title: A day in the woods
Physical Description: 46 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Dietrick ( Engraver )
Dodd, Mead & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Dodd, Mead & Company
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1878
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Picnicking -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Games -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Japan   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1878   ( local )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre: Family stories   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: illustrated.
General Note: Some illustrations engraved by Dietrick.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00035184
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225325
notis - ALG5597
oclc - 04724756

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Content
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text

























































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A DAY IN THE WOODS.










ILLUSTRATED









NEW YORK:
DODD, MEAD & COMPANY,
PUBLISHERS.



























COPYRIGHT BY
DODD, MEAD & COMPANY,
1878.













A DAY IN THE WOODS.




T0, Kitty, I won't throw the ball for
"N1 you to chase, any more; I'm too
tired, and I suppose I must put away all
the baby's toys, said Winifred Lee.
Dear me, how hot it is, I wonder if it will
be ever cool weather again. How nice it
would be to be in the woods. Oh! oh !"
she cried suddenly, clapping her hands,
"what a splendid idea. I'll go and tell
Jack," and forgetting all about the heat,
she ran out, without stopping to put on
her hat, calling aloud, Jack! Jack!"
Hallo," said a voice at the back of the
house, "what's up?"








8 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

"Oh, Jack," she cried, running toward
him, I've got a splendid idea. Let's get
papa to take us to the woods for a picnic,
to be gone all day. We could take our din-
ner with us and eat it on the grass. We
could ask Flora and Will Holt, and wouldn't
it be just splendid ?"
Wouldn't it though !" said Jack, "but
I'll tell you what would be better, and that
would be to go to Wild Lake instead
of the woods. It's ever so nice and
we could have the drive there and back.
Besides there are lots of lilies, and I've
heard that deer come there, too. Wouldn't
it be fine though, to see a real live deer,
and perhaps there would be a boat and we
could have a sail."
Oh splendid," said Winifred clapping
her hands, "let's ask papa the minute he
comes home. What fun it will be!"









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10 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

and she danced around Jack, till he sud-
denly quieted her by saying that perhaps
papa would not go.
"Oh, dear!" said Winifred,"I never
thought of that, but there are the horses
coming down the road. I'll run and ask
him."
Papa seemed to think quite well of the
idea, and mamma urged it, too, so that it was
decided that the next Saturday they should
go. Mamma could not leave the baby, so
she would stay at home and it was all ar-
ranged that papa was to drive the bay horse
in the box wagon. The two little girls were
to sit on the back seat, and he and the two
boys on the front. The children lost no
time in going over to invite Flora and Will
and then waited impatiently for Saturday to
come. It came at last, and Winifred looked
into the baskets that the cook had brought






































lilt








12 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

up for them to take with them, with great
satisfaction.
The wagon came to the door, and they
set out in high spirits. As they drew up at
the Holt's house they found Flora and
Will waiting on the piazza with their things
all on. They, too, had a great basket which
had to be crowded under the seat, and
then Flora scrambled in beside Winifred,
and Will got up in front with Jack.
Oh, Winifred," said Flora, we've got
something just too good for anything in
our basket."
What is it ?" said Winifred, very much
interested.
Little pound cakes," said Flora, I
helped make them yesterday. Some have
chocolate frosting on top and some white
and some red. They are just delicious and
we have ever so many."
















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14 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

Oh! splendid," said Winifred. We've
got something nice too-little tarts with
strawberries inside."
While the girls were discussing the pro-
visions the boys were taking turns at driv-
ing and it was such good fun that before
they knew it they were at the lake. They
stopped in a great grove of trees, and after
the horse had been tied and given some
hay to eat, Mr. Lee said, Well, boys, let
us take a walk while the girls set the table."
So off they strolled through the woods
while Winifred and Flora got out the bas-
kets and set to work. First they took a
table cloth and laid it out on the grass and
then they made little piles of sandwiches
and of cakes and all the other things they
had brought on it. A great can of milk
stood by waiting to be drunk up.
"Oh, Winifred," said Flora, as they



























































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16 A DAY IN THE WOODS

stood off at a little distance to see how the
table looked, how much prettier it would
be if we could only get some flowers.
There is a great bush full. I'll just take
this basket and fill it and then we can lay
the flowers on the cloth by the food.
So off she ran while Winifred stayed
behind to keep guard over the provisions.
There were three or four big black ants
that seemed to think that all this was
brought for their benefit, and though she
brushed them off time and again they kept
coming back not at all discouraged. At
last all was ready and Mr. Lee and the
boys came and all set to work. How good
everything tasted. The boys wanted to
eat nothing but the cakes and tarts, but the
girls insisted that they must take sand-
wiches first. They ate as if they had had
nothing for days. When they had finished,






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18 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

the boys wanted to go at once to the lake.
They had seen an old boat and indeed had
been in it. But it was so warm that Mr.
Lee thought it not safe till the sun was
lower. Then they all besought him to tell
them a story:
"I had a letter from a friend in Japan
yesterday," he said, and he sent me some
picturesdwhich I have with me. I will tell
you about that country.
Away across the Pacific Ocean many
thousand miles distant, lies the island of
Japan. It is a pleasant country, with a cli-
mate much like our own, but the habits and
customs of the people are very different
from those in force with us. As the trav-
eller nears its coast, while he is still many
miles out at sea, there rises before him a
mountain so lofty that its peak, even in the
height of summer, is white with everlasting


















........








20 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

snow. It is called Fusy Yama. and the peo-
ple think it so sacred that they make pil-
grimages to it. Here we have its picture.
Perhaps you have seen it painted on fans.
It was centuries ago a volcano, but the
snows upon it show that it is many a year
since it sent forth fire upon the lands below.
The poor people in this country use
straw very much as a material for dress.
Here is a peasant in his winter clothes.
His hat is made of straw woven closely.
Over his shoulders hangs a cloak of straw.
If it were summer he would have straw
shoes or rather sandals instead of the
wooden ones which he now wears and
which as you see lift his feet high up out
of the snow. Even the horses wear a straw
shoe instead of being shod with iron, and as
such shoes wear out very speedily, the roads
are covered with them where their owners














































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22 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

have thrown them away. In their houses
straw mats are the only furniture. The
people do not know how to use chairs
when they wish to rest they sit on their
heels in a crouching posture. The straw
mat is made about four inches thick, a lit-
tle over six feet long, and a little over three
feet wide. On this the people sleep at
night, havingput under their head a pillow
made of bamboo work and drawn over
them a coverlid. On it. they set out their
meals and on it they sit on their heels to
chat with neighbors who may drop in when
work is over. The walls of the rooms are
made by screens which slide in grooves in
the floor. By moving these the house
may be divided into larger or smaller rooms
or they may be pushed back so that there
is one large room only. The picture which
we have here is of a village in the country,













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24 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

and as the house door is often left open, no
doubt if you were passing by you could
see plainly all that is going on inside.
"The peasant, whose picture we saw a
moment ago, is in his winter dress. In the
summer, if he were working in the fields,
and were a very poor man, he would prob-
ably not wear any clothes at all. But the
rich dress very finely. The ladies wear a
great silk wrap which covers them from head
to foot, and as they are not clever with the
needle, they tie it together with strings in-
stead of using buttons. When they go
abroad, they have a queer kind of vehicle,
called a norimon, which is carried by men,
and is just large enough for them to sit
in. To add to their beauty, these ladies
pull out their eye-brows, and paint false
ones above where the real ones would nat-
urally grow, and the married women always










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26 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

dye their teeth black, and keep them so foi
all the rest of their lives.
All through the country, in the villa-
ges and the cities one comes often upon tea
houses. Here are furnished tea, cakes, fruit,
fish, etc. In fact, they are very much in
purpose like our eating-houses. Here, the
people sit cross-legged, and sip their tea,
while parties of street jugglers tumble before
them, and go through all sorts of strange
performances, and put themselves into posi-
tions so strange, that it does not seem pos-
sible that they can be men. The Japanese
jugglers are famous far and wide for their
skill. Bands of street-singers come, too,
with their strange music, and through it all
the active waitresses hurry to and fro,
looking after the wants of fresh parties,
and bearing to them cups of tea, or fruit
and cakes. All these are but a few of












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2S A DAY IN THE WOODS.

the strange sights and customs of the
land."
When Mr. Lee had finished, he said,
" Jack, suppose you tell us something, it is
still too warm to go to the lake."
I don't know anything," said Jack.
" Oh! I'll tell about the Boston tea party.
I learned that in my history a day or two
ago.
Oh do," said both girls, that sounds
very interesting."
Well, you see," said Jack, when this
country was a colony of England, the Eng-
lish government thought that they would
make all the money out of us they could, so
every few days they put on some new tax.
The governor would come out and read the
new law to the people who crowded into the
street to hear it. But the people would not
stand it, because you see they thought that









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30 A DAY IN THE WOOI)S.

they ought to have a vote themselves on
the taxes that they had to pay. So they
grumbled away, but the taxes kept coming
thicker and thicker. At last a new law
came about tea, putting a heavy tax on it.
When this was known, there was great ex-
citement. The people crowded into the
streets to read the news, and every one w\as
very angry. Just then two ships .from Eng-
land came into the harbor, loaded with tea,
and the people declared that it should not
be landed, but must go back to England.
But the captains would not go. So, one
day a party of men dressed like Indians
boarded the ship and threw the entire car-
go into the bay. Not a-leaf of it ever came
ashore. One man put a lot of it into his
coat tail pocket, and another man who saw
it, took out his knife and cut off the tail of
his coat and threw it overboard. So the










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32 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

British found out that the people wouldn't
stand everything, and as it could not be
found who did the business, owing to their
all being disguised, the owners of the tea
lost it all, and were in no hurry to send
any more."
"It must have been splendid to have
lived in those days," said Will. Did you
ever hear of Paul Jones? he was a fine fel-
low. He was a hard fighter. He was the
first man that ever raised the American flag
on a ship and he made every one respect it,
too. Did you ever read about any of his
sea fights? That one between his ship the
Bon Homme Richard and the British ship
Serapis was just splendid. They fought by
moonlight and at last the Serapis surren-
dered. Both ships were almost destroyed.
The victors had to leave their own and
take refuge on the one they had conquered,




















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34 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

for the Bon Homme Richard was so badly
injured that she sank and they had all they
could do to make the Serapis last till they
reached a friendly port. And that capture
of Whitehaven; that was just magnifi-
cent. Why he sent in two boats with fif-
teen men in each and they drove the gun-
ners out of the batteries and spiked the
guns. Then they burned one of the ships
in the harbor and if the tide and wind had
been right they would have destroyed
every one there. And all this was done in
broad daylight. After he had spread his
sails to leave, the people rushed to the bat-
teries hoping to sink his ship as it passed
but every gun was spiked and useless and
the soldiers were all scattered so that they
could not stop him at all."
"Well, Flora," said Mr. Lee, now
that the boys have entertained us it is












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36 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

the girls' turn; suppose you tell us a
story."
".I might tell the story of how mamma
was lost," said Flora.
Do," said the boys.
Well you see she was a little tiny girl
and her mamma took her to the country
for the summer. There she used to play
in the garden all by herself all day long
and was perfectly happy. There was a
great high fence so that she could not get
away, and she had a little spade with which
she used to dig, and when she was there
no one felt it necessary to look after. her,
for they knew that she was safe.
But one day the gate happened to be
opened and she thought she would take a
walk. No one was near so that she went
steadily on across the fields, stopping now
and then to pick a da;sy. By and by she












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38 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

came to a nice sunny nook and being tired
she went fast asleep.
Meantime up at the house there was
great excitement. She was missed and the
gate was found open. They searched every
nook and corner, they hunted over the
fields, and called her over and over, but
she did not answer because, you see, she
was fast asleep. At last she woke up.
At first she did not know where she was
and called for her mamma, but after a time
she grew wide awake and got up. There
was a house close at hand and she went for
it. The door stood wide open so she walked
in. There in the front room sat an old lady
in a great chair looking over a book. There
was a little fire burning though it was sum-
mer and on the mat before it lay an old cat
with a kitten. My mamma walked straight
to the old lady and climbed up into her lap.










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40 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

'My are very hungry,' she said,' where's
my mamma? oh, what lubly kitties,' and
down she scrambled to pat them.
The old lady looked perfectly aston-
ished. 'Jane, Jane,' she called, and her
daughter came. Where in the world did
this dear child come from. Can she belong
to the lady who has just come to spend the
summer here? Bring me some bread and
butter and run down to her house and let
her know, for she may be frightened.' So
Jane brought the bread and butter, and
by the time my mamma had finished them
her mamma came and she was taken home
again. She often paid the old lady a visit
though after that."
My story," said Winifred, is about a
little girl who had a blackbird. She found
it one day in the woods. It had hurt its
wing and could not fly, so that she had no








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42 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

trouble in catching it. She took it home
and put it in a cage, and in a little time it
got quite well. It was a young bird, and
soon grew so tame that it would fly all about
the room and even out of doors, but it al-
ways came at her call. In the morning
before she was awake it would fly away to
her pillow, and sing with all its might, till
she opened her eyes. One day -"
Oh I say," interrupted Jack, who had
been fidgeting about for some time, tell
us the rest of the story on the way home.
It's cool enough to go on the water now.
Come on, let's have a sail."
So Winifred good-naturedly stopped
short in the midst of her story, and they all
went down to the water. There was quite
a good boat there, and they all got in, and
Mr. Lee taking the oars, pulled them along
close to the shore. The pond lilies were





































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44 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

very thick and beautiful and the girls soon
had great bunches of them. There was one
great big fellow, that Jack was determined
to get. He jumped to the side of the boat
so suddenly that its edge almost went un-
der the water. The girls screamed, and
Jack was quite frightened, for he thought
that they were going to upset.
Mr. Lee told him that he hoped it would
teach him to keep quiet in a boat. When
I was a boy," he said, "I upset a boat in
just that way, and I arna friend who was
with me, nearly lost our lives. If another
boat had not come to our help, we would
surely have been drowned, for we were both
in the water, and far from shore."
It was growing late in the afternoon
when they came off the lake. The bay
horse was made ready, they all climbed into
the wagon, and after they had put in the










































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46 A DAY IN THE WOODS.

empty baskets, started out for home. The
sun was just setting as they stopped to let
Flora and Will out, and all declared that
they had had a perfectly glorious time.














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